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Sample records for superconductive physical random

  1. Enhancing superconducting critical current by randomness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. L.; Thoutam, L. R.; Xiao, Z. L.; Shen, B.; Pearson, J.; Divan, R.; Ocola, L. E.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.

    2016-01-11

    The key ingredient of high critical currents in a type-II superconductor is defect sites that pin vortices. Here, we demonstrate that a random pinscape, an overlooked pinning system in nanopatterned superconductors, can lead to a substantially larger critical current enhancement at high magnetic fields than an ordered array of vortex pin sites. We reveal that the better performance of a random pinscape is due to the variation of the local density of its pinning sites, which mitigates the motion of vortices. This is confirmed by achieving even higher enhancement of the critical current through a conformally mapped random pinscape, where the distribution of the local density of pinning sites is further enlarged. Our findings highlight the potential of random pinscapes in enhancing the superconducting critical currents of applied superconductors in which random pin sites of nanoscale defects emerging in the materials synthesis process or through ex-situ irradiation are the only practical choice for large-scale production. Our results may also stimulate research on effects of a random pinscape in other complementary systems such as colloidal crystals, Bose-Einstein condensates, and Luttinger liquids.

  2. Experimental Quantum Randomness Processing Using Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao; Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Ma, Yuwei; Zhang, Fang; Yan, Zhaopeng; Vijay, R.; Sun, Luyan; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Coherently manipulating multipartite quantum correlations leads to remarkable advantages in quantum information processing. A fundamental question is whether such quantum advantages persist only by exploiting multipartite correlations, such as entanglement. Recently, Dale, Jennings, and Rudolph negated the question by showing that a randomness processing, quantum Bernoulli factory, using quantum coherence, is strictly more powerful than the one with classical mechanics. In this Letter, focusing on the same scenario, we propose a theoretical protocol that is classically impossible but can be implemented solely using quantum coherence without entanglement. We demonstrate the protocol by exploiting the high-fidelity quantum state preparation and measurement with a superconducting qubit in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture and a nearly quantum-limited parametric amplifier. Our experiment shows the advantage of using quantum coherence of a single qubit for information processing even when multipartite correlation is not present.

  3. Experimental Quantum Randomness Processing Using Superconducting Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao; Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Ma, Yuwei; Zhang, Fang; Yan, Zhaopeng; Vijay, R; Sun, Luyan; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Coherently manipulating multipartite quantum correlations leads to remarkable advantages in quantum information processing. A fundamental question is whether such quantum advantages persist only by exploiting multipartite correlations, such as entanglement. Recently, Dale, Jennings, and Rudolph negated the question by showing that a randomness processing, quantum Bernoulli factory, using quantum coherence, is strictly more powerful than the one with classical mechanics. In this Letter, focusing on the same scenario, we propose a theoretical protocol that is classically impossible but can be implemented solely using quantum coherence without entanglement. We demonstrate the protocol by exploiting the high-fidelity quantum state preparation and measurement with a superconducting qubit in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture and a nearly quantum-limited parametric amplifier. Our experiment shows the advantage of using quantum coherence of a single qubit for information processing even when multipartite correlation is not present.

  4. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  5. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  6. Nuclear physics with superconducting cyclotron at Kolkata: Scopes and possibilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sailajananda Bhattacharya

    2010-08-01

    The K500 superconducting cyclotron at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, India is getting ready to deliver its first accelerated ion beam for experiment. At the same time, the nuclear physics programme and related experimental facility development activities are taking shape. A general review of the nuclear physics research opportunities with the superconducting cyclotron and the present status of the development of different detector arrays and other experimental facilities will be presented.

  7. Superconducting magnets in physics: problems and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronca, G.; Parain, J.

    1974-10-01

    The present status of solutions for the construction of magnets using superconducting windings is given. A review is given of achievements and projects using superconductors for the production of magnetic fields.

  8. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  9. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  10. Simulating Zeno physics by a quantum quench with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing-Jun; An, Jun-Hong; Kwek, L. C.; Luo, Hong-Gang; Oh, C. H.

    2014-06-01

    Studying out-of-equilibrium physics in quantum systems under quantum quench is of vast experimental and theoretical interest. Using periodic quantum quenches, we present an experimentally accessible scheme to simulate the quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in an open quantum system of a single superconducting qubit interacting with an array of transmission line resonators. The scheme is based on the following two observations: First, compared with conventional systems, the short-time nonexponential decay in our superconducting circuit system is readily observed; and second, a quench-off process mimics an ideal projective measurement when its time duration is sufficiently long. Our results show the active role of quantum quench in quantum simulation and control.

  11. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  12. Superconducting Kinetic Inductance Detectors for astronomy and particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M.; Goupy, J.; D`Addabbo, A.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Catalano, A.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-07-01

    Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) represent a novel detector technology based on superconducting resonators. Since their first demonstration in 2003, they have been rapidly developed and are today a strong candidate for present and future experiments in the different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. This has been possible thanks to the unique features of such devices: in particular, they couple a very high sensitivity to their intrinsic suitability for frequency domain multiplexed readout, making the fabrication of large arrays of ultrasensitive detectors possible. There are many fields of application that can profit of such detectors. Here, we will briefly review the principle of operation of a KID, and give two sample applications, to mm-wave astronomy and to particle physics.

  13. Superconducting Kinetic Inductance Detectors for astronomy and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, M., E-mail: martino.calvo@neel.cnrs.fr [Institute Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Goupy, J.; D' Addabbo, A.; Benoit, A. [Institute Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Bourrion, O. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Catalano, A. [Institute Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Monfardini, A. [Institute Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2016-07-11

    Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) represent a novel detector technology based on superconducting resonators. Since their first demonstration in 2003, they have been rapidly developed and are today a strong candidate for present and future experiments in the different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. This has been possible thanks to the unique features of such devices: in particular, they couple a very high sensitivity to their intrinsic suitability for frequency domain multiplexed readout, making the fabrication of large arrays of ultrasensitive detectors possible. There are many fields of application that can profit of such detectors. Here, we will briefly review the principle of operation of a KID, and give two sample applications, to mm-wave astronomy and to particle physics.

  14. Certified randomness in quantum physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-07

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  15. Certified randomness in quantum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-01

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  16. Randomly distributed spin induced suppression of superconducting properties in Gd-123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, B.; Haldar, S.; Mukherjee, I.; Kumar Ghosh, Ajay

    2017-02-01

    Suppression of superconducting property in presence of inhomogeneous spin distribution in GdBa2Cu3-xCoxO6.9 has been studied. A superconducting sample without Co exhibits superconducting transition at 56.1 K. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit nonlinear to linear transformation above a certain temperature. Two other samples (i) with Co and (ii) without Cu are found to be nonsuperconducting with very high resistive in nature at lower temperature. Localization length decreases with the increase in Co substitution. Suppression of the superconducting transition has been attributed to the change in the magnetic fluctuations induced by the randomness in spin substitution. An exponent has been extracted to understand the current-voltage behaviour. Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition may be affected strongly by the shifting of magnetic fluctuations.

  17. Hospital based superconducting cyclotron for neutron therapy: Medical physics perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudelev, M.; Burmeister, J.; Blosser, E.; Maughan, R. L.; Kota, C.

    2001-12-01

    The neutron therapy facility at the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center, Harper University Hospital in Detroit has been operational since September 1991. The d(48.5)+Be beam is produced in a gantry mounted superconducting cyclotron designed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Measurements were performed in order to obtain the physical characteristics of the neutron beam and to collect the data necessary for treatment planning. This included profiles of the dose distribution in a water phantom, relative output factors and the design of various beam modifiers, i.e., wedges and tissue compensators. The beam was calibrated in accordance with international protocol for fast neutron dosimetry. Dosimetry and radiobiology intercomparions with three neutron therapy facilities were performed prior to clinical use. The radiation safety program was established in order to monitor and reduce the exposure levels of the personnel. The activation products were identified and the exposure in the treatment room was mapped. A comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program was developed to sustain safe and reliable operation of the unit at treatment standards comparable to those for conventional photon radiation. The program can be divided into three major parts: maintenance of the cyclotron and related hardware; QA of the neutron beam dosimetry and treatment delivery; safety and radiation protection. In addition the neutron beam is used in various non-clinical applications. Among these are the microdosimetric characterization of the beam, the effects of tissue heterogeneity on dose distribution, the development of boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy and variety of radiobiology experiments.

  18. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  19. Physical tests for random numbers in simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattulainen, I.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Kankaala, K.

    1994-11-01

    We propose three physical tests to measure correlations in random numbers used in Monte Carlo simulations. The first test uses autocorrelation times of certain physical quantities when the Ising model is simulated with the Wolff algorithm. The second test is based on random walks, and the third on blocks of n successive numbers. We apply the tests to show that recent errors in high precision Ising simulations using generalized feedback shift register algorithms are due to short range correlations in random number sequences.

  20. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: Two classic experiments in superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meĭlikhov, E. Z.

    1988-05-01

    Two experiments of I. K. Kikoin—the correlation between superconductivity and the galvanomagnetic properties of metals (1933), and the gyromagnetic effect in superconductors (1938)—which were carried out long before the appearance of the microscopic theory of superconductivity, anticipated two of its principal conclusions. Established were: 1) the determining role of electron-phonon interaction; 2) the orbital nature of diamagnetism in superconductors.

  1. Physical tests for random numbers in simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vattulainen, I.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Kankaala, K. (Research Institute for Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 9 (Siltavuorenpenger 20 C), FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland) Department of Electrical Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-3310, Tampere (Finland) Center for Scientific Computing, P.O. Box 405, FIN-02101 Espoo (Finland))

    1994-11-07

    We propose three physical tests to measure correlations in random numbers used in Monte Carlo simulations. The first test uses autocorrelation times of certain physical quantities when the Ising model is simulated with the Wolff algorithm. The second test is based on random walks, and the third on blocks of [ital n] successive numbers. We apply the tests to show that recent errors in high precision Ising simulations using generalized feedback shift register algorithms are due to short range correlations in random number sequences.

  2. Jahn–Teller physics and high-Tc superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Keller

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxides was not accidental, but was based on the knowledge that the divalent copper ion, Cu2+, is one of the strongest Jahn–Teller ions. The Jahn–Teller effect is a consequence of the interplay between electronic degeneracy and coupling to the lattice, i.e. unconventional local electron–lattice interactions. The search for superconductivity in copper oxides was motivated by the idea that Jahn–Teller polaron formation could be a novel and much stronger glue for electron pairing than conventional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer electron–phonon coupling. The consequences of these ideas are unconventional isotope effects and complex pairing symmetries related to multiband superconductivity, which are reviewed here.

  3. Embedded random matrix ensembles in quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kota, V K B

    2014-01-01

    Although used with increasing frequency in many branches of physics, random matrix ensembles are not always sufficiently specific to account for important features of the physical system at hand. One refinement which retains the basic stochastic approach but allows for such features consists in the use of embedded ensembles.  The present text is an exhaustive introduction to and survey of this important field. Starting with an easy-to-read introduction to general random matrix theory, the text then develops the necessary concepts from the beginning, accompanying the reader to the frontiers of present-day research. With some notable exceptions, to date these ensembles have primarily been applied in nuclear spectroscopy. A characteristic example is the use of a random two-body interaction in the framework of the nuclear shell model. Yet, topics in atomic physics, mesoscopic physics, quantum information science and statistical mechanics of isolated finite quantum systems can also be addressed using these ensemb...

  4. The physics of nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renema, Jelmer Jan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the detection mechanism in superconducting single photon detectors via quantum detector tomography. We find that the detection event is caused by diffusion of quasiparticles from the absorption spot, combined with entrance of a vortex. Moreover, we investigate the behaviour of

  5. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  6. 3 scientists win Nobel for physics electric superconductivity, superfluidity work honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel prize for physics to Russian Vitaly Ginzburg, 87, and Russian-born American Alexei Abrikosov, 75, for their work on electric superconductivity, and to British-born American Anthony Leggett, 65, for describing how liquid helium can become a "superfluid." The three scientists will split $1.3 million in prize money (1 page).

  7. Superconducting and related oxides: Physics and nanoengineering 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavuna, D.; Bozovic, I. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    This volume is composed of 51 papers presented at the symposium. Topics covered are: physical properties of oxide superconductors; thin film growth and properties; and device physics and new concepts.

  8. Geometric barrier effects on tri-dimensional superconducting stripes with random pinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, J.D.; Cabrera, G.G. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin; Venegas, P.A.; Mello, D.F. de [UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mail: jdreis@ifi.unicamp.br

    2004-07-01

    We study the behavior of tri-dimensional driven vortex lattices in highly anisotropic superconducting materials such as BSCCO with random distribution of impurities (pinning centers). We consider a narrow stripe, finite in the transversal direction and infinite in the longitudinal one, composed by a stack of bi-dimensional layers. Our numerical simulations are made using molecular dynamics techniques with periodic boundary conditions in the direction the stripe is infinite and a surface barrier in the direction it is finite. The equation of motion includes in-plane and inter-plane pancake vortex interactions, vortex interaction with the screening current, vortex images, transport current and random distributed pinning centers. We could distinguish among three different dynamical regimes as observed in previous works, but with differences in the vortex trajectories and an increase in the critical current due to the geometric barrier effects. (author)

  9. Condensed-matter physics: Superconducting electrons go missing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaanen, Jan

    2016-08-01

    'Overdoped' high-temperature superconductors, which have a high density of charge carriers, were thought to be well understood. An experiment challenges what we know about quantum physics in such systems. See Letter p.309

  10. Elementary particle physics and the superconducting super collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigg, C; Schwitters, R F

    1986-03-28

    The present status and future prospects of elementary particle physics are reviewed, and some of the scientific questions that motivate the construction of a major new accelerator complex in the United States are summarized.

  11. Fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons and possible path to the future of US experimental high-energy particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The authors outline primary physics motivation, present proposed new arrangement for Fermilab accelerator complex, and then discuss possible long-range application of fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons at Fermilab.

  12. Quantum entanglement in random physical states

    CERN Document Server

    Hamma, Alioscia; Zanardi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Most states in the Hilbert space are maximally entangled. This fact has proven useful to investigate - among other things - the foundations of statistical mechanics. Unfortunately, most states in the Hilbert space of a quantum many body system are not physically accessible. We define physical ensembles of states by acting on random factorized states by a circuit of length k of random and independent unitaries with local support. This simulates an evolution for finite time k generated by a local (time-dependent) Hamiltonian. We apply group theoretic methods to study these statistical ensemble. In particular, we study the typicality of entanglement by means of the purity of the reduced state. We find that for a time k=O(1) the typical purity obeys the area law, while for a time k \\sim O(L) the purity obeys a volume law, with L the linear size of the system. Moreover, we show that for large values of k the reduced state becomes very close to the completely mixed state.

  13. SPS Research into superconductivity highlighted in Physical Review Letters

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Research conducted by Dr Jorge Quintanilla as part of an international collaboration has been chosen as an Editors' Suggestion on the Physical Review Letters website. The full article can be accessed here. Below is a summary from Dr Quintanilla about what the research was and how it is useful.

  14. Canted-Cosine-Theta Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for High Energy Physics and Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Lucas Nathan

    Advances in superconducting magnet technology have historically enabled the construction of new, higher energy hadron colliders. Looking forward to the needs of a potential future collider, a significant increase in magnet field and performance is required. Such a task requires an open mind to the investigation of new design concepts for high field magnets. Part I of this thesis will present an investigation of the Canted-Cosine-Theta (CCT) design for high field Nb3Sn magnets. New analytic and finite element methods for analysis of CCT magnets will be given, along with a discussion on optimization of the design for high field. The design, fabrication, and successful test of the 2.5 T NbTi dipole CCT1 will be presented as a proof-of-principle step towards a high field Nb3Sn magnet. Finally, the design and initial steps in the fabrication of the 16 T Nb3Sn dipole CCT2 will be described. Part II of this thesis will investigate the CCT concept extended to a curved magnet for use in an ion beam therapy gantry. The introduction of superconducting technology in this field shows promise to reduce the weight and cost of gantries, as well as open the door to new beam optics solutions with high energy acceptance. An analytic approach developed for modeling curved CCT magnets will be presented, followed by a design study of a superconducting magnet for a proton therapy gantry. Finally, a new magnet concept called the "Alternating Gradient CCT" (AG-CCT) will be introduced. This concept will be shown to be a practical magnet solution for achieving the alternating quadrupole fields desired for an achromatic gantry, allowing for the consideration of treatment with minimal field changes in the superconducting magnets. The primary motivation of this thesis is to share new developments for Canted-Cosine-Theta superconducting magnets, with the hope this design will improve technology for high energy physics and ion beam cancer therapy.

  15. The High Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates: Physics of the Pseudogap Region

    CERN Document Server

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the physics of the high temperature superconductivity in hole doped copper oxide ceramics in the pseudogap region. Starting from an effective reduced Hamiltonian relevant to the dynamics of holes injected into the copper oxide layers proposed in a previous paper, we determine the superconductive condensate wavefunction. We show that the low-lying elementary condensate excitations are analogous to the rotons in superfluid $^4He$. We argue that the rotons-like excitations account for the specific heat anomaly at the critical temperature. We discuss and compare with experimental observations the London penetration length, the Abrikosov vortices, the upper and lower critical magnetic fields, and the critical current density. We give arguments to explain the origin of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. We investigate the nodal gap in the cuprate superconductors and discuss both the doping and temperature dependence of the nodal gap. We suggest that the nodal gap is responsible for the doping dependence o...

  16. a Random Walk in Theoretical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Bruce Wharton

    1995-01-01

    This thesis covers four diverse topics, representing a cross section of theoretical physics (and mathematical biology). The initial two subjects deal with nonequilibrium dynamics of spatially extended systems. These two topics are spatiotemporal chaos in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and a mathematical model for biological evolution and mass extinctions. The study of the complex Ginzburg -Landau equation provides results on the topological defects that exist in this system. The defect-defect correlation function is calculated numerically, and the result is discussed in the context of generic scale invariance and in terms of analytic bounds. The biological evolution work provides a simple, coarse-grained description of the evolutionary process and its interaction with the physical environment. It provides testable predictions about the distribution of extinction sizes and species lifetimes found in the fossil record. The third topic covered in this thesis is real -space renormalization of the random field Ising model. The results provide evidence about the nature of the phases of the system through calculation of renormalization flows in parameter space. The calculation also gives critical exponents for the transition between phases, as well as the heights of barriers between metastable states. The final topic deals with the fractional quantum Hall effect in double quantum wells. Analytic work is done which provides a framework for calculating collective excitations within the single-mode approximation. These excitations are then calculated using Monte Carlo techniques and numerical integration. These calculations yield information about density fluctuations and excitonic modes, the latter of which can be related to tunneling spectral moments.

  17. MgB2 superconducting whiskers synthesized by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Zhuang, Chenggang; Gao, Jingyun; Shan, Xudong; Zhang, Jingmin; Liao, Zhimin; Xu, Hongjun; Yu, Dapeng; Feng, Qingrong

    2009-02-25

    In this work, MgB(2) whiskers were fabricated on a copper substrate by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition, which was one of the most effective ways to make high quality pure MgB(2) films, with the possible growth mechanism discussed. The whiskers are hexagonal and conelike and grow along the [0001] direction with a single-crystal structure. The onset transition temperature is approximately 39 K, which is among the best in the published nanostructure MgB(2) papers. Fabrication of nanoscale MgB(2) whiskers provides the fundamental understanding of the effect of dimensionality and size on superconductivity.

  18. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  19. The high temperature superconductivity in cuprates: physics of the pseudogap region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the physics of the high temperature superconductivity in hole doped copper oxide ceramics in the pseudogap region. Starting from an effective reduced Hamiltonian relevant to the dynamics of holes injected into the copper oxide layers proposed in a previous paper, we determine the superconductive condensate wavefunction. We show that the low-lying elementary condensate excitations are analogous to the rotons in superfluid 4He. We argue that the rotons-like excitations account for the specific heat anomaly at the critical temperature. We discuss and compare with experimental observations the London penetration length, the Abrikosov vortices, the upper and lower critical magnetic fields, and the critical current density. We give arguments to explain the origin of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. We investigate the nodal gap in the cuprate superconductors and discuss both the doping and temperature dependence of the nodal gap. We suggest that the nodal gap is responsible for the doping dependence of the so-called nodal Fermi velocity detected in angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies. We discuss the thermodynamics of the nodal quasielectron liquid and their role in the low temperature specific heat. We propose that the ubiquitous presence of charge density wave in hole doped cuprate superconductors in the pseudogap region originates from instabilities of the nodal quasielectrons driven by the interaction with the planar CuO2 lattice. We investigate the doping dependence of the charge density wave gap and the competition between charge order and superconductivity. We discuss the effects of external magnetic fields on the charge density wave gap and elucidate the interplay between charge density wave and Abrikosov vortices. Finally, we examine the physics underlying quantum oscillations in the pseudogap region.

  20. Generation of physical random numbers by using homodyne detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Kodai; Oya, Shota; Oguri, Yusuke; Ichikawa, Tsubasa; Eto, Yujiro; Hirano, Takuya; Tsurumaru, Toyohiro

    2016-10-01

    Physical random numbers generated by quantum measurements are, in principle, impossible to predict. We have demonstrated the generation of physical random numbers by using a high-speed balanced photodetector to measure the quadrature amplitudes of vacuum states. Using this method, random numbers were generated at 500 Mbps, which is more than one order of magnitude faster than previously [Gabriel et al:, Nature Photonics 4, 711-715 (2010)]. The Crush test battery of the TestU01 suite consists of 31 tests in 144 variations, and we used them to statistically analyze these numbers. The generated random numbers passed 14 of the 31 tests. To improve the randomness, we performed a hash operation, in which each random number was multiplied by a random Toeplitz matrix; the resulting numbers passed all of the tests in the TestU01 Crush battery.

  1. Continuous wave superconducting radio frequency electron linac for nuclear physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Charles E.

    2016-12-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, has been actively serving the nuclear physics research community as a unique forefront international resource since 1995. This cw electron linear accelerator (linac) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has continued to evolve as a precision tool for discerning the structure and dynamics within nuclei. Superconducting rf (SRF) technology has been the essential foundation for CEBAF, first as a 4 GeV machine, then 6 GeV, and currently capable of 12 GeV. We review the development, implementation, and performance of SRF systems for CEBAF from its early beginnings to the commissioning of the 12 GeV era.

  2. Superconducting phase formation in random neck syntheses: a study of the Y-Ba-Cu-O system by magneto-optics and magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, J B; Landau, I L; Hulliger, J [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Berne, Freiestrasse 3, CH-3012-Berne (Switzerland); Albrecht, J [Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Magneto-optical imaging and magnetization measurements were applied to investigate the local formation of a superconducting phase effected by a random neck synthesis in the Y-Ba-Cu-O system. Polished pellets of strongly inhomogeneous ceramic samples show clearly the appearance of superconducting material in the intergrain zones of binary primary particles reacted under different conditions. Susceptibility measurements allowed evaluation of the superconducting critical temperature, which turned out to be close to that of optimally doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}.

  3. Randomized Controlled Trial on Physical Therapy for TMJ Closed Lock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craane, B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Stappaerts, K.; De Laat, A.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the one-year effect of physical therapy on pain and mandibular dysfunction associated with anterior disc displacement without reduction of the temporomandibular joint (closed lock). Forty-nine individuals were randomly assigned to either a physical therapy group [n = 23, mean ag

  4. Superconductivity and physical properties of CaPd2Ge2 single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, V K; Kim, H; Tanatar, M A; Prozorov, R; Johnston, D C

    2014-10-08

    We present the superconducting and normal state properties of CaPd(2)Ge(2) single crystals investigated by magnetic susceptibility χ, isothermal magnetization M, heat capacity Cp, in-plane electrical resistivity ρ and London penetration depth λ versus temperature T and magnetic field H measurements. Bulk superconductivity is inferred from the ρ(T) and Cp(T) data. The ρ(T) data exhibit metallic behavior and a superconducting transition with T(c onset) = 1.98 K and zero resistivity at T(c 0) = 1.67 K. The χ(T) reveals the onset of superconductivity at 2.0 K. For T > 2.0 K, the χ(T) and M(H) are weakly anisotropic paramagnetic with χ(ab) > χ(c). The Cp(T) data confirm the bulk superconductivity below T(c) = 1.69(3) K. The superconducting state electronic heat capacity is analyzed within the framework of a single-band α-model of BCS superconductivity and various normal and superconducting state parameters are estimated. Within the α-model, the Cp(T) data and the ab plane λ(T) data consistently indicate a moderately anisotropic s-wave gap with Δ(0)/k(B)T(c) ≈ 1.6, somewhat smaller than the BCS value of 1.764. The relationship of the heat capacity jump at Tc and the penetration depth measurement to the anisotropy in the s-wave gap is discussed.

  5. Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Coatings for Large Scale Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namhoon; Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Wolak, Matthaeus; Xi, Xiaoxing

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered to be a great candidate for next generation superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities due to its higher critical temperature Tc (40 K) and increased thermodynamic critical field Hc compared to other conventional superconductors. These properties significantly reduce the BCS surface resistance (RsBCS)and residual resistance (Rres) according to theoretical studies and suggest the possibility of an enhanced accelerating field (Eacc) . We have investigated the possibility of coating the inner surface of a 3 GHz SRF cavity with MgB2 by using a hybrid physical-vapor deposition (HPCVD) system which was modified for this purpose. To simulate a real 3 GHz SRF cavity, a stainless steel mock cavity has been employed for the study. The film quality was characterized on small substrates that were placed at selected locations within the cavity. MgB2 films on stainless steel foils, niobium pieces and SiC substrates showed transition temperatures of above 36 K. Dielectric resonance measurements resulted in promising Q values as obtained for the MgB2 films grown on the various substrates. By employing the HPCVD technique, a uniform film was achieved across the cavity interior, demonstrating the feasibility of HPCVD for MgB2 coatings for SRF cavities.

  6. Physics and application of photon number resolving detectors based on superconducting parallel nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsili, F; Bitauld, D; Jahanmirinejad, S; Fiore, A [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, NL-5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gaggero, A; Leoni, R; Mattioli, F [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (IFN), CNR, via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: marsili@MIT.EDU

    2009-04-15

    The parallel nanowire detector (PND) is a photon number resolving (PNR) detector that uses spatial multiplexing on a subwavelength scale to provide a single electrical output proportional to the photon number. The basic structure of the PND is the parallel connection of several NbN superconducting nanowires ({approx}100 nm wide, a few nm thick), folded in a meander pattern. PNDs were fabricated on 3-4 nm thick NbN films grown on MgO (T{sub S} = 400 deg. C) substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering in an Ar/N{sub 2} gas mixture. The device performance was characterized in terms of speed and sensitivity. PNDs showed a counting rate of 80 MHz and a pulse duration as low as 660 ps full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). Building the histograms of the photoresponse peak, no multiplication noise buildup is observable. Electrical and optical equivalent models of the device were developed in order to study its working principle, define design guidelines and develop an algorithm to estimate the photon number statistics of an unknown light. In particular, the modeling provides novel insight into the physical limit to the detection efficiency and to the reset time of these detectors. The PND significantly outperforms existing PNR detectors in terms of simplicity, sensitivity, speed and multiplication noise.

  7. Superconductivity discoveries and discoverers : ten physics Nobel laureates tell their story

    CERN Document Server

    Fossheim, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    This book is about the work of 10 great scientists; who they were and are, their personal background and how they achieved their outstanding results and took their prominent place in science history. We follow one of physics and science history's most enigmatic phenomena, superconductivity, through 100 years, from its discovery in 1911 to the present, not as a history book in the usual sense, but through close ups of the leading characters and their role in that story, the Nobel laureates, who were still among us in the years 2001-2004 when the main round of interviews was carried out. Since then two of them already passed away. For each one of the 10 laureates, the author tells their story by direct quotation from interviews in their own words. Each chapter treats one laureate. The author first gives a brief account of the laureates' scientific background and main contribution. Then each laureate tells his own story in his own words. This book is unique in its approach to science history.

  8. Physical Properties of Niobium and Specifications for Fabrication of Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine, C.; Foley, M.; Dhanaraj, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    It is important to distinguish among the properties of niobium, the ones that are related to the cavity's SRF performances, the formability of the material, and the mechanical behavior of the formed cavity. In general, the properties that dictate each of the above mentioned characteristics have a detrimental effect on one another and in order to preserve the superconducting properties without subduing the mechanical behavior, a balance has to be established. Depending on the applications, some parameters become less important and an understanding of the physical origin of the requirements might help in this optimization. SRF applications require high purity niobium (high RRR), but pure niobium is very soft from fabrication viewpoint. Moreover conventional fabrication techniques tend to override the effects of any metallurgical process meant to strengthen it. As those treatments dramatically affect the forming of the material they should be avoided. These unfavorable mechanical properties have to be accounted for in the design of the cavities rather than in the material specification. The aim of this paper is to review the significance of the important mechanical properties used to characterize niobium and to present the optimal range of values. Most of the following information deals with the specification of sheets for cell forming unless otherwise noted.

  9. Exploring the physics of superconducting qubits strongly coupled to microwave frequency photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallraff, Andreas [ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    Using modern micro and nano-fabrication techniques combined with superconducting materials we realize electronic circuits the properties of which are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. In such circuits the strong interaction of photons with superconducting quantum two-level systems allows us to probe fundamental quantum properties of light and to develop components for applications in quantum information technology. Here, I present experiments in which we have created and probed entanglement between stationary qubits and microwave photons freely propagating down a transmission line. In these experiments we use superconducting parametric amplifiers realized in our lab to detect both qubit and photon states efficiently. Using similar techniques we aim at demonstrating a deterministic scheme for teleportation of quantum states in a macroscopic system based on superconducting circuits.

  10. Correlated randomness: Some examples of exotic statistical physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Eugene Stanley

    2005-05-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these sciences have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture – crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. To understand this `miracle', one might consider placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a machine. Instead, one might address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics. Inspired by principles developed by statistical physics over the past 50 years – scale invariance and universality – we review some recent applications of correlated randomness to fields that might startle Boltzmann if he were alive today.

  11. Accelerator physics and radiometric properties of superconducting wavelength shifters; Beschleunigerphysik und radiometrische Eigenschaften supraleitender Wellenlaengenschieber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheer, Michael

    2008-11-17

    Subject of this thesis is the operation of wave-length shifters at electron storage rings and their use in radiometry. The basic aspects of the radiometry, the technical requirements, the influence of wave-length shifters on the storage ring, and results of first measurements are presented for a device installed at BESSY. Most of the calculations are carried out by the program WAVE, which has been developed within this thesis. WAVE allows to calculate the synchrotron radiation spectra of wavelength shifters within an relative uncertainty of 1/100000. The properties of wave-length shifters in terms of accelerator physics as well as a generating function for symplectic tracking calculations can also be calculated by WAVE. The later was implemented in the tracking code BETA to investigate the influence of insertion devices on the dynamic aperture and emittance of the storage ring. These studies led to the concept of alternating low- and high-beta-sections at BESSY-II, which allow to operate superconducting insertion devices without a significant distortion of the magnetic optics. To investigate the experimental aspects of the radiometry at wave-length shifters, a program based on the Monte-Carlo-code GEANT4 has been developed. It allows to simulate the radiometrical measurements and the absorption properties of detectors. With the developed codes first radiometrical measurements by the PTB have been analysed. A comparison of measurements and calculations show a reasonable agreement with deviations of about five percent in the spectral range of 40-60 keV behind a 1-mm-Cu filter. A better agreement was found between 20 keV and 80 keV without Cu filter. In this case the measured data agreed within a systematic uncertainty of two percent with the results of the calculations. (orig.)

  12. On the pertinence to Physics of random walks induced by random dynamical systems: a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petritis, Dimitri

    2016-08-01

    Let be an abstract space and a denumerable (finite or infinite) alphabet. Suppose that is a family of functions such that for all we have and a family of transformations . The pair ((Sa)a , (pa)a ) is termed an iterated function system with place dependent probabilities. Such systems can be thought as generalisations of random dynamical systems. As a matter of fact, suppose we start from a given ; we pick then randomly, with probability pa (x), the transformation Sa and evolve to Sa (x). We are interested in the behaviour of the system when the iteration continues indefinitely. Random walks of the above type are omnipresent in both classical and quantum Physics. To give a small sample of occurrences we mention: random walks on the affine group, random walks on Penrose lattices, random walks on partially directed lattices, evolution of density matrices induced by repeated quantum measurements, quantum channels, quantum random walks, etc. In this article, we review some basic properties of such systems and provide with a pathfinder in the extensive bibliography (both on mathematical and physical sides) where the main results have been originally published.

  13. Physical Unclonable Function (PUF) Based Random Number Generator

    CERN Document Server

    Sadr, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Physical Unclonable Functions (PUFs) are widely used to generate random Numbers. In this paper we propose a new architecture in which an Arbiter Based PUF has been employed as a nonlinear function in Nonlinear Feedback Shift Register (NFSR) to generate true random numbers. The rate of producing the output bit streams is 10 million bits per second. The proposed RNG is able to pass all NIST tests and the entropy of the output stream is 7.999837 bits per byte. The proposed circuit has very low resource usage of 193 Slices that makes it suitable for lightweight applications.

  14. Random Matrices and Chaos in Nuclear Physics: Nuclear Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, G E; Weidenmueller, H A

    2010-01-01

    The application of random-matrix theory (RMT) to compound-nucleus (CN) reactions is reviewed. An introduction into the basic concepts of nuclear scattering theory is followed by a survey of phenomenological approaches to CN scattering. The implementation of a random-matrix approach into scattering theory leads to a statistical theory of CN reactions. Since RMT applies generically to chaotic quantum systems, that theory is, at the same time, a generic theory of quantum chaotic scattering. It uses a minimum of input parameters (average S-matrix and mean level spacing of the CN). Predictions of the theory are derived with the help of field-theoretical methods adapted from condensed-matter physics and compared with those of phenomenological approaches. Thorough tests of the theory are reviewed, as are applications in nuclear physics, with special attention given to violation of symmetries (isospin, parity) and time-reversal invariance.

  15. Randomness in Quantum Mechanics: Philosophy, Physics and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bera, Manabendra Nath; Kuś, Marek; Mitchell, Morgan; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This progress report covers recent developments in the area of quantum randomness, which is an extraordinarily interdisciplinary area that belongs not only to physics, but also to philosophy, mathematics, computer science, and technology. For this reason the article contains three parts that will be essentially devoted to different aspects of quantum randomness, and even directed, although not restricted, to various audiences: a philosophical part, a physical part, and a technological part. For these reasons the article is written on an elementary level, combining very elementary and non-technical descriptions with a concise review of more advanced results. In this way readers of various provenances will be able to gain while reading the article.

  16. Physical properties of the superconducting spin-valve Fe/Cu/Fe/In heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leksin, P. V.; Garif'yanov, N. N.; Garifullin, I. A.; Schumann, J.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of the spin-valve multilayer system CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/In. For most of the thicknesses of the second iron layer dFe2 up to 2 nm, we have observed a full spin-valve effect for the superconducting current, i.e., a complete transition from the normal to the superconducting state by changing the mutual orientation of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers. For dFe2<1 nm, the superconducting transition temperature TcP for the parallel orientation of magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers is smaller than that for the antiparallel orientation TcAP, which corresponds to the direct spin-valve effect. For dFe2⩾1 nm, we have found the inverse spin-valve effect with ΔTc=TcAP-TcP<0. Further, in samples with a fixed thickness of the In layer, we have observed an oscillating dependence of its superconducting transition temperature Tc on dFe2. The analysis of the Tc(dFe2) dependence using the theory of the superconducting-ferromagnetic proximity effect has enabled determination of all microscopic parameters of the studied system. With these parameters, a satisfactory description of the sign-changing oscillating behavior of the spin-valve effect ΔTc(dFe2) has been obtained using a recent theory by Fominov [Ya. V. Fominov , Pis'ma Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 91, 329 (2010) [JETP Lett.JTPLA20021-364010.1134/S002136401006010X 91, 308 (2010)

  17. Superconducting material development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    A superconducting compound was developed that showed a transition to a zero-resistance state at 65 C, or 338 K. The superconducting material, which is an oxide based on strontium, barium, yttrium, and copper, continued in the zero-resistance state similar to superconductivity for 10 days at room temperature in the air. It was also noted that measurements of the material allowed it to observe a nonlinear characteristic curve between current and voltage at 65 C, which is another indication of superconductivity. The research results of the laboratory experiment with the superconducting material will be published in the August edition of the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

  18. Superconductivity and mesoscopic physics in planar and cylindrical films of gold-indium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Yuri Kostyantinovich

    Superconducting properties of planar and cylindrical thin films of Au 0.7In0.3 alloy have been investigated by electrical transport measurements at low temperature and in the presence of applied magnetic field. The films were grown on flat substrates and on insulating fibers of sub-micron diameter, respectively, by sequential deposition and interdiffusion of alternating gold and indium layers. The primary focus of the study was the effects of disorder, sample size, sample topology, and quantum interferences on the superconducting properties of these samples. Structural and compositional analysis and transport measurements were carried out, which showed that the films were granular, with varying local indium concentrations, apparently corresponding to several distinct alloy phases. This variation, in turn, led to the variation in the local amplitude of the superconducting order parameter, and in the local superconducting transition temperature (Tc). In planar films, the presence of disorder in the sample leads to a broad superconducting transition regime, typically with a gradual resistance drop at the onset of the transition, followed by a more abrupt one as the temperature is lowered. At the lowest temperatures in transition regime, deviations from the behavior expected in Kosterlitz-Thouless-Berezinskii (KTB) vortex-antivortex pair unbinding model were found in the I-V characteristics of the films. This deviation could originate from vortex-antivortex pair unbinding by quantum tunneling rather than thermal activation. Magnetoresistance oscillations in cylindrical Au0.7In 0.3 films at low temperatures were also studied. In the high-temperature part of the superconducting transition regime, the resistance oscillated with a period of h/2e in the unit of the enclosed magnetic flux, as expected for Little-Parks effect. Unlike the cylindrical samples discussed above, which were mechanically and thermally anchored, superconducting Au0.7In0.3 cylinders used in the early

  19. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  20. Ensembles of physical states and random quantum circuits on graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Hamma, Alioscia; Zanardi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we continue and extend the investigations of the ensembles of random physical states introduced in A. Hamma et al arXiv:1109.4391. These ensembles are constructed by finite-length random quantum circuits (RQC) acting on (hyper)edges of an underlying (hyper)graph structure. The latter encodes for the locality structure associated with finite-time quantum evolutions generated by physical i.e., local, Hamiltonians. Our goal is to analyze physical properties of typical states in these ensembles, in particular here we focus on proxies of quantum entanglement as purity and $\\alpha$-Renyi entropies. The problem is formulated in terms of matrix elements of superoperators which depend on the graph structure, choice of probability measure over the local unitaries and circuit length. In the $\\alpha=2$ case these superoperators act on a restricted multi-qubit space generated by permutation operators associated to the subsets of vertices of the graph. For permutationally invariant interactions the dynamics c...

  1. Physical exercise at the workplace reduces perceived physical exertion during healthcare work: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Jay, Kenneth; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-11-01

    High physical exertion during work is a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain and long-term sickness absence. Physical exertion (RPE) reflects the balance between physical work demands and physical capacity of the individual. Thus, increasing the physical capacity through physical exercise may decrease physical exertion during work. This study investigates the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on physical exertion during work (WRPE) among healthcare workers. 200 female healthcare workers (age: 42.0, body mass index: 24.1, average pain intensity: 3.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, average WRPE: 3.6 on a scale of 0 to 10) from 18 departments at three participating hospitals. Participants were randomly allocated at the cluster level to 10 weeks of: (1) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed in groups during working hours for 5×10 minutes per week and up to five group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise, or (2) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed during leisure time for 5×10 minutes per week. Physical exertion was assessed at baseline and at 10-week follow-up. 2.2 (SD: 1.1) and 1.0 (SD: 1.2) training sessions were performed per week in WORK and HOME, respectively. Physical exertion was reduced more in WORK than HOME (pworkplace appears more effective than home-based exercise in reducing physical exertion during daily work tasks in healthcare workers. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  2. Foundations of heavy-fermion superconductivity: lattice Kondo effect and Mott physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steglich, Frank; Wirth, Steffen

    2016-08-01

    This article overviews the development of heavy-fermion superconductivity, notably in such rare-earth-based intermetallic compounds which behave as Kondo-lattice systems. Heavy-fermion superconductivity is of unconventional nature in the sense that it is not mediated by electron-phonon coupling. Rather, in most cases the attractive interaction between charge carriers is apparently magnetic in origin. Fluctuations associated with an antiferromagnetic (AF) quantum critical point (QCP) play a major role. The first heavy-fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2 turned out to be the prototype of a larger group of materials for which the underlying, often pressure-induced, AF QCP is likely to be of a three-dimensional (3D) spin-density-wave (SDW) variety. For UBe13, the second heavy-fermion superconductor, a magnetic-field-induced 3D SDW QCP inside the superconducting phase can be conjectured. Such a ‘conventional’, itinerant QCP can be well understood within Landau’s paradigm of order-parameter fluctuations. In contrast, the low-temperature normal-state properties of a few heavy-fermion superconductors are at odds with the Landau framework. They are characterized by an ‘unconventional’, local QCP which may be considered a zero-temperature 4 f-orbital selective Mott transition. Here, as concluded for YbRh2Si2, the breakdown of the Kondo effect concurring with the AF instability gives rise to an abrupt change of the Fermi surface. Very recently, superconductivity was discovered for this compound at ultra-low temperatures. Therefore, YbRh2Si2 along with CeRhIn5 under pressure provide a natural link between the large group of about fifty low-temperature heavy-fermion superconductors and other families of unconventional superconductors with substantially higher T c, e.g. the doped Mott insulators of the perovskite-type cuprates and the organic charge-transfer salts.

  3. On p-Wave Pairing Superconductivity under Cubic Symmetry : Condensed Matter and Statistical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Masa-aki, OZAKI; Kazushige, MACHIDA; Tetsuo, OHMI; Department of Physics, Kyoto University

    1985-01-01

    A group theoretical classification of p-wave pairing superconducting states is made for a system with cubic crystalline symmetry in the absence of the spin-orbit coupling. The 15 inert p-pairing states which make the Ginzburg-Landau free energy stationary are enumerated and characterized, indicating that the energy gap vanishes along lines on the Fermi surface in some of those states. This is contrasted with the strong spin-orbit coupling case by others.

  4. Foundations of heavy-fermion superconductivity: lattice Kondo effect and Mott physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steglich, Frank; Wirth, Steffen

    2016-08-01

    This article overviews the development of heavy-fermion superconductivity, notably in such rare-earth-based intermetallic compounds which behave as Kondo-lattice systems. Heavy-fermion superconductivity is of unconventional nature in the sense that it is not mediated by electron-phonon coupling. Rather, in most cases the attractive interaction between charge carriers is apparently magnetic in origin. Fluctuations associated with an antiferromagnetic (AF) quantum critical point (QCP) play a major role. The first heavy-fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2 turned out to be the prototype of a larger group of materials for which the underlying, often pressure-induced, AF QCP is likely to be of a three-dimensional (3D) spin-density-wave (SDW) variety. For UBe13, the second heavy-fermion superconductor, a magnetic-field-induced 3D SDW QCP inside the superconducting phase can be conjectured. Such a 'conventional', itinerant QCP can be well understood within Landau's paradigm of order-parameter fluctuations. In contrast, the low-temperature normal-state properties of a few heavy-fermion superconductors are at odds with the Landau framework. They are characterized by an 'unconventional', local QCP which may be considered a zero-temperature 4 f-orbital selective Mott transition. Here, as concluded for YbRh2Si2, the breakdown of the Kondo effect concurring with the AF instability gives rise to an abrupt change of the Fermi surface. Very recently, superconductivity was discovered for this compound at ultra-low temperatures. Therefore, YbRh2Si2 along with CeRhIn5 under pressure provide a natural link between the large group of about fifty low-temperature heavy-fermion superconductors and other families of unconventional superconductors with substantially higher T c, e.g. the doped Mott insulators of the perovskite-type cuprates and the organic charge-transfer salts.

  5. Physical randomness sources for loophole-free Bell tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2016-05-01

    We describe the strategy and physics used to select unpredictable measurement settings in the loophole-free Bell tests reported in [Hensen et al. Nature 2015, Giustina et al. PRL 2015, and Shalm et al. PRL 2015]. We demonstrate direct measurements of laser phase diffusion, a process driven by spontaneous emission, rigorous bounds on the effect of other, less-trusted contributions, and exponential predictability reduction by randomness extraction. As required for the cited experiments, we show the six-sigma bound for the predictability of the basis choices is below 0.001%. C. Abellan et al. PRL 2015.

  6. Progress of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Lu, W.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, W. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; Cao, Y.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Wu, W.; Yang, T. J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, H. W.; Ma, L. Z.; Xia, J. W.; Xie, D.

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting ECR ion sources can produce intense highly charged ion beams for the application in heavy ion accelerators. Superconducting Electron Resonance ion source with Advanced Design (SECRAL) is one of the few fully superconducting ECR ion sources that has been successfully built and put into routine operation for years. With enormous efforts and R&D work, promising results have been achieved with the ion source. Heated by the microwave power from a 7 kW/24 GHz gyrotron microwave generator, very intense highly charged gaseous ion beams have been produced, such as 455 eμA Xe27+, 236 eμA Xe30+, and 64 eμA Xe35+. Since heavy metallic ion beams are being more and more attractive and important for many accelerator projects globally, intensive studies have been made to produce highly charged heavy metal ion beams, such as those from bismuth and uranium. Recently, 420 eμA Bi30+ and 202 eμA U33+ have been produced with SECRAL source. This paper will present the latest results with SECRAL, and the operation status will be discussed as well. An introduction of recently started SECRAL II project will also be given in the presentation.

  7. Progress of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Lu, W; Feng, Y C; Zhang, W H; Zhang, X Z; Cao, Y; Zhao, Y Y; Wu, W; Yang, T J; Zhao, B; Zhao, H W; Ma, L Z; Xia, J W; Xie, D

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting ECR ion sources can produce intense highly charged ion beams for the application in heavy ion accelerators. Superconducting Electron Resonance ion source with Advanced Design (SECRAL) is one of the few fully superconducting ECR ion sources that has been successfully built and put into routine operation for years. With enormous efforts and R&D work, promising results have been achieved with the ion source. Heated by the microwave power from a 7 kW/24 GHz gyrotron microwave generator, very intense highly charged gaseous ion beams have been produced, such as 455 eμA Xe(27+), 236 eμA Xe(30+), and 64 eμA Xe(35+). Since heavy metallic ion beams are being more and more attractive and important for many accelerator projects globally, intensive studies have been made to produce highly charged heavy metal ion beams, such as those from bismuth and uranium. Recently, 420 eμA Bi(30+) and 202 eμA U(33+) have been produced with SECRAL source. This paper will present the latest results with SECRAL, and the operation status will be discussed as well. An introduction of recently started SECRAL II project will also be given in the presentation.

  8. mHealth Physical Activity Intervention: A Randomized Pilot Study in Physically Inactive Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiWon; Lee, Ji Hyeon; Vittinghoff, Eric; Fukuoka, Yoshimi

    2016-05-01

    Physical inactivity is prevalent in pregnant women, and innovative strategies to promote physical activity are strongly needed. The purpose of the study was to test a 12-week mobile health (mHealth) physical activity intervention for feasibility and potential efficacy. Participants were recruited between December 2012 and February 2014 using diverse recruitment methods. Thirty pregnant women between 10 and 20 weeks of gestation were randomized to an intervention (mobile phone app plus Fitbit) or a control (Fitbit) group. Both conditions targeted gradual increases in physical activity. The mHealth intervention included daily messages and a mobile phone activity diary with automated feedback and self-monitoring systems. On monthly average, 4 women were screened for initial eligibility by telephone and 2.5 were randomized. Intervention participants had a 1096 ± 1898 step increase in daily steps compared to an increase of 259 ± 1604 steps in control participants at 12 weeks. The change between groups in weekly mean steps per day during the 12-week study period was not statistically significant (p = 0.38). The intervention group reported lower perceived barrier to being active, lack of energy, than the control group at 12-week visit (p = 0.02). The rates of responding to daily messages and using the daily diary through the mobile app declined during the 12 week study period. It was difficult to recruit and randomize inactive women who wanted to increase physical activity during pregnancy. Pregnant women who were motivated to increase physical activity might find using mobile technologies in assessing and promoting PA acceptable. Possible reasons for the non-significant treatment effect of the mHealth intervention on physical activity are discussed. Public awareness of safety and benefits of physical activity during pregnancy should be promoted. Clinicaltrials.Gov Identifier NCT01461707.

  9. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  10. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  11. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  12. Physics of Limiting Phenomena in Superconducting Microwave Resonators: Vortex Dissipation, Ultimate Quench and Quality Factor Degradation Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [IIT, Chicago

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are devices operating in radio-frequency and able to accelerate charged particles up to energy of tera-electron-volts. Such accelerating structures are though limited in terms of quality factor and accelerating gradient, that translates--in some cases--in higher capital costs of construction and operation of superconducting rf accelerators. Looking forward for a new generation of more affordable accelerators, the physical description of limiting mechanisms in superconducting microwave resonators is discussed. In particular, the physics behind the dissipation introduced by vortices in the superconductor, the ultimate quench limitations and the quality factor degradation mechanism after a quench are described in detail. One of the limiting factor of the quality factor is the dissipation introduced by trapped magnetic flux vortices. The radio-frequency complex response of trapped vortices in superconductors is derived by solving the motion equation for a magnetic flux line, assuming a bi-dimensional and mean free path-dependent Lorentzian-shaped pinning potential. The resulting surface resistance shows the bell-shaped trend as a function of the mean free path, in agreement with the experimental data observed. Such bell-shaped trend of the surface resistance is described in terms of the interplay of the two limiting regimes identified as pinning and flux flow regimes, for low and large mean free path values respectively. The model predicts that the dissipation regime--pinning- or flux-flow-dominated--can be tuned either by acting on the frequency or on the electron mean free path value. The effect of different configurations of pinning sites and strength on the vortex surface resistance are also discussed. Accelerating cavities are also limited by the quench of the superconductive state, which limits the maximum accelerating gradient achievable. The accelerating field limiting factor is usually associate d to the

  13. Physics of Limiting Phenomena in Superconducting Microwave Resonators: Vortex Dissipation, Ultimate Quench and Quality Factor Degradation Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are devices operating in radio-frequency and able to accelerate charged particles up to energy of tera-electron-volts. Such accelerating structures are though limited in terms of quality factor and accelerating gradient, that translates--in some cases--in higher capital costs of construction and operation of superconducting rf accelerators. Looking forward for a new generation of more affordable accelerators, the physical description of limiting mechanisms in superconducting microwave resonators is discussed. In particular, the physics behind the dissipation introduced by vortices in the superconductor, the ultimate quench limitations and the quality factor degradation mechanism after a quench are described in detail. One of the limiting factor of the quality factor is the dissipation introduced by trapped magnetic flux vortices. The radio-frequency complex response of trapped vortices in superconductors is derived by solving the motion equation for a magnetic flux line, assuming a bi-dimensional and mean free path-dependent Lorentzian-shaped pinning potential. The resulting surface resistance shows the bell-shaped trend as a function of the mean free path, in agreement with the experimental data observed. Such bell-shaped trend of the surface resistance is described in terms of the interplay of the two limiting regimes identified as pinning and flux flow regimes, for low and large mean free path values respectively. The model predicts that the dissipation regime--pinning- or flux-flow-dominated--can be tuned either by acting on the frequency or on the electron mean free path value. The effect of different configurations of pinning sites and strength on the vortex surface resistance are also discussed. Accelerating cavities are also limited by the quench of the superconductive state, which limits the maximum accelerating gradient achievable. The accelerating field limiting factor is usually associate d to the

  14. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostrikov, Alexander

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS--II requirements on quality factor of 2. · 10 10 at acceleration field of 16~MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS--II.

  15. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, Alexander [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS–II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 ∙ 1010 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS–II.

  16. Exercise training and habitual physical activity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Earnest, Conrad P; Johnson, William D; Blair, Steven N; Sénéchal, Martin; Church, Timothy S

    2012-12-01

    Exercise training reduces adiposity and risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the combined effects of habitual free-living physical activity and aerobic training on waist circumference, weight, fitness, and blood pressure in postmenopausal women are unknown. To evaluate the effects of habitual physical activity levels during aerobic training on weight, waist circumference, fitness, and blood pressure. Secondary analysis of an RCT. Original data collected April 2001 to June 2005 and analyzed in 2012. Postmenopausal women in a supervised exercise trial. Women (n=325) were randomized to 4, 8, or 12 kcal/kg per week of aerobic training or a control group for 6 months. All outcome measures were collected at baseline and follow-up. Changes in dependent variables within each training group were evaluated across tertiles of pedometer-determined habitual physical activity outside exercise training sessions. Changes in waist circumference and weight. Reductions in waist circumference were significantly greater with higher steps/day accumulated outside exercise training compared to lower levels in the 4 (high: -4.8 cm vs low: -1.4 cm, p=0.03); 8 (high: -4.2 cm vs low: -0.4 cm, p=0.03), and 12 kcal/kg per week groups (high: -4.1 cm vs low: -0.7 cm, p=0.05). For all groups, p-trend≤0.03. A trend was observed for greater weight reduction with higher steps/day in the 4 kcal/kg per week group (p-trend=0.04) but not for the other exercise doses. No effects were observed for blood pressure or fitness measures (all p>0.05). In postmenopausal women, higher habitual physical activity while participating in aerobic training was associated with greater reductions in central adiposity, and was supportive of weight loss compared to lower levels. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gaussian Random Field: Physical Origin of Sersic Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-01-01

    While the Sersic profile family provide adequate fits for the surface brightness profiles of observed galaxies, the physical origin is unknown. We show that, if the cosmological density field are seeded by random gaussian fluctuations, as in the standard cold dark matter model, galaxies with steep central profiles have simultaneously extended envelopes of shallow profiles in the outskirts, whereas galaxies with shallow central profiles are accompanied by steep density profiles in the outskirts. These properties are in accord with those of the Sersic profile family. Moreover, galaxies with steep central profiles form their central regions in smaller denser subunits that possibly merge subsequently, which naturally leads to formation of bulges. In contrast, galaxies with shallow central profiles form their central regions in a coherent fashion without significant substructure, a necessary condition for disk galaxy formation. Thus, the scenario is self-consistent with respect to the correlation between observed ...

  18. Superconductivity in the Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Stanislav; Koverya, Valentin

    2015-09-01

    The report contains a brief history of the superconductor’s researches and their applications carried out in the Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering (ILTPE) of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine since the ILTPE foundation in 1960. The most important results of the researches in the field of the low- and high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are stated more detailed. The experimental validation of an electromagnetic radiation of Josephson junctions; the electron pairing and existence of the distant order in the HTS; a creation of the superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) on the basis of the HTS; formation and moving of the local frozen magnetic field along the surface of the HTS; the transport properties of new Fe-based superconductors can be referred to such results.

  19. Strength training and physical activity in boys: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Udo; Witassek, Fabienne; Petrò, Renato; Fritz, Chris; Eiholzer, Urs

    2013-12-01

    In developed societies levels of daily physical activity (PA) among school-age children are decreasing. This implies risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Specific strategies to improve levels of PA are needed. In prepubertal boys there is evidence that strength training increases spontaneous PA outside of training. A total of 102 schoolchildren (age 10-14 years) in Switzerland were randomly assigned to physical education classes or to participate twice weekly at a guided strength training program for 19 weeks. Spontaneous PA energy expenditure (PAEE; 3axial accelerometry for 7 days), leg and arm strength, and body composition (dual energy radiograph absorptiometry) were measured at baseline, after 19 weeks of training intervention, and after 3 months of washout. There were no significant differences between the groups at baseline. In the intervention group, PAEE increased by 10% from baseline to end of training in boys (P = .02), but not in girls. Leg and arm strength were increased owing to training intervention in both boys and girls. All other variables were unchanged. Baseline PAEE was significantly negatively correlated with changes of PAEE. Targeted strength training significantly increases daily spontaneous PA behavior in boys. The less active children showed the greatest increase in spontaneous PAEE. Girls showed a similar increase in strength, but not in spontaneous PAEE. This may be explained by their earlier pubertal development. Strength training may be a promising strategy in schools to counteract decreasing levels of PA.

  20. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  1. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  2. Superconducting optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  3. Cryogenic Fiber Optic Sensors for Superconducting Magnets and Power Transmission Lines in High Energy Physics Applications

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081689; Bajko, Marta

    In the framework of the Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL - LHC), a remarkable R&D effort is now ongoing at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in order to develop a new generation of accelerator magnets and superconducting power transmission lines. The magnet technology will be based on Nb3Sn enabling to operate in the 11 - 13 T range. In parallel, in order to preserve the power converters from the increasing radiation level, high power transmission lines are foreseen to feed the magnets from free - radiation zones. These will be based on high temperature superconductors cooled down with helium gas in the range 5 - 30 K. The new technologies will require advanced design and fabrication approaches as well as adapted instrumentation for monitoring both the R&D phase and operation. Resistive sensors have been used so far for voltage, temperature and strain monitoring but their integration still suffers from the number of electrical wires and the complex compensation o...

  4. Gaussian Random Field: Physical Origin of Sersic Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-08-01

    While the Sersic profile family provides adequate fits for the surface brightness profiles of observed galaxies, its physical origin is unknown. We show that if the cosmological density field is seeded by random Gaussian fluctuations, as in the standard cold dark matter model, galaxies with steep central profiles have simultaneously extended envelopes of shallow profiles in the outskirts, whereas galaxies with shallow central profiles are accompanied by steep density profiles in the outskirts. These properties are in accord with those of the Sersic profile family. Moreover, galaxies with steep central profiles form their central regions in smaller denser subunits that possibly merge subsequently, which naturally leads to the formation of bulges. In contrast, galaxies with shallow central profiles form their central regions in a coherent fashion without significant substructure, a necessary condition for disk galaxy formation. Thus, the scenario is self-consistent with respect to the correlation between observed galaxy morphology and the Sersic index. We further predict that clusters of galaxies should display a similar trend, which should be verifiable observationally.

  5. 9 July 2012 - Academy of Sciences Malaysia (ASM), Chairman, Mathematical and Physical Sciences Discipline Group M. Yahaya FASc and his delegation visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department G. De Rijk.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    9 July 2012 - Academy of Sciences Malaysia (ASM), Chairman, Mathematical and Physical Sciences Discipline Group M. Yahaya FASc and his delegation visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department G. De Rijk.

  6. Characterization of the critical current and physical properties of superconducting epitaxial NbTiN sub-micron structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A., E-mail: aklimov@ite.waw.pl [Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Słysz, W.; Guziewicz, M. [Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Kolkovsky, V.; Zaytseva, I.; Malinowski, A. [Institute of Physics Polish Academy of Science, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • This manuscript presents investigation of the critical current dependence of Nb(Ti)N nanostructured superconducting single photon detectors (SNSPD) in function of temperature and applied magnetic field. • Presented results are complimentary and compared with the same data received for submicron-wide single bridge Nb(Ti)N structures. • Our data demonstrate significant influence of local constrictions on physical properties of our SNSPD detectors. - Abstract: Measurements of critical current in NbTiN as a function of applied magnetic field and temperature are reported for two samples: 700-nm-wide bridge and 100-nm-wide meander. In 700-nm-wide NbTiN bridge we pinpointed the limiting factors for the critical current density to be current-driven vortex de-pinning at low temperatures and thermally activated flux flow closer to the transition temperature. In 100-nm-wide NbTiN meander we found phase slips activation, accompanied by hotspots formation at all measured temperatures. These two types of structures demonstrate different dependence of the critical current on the applied magnetic field. Although our NbTiN meander structures has high de-pairing critical current densities ∼10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2} at low temperatures, the real critical currents are smaller due to the presence of the local constrictions.

  7. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  8. Tsallis thermostatics as a statistical physics of random chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jizba, Petr; Korbel, Jan; Zatloukal, Václav

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we point out that the generalized statistics of Tsallis-Havrda-Charvát can be conveniently used as a conceptual framework for statistical treatment of random chains. In particular, we use the path-integral approach to show that the ensuing partition function can be identified with the partition function of a fluctuating oriented random loop of arbitrary length and shape in a background scalar potential. To put some meat on the bare bones, we illustrate this with two statistical systems: Schultz-Zimm polymer and relativistic particle. Further salient issues such as the projective special linear group PSL(2,R) transformation properties of Tsallis' inverse-temperature parameter and a grand-canonical ensemble of fluctuating random loops related to the Tsallis-Havrda-Charvát statistics are also briefly discussed.

  9. Tsallis thermostatics as a statistical physics of random chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jizba, Petr; Korbel, Jan; Zatloukal, Václav

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we point out that the generalized statistics of Tsallis-Havrda-Charvát can be conveniently used as a conceptual framework for statistical treatment of random chains. In particular, we use the path-integral approach to show that the ensuing partition function can be identified with the partition function of a fluctuating oriented random loop of arbitrary length and shape in a background scalar potential. To put some meat on the bare bones, we illustrate this with two statistical systems: Schultz-Zimm polymer and relativistic particle. Further salient issues such as the projective special linear group PSL (2 ,R ) transformation properties of Tsallis' inverse-temperature parameter and a grand-canonical ensemble of fluctuating random loops related to the Tsallis-Havrda-Charvát statistics are also briefly discussed.

  10. Mechanical and physical properties of Bi-2223 and Nb3Sn superconducting materials between 300 K and 7 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyilas, Arman; Osamura, Kozo; Sugano, Michinaka

    2003-09-01

    Within the framework of IEC/TC90-WG5 and VAMAS/TWA16, superconducting (SC) materials are investigated with respect to their mechanical properties between 300 K and 7 K. Besides the mechanical tests, physical and electrical properties are also determined for high Tc SC-tapes. The mechanical tests comprised the characterization of tensile properties at ambient temperature as well as at 7 K of Nb3Sn-reacted strands, Bi2223 tapes, pure silver tapes, silver bars, silver alloy tapes and bare filaments extracted from Bi-2223 tapes. All these investigations are carried out using a variable temperature helium gas flow cryostat equipped with a servo hydraulic tensile machine (MTS, model 810). For the load measurements specially developed, highly sensitive cryogenic proof in situ working load cells are used. For the strain determination of the wires, a high resolution ultra-light double extensometer system with a specially developed low noise signal conditioner is used. The engineering parameters such as yield strength and elastic modulus are evaluated using the obtained data with newly developed software. For the tiny and brittle filaments load versus displacement data are obtained. A determined master line (Young's modulus versus machine compliance) established by thin 0.125 mm Ø wires of different pure metals is used for the Young's modulus estimation of filaments. For the 4 K electrical voltage-current measurements under magnetic fields of up to 13 T, an existing test facility is used for the high Tc tapes. No dependency between applied strain up to 0.3% and the critical current under magnetic field could be observed for the selected specific Bi-2223 tapes. In addition, thermal expansion curves of Bi-2223 tapes along with pure silver and silver alloy (AgMg) are determined between 290 K and 7 K using in situ working extensometers. The coefficient of thermal expansion is evaluated by the determined thermal expansion versus temperature curve.

  11. Superconductivity in iron-based compounds (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 29 January 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), entitled 'Superconductivity in iron-based compounds', was held on 29 January 2014 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The agenda of the session, announced on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Eremin I M (Institut für Theoretische Physik III, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum, Deutschland; Kazan (Volga region) Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation) "Antiferromagnetism in iron-based superconductors: interaction of the magnetic, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom"; (2) Korshunov M M (Kirenskii Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk) "Superconducting state in iron-based materials and spin-fluctuation pairing theory"; (3) Kuzmicheva T E (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Lomonosov Moscow State University) "Andreev spectroscopy of iron-based superconductors: temperature dependence of the order parameters and scaling of Δ_L, S with T_C"; (4) Eltsev Yu F (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) "Synthesis and study of the magnetic and transport properties of iron-based superconductors of the 122 family". Papers written on the basis of oral presentations 1-4 are published below. • Antiferromagnetism in iron-based superconductors: magnetic order in the model of delocalized electrons, I M Eremin Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 8, Pages 807-813 • Superconducting state in iron-based materials and spin-fluctuation pairing theory, M M Korshunov Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 8, Pages 813-819 • Andreev spectroscopy of iron-based superconductors: temperature dependence of the order parameters and scaling of Δ_L, S with T_C, T E Kuzmicheva, S A Kuzmichev, M G Mikheev, Ya G Ponomarev, S N Tchesnokov, V M Pudalov, E P Khlybov, N D Zhigadlo Physics

  12. Reversible DC Magnetization Measurements of the Superconducting Parameters and Their Anisotropies in the Randomly-Doped Cuprates and Prelude to the Magnetic Resonance Studies of - Cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Jonathan Lynn

    The fact that there is no consensus on the microscopic origin of the high-temperature superconducting phenomenon highlights the need for accurate measurements of the parameters which characterize the superconducting state (i.e., the coherence lengths (Ginzburg-Landau), penetration depths, and critical fields) and their anisotropies in these materials. This dissertation presents the first dc magnetization measurements of these parameters in the electron-doped, infinite-layer superconductor rm Sr_{0.90}La _{0.10}CuO_2 (T _{c} = 40 K). This material is particularly attractive for study because of its simple structure which contains nothing more than the features common to all of the high temperature superconducting copper oxides--a stacking of CuO_2 planes separated by (here, single) ion charge doping layers. From these measurements, xi_{| }(0) (xi_|(0))=46 A (30 A), lambda _{|}(0) (lambda_ |(0))=290 nm (450 nm), and H_{c2|}(0) (H _{c2|}(0))=23.8 T (15.5 T) where | and | are with respect to the CuO_2 planes. The ratio of H_ {c2}'s indicates that rm Sr_{0.90}La_{0.10}CuO _2 is much more isotropic than the other cuprates ((m_{c}/m_{ab })^{1/2}~1.5), and one of the samples measured even displayed a surprising anisotropy of less than one. In light of this surprising inverse anisotropy, the first systematic study of the effects of sample inhomogeneities on these reversible dc magnetization measurements was performed. rm YBa_2Cu_3O_{7 -delta} was used in this study because it can be doped either randomly or uniformly, allowing isolation of the artifacts of the measurement technique due to the random nature of the doping alone. This study demonstrates that neglecting the distribution of superconducting transition temperatures which come from the random doping in this type of analysis leads to errors in the measured parameters of up to 1000%. Efforts to measure the distribution of T_{c}'s and to use this distribution in the analysis have produced mixed results, with the most

  13. Chaotic laser based physical random bit streaming system with a computer application interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Susumu; Arai, Kenichi; Davis, Peter; Sunada, Satoshi; Harayama, Takahisa

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a random bit streaming system that uses a chaotic laser as its physical entropy source. By performing real-time bit manipulation for bias reduction, we were able to provide the memory of a personal computer with a constant supply of ready-to-use physical random bits at a throughput of up to 4 Gbps. We pay special attention to the end-to-end entropy source model describing how the entropy from physical sources is converted into bit entropy. We confirmed the statistical quality of the generated random bits by revealing the pass rate of the NIST SP800-22 test suite to be 65 % to 75 %, which is commonly considered acceptable for a reliable random bit generator. We also confirmed the stable operation of our random bit steaming system with long-term bias monitoring.

  14. Quantized vortices in the ideal bose gas: a physical realization of random polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castin, Yvan; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Stock, Sabine; Dalibard, Jean; Stringari, Sandro

    2006-02-03

    We propose a physical system allowing one to experimentally observe the distribution of the complex zeros of a random polynomial. We consider a degenerate, rotating, quasi-ideal atomic Bose gas prepared in the lowest Landau level. Thermal fluctuations provide the randomness of the bosonic field and of the locations of the vortex cores. These vortices can be mapped to zeros of random polynomials, and observed in the density profile of the gas.

  15. Superconductivity in CVD diamond films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2009-06-24

    A beautiful jewel of diamond is insulator. However, boron doping can induce semiconductive, metallic and superconducting properties in diamond. When the boron concentration is tuned over 3 × 10(20) cm(-3), diamonds enter the metallic region and show superconductivity at low temperatures. The metal-insulator transition and superconductivity are analyzed using ARPES, XAS, NMR, IXS, transport and magnetic measurements and so on. This review elucidates the physical properties and mechanism of diamond superconductor as a special superconductivity that occurs in semiconductors.

  16. Superconducting bearings for flywheel applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A literature study on the application of superconducting bearings in energy storage flywheel systems. The physics of magnetic levitation and superconductors are presented in the first part of the report, followed by a discussion of the literature found onthe applications of superconducting bearings...

  17. Gifts from the superconducting curiosity shop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Mandrus

    2011-01-01

    Superconductivity has just celebrated its 100th birthday,and yet despite its advanced age it has never been more alive.Given that most subfields of materials physics have a half-life of about seven years,what accounts for the enduring popularity of superconductivity? What is it about superconductivity that continues to fascinate?

  18. Programmed Physical Exertion in Recovery From Sports-Related Concussion: A Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerlender, Arthur; Rieman, Wanda; Lichtenstein, Jonathan; Condiracci, C

    2015-01-01

    Although no data exist, general practice recommends only rest following concussion. This randomized clinical trial found that programmed physical exertion during recovery produced no significant differences in recovery time between groups of participants. However, high levels of exertion were deleterious. This study provides initial evidence that moderate physical activity is a safe replacement behavior during recovery.

  19. Physics of Stochastic Processes How Randomness Acts in Time

    CERN Document Server

    Mahnke, Reinhard; Lubashevsky, Ihor

    2008-01-01

    Based on lectures given by one of the authors with many years of experience in teaching stochastic processes, this textbook is unique in combining basic mathematical and physical theory with numerous simple and sophisticated examples as well as detailed calculations. In addition, applications from different fields are included so as to strengthen the background learned in the first part of the book. With its exercises at the end of each chapter (and solutions only available to lecturers) this book will benefit students and researchers at different educational levels. Solutions manual available

  20. The role of physical activity and physical fitness in postcancer fatigue: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, H.; Bleijenberg, G.; Heijmen, L.; Zwarts, M.J.; Leer, J.W.H.; Heerschap, A.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients suffering from postcancer fatigue have both an inferior physical activity and physical fitness compared to non-fatigued cancer survivors. The aims of this study were (1) to examine the effect of cognitive behavior therapy, an effective treatment for postcancer fatigue, on physical

  1. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  2. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldbart, P.M.; Sheehy, D.E. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang{close_quote}s SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute: Marie Curie Training Course: Applications of Random Matrices in Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Vladimir; Serban, Didina; Wiegmann, Paul; Zabrodin, Anton

    2006-01-01

    Random matrices are widely and successfully used in physics for almost 60-70 years, beginning with the works of Dyson and Wigner. Although it is an old subject, it is constantly developing into new areas of physics and mathematics. It constitutes now a part of the general culture of a theoretical physicist. Mathematical methods inspired by random matrix theory become more powerful, sophisticated and enjoy rapidly growing applications in physics. Recent examples include the calculation of universal correlations in the mesoscopic system, new applications in disordered and quantum chaotic systems, in combinatorial and growth models, as well as the recent breakthrough, due to the matrix models, in two dimensional gravity and string theory and the non-abelian gauge theories. The book consists of the lectures of the leading specialists and covers rather systematically many of these topics. It can be useful to the specialists in various subjects using random matrices, from PhD students to confirmed scientists.

  4. Effects of physical randomness training on virtual and laboratory golf putting performance in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, T C; Lamb, P F

    2017-10-09

    External randomness exists in all sports but is perhaps most obvious in golf putting where robotic putters sink only 80% of 5 m putts due to unpredictable ball-green dynamics. The purpose of this study was to test whether physical randomness training can improve putting performance in novices. A virtual random-physics golf-putting game was developed based on controlled ball-roll data. Thirty-two subjects were assigned a unique randomness gain (RG) ranging from 0.1 to 2.0-times real-world randomness. Putter face kinematics were measured in 5 m laboratory putts before and after five days of virtual training. Performance was quantified using putt success rate and "miss-adjustment correlation" (MAC), the correlation between left-right miss magnitude and subsequent right-left kinematic adjustments. Results showed no RG-success correlation (r = -0.066, p = 0.719) but mildly stronger correlations with MAC for face angle (r = -0.168, p = 0.358) and clubhead path (r = -0.302, p = 0.093). The strongest RG-MAC correlation was observed during virtual training (r = -0.692, p physical randomness in virtual training, and also that this learning may weakly transfer to real golf putting kinematics. Adaptation to external physical randomness during virtual training may therefore help golfers adapt to external randomness in real-world environments.

  5. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Zwan, van der, G.; Vente, de, W.; Huizink, A.C.; Bögels, S.M.; Bruin,, Henk

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and a...

  6. Failed theories of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalian, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Almost half a century passed between the discovery of superconductivity by Kammerlingh Onnes and the theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer. During the intervening years the brightest minds in theoretical physics tried and failed to develop a microscopic understanding of the effect. A summary of some of those unsuccessful attempts to understand superconductivity not only demonstrates the extraordinary achievement made by formulating the BCS theory, but also illustrates that mistakes are a natural and healthy part of the scientific discourse, and that inapplicable, even incorrect theories can turn out to be interesting and inspiring.

  7. Increasing students' physical activity during school physical education: rationale and protocol for the SELF-FIT cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Amy S; Lonsdale, Chris; Lubans, David R; Ng, Johan Y Y

    2017-07-11

    The Self-determined Exercise and Learning For FITness (SELF-FIT) is a multi-component school-based intervention based on tenets of self-determination theory. SELF-FIT aims to increase students' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during physical education lessons, and enhance their autonomous motivation towards fitness activities. Using a cluster randomized controlled trial, we aim to examine the effects of the intervention on students' MVPA during school physical education. Secondary 2 students (approximately aged 14 years) from 26 classes in 26 different schools will be recruited. After baseline assessments, students will be randomized into either the experimental group or wait-list control group using a matched-pair randomization. Teachers allocated to the experimental group will attend two half-day workshops and deliver the SELF-FIT intervention for 8 weeks. The main intervention components include training teachers to teach in more need supportive ways, and conducting fitness exercises using a fitness dice with interchangeable faces. Other motivational components, such as playing music during classes, are also included. The primary outcome of the trial is students' MVPA during PE lessons. Secondary outcomes include students' leisure-time MVPA, perceived need support from teachers, need satisfaction, autonomous motivation towards physical education, intention to engage in physical activity, psychological well-being, and health-related fitness (cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness). Quantitative data will be analyzed using multilevel modeling approaches. Focus group interviews will also be conducted to assess students' perceptions of the intervention. The SELF-FIT intervention has been designed to improve students' health and well-being by using high-intensity activities in classes delivered by teachers who have been trained to be autonomy needs supportive. If successful, scalable interventions based on SELF-FIT could be applied in physical

  8. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  9. Effect of physical activity councelling on disability in older people: A 2-year randomized controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    von Bonsdorff, Mikaela; Leinonen, Raija; Kujala, Urho; Heikkinen, Eino; Törmäkangas, Timo; Hirvensalo, Mirja; Rasinaho, Minna; Karhula, Sirkka; Mänty, Minna; Rantanen, Taina

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of a physical activity counseling intervention on instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) disability. DESIGN: Primary care–based, single-blind, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: City of Jyväskylä, central Finland. PARTICIPANTS: Six hundred thirty-two people aged 75 to 81 who were able to walk 500 meters without assistance, were at most moderately physically active, had a Mini-Mental State Examination score greater than 21, had no med...

  10. Hierarchic Models of Turbulence, Superfluidity and Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaivarainen, A

    2000-01-01

    New models of Turbulence, Superfluidity and Superconductivity, based on new Hierarchic theory, general for liquids and solids (physics/0102086), have been proposed. CONTENTS: 1 Turbulence. General description; 2 Mesoscopic mechanism of turbulence; 3 Superfluidity. General description; 4 Mesoscopic scenario of fluidity; 5 Superfluidity as a hierarchic self-organization process; 6 Superfluidity in 3He; 7 Superconductivity: General properties of metals and semiconductors; Plasma oscillations; Cyclotron resonance; Electroconductivity; 8. Microscopic theory of superconductivity (BCS); 9. Mesoscopic scenario of superconductivity: Interpretation of experimental data in the framework of mesoscopic model of superconductivity.

  11. Conventional and unconventional superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Superconductivity has been one of the most fruitful areas of research in condensed matter physics, bringing together researchers with distinct interests in a collaborative effort to understand from its microscopic basis to its potential for unprecedented technological applications. The concepts, techniques, and methods developed along its centennial history have gone beyond the realm of condensed matter physics and influenced the development of other fascinating areas, such as particle physics and atomic physics. These notes, based on a set of lectures given at the 2011 Advanced Summer School of Cinvestav, aim to motivate the young undergraduate student in getting involved in the exciting world of conventional and unconventional superconductors.

  12. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, J.E.; de Vente, W.; Huizink, A.C.; Bögels, S.M.; de Bruin, E.I.

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing

  13. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwan, van der J.E.; Vente, de W.; Huizink, A.C.; Bögels, S.M.; Bruin, de E.I.

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing

  14. Variations in reporting of outcomes in randomized trials on diet and physical activity in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogozińska, Ewelina; Marlin, Nadine; Yang, Fen

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Trials on diet and physical activity in pregnancy report on various outcomes. We aimed to assess the variations in outcomes reported and their quality in trials on lifestyle interventions in pregnancy. METHODS: We searched major databases without language restrictions for randomized controll...

  15. A unified framework for mesh refinement in random and physical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Stinis, Panos

    2016-10-01

    In recent work we have shown how an accurate reduced model can be utilized to perform mesh refinement in random space. That work relied on the explicit knowledge of an accurate reduced model which is used to monitor the transfer of activity from the large to the small scales of the solution. Since this is not always available, we present in the current work a framework which shares the merits and basic idea of the previous approach but does not require an explicit knowledge of a reduced model. Moreover, the current framework can be applied for refinement in both random and physical space. In this manuscript we focus on the application to random space mesh refinement. We study examples of increasing difficulty (from ordinary to partial differential equations) which demonstrate the efficiency and versatility of our approach. We also provide some results from the application of the new framework to physical space mesh refinement.

  16. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  17. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Laxdal, Robert E.; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  18. Will electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks undergo first-order transition under random attacks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xingpei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Dichen; Dong, Zhaoyang; Chen, Guo; Zhu, Zhenshan; Zhu, Xuedong; Wang, Xunting

    2016-10-01

    Whether the realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks will undergo first-order transition under random failures still remains a question. To reflect the reality of Chinese electrical cyber-physical system, the "partial one-to-one correspondence" interdependent networks model is proposed and the connectivity vulnerabilities of three realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks are analyzed. The simulation results show that due to the service demands of power system the topologies of power grid and its cyber network are highly inter-similar which can effectively avoid the first-order transition. By comparing the vulnerability curves between electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks and its single-layer network, we find that complex network theory is still useful in the vulnerability analysis of electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks.

  19. 640-Gbit/s fast physical random number generation using a broadband chaotic semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limeng; Pan, Biwei; Chen, Guangcan; Guo, Lu; Lu, Dan; Zhao, Lingjuan; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    An ultra-fast physical random number generator is demonstrated utilizing a photonic integrated device based broadband chaotic source with a simple post data processing method. The compact chaotic source is implemented by using a monolithic integrated dual-mode amplified feedback laser (AFL) with self-injection, where a robust chaotic signal with RF frequency coverage of above 50 GHz and flatness of ±3.6 dB is generated. By using 4-least significant bits (LSBs) retaining from the 8-bit digitization of the chaotic waveform, random sequences with a bit-rate up to 640 Gbit/s (160 GS/s × 4 bits) are realized. The generated random bits have passed each of the fifteen NIST statistics tests (NIST SP800-22), indicating its randomness for practical applications. PMID:28374860

  20. Note: A 10 Gbps real-time post-processing free physical random number generator chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yi; Liang, Futian; Wang, Xinzhe; Li, Feng; Chen, Lian; Jin, Ge

    2017-09-01

    A random number generator with high data rate, small size, and low power consumption is essential for a certain quantum key distribution (QKD) system. We designed a 10 Gbps random number generator ASIC, TRNG2016, for the QKD system. With a 6 mm × 6 mm QFN48 package, TRNG2016 has 10 independent physical random number generation channels, and each channel can work at a fixed frequency up to 1 Gbps. The random number generated by TRNG2016 can pass the NIST statistical tests without any post-processing. With 3.3 V IO power supply and 1.2 V core power supply, the typical power consumption of TRNG2016 is 773 mW with 10 channels on and running at 1 Gbps data rate.

  1. Cancer-Related Fatigue and Rehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial Comparing Physical Training Combined With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy With Physical Training Only and With No Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Van Weert, E.; May, A. M.; Korstjens, I.; Post, W.J.; van der Schans, C. P.; van den Borne, B; Mesters, I.; Ros, W J G; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancerrelated fatigue of physical training combined with cognitive behavioral therapy with physical training alone and with no intervention. Design. In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, 147 survivors of cancer were randomly assigned to a ...

  2. Embedded fiber Bragg grating sensors for true temperature monitoring in Nb$_3$Sn superconducting magnets for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A; Bajko, M; Consales, M; Giordano, M; Perez, J C; Cusano, A

    2016-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) planned at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) requires the development of a new generation of superconducting magnets based on Nb3Sn technology. The instrumentation required for the racetrack coils needs the development of reliable sensing systems able to monitor the magnet thermo-mechanical behavior during its service life, from the coil fabrication to the magnet operation. With this purpose, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors have been embedded in the coils of the Short Model Coil (SMC) magnet fabricated at CERN. The FBG sensitivity to both temperature and strain required the development of a solution able to separate mechanical and temperature effects. This work presents for the first time a feasibility study devoted to the implementation of an embedded FBG sensor for the measurement of the "true" temperature in the impregnated Nb3Sn coil during the fabrication process. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentatio...

  3. Numerical analysis of ultrafast physical random number generator using dual-channel optical chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsonbaty, Amr; Hegazy, Salem F.; Obayya, Salah S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Fast physical random number generators (PRNGs) are essential elements in the development of many modern applications. We numerically demonstrate an extraction scheme to establish an ultrafast PRNG using dual-channel optical-chaos source. Simultaneous suppression of time-delay signature in all observables of the output is verified using autocorrelation-function method. The proposed technique compares the level of the chaotic signal at time t with M levels of its delayed version. The comparators [1-bit analog-to-digital converters (ADCs)] are triggered using a clock subject to an incremental delay. All the delays of the chaotic signal before the ADCs and the relative delays of the clock are mutually incommensurable. The outputs of the ADCs are then combined using parity-check logic to produce physically true random numbers. The randomness quality of the generated random bits is evaluated by the statistical tests of National Institute of Standards and Technology Special Publication 800-22. The results verify that all tests are passed from M=1 to M=39 at sampling rate up to 34.5 GHz, which indicates that the maximum generation rate of random bits is 2.691 Tb/s without employing any preprocessing techniques. This rate, to the best of our knowledge, is higher than any previously reported PRNG.

  4. Group Versus Individual Physical Therapy for Veterans With Knee Osteoarthritis: Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Bongiorni, Dennis; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Datta, Santanu K; Edelman, David; Hall, Katherine S; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Oddone, Eugene Z; Hoenig, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Efficient approaches are needed for delivering nonpharmacological interventions for management of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This trial compared group-based versus individual physical therapy interventions for management of knee OA. Three hundred twenty patients with knee OA at the VA Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, (mean age=60 years, 88% male, 58% nonwhite) were randomly assigned to receive either the group intervention (group physical therapy; six 1-hour sessions, typically 8 participants per group) or the individual intervention (individual physical therapy; two 1-hour sessions). Both programs included instruction in home exercise, joint protection techniques, and individual physical therapist evaluation. The primary outcome measure was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; range=0-96, higher scores indicate worse symptoms), measured at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. The secondary outcome measure was the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range=0-12, higher scores indicate better performance), measured at baseline and 12 weeks. Linear mixed models assessed the difference in WOMAC scores between arms. At 12 weeks, WOMAC scores were 2.7 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% confidence interval [CI]=-5.9, 0.5; P=.10), indicating no between-group difference. At 24 weeks, WOMAC scores were 1.3 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% CI=-4.6, 2.0; P=.44), indicating no significant between-group difference. At 12 weeks, SPPB scores were 0.1 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% CI=-0.5, 0.2; P=.53), indicating no difference between groups. This study was conducted in one VA medical center. Outcome assessors were blinded, but participants and physical therapists were not blinded. Group physical therapy was not more effective

  5. Testing a workplace physical activity intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Cath

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased physical activity levels benefit both an individuals' health and productivity at work. The purpose of the current study was to explore the impact and cost-effectiveness of a workplace physical activity intervention designed to increase physical activity levels. Methods A total of 1260 participants from 44 UK worksites (based within 5 organizations were recruited to a cluster randomized controlled trial with worksites randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition. Measurement of physical activity and other variables occurred at baseline, and at 0 months, 3 months and 9 months post-intervention. Health outcomes were measured during a 30 minute health check conducted in worksites at baseline and 9 months post intervention. The intervention consisted of a 3 month tool-kit of activities targeting components of the Theory of Planned Behavior, delivered in-house by nominated facilitators. Self-reported physical activity (measured using the IPAQ short-form and health outcomes were assessed. Results and discussion Multilevel modelling found no significant effect of the intervention on MET minutes of activity (from the IPAQ at any of the follow-up time points controlling for baseline activity. However, the intervention did significantly reduce systolic blood pressure (B = -1.79 mm/Hg and resting heart rate (B = -2.08 beats and significantly increased body mass index (B = .18 units compared to control. The intervention was found not to be cost-effective, however the substantial variability round this estimate suggested that further research is warranted. Conclusions The current study found mixed support for this worksite physical activity intervention. The paper discusses some of the tensions involved in conducting rigorous evaluations of large-scale randomized controlled trials in real-world settings. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08807396

  6. The effect of worksite physical activity intervention on physical capacity, health, and productivity: A 1-year randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens T; Blangsted, Anne K.; Andersen, Lars L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of two contrasting physical activity worksite interventions versus a reference intervention (REF) on various health outcomes. METHODS: A 1-year randomized controlled trial was conducted with specific resistance training (SRT), all-round physical exercise (APE...... symptoms, in combination with minor increases in physical capacity....

  7. Physical states in the canonical tensor model from the perspective of random tensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Narain, Gaurav; Sato, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    Tensor models, generalization of matrix models, are studied aiming for quantum gravity in dimensions larger than two. Among them, the canonical tensor model is formulated as a totally constrained system with first-class constraints, the algebra of which resembles the Dirac algebra of general relativity. When quantized, the physical states are defined to be vanished by the quantized constraints. In explicit representations, the constraint equations are a set of partial differential equations for physical wave-functions, which do not seem straightforward to solve due to their non-linear character. In this paper, after providing some explicit solutions for N = 2,3, we show that certain scale-free integration of partition functions of statistical systems on random networks, or random tensor networks more generally, provides a series of solutions for general N. Then, by generalizing this form, we also obtain various solutions for general N. Moreover, we show that the solutions for the cases with a cosmological con...

  8. Superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuki; Kobayashi, Shingo; Tanaka, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study intrinsic superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals. Dirac semimetals host bulk Dirac points, which are formed by doubly degenerate bands, so the Hamiltonian is described by a 4 ×4 matrix and six types of k -independent pair potentials are allowed by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. We show that the unique spin-orbit coupling leads to characteristic superconducting gap structures and d vectors on the Fermi surface and the electron-electron interaction between intra and interorbitals gives a novel phase diagram of superconductivity. It is found that when the interorbital attraction is dominant, an unconventional superconducting state with point nodes appears. To verify the experimental signature of possible superconducting states, we calculate the temperature dependence of bulk physical properties such as electronic specific heat and spin susceptibility and surface state. In the unconventional superconducting phase, either dispersive or flat Andreev bound states appear between point nodes, which leads to double peaks or a single peak in the surface density of states, respectively. As a result, possible superconducting states can be distinguished by combining bulk and surface measurements.

  9. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  10. Superconducting doped topological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Satoshi, E-mail: sasaki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mizushima, Takeshi, E-mail: mizushima@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Studies on both normal- and SC-state properties of doped topological materials. • Odd-parity pairing systems with the time-reversal-invariance. • Robust superconductivity in the presence of nonmagnetic impurity scattering. • We propose experiments to identify the existence of Majorana fermions in these SCs. - Abstract: Recently, the search for Majorana fermions (MFs) has become one of the most important and exciting issues in condensed matter physics since such an exotic quasiparticle is expected to potentially give rise to unprecedented quantum phenomena whose functional properties will be used to develop future quantum technology. Theoretically, the MFs may reside in various types of topological superconductor materials that is characterized by the topologically protected gapless surface state which are essentially an Andreev bound state. Superconducting doped topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators are promising candidates to harbor the MFs. In this review, we discuss recent progress and understanding on the research of MFs based on time-reversal-invariant superconducting topological materials to deepen our understanding and have a better outlook on both the search for and realization of MFs in these systems. We also discuss some advantages of these bulk systems to realize MFs including remarkable superconducting robustness against nonmagnetic impurities.

  11. Randomized Multicenter Feasibility Trial of Myofascial Physical Therapy for Treatment of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Mary P; Anderson, Rodney U; Potts, Jeannette; Payne, Christopher K; Peters, Kenneth M; Clemens, J Quentin; Kotarinos, Rhonda; Fraser, Laura; Cosby, Annamarie; Fortman, Carole; Neville, Cynthia; Badillo, Suzanne; Odabachian, Lisa; Sanfield, Anna; O’Dougherty, Betsy; Halle-Podell, Rick; Cen, Liyi; Chuai, Shannon; Landis, J Richard; Kusek, John W; Nyberg, Leroy M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial designed to compare two methods of manual therapy (myofascial physical therapy (MPT) and global therapeutic massage (GTM)) among patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes. Materials and Methods Our goal was to recruit 48 subjects with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome or interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome at six clinical centers. Eligible patients were randomized to either MPT or GTM and were scheduled to receive up to 10 weekly treatments, each 1 hour in duration. Criteria to assess feasibility included adherence of therapists to prescribed therapeutic protocol as determined by records of treatment, adverse events which occurred during study treatment, and rate of response to therapy as assessed by the Patient Global Response Assessment (GRA). Primary outcome analysis compared response rates between treatment arms using Mantel-Haenszel methods. Results Twenty-three (49%) men and 24 (51%) women were randomized over a six month period. Twenty-four (51%) patients were randomized to GTM, 23 (49%) to MPT; 44 (94%) patients completed the study. Therapist adherence to the treatment protocols was excellent. The GRA response rate of 57% in the MPT group was significantly higher than the rate of 21% in the GTM treatment group (p=0.03). Conclusions The goals to judge feasibility of conducting a full-scale trial of physical therapy methods were met. The preliminary findings of a beneficial effect of MPT warrants further study. PMID:19535099

  12. Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity injury prevention program: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, Dorine C M; Verhagen, Evert A L M; Chinapaw, Mai J M; Knol, Dirk L; van Mechelen, Willem

    2010-02-01

    To study the effects of a school-based injury prevention program on physical activity injury incidence and severity. Cluster randomized controlled trial performed from January 1, 2006, through July 31, 2007. Forty Dutch primary schools. A total of 2210 children (aged 10-12 years). Schools were randomized to receive either the regular curriculum or an intervention program that targeted physical activity injuries. Incidence and severity of physical activity injuries per 1000 hours of physical activity participation. A total of 100 injuries in the intervention group and 104 injuries in the control group were registered. Nonresponse at baseline or follow-up was minimal (8.7%). The Cox regression analyses adjusted for clustering showed a small nonsignificant intervention effect on total (HR, 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-1.59), sports club (0.69; 0.28-1.68), and leisure time injuries (0.75; 0.36-1.55). However, physical activity appeared to be an effect modifier. In those who were less physically active, the intervention had a larger effect. The intervention reduced the total and leisure time injury incidence (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.21-1.06; and 0.43; 0.16-1.14; respectively). Sports club injury incidence was significantly reduced (HR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.07-0.75). We found a substantial and relevant reduction in physical activity injuries, especially in children in the low active group, because of the intervention. This school-based injury prevention program is promising, but future large-scale research is needed.

  13. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully.

  14. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  15. Short-term effects of an educational intervention on physical restraint use: a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulpers Math JM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical restraints are still frequently used in nursing home residents despite growing evidence for the ineffectiveness and negative consequences of these methods. Therefore, reduction in the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents is very important. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of an educational intervention on the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents. Methods A cluster randomized trial was applied to 5 psycho-geriatric nursing home wards (n = 167 residents with dementia. The wards were assigned at random to either educational intervention (3 wards or control status (2 wards. The restraint status was observed and residents' characteristics, such as cognitive status, were determined by using the Minimum Data Set (MDS at baseline and 1 month after intervention. Results Restraint use did not change significantly over time in the experimental group (55%–56%, compared to a significant increased use (P Conclusion An educational programme for nurses combined with consultation with a nurse specialist did not decrease the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents in the short term. However, the residents in the control group experienced more restraint use during the study period compared to the residents in the experimental group. Whether the intervention will reduce restraint use in the long term could not be inferred from these results. Further research is necessary to gain insight into the long-term effects of this educational intervention.

  16. Promotion of Physical Activity Among High-School Girls: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Russell R.; Ward, Dianne S.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Felton, Gwen; Dishman, Rod K.; Dowda, Marsha

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. Many adolescent girls fail to meet national guidelines for physical activity, and the prevalence of obesity is increasing among this group. Our study examined the effects of a comprehensive school-based intervention on physical activity among high-school girls. Methods. A group-randomized controlled field trial was conducted at 24 high schools. A school-based sample of 2744 girls (48.7% African American, 46.7% White) participated in a measurement protocol when they were in eighth and then ninth grade. A comprehensive physical activity intervention was designed to change the instructional program and the school environment to increase support for physical activity among girls. Results. At follow-up, 45% of girls in the intervention schools and 36% of girls in the control schools reported vigorous physical activity during an average of 1 or more 30-minute time blocks per day over a 3-day period. Conclusions. A comprehensive school-based intervention can increase regular participation in vigorous physical activity among high-school girls. PMID:16118370

  17. ASC 84: applied superconductivity conference. Final program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations covering: superconducting device fabrication; applications of rf superconductivity; conductor stability and losses; detectors and signal processing; fusion magnets; A15 and Nb-Ti conductors; stability, losses, and various conductors; SQUID applications; new applications of superconductivity; advanced conductor materials; high energy physics applications of superconductivity; electronic materials and characterization; general superconducting electronics; ac machinery and new applications; digital devices; fusion and other large scale applications; in-situ and powder process conductors; ac applications; synthesis, properties, and characterization of conductors; superconducting microelectronics. (LEW)

  18. Contribution of Dry Needling to Individualized Physical Therapy Treatment of Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palomares, Sara; Oliván-Blázquez, Bárbara; Pérez-Palomares, Ana; Gaspar-Calvo, Elena; Pérez-Benito, Marina; López-Lapeña, Elena; de la Torre-Beldarraín, Maria Luisa; Magallón-Botaya, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Multicenter, parallel randomized clinical trial. Background Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are implicated in shoulder pain and functional limitations. An intervention intended to treat MTrPs is dry needling. Objectives To investigate the effectiveness of dry needling in addition to evidence-based personalized physical therapy treatment in the treatment of shoulder pain. Methods One hundred twenty patients with nonspecific shoulder pain were randomly allocated into 2 parallel groups: (1) personalized, evidencebased physical therapy treatment; and (2) trigger point dry needling in addition to personalized, evidence-based physical therapy treatment. Patients were assessed at baseline, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was pain assessed by a visual analog scale at 3 months, and secondary variables were joint range-of-motion limitations, Constant-Murley score for pain and function, and number of active MTrPs. Clinical efficacy was assessed using intention-to-treat analysis. Results Of the 120 enrolled patients, 63 were randomly assigned to the control group and 57 to the intervention group. There were no significant differences in outcome between the 2 treatment groups. Both groups showed improvement over time. Conclusion Dry needling did not offer benefits in addition to personalized, evidencebased physical therapy treatment for patients with nonspecific shoulder pain. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Registered February 11, 2009 at www.isrctn.com (ISRCTN30907460). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(1):11-20. Epub 9 Dec 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6698.

  19. Research progresses shed light on superconductivity mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The spring of 2008 saw substantial breakthroughs in superconductivity research. Four groups of physicists, one after another, achieved remarkable progresses in the study of iron-based materials after the breakthrough made by H. Hosono's group in Japan, providing renewed insights into the fundamental mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC), a perplexing enigma on the frontier of condensed matter physics.

  20. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress.

  1. Physics of electrons in solids: Volume 1 - Solid state physics, band structure, superconductivity and magnetism; Volume 2 - Solid state physics, exercises and problems with keys; Physique des electrons dans les solides: Tome 1, structure de bandes, supraconductivite et magnetisme. Physique des electrons dans les solides: Tome 2, recueil d'exercices et de problemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloul, H. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique des Solides

    2007-07-01

    The diversity of the macroscopic properties of solids like magnetism or superconductivity stems from the quantum states of electrons. Today only the experimental approach reveals the spectacular effects of these properties but basic concepts of quantum mechanics and of statistical physics are necessary to give an account of the link between the microscopic scale and the macroscopic world. The simple approach involving independent electrons gives a description of the electronic structure as energy bands that explains the existence of metals, isolators and semi-conductors. Magnetism and superconductivity can be understood only by taking into account the existence of correlations between the electrons in the solids. The first tome presents the formalism of quantum mechanics applied to the system formed by nuclei and the electrons in solids. Different issues like electronic structures in solids, electron transport, the microscopic origin of superconductivity, the magnetism of isolators, the dynamics of spin and magnetic resonance are explained. The second volume can be divided into 2 parts, the first part giving the keys of the questions arisen in the first volume while the second part propose a series of problems (with keys). These problems illustrate the topics presented in the first volume and deal with issues like optical properties of solids, electron bands, Peierls transition, phonons in solids, isolator-metal transition, cyclotron resonance, superconductivity of NbSe{sub 2}, electronic properties of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, or the magnetism of thin films. (A.C.)

  2. Superconductivity an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiner, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this proven text has been developed further in both scope and scale to reflect the potential for superconductivity in power engineering to increase efficiency in electricity transmission or engines. The landmark reference remains a comprehensive introduction to the field, covering every aspect from fundamentals to applications, and presenting the latest developments in organic superconductors, superconducting interfaces, quantum coherence, and applications in medicine and industry. Due to its precise language and numerous explanatory illustrations, it is suitable as an introductory textbook, with the level rising smoothly from chapter to chapter, such that readers can build on their newly acquired knowledge. The authors cover basic properties of superconductors and discuss stability and different material groups with reference to the latest and most promising applications, devoting the last third of the book to applications in power engineering, medicine, and low temperature physics. An e...

  3. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  4. Distinct Brain and Behavioral Benefits from Cognitive versus Physical Training: A Randomized Trial in Aging Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bond Chapman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Insidious declines in normal aging are well established. Emerging evidence suggests that non-pharmacological interventions, specifically cognitive and physical training, may counter diminishing age-related cognitive and brain functions. This randomized trial compared effects of two training protocols: cognitive training (CT versus physical training (PT on cognition and brain function in adults 56–75 years. Sedentary participants (N=36 were randomized to either CT or PT group for 3 hours/week over 12 weeks. They were assessed at baseline, mid-training and post-training using neurocognitive, MRI and physiological measures. The CT group improved on executive function whereas PT group’s memory was enhanced. Uniquely deploying cerebral blood flow (CBF and cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR MRI, the CT cohort showed increased CBF within the prefrontal and middle/posterior cingulate cortex without change to CVR compared to PT group. Improvements in complex abstraction were positively associated with increased resting CBF in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Exercisers with higher CBF in hippocampi bilaterally showed better immediate memory. The preliminary evidence indicates that increased cognitive and physical activity improves brain health in distinct ways. Reasoning training enhanced frontal networks shown to be integral to top-down cognitive control and brain resilience. Evidence of increased resting CBF without changes to CVR implicates increased neural health rather than improved vascular response. Exercise did not improve cerebrovascular response, although CBF increased in hippocampi of those with memory gains. Distinct benefits incentivize testing effectiveness of combined protocols to strengthen brain health.

  5. Enhancing physical activity and reducing obesity through smartcare and financial incentives: A pilot randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Jae Moon; Shin, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Hyuktae; Min, Hye Yeon; Joh, Hee-Kyung; Chung, Won Joo; Park, Jin Ho; Jung, Kee-Taig; Cho, BeLong

    2017-02-01

    A pilot randomized trial assessed the feasibility and effectiveness of an intervention combining Smartcare (activity tracker with a smartphone application) and financial incentives. A three-arm, open-label randomized controlled trial design involving traditional education, Smartcare, and Smartcare with financial incentives was involved in this study. The latter group received financial incentives depending on the achievement of daily physical activity goals (process incentive) and weight loss targets (outcome incentive). Male university students (N = 105) with body mass index of ≥27 were enrolled. The average weight loss in the traditional education, Smartcare, and Smartcare with financial incentives groups was -0.4, -1.1, and -3.1 kg, respectively, with significantly greater weight loss in the third group (both Ps incentives groups (odds ratio for the Smartcare with financial incentive vs. Smartcare = 7.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.45-36.47). Levels of physical activity were significantly higher in this group. The addition of financial incentives to Smartcare was effective in increasing physical activity and reducing obesity. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  6. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  7. Feasibility, safety, and compliance in a randomized controlled trial of physical therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Jennifer L; Martin, Clarissa; Huxham, Frances E; Menz, Hylton B; Danoudis, Mary; Murphy, Anna T; Watts, Jennifer J; Iansek, Robert; Morris, Meg E

    2012-01-01

    Both efficacy and clinical feasibility deserve consideration in translation of research outcomes. This study evaluated the feasibility of rehabilitation programs within the context of a large randomized controlled trial of physical therapy. Ambulant participants with Parkinson's disease (PD) (n = 210) were randomized into three groups: (1) progressive strength training (PST); (2) movement strategy training (MST); or (3) control ("life skills"). PST and MST included fall prevention education. Feasibility was evaluated in terms of safety, retention, adherence, and compliance measures. Time to first fall during the intervention phase did not differ across groups, and adverse effects were minimal. Retention was high; only eight participants withdrew during or after the intervention phase. Strong adherence (attendance >80%) did not differ between groups (P = .435). Compliance in the therapy groups was high. All three programs proved feasible, suggesting they may be safely implemented for people with PD in community-based clinical practice.

  8. Feasibility, Safety, and Compliance in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Physical Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. McGinley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both efficacy and clinical feasibility deserve consideration in translation of research outcomes. This study evaluated the feasibility of rehabilitation programs within the context of a large randomized controlled trial of physical therapy. Ambulant participants with Parkinson's disease (PD (n=210 were randomized into three groups: (1 progressive strength training (PST; (2 movement strategy training (MST; or (3 control (“life skills”. PST and MST included fall prevention education. Feasibility was evaluated in terms of safety, retention, adherence, and compliance measures. Time to first fall during the intervention phase did not differ across groups, and adverse effects were minimal. Retention was high; only eight participants withdrew during or after the intervention phase. Strong adherence (attendance >80% did not differ between groups (P=.435. Compliance in the therapy groups was high. All three programs proved feasible, suggesting they may be safely implemented for people with PD in community-based clinical practice.

  9. Physically transient photonics: random versus distributed feedback lasing based on nanoimprinted DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camposeo, Andrea; Del Carro, Pompilio; Persano, Luana; Cyprych, Konrad; Szukalski, Adam; Sznitko, Lech; Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-10-28

    Room-temperature nanoimprinted, DNA-based distributed feedback (DFB) laser operation at 605 nm is reported. The laser is made of a pure DNA host matrix doped with gain dyes. At high excitation densities, the emission of the untextured dye-doped DNA films is characterized by a broad emission peak with an overall line width of 12 nm and superimposed narrow peaks, characteristic of random lasing. Moreover, direct patterning of the DNA films is demonstrated with a resolution down to 100 nm, enabling the realization of both surface-emitting and edge-emitting DFB lasers with a typical line width of <0.3 nm. The resulting emission is polarized, with a ratio between the TE- and TM-polarized intensities exceeding 30. In addition, the nanopatterned devices dissolve in water within less than 2 min. These results demonstrate the possibility of realizing various physically transient nanophotonics and laser architectures, including random lasing and nanoimprinted devices, based on natural biopolymers.

  10. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  11. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  12. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  13. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorita, T., E-mail: yorita@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  14. Effects of a Physical Education-Based Programme on Health-Related Physical Fitness and Its Maintenance in High School Students: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Montoro-Escaño, Jorge; Merino-Marban, Rafael; Viciana, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a physical education-based development and maintenance programme on objective and perceived health-related physical fitness in high school students. A sample of 111 students aged 12-14 years old from six classes were cluster-randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 54) or a control…

  15. Effects of a Physical Education-Based Programme on Health-Related Physical Fitness and Its Maintenance in High School Students: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Montoro-Escaño, Jorge; Merino-Marban, Rafael; Viciana, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a physical education-based development and maintenance programme on objective and perceived health-related physical fitness in high school students. A sample of 111 students aged 12-14 years old from six classes were cluster-randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 54) or a control…

  16. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Koes, B.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  17. Psychosocial effects of workplace physical exercise among workers with chronic pain: Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars L; Persson, Roger; Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil

    2017-01-01

    While workplace physical exercise can help manage musculoskeletal disorders, less is known about psychosocial effects of such interventions. This aim of this study was to investigate the effect of workplace physical exercise on psychosocial factors among workers with chronic musculoskeletal pain.The trial design was a 2-armed parallel-group randomized controlled trial with allocation concealment. A total of 66 slaughterhouse workers (51 men and 15 women, mean age 45 years [standard deviation (SD) 10]) with upper limb chronic musculoskeletal pain were randomly allocated to group-based strength training (physical exercise group) or individual ergonomic training and education (reference group) for 10 weeks. Social climate was assessed with the General Nordic Questionnaire for Psychological and Social Factors at Work, and vitality and mental health were assessed with the 36-item Short Form Health Survey. All scales were converted to 0 to 100 (higher scores are better). Between-group differences from baseline to follow-up were determined using linear mixed models adjusted for workplace, age, gender, and baseline values of the outcome.Mean baseline scores of social climate, mental health, and vitality were 52.2 (SD 14.9), 79.5 (SD 13.7), and 53.9 (SD 19.7), respectively. Complete baseline and follow-up data were obtained from 30 and 31 from the physical exercise and reference groups, respectively. The between-group differences from baseline to follow-up between physical exercise and reference were 7.6 (95% CI 0.3 to 14.9), -2.3 (95% CI -10.3 to 5.8), and 10.1 (95% CI 0.6 to 19.5) for social climate, mental health, and vitality, respectively. For social climate and vitality, this corresponded to moderate effect sizes (Cohen d = 0.51 for both) in favor of physical exercise. There were no reported adverse events.In conclusion, workplace physical exercise performed together with colleagues improves social climate and vitality among workers with chronic musculoskeletal

  18. Short-term effects of an educational intervention on physical restraint use: a cluster randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizing, Anna R; Hamers, Jan PH; Gulpers, Math JM; Berger, Martijn PF

    2006-01-01

    Background Physical restraints are still frequently used in nursing home residents despite growing evidence for the ineffectiveness and negative consequences of these methods. Therefore, reduction in the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents is very important. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of an educational intervention on the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents. Methods A cluster randomized trial was applied to 5 psycho-geriatric nursing home wards (n = 167 residents with dementia). The wards were assigned at random to either educational intervention (3 wards) or control status (2 wards). The restraint status was observed and residents' characteristics, such as cognitive status, were determined by using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) at baseline and 1 month after intervention. Results Restraint use did not change significantly over time in the experimental group (55%–56%), compared to a significant increased use (P < 0.05) in the control group (56%–70%). The mean restraint intensity and mean multiple restraint use in residents increased in the control group but no changes were shown in the experimental group. Logistic regression analysis showed that residents in the control group were more likely to experience increased restraint use than residents in the experimental group. Conclusion An educational programme for nurses combined with consultation with a nurse specialist did not decrease the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents in the short term. However, the residents in the control group experienced more restraint use during the study period compared to the residents in the experimental group. Whether the intervention will reduce restraint use in the long term could not be inferred from these results. Further research is necessary to gain insight into the long-term effects of this educational intervention. PMID:17067376

  19. Engineering Online and In-Person Social Networks for Physical Activity: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovniak, Liza S; Kong, Lan; Hovell, Melbourne F; Ding, Ding; Sallis, James F; Ray, Chester A; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Matthews, Stephen A; Kiser, Elizabeth; Chinchilli, Vernon M; George, Daniel R; Sciamanna, Christopher N

    2016-12-01

    Social networks can influence physical activity, but little is known about how best to engineer online and in-person social networks to increase activity. The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial based on the Social Networks for Activity Promotion model to assess the incremental contributions of different procedures for building social networks on objectively measured outcomes. Physically inactive adults (n = 308, age, 50.3 (SD = 8.3) years, 38.3 % male, 83.4 % overweight/obese) were randomized to one of three groups. The Promotion group evaluated the effects of weekly emailed tips emphasizing social network interactions for walking (e.g., encouragement, informational support); the Activity group evaluated the incremental effect of adding an evidence-based online fitness walking intervention to the weekly tips; and the Social Networks group evaluated the additional incremental effect of providing access to an online networking site for walking as well as prompting walking/activity across diverse settings. The primary outcome was mean change in accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), assessed at 3 and 9 months from baseline. Participants increased their MVPA by 21.0 min/week, 95 % CI [5.9, 36.1], p = .005, at 3 months, and this change was sustained at 9 months, with no between-group differences. Although the structure of procedures for targeting social networks varied across intervention groups, the functional effect of these procedures on physical activity was similar. Future research should evaluate if more powerful reinforcers improve the effects of social network interventions. The trial was registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01142804).

  20. Effect of pediatric physical therapy on deformational plagiocephaly in children with positional preference: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vlimmeren, van, MFJ Ria; Graaf, de, J.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.; L'Hoir, Monique P.; Helders, Paul J. M.; Raoul H.H. Engelbert

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of pediatric physical therapy on positional preference and deformational plagiocephaly. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Bernhoven Hospital, Veghel, the Netherlands. Participants Of 380 infants referred to the examiners at age 7 weeks, 68 (17.9%) met criteria for positional preference, and 65 (17.1%) were enrolled and followed up at ages 6 and 12 months. Intervention Infants with positional preference were randomly assigned to receive either physical t...

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Tai Chi Versus Physical Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; Schmid, Christopher H; Iversen, Maura D; Harvey, William F; Fielding, Roger A; Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn; Wong, John B; Reid, Kieran F; Rones, Ramel; McAlindon, Timothy

    2016-07-19

    Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis. To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Randomized, 52-week, single-blind comparative effectiveness trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01258985). An urban tertiary care academic hospital. 204 participants with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (mean age, 60 years; 70% women; 53% white). Tai Chi (2 times per week for 12 weeks) or standard physical therapy (2 times per week for 6 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of monitored home exercise). The primary outcome was Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included physical function, depression, medication use, and quality of life. At 12 weeks, the WOMAC score was substantially reduced in both groups (Tai Chi, 167 points [95% CI, 145 to 190 points]; physical therapy, 143 points [CI, 119 to 167 points]). The between-group difference was not significant (24 points [CI, -10 to 58 points]). Both groups also showed similar clinically significant improvement in most secondary outcomes, and the benefits were maintained up to 52 weeks. Of note, the Tai Chi group had significantly greater improvements in depression and the physical component of quality of life. The benefit of Tai Chi was consistent across instructors. No serious adverse events occurred. Patients were aware of their treatment group assignment, and the generalizability of the findings to other settings remains undetermined. Tai Chi produced beneficial effects similar to those of a standard course of physical therapy in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health of the National Institutes of Health.

  2. Physical activity and nutrition program for seniors (PANS: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Andy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with reduced levels of physical activity, older Australian's mean energy consumption has increased. Now over 60% of older Australians are considered overweight or obese. This study aims to confirm if a low-cost, accessible physical activity and nutrition program can improve levels of physical activity and diet of insufficiently active 60-70 year-olds. Methods/Design This 12-month home-based randomised controlled trial (RCT will consist of a nutrition and physical activity intervention for insufficiently active people aged 60 to 70 years from low to medium socio-economic areas. Six-hundred participants will be recruited from the Australian Federal Electoral Role and randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 300 and control (n = 300 groups. The study is based on the Social Cognitive Theory and Precede-Proceed Model, incorporating voluntary cooperation and self-efficacy. The intervention includes a specially designed booklet that provides participants with information and encourages dietary and physical activity goal setting. The booklet will be supported by an exercise chart, calendar, bi-monthly newsletters, resistance bands and pedometers, along with phone and email contact. Data will be collected over three time points: pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention and 6-months post-study. Discussion This trial will provide valuable information for community-based strategies to improve older adults' physical activity and dietary intake. The project will provide guidelines for appropriate sample recruitment, and the development, implementation and evaluation of a minimal intervention program, as well as information on minimising barriers to participation in similar programs. Trial Registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000735257

  3. Long-term effects of daily postprandial physical activity on blood glucose: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Håvard; Grindaker, Eirik; Rønnestad, Bent Ronny; Holmboe-Ottesen, Gerd; Høstmark, Arne Torbjørn

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that a bout of moderate or light postprandial physical activity effectively blunts the postprandial increase in blood glucose. The objective of this study was to test whether regular light postprandial physical activity can improve glycemia in persons with hyperglycemia or with a high risk of hyperglycemia. We randomized 56 participants to an intervention or a control group. They were diagnosed as hyperglycemic, not using antidiabetics, or were categorized as high-risk individuals for type 2 diabetes. The intervention group was instructed to undertake a minimum 30 min of daily light physical activity, starting a maximum of 30 min after a meal in addition to their usual physical activity for 12 weeks. The control group maintained their usual lifestyle. Blood samples were taken pre- and post-test. Forty participants completed the study and are included in the results. The self-reported increase in daily physical activity from before to within the study period was higher in the intervention group compared with control (41 ± 25 vs. 2 ± 16 min, p < 0.001). Activity diaries and accelerometer recordings supported this observation. The activity in the intervention group started earlier after the last meal compared with control (30 ± 13 vs. 100 ± 57 min, p = 0.001). There were no within- or between-group differences in any glycemic variable from pre- to post-test. In conclusion, the present study does not seem to support the notion that regular light postprandial physical activity improves blood glucose in the long term in persons with hyperglycemia or with high risk of hyperglycemia.

  4. Physical states in the canonical tensor model from the perspective of random tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Gaurav; Sasakura, Naoki; Sato, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    Tensor models, generalization of matrix models, are studied aiming for quantum gravity in dimensions larger than two. Among them, the canonical tensor model is formulated as a totally constrained system with first-class constraints, the algebra of which resembles the Dirac algebra of general relativity. When quantized, the physical states are defined to be vanished by the quantized constraints. In explicit representations, the constraint equations are a set of partial differential equations for the physical wave-functions, which do not seem straightforward to be solved due to their non-linear character. In this paper, after providing some explicit solutions for N = 2 , 3, we show that certain scale-free integration of partition functions of statistical systems on random networks (or random tensor networks more generally) provides a series of solutions for general N. Then, by generalizing this form, we also obtain various solutions for general N. Moreover, we show that the solutions for the cases with a cosmological constant can be obtained from those with no cosmological constant for increased N. This would imply the interesting possibility that a cosmological constant can always be absorbed into the dynamics and is not an input parameter in the canonical tensor model. We also observe the possibility of symmetry enhancement in N = 3, and comment on an extension of Airy function related to the solutions.

  5. Final Report - Development of a Multi-Spoke Superconducting Cavity for Nuclear Physics, Light Sources, and Driven Systems Applications (ODU Contribution)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, Jean [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This report summarizes the work done by Old Dominion University, in collaboration with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility toward the development of high-velocity superconducting spoke cavities.

  6. Discovering superconductivity an investigative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ireson, Gren

    2012-01-01

    The highly-illustrated text will serve as excellent introduction for students, with and without a physics background, to superconductivity. With a strong practical, experimental emphasis, it will provide readers with an overview of the topic preparing them for more advanced texts used in more advanced undergraduate and post-graduate courses.

  7. Superconductivity resulting from antiferromagnetic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Shi-Ping (Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University (CN))

    1989-09-01

    When the dopping is low enough, the holes obey Bose statistics, Bose-Einstein condensation of these holes may lead to occurance of superconductivity. In this framework, we have calculated some physical quantities, the results are in qualitative agreement with experiments.

  8. Supplemental vitamin D and physical performance in COPD: a pilot randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjerk SM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sonja M Bjerk,1 Bradley D Edgington,1 Thomas S Rector,1,2 Ken M Kunisaki1,21University of Minnesota, 2Minneapolis VA Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN, USABackground: Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D levels, commonly observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, are associated with muscle weakness in elderly populations, and vitamin D supplementation appears to improve muscle strength and decrease falls in older individuals. We tested the effect of vitamin D supplementation on physical performance in patients with COPD.Methods: Patients were randomized to daily cholecalciferol (2000 IU or placebo for 6 weeks. The primary outcome was the 6-week change in Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB score. Secondary outcomes included changes in the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ score, and serum 25(OHD.Results: Thirty-six participants (mean age 68 years, all Caucasian males, mean forced expiratory volume in one second 33% of predicted completed the study. Despite an increase in 25(OHD levels in the intervention arm to a mean of 32.6 ng/mL (versus 22.1 ng/mL in the placebo arm, there was no difference in improvements in either SPPB scores (0.3 point difference; 95% confidence interval -0.8 to 1.5; P = 0.56 or SGRQ scores (2.3 point difference; 95% confidence interval -2.3 to 6.9; P = 0.32.Conclusion: Among patients with severe COPD, 2000 IU of daily vitamin D for 6 weeks increased 25(OHD to a level widely considered as normal. However, compared with placebo, short-term vitamin D supplementation had no discernible effect on a simple measure of physical performance.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, randomized controlled trial, vitamin D, skeletal muscle strength

  9. Physical exercise for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haren, I.E.P.M.; Timmerman, H.; Potting, C.M.J.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Staal, J.B.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment-related burden for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may be relieved by physical exercises. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to summarize and analyze the evidence provided by randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on physical exercise int

  10. One-year evaluation of the effect of physical therapy for masticatory muscle pain : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craane, B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Stappaerts, K.; De Laat, A.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy is widely used to decrease pain and restore function in patients suffering from masticatory muscle pain. Controlled studies on its efficacy are scarce. This study evaluated the 1-year effect of a 6-week physical therapy programme in a single blind, randomized, controlled trial. Fift

  11. A Randomized Controlled Design Investigating the Effects of Classroom-Based Physical Activity on Children's Fluid Intelligence and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Alicia L.; Ahn, Soyeon; Erwin, Heather; Davis, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Existing literature shows promising effects of physical activity on children's cognitive outcomes. This study assessed via a randomized, controlled design whether additional curricular physical activity during the school day resulted in gains for children's fluid intelligence and standardized achievement outcomes. Participants were children…

  12. The cold wars a history of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Matricon, Jean

    1994-01-01

    Among the most peculiar of matter¡¦s behaviors is superconductivity„oelectric current without resistance. Since the 1986 discovery that superconductivity is possible at temperatures well above absolute zero, research into practical applications has flourished. The Cold Wars tells the history of superconductivity, providing perspective on the development of the field and its relationship with the rest of physics. Superconductivity offers an excellent example of the evolution of physics in the twentieth century: the science itself, its foundations, and its social context. The authors also introduce the reader to the fascinating scientific personalities, including 2003 Nobel Prize winners Alexei Alexeievich Abrikosov and Vitali Ginzburg, and political struggles behind this research.

  13. ZGS roots of superconductivity: People and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pewitt, E.G.

    1994-12-31

    The ZGS community made basic contributions to the applications of superconducting magnets to high energy physics as well as to other technological areas. ZGS personnel pioneered many significant applications until the time the ZGS was shutdown in 1979. After the shutdown, former ZGS personnel developed magnets for new applications in high energy physics, fusion, and industrial uses. The list of superconducting magnet accomplishments of ZGS personnel is impressive.

  14. Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC): a randomized controlled trial to promote physical activity and diminish overweight and obesity in elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Joseph E; Greene, Jerry L; Gibson, Cheryl A; Smith, Bryan K; Washburn, Richard A; Sullivan, Debra K; DuBose, Katrina; Mayo, Matthew S; Schmelzle, Kristin H; Ryan, Joseph J; Jacobsen, Dennis J; Williams, Shannon L

    2009-10-01

    Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC) was a three-year cluster randomized controlled trial to promote physical activity and diminish increases in overweight and obesity in elementary school children. Twenty-four elementary schools were cluster randomized to the Physical Activity Across the Curriculum intervention or served as control. All children in grades two and three were followed to grades four and five. Physical Activity Across the Curriculum promoted 90 min/wk of moderate to vigorous intensity physically active academic lessons delivered by classroom teachers. Body Mass Index was the primary outcome, daily Physical activity and academic achievement were secondary outcomes. The three-year change in Body Mass Index for Physical Activity Across the Curriculum was 2.0+/-1.9 and control 1.9+/-1.9, respectively (NS). However, change in Body Mass Index from baseline to 3 years was significantly influenced by exposure to Physical Activity Across the Curriculum. Schools with > or =75 min of Physical Activity Across the Curriculum/wk showed significantly less increase in Body Mass Index at 3 years compared to schools that had Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (1.8+/-1.8 vs. 2.4+/-2.0, p=0.02). Physical Activity Across the Curriculum schools had significantly greater changes in daily Physical activity and academic achievement scores. The Physical Activity Across the Curriculum approach may promote daily Physical activity and academic achievement in elementary school children. Additionally, 75 min of Physical Activity Across the Curriculum activities may attenuate increases in Body Mass Index.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  16. Introduction to superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rose-Innes, AC

    1978-01-01

    Introduction to Superconductivity differs from the first edition chiefly in Chapter 11, which has been almost completely rewritten to give a more physically-based picture of the effects arising from the long-range coherence of the electron-waves in superconductors and the operation of quantum interference devices. In this revised second edition, some further modifications have been made to the text and an extra chapter dealing with """"high-temperature"""" superconductors has been added. A vast amount of research has been carried out on these since their discovery in 1986 but the results, both

  17. Effect of Kaempferia parviflora Extract on Physical Fitness of Soccer Players: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Promthep, Kreeta; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn; Chatchawan, Uraiwan

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical fitness is a fundamental prerequisite for soccer players. Kaempferia parviflora is an herbal plant that has been used in some Asian athletes with the belief that it might prevent fatigue and improve physical fitness. This study aimed to determine the effects of Kaempferia parviflora on the physical fitness of soccer players. Material/Methods Sixty soccer players who routinely trained at a sports school participated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial and were random...

  18. Assessing causality in the association between child adiposity and physical activity levels: a Mendelian randomization analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Richmond

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional studies have shown that objectively measured physical activity is associated with childhood adiposity, and a strong inverse dose-response association with body mass index (BMI has been found. However, few studies have explored the extent to which this association reflects reverse causation. We aimed to determine whether childhood adiposity causally influences levels of physical activity using genetic variants reliably associated with adiposity to estimate causal effects.The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children collected data on objectively assessed activity levels of 4,296 children at age 11 y with recorded BMI and genotypic data. We used 32 established genetic correlates of BMI combined in a weighted allelic score as an instrumental variable for adiposity to estimate the causal effect of adiposity on activity. In observational analysis, a 3.3 kg/m² (one standard deviation higher BMI was associated with 22.3 (95% CI, 17.0, 27.6 movement counts/min less total physical activity (p = 1.6×10⁻¹⁶, 2.6 (2.1, 3.1 min/d less moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity (p = 3.7×10⁻²⁹, and 3.5 (1.5, 5.5 min/d more sedentary time (p = 5.0×10⁻⁴. In Mendelian randomization analyses, the same difference in BMI was associated with 32.4 (0.9, 63.9 movement counts/min less total physical activity (p = 0.04 (∼5.3% of the mean counts/minute, 2.8 (0.1, 5.5 min/d less moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity (p = 0.04, and 13.2 (1.3, 25.2 min/d more sedentary time (p = 0.03. There was no strong evidence for a difference between variable estimates from observational estimates. Similar results were obtained using fat mass index. Low power and poor instrumentation of activity limited causal analysis of the influence of physical activity on BMI.Our results suggest that increased adiposity causes a reduction in physical activity in children and support research into the targeting of BMI in efforts to

  19. A cluster-randomized controlled trial of strategies to increase adolescents’ physical activity and motivation during physical education lessons: the Motivating Active Learning in Physical Education (MALP trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenkranz Richard R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physical activity (PA levels of many children and adolescents in Australia are currently insufficient to promote health benefits. Physical education (PE programs aim to promote PA and reach nearly all school-aged children, but PA levels within PE lessons are often low. PE teachers may influence children’s motivation to be physically active in PE lessons, but little is known about teacher strategies that effectively motivate children to participate in PA, and few intervention studies have examined motivational strategies in PE. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three motivational strategies, each based on Self-Determination Theory (SDT, on PA levels, and their hypothesized antecedents, during year 8 PE lessons. Methods/design This study employed a cluster-randomized controlled trial design. Following a familiarization session, PA levels and hypothesized PA antecedents were measured during a baseline lesson and a post-intervention or control lesson. Teachers (n = 16 and their classes from five secondary schools in Sydney, Australia were randomly assigned into four blocks and instructed to provide one of four 20-min lesson teaching strategy conditions: (1 explaining the relevance of activities; (2 providing choice from PA options selected by the teacher; (3 providing equipment and free choice of activities; or (4 usual practice. The primary outcomes were lesson time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA, and motivation towards the lesson. Secondary outcomes were perceptions of teacher behavior, psychological needs satisfaction, and lesson time spent in sedentary behavior. PA and sedentary behavior were measured during baseline and post-intervention lessons with waist-mounted Actigraph GT3X accelerometers. Teacher behavior, psychological needs satisfaction, and motivation were assessed via questionnaires at the end of each lesson. Linear mixed-model analyses will be run on all outcomes, with students nested

  20. Designing quantum-information-processing superconducting qubit circuits that exhibit lasing and other atomic-physics-like phenomena on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting (SC) circuits can behave like atoms making transitions between a few energy levels. Such circuits can test quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales and be used to conduct atomic-physics experiments on a silicon chip. This talk overviews a few of our theoretical studies on SC circuits and quantum information processing (QIP) including: SC qubits for single photon generation and for lasing; controllable couplings among qubits; how to increase the coherence time of qubits using a capacitor in parallel to one of the qubit junctions; hybrid circuits involving both charge and flux qubits; testing Bell's inequality in SC circuits; generation of GHZ states; quantum tomography in SC circuits; preparation of macroscopic quantum superposition states of a cavity field via coupling to a SC qubit; generation of nonclassical photon states using a SC qubit in a microcavity; scalable quantum computing with SC qubits; and information processing with SC qubits in a microwave field. Controllable couplings between qubits can be achieved either directly or indirectly. This can be done with and without coupler circuits, and with and without data-buses like EM fields in cavities (e.g., we will describe both the variable-frequency magnetic flux approach and also a generalized double-resonance approach that we introduced). It is also possible to ``turn a quantum bug into a feature'' by using microscopic defects as qubits, and the macroscopic junction as a controller of it. We have also studied ways to implement radically different approaches to QIP by using ``cluster states'' in SC circuits. For a general overview of this field, see, J.Q. You and F. Nori, Phys. Today 58 (11), 42 (2005)

  1. The road to superconducting spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschrig, Matthias

    Energy efficient computing has become a major challenge, with the increasing importance of large data centres across the world, which already today have a power consumption comparable to that of Spain, with steeply increasing trend. Superconducting computing is progressively becoming an alternative for large-scale applications, with the costs for cooling being largely outweighed by the gain in energy efficiency. The combination of superconductivity and spintronics - ``superspintronics'' - has the potential and flexibility to develop into such a green technology. This young field is based on the observation that new phenomena emerge at interfaces between superconducting and other, competing, phases. The past 15 years have seen a series of pivotal predictions and experimental discoveries relating to the interplay between superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The building blocks of superspintronics are equal-spin Cooper pairs, which are generated at the interface between superconducting and a ferromagnetic materials in the presence of non-collinear magnetism. Such novel, spin-polarised Cooper pairs carry spin-supercurrents in ferromagnets and thus contribute to spin-transport and spin-control. Geometric Berry phases appear during the singlet-triplet conversion process in structures with non-coplanar magnetisation, enhancing functionality of devices, and non-locality introduced by superconducting order leads to long-range effects. With the successful generation and control of equal-spin Cooper pairs the hitherto notorious incompatibility of superconductivity and ferromagnetism has been not only overcome, but turned synergistic. I will discuss these developments and their extraordinary potential. I also will present open questions posed by recent experiments and point out implications for theory. This work is supported by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC Grant No. EP/J010618/1).

  2. Dust storm detection using random forests and physical-based approaches over the Middle East

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amir Hossein Souri; Sanaz Vajedian

    2015-07-01

    Dust storms are important phenomena over large regions of the arid and semi-arid areas of the Middle East. Due to the influences of dust aerosols on climate and human daily activities, dust detection plays a crucial role in environmental and climatic studies. Detection of dust storms is critical to accurately understand dust, their properties and distribution. Currently, remotely sensed data such as MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) with appropriate temporal and spectral resolutions have been widely used for this purpose. This paper investigates the capability of two physical-based methods, and random forests (RF) classifier, for the first time, to detect dust storms using MODIS imagery. Since the physical-based approaches are empirical, they suffer from certain drawbacks such as high variability of thresholds depending on the underlying surface. Therefore, classification-based approaches could be deployed as an alternative. In this paper, the most relevant bands are chosen based on the physical effects of the major classes, particularly dust, cloud and snow, on both emissive infrared and reflective bands. In order to verify the capability of the methods, OMAERUV AAOD (aerosol absorption optical depth) product from OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) sensor is exploited. In addition, some small regions are selected manually to be considered as ground truth for measuring the probability of false detection (POFD) and probability of missing detection (POMD). The dust class generated by RF is consistent qualitatively with the location and extent of dust observed in OMERAUV and MODIS true colour images. Quantitatively, the dust classes generated for eight dust outbreaks in the Middle East are found to be accurate from 7% and 6% of POFD and POMD respectively. Moreover, results demonstrate the sound capability of RF in classifying dust plumes over both water and land simultaneously. The performance of the physical-based approaches is found weaker than RF

  3. Itinerant Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karchev, Naoum

    2004-01-01

    Superconductivity has again become a challenge following the discovery of unconventional superconductivity. Resistance-free currents have been observed in heavy-fermion materials, organic conductors and copper oxides. The discovery of superconductivity in a single crystal of $UGe_2$, $ZrZn_2$ and $URhGe$ revived the interest in the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The experiments indicate that: i)The superconductivity is confined to the ferromagnetic phase. ii)The ferromag...

  4. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  5. Role of Kabat physical rehabilitation in Bell's palsy: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Maurizio; Antonini, Giovanni; Vestri, Annarita; Volpini, Luigi; Monini, Simonetta

    2010-01-01

    When applied at an early stage, Kabat's rehabilitation was shown to provide a better and faster recovery rate in comparison with non-rehabilitated patients. To assess the validity of an early rehabilitative approach to Bell's palsy patients. A randomized study involved 20 consecutive patients (10 males, 10 females; aged 35-42 years) affected by Bell's palsy, classified according to the House-Brackmann (HB) grading system and grouped on the basis of undergoing or not early physical rehabilitation according to Kabat, i.e. a proprioceptive neuromuscular rehabilitation. The evaluation was carried out by measuring the amplitude of the compound motor action potential (CMAP), as well as by observing the initial and final HB grade, at days 4, 7 and 15 after onset of facial palsy. Patients belonging to the rehabilitation group clearly showed an overall improvement of clinical stage at the planned final observation, i.e. 15 days after onset of facial palsy, without presenting greater values of CMAP.

  6. Effectiveness of exercise at workplace in physical fitness: uncontrolled randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Antônio José; Silva, Valter; Parra, Sérgio Alencar

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of workplace exercise for employee health by means of health-related physical activity components. A randomized uncontrolled study with 20 workers was carried out during three months to evaluate a workplace exercise program. The selected outcomes were flexibility, body mass, fat percentage, lean mass, blood pressure, and heart rate. For statistical analysis, the paired t test and the intent-to-treat analysis were used. There was a significant increase in weight, fat percentage, blood pressure, and heart rate. However the clinical significance was 10% in the size of the effect. The changes verified in the outcomes analyzed were not significant; the variables are within normality ranges proposed by academic organizations.

  7. Moderate-to-High Intensity Physical Exercise in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kristine; Sobol, Nanna A; Frederiksen, Kristian S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies of physical exercise in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are few and results have been inconsistent. Objective: To assess the effects of a moderate-to-high intensity aerobic exercise program in patients with mild AD. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, we recruited...... 200 patients with mild AD to a supervised exercise group (60-min sessions three times a week for 16 weeks) or to a control group. Primary outcome was changed from baseline in cognitive performance estimated by Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) in the intention-to-treat (ITT) group. Secondary...... outcomes included changes in quality of life, ability to perform activities of daily living, and in neuropsychiatric and depressive symptoms. Results: The ITT analysis showed no significant differences between intervention and control groups in change from baseline of SDMT, other cognitive tests, quality...

  8. The mPED randomized controlled clinical trial: applying mobile persuasive technologies to increase physical activity in sedentary women protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuoka Yoshimi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the significant health benefits of regular physical activity, approximately half of American adults, particularly women and minorities, do not meet the current physical activity recommendations. Mobile phone technologies are readily available, easily accessible and may provide a potentially powerful tool for delivering physical activity interventions. However, we need to understand how to effectively apply these mobile technologies to increase and maintain physical activity in physically inactive women. The purpose of this paper is to describe the study design and protocol of the mPED (mobile phone based physical activity education randomized controlled clinical trial that examines the efficacy of a 3-month mobile phone and pedometer based physical activity intervention and compares two different 6-month maintenance interventions. Methods A randomized controlled trial (RCT with three arms; 1 PLUS (3-month mobile phone and pedometer based physical activity intervention and 6-month mobile phone diary maintenance intervention, 2 REGULAR (3-month mobile phone and pedometer based physical activity intervention and 6-month pedometer maintenance intervention, and 3 CONTROL (pedometer only, but no intervention will be conducted. A total of 192 physically inactive women who meet all inclusion criteria and successfully complete a 3-week run-in will be randomized into one of the three groups. The mobile phone serves as a means of delivering the physical activity intervention, setting individualized weekly physical activity goals, and providing self-monitoring (activity diary, immediate feedback and social support. The mobile phone also functions as a tool for communication and real-time data capture. The primary outcome is objectively measured physical activity. Discussion If efficacy of the intervention with a mobile phone is demonstrated, the results of this RCT will be able to provide new insights for current behavioral

  9. Physical performance in recently aged adults after 6 weeks traditional Thai dance: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janyacharoen T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Taweesak Janyacharoen,1–3 Maneepun Laophosri,2,4 Jaturat Kanpittaya,3,5 Paradee Auvichayapat,6 Kittisak Sawanyawisuth71School of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 2Improvement of Physical Performance and Quality of Life Research Group, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 3Back, Neck and Other Joint Pain Research Group, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 4Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 5Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 6Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 7Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, ThailandBackground: Exercise has been shown to be effective in cardiovascular endurance in the elderly. We studied the effect of Thai dancing on physical performance of Thai elderly.Methods: This was an open-labeled, randomized intervention study. The Thai dancing group exercised for 40 minutes three times a week for 6 weeks. Physical performance ability was the primary outcome, including a 6-minute walk test (6MWT, five-times sit-to-stand (FTSST, and a sit-and-reach test measured before and after 6 weeks of intervention.Results: There were 42 subjects enrolled in the study, and 38 female subjects completed (20 in Thai dance group, 18 controls, with an average age of 65.8 ± 5.1 years. The Thai dance group had significantly better physical performance in all measurements at the end of the study. The 6MWT was longer (416.7 ± 58.7 versus 345.7 ± 55.1 m; P = 0.011, FTSST was quicker (10.2 ± 1.5 versus 14.4 ± 3.3 seconds; P < 0.001, and flexibility was higher (14.9 ± 3.5 versus 11.1 ± 5.7 cm; P = 0.002 in the Thai dance group than the control group.Conclusion: Thai dance can improve physical performance in recently aged (elderly female adults

  10. Support or competition? How online social networks increase physical activity: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Zhang, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To identify what features of online social networks can increase physical activity, we conducted a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in 2014 in Philadelphia, PA. Students (n = 790, mean age = 25.2 at an university were randomly assigned to one of four conditions composed of either supportive or competitive relationships and either with individual or team incentives for attending exercise classes. The social comparison condition placed participants into 6-person competitive networks with individual incentives. The social support condition placed participants into 6-person teams with team incentives. The combined condition with both supportive and competitive relationships placed participants into 6-person teams, where participants could compare their team's performance to 5 other teams' performances. The control condition only allowed participants to attend classes with individual incentives. Rewards were based on the total number of classes attended by an individual, or the average number of classes attended by the members of a team. The outcome was the number of classes that participants attended. Data were analyzed using multilevel models in 2014. The mean attendance numbers per week were 35.7, 38.5, 20.3, and 16.8 in the social comparison, the combined, the control, and the social support conditions. Attendance numbers were 90% higher in the social comparison and the combined conditions (mean = 1.9, SE = 0.2 in contrast to the two conditions without comparison (mean = 1.0, SE = 0.2 (p = 0.003. Social comparison was more effective for increasing physical activity than social support and its effects did not depend on individual or team incentives.

  11. Effects of physical therapy on quality of life in osteoporosis patients - a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schröder Guido

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Summary The aim of this prospective randomized single-center study was to investigate whether sling exercise therapy is superior to conventional exercises in osteoporosis patients. Background Patients with osteoporosis frequently experience fractures of the vertebral body, which may cause chronic back pain and other symptoms. These, in turn, may lead to immobilization, muscular atrophy, and restrictions in activities of daily living. The situation can be improved with specific medication and physiotherapy. We explored the effects of a variety of physical treatments on activities of daily living in patients with osteoporosis. Method Fifty patients were randomly allocated to two treatment groups. Group A received traditional physiotherapy (PT while group B underwent sling exercise therapy (ST. Both treatments were given twice a week for three months. The results of the treatment were registered on the quality of life questionnaire (Qualeffo-41 devised by the International Osteoporosis Foundation. After a further three months with no specific exercise treatment, we again tested all patients in order to draw conclusions about the long-term effects of both types of exercise. Results Forty-four patients (88% completed the study. Patients were assigned to small groups (a maximum of 5 patients in each group and thus received individual attention and motivation. Quality of life was improved in both groups; a significantly greater improvement was registered in patients who performed sling exercises (Global score Qualeffo: p = 0.002. Conclusion The test results confirm the known positive effects of physical therapy on the quality of life of osteoporosis patients, as well as the fact that sling exercises are a sound alternative treatment for this condition.

  12. Support or competition? How online social networks increase physical activity: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwen; Brackbill, Devon; Yang, Sijia; Becker, Joshua; Herbert, Natalie; Centola, Damon

    2016-12-01

    To identify what features of online social networks can increase physical activity, we conducted a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in 2014 in Philadelphia, PA. Students (n = 790, mean age = 25.2) at an university were randomly assigned to one of four conditions composed of either supportive or competitive relationships and either with individual or team incentives for attending exercise classes. The social comparison condition placed participants into 6-person competitive networks with individual incentives. The social support condition placed participants into 6-person teams with team incentives. The combined condition with both supportive and competitive relationships placed participants into 6-person teams, where participants could compare their team's performance to 5 other teams' performances. The control condition only allowed participants to attend classes with individual incentives. Rewards were based on the total number of classes attended by an individual, or the average number of classes attended by the members of a team. The outcome was the number of classes that participants attended. Data were analyzed using multilevel models in 2014. The mean attendance numbers per week were 35.7, 38.5, 20.3, and 16.8 in the social comparison, the combined, the control, and the social support conditions. Attendance numbers were 90% higher in the social comparison and the combined conditions (mean = 1.9, SE = 0.2) in contrast to the two conditions without comparison (mean = 1.0, SE = 0.2) (p = 0.003). Social comparison was more effective for increasing physical activity than social support and its effects did not depend on individual or team incentives.

  13. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Immersive Virtual Reality Analgesia during Physical Therapy for Pediatric Burn Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Yuko S.; Hoffman, Hunter G.; Blough, David K.; Patterson, David R.; Jensen, Mark P.; Soltani, Maryam; Carrougher, Gretchen J.; Nakamura, Dana; Sharar, Sam R.

    2010-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, within-subjects (crossover design) study examined the effects of immersive virtual reality as an adjunctive analgesic technique for hospitalized pediatric burn inpatients undergoing painful physical therapy. Fifty-four subjects (6–19 years old) performed range-of-motion exercises under a therapist’s direction for one to five days. During each session, subjects spent equivalent time in both the virtual reality and the control conditions (treatment order randomized and counterbalanced). Graphic rating scale scores assessing the sensory, affective, and cognitive components of pain were obtained for each treatment condition. Secondary outcomes assessed subjects’ perception of the virtual reality experience and maximum range-of-motion. Results showed that on study day one, subjects reported significant decreases (27–44%) in pain ratings during virtual reality. They also reported improved affect (“fun”) during virtual reality. The analgesia and affect improvements were maintained with repeated virtual reality use over multiple therapy sessions. Maximum range-of-motion was not different between treatment conditions, but was significantly greater after the second treatment condition (regardless of treatment order). These results suggest that immersive virtual reality is an effective nonpharmacologic, adjunctive pain reduction technique in the pediatric burn population undergoing painful rehabilitation therapy. The magnitude of the analgesic effect is clinically meaningful and is maintained with repeated use. PMID:20692769

  14. A randomized, controlled trial of immersive virtual reality analgesia, during physical therapy for pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Yuko S; Hoffman, Hunter G; Blough, David K; Patterson, David R; Jensen, Mark P; Soltani, Maryam; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Nakamura, Dana; Sharar, Sam R

    2011-02-01

    This randomized, controlled, within-subjects (crossover design) study examined the effects of immersive virtual reality as an adjunctive analgesic technique for hospitalized pediatric burn inpatients undergoing painful physical therapy. Fifty-four subjects (6-19 years old) performed range-of-motion exercises under a therapist's direction for 1-5 days. During each session, subjects spent equivalent time in both the virtual reality and the control conditions (treatment order randomized and counterbalanced). Graphic rating scale scores assessing the sensory, affective, and cognitive components of pain were obtained for each treatment condition. Secondary outcomes assessed subjects' perception of the virtual reality experience and maximum range-of-motion. Results showed that on study day one, subjects reported significant decreases (27-44%) in pain ratings during virtual reality. They also reported improved affect ("fun") during virtual reality. The analgesia and affect improvements were maintained with repeated virtual reality use over multiple therapy sessions. Maximum range-of-motion was not different between treatment conditions, but was significantly greater after the second treatment condition (regardless of treatment order). These results suggest that immersive virtual reality is an effective nonpharmacologic, adjunctive pain reduction technique in the pediatric burn population undergoing painful rehabilitation therapy. The magnitude of the analgesic effect is clinically meaningful and is maintained with repeated use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Judith Esi; de Vente, Wieke; Huizink, Anja C; Bögels, Susan M; de Bruin, Esther I

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and an introduction to the specific intervention techniques and 5 weeks of daily exercises at home. The PA exercises consisted of a vigorous-intensity activity of free choice. The MM exercises consisted of guided mindfulness meditation. The HRV-BF exercises consisted of slow breathing with a heart rate variability biofeedback device. Participants received daily reminders for their exercises and were contacted weekly to monitor their progress. They completed questionnaires prior to, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. Results indicated an overall beneficial effect consisting of reduced stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improved psychological well-being and sleep quality. No significant between-intervention effect was found, suggesting that PA, MM, and HRV-BF are equally effective in reducing stress and its related symptoms. These self-help interventions provide easily accessible help for people with stress complaints.

  16. Effective Group Training for Patients with Unexplained Physical Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a Non-Randomized One-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, Lyonne N. L.; van Rood, Yanda R.; Timman, Reinier; Kooiman, Cornelis G.; van't Spijker, Adriaan; Busschbach, Jan J. V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although cognitive-behavioral therapy for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS) is effective in secondary care, studies done in primary care produced implementation problems and conflicting results. We evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group training tailored to primary care patients and provided by a secondary community mental-health service reaching out into primary care. Methodology/Principal Findings The effectiveness of this training was explored in a randomized controlled trial. In this trial, 162 patients with UPS classified as undifferentiated somatoform disorder or as chronic pain disorder were randomized either to the training or a waiting list. Both lasted 13 weeks. The preservation of the training's effect was analyzed in non-randomized follow-ups, for which the waiting group started the training after the waiting period. All patients attended the training were followed-up after three months and again after one year. The primary outcomes were the physical and the mental summary scales of the SF-36. Secondary outcomes were the other SF-36-scales and the SCL-90-R. The courses of the training's effects in the randomized controlled trial and the follow-ups were analyzed with linear mixed modeling. In the randomized controlled trial, the training had a significantly positive effect on the quality of life in the physical domain (Cohen's d = 0.38;p = .002), but this overall effect was not found in the mental domain. Regarding the secondary outcomes, the training resulted in reporting an improved physical (Cohen's d = 0.43;p = 0.01), emotional (Cohen's d = 0.44;p = .0.01), and social (Cohen's d = 0.36;p = 0.01) functioning, less pain and better functioning despite pain (Cohen's d = 0.51;p =  PMID:22880056

  17. Effective group training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: a randomized controlled trial with a non-randomized one-year follow-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyonne N L Zonneveld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cognitive-behavioral therapy for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS is effective in secondary care, studies done in primary care produced implementation problems and conflicting results. We evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group training tailored to primary care patients and provided by a secondary community mental-health service reaching out into primary care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effectiveness of this training was explored in a randomized controlled trial. In this trial, 162 patients with UPS classified as undifferentiated somatoform disorder or as chronic pain disorder were randomized either to the training or a waiting list. Both lasted 13 weeks. The preservation of the training's effect was analyzed in non-randomized follow-ups, for which the waiting group started the training after the waiting period. All patients attended the training were followed-up after three months and again after one year. The primary outcomes were the physical and the mental summary scales of the SF-36. Secondary outcomes were the other SF-36-scales and the SCL-90-R. The courses of the training's effects in the randomized controlled trial and the follow-ups were analyzed with linear mixed modeling. In the randomized controlled trial, the training had a significantly positive effect on the quality of life in the physical domain (Cohen's d = 0.38;p = .002, but this overall effect was not found in the mental domain. Regarding the secondary outcomes, the training resulted in reporting an improved physical (Cohen's d = 0.43;p = 0.01, emotional (Cohen's d = 0.44;p = 0.01, and social (Cohen's d = 0.36;p = 0.01 functioning, less pain and better functioning despite pain (Cohen's d = 0.51;p =

  18. Statistic Ensemble Theory of Small Superconducting Grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-Qian; ZHENG Ren-Rong

    2001-01-01

    We apply the random matrix theory to small metallic grains in different spin states of S = 0, 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, 5/2, .., and find that there exist theoretical critical level spacings de at which the superconductivity would breakdown. We also find that the higher the spin state, the smaller the critical level spacing, and for the state of S = 0superconducting enhancement actually exists.

  19. Aquatic physical therapy for hip and knee osteoarthritis: results of a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Rana S; Heywood, Sophie E; Day, Anthony R

    2007-01-01

    Aquatic physical therapy is frequently used in the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA), yet there is little research establishing its efficacy for this population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of aquatic physical therapy on hip or knee OA. A total of 71 volunteers with symptomatic hip OA or knee OA participated in this study. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial in which participants randomly received 6 weeks of aquatic physical therapy or no aquatic physical therapy. Outcome measures included pain, physical function, physical activity levels, quality of life, and muscle strength. The intervention resulted in less pain and joint stiffness and greater physical function, quality of life, and hip muscle strength. Totals of 72% and 75% of participants reported improvements in pain and function, respectively, compared with only 17% (each) of control participants. Benefits were maintained 6 weeks after the completion of physical therapy, with 84% of participants continuing independently. Compared with no intervention, a 6-week program of aquatic physical therapy resulted in significantly less pain and improved physical function, strength, and quality of life. It is unclear whether the benefits were attributable to intervention effects or a placebo response.

  20. Tai chi improves cognitive and physical function in the elderly: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao; Kanagawa, Katsuko; Sasaki, Junko; Ooki, Syuichi; Xu, Huali; Wang, Li

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of Tai Chi on cognitive and physical function in the elderly. [Subjects and Methods] A randomized trial design was used. A total 150 subjects were enrolled and were divided into Tai Chi and control groups. Subjects in the Tai Chi group participated Tai Chi for 6 months, and subjects in the control group participated in other non-athletic activities. [Results] There were no differences between the groups in the one leg standing time with eyes open, left grip strength, or the Frontal Assessment Battery at bedside after 3 and 6 months of intervention. The Mini-Mental State Examination scores after 3 and 6 months were higher in the Tai Chi group than in the control group. The right grip strength after 3 months increased more in the Tai Chi group than in the control group. Both the 5-m high walking speed and 10-m normal walking speed were significantly lower after 3 and 6 months of Tai Chi practice. [Conclusion] These results suggest that regular Tai Chi practice may improve cognitive and physical function in the elderly.

  1. Kondo Physics and Unconventional Superconductivity in the U Intermetallic U2PtC2 Revealed by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mounce, Andrew M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thompson, Joe David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-17

    The set of slides begins by discussing the topic NMR of heavy fermion superconductors under the topics heavy fermion materials, superconductivity, and nuclear magnetic resonance. The history of these phenomena is sketched, with particular mention made of CeCu2Si2, UPt3, and UBe13. Unconventional superconductivity, which is non-phonon mediated superconductivity, presents a high Tc (up to ~150 K), and involves a more complicated spin/orbital wave function. The presentation then goes on to give experimental NMR results for U2PtC2 and Pu-115’s.

  2. Effect of physical training on urinary incontinence: a randomized parallel group trial in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinsnes AG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Anne G Vinsnes1, Jorunn L Helbostad2, Signe Nyrønning3, Gene E Harkless1,4, Randi Granbo5, Arnfinn Seim61Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 2Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 3Søbstad Community Hospital and Teaching Nursing Home, Trondheim, Norway; 4University of New Hampshire, College of Health and Social Services, Nursing Faculty, Durham, New Hampshire, USA; 5Department of Physiotherapy, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 6Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Residents in nursing homes (NHs are often frail older persons who have impaired physical activity. Urinary incontinence (UI is a common complaint for residents in NHs. Reduced functional ability and residence in NHs are documented to be risk factors for UI.Objective: To investigate if an individualized training program designed to improve activity of daily living (ADL and physical capacity among residents in nursing homes has any impact on UI.Materials and methods: This randomized controlled trial was a substudy of a Nordic multicenter study. Participants had to be >65 years, have stayed in the NH for more than 3 months and in need of assistance in at least one ADL. A total of 98 residents were randomly allocated to either a training group (n = 48 or a control group (n = 50 after baseline registrations. The training program lasted for 3 months and included accommodated physical activity and ADL training. Personal treatment goals were elicited for each subject. The control group received their usual care. The main outcome measure was UI as measured by a 24-hour pad-weighing test. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups on this measure at baseline (P = 0.15. Changes were calculated from baseline to 3 months after the end of the intervention.Results: Altogether, 68 participants were included in the analysis

  3. Movement skills and physical activity in obese children: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Dylan P; Okely, Anthony D; Morgan, Philip J; Steele, Julie R; Jones, Rachel A; Colyvas, Kim; Baur, Louise A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support physical activity program in overweight children. A multisite randomized controlled trial was conducted with three intervention arms: 1) child-centered physical activity skill development program (Activity), 2) parent-centered dietary modification program (DIET), or 3) both programs combined (PA+DIET). Movement skill proficiency, perceived athletic competence, accelerometer-assessed physical activity, and parent-reported time spent in screen behaviors were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months in 165 prepubertal children aged 5.5-9 yr (59% girls, 78% obese). Differences in changes in outcomes between groups were assessed using linear mixed models. Compared with the diet group, the activity group (mean (95% confidence interval): +7.7 units (3.8-11.6 units)) and the activity + diet group (+6.7 units (2.9-10.5 units)) displayed 11%-13% greater improvement in overall movement skill proficiency (gross motor quotient) at 6 months. Perceived athletic competence increased across groups at follow-up (across groups: 6 months = +0.21 units (0.11-0.31 units), 12 months = +0.21 units (0.07-0.35 units)). Groups did not differ statistically for change in physical activity outcomes. Total screen time (min·wk(-1)) decreased in all groups at 6 months (across groups: -385.4 (-501.0 to -269.8)) and in the activity group (-261.8 (-470.5 to -53.1)) and activity + diet group (-340.5 (-534.6 to -146.4)) at 12 months. The diet group reported greater reductions in TV or DVD viewing time at 6 months compared with the activity group (248.6 (24.0-473.3)). The activity and the activity + diet programs were efficacious in improving overweight children's movement skill proficiency. All programs were efficacious in reducing time spent in screen behaviors. Other correlates may need to be targeted in addition to movement skills to increase physical activity among overweight children.

  4. Effectiveness of physical exercise to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in youths: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesa, Claudia Ciceri; Barbiero, Sandra Mari; Petkowicz, Rosemary de Oliveira; Martins, Carla Correa; Marques, Renata das Virgens; Andreolla, Allana Abreu Martins; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to test the effectiveness of a physical activity and exercise-based program in a clinical context to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents. A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a pediatric preventive outpatient clinic. Intervention was 14 weeks of exercise for the intervention group or general health advice for the control group. The primary and the secondary outcomes were reduction of cardiovascular risk factors and the feasibility and the effectiveness of clinical advice plan to practice physical exercises at home. A total of 134 children were screened; 26 met eligibility criteria. Of these, 10 were allocated in the exercise intervention group and nine were included in the control group until the end of the intervention. Those patients who discontinued the intervention had the lowest scores of z-BMI (P = 0.033) and subscapular skin fold (P = 0.048). After 14 weeks of intervention, no statistical differences were found between the groups. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was higher in the exercise group, with a mild tendency to be significant (P = 0.066). Patients who adhere to treatment had diastolic blood pressure decreased from baseline to the end of the follow-up period in the control group (P = 0.013). Regardless of this result, the other comparisons within the group were not statistically different between T0 and T14. A low-cost physical activity advice intervention presented many barriers for implementation in routine clinical care, limiting its feasibility and evaluation of effectiveness to reduce cardiovascular risk factors.

  5. Integrating acupuncture with exercise-based physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lan X; Mao, Jun J; Fernandes, Shawn; Galantino, Mary Lou; Guo, Wensheng; Lariccia, Patrick; Teal, Valerie L; Bowman, Marjorie A; Schumacher, H Ralph; Farrar, John T

    2013-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease associated with significant morbidity and economic cost. The efficacy of acupuncture in addition to traditional physical therapy has received little study. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of integrating a standardized true acupuncture protocol versus nonpenetrating acupuncture into exercise-based physical therapy (EPT). This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial at 3 physical therapy centers in Philadelphia, PA. We studied 214 patients (66% African Americans) with at least 6 months of chronic knee pain and x-ray-confirmed Kellgren scores of 2 or 3. Patients received 12 sessions of acupuncture directly following EPT over 6 to 12 weeks. Acupuncture was performed at the same 9 points dictated by the traditional Chinese "Bi" syndrome approach to knee pain, using either standard needles or Streitberger non-skin-puncturing needles. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with at least a 36% improvement in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score at 12 weeks. Both treatment groups showed improvement from combined therapy with no difference between true (31.6%) and nonpenetrating acupuncture (30.3%) in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index response rate (P = 0.5) or report of minor adverse events. A multivariable logistic regression prediction model identified an association between a positive expectation of relief from acupuncture and reported improvement. No differences were noted by race, sex, or age. Puncturing acupuncture needles did not perform any better than nonpuncturing needles integrated with EPT. Whether EPT, acupuncture, or other factors accounted for any improvement noted in both groups could not be determined in this study. Expectation for relief was a predictor of reported benefit.

  6. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  7. Cancer-Related Fatigue and Rehabilitation : A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial Comparing Physical Training Combined With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy With Physical Training Only and With No Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, E.; May, A.M.; Korstjens, I.; Post, W.J.; van der Schans, C.P.; van den Borne, B.; Mesters, I.; Ros, W.J.G.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancer-related fatigue of physical training combined with cogniti

  8. Cancer-related fatigue and rehabilitation: A randomized controlled multicenter trial comparing physical training combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy with physical training only and with no intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Weert (Ellen); A.M. May (Anne); I. Korstjens (Irene); W.J. Post (Wendy); C.P. van der Schans (Cees); B. van den Borne (Bart); I. Mesters (Ilse); W.J.G. Ros (Wynand); J.E.H.M. Hoekstra-Weebers (Josette)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancerrelated fatigue of physical training combined

  9. Cancer-Related Fatigue and Rehabilitation : A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial Comparing Physical Training Combined With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy With Physical Training Only and With No Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, E.; May, A.M.; Korstjens, I.; Post, W.J.; van der Schans, C.P.; van den Borne, B.; Mesters, I.; Ros, W.J.G.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancer-related fatigue of physical training combined with

  10. Cancer-related fatigue and rehabilitation: A randomized controlled multicenter trial comparing physical training combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy with physical training only and with no intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Weert (Ellen); A.M. May (Anne); I. Korstjens (Irene); W.J. Post (Wendy); C.P. van der Schans (Cees); B. van den Borne (Bart); I. Mesters (Ilse); W.J.G. Ros (Wynand); J.E.H.M. Hoekstra-Weebers (Josette)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancerrelated fatigue of physical training combined w

  11. Dose of physical activity, physical functioning and disability risk in mobility-limited older adults: Results from the LIFE study randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnik, Jack M.; King, Abby C.; Pahor, Marco; McDermott, Mary M.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Manini, Todd M.; Glynn, Nancy W.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Axtell, Robert S.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the minimal dose of physical activity required to achieve improvement in physical functioning and reductions in disability risk is necessary to inform public health recommendations. To examine the effect of physical activity dose on changes in physical functioning and the onset of major mobility disability in The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study. We conducted a multicenter single masked randomized controlled trial that enrolled participants in 2010 and 2011 and followed them for an average of 2.6 years. 1,635 sedentary men and women aged 70–89 years who had functional limitations were randomized to a structured moderate intensity walking, resistance, and flexibility physical activity program or a health education program. Physical activity dose was assessed by 7-day accelerometry and self-report at baseline and 24 months. Outcomes included the 400 m walk gait speed, the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months, and onset of major mobility disability (objectively defined by loss of ability to walk 400 m in 15 min). When the physical activity arm or the entire sample were stratified by change in physical activity from baseline to 24 months, there was a dose-dependent increase in the change in gait speed and SPPB from baseline at 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, the magnitude of change in physical activity over 24 months was related to the reduction in the onset of major mobility disability (overall P 48 minutes per week) in regular physical activity participation had significant and clinically meaningful effects on these outcomes. Trial registration: ClinicalsTrials.gov NCT00116194 PMID:28820909

  12. Theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Crisan, Mircea

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up t

  13. From Random Walks to Brownian Motion, from Diffusion to Entropy: Statistical Principles in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology textbooks is dominant contribution of the entropy in driving important biological processes towards equilibrium. From diffusion to cell-membrane formation, to electrostatic binding in protein folding, to the functioning of nerve cells, entropic effects often act to counterbalance deterministic forces such as electrostatic attraction and in so doing, allow for effective molecular signaling. A small group of biology, biophysics and computer science faculty have worked together for the past five years to develop curricular modules (based on SCALEUP pedagogy) that enable students to create models of stochastic and deterministic processes. Our students are first-year engineering and science students in the calculus-based physics course and they are not expected to know biology beyond the high-school level. In our class, they learn to reduce seemingly complex biological processes and structures to be described by tractable models that include deterministic processes and simple probabilistic inference. The students test these models in simulations and in laboratory experiments that are biologically relevant. The students are challenged to bridge the gap between statistical parameterization of their data (mean and standard deviation) and simple model-building by inference. This allows the students to quantitatively describe realistic cellular processes such as diffusion, ionic transport, and ligand-receptor binding. Moreover, the students confront ``random'' forces and traditional forces in problems, simulations, and in laboratory exploration throughout the year-long course as they move from traditional kinematics through thermodynamics to electrostatic interactions. This talk

  14. Does continuing education improve physical therapists' effectiveness in treating neck pain? A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Joshua A; Fritz, Julie M; Brennan, Gerard P; Magel, Jake

    2009-01-01

    Physical therapists often attend continuing education (CE) courses to improve their overall clinical performance and patient outcomes. However, evidence suggests that CE courses may not improve the outcomes for patients receiving physical therapy for the management of neck pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an ongoing educational intervention for improving the outcomes for patients with neck pain. The study participants were 19 physical therapists who attended a 2-day CE course focusing on the management of neck pain. All patients treated by the therapists in this study completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and a pain rating scale at the initial examination and at their final visit. Therapists from 11 clinics were invited to attend a 2-day CE course on the management of neck pain. After the CE course, the therapists were randomly assigned to receive either ongoing education consisting of small group sessions and an educational outreach session or no further education. Clinical outcomes achieved by therapists who received ongoing education and therapists who did not were compared for both pretraining and posttraining periods. The effects of receiving ongoing education were examined by use of linear mixed-model analyses with time period and group as fixed factors; improvements in disability and pain as dependent variables; and age, sex, and the patient's initial NDI and pain rating scores as covariates. Patients treated by therapists who received ongoing education experienced significantly greater reductions in disability during the study period (pretraining to posttraining) than those treated by therapists who did not receive ongoing training (mean difference=4.2 points; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.69, 7.7). Changes in pain did not differ for patients treated by the 2 groups of therapists during the study period (mean difference=0.47 point; 95% CI=-0.11, 1.0). Therapists in the ongoing education group also used fewer

  15. Long-term effect of physical activity counseling on mobility limitation among older people: a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, Ari; Leinonen, Raija

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity counseling increases physical activity among older people, but its effectiveness on mobility, that is, maintaining the ability to move independently, is unknown. We studied the effect of physical activity counseling on mobility among older people and evaluated whether...... counseling-induced benefits persist after cessation of the intervention. METHODS: In a 2-year, single-blinded, randomized controlled study, 632 sedentary participants aged 75-81 years were randomly assigned into the intervention (n = 318) or control (n = 314) group. The intervention group received a single...... individualized physical activity counseling session with a supportive telephone contact every 4 months for 2 years. The outcome measures-perceived difficulty in advanced (walking 2 km) and basic (walking 0.5 km) mobility-were gathered semiannually during the intervention and the 1.5-year postintervention follow...

  16. A school-based randomized controlled trial to improve physical activity among Iranian high school girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghofranipour Fazloalha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity (PA rates decline precipitously during the high school years and are consistently lower among adolescent girls than adolescent boys. Due to cultural barriers, this problem might be exacerbated in female Iranian adolescents. However, little intervention research has been conducted to try to increase PA participation rates with this population. Because PA interventions in schools have the potential to reach many children and adolescents, this study reports on PA intervention research conducted in all-female Iranian high schools. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the effects of two six-month tailored interventions on potential determinants of PA and PA behavior. Students (N = 161 were randomly allocated to one of three conditions: an intervention based on Pender's Health Promotion model (HP, an intervention based on an integration of the health promotion model and selected constructs from the Transtheoretical model (THP, and a control group (CON. Measures were administered prior to the intervention, at post-intervention and at a six-month follow-up. Results Repeated measure ANOVAs showed a significant interaction between group and time for perceived benefits, self efficacy, interpersonal norms, social support, behavioral processes, and PA behavior, indicating that both intervention groups significantly improved across the 24-week intervention, whereas the control group did not. Participants in the THP group showed greater use of counter conditioning and stimulus control at post-intervention and at follow-up. While there were no significant differences in PA between the HP and CON groups at follow-up, a significant difference was still found between the THP and the CON group. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence of the effectiveness of a PA intervention based on Pender's HP model combined with selected aspects of the TTM on potential determinants to increase PA among

  17. Physical therapy after prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unukovych, Dmytro; Johansson, Hemming; Johansson, Elizabeth; Arver, Brita; Liljegren, Annelie; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2014-08-01

    The rate of prophylactic mastectomies (PM) is increasing. Patients generally report high levels of health related quality of life and satisfaction after the procedure, whereas body image perception and sexuality may be negatively affected. The aim of the study was to evaluate the interest in physical therapy as a means of improving body image and sexuality in women after PM. Patients undergoing PM at Karolinska University Hospital between 2006 and 2010 were eligible. The following patient-reported outcome measures were used at study baseline and 2 years postoperatively: the body image scale (BIS), the sexual activity questionnaire (SAQ), the short-form health survey (SF-36), the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD), and a study specific "pain/motion/sensation scale". Out of 125 patients invited to participate in this prospective randomized study, 43 (34%) consented and were randomized into the intervention (n = 24, 56%) or control (n = 19, 44%) groups. There were no statistically significant between-group differences found with respect to BIS, SAQ, SF-36, HAD, and "pain/motion/sensation". Two years postoperatively, more than half of the patients in both groups reported problems like feeling less attractive, less sexually attractive, their body feeling less whole, and being dissatisfied with their body. A majority marked a decreased sensation in breast area. The interest in a physiotherapy intervention was limited among women who had undergone PM. The intervention did not show any substantial effects. A large proportion of patients reported specific body image related and pain/motion/sensation problems postoperatively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Physical Exercise with Multicomponent Cognitive Intervention for Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease: A 6-Month Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Min-Ji Kim; Chang-Wan Han; Kyoung-Youn Min; Chae-Yoon Cho; Chae-Won Lee; Yoshiko Ogawa; Etsuro Mori; Masahiro Kohzuki

    2016-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effect of 6-month physical exercise with a multicomponent cognitive program (MCP) on the cognitive function of older adults with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: We included 33 participants with AD in a 6-month randomized controlled trial. The intervention group participated in physical exercise and received a MCP. The control group received only the MCP. Before and after the intervention, cognitive outcomes were assessed using th...

  19. Effects of a multifactorial injury prevention intervention in physical education teachers: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Sien; Haerens, Leen; Verhagen, Evert; Goossens, Lennert; De Clercq, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Physical education (PE) teachers are at a high risk of musculoskeletal sports or work-related injuries because of the physical activity as inherent part of their profession. Such injuries have a negative impact on work and leisure time activities, and effective injury prevention interventions are needed. The present study aimed at testing the effectiveness of an injury prevention intervention that was developed and optimized according to PE teachers' wishes and values. Fifty-five PE teachers were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. Intervention group teachers engaged in two days of training during which they familiarized with eight injury prevention strategies (seven intrinsic and one extrinsic). A special feature of the intervention was that the way of delivery was based on the self-determination theory in order to stimulate participants' motivation to adhere to the proposed strategies. Prospective registrations during one school year were conducted concerning injuries and preventive behaviours. Results showed that the intervention group teachers had a lower number of injuries per 1000 h time of exposure (TOE) than the controls (INT: 0.49, CON: 1.14 injuries/1000 h TOE, OR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.06-5.07), and applied a broader variety of strategies including dynamic and static stretching, core stability, balance and strength training, when compared to the controls who mainly engaged in warming-up. In conclusion, with the same amount of time, an injury reduction was found in PE teachers through a more balanced use of provided preventive strategies.

  20. Do walking strategies to increase physical activity reduce reported sitting in workplaces: a randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Nicola W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions designed to increase workplace physical activity may not automatically reduce high volumes of sitting, a behaviour independently linked to chronic diseases such as obesity and type II diabetes. This study compared the impact two different walking strategies had on step counts and reported sitting times. Methods Participants were white-collar university employees (n = 179; age 41.3 ± 10.1 years; 141 women, who volunteered and undertook a standardised ten-week intervention at three sites. Pre-intervention step counts (Yamax SW-200 and self-reported sitting times were measured over five consecutive workdays. Using pre-intervention step counts, employees at each site were randomly allocated to a control group (n = 60; maintain normal behaviour, a route-based walking group (n = 60; at least 10 minutes sustained walking each workday or an incidental walking group (n = 59; walking in workday tasks. Workday step counts and reported sitting times were re-assessed at the beginning, mid- and endpoint of intervention and group mean± SD steps/day and reported sitting times for pre-intervention and intervention measurement points compared using a mixed factorial ANOVA; paired sample-t-tests were used for follow-up, simple effect analyses. Results A significant interactive effect (F = 3.5; p t = 3.9, p t = 2.5, p Conclusion Compared to controls, both route and incidental walking increased physical activity in white-collar employees. Our data suggests that workplace walking, particularly through incidental movement, also has the potential to decrease employee sitting times, but there is a need for on-going research using concurrent and objective measures of sitting, standing and walking.

  1. Electrothermal simulation of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Francesco; Najafi, Faraz; Herder, Charles; Berggren, Karl K.

    2011-02-01

    We developed an electrothermal model of NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) on sapphire substrates. SNAPs are single-photon detectors consisting of the parallel connection of N superconducting nanowires. We extrapolated the physical constants of the model from experimental data and we simulated the time evolution of the device resistance, temperature and current by solving two coupled electrical and thermal differential equations describing the nanowires. The predictions of the model were in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Superconductivity of small metal grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Renrong; CHEN; Zhiqian; ZHU; Shunquan

    2005-01-01

    The formulas of the energy gap and superconducting critical temperature appropriate for systems with both odd and even number of electrons are derived; the bases of the derivations are BCS theory and energy level statistics. Numerical results qualitatively agree with the experimental phenomena. i.e., the superconductivity of small metallic grains will first enhance then decrease to zero when the grain are getting smaller and smaller. The calculations indicate that the above phenomena happen in the metallic grains belonging to Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE) and Gaussian Unitary ensemble (GUE) with zero spin; The superconductivity of small metallic grains in Gaussian Symplectic Ensemble (GSE) will monotonically decrease to zero with the decreasing of the grain size. The analyses suggest that the superconductivity enhancements come from pairing and the balance of the strengths between spin-orbital coupling and external magnetic field. In order to take the latter into account, it is necessary to include the level statistics given by Random Matrix Theory (RMT) in describing small metallic grains.

  3. Randomized trial of an internet-based computer-tailored expert system for physical activity in patients with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Robert D; Morrin, Louise I; Beaton, Louise J; Papadakis, Sophia; Kocourek, Jana; McDonnell, Lisa; Slovinec D'Angelo, Monika E; Tulloch, Heather; Suskin, Neville; Unsworth, Karen; Blanchard, Chris; Pipe, Andrew L

    2012-12-01

    The CardioFit Internet-based expert system was designed to promote physical activity in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) who were not participating in cardiac rehabilitation. This randomized controlled trial compared CardioFit to usual care to assess its effects on physical activity following hospitalization for acute coronary syndromes. A total of 223 participants were recruited at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute or London Health Sciences Centre and randomly assigned to either CardioFit (n = 115) or usual care (n = 108). The CardioFit group received a personally tailored physical-activity plan upon discharge from the hospital and access to a secure website for activity planning and tracking. They completed five online tutorials over a 6-month period and were in email contact with an exercise specialist. Usual care consisted of physical activity guidance from an attending cardiologist. Physical activity was measured by pedometer and self-reported over a 7-day period, 6 and 12 months after randomization. The CardioFit Internet-based physical activity expert system significantly increased objectively measured (p = 0.023) and self-reported physical activity (p = 0.047) compared to usual care. Emotional (p = 0.038) and physical (p = 0.031) dimensions of heart disease health-related quality of life were also higher with CardioFit compared to usual care. Patients with CHD using an Internet-based activity prescription with online coaching were more physically active at follow up than those receiving usual care. Use of the CardioFit program could extend the reach of rehabilitation and secondary-prevention services.

  4. Network Location-Aware Service Recommendation with Random Walk in Cyber-Physical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuyu; Yu, Fangzheng; Xu, Yueshen; Yu, Lifeng; Mu, Jinglong

    2017-09-08

    Cyber-physical systems (CPS) have received much attention from both academia and industry. An increasing number of functions in CPS are provided in the way of services, which gives rise to an urgent task, that is, how to recommend the suitable services in a huge number of available services in CPS. In traditional service recommendation, collaborative filtering (CF) has been studied in academia, and used in industry. However, there exist several defects that limit the application of CF-based methods in CPS. One is that under the case of high data sparsity, CF-based methods are likely to generate inaccurate prediction results. In this paper, we discover that mining the potential similarity relations among users or services in CPS is really helpful to improve the prediction accuracy. Besides, most of traditional CF-based methods are only capable of using the service invocation records, but ignore the context information, such as network location, which is a typical context in CPS. In this paper, we propose a novel service recommendation method for CPS, which utilizes network location as context information and contains three prediction models using random walking. We conduct sufficient experiments on two real-world datasets, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed methods and verify that the network location is indeed useful in QoS prediction.

  5. NCSA: A New Protocol for Random Multiple Access Based on Physical Layer Network Coding

    CERN Document Server

    Bui, Huyen Chi; Boucheret, Marie-Laure

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a random multiple access method for satellite communications, named Network Coding-based Slotted Aloha (NCSA). The goal is to improve diversity of data bursts on a slotted-ALOHA-like channel thanks to error correcting codes and Physical-layer Network Coding (PNC). This scheme can be considered as a generalization of the Contention Resolution Diversity Slotted Aloha (CRDSA) where the different replicas of this system are replaced by the different parts of a single word of an error correcting code. The performance of this scheme is first studied through a density evolution approach. Then, simulations confirm the CRDSA results by showing that, for a time frame of $400$ slots, the achievable total throughput is greater than $0.7\\times C$, where $C$ is the maximal throughput achieved by a centralized scheme. This paper is a first analysis of the proposed scheme which open several perspectives. The most promising approach is to integrate collided bursts into the decoding process in order to im...

  6. A new technique for ultra-fast physical random number generation using optical chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Elsonbaty, Amr; Obayyaa, Salah S A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically demonstrate a new extraction scheme for generating ultra-fast physically random sequence of bits. For this purpose, we utilize a dual-channel optical chaos source with suppressed time delayed (TD) signature in both the intensity and the phase of its two channels. The proposed technique uses M 1-bit analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) to compare the level of the chaotic intensity signal at time t with its levels after incommensurable delay-interval Tm, where m = {1,2,...,M}. The binary output of each 1-bit ADC is then sampled by a positive-edge-triggered D flip-flop. The clock sequence applied to the flip-flops is relatively delayed such that the rising edge of the clock triggering the m flip-flop precedes the rising edge of the clock of a subsequent m+1 flip-flop by a fixed period. The outputs of all flip-flops are then combined by means of a parity-check logic. Numerical simulations are carried out using values of parameters at which TD signature is suppressed for chosen values ...

  7. Physical-layer security analysis of PSK quantum-noise randomized cipher in optically amplified links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Haisong; Pu, Tao; Xiang, Peng; Zheng, Jilin; Fang, Tao; Zhu, Huatao

    2017-08-01

    The quantitative security of quantum-noise randomized cipher (QNRC) in optically amplified links is analyzed from the perspective of physical-layer advantage. Establishing the wire-tap channel models for both key and data, we derive the general expressions of secrecy capacities for the key against ciphertext-only attack and known-plaintext attack, and that for the data, which serve as the basic performance metrics. Further, the maximal achievable secrecy rate of the system is proposed, under which secrecy of both the key and data is guaranteed. Based on the same framework, the secrecy capacities of various cases can be assessed and compared. The results indicate perfect secrecy is potentially achievable for data transmission, and an elementary principle of setting proper number of photons and bases is given to ensure the maximal data secrecy capacity. But the key security is asymptotically perfect, which tends to be the main constraint of systemic maximal secrecy rate. Moreover, by adopting cascaded optical amplification, QNRC can realize long-haul transmission with secure rate up to Gb/s, which is orders of magnitude higher than the perfect secrecy rates of other encryption systems.

  8. A smartphone "app"-delivered randomized factorial trial targeting physical activity in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Jason; Roberts, Sarah; Hillman, Charles H; Mullen, Sean P; Ritterband, Lee; McAuley, Edward

    2017-03-02

    Rapid technological development has challenged researchers developing mobile moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) interventions. This 12-week randomized factorial intervention aimed to determine the individual and combined impact of a self-monitoring smartphone-app (tracking, feedback, education) and two theory-based modules (goal-setting, points-based feedback) on MVPA, key psychosocial outcomes, and application usage. Adults (N = 116; M age  = 41.38 ± 7.57) received (1) a basic self-monitoring app, (2) the basic app plus goal setting, (3) the basic app plus points-based feedback, or (4) the basic app plus both modules. All individuals increased MVPA by more than 11 daily minutes. Those with points-based feedback demonstrated still higher levels of MVPA and more favorable psychosocial and app usage outcomes across the intervention. Those with access to in-app goal setting had higher levels of app usage relative to those without the component. It is imperative that effective digital intervention "ingredients" are identified, and these findings provide early evidence to this effect. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02592590.

  9. Cardiorespiratory fitness moderates the effect of an affect-guided physical activity prescription: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, A.S.; Kangas, J.L.; Denman, D.C.; Smits, J.A.J.; Yamada, T.; Otto, M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) interventions have a clear role in promoting mental health. Current PA guidelines directed toward specific PA intensities may have negative effects on affective response to exercise, and affective response is an important determinant of PA adherence. In this randomized trial

  10. Short- and long-term effects of a physical activity counselling programme in COPD : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altenburg, Wytske A.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Bossenbroek, Linda; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; de Greef, Mathieu H.G.; Wempe, Johan B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We were interested in the effects of a physical activity (PA) counselling programme in three groups of COPD patients from general practice (primary care), outpatient clinic (secondary care) and pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Methods: In this randomized controlled trial 155 COPD patients,

  11. Yoga Improves Academic Performance in Urban High School Students Compared to Physical Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Yoga programs within schools have become more widespread but research regarding the potential effect on academic achievement remains limited. This study cluster-randomized 112 students within a single New York City public high school to participate in either school-based yoga or physical education (PE) for an entire academic year. The primary…

  12. Effect of pediatric physical therapy on deformational plagiocephaly in children with positional preference: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlimmeren, van Leo A.; Graaf, van der Jolanda; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.; L'Hoir, Monique P.; Helders, Paul J.M.; Engelbert, Raoul H.H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of pediatric physical therapy on positional preference and deformational plagiocephaly. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Bernhoven Hospital, Veghel, the Netherlands. Participants Of 380 infants referred to the examiners at age 7 weeks, 68 (17.9%) met c

  13. Effect of pediatric physical therapy on deformational plagiocephaly in children with positional preference: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; van der Graaf, Jolanda; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; L'Hoir, Monique P.; Helders, Paul J.M.; Engelbert, Raoul H.H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of pediatric physical therapy on positional preference and deformational plagiocephaly. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Bernhoven Hospital, Veghel, the Netherlands. Participants Of 380 infants referred to the examiners at age 7 weeks, 68 (17.9%) met criteria

  14. Superconductivity a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Superconductivity is one of the most exciting areas of research in physics today. Outlining the history of its discovery, and the race to understand its many mysterious and counter-intuitive phenomena, this Very Short Introduction explains in accessible terms the theories that have been developed, and how they have influenced other areas of science, including the Higgs boson of particle physics and ideas about the early Universe. It is an engaging and informative accountof a fascinating scientific detective story, and an intelligible insight into some deep and beautiful ideas of physics

  15. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  16. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  17. Predictors and Outcomes of Crossover to Surgery from Physical Therapy for Meniscal Tear and Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Trial Comparing Physical Therapy and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeffrey N; Wright, John; Spindler, Kurt P; Mandl, Lisa A; Safran-Norton, Clare E; Reinke, Emily K; Levy, Bruce A; Wright, Rick W; Jones, Morgan H; Martin, Scott D; Marx, Robert G; Losina, Elena

    2016-11-16

    Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) combined with physical therapy (PT) have yielded pain relief similar to that provided by PT alone in randomized trials of subjects with a degenerative meniscal tear. However, many patients randomized to PT received APM before assessment of the primary outcome. We sought to identify factors associated with crossing over to APM and to compare pain relief between patients who had crossed over to APM and those who had been randomized to APM. We used data from the MeTeOR (Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research) Trial of APM with PT versus PT alone in subjects ≥45 years old who had mild-to-moderate osteoarthritis and a degenerative meniscal tear. We assessed independent predictors of crossover to APM among those randomized to PT. We also compared pain relief at 6 months among those randomized to PT who crossed over to APM, those who did not cross over, and those originally randomized to APM. One hundred and sixty-four subjects were randomized to and received APM and 177 were randomized to PT, of whom 48 (27%) crossed over to receive APM in the first 140 days after randomization. In multivariate analyses, factors associated with a higher likelihood of crossing over to APM among those who had originally been randomized to PT included a baseline Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Pain Score of ≥40 (risk ratio [RR] = 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00, 3.93) and symptom duration of <1 year (RR = 1.74; 95% CI = 0.98, 3.08). Eighty-one percent of subjects who crossed over to APM and 82% of those randomized to APM had an improvement of ≥10 points in their pain score at 6 months, as did 73% of those who were randomized to and received only PT. Subjects who crossed over to APM had presented with a shorter symptom duration and greater baseline pain than those who did not cross over from PT. Subjects who crossed over had rates of surgical success similar to those of the patients who had been

  18. Inelastic tunneling in superconducting junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlobil, Patrik Christian

    2016-06-10

    In this dissertation a theoretical formalism of elastic and inelastic tunneling spectroscopy is developed for superconductors. The underlying physical processes behind the different two tunneling channels and their implications for the interpretation of experimental tunneling data are investigated in detail, which can explain the background conductance seen in the cuprate and iron-based superconductors. Further, the properties of the emitted light from a superconducting LED are investigated.

  19. An adaptive physical activity intervention for overweight adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A Adams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA interventions typically include components or doses that are static across participants. Adaptive interventions are dynamic; components or doses change in response to short-term variations in participant's performance. Emerging theory and technologies make adaptive goal setting and feedback interventions feasible. OBJECTIVE: To test an adaptive intervention for PA based on Operant and Behavior Economic principles and a percentile-based algorithm. The adaptive intervention was hypothesized to result in greater increases in steps per day than the static intervention. METHODS: Participants (N = 20 were randomized to one of two 6-month treatments: 1 static intervention (SI or 2 adaptive intervention (AI. Inactive overweight adults (85% women, M = 36.9 ± 9.2 years, 35% non-white in both groups received a pedometer, email and text message communication, brief health information, and biweekly motivational prompts. The AI group received daily step goals that adjusted up and down based on the percentile-rank algorithm and micro-incentives for goal attainment. This algorithm adjusted goals based on a moving window; an approach that responded to each individual's performance and ensured goals were always challenging but within participants' abilities. The SI group received a static 10,000 steps/day goal with incentives linked to uploading the pedometer's data. RESULTS: A random-effects repeated-measures model accounted for 180 repeated measures and autocorrelation. After adjusting for covariates, the treatment phase showed greater steps/day relative to the baseline phase (p<.001 and a group by study phase interaction was observed (p  .017. The SI group increased by 1,598 steps/day on average between baseline and treatment while the AI group increased by 2,728 steps/day on average between baseline and treatment; a significant between-group difference of 1,130 steps/day (Cohen's d = .74. CONCLUSIONS: The adaptive

  20. Activity monitor intervention to promote physical activity of physicians-in-training: randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne N Thorndike

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physicians are expected to serve as role models for healthy lifestyles, but long work hours reduce time for healthy behaviors. A hospital-based physical activity intervention could improve physician health and increase counseling about exercise. METHODS: We conducted a two-phase intervention among 104 medical residents at a large hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Phase 1 was a 6-week randomized controlled trial comparing daily steps of residents assigned to an activity monitor displaying feedback about steps and energy consumed (intervention or to a blinded monitor (control. Phase 2 immediately followed and was a 6-week non-randomized team steps competition in which all participants wore monitors with feedback. Phase 1 outcomes were: 1 median steps/day and 2 proportion of days activity monitor worn. The Phase 2 outcome was mean steps/day on days monitor worn (≥500 steps/day. Physiologic measurements were collected at baseline and study end. Median steps/day were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Mean steps were compared using repeated measures regression analyses. RESULTS: In Phase 1, intervention and control groups had similar activity (6369 vs. 6063 steps/day, p = 0.16 and compliance with wearing the monitor (77% vs. 77% of days, p = 0.73. In Phase 2 (team competition, residents recorded more steps/day than during Phase 1 (CONTROL: 7,971 vs. 7,567, p = 0.002; INTERVENTION: 7,832 vs. 7,739, p = 0.13. Mean compliance with wearing the activity monitor decreased for both groups during Phase 2 compared to Phase 1 (60% vs. 77%, p<0.001. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased (p = 0.004 and HDL cholesterol increased (p<0.001 among all participants at end of study compared to baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Although the activity monitor intervention did not have a major impact on activity or health, the high participation rates of busy residents and modest changes in steps, blood pressure, and HDL suggest that more

  1. The happy marriage between electron-phonon superconductivity and Mott physics in Cs3C60: A first-principle phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Massimo; Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Giovannetti, Gianluca; Arita, Ryotaro

    The phase diagram of doped fullerides like Cs3C60 as a function of the spacing between fullerene molecules is characterized by a first-order transition between a Mott insulator and an s-wave superconductor with a dome-shaped behavior of the critical temperature. By means of an ab-initio modeling of the bandstructure, the electron-phonon interaction and the interaction parameter and a Dynamical Mean-Field Theory solution, we reproduce the phase diagram and demonstrate that phonon superconductivity benefits from strong correlations confirming earlier model predictions. The role of correlations is manifest also in infrared measurements carried out by L. Baldassarre. The superconducting phase shares many similarities with ''exotic'' superconductors with electronic pairing, suggesting that the anomalies in the ''normal'' state, rather than the pairing glue, can be the real common element unifying a wide family of strongly correlated superconductors including cuprates and iron superconductors

  2. Superconductivity in One-atomic-layer Metal Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tong; CHEN Xi; WANG Yayu; LIU Ying; LIN Haiqing; JIA Jinfeng; XUE Qikun; CHENG Peng; LI Wenjuan; SUN Yujie; WANG Guang; ZHU Xicgang; HE Ke; WANG Lili; MA Xucun

    2011-01-01

    @@ Superconductivity is a peculiar quantum phenomenon which originates from the pairing of conduction electrons, followed by phase coherent condensation.Since the discovery by K.Onnes in 1911, superconductivity has been one of the hottest topics in physics for an entire century, and still attracts people's great interest.One of the intriguing issues is how superconductivity appears in low dimensional system where quantum size effect and surface/interface effect that large bulk material doesn't have may become crucial.

  3. Superconductivity in One-atomic-layer Metal Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tong; CHENG Peng; LI Wenjuan; SUN Yujie; WANG Guang; ZHU Xiegang; HE Ke; WANG Lili; MA Xucun; CHEN Xi; WANG Yayu; LIU Ying; LIN Haiqing; JIA Jinfeng; XUE Qikun

    2011-01-01

    Superconductivity is a peculiar quantum phenomenon which originates from the pairing of conduction electrons, tbllowed by phase coherent condensation, Since the discovery by K. Onnes in 1911, superconductivity has been one of the hottest topics in physics for an entire century, and still attracts people's great interest. One of the intriguing issues is how superconductivity appears in low dimensional system where quantum size effect and surface/interface effect that large bulk material doesn't have may become crucial.

  4. Tutorial on Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, M. J. Penny; Goodzeit, Carl L.

    1997-05-01

    A multimedia CD-ROM tutorial on the physics and engineering concepts of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators is being developed under a U.S. Dept. of Energy SBIR grant. The tutorial, scheduled for distribution this summer, is targeted to undergraduate junior or senior level science students. However, its unified presentation of the broad range of issues involved in the design of superconducting magnets for accelerators and the extensive detail about the construction process (including animations and video clips) will also be of value to staff of research institutes and industrial concerns with an interest in applied superconductivity or magnet development. The source material, which is based on the world-wide R and D programs to develop superconducting accelerator magnets, is organized in five units with the following themes: Introduction to magnets and accelerators; (2) Superconductors for accelerator magnets; (3) Magnetic design methods for accelerator magnets; (4) Electrical, mechanical, and cryogenic considerations for the final magnet package; (5) Performance characteristics and measurement methods. A detailed outline and examples will be shown.

  5. Time-Based Physical Activity Interventions for Weight Loss: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakicic, John M.; Rickman, Amy D.; Lang, Wei; Davis, Kelliann K.; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Neiberg, Rebecca; Marcus, Marsha D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether enhancing standard behavior weight loss interventions (SBWP) with additional strategies at the initiation of the intervention (ADOPT) or providing the additional strategies at predetermined times over the intervention period (MAINTAIN) enhances 18 month weight loss. Methods This was a clinical trial with participants (n=195; age= 43.2±8.6 yrs; BMI= 33.0±3.4 kg/m2) randomized to SBWP, ADOPT, or MAINTAIN. All were prescribed an energy restricted diet and physical activity, with group intervention sessions delivered over 18 months. ADOPT received additional phone contact (months 1–3), supervised exercise (months 1–6), and behavior campaigns (months 4–9). MAINTAIN received additional phone contact (months 4–6), supervised exercise (months 7–12), and behavior campaigns (months 13–18). Results There was a significant Group X Time interaction for weight loss (p=0.0032). SBWP lost 9.3±0.9, 7.8±1.1, and 5.9±1.2 kg at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. ADOPT lost 8.9±0.9, 7.6±1.2, and 5.8±1.2 kg, and MAINTAIN lost 9.7±0.9, 11.0±1.2, and 9.0±1.2 kg at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. The Group X Time interaction for SBWP vs. MAINTAIN (p=0.0033) and ADOPT vs. MAINTAIN (p=0.0075) was significant. There was a significant Group X Time interaction for change in fitness (p=0.0060). The Group X Time interaction for MAINTAIN vs. ADOPT (p=0.0018) was significant with a trend for MAINTAIN vs. SBWP (p=0.0525). Conclusions MAINTAIN improved 18-month weight loss compared to SBWP and ADOPT, with statistical trends that MAINTAIN resulted in greater improvements in fitness. These results suggest that time-based strategies emphasizing physical activity conferred greater benefits when delivered later and over the full course of intervention. This provides valuable information for the implementation of time-based strategies to improve long-term weight loss and fitness in overweight and obese adults. PMID:25160843

  6. Intervention effects on adolescent physical activity in the multicomponent SPACE study: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Toftager

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multicomponent school-based interventions have the potential to reduce the age-related decline in adolescents' physical activity (PA, yet there is not consistent evidence to guide non-curricular and school environment interventions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a multicomponent environmental school-based intervention, designed to reduce the age-related decline in PA among adolescents. METHODS: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 7 intervention and 7 control schools. Baseline measurements were carried out in spring 2010 with 2 years of follow-up. A total of 1,348 students (11-13 years, in grade 5 and 6 enrolled in the study at baseline. The 14 schools included in the study were located in the Region of Southern Denmark. The intervention consisted of organizational and physical changes in the school environment with a total of 11 intervention components. The primary outcome measure was overall PA (cpm, counts per minute and was supported by analyses of time spent in MVPA, and time spent sedentary. Furthermore, a secondary outcome measure was PA in school time and during recess. PA was measured using accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X. RESULTS: A total of 797 students completed the trial and had valid accelerometer data. No significant difference was found for overall PA with an adjusted difference of -19.1 cpm (95% CI: -93, 53 or for school time activity with an adjusted difference of 6 cpm (95% CI: -73, 85. A sensitivity analysis revealed a positive significant intervention effect of PA in recess with an adjusted difference of 95 cpm. CONCLUSIONS: No evidence was found of the overall effect of a non-curricular multicomponent school-based intervention on PA among Danish adolescents. The intervention was positively associated with PA during school time and recess, however, with small estimates. Lack of effect on overall PA could be due to both program theory and different degrees of

  7. Superconducting Hadron Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Ostroumov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the main building blocks of a superconducting (SC) linac, the choice of SC resonators, their frequencies, accelerating gradients and apertures, focusing structures, practical aspects of cryomodule design, and concepts to minimize the heat load into the cryogenic system. It starts with an overview of design concepts for all types of hadron linacs differentiated by duty cycle (pulsed or continuous wave) or by the type of ion species (protons, H-, and ions) being accelerated. Design concepts are detailed for SC linacs in application to both light ion (proton, deuteron) and heavy ion linacs. The physics design of SC linacs, including transverse and longitudinal lattice designs, matching between different accelerating–focusing lattices, and transition from NC to SC sections, is detailed. Design of high-intensity SC linacs for light ions, methods for the reduction of beam losses, preventing beam halo formation, and the effect of HOMs and errors on beam quality are discussed. Examples are ta...

  8. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  9. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  10. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  11. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  12. Effectiveness of physical activity in reducing pain in patients with fibromyalgia: a blinded randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayo, Andrea Harumi; Peccin, Maria Stella; Sanches, Carla Munhoz; Trevisani, Virgínia Fernandes Moça

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of muscle-strengthening exercises (MS) and a walking program (WA) in reducing pain in patients with fibromyalgia. Ninety women, 30-55 years of age, diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria, were randomized into 3 groups: WA Group, MS Group, and control group. Pain (visual analog scale) was evaluated as the primary outcome. Physical functioning (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, FIQ), health-related quality of life (Short-Form 36 Health Survey, SF-36), and use of medication were evaluated as secondary outcomes. Assessments were performed at baseline, 8, 16, and 28 weeks. Intention-to-treat and efficacy analyses were conducted. Sixty-eight patients completed the treatment protocol. All 3 groups showed improvement after the 16-week treatment compared to baseline. At the 28-week follow-up, pain reduction was similar for the WA and MS groups (P = 0.39), but different from the control group (P = 0.01). At the end of the treatment, 80% of subjects in the control group took pain medication, but only 46.7% in the WA and 41.4% in the MS groups. Mean FIQ total scores were lower for the WA and MS groups (P = 0.96) compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Patients in the WA and MS groups reported higher scores (better health status) than controls in almost all SF-36 subscales. MS was as effective as WA in reducing pain regarding all study variables; however, symptoms management during the follow-up period was more efficient in the WA group.

  13. Physical and chemical mechanisms in oxide-based resistance random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuan-Chang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Zhang, Rui; Hung, Ya-Chi; Syu, Yong-En; Chang, Yao-Feng; Chen, Min-Chen; Chu, Tian-Jian; Chen, Hsin-Lu; Pan, Chih-Hung; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of our work in resistive switching mechanisms on oxide-based resistance random access memory (RRAM) devices. Based on the investigation of physical and chemical mechanisms, we focus on its materials, device structures, and treatment methods so as to provide an in-depth perspective of state-of-the-art oxide-based RRAM. The critical voltage and constant reaction energy properties were found, which can be used to prospectively modulate voltage and operation time to control RRAM device working performance and forecast material composition. The quantized switching phenomena in RRAM devices were demonstrated at ultra-cryogenic temperature (4K), which is attributed to the atomic-level reaction in metallic filament. In the aspect of chemical mechanisms, we use the Coulomb Faraday theorem to investigate the chemical reaction equations of RRAM for the first time. We can clearly observe that the first-order reaction series is the basis for chemical reaction during reset process in the study. Furthermore, the activation energy of chemical reactions can be extracted by changing temperature during the reset process, from which the oxygen ion reaction process can be found in the RRAM device. As for its materials, silicon oxide is compatible to semiconductor fabrication lines. It is especially promising for the silicon oxide-doped metal technology to be introduced into the industry. Based on that, double-ended graphene oxide-doped silicon oxide based via-structure RRAM with filament self-aligning formation, and self-current limiting operation ability is demonstrated. The outstanding device characteristics are attributed to the oxidation and reduction of graphene oxide flakes formed during the sputter process. Besides, we have also adopted a new concept of supercritical CO2 fluid treatment to efficiently reduce the operation current of RRAM devices for portable electronic applications.

  14. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Jay, Kenneth; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-03-01

    Numerous studies has shown that regular physical exercise can reduce musculoskeletal pain, but the optimal setting to achieve high adherence and effectiveness remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of workplace versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers. The randomized controlled trial (RCT) comprised 200 female healthcare workers from 18 departments at 3 hospitals. Participants were randomly allocated at the cluster level to ten weeks of: (i) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed during working hours for 5×10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise, or (ii) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed during leisure time for 5×10 minutes per week. Both groups received ergonomic counseling on patient handling and use of lifting aides. Average pain intensity (0-10 scale) in the low back and neck/shoulder was the primary outcome. Per week, 2.2 (SD 1.1) and 1.0 (SD 1.2) training sessions were performed in WORK and HOME groups, respectively. Pain intensity, back muscle strength and use of analgesics improved more following WORK than HOME (PWorkplace physical exercise is more effective than home-based exercise in reducing musculoskeletal pain, increasing muscle strength and reducing the use of analgesics among healthcare workers.

  15. Improving Physical Health in Patients With Chronic Mental Disorders: Twelve-Month Results From a Randomized Controlled Collaborative Care Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Barbaresso, Michelle M; Lai, Zongshan; Nord, Kristina M; Bramlet, Margretta; Goodrich, David E; Post, Edward P; Almirall, Daniel; Bauer, Mark S

    2017-01-01

    Persons with chronic mental disorders are disproportionately burdened with physical health conditions. We determined whether Life Goals Collaborative Care compared to usual care improves physical health in patients with mental disorders within 12 months. This single-blind randomized controlled effectiveness study of a collaborative care model was conducted at a midwestern Veterans Affairs urban outpatient mental health clinic. Patients (N = 293 out of 474 eligible approached) with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder and at least 1 cardiovascular disease risk factor provided informed consent and were randomized (February 24, 2010, to April 29, 2015) to Life Goals (n = 146) or usual care (n = 147). A total of 287 completed baseline assessments, and 245 completed 12-month follow-up assessments. Life Goals included 5 weekly sessions that provided semistructured guidance on managing physical and mental health symptoms through healthy behavior changes, augmented by ongoing care coordination. The primary outcome was change in physical health-related quality of life score (Veterans RAND 12-item Short Form Health Survey [VR-12] physical health component score). Secondary outcomes included control of cardiovascular risk factors from baseline to 12 months (blood pressure, lipids, weight), mental health-related quality of life, and mental health symptoms. Among patients completing baseline and 12-month outcomes assessments (N = 245), the mean age was 55.3 years (SD = 10.8; range, 25-78 years), and 15.4% were female. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed that compared to those in usual care, patients randomized to Life Goals had slightly increased VR-12 physical health scores (coefficient = 3.21; P = .01). Patients with chronic mental disorders and cardiovascular disease risk who received Life Goals had improved physical health-related quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT01487668 and NCT01244854.

  16. Improving Physical Health in Patients with Chronic Mental Disorders: 12-Month Results from a Randomized Controlled Collaborative Care Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Barbaresso, Michelle M.; Lai, Zongshan; Nord, Kristina M.; Bramlet, Margretta; Goodrich, David E.; Post, Edward P.; Almirall, Daniel; Bauer, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Persons with chronic mental disorders are disproportionately burdened with physical health conditions. We determined whether Life Goals Collaborative Care compared to usual care improves physical health in patients with mental disorders within 12 months. Method This single-blind randomized controlled effectiveness study of a collaborative care model was conducted at a mid-western Veterans Affairs urban outpatient mental health clinic. Patients (N=293 out of 474 eligible approached) with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder and at least one cardiovascular disease risk factor were consented and randomized (02/24/10 to 04/29/15) to Life Goals (N=146) or usual care (N=147). A total of 287 completed baseline assessments and 245 completed 12-month follow-up assessments. Life Goals included five weekly sessions that provided semi-structured guidance on managing physical and mental health symptoms through healthy behavior changes, augmented by ongoing care coordination. The primary outcome was change in physical health-related quality of life score (VR-12 physical health component score). Secondary outcomes included control of cardiovascular risk factors from baseline to 12 months (blood pressure, lipids, weight), mental health-related quality of life, and mental health symptoms. Results Among patients completing baseline and 12-month outcomes assessments (N=245), the mean age was 55.3 (SD=10.8; range 28-75 years) and 15.4% were female. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed that compared to those in usual care, patients randomized to Life Goals had slightly increased VR-12 physical health scores (coefficient=3.21;p=0.01). Conclusion Patients with chronic mental disorders and cardiovascular disease risk who received Life Goals had improved physical health-related quality of life. PMID:27780336

  17. Typical kernel size and number of sparse random matrices over GF(q) - a statistical physics approach

    OpenAIRE

    Alamino, Roberto C.; Saad, David

    2008-01-01

    Using methods of statistical physics, we study the average number and kernel size of general sparse random matrices over GF(q), with a given connectivity profile, in the thermodynamical limit of large matrices. We introduce a mapping of $GF(q)$ matrices onto spin systems using the representation of the cyclic group of order q as the q-th complex roots of unity. This representation facilitates the derivation of the average kernel size of random matrices using the replica approach, under the re...

  18. Implementing intelligent physical exercise training at the workplace: health effects among office workers—a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Justesen, Just Bendix; Murray, Mike;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to assess 1-year cardiovascular health effects of Intelligent Physical Exercise Training, IPET. Methods: Office workers from six companies were randomized 1:1 to a training group, TG (N = 194) or a control group, CG (N = 195). TG received 1-h supervised high intensity IPET...... every week within working hours for 1 year, and was recommended to perform 30-min of moderate intensity physical activity 6 days a week during leisure. The training program was based on baseline health check measures of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), body composition, blood pressure, blood profile....... Conclusion: High intensity IPET combined with the recommendations of moderate intensity physical activity demonstrated significant clinical relevant improvements in CRF and systolic blood pressure. This underlines the effectiveness of health promotion by implementing physical exercise training...

  19. Physically Active Math and Language Lessons Improve Academic Achievement : A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullender-Wijnsma, Marijke J.; Hartman, Esther; de Greeff, Johannes W.; Doolaard, Simone; Bosker, Roel J.; Visscher, Chris

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Using physical activity in the teaching of academic lessons is a new way of learning. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an innovative physically active academic intervention ("Fit & Vaardig op School" [F&V]) on academic achievement of children. METHODS: Using physic

  20. The Prescribed Amount of Physical Activity in Randomized Clinical Trials in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Judy; Buchner, David M.; Prohaska, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Over the past two decades, a consensus has formed that increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior in older adults are important for physical and cognitive health. Although there is strong evidence that regular physical activity can prevent or delay the onset of many chronic diseases, a major concern is ensuring that…

  1. The effect of physical activity on cognitive function in patients with dementia: A meta-analysis of randomized control trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, C; Hooghiemstra, A M; Raijmakers, P G H M; van Berckel, B N M; Scheltens, P; Scherder, E J A; van der Flier, W M; Ossenkoppele, R

    2016-01-01

    Non-pharmacological therapies, such as physical activity interventions, are an appealing alternative or add-on to current pharmacological treatment of cognitive symptoms in patients with dementia. In this meta-analysis, we investigated the effect of physical activity interventions on cognitive function in dementia patients, by synthesizing data from 802 patients included in 18 randomized control trials that applied a physical activity intervention with cognitive function as an outcome measure. Post-intervention standardized mean difference (SMD) scores were computed for each study, and combined into pooled effect sizes using random effects meta-analysis. The primary analysis yielded a positive overall effect of physical activity interventions on cognitive function (SMD[95% confidence interval]=0.42[0.23;0.62], pAlzheimer's disease (AD, SMD=0.38[0.09;0.66], pdementia diagnosis (SMD=0.47[0.14;0.80], pexercise interventions (SMD=0.59[0.32;0.86], pexercise interventions (SMD=0.41[0.05;0.76], peffect on cognition, while this association was absent for non-aerobic exercise interventions (SMD=-0.10[-0.38;0.19], p=.51). Finally, we found that interventions offered at both high frequency (SMD=0.33[0.03;0.63], peffect on cognitive function. This meta-analysis suggests that physical activity interventions positively influence cognitive function in patients with dementia. This beneficial effect was independent of the clinical diagnosis and the frequency of the intervention, and was driven by interventions that included aerobic exercise.

  2. Internet-delivered therapist-guided physical activity for mild to moderate depression: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Ström

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main hypothesis, and the objective of the study, was to test if the participants allocated to the treatment group would show a larger reduction in depressive symptoms than those in the control group. Methods. This study was a randomized nine week trial of an Internet-administered treatment based on guided physical exercise for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. A total of 48 participants with mild to moderate depression, diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, were randomized either to a treatment intervention or to a waiting-list control group. The main outcome measure for depression was the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and physical activity level was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. The treatment program consisted of nine text modules, and included therapist guidance on a weekly basis. Results. The results showed significant reductions of depressive symptoms in the treatment group compared to the control group, with a moderate between-group effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.67; 95% confidence interval: 0.09–1.25. No difference was found between the groups with regards to increase of physical activity level. For the treatment group, the reduction in depressive symptoms persisted at six months follow-up. Conclusions. Physical activity as a treatment for depression can be delivered in the form of guided Internet-based self-help. Trial Registration. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01573130.

  3. Physical methods for the treatment of fever in critically ill patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Patrícia de Oliveira; Silva, Ludmila Christiane Rosa da; Silva, Priscila Marinho Aleixo; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of physical methods of reducing body temperature (ice pack and warm compression) in critically ill patients with fever. A randomized clinical trial involving 102 adult patients with tympanic temperature ≥ 38.3°C of an infectious focus, and randomized into three groups: Intervention I - ice pack associated with antipyretic; Intervention II - warm compress associated with antipyretic; and Control - antipyretic. Tympanic temperature was measured at 15 minute intervals for 3 hours. The effect of the interventions was evaluated through the Mann-Whitney test and Survival Analysis. "Effect size" calculation was carried out. Patients in the intervention groups I and II presented greater reduction in body temperature. The group of patients receiving intervention I presented tympanic temperature below 38.3°C at 45 minutes of monitoring, while the value for control group was lower than 38.3°C starting at 60 minutes, and those who received intervention II had values lower than 38.3°C at 75 minutes of monitoring. No statistically significant difference was found between the interventions, but with the intervention group I patients showed greater reduction in tympanic temperature compared to the other groups. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-2k3kbq. Avaliar o efeito de métodos físicos (bolsa de gelo e compressa morna) na redução da temperatura corporal de pacientes críticos com febre. Ensaio clínico randomizado com 102 pacientes adultos e temperatura timpânica ≥ 38,3°C de foco infeccioso, aleatorizados em três grupos: Intervenção I ‒ bolsa de gelo associada a antitérmico; Intervenção II ‒ compressa morna associada a antitérmico; e Controle ‒ antitérmico. A temperatura timpânica foi mensurada em intervalos de 15 minutos durante 3 horas. O efeito das intervenções foi avaliado pelo teste Mann-Whitney e Análise de Sobrevivência. Cálculo do "Effect size" foi procedido. Os pacientes dos grupos Intervenção I e II

  4. Field-Induced Superconductivity in Electric Double Layer Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ueno, Kazunori; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Yuan, Hongtao; Ye, Jianting; Kawasaki, Masashi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Electric field tuning of superconductivity has been a long-standing issue in solid state physics since the invention of the field-effect transistor (FET) in 1960. Owing to limited available carrier density in conventional FET devices, electric-field-induced superconductivity was believed to be possi

  5. Topological superconducting phase and Majorana bound states in Shiba chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pientka, Falko; Peng, Yang; Glazman, Leonid; von Oppen, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Chains of magnetic adatoms on a conventional superconducting substrate constitute a promising venue for realizing topological superconductivity and Majorana end states. Here, we give a brief overview over recent attempts to describe these systems theoretically, emphasizing how the topological phase emerges from the physics of individual magnetic impurities and their associated Shiba states.

  6. Perceived autonomy and activity choices among physically disabled older people in nursing home settings: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Runge, Ulla; Hoff, Morten

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effect of individually tailored programs on perceived autonomy in institutionalized physically disabled older people and to describe participants' activity wishes and content of the programs. METHOD. This blinded randomized trial with follow up included a total of nine...... the correspondence between the individual wishes for activities and the concrete content of the programs was not obvious, results indicate potential for enabling the perception of autonomy among physically disabled older nursing home residents. The clinical consequences may suggest a focus on existing traditions...... nursing homes and 50 nursing home residents who were randomized into either a control group or an intervention group. Perceived autonomy was measured at baseline (T1), after 12 weeks (T2) of intervention and after 24 weeks (T3) Wishes for daily activities was identified at T1. Weekly reports of individual...

  7. Quantification of Uncertainties in Turbulence Modeling: A Comparison of Physics-Based and Random Matrix Theoretic Approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Numerical models based on Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are widely used in engineering turbulence modeling. However, the RANS predictions have large model-form uncertainties for many complex flows. Quantification of these large uncertainties originating from the modeled Reynolds stresses has attracted attention in turbulence modeling community. Recently, a physics-based Bayesian framework for quantifying model-form uncertainties has been proposed with successful applications to several flows. Nonetheless, how to specify proper priors without introducing unwarranted, artificial information remains challenging to the current form of the physics-based approach. Another recently proposed method based on random matrix theory provides the prior distributions with the maximum entropy, which is an alternative for model-form uncertainty quantification in RANS simulations. In this work, we utilize the random matrix theoretic approach to assess and possibly improve the specification of priors used in ...

  8. Yoga, Physical Therapy, or Education for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Noninferiority Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saper, Robert B; Lemaster, Chelsey; Delitto, Anthony; Sherman, Karen J; Herman, Patricia M; Sadikova, Ekaterina; Stevans, Joel; Keosaian, Julia E; Cerrada, Christian J; Femia, Alexandra L; Roseen, Eric J; Gardiner, Paula; Gergen Barnett, Katherine; Faulkner, Carol; Weinberg, Janice

    2017-07-18

    Yoga is effective for mild to moderate chronic low back pain (cLBP), but its comparative effectiveness with physical therapy (PT) is unknown. Moreover, little is known about yoga's effectiveness in underserved patients with more severe functional disability and pain. To determine whether yoga is noninferior to PT for cLBP. 12-week, single-blind, 3-group randomized noninferiority trial and subsequent 40-week maintenance phase. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01343927). Academic safety-net hospital and 7 affiliated community health centers. 320 predominantly low-income, racially diverse adults with nonspecific cLBP. Participants received 12 weekly yoga classes, 15 PT visits, or an educational book and newsletters. The maintenance phase compared yoga drop-in classes versus home practice and PT booster sessions versus home practice. Primary outcomes were back-related function, measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and pain, measured by an 11-point scale, at 12 weeks. Prespecified noninferiority margins were 1.5 (RMDQ) and 1.0 (pain). Secondary outcomes included pain medication use, global improvement, satisfaction with intervention, and health-related quality of life. One-sided 95% lower confidence limits were 0.83 (RMDQ) and 0.97 (pain), demonstrating noninferiority of yoga to PT. However, yoga was not superior to education for either outcome. Yoga and PT were similar for most secondary outcomes. Yoga and PT participants were 21 and 22 percentage points less likely, respectively, than education participants to use pain medication at 12 weeks. Improvements in yoga and PT groups were maintained at 1 year with no differences between maintenance strategies. Frequency of adverse events, mostly mild self-limited joint and back pain, did not differ between the yoga and PT groups. Participants were not blinded to treatment assignment. The PT group had disproportionate loss to follow-up. A manualized yoga program for nonspecific cLBP was noninferior to PT for

  9. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly subjects: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    OpenAIRE

    Aznar Laín, Susana; Webster, A. L., Mrs.; Cañete, Silvia; San Juan, Alejandro F.; López Mojares, Luis Miguel; Pérez Ruiz, Margarita; Lucía Mulas, Alejandro; Chicharro García, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to improve exercise capacity in diseased populations. We chose to examine the effects of eight weeks of IMT on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly individuals. Eighteen moderately active elderly subjects (68.1 +/- 6.8 years [mean +/- SD]; range 58 - 78 years) were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n = 9) or a control group (n = 9) in a double-blind manner. All subjects underwent inspiratory muscle tes...

  10. Diabetes NetPLAY: A physical activity website and linked email counselling randomized intervention for individuals with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courneya Kerry S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - This pilot study evaluated the feasibility (recruitment, retention, adherence and satisfaction and preliminary efficacy of a 12-week website and email-linked counselling intervention on physical activity behaviour change in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Methods - A total of 49 individuals with type 2 diabetes (59% female, average age 54.1 years were randomized to the Diabetes NetPLAY intervention or control condition. The intervention condition received information grounded in the Social Cognitive Theory (SCT, personalized weekly emails, an on-line logbook and message board. Key outcomes included physical activity behaviour and related cognition changes. The control condition was provided links to the Canadian Diabetes Association's Clinical Practice Guidelines for Physical Activity and Canada's Guide to Physical Activity. Results - Intervention participants indicated high levels of satisfaction for this mode of delivery and study results demonstrated the feasibility of web-based mediums for the delivery of physical activity information in this population. The intervention group demonstrated a significant improvement in total vigorous and moderate minutes of physical activity (p = 0.05 compared to the control group over the 12-week study. Among the SCT variables, behavioural capacity, showed a significant increase (p Conclusion - Web-based interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes are feasible and show promise for improving positive physical activity outcomes.

  11. Superconductivity in the Tungsten Bronzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Phillip; Ishii, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kenji; Munakata, Ko; Hammond, Robert H.; Tokiwa, Kazuyasu; Geballe, Theodore H.; Beasley, Malcolm R.

    2015-03-01

    Via pulsed laser deposition and post-annealing, high quality K-doped WO3-y films with reproducible transport properties are obtained. A home built two-coil mutual inductance setup is used to probe the behavior of the films in the superconducting and normal state. The inverse penetration depths and dissipation peaks are measured as a function of temperature and field. Separately, via thin film deposition techniques, we report for the first time stable crystalline hexagonal WO3 on substrates. In order to tune the physical properties of the undoped material, we utilized an ionic liquid gating technique. We observe an insulator-to-metal transition, showing the ionic liquid gate to be a viable technique to alter the electrical transport properties of this material. By comparing the alkali and ionic liquid gated WO3, we conclude with some remarks regarding how superconductivity arises in this system.

  12. A Web-Based, Social Networking Physical Activity Intervention for Insufficiently Active Adults Delivered via Facebook App: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Carol; Ferguson, Monika; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Plotnikoff, Ron; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Thomas, Samantha; Nelson-Field, Karen; Olds, Tim

    2015-07-13

    Online social networks offer considerable potential for delivery of socially influential health behavior change interventions. To determine the efficacy, engagement, and feasibility of an online social networking physical activity intervention with pedometers delivered via Facebook app. A total of 110 adults with a mean age of 35.6 years (SD 12.4) were recruited online in teams of 3 to 8 friends. Teams were randomly allocated to receive access to a 50-day online social networking physical activity intervention which included self-monitoring, social elements, and pedometers ("Active Team" Facebook app; n=51 individuals, 12 teams) or a wait-listed control condition (n=59 individuals, 13 teams). Assessments were undertaken online at baseline, 8 weeks, and 20 weeks. The primary outcome measure was self-reported weekly moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Secondary outcomes were weekly walking, vigorous physical activity time, moderate physical activity time, overall quality of life, and mental health quality of life. Analyses were undertaken using random-effects mixed modeling, accounting for potential clustering at the team level. Usage statistics were reported descriptively to determine engagement and feasibility. At the 8-week follow-up, the intervention participants had significantly increased their total weekly MVPA by 135 minutes relative to the control group (P=.03), due primarily to increases in walking time (155 min/week increase relative to controls, Pnetworking physical activity intervention with pedometers can produce sizable short-term physical activity changes. Future work is needed to determine how to maintain behavior change in the longer term, how to reach at-need populations, and how to disseminate such interventions on a mass scale. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614000488606; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366239 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ZVtu6TMz).

  13. The effect of school-based physical activity interventions on body mass index: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Guerra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study reviewed the effectiveness of school-based physical activity interventions aimed at reducing overweight, obesity and hypertension in children. We searched 14 databases and analyzed studies published between April 2009 and September 2012. Only randomized controlled trials performed at the school level that included elements of physical activity but did not include nutritional co-interventions were analyzed. Studies were assessed by two recommended tools (EPHPP and GRADE, and the standardized mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were collected for a random-effect meta-analysis. A total of 12 papers were included in the meta-analysis, and these were divided according to three outcomes: body mass index (11 trials, n  =  4,273, −0.02, 95% CI: −0.13 to 0.17, p  =  0.8; body weight (5 trials, n  =  1,330, −0.07, 95% CI: −0.18 to 0.04, p  =  0.2; and blood pressure (6 trials, n  =  1,549, including systolic (0.11, 95% CI: −0.10 to 0.31, p  =  0.3 and diastolic pressure (−0.00, 95% CI: −0.10 to 0.10, p  =  0.9. This meta-analysis of data from 11 randomized, school-based physical activity interventions suggests that, regardless of the potential benefits of physical activity in the school environment, the interventions did not have a statistically significant effect. However, it is difficult to generalize from these results because the duration, intensity and type of physical activity used in the interventions varied greatly.

  14. Assessing the comparative effectiveness of Tai Chi versus physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: design and rationale for a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; Iversen, Maura D; McAlindon, Timothy; Harvey, William F; Wong, John B; Fielding, Roger A; Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn; Rones, Ramel; Gamache, Tressa; Schmid, Christopher H

    2014-09-08

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) causes pain and long-term disability with annual healthcare costs exceeding $185 billion in the United States. Few medical remedies effectively influence the course of the disease. Finding effective treatments to maintain function and quality of life in patients with knee OA is one of the national priorities identified by the Institute of Medicine. We are currently conducting the first comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness randomized trial of Tai Chi versus a physical-therapy regimen in a sample of patients with symptomatic and radiographically confirmed knee OA. This article describes the design and conduct of this trial. A single-center, 52-week, comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial of Tai Chi versus a standardized physical-therapy regimen is being conducted at an urban tertiary medical center in Boston, Massachusetts. The study population consists of adults ≥ 40 years of age with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA (American College of Rheumatology criteria). Participants are randomly allocated to either 12 weeks of Tai Chi (2x/week) or Physical Therapy (2x/week for 6 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of rigorously monitored home exercise). The primary outcome measure is pain (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities WOMAC) subscale at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes include WOMAC stkiffness and function domain scores, lower extremity strength and power, functional balance, physical performance tests, psychological and psychosocial functioning, durability effects, health related quality of life, and healthcare utilization at 12, 24 and 52 weeks. This study will be the first randomized comparative-effectiveness and cost-effectiveness trial of Tai Chi versus Physical Therapy in a large symptomatic knee OA population with long-term follow up. We present here a robust and well-designed randomized comparative-effectiveness trial that also explores multiple outcomes to elucidate the potential mechanisms of mind

  15. Attenuation in Superconducting Circular Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Yeap

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis on wave propagation in superconducting circular waveguides. In order to account for the presence of quasiparticles in the intragap states of a superconductor, we employ the characteristic equation derived from the extended Mattis-Bardeen theory to compute the values of the complex conductivity. To calculate the attenuation in a circular waveguide, the tangential fields at the boundary of the wall are first matched with the electrical properties (which includes the complex conductivity of the wall material. The matching of fields with the electrical properties results in a set of transcendental equations which is able to accurately describe the propagation constant of the fields. Our results show that although the attenuation in the superconducting waveguide above cutoff (but below the gap frequency is finite, it is considerably lower than that in a normal waveguide. Above the gap frequency, however, the attenuation in the superconducting waveguide increases sharply. The attenuation eventually surpasses that in a normal waveguide. As frequency increases above the gap frequency, Cooper pairs break into quasiparticles. Hence, we attribute the sharp rise in attenuation to the increase in random collision of the quasiparticles with the lattice structure.

  16. Fundamentals of Superconducting Nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Anatolie

    2011-01-01

    This book demonstrates how the new phenomena in superconductivity on the nanometer scale (FFLO state, triplet superconductivity, Crossed Andreev Reflection, synchronized generation etc.) serve as the basis for the invention and development of novel nanoelectronic devices and systems. It demonstrates how rather complex ideas and theoretical models, like odd-pairing, non-uniform superconducting state, pi-shift etc., adequately describe the processes in real superconducting nanostructues and novel devices based on them. The book is useful for a broad audience of readers, researchers, engineers, P

  17. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  18. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  19. Does Pedometer Goal Setting Improve Physical Activity among Native Elders? Results from a Randomized Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchuk, Craig N.; Russo, Joan E.; Charles, Steve; Goldberg, Jack; Forquera, Ralph; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    We examined if step-count goal setting resulted in increases in physical activity and walking compared to only monitoring step counts with pedometers among American Indian/Alaska Native elders. Outcomes included step counts, self-reported physical activity and well-being, and performance on the 6-minute walk test. Although no significant…

  20. Effect of physical activity intervention based on a pedometer on physical activity level and anthropometric measures after childbirth: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maturi Masumeh S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy and childbirth are associated with weight gain in women, and retention of weight gained during pregnancy can lead to obesity in later life. Diet and physical activity are factors that can influence the loss of retained pregnancy weight after birth. Exercise guidelines exist for pregnancy, but recommendations for exercise after childbirth are virtually nonexistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of physical activity intervention based on pedometer on physical activity level and anthropometric measures of women after childbirth. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial in which 66 women who had given birth 6 weeks to 6 months prior were randomly assigned to receive either a 12 week tailored program encouraging increased walking using a pedometer (intervention group, n = 32 or routine postpartum care (control group, n = 34. During the 12-week study period, each woman in the intervention group wore a pedometer and recorded her daily step count. The women were advised to increase their steps by 500 per week until they achieved the first target of 5000 steps per day and then continued to increase it to minimum of 10,000 steps per day by the end of 12th week. Assessed outcomes included anthropometric measures, physical activity level, and energy expenditure per week. Data were analyzed using the paired t-test, independent t-test, Mann-Whitney, chi-square, Wilcoxon, covariance analysis, and the general linear model repeated measures procedure as appropriate. Results After 12 weeks, women in the intervention group had significantly increased their physical activity and energy expenditure per week (4394 vs. 1651 calorie, p P = 0.001, Body Mass Index (P = 0.001, waist circumference (P = 0.001, hip circumference (P = 0.032 and waist-hip ratio (P = 0.02 were presented after the intervention. The intervention group significantly increased their mean daily step count over the study period (from 3249

  1. Skipping breakfast reduces energy intake and physical activity in healthy women who are habitual breakfast eaters: A randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Eiichi; Hatamoto, Yoichi; Yonekura, Satomi; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2017-03-09

    Many epidemiological studies indicate a positive relationship between skipping breakfast (SB) and obesity. However, it is unclear whether SB affects energy intake and physical activity during the day. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of SB on energy intake and physical activity under free-living conditions. The present study used a randomized, crossover trial design comparing eating breakfast (EB) and SB days. Twenty lean, healthy women 21-25years old who were habitual breakfast eaters (≥5daysperweek) took part in this study. On EB days, participants were provided a standard breakfast (542kcal). The meals and physical activity after breakfast were under free-living conditions. The meals consisted of foods available at supermarkets, restaurants, and convenience stores. Dietary intake was evaluated by adding values from food labels. Physical activity was assessed using a tri-axial accelerometer. Energy intake at lunch was significantly increased after SB compared with EB (+131±188kcal; p=0.0057). Total energy intake per day was significantly lower after SB compared with EB (-262±428kcal, p=0.013). Physical activity energy expenditure was slightly lower after SB compared with EB (-41±75kcal in the morning, p=0.024; -56±129kcalperday, p=0.064). Step counts and time spent physically active over the whole day were not significantly different between conditions. Skipping breakfast reduced energy intake during the day and morning physical activity in healthy women who were habitual breakfast eaters. The decreased energy expenditure related to physical activity after SB did not exceed the decreased energy intake.

  2. Scalable parallel physical random number generator based on a superluminescent LED

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiaowen; Murphy, Thomas E; Roy, Rajarshi

    2011-01-01

    We describe an optoelectronic system for simultaneously generating parallel, independent streams of random bits using spectrally separated noise signals obtained from a single optical source. Using a pair of non-overlapping spectral filters and a fiber-coupled superluminescent light-emitting diode (SLED), we produced two independent 10 Gb/s random bit streams, for a cumulative generation rate of 20 Gb/s. The system relies principally on chip-based optoelectronic components that could be integrated in a compact, economical package.

  3. A generalization of random matrix theory and its application to statistical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duan; Zhang, Xin; Horvatic, Davor; Podobnik, Boris; Eugene Stanley, H

    2017-02-01

    To study the statistical structure of crosscorrelations in empirical data, we generalize random matrix theory and propose a new method of cross-correlation analysis, known as autoregressive random matrix theory (ARRMT). ARRMT takes into account the influence of auto-correlations in the study of cross-correlations in multiple time series. We first analytically and numerically determine how auto-correlations affect the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix. Then we introduce ARRMT with a detailed procedure of how to implement the method. Finally, we illustrate the method using two examples taken from inflation rates for air pressure data for 95 US cities.

  4. Superconducting quantum circuits theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiuhao

    Superconducting quantum circuit models are widely used to understand superconducting devices. This thesis consists of four studies wherein the superconducting quantum circuit is used to illustrate challenges related to quantum information encoding and processing, quantum simulation, quantum signal detection and amplification. The existence of scalar Aharanov-Bohm phase has been a controversial topic for decades. Scalar AB phase, defined as time integral of electric potential, gives rises to an extra phase factor in wavefunction. We proposed a superconducting quantum Faraday cage to detect temporal interference effect as a consequence of scalar AB phase. Using the superconducting quantum circuit model, the physical system is solved and resulting AB effect is predicted. Further discussion in this chapter shows that treating the experimental apparatus quantum mechanically, spatial scalar AB effect, proposed by Aharanov-Bohm, can't be observed. Either a decoherent interference apparatus is used to observe spatial scalar AB effect, or a quantum Faraday cage is used to observe temporal scalar AB effect. The second study involves protecting a quantum system from losing coherence, which is crucial to any practical quantum computation scheme. We present a theory to encode any qubit, especially superconducting qubits, into a universal quantum degeneracy point (UQDP) where low frequency noise is suppressed significantly. Numerical simulations for superconducting charge qubit using experimental parameters show that its coherence time is prolong by two orders of magnitude using our universal degeneracy point approach. With this improvement, a set of universal quantum gates can be performed at high fidelity without losing too much quantum coherence. Starting in 2004, the use of circuit QED has enabled the manipulation of superconducting qubits with photons. We applied quantum optical approach to model coupled resonators and obtained a four-wave mixing toolbox to operate photons

  5. Assessing Causality in the Association between Child Adiposity and Physical Activity Levels : A Mendelian Randomization Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rebecca C Richmond; George Davey Smith; Ness, Andy R; Marcel den Hoed; George McMahon; Nicholas J Timpson

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundCross-sectional studies have shown that objectively measured physical activity is associated with childhood adiposity, and a strong inverse dose-response association with body mass index (BMI) has been found. However, few studies have explored the extent to which this association reflects reverse causation. We aimed to determine whether childhood adiposity causally influences levels of physical activity using genetic variants reliably associated with adiposity to estimate causal eff...

  6. Kaatsu training to enhance physical function of older adults with knee osteoarthritis: Design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, Thomas W; Fillingim, Roger B; Manini, Todd M; Sibille, Kimberly T; Vincent, Kevin R; Wu, Samuel S

    2015-07-01

    As the U.S. population ages, efficacious interventions are needed to manage pain and maintain physical function among older adults with osteoarthritis (OA). Skeletal muscle weakness is a primary contributory factor to pain and functional decline among persons with OA, thus interventions are needed that improve muscle strength. High-load resistance exercise is the best-known method of improving muscle strength; however high-compressive loads commonly induce significant joint pain among persons with OA. Thus interventions with low-compressive loads are needed which improve muscle strength while limiting joint stress. This study is investigating the potential of an innovative training paradigm, known as Kaatsu, for this purpose. Kaatsu involves performing low-load exercise while externally-applied compression partially restricts blood flow to the active skeletal muscle. The objective of this randomized, single-masked pilot trial is to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of chronic Kaatsu training for improving skeletal muscle strength and physical function among older adults. Participants aged ≥ 60 years with physical limitations and symptomatic knee OA will be randomly assigned to engage in a 3-month intervention of either (1) center-based, moderate-load resistance training, or (2) Kaatsu training matched for overall workload. Study dependent outcomes include the change in 1) knee extensor strength, 2) objective measures of physical function, and 3) subjective measures of physical function and pain. This study will provide novel information regarding the therapeutic potential of Kaatsu training while also informing about the long-term clinical viability of the paradigm by evaluating participant safety, discomfort, and willingness to continually engage in the intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Aquatic Physical Therapy for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan; McIntyre, Auburn; Plummer, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic therapy is an intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) that has not been investigated formally. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial to investigate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an aquatic therapy program to improve motor skills of children with DCD. Thirteen children (mean age 7…

  8. Aquatic Physical Therapy for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan; McIntyre, Auburn; Plummer, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic therapy is an intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) that has not been investigated formally. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial to investigate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an aquatic therapy program to improve motor skills of children with DCD. Thirteen children (mean age 7…

  9. Physical Exercise with Multicomponent Cognitive Intervention for Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease: A 6-Month Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ji Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effect of 6-month physical exercise with a multicomponent cognitive program (MCP on the cognitive function of older adults with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods: We included 33 participants with AD in a 6-month randomized controlled trial. The intervention group participated in physical exercise and received a MCP. The control group received only the MCP. Before and after the intervention, cognitive outcomes were assessed using the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-cog, Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Clock Drawing Test. Physical performance was evaluated by exercise time, the number of pedal rotation, total load, grip strength, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS. Results: In all cognitive measures, there were no significant improvements between the two groups after 6 months in the baseline value-adjusted primary analysis. However, the ADAS-cog score was significantly lower between the two groups in secondary analysis adjusted for baseline value, age, sex, and education years. All physical outcomes were significantly higher in the intervention group except for total load compared with baseline measurements. Conclusion: This study indicates that it is possible to improve cognitive function in older adults with moderate to severe AD through 6-month physical exercise with a multicomponent cognitive intervention.

  10. Effect of Early Physical Activity Programs on Motor Performance and Neuromuscular Development in Infants Born Preterm: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Leila; Sanaeefar, Mahnaz; Hosseini, Mohammad Bager; Asgari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Shamili, Aryan

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Although the survival rate of infants born preterm has increased, the prevalence of developmental problems and motor disorders among this population of infants remains the same. This study investigated the effect of physical activity programs in and out of water on motor performance and neuromuscular development of infants born preterm and had induced immobility by mechanical ventilation. Methods: This study was carried out in Al-Zahra hospital, Tabriz. 76 premature infants were randomly assigned into four groups. One group received daily passive range of motion to all extremities based on the Moyer-Mileur protocol. Hydrotherapy group received exercises for shoulders and pelvic area in water every other day. A combination group received physical activity programs in and out of water on alternating days. Infants in a containment group were held in a fetal position. Duration of study was two weeks 'from 32 through 33 weeks post menstrual age (PMA). Motor outcomes were measured by the Test of Infant Motor Performance. Neuromuscular developmental was assessed by New Ballard scale and leg recoil and Ankle dorsiflexion items from Dubowitz scale. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13. Results: TIMP and neuromuscular scores improved in all groups. Motor performance did not differ between groups at 34 weeks PMA. Postural tone of leg recoil was significantly higher in physical activity groups post intervention. Conclusion: Physical activities and containment didn't have different effects on motor performance in infants born preterm. Leg recoil of neuromuscular development items was affected by physical activity programs.

  11. Inclusion of trigger point dry needling in a multimodal physical therapy program for postoperative shoulder pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Buría, José L; Valero-Alcaide, Raquel; Cleland, Joshua Aland; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Atín-Arratibel, María A; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of including 1 session of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) into a multimodal physiotherapy treatment on pain and function in postoperative shoulder pain. Twenty patients (5 male; 15 female; age, 58 ± 12 years) with postoperative shoulder pain after either open reduction and internal fixation with Proximal Humeral Internal Locking System plate plate or rotator cuff tear repair were randomly divided into 2 groups: physiotherapy group (n = 10) who received best evidence physical therapy interventions and a physical therapy plus TrP-DN group (n = 10) who received the same intervention plus a single session of TrP-DN targeted at active TrPs. The Constant-Murley score was used to determine pain, activities of daily living, range of motion, and strength, which was captured at baseline and 1 week after by an assessor blinded to group assignment. Analysis of variance showed that subjects receiving TrP-DN plus physical therapy exhibited greater improvement in the Constant-Murley total score (P physical therapy alone. Between-group effect sizes were large in favor of the TrP-DN group (0.97 physical therapy approach may assist with faster increases in function in individuals with postoperative shoulder pain. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Early Physical Activity Programs on Motor Performance and Neuromuscular Development in Infants Born Preterm: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Leila; Sanaeefar, Mahnaz; Hosseini, Mohammad Bager; Asgari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Shamili, Aryan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although the survival rate of infants born preterm has increased, the prevalence of developmental problems and motor disorders among this population of infants remains the same. This study investigated the effect of physical activity programs in and out of water on motor performance and neuromuscular development of infants born preterm and had induced immobility by mechanical ventilation. Methods: This study was carried out in Al-Zahra hospital, Tabriz. 76 premature infants were randomly assigned into four groups. One group received daily passive range of motion to all extremities based on the Moyer-Mileur protocol. Hydrotherapy group received exercises for shoulders and pelvic area in water every other day. A combination group received physical activity programs in and out of water on alternating days. Infants in a containment group were held in a fetal position. Duration of study was two weeks ‘from 32 through 33 weeks post menstrual age (PMA). Motor outcomes were measured by the Test of Infant Motor Performance. Neuromuscular developmental was assessed by New Ballard scale and leg recoil and Ankle dorsiflexion items from Dubowitz scale. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13. Results: TIMP and neuromuscular scores improved in all groups. Motor performance did not differ between groups at 34 weeks PMA. Postural tone of leg recoil was significantly higher in physical activity groups post intervention. Conclusion: Physical activities and containment didn’t have different effects on motor performance in infants born preterm. Leg recoil of neuromuscular development items was affected by physical activity programs. PMID:28299299

  13. Impact of a brief intervention on physical activity and social cognitive determinants among working mothers: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailey, Emily L; McAuley, Edward

    2014-04-01

    Working mothers exhibit high levels of inactivity, and theory-based interventions to bolster physical activity within this population are needed. This study examined the effectiveness of a brief social cognitive theory-based intervention designed to increase physical activity among working mothers. Participants (N = 141) were randomly assigned to an intervention only, intervention plus follow-up support, or waitlist control condition. The intervention consisted of two group-based workshop sessions designed to teach behavior modification strategies using social cognitive theory. Data were collected at baseline, immediately post-intervention, and 6-month follow-up. Results showed intervention participants exhibited short-term increases in physical activity, which were partially maintained 6 months later. Improvements in physical activity were mediated by increases in self-regulation and self-efficacy. This study provides some support for the effectiveness of a brief intervention to increase physical activity among working mothers. Future programs should explore alternative support mechanisms which may lead to more effective maintenance of initial behavior changes.

  14. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  15. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  16. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  17. The PLUNGE randomized controlled trial: evaluation of a games-based physical activity professional learning program in primary school physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Christensen, Erin M; Eather, Narelle; Sproule, John; Annis-Brown, Laura; Lubans, David Revalds

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the Professional Learning for Understanding Games Education (PLUNGE) program on fundamental movement skills (FMS), in-class physical activity and perceived sporting competence. A cluster-randomized controlled trial involving one year six class each from seven primary schools (n=168; mean age=11.2 years, SD=1.0) in the Hunter Region, NSW, Australia. In September (2013) participants were randomized by school into the PLUNGE intervention (n=97 students) or the 7-week wait-list control (n=71) condition. PLUNGE involved the use of Game Centered curriculum delivered via an in-class teacher mentoring program. Students were assessed at baseline and 8-week follow-up for three object control FMS (Test of Gross Motor Development 2), in-class physical activity (pedometer steps/min) and perceived sporting competence (Self-perception Profile for Children). Linear mixed models revealed significant group-by-time intervention effects (all psize: d=0.9), and in-class pedometer steps/min (d=1.0). No significant intervention effects (p>0.05) were observed for perceived sporting competence. The PLUNGE intervention simultaneously improved object control FMS proficiency and in-class PA in stage three students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Design of the Physical exercise during Adjuvant Chemotherapy Effectiveness Study (PACES:A randomized controlled trial to evaluate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of physical exercise in improving physical fitness and reducing fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonke Gabe S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer chemotherapy is frequently associated with a decline in general physical condition, exercise tolerance, and muscle strength and with an increase in fatigue. While accumulating evidence suggests that physical activity and exercise interventions during chemotherapy treatment may contribute to maintaining cardiorespiratory fitness and strength, the results of studies conducted to date have not been consistent. Additional research is needed to determine the optimal intensity of exercise training programs in general and in particular the relative effectiveness of supervised, outpatient (hospital- or physical therapy practice-based versus home-based programs. Methods This multicenter, prospective, randomized trial will evaluate the effectiveness of a low to moderate intensity, home-based, self-management physical activity program, and a high intensity, structured, supervised exercise program, in maintaining or enhancing physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength, in minimizing fatigue and in enhancing the health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast or colon cancer (n = 360 are being recruited from twelve hospitals in the Netherlands, and randomly allocated to one of the two treatment groups or to a 'usual care' control group. Performance-based and self-reported outcomes are assessed at baseline, at the end of chemotherapy and at six month follow-up. Discussion This large, multicenter, randomized clinical trial will provide additional empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical exercise during adjuvant chemotherapy in enhancing physical fitness, minimizing fatigue, and maintaining or enhancing patients' quality of life. If demonstrated to be effective, exercise intervention programs will be a welcome addition to the standard program of care offered to patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Trial registration This study is registered at

  19. Local Electronic Structure and High Temperature Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V. J.; Kivelson, S. A.

    1999-02-08

    It is argued that a new mechanism and many-body theory of superconductivity are required for doped correlated insulators. Here they review the essential features of and the experimental support for such a theory, in which the physics is driven by the kinetic energy.

  20. Telephone Coaching to Enhance a Home-Based Physical Activity Program for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Campbell, Penny K; Egerton, Thorlene; Metcalf, Ben; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Bills, Caroline; Gale, Janette; Harris, Anthony; Kolt, Gregory S; Bunker, Stephen J; Hunter, David J; Brand, Caroline A; Hinman, Rana S

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether simultaneous telephone coaching improves the clinical effectiveness of a physiotherapist-prescribed home-based physical activity program for knee osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 168 inactive adults ages ≥50 years with knee pain on a numeric rating scale ≥4 (NRS; range 0-10) and knee OA were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to a physiotherapy (PT) and coaching group (n = 84) or PT-only (n = 84) group. All participants received five 30-minute consultations with a physiotherapist over 6 months for education, home exercise, and physical activity advice. PT+coaching participants also received 6-12 telephone coaching sessions by clinicians trained in behavioral-change support for exercise and physical activity. Primary outcomes were pain (NRS) and physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC; score range 0-68]) at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were these same measures at 12 and 18 months, as well as physical activity, exercise adherence, other pain and function measures, and quality of life. Analyses were intent-to-treat with multiple imputation for missing data. A total of 142 (85%), 136 (81%), and 128 (76%) participants completed 6-, 12-, and 18-month measurements, respectively. The change in NRS pain (mean difference 0.4 unit [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -0.4, 1.3]) and in WOMAC function (1.8 [95% CI -1.9, 5.5]) did not differ between groups at 6 months, with both groups showing clinically relevant improvements. Some secondary outcomes related to physical activity and exercise behavior favored PT+coaching at 6 months but generally not at 12 or 18 months. There were no between-group differences in most other outcomes. The addition of simultaneous telephone coaching did not augment the pain and function benefits of a physiotherapist-prescribed home-based physical activity program. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Aging of residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, M.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics......Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics...

  2. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  3. High-Density Physical Random Number Generator Using Spin Signals in Multidomain Ferromagnetic Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Chun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-density random number generator (RNG based on spin signals in a multidomain ferromagnetic layer in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ is proposed and fabricated. Unlike conventional spin-based RNGs, the proposed method does not require one to control an applied current, leading to a time delay in the system. RNG demonstrations are performed at room temperature. The randomness of the bit sequences generated by the proposed RNG is verified using the FIPS 140-2 statistical test suite provided by the NIST. The test results validate the effectiveness of the proposed RNGs. Our results suggest that we can obtain high-density, ultrafast RNGs if we can achieve high integration on the chip.

  4. The crystallography of color superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, J A; Bowers, Jeffrey A.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2003-01-01

    We describe the crystalline phase of color superconducting quark matter. This phase may occur in quark matter at densities relevant for compact star physics, with possible implications for glitch phenomena in pulsars. We use a Ginzburg-Landau approach to determine that the crystal has a face-centered-cubic (FCC) structure. Moreover, our results indicate that the phase is robust, with gaps, critical temperature, and free energy comparable to those of the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase. Our calculations also predict ``crystalline superfluidity'' in ultracold gases of fermionic atoms.

  5. The materials physics companion

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer-Cripps, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Materials Physics: Structure of matter. Solid state physics. Dynamic properties of solids. Dielectric Properties of Materials: Dielectric properties. Ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Dielectric breakdown. Applications of dielectrics. Magnetic Properties of Materials: Magnetic properties. Magnetic moment. Spontaneous magnetization. Superconductivity.

  6. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study of spirulina supplementation on indices of mental and physical fatigue in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Morgan; Hassinger, Lauren; Davis, Joshua; Devor, Steven T; DiSilvestro, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Spirulina may increase people's ability to resist mental and physical fatigue. This study tested that hypothesis in a randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled study in men. After 1 week, a 3 g/day dose of spirulina produced a small, but statistically significant increase in exercise output (Kcals consumed in 30 min exercise on a cross trainer machine). A mathematical based mental fatigue test showed improved performance 4 h after the first time of supplementation as well as 8 weeks later. Similarly, a subjective survey for a sense of physical and mental fatigue showed improvement within 4 h of the first supplementation as well as 8 weeks later. These results show that spirulina intake can affect fatigue in men.

  7. An Internet-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Improve Quality of Life of Inactive Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhuizen, Karen; de Gelder, Jelle; Wijsman, Carolien A; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Verhagen, Evert; Slagboom, Pieternella E; van Mechelen, Willem; van Heemst, Diana; van der Ouderaa, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing physical activity is a viable strategy for improving both the health and quality of life of older adults. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if an Internet-based intervention aimed to increase physical activity was effective in improving quality of life of inactive older adults. In addition, we analyzed the effect of the intervention on quality of life among those participants who successfully reached their individually targeted increase in daily physical activity as indicated by the intervention program, as well as the dose-response effect of increasing physical activity on quality of life. Methods The intervention was tested in a randomized controlled trial and was comprised of an Internet program—DirectLife (Philips)—aimed at increasing physical activity using monitoring and feedback by accelerometry and feedback by digital coaching (n=119). The control group received no intervention (n=116). Participants were inactive 60-70-year-olds and were recruited from the general population. Quality of life and physical activity were measured at baseline and after 3 months using the Research ANd Development 36-item health survey (RAND-36) and wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer, respectively. Results After 3 months, a significant improvement in quality of life was seen in the intervention group compared to the control group for RAND-36 subscales on emotional and mental health (2.52 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.03) and health change (8.99 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.01). A total of 50 of the 119 participants (42.0%) in the intervention group successfully reached their physical activity target and showed a significant improvement in quality of life compared to the control group for subscales on emotional and mental health (4.31 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.009) and health change (11.06 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.004). The dose-response analysis showed that there was a significant association between increase in minutes spent in moderate

  8. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  9. Superconducting circuits for quantum information: an outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2013-03-08

    The performance of superconducting qubits has improved by several orders of magnitude in the past decade. These circuits benefit from the robustness of superconductivity and the Josephson effect, and at present they have not encountered any hard physical limits. However, building an error-corrected information processor with many such qubits will require solving specific architecture problems that constitute a new field of research. For the first time, physicists will have to master quantum error correction to design and operate complex active systems that are dissipative in nature, yet remain coherent indefinitely. We offer a view on some directions for the field and speculate on its future.

  10. Video game play, child diet, and physical activity behavior change: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Video games designed to promote behavior change are a promising venue to enable children to learn healthier behaviors. The purpose is to evaluate the outcome from playing "Escape from Diab" (Diab) and "Nanoswarm: Invasion from Inner Space" (Nano) video games on children's diet, physical activity, an...

  11. [Results of a physical therapy program in nursing home residents: A randomized clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilda-López, Jesús; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Garzón-Moreno, Victor Manuel; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of the physical functionality is a key factor in the care of the elderly. Inactive people have a higher risk of death due to diseases associated with inactivity. In addition, the maintenance of optimal levels of physical and mental activity has been suggested as a protective factor against the development and progression of chronic illnesses and disability. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of an 8-week exercise program with elastic bands, on exercise capacity, walking and balance in nursing home residents. A nursing home sample was divided into two groups, intervention group (n=26) and control group (n=25). The intervention group was included in an 8-week physical activity program using elastic bands, twice a week, while the control group was took part in a walking programme. Outcome measurements were descriptive variables (anthropometric characteristics, quality of life, fatigue, fear of movement) and fundamental variables (exercise capacity, walking and balance). A significant improvement in balance and walking speed was observed after the programme. Additionally, exercise capacity improved significantly (P≤.001), and the patients showed an improvement in perceived dyspnea after the physical activity programme in the intervention group. The exercise program was safe and effective in improving dyspnea, exercise capacity, walking, and balance in elderly. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Low-Intensity Physical Activity and Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise During Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Physical Fitness, Fatigue, and Chemotherapy Completion Rates: Results of the PACES Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waart, Hanna; Stuiver, Martijn M; van Harten, Wim H; Geleijn, Edwin; Kieffer, Jacobien M; Buffart, Laurien M; de Maaker-Berkhof, Marianne; Boven, Epie; Schrama, Jolanda; Geenen, Maud M; Meerum Terwogt, Jetske M; van Bochove, Aart; Lustig, Vera; van den Heiligenberg, Simone M; Smorenburg, Carolien H; Hellendoorn-van Vreeswijk, Jeannette A J H; Sonke, Gabe S; Aaronson, Neil K

    2015-06-10

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a low-intensity, home-based physical activity program (Onco-Move) and a moderate- to high-intensity, combined supervised resistance and aerobic exercise program (OnTrack) versus usual care (UC) in maintaining or enhancing physical fitness, minimizing fatigue, enhancing health-related quality of life, and optimizing chemotherapy completion rates in patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. We randomly assigned patients who were scheduled to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy (N = 230) to Onco-Move, OnTrack, or UC. Performance-based and self-reported outcomes were assessed before random assignment, at the end of chemotherapy, and at the 6-month follow-up. We used generalized estimating equations to compare the groups over time. Onco-Move and OnTrack resulted in less decline in cardiorespiratory fitness (P physical functioning (P ≤ .001), less nausea and vomiting (P = .029 and .031, respectively) and less pain (P = .003 and .011, respectively) compared with UC. OnTrack also resulted in better outcomes for muscle strength (P = .002) and physical fatigue (P exercise program is most effective for patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy. A home-based, low-intensity physical activity program represents a viable alternative for women who are unable or unwilling to follow the higher intensity program. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Efficacy of Tailored Exercise Therapy on Physical Functioning in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis and Comorbidity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Cheung, John; van der Esch, Martin; Häkkinen, Arja; Haverkamp, Daniël; Roorda, Leo D; Twisk, Jos; Vollebregt, Joke; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy on physical functioning and safety of tailored exercise therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and comorbidities. In a randomized controlled trial, 126 participants were included with a clinical diagnosis of knee OA and at least 1 of the following target comorbidities: coronary disease, heart failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) ), with severity score ≥2 on the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. The intervention group received a 20-week, individualized, comorbidity-adapted exercise program consisting of aerobic and strength training and training of daily activities. The control group received their current medical care for knee OA and were placed on a waiting list for exercise therapy. Primary outcome measures were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, subscale physical functioning (WOMAC-pf), and the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Measurements were performed at baseline, after 20 weeks (directly posttreatment), and at 3 months posttreatment. Statistically significant physical functioning differences over time were found between the intervention and control group (WOMAC: B = -7.43 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -9.99, -4.87], P therapy is efficacious in improving physical functioning and safe in patients with knee OA and severe comorbidities. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Randomized Trial of a Lifestyle Physical Activity Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors: Effects on Transtheoretical Model Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Stacie; Mama, Scherezade K; Carmack, Cindy L; Douglas, Tommy; Diamond, Pamela; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2017-06-01

    This study examined whether a physical activity intervention affects transtheoretical model (TTM) variables that facilitate exercise adoption in breast cancer survivors. Sixty sedentary breast cancer survivors were randomized to a 6-month lifestyle physical activity intervention or standard care. TTM variables that have been shown to facilitate exercise adoption and progress through the stages of change, including self-efficacy, decisional balance, and processes of change, were measured at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Differences in TTM variables between groups were tested using repeated measures analysis of variance. The intervention group had significantly higher self-efficacy ( F = 9.55, p = .003) and perceived significantly fewer cons of exercise ( F = 5.416, p = .025) at 3 and 6 months compared with the standard care group. Self-liberation, counterconditioning, and reinforcement management processes of change increased significantly from baseline to 6 months in the intervention group, and self-efficacy and reinforcement management were significantly associated with improvement in stage of change. The stage-based physical activity intervention increased use of select processes of change, improved self-efficacy, decreased perceptions of the cons of exercise, and helped participants advance in stage of change. These results point to the importance of using a theory-based approach in interventions to increase physical activity in cancer survivors.

  15. Physical exercise at the workplace prevents deterioration of work ability among healthcare workers: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Jay, Kenneth; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-11-25

    Imbalance between individual resources and work demands can lead to musculoskeletal disorders and reduced work ability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on work ability among healthcare workers. Two hundred female healthcare workers (Age: 42.0, BMI: 24.1, work ability index [WAI]: 43.1) from 18 departments at three Danish hospitals participated (Copenhagen, Denmark, Aug 2013-Jan 2014). Participants were randomly allocated at the cluster level to 10 weeks of: 1) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed during working hours for 5x10 min per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise, or 2) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed during leisure time for 5x10 min per week. Both groups received ergonomic counseling on patient handling and use of lifting aides. The main outcome measure was the change from baseline to 10-week follow-up in WAI. Significant group by time interaction was observed for WAI (p workplace prevents deterioration of work ability among female healthcare workers. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01921764 . Registered 10 August 2013.

  16. A randomized multifactorial intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (Inter99): The long-term effect on physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, L.V.H.; Ladelund, S.; Borch-Johnsen, K.;

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of a randomized multiple risk factor intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) on the development in physical activity over a 36-month period. METHODS: Two random samples (high intensity intervention, group A, n=11,708; low intensity interventio...

  17. Pasos Hacia La Salud: a randomized controlled trial of an internet-delivered physical activity intervention for Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Bess H; Hartman, Sheri J; Larsen, Britta A; Pekmezi, Dori; Dunsiger, Shira I; Linke, Sarah; Marquez, Becky; Gans, Kim M; Bock, Beth C; Mendoza-Vasconez, Andrea S; Noble, Madison L; Rojas, Carlos

    2016-05-28

    Internet access has grown markedly in Latinos during the past decade. However, there have been no Internet-based physical activity interventions designed for Latinos, despite large disparities in lifestyle-related conditions, such as obesity and diabetes, particularly in Latina women. The current study tested the efficacy of a 6-month culturally adapted, individually tailored, Spanish-language Internet-based physical activity intervention. Inactive Latinas (N = 205) were randomly assigned to the Tailored Physical Activity Internet Intervention or the Wellness Contact Control Internet Group. Participants in both groups received emails on a tapered schedule over 6 months to alert them to new content on the website. The primary outcome was minutes/week of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at 6 months as measured by the 7-Day Physical Activity Recall; activity was also measured by accelerometers. Data were collected between 2011 and 2014 and analyzed in 2015 at the University of California, San Diego. Increases in minutes/week of MVPA were significantly greater in the Intervention Group compared to the Control Group (mean difference = 50.00, SE = 9.5, p < 0.01). Increases in objectively measured MVPA were also significantly larger in the Intervention Group (mean differences = 31.0, SE = 10.7, p < .01). The Intervention Group was also significantly more likely to meet national physical activity guidelines at 6 months (OR = 3.12, 95% CI 1.46-6.66, p < .05). Findings from the current study suggest that this Internet-delivered individually tailored intervention successfully increased MVPA in Latinas compared to a Wellness Contact Control Internet Group. NCT01834287.

  18. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franssen Jo LM

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis, but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle. It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. Methods/Design This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 – September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects

  19. Materials and Physics Challenges for Spin Transfer Torque Magnetic Random Access Memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, O.

    2014-10-05

    Magnetic random access memories utilizing the spin transfer torque effect for writing information are a strong contender for non-volatile memories scalable to the 20 nm node, and perhaps beyond. I will here examine how these devices behave as the device size is scaled down from 70 nm size to 20 nm. As device sizes go below ~50 nm, the size becomes comparable to intrinsic magnetic length scales and the device behavior does not simply scale with size. This has implications for the device design and puts additional constraints on the materials in the device.

  20. A Statistical Distribution of Surface Elevation for Nonlinear Random Sea Waves and Its Physical Explanation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙孚; 丁平兴

    1994-01-01

    Based upon the nonlinear model of random sea waves,a commonly applicable statisticaldistribution of wave surface elevation exact to the third order is derived through the direct calculations ofeach order moment.The distribution arrived reduces,in the sense of being exact to H6,to the Gram-Charlierseries due to Longuet-Higgins for deep water,provided that only the two simplest kinds of wave-wave inter-actions are taken into account The reason why the agreement of Gram-Charlier series with experimental databecomes worse and worse as the terms of series are increased is explicited for the first time.

  1. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garifullin, I.A., E-mail: ilgiz_garifullin@yahoo.com [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Leksin, P.V.; Garif' yanov, N.N.; Kamashev, A.A. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Fominov, Ya.V. [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O.G. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Büchner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoO{sub x}/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers. - Highlights: • We studied a spin switch design F1/F2/S. • We prepared a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). • The full spin switch effect for the superconducting current was realized. • We observed its oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness. • We obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity.

  2. Superconductivity in Cuba: Reaching the Frontline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arés Muzio, Oscar; Altshuler, Ernesto

    The start of experimental research in the field of superconductivity was a very special moment for Cuban physics: Cuban scientists at the Physics Faculty, University of Havana, synthesized the first Cuban superconductor (a 123-YBCO ceramic sample) just 2 months after the publication of the famous paper by Wu and co-workers that triggered the frantic race of High Tc superconductors all over the world. We timely joined the world's frontline in superconductor research.

  3. Effects of Home-based Telesupervising Rehabilitation on Physical Function for Stroke Survivors with Hemiplegia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Jin, Wei; Dong, Wen Shuai; Jin, Yan; Qiao, Feng Lei; Zhou, Ya Fei; Ren, Cheng Chuan

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this work were to evaluate the effects of home-based telesupervising rehabilitation on physical function for stroke survivors with hemiplegia and to determine if the rehabilitation therapy can relieve the burden on caregivers. This study is a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded trial. Stroke survivors were randomly assigned to either home-based telesupervising rehabilitation group or conventional rehabilitation group to receive physical exercise and electromyography-triggered neuromuscular stimulation. Modified Barthel Index, Berg Balance Scale, modified Rankin Scale, Caregiver Strain Index, root mean square of extensor carpi radialis longus and tibialis anterior muscle were measured at 3 time points: baseline, postintervention (12 weeks), and 12-week follow-up (24 weeks). Both the home-based telerehabilitation and conventional rehabilitation groups demonstrated significant effects within groups over the 3 time points in increasing Modified Barthel Index, Berg Balance Scale, and root mean square value of extensor carpi radialis longus and tibialis anterior, as well as decreasing Caregiver Strain Index (P rehabilitation is most likely as effective as the conventional outpatient rehabilitation for improving functional recovery in stroke survivors and could ease the burden of caregivers as conventional rehabilitation.

  4. Applied superconductivity handbook on devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This wide-ranging presentation of applied superconductivity, from fundamentals and materials right up to the latest applications, is an essential reference for physicists and engineers in academic research as well as in the field. Readers looking for a systematic overview on superconducting materials will expand their knowledge and understanding of both low and high Tc superconductors, including organic and magnetic materials. Technology, preparation and characterization are covered for several geometries, but the main benefit of this work lies in its broad coverage of significant applications in power engineering or passive devices, such as filter and antenna or magnetic shields. The reader will also find information on superconducting magnets for diverse applications in mechanical engineering, particle physics, fusion research, medicine and biomagnetism, as well as materials processing. SQUIDS and their usage in medicine or geophysics are thoroughly covered as are applications in quantum metrology, and, las...

  5. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  6. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  7. Model and Effectiveness of Endurance Exercise to Increase Physical Fitness in Intellectual Disability Subjects with Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirza Z Tamin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to design a model and assess the effectiveness of endurance exercise to increase physical fitness in intelectual disability (ID patients with obesity. Methods: a randomized-controlled clinical trial was performed in ID patients with obesity aged 10-30 years old from all Special School in DKI Jakarta, which were randomly allocated into 3 groups and then given 3 different type of exercises: lower extremity muscles endurance exercise for 20 RM followed by cardiorespiratory endurance exercise for 24-25 minutes (type I, lower extremity muscles endurance exercises for 10 RM followed by cardiorespiratory endurance exercises for 26-27 minutes (type II, and threw a tennis ball with 10 m distance for 10 minutes as control (type III. These program was performed 3 times a week for 4 months. Assesment of the exercise effectiveness was done by measuring maximum load that can be lifted and six-minutes walking test on rectangular track which was converted with the VO2 max prediction formula. Analysis was perfomed with Kruskal Wallis test. Results: two hundred and twelve (212 subjects were included in the study, randomly allocated into three types (I, II, and III of exercises groups. The type II of endurance exercise model was proved to be more effective in increasing lower extremity muscles endurance level compared to type I and III for ID patients with obesity (p<0.05. Meanwhile, type I of endurance exercise model was proved to be more effective in increasing cardiorespiratory endurance level compared to type II and III for ID patients with obesity (p<0.05. Conclusion: lower extremity muscles endurance exercise followed by a cardiorespiratory endurance exercise can be used to increase physical fitness in ID patients with obesity. Key words: intelectual disability patient, obesity, lower extremity muscles and cardiorespiratory endurance exercise, lower extremity muscles endurance level, cardiorespiratory endurance level.

  8. mActive: A Randomized Clinical Trial of an Automated mHealth Intervention for Physical Activity Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Seth S; Feldman, David I; Blumenthal, Roger S; Jones, Steven R; Post, Wendy S; McKibben, Rebeccah A; Michos, Erin D; Ndumele, Chiadi E; Ratchford, Elizabeth V; Coresh, Josef; Blaha, Michael J

    2015-11-09

    We hypothesized that a fully automated mobile health (mHealth) intervention with tracking and texting components would increase physical activity. mActive enrolled smartphone users aged 18 to 69 years at an ambulatory cardiology center in Baltimore, Maryland. We used sequential randomization to evaluate the intervention's 2 core components. After establishing baseline activity during a blinded run-in (week 1), in phase I (weeks 2 to 3), we randomized 2:1 to unblinded versus blinded tracking. Unblinding allowed continuous access to activity data through a smartphone interface. In phase II (weeks 4 to 5), we randomized unblinded participants 1:1 to smart texts versus no texts. Smart texts provided smartphone-delivered coaching 3 times/day aimed at individual encouragement and fostering feedback loops by a fully automated, physician-written, theory-based algorithm using real-time activity data and 16 personal factors with a 10 000 steps/day goal. Forty-eight outpatients (46% women, 21% nonwhite) enrolled with a mean±SD age of 58±8 years, body mass index of 31±6 kg/m(2), and baseline activity of 9670±4350 steps/day. Daily activity data capture was 97.4%. The phase I change in activity was nonsignificantly higher in unblinded participants versus blinded controls by 1024 daily steps (95% confidence interval [CI], -580 to 2628; P=0.21). In phase II, participants receiving texts increased their daily steps over those not receiving texts by 2534 (95% CI, 1318 to 3750; Pintervention increased physical activity with, but not without, the texting component. These results support new mHealth tracking technologies as facilitators in need of behavior change drivers. URL: http://ClinicalTrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT01917812. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. A pilot randomized trial of technology-assisted goal setting to improve physical activity among primary care patients with prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Devin M; Palmisano, Joseph; Lin, Jenny J

    2016-12-01

    Lifestyle behavior changes can prevent progression of prediabetes to diabetes but providers often are not able to effectively counsel about preventive lifestyle changes. We developed and pilot tested the Avoiding Diabetes Thru Action Plan Targeting (ADAPT) program to enhance primary care providers' counseling about behavior change for patients with prediabetes. Primary care providers in two urban academic practices and their patients with prediabetes were recruited to participate in the ADAPT study, an unblinded randomized pragmatic trial to test the effectiveness of the ADAPT program, including a streamlined electronic medical record-based goal setting tool. Providers were randomized to intervention or control arms; eligible patients whose providers were in the intervention arm received the ADAPT program. Physical activity (the primary outcome) was measured using pedometers, and data were gathered about patients' diet, weight and glycemic control. A total of 54 patients were randomized and analyzed as part of the 6-month ADAPT study (2010-2012, New York, NY). Those in the intervention group showed an increase total daily steps compared to those in the control group (+ 1418 vs - 598, p = 0.007) at 6 months. There was also a trend towards weight loss in the intervention compared to the control group (- 1.0 lbs. vs. 3.0 lbs., p = 0.11), although no change in glycemic control. The ADAPT study is among the first to use standard electronic medical record tools to embed goal setting into realistic primary care workflows and to demonstrate a significant improvement in prediabetes patients' physical activity.

  10. Efficacy of combined physical and occupational therapy in patients with conservatively treated distal radius fracture: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipova, Verica; Lonzarić, Dragan; Jesenšek Papež, Breda

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of combined physical and occupational therapy in comparison with physical therapy alone in patients with conservatively treated distal radius fracture. Sixty-one participants, conservatively treated after a distal radius fracture, were included in a randomized and single-blind trial. Group A had physical therapy only (n = 31) and group B had physical and occupational therapy (n = 30). The assessment was performed three times: upon inclusion in the study in the first week after removal of the cast (T1), immediately after the end of the rehabilitation (T2), and 1 month after completing the rehabilitation (T3). The passive wrist range-of-motion, grip strength, and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score were used as rehabilitation outcomes. Rehabilitation outcomes were analyzed using two-way mixed analysis of variance. The effect of time was statistically significant (p therapy) factor was statistically significant for grip strength only (p = 0.038). The interaction effect was statistically significant for rotation (p = 0.034) and grip strength (p = 0.021). A comparison between time points T3:T1 showed statistically significant difference in grip strength in favor of group B 67 % (95 % CI 60-74 %) versus group A 53 % (95 % CI 45-61 %), p = 0.024. The combined therapy resulted in a statistically significant increase of grip strength in comparison with isolated physical therapy in the period of 12-16 weeks after the fracture. This effectiveness was not confirmed with DASH score results.

  11. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly subjects: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Lain, S; Webster, A L; Cañete, S; San Juan, A F; López Mojares, L M; Pérez, M; Lucia, A; Chicharro, J L

    2007-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to improve exercise capacity in diseased populations. We chose to examine the effects of eight weeks of IMT on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly individuals. Eighteen moderately active elderly subjects (68.1 +/- 6.8 years [mean +/- SD]; range 58 - 78 years) were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n = 9) or a control group (n = 9) in a double-blind manner. All subjects underwent inspiratory muscle testing, treadmill exercise testing and a four-day measurement period of spontaneous physical activity (using accelerometry) both pre- and post-intervention. The experimental group underwent eight weeks of incremental IMT using a pressure threshold device, while the control group underwent sham training using identical devices. After IMT training, inspiratory muscle strength (mean + 21.5 cm H (2)O; 95 % CI: 9.3, 33.7; p = 0.002), V.O (2peak) (+ 2.8 ml x min (-1) x kg (-1); 95 % CI: 0.5, 5.2; p = 0.022), time to exhaustion during a fixed workload treadmill test (+ 7.1 min; 95 % CI: 1.8, 2.4; p = 0.013) and time engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (+ 59 min; 95 % CI: 15, 78; p = 0.008) improved. Except for a decline in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, no significant changes were seen in the control group. Therefore, IMT may be a useful technique for positively influencing exercise capacity and physical activity in elderly individuals.

  12. Effect of Kaempferia parviflora Extract on Physical Fitness of Soccer Players: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promthep, Kreeta; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn; Chatchawan, Uraiwan

    2015-05-06

    Physical fitness is a fundamental prerequisite for soccer players. Kaempferia parviflora is an herbal plant that has been used in some Asian athletes with the belief that it might prevent fatigue and improve physical fitness. This study aimed to determine the effects of Kaempferia parviflora on the physical fitness of soccer players. Sixty soccer players who routinely trained at a sports school participated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial and were randomly allocated to the treatment group or the placebo group. The participants in both groups were given either 180 mg of Kaempferia parviflora extract in capsules or a placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Baseline data were collected using the following 6 tests of physical performance: a sit-and-reach test, a hand grip strength test, a back-and-leg strength test, a 40-yard technical test, a 50-metre sprint test, and a cardiorespiratory fitness test. All of the tests were performed every 4 weeks throughout the 12-week study period. The study showed that after treatment with Kaempferia parviflora, the right-hand grip strength was significantly increased at weeks 4, 8, and 12. The left-hand grip strength was significantly increased at week 8. However, the back-and-leg strength, the 40-yard technical test, the sit-and-reach test, the 50-metre sprint test, and the cardiorespiratory fitness test results of the treatment group were not significantly different from those of the placebo group. Taking Kaempferia parviflora supplements for 12 weeks may significantly enhance some physical fitness components in soccer players.

  13. Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics Talk: Shape fluctuations of growing droplets and random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, Herbert

    2011-03-01

    In 1986 Kardar, Parisi, and Zhang (KPZ) proposed a stochastic evolution equation for growing interfaces, thereby triggering an intense study of growth processes with local growth rules. Specifically we have in mind the recent spectacular experiment of Takeuchi and Sano on droplet growth in a thin film of turbulent liquid crystal. Over the last ten years one has studied universal probability density functions on the basis of simplified lattice growth models. Surprisingly enough the one-point shape fluctuations are governed by the same statistical laws as the largest eigenvalue of a random matrix, Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE) in case of a curved front and Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE) for a flat front. Recently we obtained the first exact solution of the KPZ equation for initial conditions corresponding to droplet growth, thereby providing the probability density function for the height at any time. For long times we recover the universal statistical properties as computed from lattice growth models.

  14. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    , the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However...... MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train....

  15. Superconductivity fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buckel, Werner

    2004-01-01

    This is the second English edition of what has become one of the definitive works on superconductivity in German -- currently in its sixth edition. Comprehensive and easy to understand, this introductory text is written especially with the non-specialist in mind. The authors, both long-term experts in this field, present the fundamental considerations without the need for extensive mathematics, describing the various phenomena connected with the superconducting state, with liberal insertion of experimental facts and examples for modern applications. While all fields of superconducting phenomena are dealt with in detail, this new edition pays particular attention to the groundbreaking discovery of magnesium diboride and the current developments in this field. In addition, a new chapter provides an overview of the elements, alloys and compounds where superconductivity has been observed in experiments, together with their major characteristics. The chapter on technical applications has been considerably expanded...

  16. Intelligent Physical Exercise Training in a Workplace Setting Improves Muscle Strength and Musculoskeletal Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Dalager

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess effects of 1-year Intelligent Physical Exercise Training (IPET on musculoskeletal health. Methods. Office workers were randomized 1 : 1 to a training group, TG (N=193, or a control group, CG (N=194. TG received 1 h supervised high intensity IPET every week within working hours for 1 year and was recommended to perform 30 min of moderate intensity physical activity for 6 days a week during leisure. The IPET program was based on baseline health measures. Results. No baseline differences were present. An intention-to-treat analysis showed significant between-group effect for muscle strength but not for musculoskeletal pain. However, a per-protocol analysis of those with an adherence of ≥70% demonstrated a significant between-group effect for neck pain during the past three months. Several significant within-group changes were present, where TG and TG ≥ 70% demonstrated clinically relevant pain reductions whereas minimal reductions were seen for CG. Conclusion. IPET and recommendations of moderate intensity physical activity demonstrated significant between-group effect on muscle strength. Interestingly, significant within-group reductions in musculoskeletal pain were seen not only in TG but also in CG. This may underlie the lack of such between-group effect and shows that a possible positive side effect of merely drawing attention can improve musculoskeletal health.

  17. Physical Exercise on Inflammatory Markers in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Luciana Costa; Dativo-Medeiros, Jaime; Menezes-Silva, Carlos Eduardo; de Sousa-Rodrigues, Célio Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a serious disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. Scientific findings showed that physical exercise is an option for treatment of these patients. This study's objective is to investigate the effects of supervised aerobic and/or resistance physical training on inflammatory markers in subjects with T2DM. Methods. A systematic review was conducted on four databases, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, LILACS, and Scopus, and manual search from 21 to 30 November 2016. Randomized clinical trials involving individuals diagnosed with T2DM, who have undergone supervised training protocols, were selected in this study. Results. Eleven studies were included. Studies that evaluated control group versus aerobic exercise reported controversial results about the effectiveness of physical training in modifying C-reactive protein (CRP) and cytokine levels. The only variable analyzed by the six studies in comparison to the control group versus resistance exercise was CRP. This protein showed no significant difference between groups. Between the two modes of exercise (aerobic and resistance), only one study demonstrated that aerobic exercise was more effective in reducing CRP. Conclusion. The evidence was insufficient to prove that aerobic or resistance exercise improves systemic levels of inflammatory markers in patients with T2DM. PMID:28400914

  18. Physical Activity and Early Rehabilitation in Hospitalized Elderly Medical Patients: Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Velilla, N; Cadore, L; Casas-Herrero, Á; Idoate-Saralegui, F; Izquierdo, M

    2016-01-01

    To critically review the effect of interventions incorporating exercise and early rehabilitation (physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physical activity) in the functional outcomes (i.e., active daily living tests, such as Barthel Index Scores, Timed-up-and go, mobility tests), and feasibility in hospitalized elderly medical patients. Systematic review of the literature. A literature search was conducted using the following databases and medical resources from 1966 to January 2014: PubMed (Medline), PEDro, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Google Scholar, ClinicalTrials.gov, Clinical Evidence, SportsDiscus, EMBASE and UptoDate. Studies must have mentioned the effects of early rehabilitation on the above mentioned functional outcomes and feasibility. Data on the mortality, economic profile and average stay were also described. From the 6564 manuscripts potentially related to exercise performance in hospitalized elderly patients, the review focused on 1086, and 17 articles were ultimately included. Regarding functional outcomes after discharge, four studies observed significant improvement in functional outcomes following early rehabilitation, even up to twelve months after discharge. Eight studies directly or indirectly assessed the economic impact of exercise intervention. Five of them did not show any increase in costs, while three concluded that the intervention was cost effective. No adverse effect related with the interventions were mentioned. The introduction of an exercise program for hospitalized elderly patients may be feasible, and may not increase costs. Importantly, early rehabilitation may also improve the functional and healthcare.

  19. Efficacy of a randomized controlled self-regulation based physical activity intervention for chronic fatigue: Mediation effects of physical activity progress and self-regulation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M M; de Gucht, V; Leal, I; Maes, S

    2017-03-01

    Examine the medium-term effects of a brief physical activity (PA) self-regulation (SR) based intervention (4-STEPS program) for chronic fatigue, and explore the mediating effects of PA related variables and SR skills. A two-arm randomized controlled trial (Usual Care vs 4-STEPS) was carried out. The 4-STEPS program consisted of Motivational Interviewing and SR-skills training. Fatigue severity (primary outcome) and impact, PA, health-related quality of life (HrQoL), and somatic and psychological distress were assessed at baseline, post-treatment (12weeks) and 12months follow-up. Ninety-one patients (45 intervention and 46 controls) were included. At follow-up, there were significant treatment effects on fatigue severity (g=0.72) and fatigue impact, leisure-time PA, and physical and psychological HrQoL. No significant effects were found for number of daily steps and somatic and psychological distress. Fatigue severity at follow-up was partially mediated by post-treatment progress on a personal PA goal (effect ratio=18%). Results suggest that a brief intervention, focusing on the formulation and pursuit of personal PA goals and the use of SR skills, produces sustained benefits for fatigue severity. Despite these promising results, dropout was high and the intervention was not beneficial for all secondary outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Superconductivity and symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarasua, L.G., E-mail: sarasua@fisica.edu.uy [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-02-15

    In the present work we consider the relation between superconductivity and spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking (SGBS). We show that ODLRO does not require in principle SBGS, even in the presence of particle number fluctuations, by examining exact solutions of a fermionic pairing model. The criteria become equivalent if a symmetry breaking field is allowed, which can be attributed to the interaction with the environment. However, superconducting states without SBGS are not forbidden.

  1. Photoemission, Correlation and Superconductivity:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Cloëtta, D.; Pavuna, D.; Perfetti, L.; Grioni, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    We review some of the problems still affecting photoemission as a probe of high-temperature superconductivity, as well as important recent results concerning their solution. We show, in particular, some of the first important results on thin epitaxial films grown by laser ablation, which break the monopoly of cleaved BCSCO in this type of experiments. Such results, obtained on thin LSCO, may have general implications on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity.

  2. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  3. Superconducting Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized superconducting fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs by potassium (K intercalation. They showed large superconducting volume fractions, as high as 80%. The superconducting transition temperature at 17 K was independent of the K content (x in the range between 1.6 and 6.0 in K-doped C60 nanowhiskers (KxC60NWs, while the superconducting volume fractions changed with x. The highest shielding fraction of a full shielding volume was observed in the material of K3.3C60NW by heating at 200 °C. On the other hand, that of a K-doped fullerene (K-C60 crystal was less than 1%. We report the superconducting behaviors of our newly synthesized KxC60NWs in comparison to those of KxC60 crystals, which show superconductivity at 19 K in K3C60. The lattice structures are also discussed, based on the x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses.

  4. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic, Ivan [Mount Sinai, NY; Logvenov, Gennady [Port Jefferson Station, NY; Gozar, Adrian Mihai [Port Jefferson, NY

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  5. Effects of a weight loss plus exercise program on physical function in overweight, older women: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton SD

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephen D Anton1,2, Todd M Manini1, Vanessa A Milsom2, Pamela Dubyak2, Matteo Cesari3, Jing Cheng4, Michael J Daniels5, Michael Marsiske2, Marco Pahor1, Christiaan Leeuwenburgh1, Michael G Perri21Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 2Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 3Area di Geriatria, Università Campus Bio-Medico, Rome, Italy; 4Division of Oral Epidemiology and Dental Public Health, San Francisco, CA, USA; 5Department of Statistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USABackground: Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle are associated with physical impairments and biologic changes in older adults. Weight loss combined with exercise may reduce inflammation and improve physical functioning in overweight, sedentary, older adults. This study tested whether a weight loss program combined with moderate exercise could improve physical function in obese, older adult women.Methods: Participants (n = 34 were generally healthy, obese, older adult women (age range 55–79 years with mild to moderate physical impairments (ie, functional limitations. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups for 24 weeks: (i weight loss plus exercise (WL+E; n = 17; mean age = 63.7 years [4.5] or (ii educational control (n = 17; mean age = 63.7 [6.7]. In the WL+E group, participants attended a group-based weight management session plus three supervised exercise sessions within their community each week. During exercise sessions, participants engaged in brisk walking and lower-body resistance training of moderate intensity. Participants in the educational control group attended monthly health education lectures on topics relevant to older adults. Outcomes were: (i body weight, (ii walking speed (assessed by 400-meter walk test, (iii the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, and (iv knee extension isokinetic strength.Results: Participants randomized

  6. Pilates exercise training vs. physical therapy for improving walking and balance in people with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Rosenblum, Uri; Frid, Lior; Achiron, Anat

    2017-03-01

    Evaluate the effects of a Pilates exercise programme on walking and balance in people with multiple sclerosis and compare this exercise approach to conventional physical therapy sessions. Randomized controlled trial. Multiple Sclerosis Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel. Forty-five people with multiple sclerosis, 29 females, mean age (SD) was 43.2 (11.6) years; mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (S.D) was 4.3 (1.3). Participants received 12 weekly training sessions of either Pilates ( n=22) or standardized physical therapy ( n=23) in an outpatient basis. Spatio-temporal parameters of walking and posturography parameters during static stance. Functional tests included the Time Up and Go Test, 2 and 6-minute walk test, Functional Reach Test, Berg Balance Scale and the Four Square Step Test. In addition, the following self-report forms included the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale and Modified Fatigue Impact Scale. At the termination, both groups had significantly increased their walking speed ( P=0.021) and mean step length ( P=0.023). According to the 2-minute and 6-minute walking tests, both groups at the end of the intervention program had increased their walking speed. Mean (SD) increase in the Pilates and physical therapy groups were 39.1 (78.3) and 25.3 (67.2) meters, respectively. There was no effect of group X time in all instrumented and clinical balance and gait measures. Pilates is a possible treatment option for people with multiple sclerosis in order to improve their walking and balance capabilities. However, this approach does not have any significant advantage over standardized physical therapy.

  7. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garifullin, I. A.; Leksin, P. V.; Garif`yanov, N. N.; Kamashev, A. A.; Fominov, Ya. V.; Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers.

  8. An innovative peer assessment approach to enhance guideline adherence in physical therapy: single-masked, cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Marjo J M; van der Wees, Philip J; Braam, Carla; Koetsenruijter, Jan; Heerkens, Yvonne F; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2015-04-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are not readily implemented in clinical practice. One of the impeding factors is that physical therapists do not hold realistic perceptions of their adherence to CPGs. Peer assessment (PA) is an implementation strategy that aims at improving guideline adherence by enhancing reflective practice, awareness of professional performance, and attainment of personal goals. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of PA with the usual case discussion (CD) strategy on adherence to CPGs for physical therapist management of upper extremity complaints. A single-masked, cluster-randomized controlled trial with pretest-posttest design was conducted. Twenty communities of practice (n=149 physical therapists) were randomly assigned to groups receiving PA or CD, with both interventions consisting of 4 sessions over 6 months. Both PA and CD groups worked on identical clinical cases relevant to the guidelines. Peer assessment focused on individual performance observed and evaluated by peers; CD focused on discussion. Guideline adherence was measured with clinical vignettes, reflective practice was measured with the Self-Reflection and Insight Scale (SRIS), awareness of performance was measured via the correlation between perceived and assessed improvement, and attainment of personal goals was measured with written commitments to change. The PA groups improved more on guideline adherence compared with the CD groups (effect=22.52; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]=2.38, 42.66; P=.03). The SRIS scores did not differ between PA and CD groups. Awareness of performance was greater for the PA groups (r=.36) than for the CD groups (r=.08) (effect=14.73; 95% CI=2.78, 26.68; P=.01). The PA strategy was more effective than the CD strategy in attaining personal goals (effect=0.50; 95% CI=0.04, 0.96; P=.03). Limited validity of clinical vignettes as a proxy measure of clinical practice was a limitation of the study. Peer assessment was more

  9. Efficacy of addition of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to standardized physical therapy in subacute spinal spasticity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Win Min

    2014-11-01

    To study the immediate and short-term efficacy of adding transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to standardized physical therapy on subacute spasticity within 6 months of spinal cord injury. Randomized controlled trial for 3 weeks. A university hospital. Subjects (N=16) with clinically determined spasticity were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (n=8) or the control group (n=8). Sixty-minute sessions of TENS over the bilateral common peroneal nerves before 30 minutes of physical therapy for the experimental group and 30 minutes of physical therapy alone for the control group. All patients in both groups had access to standardized rehabilitation care. The composite spasticity score, which included 3 subscores (ankle jerk, muscle tone, and ankle clonus scores), was used as the primary end point to assess plantar flexor spasticity. These subscores were designated as secondary end points. Serial evaluations were made at baseline before study entry and immediately after the first and last sessions in both groups. On analysis for immediate effects, there was a significant reduction only in the composite spasticity score (mean difference, 1.75; 99% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-3.03; P=.002) in the experimental group, but no significant reduction was observed in all outcome variables in the control group. A significant difference in the composite spasticity score (1.63; 99% CI, 0.14-3.11; P=.006) was observed between the 2 groups. After 15 sessions of treatment, a significant reduction was determined in the composite spasticity score (2.75; 99% CI, 1.31-4.19; P<.001), the muscle tone score (1.75; 99% CI, 0.16-3.34; P=.006), and the ankle clonus score (0.75; 99% CI, 0.18-1.32; P=.003) in the experimental group, whereas none of the outcome variables revealed a significant reduction in the control group. The between-group difference was significant only for the composite spasticity score (2.13; 99% CI, 0.59-3.66; P=.001) and the muscle tone

  10. Effects of core strength training using stable versus unstable surfaces on physical fitness in adolescents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Schellbach, Jörg; Klein, Katja; Prieske, Olaf; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Muehlbauer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that core strength training is an effective means to enhance trunk muscle strength (TMS) and proxies of physical fitness in youth. Of note, cross-sectional studies revealed that the inclusion of unstable elements in core strengthening exercises produced increases in trunk muscle activity and thus provide potential extra training stimuli for performance enhancement. Thus, utilizing unstable surfaces during core strength training may even produce larger performance gains. However, the effects of core strength training using unstable surfaces are unresolved in youth. This randomized controlled study specifically investigated the effects of core strength training performed on stable surfaces (CSTS) compared to unstable surfaces (CSTU) on physical fitness in school-aged children. Twenty-seven (14 girls, 13 boys) healthy subjects (mean age: 14 ± 1 years, age range: 13-15 years) were randomly assigned to a CSTS (n = 13) or a CSTU (n = 14) group. Both training programs lasted 6 weeks (2 sessions/week) and included frontal, dorsal, and lateral core exercises. During CSTU, these exercises were conducted on unstable surfaces (e.g., TOGU© DYNAIR CUSSIONS, THERA-BAND© STABILITY TRAINER). Significant main effects of Time (pre vs. post) were observed for the TMS tests (8-22%, f = 0.47-0.76), the jumping sideways test (4-5%, f = 1.07), and the Y balance test (2-3%, f = 0.46-0.49). Trends towards significance were found for the standing long jump test (1-3%, f = 0.39) and the stand-and-reach test (0-2%, f = 0.39). We could not detect any significant main effects of Group. Significant Time x Group interactions were detected for the stand-and-reach test in favour of the CSTU group (2%, f = 0.54). Core strength training resulted in significant increases in proxies of physical fitness in adolescents. However, CSTU as compared to CSTS had only limited additional effects (i.e., stand-and-reach test). Consequently, if the

  11. Radon balneotherapy and physical activity for osteoporosis prevention: a randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklmayr, Martina; Kluge, Christian; Winklmayr, Wolfgang; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Steiner, Martina; Ritter, Markus; Hartl, Arnulf

    2015-03-01

    Low-dose radon hyperthermia balneo treatment (LDRnHBT) is applied as a traditional measure in the non-pharmacological treatment of rheumatic diseases in Europe. During the last decades, the main approach of LDRnHBT was focused on the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, but scientific evidence for the biological background of LDRnHBT is weak. Recently, evidence emerged that LDRnHBT influences bone metabolism. We investigated, whether combined LDRnHBT and exercise treatment has an impact on bone metabolism and quality of life in a study population in an age group at risk for developing osteoporosis. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprised guided hiking tours and hyperthermia treatment in either radon thermal water (LDRnHBT) or radon-free thermal water (PlaceboHBT). Markers of bone metabolism, quality of life and somatic complaints were evaluated. Statistics was performed by linear regression and a linear mixed model analysis. Significant changes over time were observed for most analytes investigated as well as an improvement in self-assessed health in both groups. No significant impact from the LDRnHBT could be observed. After 6 months, the LDRnHBT group showed a slightly stronger reduction of the osteoclast stimulating protein receptor activator of nuclear kB-ligand compared to the PlaceboHBT group, indicating a possible trend. A combined hyperthermia balneo and exercise treatment has significant immediate and long-term effects on regulators of bone metabolism as well as somatic complaints. LDRnHBT and placeboHBT yielded statistically equal outcomes.

  12. Electrostatic separation of superconducting particles from non-superconducting particles and improvement in fuel atomization by electrorheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabria, Deepika

    particles are smaller than 45mum. One always come across multiphase superconducting materials where most superconducting grains are much smaller than 45mum. On the other hand, since our technology is based on the surface effect, it gets stronger when the particles become smaller. Our technology is thus perfect for small superconducting particles and for fabrication of HTSC materials. The area of superconductivity is expected to be very important for 21 st Century energy industry. The key for this development is the HTSC materials. We, therefore, expect that our technology will have strong impact in the area. (2) Improving engine efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions are extremely important. Here we report our fuel injection technology based on new physics principle that proper application of electrorheology can reduce the viscosity of petroleum fuels. A small device is thus introduced just before the fuel injection for the engine, producing a strong electric field to reduce the fuel viscosity, resulting in much smaller fuel droplets in atomization. As combustion starts at the interface between fuel and air and most harmful emissions are coming from incomplete burning, reducing the size of fuel droplets would increase the total surface area to start burning, leading to a cleaner and more efficient engine. This concept has been widely accepted as the discussions about future engine for efficient and clean combustion are focused on ultra-dilute mixtures at extremely high pressure to produce much finer mist of fuel for combustion. The technology is expected to have broad applications, applicable to current internal combustion engines and future engines as well.

  13. New Challenges in Superconductivity: Experimental Advances and Emerging Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, J.; Eremin, Mikhail V.; Cohn, Joshua L.; Eremin, Ilya; Manske, Dirk; Pavuna, Davor; Zuo, Fuliln

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 2004 University of Miami Workshop onUnconventional Superconductivity. The workshop was the fourth in a series of successful meetings on High-TC Superconductivity and related topics, which took place at the James L. Knight Physics Building on the University of Miami campus in Coral Gables, Florida, in January 1991, 1995, 1999, and 2004. The volume includes high-quality papers on state of the art works on unconventional superconductivity. A key issue, discussed by many in the workshop, was how homogeneous the cuprates are.

  14. Metabolic risk management, physical exercise and lifestyle counselling in low-active adults: controlled randomized trial (BELLUGAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensenyat, Assumpta; Espigares-Tribo, Gemma; Machado, Leonardo; Verdejo, Francisco José; Rodriguez-Arregui, Rosa; Serrano, José; Miret, Marta; Galindo, Gisela; Blanco, Alfonso; Marsal, Josep-Ramon; Sarriegui, Susana; Sinfreu-Bergues, Xenia; Serra-Paya, Noemi

    2017-03-14

    The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of different doses (intensity) of supervised exercise training - concomitant with lifestyle counselling - as a primary care intervention tool for the management of metabolic syndrome risk factors in low-active adults with one or more such factors (programme name in Catalan: Bellugat de CAP a peus). Three-arm, randomized controlled clinical trial implemented in the primary care setting, with a duration of 40 weeks (16 weeks intervention and 24-week follow-up). Adults aged 30 to 55 years with metabolic risk factors will be randomized into three intervention groups: 1) aerobic interval training (16 supervised training lessons) plus a healthy lifestyle counselling programme (6 group and 3 individual meetings); 2) low-to-moderate intensity continuous training (16 supervised training lessons) plus the same counselling programme; or 3) the counselling- programme without any supervised physical exercise. The main output variables assessed will be risk factors for metabolic syndrome (waist circumference, blood pressure, and levels of plasma triglycerides, high-density lipoproteins and glucose), systemic inflammation, cardiorespiratory fitness, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, dietary habits, health-related quality of life, self-efficacy and empowerment. Economic factors will also be analysed in order to determine the cost-effectiveness of the programme. These variables will be assessed three times during the study: at baseline, at the end of the intervention, and at follow-up. We estimate to recruit 35 participants per group. The results of this study will provide insight into the immediate and medium-term effects on metabolic risk and lifestyle of a combined approach involving aerobic interval training and a multidisciplinary behavioural intervention. If effective, the proposed intervention would provide both researchers and practitioners in this field with a platform on which to develop similar

  15. Efficacy and Safety of "URSA Complex" in Subjects with Physical Fatigue: A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-blind,Placebo-controlled Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwang-Min Kim; Moon-Jong Kim; Sang-Wook Song; Doo-Yeoun Cho; Kyung-Chae Park; Sung-Won Yang; Young-Sang Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background:Fatigue is a common symptom both in diseases status and in healthy subjects.Various supplements and nutraceuticals for relieving of fatigue have been used.However,there are a few studies to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of the drug for fatigue alleviation,we conducted using URSA Complex to evaluate the efficacy on physical fatigue via score changes in the checklist individual strength (CIS).Methods:The study was designed as a multicenter,randomized,double-blind,placebo-controlled trial,with subjects randomized to one of the two arms,receiving either placebo or URSA Complex administered as identical capsules.The primary efficacy endpoints of this clinical trials are the ratio of improving CIS scores < 76 points in patients at the end (4 weeks).Secondary efficacy variables are as follows one is an improvement of fatigue and the other is an improvement of the liver enzyme.Results:The fatigue recovery rate in who had improved CIS scores of< 76 points were 70.0%,50.9% in the therapy group and placebo group,respectively (P =0.019).The fatigue recovery rate in CIS score was higher in URSA Complex therapy group than placebo group.The difference between therapy group and placebo group was statistically significant at 4 weeks later,but not 2 weeks.Conclusions:Our results provided that the URSA Complex was effective in alleviating physical fatigue.The adverse event frequency in the therapy groups was similar to that in the placebo group.

  16. The effects of physical training without equipment on pain perception and balance in the elderly: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Antonino; Bianco, Antonino; Karsten, Bettina; Montalto, Maria Alessandra; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bellafiore, Marianna; Cassata, Daniela; Scoppa, Fabio; Paoli, Antonio; Iovane, Angelo; Messina, Giuseppe; Palma, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Research supports a link between exercise and falls prevention in the older population. Our aims were to evaluate pain perception and balance skills in a group of elderly subjects and to examine the consequences of a standardized equipment-free exercise program intervention on these variables. The study utilized a randomized controlled trial method. 92 subjects were recruited from a rural Sicilian village (Resuttano, Sicily, Italy). Subjects were randomly split into two groups, an experimental group (EG; n = 49) and a control group (CG; n = 43). Qualified fitness instructors delivered the standardized physical exercise program for the EG whilst the CG did not receive this exercise intervention. The Berg Balance Scale and the Oswestry Disability Index were administered in both groups before (T0) and after the intervention (T1). At T1, the EG group significantly improvement in balance (p balance and perception of pain in the elderly. This type of intervention can consequently provide a low cost strategy to counteract the rate of disability in elderly.

  17. Intervening on spontaneous physical activity to prevent weight regain in older adults: design of a randomized, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklas, Barbara J; Gaukstern, Jill E; Legault, Claudine; Leng, Iris; Rejeski, W Jack

    2012-03-01

    There is a need to identify evidenced-based obesity treatments that are effective in maintaining lost weight. Weight loss results in reductions in energy expenditure, including spontaneous physical activity (SPA) which is defined as energy expenditure resulting primarily from unstructured mobility-related activities that occur during daily life. To date, there is little research, especially randomized, controlled trials, testing strategies that can be adopted and sustained to prevent declines in SPA that occur with weight loss. Self-monitoring is a successful behavioral strategy to facilitate behavior change, so a provocative question is whether monitoring SPA-related energy expenditure would override these reductions in SPA, and slow weight regain. This study is a randomized trial in older, obese men and women designed to test the hypothesis that adding a self-regulatory intervention (SRI), focused around self-monitoring of SPA, to a weight loss intervention will result in less weight and fat mass regain following weight loss than a comparable intervention that lacks this self-regulatory behavioral strategy. Participants (n=72) are randomized to a 5-month weight loss intervention with or without the addition of a behavioral component that includes an innovative approach to promoting increased SPA. Both groups then transition to self-selected diet and exercise behavior for a 5-month follow-up. Throughout the 10-month period, the SRI group is provided with an intervention designed to promote a SPA level that is equal to or greater than each individual's baseline SPA level, allowing us to isolate the effects of the SPA self-regulatory intervention component on weight and fat mass regain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6 min bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE.

  19. Hardware-Efficient and Fully Autonomous Quantum Error Correction in Superconducting Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapit, Eliot

    2016-04-01

    Superconducting qubits are among the most promising platforms for building a quantum computer. However, individual qubit coherence times are not far past the scalability threshold for quantum error correction, meaning that millions of physical devices would be required to construct a useful quantum computer. Consequently, further increases in coherence time are very desirable. In this Letter, we blueprint a simple circuit consisting of two transmon qubits and two additional lossy qubits or resonators, which is passively protected against all single-qubit quantum error channels through a combination of continuous driving and engineered dissipation. Photon losses are rapidly corrected through two-photon drive fields implemented with driven superconducting quantum interference device couplings, and dephasing from random potential fluctuations is heavily suppressed by the drive fields used to implement the multiqubit Hamiltonian. Comparing our theoretical model to published noise estimates from recent experiments on flux and transmon qubits, we find that logical state coherence could be improved by a factor of 40 or more compared to the individual qubit T1 and T2 using this technique. We thus demonstrate that there is substantial headroom for improving the coherence of modern superconducting qubits with a fairly modest increase in device complexity.

  20. Hardware-Efficient and Fully Autonomous Quantum Error Correction in Superconducting Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapit, Eliot

    2016-04-15

    Superconducting qubits are among the most promising platforms for building a quantum computer. However, individual qubit coherence times are not far past the scalability threshold for quantum error correction, meaning that millions of physical devices would be required to construct a useful quantum computer. Consequently, further increases in coherence time are very desirable. In this Letter, we blueprint a simple circuit consisting of two transmon qubits and two additional lossy qubits or resonators, which is passively protected against all single-qubit quantum error channels through a combination of continuous driving and engineered dissipation. Photon losses are rapidly corrected through two-photon drive fields implemented with driven superconducting quantum interference device couplings, and dephasing from random potential fluctuations is heavily suppressed by the drive fields used to implement the multiqubit Hamiltonian. Comparing our theoretical model to published noise estimates from recent experiments on flux and transmon qubits, we find that logical state coherence could be improved by a factor of 40 or more compared to the individual qubit T_{1} and T_{2} using this technique. We thus demonstrate that there is substantial headroom for improving the coherence of modern superconducting qubits with a fairly modest increase in device complexity.

  1. The ExStroke Pilot Trial: rationale, design, and baseline data of a randomized multicenter trial comparing physical training versus usual care after an ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L.H.; Gluud, C.; Truelsen, T.

    2008-01-01

    : Patients with ischemic stroke above 39 years were randomized to intervention or control group. The intervention group will, over a 2-year period, receive information on and verbal instruction to exercise by a physiotherapist or a physician. The control group will receive the department's usual care......INTRODUCTION: A high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of first stroke and physical activity modifies recognized stroke risk factors and is recommended for stroke survivors. Available research shows that stroke patients can increase their level of physical performance...... over a short period. When the intervention period is over, physical performance often declines towards baseline level. Currently, there is no evidence on the association between physical activity and the risk of recurrent stroke. The ExStroke Pilot Trial is a randomized clinical trial with the aim...

  2. Magnetoresistance of a two-dimensional electron gas in a random magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef; Hansen, Luise Theil

    1994-01-01

    We report magnetoresistance measurements on a two-dimensional electron gas made from a high-mobility GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructure, where the externally applied magnetic field was expelled from regions of the semiconductor by means of superconducting lead grains randomly distributed on the surf...... on the surface of the sample. A theoretical explanation in excellent agreement with the experiment is given within the framework of the semiclassical Boltzmann equation. © 1994 The American Physical Society...

  3. ICTP Spring College in Condensed Matter on Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Y

    1995-01-01

    This volume contains the lecture notes of the ""Spring College on Superconductivity"" held from 27 April to 19 June 1992 at ICTP. The distinguished faculty of lecturers has provided a wide coverage of topics on the fascinating subject of superconductivity, ranging from basic physics to the latest developments. The comprehensive reviews included in this volume will prove invaluable for research workers and graduate students in the field.

  4. Casimir Energy and Vacua vor Superconducting Ball in Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Burinskii, A

    2002-01-01

    Casimir energy for solid conducting ball is considered on the base of some finite models. One model is physical and built of a battery of parallel metallic plates. Two finite models are based on the Higgs model of superconductivity. One of them is supersymmetric and based on the Witten field model for superconducting strings. Treatment shows that contribution of Casimir energy can be very essential for superdence state in the neutron stars and nuclear matter.

  5. Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies in Afterschool Programs: Results from a Group-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L.; Giles, Catherine M.; deBlois, Madeleine E.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Chinfatt, Sherene; Cradock, Angie L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Afterschool programs can be health-promoting environments for children. Written policies positively influence nutrition and physical activity (PA) environments, but effective strategies for building staff capacity to write such policies have not been evaluated. This study measures the comprehensiveness of written nutrition, PA, and screen time policies in afterschool programs and assesses impact of the Out of School Nutrition and Physical Activity (OSNAP) intervention on key policies. METHODS Twenty afterschool programs in Boston, MA participated in a group-randomized, controlled trial from September 2010 to June 2011. Intervention program staff attended learning collaboratives focused on practice and policy change. The Out-of-School Time (OST) Policy Assessment Index evaluated written policies. Inter-rater reliability and construct validity of the measure and impact of the intervention on written policies were assessed. RESULTS The measure demonstrated moderate to excellent inter-rater reliability (Spearman’s r=0.53 to 0.97) and construct validity. OSNAP was associated with significant increases in standards-based policy statements surrounding snacks (+2.6, p=0.003), beverages (+2.3, p=0.008), screen time (+0.8, p=0.046), family communication (+2.2, p=0.002), and a summary index of OSNAP goals (+3.3, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS OSNAP demonstrated success in building staff capacity to write health-promoting policy statements. Future research should focus on determining policy change impact on practices. PMID:24941286

  6. Physical activity maintenance among Spanish-speaking Latinas in a randomized controlled trial of an Internet-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Sheri J; Dunsiger, Shira I; Bock, Beth C; Larsen, Britta A; Linke, Sarah; Pekmezi, Dori; Marquez, Becky; Gans, Kim M; Mendoza-Vasconez, Andrea S; Marcus, Bess H

    2017-06-01

    Spanish-speaking Latinas have some of the lowest rates of meeting physical activity guidelines in the U.S. and are at high risk for many related chronic diseases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the maintenance of a culturally and individually-tailored Internet-based physical activity intervention for Spanish-speaking Latinas. Inactive Latinas (N  =  205) were randomly assigned to a 6-month Tailored Physical Activity Internet Intervention or a Wellness Contact Control Internet Group, with a 6-month follow-up. Maintenance was measured by assessing group differences in minutes per week of self-reported and accelerometer measured moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at 12 months after baseline and changes in MVPA between the end of the active intervention (month 6) and the end of the study (month 12). Potential moderators of the intervention were also examined. Data were collected between 2011 and 2014, and were analyzed in 2015 at the University of California, San Diego. The Intervention Group engaged in significantly more minutes of MVPA per week than the Control Group at the end of the maintenance period for both self-reported (mean diff. = 30.68, SE = 11.27, p = .007) and accelerometer measured (mean diff. = 11.47, SE = 3.19, p = .01) MVPA. There were no significant between- or within-group changes in MVPA from month 6 to 12. Greater intervention effects were seen for those with lower BMI (BMI × intervention = -6.67, SE = 2.88, p = .02) and lower perceived places to walk to in their neighborhood (access × intervention = -43.25, SE = 19.07, p = .02), with a trend for less family support (social support × intervention = -3.49, SE = 2.05, p = .08). Acculturation, health literacy, and physical activity related psychosocial variables were not significant moderators of the intervention effect during the maintenance period. Findings from the current study support the efficacy of an Internet

  7. The ExStroke Pilot Trial: rationale, design, and baseline data of a randomized multicenter trial comparing physical training versus usual care after an ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L.H.; Gluud, C.; Truelsen, T.

    2008-01-01

    of increasing stroke patients' level of physical activity and secondarily to associate the level of physical activity to the risk of recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, and all-cause mortality in the two groups. We describe the rationale, design, and baseline data of the ExStroke Pilot Trial. METHODS......INTRODUCTION: A high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of first stroke and physical activity modifies recognized stroke risk factors and is recommended for stroke survivors. Available research shows that stroke patients can increase their level of physical performance...... over a short period. When the intervention period is over, physical performance often declines towards baseline level. Currently, there is no evidence on the association between physical activity and the risk of recurrent stroke. The ExStroke Pilot Trial is a randomized clinical trial with the aim...

  8. Effectiveness of Tai Chi on Physical and Psychological Health of College Students: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Zheng

    Full Text Available To investigate the effectiveness and safety of Tai Chi Chuan (TCC on physical and psychological health of college students.Two hundred six college students were recruited and randomly allocated to a control group or a TCC exercise group in an equal ratio. Participants in the control group were instructed to maintain their original activity level and those in the TCC exercise group received 12 weeks of TCC exercise training based on their original activity level. Physical and psychological outcomes were evaluated at baseline, 13 weeks and 25 weeks. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed for the above outcomes.Compared with the control group, the TCC exercise group showed significant improvements at the end of the 12-week intervention period for flexibility (length of Sit and Reach (cm: TCC group 14.09±7.40 versus control 12.88±6.57, P = 0.039 adjusted for its baseline measures using a general linear model and balance ability (open eyes perimeter: TCC group 235.6(191~314 versus control 261(216~300; closed eyes perimeter: TCC group 370.5 (284~454 versus control 367 (293~483; P = 0.0414, 0.008, respectively, adjusted for corresponding baseline measures using a general linear model. No significant changes in other physical and mental outcomes were found between the two groups. No adverse events were reported during the study period.TCC exercise was beneficial in college students for improving flexibility and balance capability to some extent, compared with usual exercise.Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-13003328.

  9. Nanoscience and Engineering in Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Moshchalkov, Victor; Lang, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    For emerging energy saving technologies, superconducting materials with superior performance are needed. Such materials can be developed by manipulating the 'elementary building blocks' through nanostructuring. For superconductivity the 'elementary blocks' are Cooper pair and fluxon (vortex). This book presents new ways how to modify superconductivity and vortex matter through nanostructuring and the use of nanoscale magnetic templates. The basic nano-effects, vortex and vortex-antivortex patterns, vortex dynamics, Josephson phenomena, critical currents, and interplay between superconductivity

  10. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V. [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-24

    transitions from magnetic to nonmagnetic phases in a broad pressure-temperature range; using X-ray methods including the newly developed RIXS high-pressure technique to explore pressure-tuned electronic excitations in strongly correlated 3d-materials; and advancing transport and magnetic techniques for measurements on small samples at very high pressures in a wide temperature range, with the application of focused ion beam technology and photolithography tailored to the design of microcircuits down to a nanoscale size, thus expanding the horizon in the search for novel physical phenomena at ultrahigh pressures. Apply new optical magnetic sensing techniques with NV- centers in diamond to detect superconductivity and magnetic transitions with unprecedented spatial resolution.

  11. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  12. Large Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Védrine, P.

    2014-07-17

    The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb−Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

  13. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  14. Fingerprints of Mott Superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强华

    2003-01-01

    We improve a previous theory of doped Mott insulators with duality between pairing and magnetism by a further duality transform. As the result we obtained a quantum Ginzburg-Landau theory describing the Cooper pair condensate and the dual of spin condensate. We address the superconductivity by doping a Mott insulator,which we call the Mott superconductivity. Some fingerprints of such novelty in cuprates are the scaling between neutron resonance energy and superfluid density, and the induced quantized spin moment by vortices or Zn impurity (together with circulating charge super-current to be checked by experiments).

  15. Effect of physical therapy on pain and function in patients with hip osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Egerton, Thorlene; Martin, Joel; Abbott, J Haxby; Metcalf, Ben; McManus, Fiona; Sims, Kevin; Pua, Yong-Hao; Wrigley, Tim V; Forbes, Andrew; Smith, Catherine; Harris, Anthony; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2014-05-21

    There is limited evidence supporting use of physical therapy for hip osteoarthritis. To determine efficacy of physical therapy on pain and physical function in patients with hip osteoarthritis. Randomized, placebo-controlled, participant- and assessor-blinded trial involving 102 community volunteers with hip pain levels of 40 or higher on a visual analog scale of 100 mm (range, 0-100 mm; 100 indicates worst pain possible) and hip osteoarthritis confirmed by radiograph. Forty-nine patients in the active group and 53 in the sham group underwent 12 weeks of intervention and 24 weeks of follow-up (May 2010-February 2013) INTERVENTIONS: Participants attended 10 treatment sessions over 12 weeks. Active treatment included education and advice, manual therapy, home exercise, and gait aid if appropriate. Sham treatment included inactive ultrasound and inert gel. For 24 weeks after treatment, the active group continued unsupervised home exercise while the sham group self-applied gel 3 times weekly. Primary outcomes were average pain (0 mm, no pain; 100 mm, worst pain possible) and physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, 0 no difficulty to 68 extreme difficulty) at week 13. Secondary outcomes were these measures at week 36 and impairments, physical performance, global change, psychological status, and quality of life at weeks 13 and 36. Ninety-six patients (94%) completed week 13 measurements and 83 (81%) completed week 36 measurements. The between-group differences for improvements in pain were not significant. For the active group, the baseline mean (SD) visual analog scale score was 58.8 mm (13.3) and the week-13 score was 40.1 mm (24.6); for the sham group, the baseline score was 58.0 mm (11.6) and the week-13 score was 35.2 mm (21.4). The mean difference was 6.9 mm favoring sham treatment (95% CI, -3.9 to 17.7). The function scores were not significantly different between groups. The baseline mean (SD) physical function score

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  17. LHC Report: superconducting circuit powering tests

    CERN Multimedia

    Mirko Pojer

    2015-01-01

    After the long maintenance and consolidation campaign carried out during LS1, the machine is getting ready to start operation with beam at 6.5 TeV… the physics community can’t wait! Prior to this, all hardware and software systems have to be tested to assess their correct and safe operation.   Most of the cold circuits (those with high current/stored energy) possess a sophisticated magnet protection system that is crucial to detect a transition of the coil from the superconducting to the normal state (a quench) and safely extract the energy stored in the circuits (about 1 GJ per dipole circuit at nominal current). LHC operation relies on 1232 superconducting dipoles with a field of up to 8.33 T operating in superfluid helium at 1.9 K, along with more than 500 superconducting quadrupoles operating at 4.2 or 1.9 K. Besides, many other superconducting and normal resistive magnets are used to guarantee the possibility of correcting all beam parameters, for a total of mo...

  18. Unconventional high-Tc superconductivity in fullerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Yasuhiro; Prassides, Kosmas

    2016-09-13

    A3C60 molecular superconductors share a common electronic phase diagram with unconventional high-temperature superconductors such as the cuprates: superconductivity emerges from an antiferromagnetic strongly correlated Mott-insulating state upon tuning a parameter such as pressure (bandwidth control) accompanied by a dome-shaped dependence of the critical temperature, Tc However, unlike atom-based superconductors, the parent state from which superconductivity emerges solely by changing an electronic parameter-the overlap between the outer wave functions of the constituent molecules-is controlled by the C60 (3-) molecular electronic structure via the on-molecule Jahn-Teller effect influence of molecular geometry and spin state. Destruction of the parent Mott-Jahn-Teller state through chemical or physical pressurization yields an unconventional Jahn-Teller metal, where quasi-localized and itinerant electron behaviours coexist. Localized features gradually disappear with lattice contraction and conventional Fermi liquid behaviour is recovered. The nature of the underlying (correlated versus weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory) s-wave superconducting states mirrors the unconventional/conventional metal dichotomy: the highest superconducting critical temperature occurs at the crossover between Jahn-Teller and Fermi liquid metal when the Jahn-Teller distortion melts.This article is part of the themed issue 'Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene'.

  19. Physical activity as an aid to smoking cessation during pregnancy (LEAP trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ussher Michael

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many women try to stop smoking in pregnancy but fail. One difficulty is that there is insufficient evidence that medications for smoking cessation are effective and safe in pregnancy and thus many women prefer to avoid these. Physical activity (PA interventions may assist cessation; however, trials examining these interventions have been too small to detect or exclude plausible beneficial effects. The London Exercise And Pregnant smokers (LEAP trial is investigating whether a PA intervention is effective and cost-effective when used for smoking cessation by pregnant women, and will be the largest study of its kind to date. Methods/design The LEAP study is a pragmatic, multi-center, two-arm, randomized, controlled trial that will target pregnant women who smoke at least one cigarette a day (and at least five cigarettes a day before pregnancy, and are between 10 and 24 weeks pregnant. Eligible patients are individually randomized to either usual care (that is, behavioral support for smoking cessation or usual care plus a intervention (entailing supervised exercise on a treadmill plus PA consultations. The primary outcome of the trial is self-reported and biochemically validated continuous abstinence from smoking between a specified quit date and the end of pregnancy. The secondary outcomes, measured at 1 and 4 weeks after the quit date, and at the end of pregnancy and 6 months after childbirth, are PA levels, depression, self-confidence, and cigarette withdrawal symptoms. Smoking status will also be self-reported at 6 months after childbirth. In addition, perinatal measures will be collected, including antenatal complications, duration of labor, mode of delivery, and birth and placental weight. Outcomes will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis, and logistic regression models used to compare treatment effects on the primary outcome. Discussion This trial will assess whether a PA intervention is effective when used for

  20. Assessing the Causality Factors in the Association between (Abdominal) Obesity and Physical Activity among the Newfoundland Population—A Mendelian Randomization Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Barning; Taraneh Abarin

    2016-01-01

    A total of 1,263 adults from Newfoundland and Labrador were studied in the research. Body mass index (BMI) and percent trunk fat (PTF) were analyzed as biomarkers for obesity. The Mendelian randomization (MR) approach with two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the fat-mass and obesity (FTO) gene as instruments was employed to assess the causal effect. In both genders, increasing physical activity significantly reduced BMI and PTF when adjusted for age and the FTO gene. The effect of physical...

  1. Synergistic effects of compound physical factor treatment on neurological outcome after peripheral nerve entrapment surgery A randomized controlled study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaofeng Li; Dehu Tian; Jianli Yu; Wenzhi Li; Jie Meng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Iatrophysics can improve the velocity of local microcirculation at peripheral nerve injured sites and promote the recovery from injury. Research has shown that simultaneous application of two physical factors has synergistic effects on the recovery of peripheral nerve function.OBJECTIVE: To treat patients that received peripheral nerve entrapment surgery with comprehensive rehabilitation by decimeter wave therapy and electrical stimulation, and to observe the clinical effects of promoting nerve function recovery. DESIGN: Randomized controlled study.SETTINGS: Department of Orthopaedics, the Third Hospital of Baoding; Department of Hand Surgery, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University; Woman-Children Healthcare Center, Southern District, Baoding. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 124 patients, who received peripheral nerve entrapment surgery, were selected from the Department of Orthopaedics, the Third Hospital of Baoding between July 2001 and May 2007. All patients met the diagnostic standard of peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome defined by Doctor Chen in 1995. All subjects gave informed consent for treatments and conditions involved. The experiment was approved by a local ethics committee. All patients were randomly divided into four groups: electrical stimulation group, decimeter wave group, compound physical factor group, and control group, with 31 subjects in each group. METHODS: Patients received neurolysis at an appropriate interval after hospitalization. ① Multi-form wave therapeutic equipment made in China was used to treat patients in the electrical stimulation group after neurolysis. Wave form, stimulus width, interval time, and stimulus intensity were regulated based on the grade of nerve injury. The details were as follows: mild nerve injury: 50–100-ms stimulus width and 1 500–2 000-ms intervals; moderate nerve injury: 100–200-ms stimulus width and 3 000–4 000-ms intervals; severe nerve injury: 200–300-ms stimulus width and 3 000

  2. Patient education for colon cancer screening: a randomized trial of a video mailed before a physical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Jane G; Lemon, Stephenie C; Puleo, Elaine; Estabrook, Barbara; Luckmann, Roger; Erban, Stephen

    2004-11-02

    Colorectal cancer screening is underused, and primary care clinicians are challenged to provide patient education within the constraints of busy practices. To test the effect of an educational video, mailed to patients' homes before a physical examination, on performance of colorectal cancer screening, particularly sigmoidoscopy. Randomized, controlled trial. 5 primary care practices in central Massachusetts. 938 patients age 50 to 74 years who were scheduled for an upcoming physical examination, had no personal history of colorectal cancer, and were eligible for lower-endoscopy screening according to current guidelines. Participants were randomly assigned to receive usual care (n = 488) or a video about colorectal cancer, the importance of early detection, and screening options (n = 450). Baseline and 6-month follow-up telephone assessments were conducted. A dependent variable classified screening since baseline as 1) sigmoidoscopy with or without other tests, 2) another test or test combination, or 3) no tests. Overall screening rates were the same in the intervention and control groups (55%). In regression modeling, intervention participants were nonsignificantly more likely to complete sigmoidoscopy alone or in combination with another test (odds ratio, 1.22 [95% CI, 0.88 to 1.70]). Intervention dose (viewing at least half of the video) was significantly related to receiving sigmoidoscopy with or without another test (odds ratio, 2.81 [CI, 1.85 to 4.26]). Recruitment records showed that at least 23% of people coming for periodic health assessments were currently screened by a lower-endoscopy procedure and therefore were not eligible. The primary care sample studied consisted primarily of middle-class white persons who had high screening rates at baseline. The results may not be generalizable to other populations. The trial was conducted during a period of increased health insurance coverage for lower-endoscopy procedures and public media attention to colon

  3. Core Journals of the Rapidly Changing Research Front of "Superconductivity."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Analyzes journals contributing to the literature on superconductivity from 1973 to 1987. Reveals that the literature has tripled in absolute size and has grown in intensity. Identifies core journals and reveals a communication pattern dominated by two journals, "Physical Review Letters" and "Physical Review B." Critiques…

  4. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  5. Early physical training and psycho-educational intervention for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The SheppHeart randomized 2 × 2 factorial clinical pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højskov, Ida E; Moons, Philip; Hansen, Niels V; Greve, Helle; Olsen, Dorte Bæk; Cour, Søren La; Glud, Christian; Winkel, Per; Lindschou, Jane; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2016-10-01

    Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery often experience a range of problems and symptoms such as immobility, pain and insufficient sleep. Results from trials investigating testing in-hospital physical exercise or psychological intervention have been promising. However, no randomized clinical trials have tested a comprehensive rehabilitation programme consisting of both physical exercise and psycho-education in the early rehabilitation phase. The aims of the present SheppHeart pilot randomized clinical trial were to evaluate the feasibility of patient recruitment, patient acceptance of the intervention, safety and tolerability of the intervention. Sixty patients admitted for coronary artery bypass graft were randomized 1:1:1:1 to: 1) physical exercise plus usual care, or 2) psycho-educational intervention plus usual care, or 3) physical exercise and psycho-educational plus usual care, or 4) usual care alone during a four week period after surgery. The acceptability of trial participation was 67% during the three month recruitment period. In the physical exercise groups, patients complied with 59% of the total expected training sessions during hospitalization. Nine patients (30%) complied with >75% and nine patients (30%) complied with 50% of the planned exercise sessions. Eleven patients (42%) participated in ⩾75% of the four consultations and six patients (23%) participated in 50% of the psycho-educational programme. Comprehensive phase one rehabilitation combining physical exercise and psycho-education in coronary artery bypass graft patients shows reasonably high inclusion, feasibility and safety. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  6. Challenges and recommendations for placebo controls in randomized trials in physical and rehabilitation medicine: a report of the international placebo symposium working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregni, Felipe; Imamura, Marta; Chien, Hsin Fen; Lew, Henry L; Boggio, Paulo; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Riberto, Marcelo; Hsing, Wu Tu; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo; Furlan, Andrea

    2010-02-01

    Compared with other specialties, the field of physical and rehabilitation medicine has not received the deserved recognition from clinicians and researchers in the scientific community. One of the reasons is the lack of sound evidence to support the traditional physical and rehabilitation medicine treatments. The best way to change this disadvantage is through a well conducted clinical research, such as standard placebo- or sham-controlled randomized clinical trials. Therefore, having placebo groups in clinical trials is essential to improve the level of evidence-based practice in physical and rehabilitation medicine that ultimately translates to better clinical care. To address the challenges for the use of placebo in physical and rehabilitation medicine and randomized clinical trials and to create useful recommendations, we convened a working group during the inaugural International Symposium in Placebo (February 2009, in Sao Paulo, Brazil) in which the following topics were discussed: (1) current status of randomized clinical trials in physical and rehabilitation medicine, (2) challenges for the use of placebo in physical and rehabilitation medicine, (3) bioethics, (4) use of placebo in acupuncture trials and for the treatment of low-back pain, (5) mechanisms of placebo, and (6) insights from other specialties. The current article represents the consensus report from the working group.

  7. Treatment of Metabolic syndrome by combination of physical activity and diet needs an optimal protein intake: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutheil Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recommended dietary allowance (RDA for protein intake has been set at 1.0-1.3 g/kg/day for senior. To date, no consensus exists on the lower threshold intake (LTI = RDA/1.3 for the protein intake (PI needed in senior patients ongoing both combined caloric restriction and physical activity treatment for metabolic syndrome. Considering that age, caloric restriction and exercise are three increasing factors of protein need, this study was dedicated to determine the minimal PI in this situation, through the determination of albuminemia that is the blood marker of protein homeostasis. Methods Twenty eight subjects (19 M, 9 F, 61.8 ± 6.5 years, BMI 33.4 ± 4.1 kg/m2 with metabolic syndrome completed a three-week residential programme (Day 0 to Day 21 controlled for nutrition (energy balance of −500 kcal/day and physical activity (3.5 hours/day. Patients were randomly assigned in two groups: Normal-PI (NPI: 1.0 g/kg/day and High-PI (HPI: 1.2 g/kg/day. Then, patients returned home and were followed for six months. Albuminemia was measured at D0, D21, D90 and D180. Results At baseline, PI was spontaneously 1.0 g/kg/day for both groups. Albuminemia was 40.6 g/l for NPI and 40.8 g/l for HPI. A marginal protein under-nutrition appeared in NPI with a decreased albuminemia at D90 below 35 g/l (34.3 versus 41.5 g/l for HPI, p  Conclusion During the treatment based on restricted diet and exercise in senior people with metabolic syndrome, the lower threshold intake for protein must be set at 1.2 g/kg/day to maintain blood protein homeostasis.

  8. The 'Women's Lifestyle Study', 2-year randomized controlled trial of physical activity counselling in primary health care: rationale and study design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowell Anthony C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity is an independent risk factor for diabetes and heart disease. There is evidence that increasing physical activity can reduce the risk of developing these chronic diseases, but less evidence about effective ways to increase adherence to physical activity. Interventions are therefore needed that produce sustained increases in adherence to physical activity, are cost-effective and improve clinical endpoints. Methods The Women's Lifestyle Study is a two year randomized controlled trial involving a nurse-led intervention to increase physical activity in 40–74 year old physically inactive women recruited from primary care. Baseline measures were assessed in a face-to-face interview with a primary care nurse. The intervention involved delivery of a 'Lifestyle script' by a primary care nurse followed by telephone counselling for nine months and a face-to-face nurse visit at six months. Outcome measurements are assessed at 12 and 24 months. The primary outcome is physical activity measured using a validated physical activity questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include blood pressure, weight, waist circumference, physical fitness (step test, serum HbA1c, fasting glucose, lipids, insulin, and quality of life (SF36. Costs were measured prospectively to allow a subsequent cost-effectiveness evaluation if the trial is positive. Discussion Due to report in 2008, the Women's Lifestyle Study tests the effectiveness of an enhanced low-cost, evidence-based intervention in increasing physical activity, and improving cardiovascular and diabetes risk indicators over two years. If successful in demonstrating improvements in health outcomes, this randomized controlled trial will be the first to demonstrate long-term cardiovascular and diabetes risk health benefit, in addition to improvements in physical activity, from a sustainable physical activity intervention based in primary care. Trial Registration Australian Clinical Trials

  9. More superconductivity questions than answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A L

    1987-07-17

    Although making liquid nitrogen-temperature superconductors is easy enough that high school science projects already feature them, researchers still have little idea how the new ceramic oxides work and therefore little guidance for improving them. At the International Workshop on Novel Mechanisms of Superconductivity, held from 22 to 26 June in Berkeley, California, theorists reviewed a host of competing explanations of how these materials come by their remarkable properties, but they could not, get far in sifting through the candidates for the best one. One cause of the unsettled situation is that theorists have not yet pushed their models far enough to make many specific predictions about physical properties and therefore to provide a reason to choose one theory over another. But experimental data for comparison with theory are lacking, too. For example, experimentalists are just now succeeding in being able to grow single crystals and thin films of the ceramic oxide superconductors, whose properties were shown at the workshop to be highly anisotropic. Measurements already made on the polycrystalline sintered material available up to now are difficult to interpret and therefore need to be repeated on good-quality crystals and films, where the variation of properties with crystallographic orientation can be mapped out. Given the high level of Japanese activity in the field, it was surprising that no researchers from industrial laboratories in Japan presented their findings at the workshop. In the light of a budding international competition in commercializing superconductors, some American scientists interpreted the absence as an attempt to protect proprietary advances. A more pleasant surprise was the attendance of a delegation of six Soviet scientists, although one of the fathers of superconductivity theory, Vitaly Ginzburg of the P.N.Lebedev Institute of Physics in Moscow, who was expected, did not come.

  10. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  11. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  12. Engineering of superconductors and superconducting devices using artificial pinning sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wördenweber, Roger

    2017-08-01

    Vortex matter in superconducting films and devices is not only an interesting topic for basic research but plays a substantial role in the applications of superconductivity in general. We demonstrate, that in most electronic applications, magnetic flux penetrates the superconductor and affects the performance of superconducting devices. Therefore, vortex manipulation turns out to be a useful tool to avoid degradation of superconducting device properties. Moreover, it can also be used to analyze and understand novel and interesting physical properties and develop new concepts for superconductor applications. In this review, various concepts for vortex manipulation are sketched. For example, the use of micro- and nanopatterns (especially, antidots) for guiding and trapping of vortices in superconducting films and thin film devices is discussed and experimental evidence of their vortex guidance and vortex trapping by various arrangements of antidots is given. We demonstrate, that the vortex state of matter is very important in applications of superconductivity. A better understanding does not only lead to an improvement of the performance of superconductor components, such as reduced noise, better power handling capability, or improved reliability, it also promises deeper insight into the basic physics of vortices and vortex matter.

  13. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  14. Superconducting Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    of Nb/Al- Nx /NbTiN junctions for SIS mixer applications,” IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconduct., vol. 11, pp. 76–79, Mar. 2001. [48] M. Gurvitch, W. A...Another connector developed by IBM for commercial applications using a dendritic interposer technology. A “beam-on-pad” approach developed by Siemens

  15. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  16. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  17. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  18. LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Jean Leyder

    2000-01-01

    The LHC is the next step in CERN's quest to unravel the mysteries of the Universe. It will accelerate protons to energies never before achieved in laboratories, and to hold them on course it will use powerful superconducting magnets on an unprecedented scale.

  19. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  20. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  1. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  2. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  3. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Ejrnaes, M [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Naples (Italy); Esposito, E [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Lisitskyi, M P [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Nappi, C [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Pagano, S [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Perez de Lara, D [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  4. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  5. Nonlinearities in Microwave Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ledenyov, Dimitri O.; Ledenyov, Viktor O.

    2012-01-01

    The research is focused on the modeling of nonlinear properties of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) thin films, using Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer and Lumped Element Circuit theories, with purpose to enhance microwave power handling capabilities of microwave filters and optimize design of microwave circuits in micro- and nano- electronics.

  6. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  7. Applications of Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  8. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  9. ISR Superconducting Quadrupoles

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Michel Bouvier is preparing for curing the 6-pole superconducting windings inbedded in the cylindrical wall separating liquid helium from vacuum in the quadrupole aperture. The heat for curing the epoxy glue was provided by a ramp of infrared lamps which can be seen above the slowly rotating cylinder. See also 7703512X, 7702690X.

  10. High temperature interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozar, A., E-mail: adrian.gozar@yale.edu [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bozovic, I. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T{sub c} superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T{sub c} Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  11. Superconductivity and ferromagnetism in nanomaterial NbSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Raminder

    2017-07-01

    Finding of superconductivity (SC) in ultra thin layer of Niobium diselenide (NbSe2) caught the attention of each condensed matter physicist in the era of nanotechnology. The coexistence of SC and magnetism have been a topic of interesting research in solid-state physics since the discovery of superconductivity. Ferromagnetism induced in any compound could destroy superconductivity by disturbing the cooper pairing of electrons of the atoms. The interplay between ferromagnetism (FM) and SC in nanomaterial NBSe2 impressed to study and to know the exact mechanism behind this coexistence which can lead to a very interesting research: superconductivity at room temperature. In this paper, I have theoretically studied the coexistence of SC and FM in NbSe2 and how this material could be useful in finding many high Tc nanomaterials.

  12. Superconductivity of heavy fermions in the Kondo lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykora, Steffen [IFW Dresden (Germany); Becker, Klaus W. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Understanding of the origin of superconductivity in strongly correlated electron systems is one of the basic unresolved problems in physics. Examples for such systems are the cuprates and also the heavy-fermion metals, which are compounds with 4f and 5f electrons. In all these materials the superconducting pairing interaction is often believed to be predominantly mediated by spin fluctuations and not by phonons as in normal metals. For the Kondo-lattice model we present results, which are derived within the Projective Renormalization Method (PRM). Based on a recent study of the one-particle spectral function for the normal state we first derive an effective Hamiltonian which describes heavy fermion quasiparticle bands close to the Fermi surface. An extension to the superconducting phase leads to d-wave solutions for the superconducting order parameter in agreement with recent STM measurements.

  13. Pairing-fluctuation effect in d-wave superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, X Z

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of a ladder-diagram approximation, we study the pairing-fluctuation effect in d-wave superconductivity. The single particles and pairs are treated on an equal footing. In the superconducting state, the predominant pairing fluctuation is due to the excitation of pairs to the states of the Goldstone mode. These bosonic degrees of freedom are relevant to the pseudogap physics in high-T sub c cuprates. The Green function of electrons is obtained as an analytic solution to a cubic equation. The superconducting order parameter and the transition temperature are substantially reduced from the values of the mean-field theory. The calculated phase boundary of the superconductivity can reasonably describe the experiment results for cuprates. (letter to the editor)

  14. Superconductivity in Electric Double Layer Capacitor under Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Duncan; Misek, Martin; Kamenev, Konstantin; Huxley, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Chemical doping generally provides the most common method for tuning into the superconducting state of a material yet can be difficult to control and also potentially introduces structural disorder complicating the underlying physics. Electric Double Layer devices however provide a means to electrostatically dope materials with high electric fields allowing continuous tuning of a 2D superconducting state thus avoiding such issues. One such device is the Electric Double Layer Capacitor which can detect the onset of superconductivity through AC magnetisation measurements. We make use of a similar device in an attempt to electrostatically dope and tune the superconductivity in the cuprate compound La1.93Sr0.07CuO4 as well as investigating whether application of pressure improves its efficiency.

  15. Electronic structure and superconductivity of FeSe-related superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Liu, Defa; Mou, Daixiang; Shen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Huang, Jianwei; Zhou, X J

    2015-05-13

    FeSe superconductors and their related systems have attracted much attention in the study of iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K and it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se with Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. A recent report of possible high temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review of the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.

  16. Induced spectral gap and pairing correlations from superconducting proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Cole, William S.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically consider superconducting proximity effect, using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) theory, in heterostructure sandwich-type geometries involving a normal s -wave superconductor and a nonsuperconducting material with the proximity effect being driven by Cooper pairs tunneling from the superconducting slab to the nonsuperconducting slab. Applications of the superconducting proximity effect may rely on an induced spectral gap or induced pairing correlations without any spectral gap. We clarify that in a nonsuperconducting material the induced spectral gap and pairing correlations are independent physical quantities arising from the proximity effect. This is a crucial issue in proposals to create topological superconductivity through the proximity effect. Heterostructures of three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) slabs on conventional s -wave superconductor (SC) substrates provide a platform, with proximity-induced topological superconductivity expected to be observed on the "naked" top surface of a thin TI slab. We theoretically study the induced superconducting gap on this naked surface. In addition, we compare against the induced spectral gap in heterostructures of SC with a normal metal or a semiconductor with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman splitting potential (another promising platform for topological superconductivity). We find that for any model for the non-SC metal (including metallic TI) the induced spectral gap on the naked surface decays as L-3 as the thickness (L ) of the non-SC slab is increased in contrast to the slower 1 /L decay of the pairing correlations. Our distinction between proximity-induced spectral gap (with its faster spatial decay) and pairing correlation (with its slower spatial decay) has important implications for the currently active search for topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in various superconducting heterostructures.

  17. Physical exercise recommendations improve postural changes found in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindel, Cláudia S; Hommerding, Patrícia X; Melo, Denizar A S; Baptista, Rafael R; Marostica, Paulo J C; Donadio, Márcio V F

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate postural changes and the distribution of plantar pressures in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We also sought to evaluate the effects of an educational guideline for physical activity on body posture in children and adolescents with CF. This was a 2-phase study of individuals between age 7 and 20 years. Phase I was a cross-sectional study in which healthy subjects were selected for postural evaluation and baropodometry, aiming to perform a later comparison with patients with CF. In phase II, we performed a randomized controlled clinical trial to assess the influence of the exercise guideline on the postural changes. Patients were assigned to 2 groups: control and intervention. The intervention consisted of a handbook with instructions for aerobic exercise and stretching. Main outcomes were postural abnormalities, plantar pressure distribution, and lung function. In phase I, 34 patients with CF and 34 healthy matched individuals were included. No significant baseline differences were identified. Children with CF presented more postural deviations compared with healthy subjects (P pressure and contact area. Children and adolescents with CF present postural changes when compared with healthy individuals. The educational guideline for exercise practice helped to improve posture, preventing the progression of some postural disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of combined exercise on physical fitness and neurotransmitters in children with ADHD: a pilot randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Kyoung; Lee, Chung-Moo; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of a jump rope and ball combined exercise program on the physical fitness the neurotransmitter (epinephrine, serotonin) levels of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 boys attending elementary school, whose grade levels ranged from 1–4. The block randomization method was used to distribute the participants between the combined exercise group (n = 6) and control group (n = 6). The program consisted of a 60-min exercise (10-min warm-up, 40-min main exercise, and 10-min cool down) performed three times a week, for a total of 12 weeks. [Results] The exercise group showed a significant improvement in cardiorespiratory endurance, muscle strength, muscle endurance and flexibility after 12 weeks. A significant increase in the epinephrine level was observed in the exercise group. [Conclusion] The 12-week combined exercise program in the current study (jump rope and ball exercises) had a positive effect on overall fitness level, and neurotransmission in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:26504324

  19. Weight Gain Prevention among Midlife Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Needs Related to the Physical and Social Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney D. Perry

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Women tend to gain weight at midlife (40–60 years increasing risk of obesity-related chronic diseases. Within specific eating occasions, needs related to the physical and social environment may result in less healthy eating behavior, which can lead to weight gain over time. The purpose of this study was to determine if a dietitian-delivered nutrition counseling intervention tailored to eating occasion needs could improve diet and prevent weight gain among midlife women over two years. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with healthy midlife women (n = 354 in one U.S. metropolitan area. The intervention group (n = 185 received ten hours of individual nutrition counseling from dietitians over six months, while women in a control group (n = 169 received no counseling. Measured height, weight and waist circumference, and dietary intakes were collected at baseline and every six months over two years. Mixed linear models were used to test for intervention effect on change in outcome variables over time. Dietary intakes of fruit, reduced/low-fat dairy foods and refined grains were significantly improved over time in the intervention compared to control group. However, the intervention had no effect on weight over time (p = 0.48. Nutrition counseling tailored to address eating occasion needs improved self-reported diet but did not significantly affect weight change.

  20. Physical therapy intervention in patients with non-cardiac chest pain following a recent cardiac event: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid T Berg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the effect of two different physical therapy interventions in patients with stable coronary heart disease and non-cardiac chest pain. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out at a university hospital in Norway. A total of 30 patients with known and stable coronary heart disease and self-reported persistent chest pain reproduced by palpation of intercostal trigger points were participating in the study. The intervention was deep friction massage and heat pack versus heat pack only. The primary outcome was pain intensity after the intervention period and 3 months after the last treatment session, measured by Visual Analogue Scale, 0 to 100. Secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Results: Treatment with deep friction massage and heat pack gave significant pain reduction compared to heat pack only (–17.6, 95% confidence interval: –30.5, –4.7; p < 0.01, and the reduction was persistent at 3 months’ follow-up (–15.2, 95% confidence interval: –28.5, –1.8; p = 0.03. Health-related quality of life improved in all three domains in patients with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: Deep friction massage combined with heat pack is an efficient treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

  1. Community-based intervention to improve dietary habits and promote physical activity among older adults: a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Mika

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fastest growing age group globally is older adults, and preventing the need for long-term nursing care in this group is important for social and financial reasons. A population approach to diet and physical activity through the use of social services can play an important role in prevention. This study examined the effectiveness of a social health program for community-dwelling older adults aimed at introducing and promoting physical activity in the home at each individual’s pace, helping participants maintain good dietary habits by keeping self-check sheets, and determining whether long-standing unhealthy or less-than-ideal physical and dietary habits can be changed. Method This cluster randomized trial conducted at 6 community centers in an urban community involved 92 community-dwelling older adults aged 65–90 years. The intervention group (3 community centers; n = 57 participated in the social health program “Sumida TAKE10!” which is an educational program incorporating the “TAKE10!® for Older Adults” program, once every 2 weeks for 3 months. The control group (3 community centers; n=35 was subsequently provided with the same program as a crossover intervention group. The main outcome measures were changes in food intake frequency, food frequency score (FFS, dietary variety score (DVS, and frequency of walking and exercise. The secondary outcome measures were changes in self-rated health, appetite, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology (TMIG Index of Competence score. Results Compared to baseline, post-intervention food intake frequency for 6 of 10 food groups (meat, fish/shellfish, eggs, potatoes, fruits, and seaweed, FFS, and DVS were significantly increased in the intervention group, and interaction effects of FFS and DVS were seen between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between baseline and post-intervention in the control group. Frequency of walking and

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  3. Low-intensity wheelchair training in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury : A randomized controlled trial on fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Jan W; de Groot, Sonja; Tepper, Marga; Faber, Willemijn; Group, Allrisc; Veeger, DirkJan H; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of low-intensity wheelchair training on wheelchair-specific fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. PARTICIPANTS: Inactive manual wheelchair use

  4. Does an Exercise Intervention Improving Aerobic Capacity Among Construction Workers Also Improve Musculoskeletal Pain, Work Ability, Productivity, Perceived Physical Exertion, and Sick Leave? A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gram, Bibi; Holtermann, Andreas; Bultmann, Ute; Sjogaard, Gisela; Sogaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether an exercise intervention shown to increase aerobic capacity, would also lead to less musculoskeletal pain; improved work ability, productivity, and perceived physical exertion; and less sick leave. Methods: Sixty-seven construction workers were randomized into an ex

  5. Results From a European Multicenter Randomized Trial of Physical Activity and/or Healthy Eating to Reduce the Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, David; Jelsma, Judith G M; Galjaard, Sander

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ways to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remain unproven. We compared the impact of three lifestyle interventions (healthy eating [HE], physical activity [PA], and both HE and PA [HE+PA]) on GDM risk in a pilot multicenter randomized trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS...

  6. Cost-effectiveness of a long-term Internet-delivered worksite health promotion programme on physical activity and nutrition: A cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.W. Robroek (Suzan); S. Polinder (Suzanne); F.J. Bredt (Folef); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the u

  7. Preoperative home-based physical therapy versus usual care to improve functional health of frail older adults scheduled for elective total hip arthroplasty: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosting, E.; Jans, M.P.; Dronkers, J.J.; Naber, R.H.; Dronkers-Landman, C.M.; Appelman-De Vries, S.M.; Meeteren, N.L. van

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative home-based physical therapy versus usual care to improve functional health of frail older adults scheduled for elective total hip arthroplasty: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Objective: To investigate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a home-based intensive exercise

  8. The effects of a multicomponent dyadic intervention on the mood, behavior, and physical health of people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prick, A.J.C.; Lange, J. de; Scherder, E.; Twisk, J.; Pot, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of a multicomponent dyadic intervention on the mood, behavior, and physical health of people with dementia living in the community were evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. This multicomponent dyadic intervention is a translated and adapted version of an intervention that

  9. The effect of a polynutrient supplement on fatigue and physical activity of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, F.M.; Werf, S.P. van der; Bleijenberg, G.; Zee, L. van der; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The efficacy of dietary supplements in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is uncertain, with conflicting evidence. Aim: To assess the effect of a polynutrient supplement on fatigue and physical activity of patients with CFS. DESIGN:Prospective randomized placebo-controlled, double-blind

  10. Treatment of myogenic temporomandibular disorder: a prospective randomized clinical trial, comparing a mechanical stretching device (TheraBite®) with standard physical therapy exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijenga, S.; van der Molen, L.; van Tinteren, H.; Hilgers, F.; Smeele, L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To compare in a randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) the application of the TheraBite® (TB) Jaw Motion Rehabilitation System with a standard physical therapy (PT) exercise regimen for the treatment of myogenic temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Methodology: Myogenic TMD patients were

  11. The effects of a multicomponent dyadic intervention on the mood, behavior, and physical health of people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Pot; J. Twisk; Dr. J. de Lange; A.J.C. Prick; E. Scherder

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of a multicomponent dyadic intervention on the mood, behavior, and physical health of people with dementia living in the community were evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. This multicomponent dyadic intervention is a translated and adapted version of an intervention that

  12. Low-intensity wheelchair training in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury : A randomized controlled trial on fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Jan W.; de Groot, Sonja; Tepper, Marga; Faber, Willemijn; Veeger, DirkJan H.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    Objective: To investigate the effects of low-intensity wheelchair training on wheelchair-specific fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Participants: Inactive manual wheelchair

  13. Manipulative therapy in addition to usual care for patients with shoulder complaints : results of physical examination outcomes in a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, Geert; Winters, Jan C.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty; Postema, Klaas; van der Heijden, Geert J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of manipulative therapy on the shoulder girdle, in addition to usual care provided by the general practitioner, on the Outcomes of physical examination tests for the treatment of shoulder complaints. Methods: This was a randomized contro

  14. A randomized trial on the effect of a multimodal intervention on physical capacity, functional performance and quality of life in adult patients undergoing allogeneic SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, M; Baadsgaard, M T; Hovgaard, D J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of a 4- to 6-week multimodal program of exercise, relaxation and psychoeducation on physical capacity, functional performance and quality of life (QOL) in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) adult reci...

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  17. A randomized multifactorial intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (Inter99): the long-term effect on physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Huth Smith, Lisa; Ladelund, Steen; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of a randomized multiple risk factor intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) on the development in physical activity over a 36-month period. METHODS: Two random samples (high intensity intervention, group A, n=11,708; low intensity intervention....... High-risk persons in group B were referred to their GP. High-risk persons were re-counselled after 12 and 36 months. The control group (group C, n=5,264, response rate=61.3%) answered a mailed questionnaire. Data were analysed using longitudinal linear regression models with random effects. MAIN......, group B, n=1,308) were invited for a health examination, an assessment of absolute risk of developing IHD, and an individualized lifestyle intervention. The participation rate was 52.5%. High-risk persons in group A were also offered diet/physical activity and/or smoking cessation group counselling...

  18. Statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sadovskii, Michael V

    2012-01-01

    This volume provides a compact presentation of modern statistical physics at an advanced level. Beginning with questions on the foundations of statistical mechanics all important aspects of statistical physics are included, such as applications to ideal gases, the theory of quantum liquids and superconductivity and the modern theory of critical phenomena. Beyond that attention is given to new approaches, such as quantum field theory methods and non-equilibrium problems.

  19. Interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubukov, Andrey V [University of Wisconsin

    2015-06-10

    This proposal is for theoretical work on strongly correlated electron systems, which are at the center of experimental and theoretical activities in condensed-matter physics. The interest to this field is driven fascinating variety of observed effects, universality of underlying theoretical ideas, and practical applications. I propose to do research on Iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), which currently attract high attention in the physics community. My goal is to understand superconductivity and magnetism in these materials at various dopings, the interplay between the two, and the physics in the phase in which magnetism and superconductivity co-exist. A related goal is to understand the origin of the observed pseudogap-like behavior in the normal state. My research explores the idea that superconductivity is of electronic origin and is caused by the exchange of spin-fluctuations, enhanced due to close proximity to antiferromagnetism. The multi-orbital/multi-band nature of FeSCs opens routes for qualitatively new superconducting states, particularly the ones which break time-reversal symmetry. By all accounts, the coupling in pnictdes is below the threshold for Mott physics and I intend to analyze these systems within the itinerant approach. My plan is to do research in two stages. I first plan to address several problems within weak-coupling approach. Among them: (i) what sets stripe magnetic order at small doping, (ii) is there a preemptive instability into a spin-nematic state, and how stripe order affects fermions; (iii) is there a co-existence between magnetism and superconductivity and what are the system properties in the co-existence state; (iv) how superconductivity emerges despite strong Coulomb repulsion and can the gap be s-wave but with nodes along electron FSs, (v) are there complex superconducting states, like s+id, which break time reversal symmetry. My second goal is to go beyond weak coupling and derive spin-mediated, dynamic interaction between

  20. Coherence properties in superconducting flux qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilla, Samuele

    2015-02-16

    The research work discussed in this thesis deals with the study of superconducting Josephson qubits. Superconducting qubits are solid-state artificial atoms which are based on lithographically defined Josephson tunnel junctions properties. When sufficiently cooled, these superconducting devices exhibit quantized states of charge, flux or junction phase depending on their design parameters. This allows to observe coherent evolutions of their states. The results presented can be divided into two parts. In a first part we investigate operations of superconducting qubits based on the quantum coherence in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID). We explain experimental data which has been observed in a SQUID subjected to fast, large-amplitude modifications of its effective potential shape. The motivations for this work come from the fact that in the past few years there have been attempts to interpret the supposed quantum behavior of physical systems, such as Josephson devices, within a classical framework. Moreover, we analyze the possibility of generating GHZ states, namely maximally entangled states, in a quantum system made out of three Josephson qubits. In particular, we investigate the possible limitations of the GHZ state generation due to coupling to bosonic baths. In the second part of the thesis we address a particular cause of decoherence of flux qubits which has been disregarded until now: thermal gradients, which can arise due to accidental non equilibrium quasiparticle distributions. The reason for these detrimental effects is that heat currents flowing through Josephson tunnel junctions in response to a temperature gradient are periodic functions of the phase difference between the electrodes. The phase dependence of the heat current comes from Andreev reflection, namely an interplay between the quasiparticles which carry heat and the superconducting condensate which is sensitive to the superconducting phase difference. Generally speaking

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  2. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C. [eds.] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  3. A vertical test system for China-ADS project injector II superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; He, Yuan; Wen, Liang-Hua; Li, Chun-Long; Xue, Zong-Heng; Song, Yu-Kun; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Zheng-Long; Gao, Zheng; Zhang, Cong; Sun, Lie-Peng; Yue, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; You, Zhi-Ming; Thomas, Joseph Powers(Tom Powers

    2014-05-01

    To test superconducting cavities, a vertical test system has been designed and set up at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The system design is based on VCO-PLL hardware and the NI Labview software. The test of the HWR010#2 superconducting cavity shows that the function of this test system is satisfactory for testing the low frequency cavity.

  4. A participatory parent-focused intervention promoting physical activity in preschools: design of a cluster-randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With rates of childhood obesity increasing, physical activity (PA promotion especially in young children has assumed greater importance. Given the limited effectiveness of most interventions to date, new approaches are needed. The General Systems theory suggests that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier life styles in children. We describe the development of a parent-focused participatory intervention and the procedures used to evaluate its effectiveness in increasing daily PA in preschoolers. Methods/Design Thirty-seven South German preschools were identified for this study and agreed to participate. Using a two-armed, controlled cluster-randomized trial design we test a participatory intervention with parents as the primary target group and potential agents of behavioural change. Specifically, the intervention is designed to engage parents in the development, refinement and selection of project ideas to promote PA and in incorporating these ideas into daily routines within the preschool community, consisting of children, teachers and parents. Our study is embedded within an existing state-sponsored programme providing structured gym lessons to preschool children. Thus, child-based PA outcomes from the study arm with the parent-focused intervention and the state-sponsored programme are compared with those from the study arm with the state-sponsored programme alone. The evaluation entails baseline measurements of study outcomes as well as follow-up measurements at 6 and 12 months. Accelerometry measures PA intensity over a period of six days, with the mean over six days used as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes include childrens' BMI, a sum of averaged skin fold thickness measurements across multiple sites, and PA behaviour. Longitudinal multilevel models are used to assess within-subject change and between-group differences in study outcomes, adjusted for covariates

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Primary Care Management With or Without Early Physical Therapy for Acute Low Back Pain: Economic Evaluation of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julie M; Kim, Minchul; Magel, John S; Asche, Carl V

    2017-03-01

    Economic evaluation of a randomized clinical trial. Compare costs and cost-effectiveness of usual primary care management for patients with acute low back pain (LBP) with or without the addition of early physical therapy. Low back pain is among the most common and costly conditions encountered in primary care. Early physical therapy after a new primary care consultation for acute LBP results in small clinical improvement but cost-effectiveness of a strategy of early physical therapy is unknown. Economic evaluation was conducted alongside a randomized clinical trial of patients with acute, nonspecific LBP consulting a primary care provider. All patients received usual primary care management and education, and were randomly assigned to receive four sessions of physical therapy or usual care of delaying referral consideration to permit spontaneous recovery. Data were collected in a randomized trial involving 220 participants age 18 to 60 with LBP costs related to LBP were collected monthly and valued using standard costs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was computed as incremental total costs divided by incremental QALYs. Early physical therapy resulted in higher total 1-year costs (mean difference in adjusted total costs = $580, 95% CI: $175, $984, P = 0.005) and better quality of life (mean difference in QALYs = 0.02, 95% CI: 0.005, 0.35, P = 0.008) after 1-year. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $32,058 (95% CI: $10,629, $151,161) per QALY. Our results support early physical therapy as cost-effective relative to usual primary care after 1 year for patients with acute, nonspecific LBP. 2.

  6. Effectiveness of a worksite social & physical environment intervention on need for recovery, physical activity and relaxation; results of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffeng, J.K.; Boot, C.R.L.; Duijts, S.F.A.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Mechelen, W. van; Hendriksen, I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of a worksite social and physical environment intervention on need for recovery (i.e., early symptoms of work-related mental and physical fatigue), physical activity and relaxation. Also, the effectiveness of the separate interventions was investigated.

  7. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  8. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  9. The Large Hadron Collider and the Role of Superconductivity in One of the Largest Scientific Enterprises

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    After ten years of R&D and industrialization and seven years of construction, the LHC is near completion. The manufacture of the 1750 main superconducting magnets and of the 8000 superconducting correctors for the accelerator, as well as their cold test at CERN, is approaching the end, while their commissioning in the 27 km-long tunnel has started. The very large superconducting magnets for the main detectors, ATLAS and CMS, are installed and their commissioning is under way. Superconductivity is the key technology for the largest scientific enterprise of this decade: it accounts for half of the total cost and has proved to be affordable and reliable. Thanks to superconductivity we can probe new states of matters and reproduce conditions of 1 ps after the big bang. The paper will give the link between the Physics requirements and the answers that applied superconductivity has offered in this project.

  10. Effects of Physical-Cognitive Dual Task Training on Executive Function and Gait Performance in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbo, S; Condello, G; Capranica, L; Forte, R; Pesce, C

    2016-01-01

    Physical and cognitive training seem to counteract age-related decline in physical and mental function. Recently, the possibility of integrating cognitive demands into physical training has attracted attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of twelve weeks of designed physical-cognitive training on executive cognitive function and gait performance in older adults. Thirty-six healthy, active individuals aged 72.30 ± 5.84 years were assigned to two types of physical training with major focus on physical single task (ST) training (n = 16) and physical-cognitive dual task (DT) training (n = 20), respectively. They were tested before and after the intervention for executive function (inhibition, working memory) through Random Number Generation and for gait (walking with/without negotiating hurdles) under both single and dual task (ST, DT) conditions. Gait performance improved in both groups, while inhibitory performance decreased after exercise training with ST focus but tended to increase after training with physical-cognitive DT focus. Changes in inhibition performance were correlated with changes in DT walking performance with group differences as a function of motor task complexity (with/without hurdling). The study supports the effectiveness of group exercise classes for older individuals to improve gait performance, with physical-cognitive DT training selectively counteracting the age-related decline in a core executive function essential for daily living.

  11. A transmission calibration method for superconducting resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, Samuel H; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2014-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for \\textit{in-situ} calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response was modeled in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microst...

  12. Random Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanov, M A; Wettig, T

    2005-01-01

    We review elementary properties of random matrices and discuss widely used mathematical methods for both hermitian and nonhermitian random matrix ensembles. Applications to a wide range of physics problems are summarized. This paper originally appeared as an article in the Wiley Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering.

  13. Training Medical Specialists to Communicate Better with Patients with Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS. A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Weiland

    Full Text Available Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS are prevalent 25-50% in general and specialist care. Medical specialists and residents often find patients without underlying pathology difficult to deal with, whereas patients sometimes don't feel understood. We developed an evidence-based communication training, aimed to improve specialists' interviewing, information-giving and planning skills in MUPS consultations, and tested its effectiveness.The intervention group in this multi-center randomized controlled trial received a 14-hour training program to which experiential learning and feedback were essential. Using techniques from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, they were stimulated to seek interrelating factors (symptoms, cognitions, emotions, behavior, and social environment that reinforced a patient's symptoms. They were taught to explain MUPS understandably, reassure patients effectively and avoid unnecessary diagnostic testing. Before and after the intervention training, specialists videotaped a total of six consultations with different MUPS patients. These were evaluated to assess doctors' MUPS-focused communicating skills using an adapted version of the Four Habit Coding Scheme on five-point Likert scales. Participants evaluated the training by self-report on three-point Likert scales. Doctors in the control group received training after completion of the study.123 doctors (40% specialists, 60% residents and 478 MUPS patients from 11 specialties were included; 98 doctors completed the study (80% and 449 videotaped consultations were assessed. Trained doctors interviewed patients more effectively than untrained ones (p < 0.001, summarized information in a more patient-centered way (p = 0.001, and better explained MUPS and the role of perpetuating factors (p < 0.05. No effects on planning skills were found. On a 3-point scale the training was evaluated with 2.79.MUPS-focused communication training increases the interviewing and

  14. Effectiveness of workplace exercise supervised by a physical therapist among nurses conducting shift work: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugaki, Ryutaro; Kuhara, Satoshi; Saeki, Satoru; Jiang, Ying; Michishita, Ryoma; Ohta, Masanori; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2017-07-27

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of supervised exercise among nurses conducting shift work for health promotion. A total of 30 healthy female nurses conducting shift work participated in this study and they were randomly assigned to one of the following 2 groups: The supervised exercise group (SG; participants exercised under the supervision of a physical therapist (PT)) and the voluntary exercise group (VG; participants exercised without supervision). The study participants were asked to exercise twice/week for 12 weeks for 24 sessions. The primary outcome was aerobic fitness, and the secondary outcomes were muscle strength, anthropometric data, biochemical parameters, and mental health. We compared all the outcomes before and after the intervention within each group and between both groups at follow-up. Aerobic fitness increased in the SG whereas it decreased in the VG, but these changes were not statistically significant (p=0.053 and 0.073, respectively). However, the between-group difference was significant in the intervention effect (p=0.010). Muscle strength, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and metabolic profile (high-molecular weight adiponectin), and depressive symptom significantly improved in the SG over time, even though the SG exercised less as compared with the VG. Moreover, significant differences in muscle strength, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and reactive oxygen metabolite levels were observed between both groups, and these parameters were better in the SG than in the VG. Our data-suggest the effectiveness of exercise supervised by a PT at the workplace of nurses conducting shift work for health promotion.

  15. Fe en Accion/Faith in Action: Design and implementation of a church-based randomized trial to promote physical activity and cancer screening among churchgoing Latinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Elva M.; Haughton, Jessica; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Slymen, Donald J.; Sallis, James F.; Burke, Kari; Holub, Christina; Chanson, Dayana; Perez, Lilian G.; Valdivia, Rodrigo; Ryan, Sherry; Elder, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe both conditions of a two-group randomized trial, one that promotes physical activity and one that promotes cancer screening, among churchgoing Latinas. The trial involves promotoras (community health workers) targeting multiple levels of the Ecological Model. This trial builds on formative and pilot research findings. Design Sixteen churches were randomly assigned to either the physical activity intervention or cancer screening comparison condition (approximately 27 women per church). In both conditions, promotoras from each church intervened at the individual- (e.g., beliefs), interpersonal- (e.g., social support), and environmental- (e.g., park features and access to health care) levels to affect change on target behaviors. Measurements The study’s primary outcome is min/wk of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at baseline and 12 and 24 months following implementation of intervention activities. We enrolled 436 Latinas (aged 18–65 years) who engaged in less than 250 min/wk of MVPA at baseline as assessed by accelerometer, attended church at least four times per month, lived near their church, and did not have a health condition that could prevent them from participating in physical activity. Participants were asked to complete measures assessing physical activity and cancer screening as well as their correlates at 12- and 24-months. Summary Findings from the current study will address gaps in research by showing the long term effectiveness of multi-level faith-based interventions promoting physical activity and cancer screening among Latino communities. PMID:26358535

  16. The effectiveness of Tai Chi on the physical and psychological well-being of college students: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guohua; Lan, Xiulu; Li, Moyi; Ling, Kun; Lin, Hui; Chen, Lidian; Tao, Jing; Li, Junzhe; Zheng, Xin; Chen, Bai; Fang, Qianying

    2014-04-17

    The physical and mental health of college-age youths tends to continuously decline around the world. It is therefore important to promote health during this period. As a traditional Chinese mind-body exercise, Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) may be an available selection. However for the college student population, the evidence is unclear as to whether TCC can be recommended as an effective exercise for promoting their physical and psychological wellbeing. Therefore high quality, rigorous, prospective, and well-controlled randomized trials are needed to further understand TCC serving as a psychological and physical intervention in college age populations. We designed a randomized, single-blind, parallel-controlled trial with a sample size of 206 participants. All the participants who meet the inclusion criteria come from Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (FJTCM). Participants of the TCC training group will receive TCC training at a frequency of five days per week for one hour per day for 12 weeks. No specific exercise will be administered on the participants in the control group. Both physical and mental health outcomes, including balance ability, lower limb proprioception, flexibility, physical fitness, self-efficacy, psychological symptoms, attention span, stress, self-esteem, mood and mindfulness, quality of life, and quality of sleep. Safety outcomes will be evaluated by blinded operators at baseline, 12 and 24-weeks post-intervention. This protocol presents an objective design of a randomized, single-blind trial that will test the effectiveness and safety of TCC on the physical and psychological wellbeing of college students. If the outcome is positive, the results will provide higher quality evidence of TCC on the physical and mental health of college age populations. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-13003328.

  17. Statistical mechanics of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kita, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical, step-by-step comprehensive explanation of superconductivity for undergraduate and graduate students who have completed elementary courses on thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. To this end, it adopts the unique approach of starting with the statistical mechanics of quantum ideal gases and successively adding and clarifying elements and techniques indispensible for understanding it. They include the spin-statistics theorem, second quantization, density matrices, the Bloch–De Dominicis theorem, the variational principle in statistical mechanics, attractive interaction, and bound states. Ample examples of their usage are also provided in terms of topics from advanced statistical mechanics such as two-particle correlations of quantum ideal gases, derivation of the Hartree–Fock equations, and Landau’s Fermi-liquid theory, among others. With these preliminaries, the fundamental mean-field equations of superconductivity are derived with maximum mathematical clarity based on ...

  18. Superconducting switch pack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, V.C.; Wollan, J.J.

    1990-07-24

    This patent describes a superconducting switch pack at least one switch element. The switch element including a length of superconductive wire having a switching portion and two lead portions, the switching portion being between the lead portions; means for supporting the switching portion in a plane in a common mold; hardened resin means encapsulating the switching portion in the plane in a solid body; wherein the solid body has an exterior surface which is planar and substantially parallel with and spaced apart from the plane in which the switching portion is positioned. The exterior surface being exposed to the exterior of the switch pack and the resin means filling the space between the exterior surface and the plane of the switching portion so as to provide uninterrupted thermal communication between the plane of the switching portion and the exterior of the switch pack; and a heater element in thermal contact with the switching portion.

  19. Tunable superconducting nanoinductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annunziata, Anthony J; Santavicca, Daniel F; Frunzio, Luigi; Rooks, Michael J; Prober, Daniel E [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Catelani, Gianluigi [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Frydman, Aviad, E-mail: anthony.annunziata@yale.edu, E-mail: daniel.prober@yale.edu [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2010-11-05

    We characterize inductors fabricated from ultra-thin, approximately 100 nm wide strips of niobium (Nb) and niobium nitride (NbN). These nanowires have a large kinetic inductance in the superconducting state. The kinetic inductance scales linearly with the nanowire length, with a typical value of 1 nH {mu}m{sup -1} for NbN and 44 pH {mu}m{sup -1} for Nb at a temperature of 2.5 K. We measure the temperature and current dependence of the kinetic inductance and compare our results to theoretical predictions. We also simulate the self-resonant frequencies of these nanowires in a compact meander geometry. These nanowire inductive elements have applications in a variety of microwave frequency superconducting circuits.

  20. Time ripe for superconductivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsh

    2002-04-01

    But there is a crucial deadline and failure to meet it could send superconductivity back to the commercial shadows (at least outside the medical and scientific niches where it is a key enabler in analytical instruments, magnetic resonance imaging, and particle accelerators for another 30 years. Later this decade, the vintage infrastructure of dense copper conductors that supports power distribution in developed countries, in particular in the US, will become due for renewal. (Recent power problems in California were largely those of distribution infrastructure. At the same time, boosting capacity to serve the needs of increasingly affluent populations will pose a challenge. Superconductivity could provide the answer — if the technology matures in time and cost targets are met.

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  3. Relativistic Model for two-band Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ohsaku, Tadafumi

    2003-01-01

    To understand the superconductivity in MgB2, several two-band models of superconductivity were proposed. In this paper, by using the relativistic fermion model, we clearize the effect of the lower band in the superconductivity.

  4. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Cristian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  5. Unconventional superconductivity near inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenicke, A.F.

    2008-01-25

    After the presentation of a quasi-classical theory the specific heat of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is considered. Then tunneling spectroscopy on cuprate superconductors is discussed. Thereafter the subharmonic gap structure in d-wave superconductors is considered. Finally the application of the S-matrix in superconductivity is discussed with spin mixing, CrO{sub 2} as example, and an interface model. (HSI)

  6. Helical superconducting black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  7. Project X: Physics Opportunities

    CERN Document Server

    Kronfeld, Andreas S; Al-Binni, Usama; Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Babu, Kaladi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bass, Matthew; Batell, Brian; Baxter, David V; Berezhiani, Zurab; Bergevin, Marc; Bernstein, Robert; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Bishai, Mary; Blum, Thomas; Bogacz, S Alex; Brice, Stephen J; Brod, Joachim; Bross, Alan; Buchoff, Michael; Burgess, Thomas W; Carena, Marcela; Castellanos, Luis A; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chen, Mu-Chun; Cherdack, Daniel; Christ, Norman H; Chupp, Tim; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Coloma, Pilar; Coppola, Christopher E; Cowsik, Ramanath; Crabtree, J Allen; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Denisov, Dmitri; deNiverville, Patrick; de Gouvêa, André; Dharmapalan, Ranjan; Dolgov, Alexander; Dvali, Georgi; Eichten, Estia; Engelfried, Jürgen; Ferguson, Phillip D; Gabriel, Tony; Gal, Avraham; Gallmeier, Franz; Ganezer, Kenneth S; Gardner, Susan; Glenzinski, Douglas; Godfrey, Stephen; Golubeva, Elena S; Gori, Stefania; Graves, Van B; Greene, Geoffrey; Griffard, Cory L; Haisch, Ulrich; Handler, Thomas; Hartfiel, Brandon; Hawari, Ayman; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Hill, James E; Huber, Patrick; Jaffe, David E; Johnson, Christian; Kamyshkov, Yuri; Kaplan, Daniel M; Kerbikov, Boris; Kiburg, Brendan; Kirk, Harold G; Klein, Andreas; Knoepfel, Kyle; Kopeliovich, Boris; Kopeliovich, Vladimir; Kopp, Joachim; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kribs, Graham; Lipton, Ronald; Liu, Chen-Yu; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Makins, Naomi C R; McKeen, David; Mills, Geoffrey; Mohapatra, Rabindra; Mokhov, Nikolai V; Mocko, Michael; Muhrer, Guenter; Mumm, Pieter; Okun, Lev; Neuffer, David; Palmer, Mark A; Palmer, Robert; Pattie, Robert W; Phillips, David G; Pronsikh, Vitaly; Pitts, Kevin; Pospelov, Maxim; Quigg, Chris; Ramberg, Erik; Ray, Amlan; Reimer, Paul E; Richards, David G; Ritz, Adam; Roy, Amit; Ruggles, Arthur; Ryne, Robert; Sarkar, Utpal; Saunders, Andy; Semertzidis, Yannis K; Serebrov, Anatoly; Shimizu, Hirohiko; Shrock, Robert; Snopok, Pavel V; Snow, William M; Sikdar, Arindam K; Soha, Aria; Spanier, Stefan; Striganov, Sergei; Tang, Zhaowen; Townsend, Lawrence; Urheim, Jon; Vainshtein, Arkady; Van Kooten, Richard J; Van de Water, Richard; Van de Water, Ruth S; Wehring, Bernard; Whitehead, Lisa; Wilson, Robert J; Worcester, Elizabeth; Young, Albert R; Wester, William C; Zeller, Geralyn

    2013-01-01

    Part 2 of "Project X: Accelerator Reference Design, Physics Opportunities, Broader Impacts". In this Part, we outline the particle-physics program that can be achieved with Project X, a staged superconducting linac for intensity-frontier particle physics. Topics include neutrino physics, kaon physics, muon physics, electric dipole moments, neutron-antineutron oscillations, new light particles, hadron structure, hadron spectroscopy, and lattice-QCD calculations.

  8. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F., E-mail: francois.lefloch@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA - INAC - SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D. [Université Paris-sud, CNRS - IEF, F-91405 Orsay - France (France); Hasselbach, K. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS - Inst. Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Kirtley, J. R. [Center for probing at nanoscale, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305-4045 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  9. Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer (SQOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-05

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The SQOT (Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer ) project proposes to build a novel electro-optic system which can...Apr-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: "Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer " (SQOT) The views, opinions and...journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: "Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer " (SQOT) Report Title The

  10. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, V; Cirillo, M; Lucci, M; Ottaviani, I; Scherillo, A; Celentano, G; Pietropaolo, A

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the supercond...

  11. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-04-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  12. US Navy superconductivity program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  13. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  14. Superconductivity in Lu{sub 2}SnC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchida, S., E-mail: s-kuchida@phys.aoyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama-Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Muranaka, T. [Department of Engineering Science, The University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Kawashima, K.; Inoue, K. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama-Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [IMRA Material Co. Ltd., 2-1 Asahicho, Kariya, Aichi 448-0032 (Japan); Akimitsu, J. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama-Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We discovered the superconductivity in Lu{sub 2}SnC. •The superconducting transition temperature is confirmed at around 5.2 K. •The M–H curve at 1.8 K shows that Lu{sub 2}SnC is categorized to be a conventional type-II superconductor. -- Abstract: We discovered the superconductivity in Lu{sub 2}SnC with the T{sub c} of 5.2 K. Lu{sub 2}SnC crystallizes in a hexagonal structure (Cr{sub 2}AlC-type) with the space group of P6{sub 3}/mmc. We measured the physical properties of Lu{sub 2}SnC in the superconducting state as functions of temperature and magnetic field. The M–H curve shows the typical type-II superconducting behavior. Superconducting parameters H{sub c1}(0), H{sub c2}(0), λ(0), ξ(0) and κ{sub GL} are determined to be about 110 Oe, 4.5 kOe, 250 nm, 27 nm, and 9.2, respectively.

  15. Unconventional superconductivity in honeycomb lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sahebsara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available   ‎ The possibility of symmetrical s-wave superconductivity in the honeycomb lattice is studied within a strongly correlated regime, using the Hubbard model. The superconducting order parameter is defined by introducing the Green function, which is obtained by calculating the density of the electrons ‎ . In this study showed that the superconducting order parameter appears in doping interval between 0 and 0.5, and x=0.25 is the optimum doping for the s-wave superconductivity in honeycomb lattice.

  16. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  17. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  18. Effectiveness of Facebook-Delivered Lifestyle Counselling and Physical Activity Self-Monitoring on Physical Activity and Body Mass Index in Overweight and Obese Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Ruotsalainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week, Facebook-delivered lifestyle counselling intervention, with or without physical activity self-monitoring, on physical activity and body mass index (BMI in overweight and obese 13–16-year-old adolescents. Methods. Three-arm randomized controlled trial. Participants (n=46 were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups: one group received Facebook-delivered lifestyle counselling and monitoring of their physical activity (Fb + Act, n=15, whereas a second experimental group received the same Facebook-delivered lifestyle counselling without self-monitoring (Fb, n=16 and a third group served as the control group (n=15. Objective and self-reported physical activity assessment were used. Nonparametric statistical tests were used. Results. There were no significant intervention effects in terms of changes in physical activity levels or BMI from baseline to the 12-week postintervention measurements between the intervention and control groups. The Fb + Act group had lower sedentary time on weekdays compared to the control group during postintervention measurements (p=0.021, but there was no interaction between time and group. Conclusions. Interventions were not effective at increasing physical activity in overweight and obese adolescents. Before implementing such interventions, more evaluations on their effectiveness are needed. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02295761 (2014-11-17.

  19. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    systems. In addition, the role of thermodynamic fluctuations on superconducting properties has been extensively studied in the context of nanoparticles and nanowires both experimentally and theoretically. In the past decade, a lot of work has been initiated in the area of interface superconductivity where different techniques have been demonstrated to tune Tc. Although the progress in this field has deepened our understanding of nanoscale superconductors, there are several open and key questions which need to be addressed. Some of these are: (1) can superconductivity be enhanced and Tc increased in nanostructures with respect to the bulk limit and if so, how can it be controlled? (2) What are the theoretical and experimental limits for the enhancement and control of superconductivity? (3) Can the phenomena identified in conventional nanostructures shed light on phenomena in high Tc superconductors and vice versa? (4) How will the new fundamental physics of superconductivity at the nanoscale promote advances in nanotechnology applications and vice versa? The papers in this focus section reflect the advances made in this field, in particular in nanowires and nanofilms, but also attempt to answer some of the key open questions outlined above. The theoretical papers explore unconventional quantum phenomena such as the role of confinement in the dynamics of single Cooper pairs in isolated grains [1] and Fano resonances in superconducting gaps in multi-condensate superconductors near a 2.5 Lifshitz transition [2]. Here a new emerging class of quantum phenomena of fundamental physics appear at the Bose-BCS crossover in multi-condensate superconductors [2]. Nanosize effects can now be manipulated by controlling defects in layered oxides [3]. A new approach is provided by controlling the self-organization of oxygen interstitials in layered copper oxides that show an intrinsic nanoscale phase separation [4]. In this case a non-trivial distribution of superconducting nanograins

  20. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  2. Effective group training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: A randomized controlled trial with a non-randomized one-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.N.L. Zonneveld (Lyonne); Y.R. van Rood (Yanda); R. Timman (Reinier); C.G. Kooiman (Cornelis); A. van 't Spijker (Adriaan); J.J. van Busschbach (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Although cognitive-behavioral therapy for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS) is effective in secondary care, studies done in primary care produced implementation problems and conflicting results. We evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group training tailore

  3. Quantum information processing with superconducting circuits: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendin, G.

    2017-10-01

    During the last ten years, superconducting circuits have passed from being interesting physical devices to becoming contenders for near-future useful and scalable quantum information processing (QIP). Advanced quantum simulation experiments have been shown with up to nine qubits, while a demonstration of quantum supremacy with fifty qubits is anticipated in just a few years. Quantum supremacy means that the quantum system can no longer be simulated by the most powerful classical supercomputers. Integrated classical-quantum computing systems are already emerging that can be used for software development and experimentation, even via web interfaces. Therefore, the time is ripe for describing some of the recent development of superconducting devices, systems and applications. As such, the discussion of superconducting qubits and circuits is limited to devices that are proven useful for current or near future applications. Consequently, the centre of interest is the practical applications of QIP, such as computation and simulation in Physics and Chemistry.

  4. Heavy-ion acceleration with a superconducting linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    This year, 1988, is the tenth anniversary of the first use of RF superconductivity to accelerate heavy ions. In June 1978, the first two superconducting resonators of the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) were used to boost the energy of a /sup 19/F beam from the tandem, and by September 1978 a 5-resonator linac provided an /sup 16/O beam for a nuclear-physics experiment. Since then, the superconducting linac has grown steadily in size and capability until now there are 42 accelerating structures and 4 bunchers. Throughout this period, the system was used routinely for physics research, and by now the total time with beam on target is 35,000 hours. Lessons learned from this long running experience and some key technical developments that made it possible are reviewed in this paper. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  6. Tuning the Superconducting Properties of Magnesium Diboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theoderich Wilke, Rudeger Heinrich [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This work is presented in the following order: A review of the relevant physics and discussion of theoretical predictions for a two gap superconducting compound is given in chapter 2. Chapter 3 provides a review of the basic properties of MgB2. Details of sample synthesis and characterization are given in chapter 4. Chapter 5 presents normal state and superconducting properties of Mg(B1-xCx)2 wires. Attempts to increase critical current densities in filaments via titanium additions are discussed in chapter 6. In chapters 7 and 8 alternative methods for synthesizing doped MgB2 powders are explored. In chapter 7 we synthesize Mg(B1-xCx)2 up to x=0.069 using a mixture of Mg, B, and the binary compound B4C. Chapter 8 explores an alternative method, plasma spray synthesis, to produce nanometer sized doped boron powders for powder-in-tube applications. The effects of neutron irradiation on pure MgB2 wires is discussed in chapter 9. This is followed by a study of the effects of neutron irradiation on Mg(B.962C.038)2 wires, presented in chapter 10. I will summarize the results of all of these studies in chapter 11 and discuss future directions for research in understanding the physics behind this novel material as well as its development for practical applications. In this thesis I have presented the results of investigations into the changes in the superconducting properties of MgB2 as a function of carbon doping and neutron irradiation. The goal has been to understand the physics underlying this unique two-gap superconductor as different types of perturbations are made to the system. Such knowledge not only contributes to our understanding of two-gap superconductivity, but could potentially lead to the development of superconducting MgB2 wires for the use in power applications near 20 K.

  7. Effectiveness of a worksite social & physical environment intervention on need for recovery, physical activity and relaxation; results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffeng, Jennifer K; Boot, Cécile R L; Duijts, Saskia F A; Twisk, Jos W R; van Mechelen, Willem; Hendriksen, Ingrid J M

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a worksite social and physical environment intervention on need for recovery (i.e., early symptoms of work-related mental and physical fatigue), physical activity and relaxation. Also, the effectiveness of the separate interventions was investigated. In this 2 × 2 factorial design study, 412 office employees from a financial service provider participated. Participants were allocated to the combined social and physical intervention, to the social intervention only, to the physical intervention only or to the control group. The primary outcome measure was need for recovery. Secondary outcomes were work-related stress (i.e., exhaustion, detachment and relaxation), small breaks, physical activity (i.e., stair climbing, active commuting, sport activities, light/moderate/vigorous physical activity) and sedentary behavior. Outcomes were measured by questionnaires at baseline, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Multilevel analyses were performed to investigate the effects of the three interventions. In all intervention groups, a non-significant reduction was found in need for recovery. In the combined intervention (n = 92), exhaustion and vigorous physical activities decreased significantly, and small breaks at work and active commuting increased significantly compared to the control group. The social intervention (n = 118) showed a significant reduction in exhaustion, sedentary behavior at work and a significant increase in small breaks at work and leisure activities. In the physical intervention (n = 96), stair climbing at work and active commuting significantly increased, and sedentary behavior at work decreased significantly compared to the control group. None of the interventions was effective in improving the need for recovery. It is recommended to implement the social and physical intervention among a population with higher baseline values of need for recovery. Furthermore, the intervention itself could be improved by increasing the

  8. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on pain in healthcare workers: study protocol for a single blinded cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anne Zoëga; Jay, Kenneth; Stelter, Reinhard; Lavendt, Ebbe; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-04-07

    The prevalence and consequences of musculoskeletal pain is considerable among healthcare workers, allegedly due to high physical work demands of healthcare work. Previous investigations have shown promising results of physical exercise for relieving pain among different occupational groups, but the question remains whether such physical exercise should be performed at the workplace or conducted as home-based exercise. Performing physical exercise at the workplace together with colleagues may be more motivating for some employees and thus increase adherence. On the other hand, physical exercise performed during working hours at the workplace may be costly for the employers in terms of time spend. Thus, it seems relevant to compare the efficacy of workplace- versus home-based training on musculoskeletal pain. This study is intended to investigate the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers. This study was designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial performed at 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. Clusters are hospital departments and hospital units. Cluster randomization was chosen to increase adherence and avoid contamination between interventions. Two hundred healthcare workers from 18 departments located at three different hospitals is allocated to 10 weeks of 1) workplace based physical exercise performed during working hours (using kettlebells, elastic bands and exercise balls) for 5 × 10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions, or 2) home based physical exercise performed during leisure time (using elastic bands and body weight exercises) for 5 × 10 minutes per week. Both intervention groups will also receive ergonomic instructions on patient handling and use of lifting aides etc. Inclusion criteria are female healthcare workers working at a hospital. Average pain intensity (VAS scale 0-10) of the back, neck and shoulder (primary outcome) and physical

  9. Effect of physical exercise interventions on musculoskeletal pain in all body regions among office workers: A one-year randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L.; Christensen, Karl Bang; Holtermann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated effects of physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain symptoms in all regions of the body, as well as on other musculoskeletal pain in association with neck pain. A single blind randomized controlled trial testing a one-year exercise intervention was performed among 549...... office workers; specific neck/shoulder resistance training, all-round physical exercise, or a reference intervention. Pain symptoms were determined by questionnaire screening of twelve selected body regions. Case individuals were identified for each body region as those reporting pain intensities...... group (Pphysical...

  10. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  11. Effects of Physical-Exercise-Based Rehabilitation Programs on the Quality of Life of Patients With Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascaes da Silva, Franciele; Iop Rda, Rodrigo; Domingos Dos Santos, Patrícia; Aguiar Bezerra de Melo, Lídia Mara; Barbosa Gutierres Filho, Paulo José; da Silva, Rudney

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of physical-exercise-based rehabilitation programs on quality of life of patients with Parkinson's disease through a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. For this purpose the following electronic databases were selected: Medline by PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, and PEDro. The search strategy included the proposed descriptors in the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), associated with a sensitive list of terms to search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), without year and language restrictions. Fourteen studies were potentially relevant, and these studies were included. Physical-exercise-based rehabilitation programs realized 2-4 times a week, 60 min each session, for 6-12 weeks, and follow-up of 3 months promotes significant positive effects on quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients at mild to moderate stages and disease duration around 6 years.

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Hill

    2012-01-01

    The months that have passed since the last CMS Bulletin have been a very busy and exciting time for CMS physics. We have gone from observing the very first 8TeV collisions produced by the LHC to collecting a dataset of the collisions that already exceeds that recorded in all of 2011. All in just a few months! Meanwhile, the analysis of the 2011 dataset and publication of the subsequent results has continued. These results come from all the PAGs in CMS, including searches for the Higgs boson and other new phenomena, that have set the most stringent limits on an ever increasing number of models of physics beyond the Standard Model including dark matter, Supersymmetry, and TeV-scale gravity scenarios, top-quark physics where CMS has overtaken the Tevatron in the precision of some measurements, and bottom-quark physics where CMS made its first discovery of a new particle, the Ξ*0b baryon (candidate event pictured below). Image 2:  A Ξ*0b candidate event At the same time POGs and PAGs...

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  15. Changes in Physical Activity Following a Genetic-Based Internet-Delivered Personalized Intervention: Randomized Controlled Trial (Food4Me)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Fallaize, Rosalind; Kolossa, Silvia; Hallmann, Jacqueline; San-Cristobal, Rodrigo; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; O'Donovan, Clare B; Woolhead, Clara; Forster, Hannah; Moschonis, George; Lambrinou, Christina-Paulina; Surwillo, Agnieszka; Godlewska, Magdalena; Hoonhout, Jettie; Goris, Annelies; Macready, Anna L; Walsh, Marianne C; Gibney, Eileen R; Brennan, Lorraine; Manios, Yannis; Traczyk, Iwona; Drevon, Christian A; Lovegrove, Julie A; Martinez, J Alfredo; Daniel, Hannelore; Gibney, Michael J; Mathers, John C; Saris, Wim HM

    2016-01-01

    Background There is evidence that physical activity (PA) can attenuate the influence of the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) genotype on the risk to develop obesity. However, whether providing personalized information on FTO genotype leads to changes in PA is unknown. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if disclosing FTO risk had an impact on change in PA following a 6-month intervention. Methods The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs9939609 in the FTO gene was genotyped in 1279 participants of the Food4Me study, a four-arm, Web-based randomized controlled trial (RCT) in 7 European countries on the effects of personalized advice on nutrition and PA. PA was measured objectively using a TracmorD accelerometer and was self-reported using the Baecke questionnaire at baseline and 6 months. Differences in baseline PA variables between risk (AA and AT genotypes) and nonrisk (TT genotype) carriers were tested using multiple linear regression. Impact of FTO risk disclosure on PA change at 6 months was assessed among participants with inadequate PA, by including an interaction term in the model: disclosure (yes/no) × FTO risk (yes/no). Results At baseline, data on PA were available for 874 and 405 participants with the risk and nonrisk FTO genotypes, respectively. There were no significant differences in objectively measured or self-reported baseline PA between risk and nonrisk carriers. A total of 807 (72.05%) of the participants out of 1120 in the personalized groups were encouraged to increase PA at baseline. Knowledge of FTO risk had no impact on PA in either risk or nonrisk carriers after the 6-month intervention. Attrition was higher in nonrisk participants for whom genotype was disclosed (P=.01) compared with their at-risk counterparts. Conclusions No association between baseline PA and FTO risk genotype was observed. There was no added benefit of disclosing FTO risk on changes in PA in this personalized intervention. Further RCT studies

  16. Electronic feedback in a diet- and physical activity-based lifestyle intervention for weight loss: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriwether Rebecca A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SenseWear™ Armband (SWA (BodyMedia, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA is a physical activity and lifestyle monitor that objectively and accurately measures free-living energy balance and sleep and includes software for self-monitoring of daily energy expenditure and energy intake. The real-time feedback of the SWA can improve individual self-monitoring and, therefore, enhance weight loss outcomes. Methods We recruited 197 sedentary overweight or obese adults (age, 46.8 ± 10.8 y; body mass index (BMI, 33.3 ± 5.2 kg/m2; 81% women, 32% African-American from the greater Columbia, South Carolina area. Participants were randomized into 1 of 4 groups, a self-directed weight loss program via an evidence-based weight loss manual (Standard Care, n = 50, a group-based behavioral weight loss program (GWL, n = 49, the armband alone (SWA-alone, n = 49, or the GWL plus the armband (GWL+SWA, n = 49, during the 9-month intervention. The primary outcome was change in body weight and waist circumference. A mixed-model repeated-measures analysis compared change in the intervention groups to the standard care group on weight and waist circumference status after adjusting for age, sex, race, education, energy expenditure, and recruitment wave. Results Body weight was available for 62% of participants at 9 months (52% standard care, 70% intervention. There was significant weight loss in all 3 intervention groups (GWL, 1.86 kg, P = 0.05; SWA-alone, 3.55 kg, P = 0.0002; GWL+SWA, 6.59 kg, P Conclusions Continuous self-monitoring from wearable technology with real-time feedback may be particularly useful to enhance lifestyle changes that promote weight loss in sedentary overweight or obese adults. This strategy, combined with a group-based behavioral intervention, may yield optimal weight loss. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00957008

  17. Bari-Active: A randomized controlled trial of a preoperative intervention to increase physical activity in bariatric surgery patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Dale S.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Thomas, J. Graham; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Unick, Jessica L.; Jakicic, John M.; Pohl, Dieter; Ryder, Beth A.; Roye, G. Dean; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Habitual physical activity (PA) may help to optimize bariatric surgery outcomes; however objective PA measures show that most patients have low PA preoperatively and make only modest PA changes postoperatively. Patients require additional support to adopt habitual PA. Objectives: Test the efficacy of a preoperative PA intervention (PAI) versus standard pre-surgical care (SC) for increasing daily moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) in bariatric surgery patients. Setting: University Hospital, United States. Methods: Outcomes analysis included 75 participants (86.7% women; 46.0±8.9 years; Body Mass Index [BMI]=45.0±6.5 kg/m2) who were randomly assigned preoperatively to 6 weeks of PAI (n=40) or SC (n=35). PAI received weekly individual face-to-face sessions with tailored instruction in behavioral strategies (e.g., self-monitoring, goal-setting) to increase home-based walking exercise. The primary outcome, pre- to post-intervention change in daily bout-related (≥10-min bouts) and total (≥1-minute bouts) MVPA minutes, was assessed objectively via a multi-sensor monitor worn for 7 days at baseline- and post-intervention. Results: Retention was 84% at the post-intervention primary end point. In intent-to-treat analyses with baseline value carried forward for missing data and adjusted for baseline MVPA, PAI achieved a mean increase of 16.6±20.6 minutes/day in bout-related MVPA (baseline: 4.4±5.5 to post-intervention: 21.0±21.4 minutes/day) compared to no change (−0.3±12.7 minutes/day; baseline: 7.9±16.6 to post-intervention: 7.6±11.5 minutes/day) for SC (p=0.001). Similarly, PAI achieved a mean increase of 21.0±26.9 minutes/day in total MVPA (baseline: 30.9±21.2 to post-intervention: 51.9±30.0 minutes/day), whereas SC demonstrated no change (− 0.1±16.3 minutes/day; baseline: 33.7±33.2 to post-intervention: 33.6±28.5 minutes/day) (p=0.001). Conclusions: With behavioral intervention, patients can significantly increase MVPA before bariatric

  18. Beam commissioning for a superconducting proton linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; He, Yuan; Jia, Huan; Dou, Wei-ping; Chen, Wei-long; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, Shu-hui; Feng, Chi; Tao, Yue; Wang, Wang-sheng; Wu, Jian-qiang; Zhang, Sheng-hu; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2016-12-01

    To develop the next generation of safe and cleaner nuclear energy, the accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system emerges as one of the most attractive technologies. It will be able to transmute the long-lived transuranic radionuclides produced in the reactors of today's nuclear power plants into shorter-lived ones, and also it will provide positive energy output at the same time. The prototype of the Chinese ADS (C-ADS) proton accelerator comprises two injectors and a 1.5 GeV, 10 mA continuous wave (CW) superconducting main linac. The injector scheme II at the C-ADS demo facility inside the Institute of Modern Physics is a 10 MeV CW superconducting linac with a designed beam current of 10 mA, which includes an ECR ion source, a low-energy beam transport line, a 162.5 MHz radio frequency quadrupole accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport line, and a superconducting half wave resonator accelerator section. This demo facility has been successfully operating with an 11 mA, 2.7 MeV CW beam and a 3.9 mA, 4.3 MeV CW beam at different times and conditions since June 2014. The beam power has reached 28 kW, which is the highest record for the same type of linear accelerators. In this paper, the parameters of the test injector II and the progress of the beam commissioning are reported.

  19. Superconducting cyclotrons at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, H. G.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes the status of the three superconducting cyclotrons which are in operation or under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The oldest of these, the K500, has been in operation since September 1982 supporting a national user program in heavy ion nuclear physics. A second large research cyclotron, the K800, is now nearing completion. This cyclotron will accelerate lighter heavy ions to 200 MeV/nuc and heavier particles up to energies given by 1200 Q2/ A MeV/nucleon. The magnet for this cyclotron came into operation in May 1984 and has performed smoothly and reliably in three extended operating periods. At present, K800 construction activity centers on fabrication and installation of the rf system, the extraction system, and the ECR injection line. The third NSCL superconducting cyclotron is a smaller 50 MeV deuteron cyclotron to be used for neutron therapy in the radiation oncology center of a major Detroit hospital (Harper Hospital). Design features of this small, application oriented, cyclotron are described in some detail.

  20. Learn 2 Move 16-24: effectiveness of an intervention to stimulate physical activity and improve physical fitness of adolescents and young adults with spastic cerebral palsy; a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinders- Messelink Heleen A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persons with cerebral palsy (CP are at risk for developing an inactive lifestyle and often have poor fitness levels, which may lead to secondary health complications and diminished participation and quality of life. However, persons with CP also tend not to receive structural treatment to improve physical activity and fitness in adolescence, which is precisely the period when adult physical activity patterns are established. Methods We aim to include 60 adolescents and young adults (16-24 years with spastic CP. Participants will be randomly assigned to an intervention group or a control group (no treatment; current policy. The intervention will last 6 months and consist of three parts; 1 counselling on daily physical activity; 2 physical fitness training; and 3 sports advice. To evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention, all participants will be measured before, during, directly after, and at 6 months following the intervention period. Primary outcome measures will be: 1 physical activity level, which will be measured objectively with an accelerometry-based activity monitor during 72 h and subjectively with the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities; 2 aerobic fitness, which will be measured with a maximal ramp test on a bicycle or armcrank ergometer and a 6-minute walking or wheelchair test; 3 neuromuscular fitness, which will be measured with handheld dynamometry; and 4 body composition, which will be determined by measuring body mass, height, waist circumference, fat mass and lipid profile. Conclusions This paper outlines the design, methodology and intervention of a multicenter randomized controlled trial (LEARN 2 MOVE 16-24 aimed at examining the effectiveness of an intervention that is intended to permanently increase physical activity levels and improve fitness levels of adolescents and young adults with CP by achieving a behavioral change toward a more active lifestyle. Trial