WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconducting tf coils

  1. Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with superconducting TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Tobita, K.; Konishi, S.; Ando, T.; Hiroki, S.; Kuroda, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Azumi, M.; Nagata, M.

    2003-01-01

    Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coils has been proposed. A center solenoid coil system and an inboard blanket were discarded. The key point was how to find the engineering design solution of the TF coil system with the high field and high current density. The coil system with the center post radius of less than 1 m can generate the maximum field of ∼ 20 T. This coil system causes a compact reactor concept, where the plasma major and minor radii of 3.75 m and 1.9 m, respectively and the fusion power of 1.8 GW. (author)

  2. Structural design of the superconducting toroidal field coils for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, F.M.G.; Sborchia, C.; Thome, R.J.; Malkov, A.; Titus, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Structural design issues and features of the superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will be discussed. Selected analyses of the structural and mechanical behavior of the ITER TF coils will also be presented. (orig.)

  3. Test facility for PLT TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearney, J.; File, J.; Dreskin, S.

    1975-01-01

    Past experience with the model C stellerator and other toroidal field devices indicates that mechanical and electrical tests of a toroidal field coil prior to maximum field operation of the device is prudent and desirable. This paper describes a test program for the PLT-TF coils. The test stand consists of one test coil, two background coils and a steel supporting structure. The three coil configuration produces a 67.5 kG field at the inner conductor (38 kG at the bore center) and simulates a 1/R field distribution in the bore of the test coil. The resolution of the field force system and resultant stresses within the test structure are discussed. A test procedure is described which maximizes the information obtained from a 100,000 pulse program

  4. Proposals for cold testing of the ITER TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libeyre, P.; Ciazynski, D.; Dolgetta, N.; Duchateau, J.L.; Lyraud, C.; Kircher, F.; Schild, T.; Fietz, W.H.; Zahn, G.

    2005-01-01

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system will be made of 18 coils using Nb 3 Sn as superconducting material. These coils will operate at a maximum field of 11.8 T for a nominal current of 68 kA carried by a dual channel cable-in-conduit conductor cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.5 K. In each coil, seven 760 m conductor lengths wound in double pancakes will be connected to each other by low resistance joints. As a final step of the reception tests, it is proposed to perform cold tests of these coils at liquid helium temperature after completion of their manufacture. The testing shall include high voltage tests to check the quality of the insulation, leak tests and pressure drop measurements of the hydraulic circuits as well as measurement of the joint resistances. Testing the coils up to nominal current is a discussed option, addressing on one hand measurement of the electrical performances in self field and on the other hand the mechanical behaviour of the coils. To perform these tests, a dedicated test facility has to be built, allowing possible simultaneous testing of two coils, assembled together in a twin coil configuration, similarly to their assembly in the torus. (authors)

  5. Proposals for cold testing of the ITER TF coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libeyre, P.; Ciazynski, D.; Dolgetta, N.; Duchateau, J.L.; Lyraud, C. [Association Euratom/CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Kircher, F.; Schild, T. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Fietz, W.H.; Zahn, G. [Association Euratom-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system will be made of 18 coils using Nb{sub 3}Sn as superconducting material. These coils will operate at a maximum field of 11.8 T for a nominal current of 68 kA carried by a dual channel cable-in-conduit conductor cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.5 K. In each coil, seven 760 m conductor lengths wound in double pancakes will be connected to each other by low resistance joints. As a final step of the reception tests, it is proposed to perform cold tests of these coils at liquid helium temperature after completion of their manufacture. The testing shall include high voltage tests to check the quality of the insulation, leak tests and pressure drop measurements of the hydraulic circuits as well as measurement of the joint resistances. Testing the coils up to nominal current is a discussed option, addressing on one hand measurement of the electrical performances in self field and on the other hand the mechanical behaviour of the coils. To perform these tests, a dedicated test facility has to be built, allowing possible simultaneous testing of two coils, assembled together in a twin coil configuration, similarly to their assembly in the torus. (authors)

  6. A coil test facility for the cryogenic tests of the JT-60SA TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantant, M.; Genini, L.; Bayetti, P.; Millet, F.; Wanner, M.; Massaut, V.; Corte, A. Della; Ardelier-Desage, F.; Catherine-Dumont, V.; Dael, A.; Decool, P.; Donati, A.; Duchateau, J.L.; Garibaldi, P.; Girard, S.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Fejoz, P.; Jamotton, P.; Jourdheuil, L.; Juster, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Broader Approach Activities, the EU will deliver to Japan the 18 superconducting coils, which constitute the JT-60SA Toroidal field magnet. These 18 coils, manufactured by France and Italy, will be cold tested before shipping to Japan. For this purpose, the European Joint Undertaking for ITER, the Development of Fusion Energy ('Fusion for Energy', F4E) and the European Voluntary Contributors are collaborating to design and set-up a coil test facility (CTF) and to perform the acceptance test of the 18 JT-60SA Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The test facility is designed to test one coil at a time at nominal current and cryogenic temperature. The test of the first coil of each manufacturer includes a quench triggered by increasing the temperature. The project is presently in the detailed design phase.

  7. Magnetic field shielding effect for CFETR TF coil-case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Xufeng, E-mail: Lxf@ipp.ac.cn; Du, Shuangsong; Zheng, Jinxing

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The eddy current of CFETR vacuum vessel can be calculated by using a series of ideal current loops. • The shielding effect with different eddy current is studied by decomposing the exciting magnetic field as two orthogonal components. • The shielding effect can be determined from the rate of eddy current magnetic field to the external magnetic field. - Abstract: The operation of superconducting magnet for fusion device is under the complex magnetic field condition, which affect the stabilization of superconductor. The coil-case of TF coil can shield the magnetic field to some extent. The shielding effect is related to the eddy current of coil-case. The shielding effect with different eddy current is studied by decomposing the exciting magnetic field as two orthogonal components, respectively. The results indicate that the shielding effect of CFETR TF coil-case has obvious different with the different directional magnetic field, and it’s larger for tangential magnetic compared with that for normal field.

  8. Thermo hydraulic and quench propagation characteristics of SST-1 TF coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, A.N., E-mail: ansharma@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Pradhan, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Duchateau, J.L. [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Khristi, Y.; Prasad, U.; Doshi, K.; Varmora, P.; Patel, D.; Tanna, V.L. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Details of SST-1 TF coils, CICC. • Details of SST-1 TF coil cold test. • Quench analysis of TF magnet. • Flow changes following quench. • Predictive analysis of assembled magnet system. - Abstract: SST-1 toroidal field (TF) magnet system is comprising of sixteen superconducting modified ‘D’ shaped TF coils. During single coil test campaigns spanning from June 10, 2010 till January 24, 2011; the electromagnetic, thermal hydraulic and mechanical performances of each TF magnet have been qualified at its respective nominal operating current of 10,000 A in either two-phase or supercritical helium cooling conditions. During the current charging experiments, few quenches have initiated either as a consequence of irrecoverable normal zones or being induced in some of the TF magnets. Quench evolution in the TF coils have been analyzed in detail in order to understand the thermal hydraulic and quench propagation characteristics of the SST-1 TF magnets. The same were also simulated using 1D code Gandalf. This paper elaborates the details of the analyses and the quench simulation results. A predictive quench propagation analysis of 16 assembled TF magnets system has also been reported in this paper.

  9. Superconducting coil design for a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.; Smelser, P.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting toroidal field (TF) and polodial-field (PF) coils have been designed for the proposed Argonne National Laboratory experimental power reactor (EPR). Features of the design include: (1) Peak field of 8 T at 4.2 K or 10 T at 3.0 K. (2) Constant-tension shape for the TF coils, corrected for the finite number (16) of coils. (3) Analysis of errors in coil alignment. (4) Comparison of safety aspects of series-connected and parallel-connected coils. (5) A 60 kA sheet conductor of NbTi with copper stabilizer and stainless steel for support. (6) Superconducting PF coils outside the TF coils. (7) The TF coils shielded from pulsed fields by high-purity aluminum

  10. Superconducting magnetic coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  11. Superconducting coil protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    The protection system is based on a two-phase construction program. Phase I is the development of a reliable hardwired relay control system with a digital loop utilizing firmware and a microprocessor controller. Phase II is an expansion of the digital loop to include many heretofore unmonitored coil variables. These new monitored variables will be utilized to establish early quench detection and to formulate confirmation techniques of the quench detection mechanism. Established quench detection methods are discussed and a new approach to quench detection is presented. The new circuit is insensitive to external pulsed magnetic fields and the associated induced voltages. Reliability aspects of the coil protection system are discussed with respect to shutdowns of superconducting coil systems. Redundance and digital system methods are presented as related topics

  12. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design -- particularly in assembly and maintenance

  13. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design - particularly in assembly and maintenance

  14. Radiation resistant ducted superconductive coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleich, A.

    1976-01-01

    The radiation-resistant ducted superconductive coil consists of a helically wound electrical conductor constituted by an electrically conductive core of superconductive material provided with a longitudinally extending cooling duct. The core is covered with a layer of inorganic insulating material and the duct is covered by an electrically conductive metallic gas-tight sheath. The metallic sheaths on adjacent turns of the coil are secured together. 2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures

  15. Tolerance Evaluation of Poloidal Shear Keys for ITER TF Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Youkun; Neil, M.; Cees Jong

    2006-01-01

    There are 18 ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. Unlike the other ITER coils, these coils are structurally linked. These links consist of friction between the coil legs in the central vault formed by the inner straight legs of the coils, four outer inter-coil structures (OIS) and one inner inter-coil structure (IIS). The OIS consists essentially of bands around all 18 coils to provide shear support by forming shear panels with the coil case, and the IIS consists of poloidal circular keys placed directly between the coil cases. Global analysis of the 'perfect' coil shape has shown high stresses in the IIS, in the poloidal keyways. Optimization has successfully reduced these stresses to acceptable values as regards the expected fatigue resistance. However it is necessary to confirm that the stresses are still acceptable when realistic values of geometry variations are included (i.e. the effect of coil and case tolerances). Because of the extensive mechanical links between coils the poloidal key stresses can also be affected by tolerances elsewhere in the case. As the first step in assessment of the possible variations in stresses, a substructure technique is being used to develop a local model of the key region. The result of geometry variations between individual coils is a loss in the 18 fold symmetry used to simplify previous analyses. With the new and optimized model it should be possible to relax the 18-fold symmetry, but a full analysis of all 18 coils is still not possible. Systematic ways of representing the tolerance variation in the finite element model have been developed so that parametric studies can be undertaken without a full reconstruction of the model. (author)

  16. Fabrication of new joints for SST-1 TF coil winding packs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Upendra; Sharma, A.N.; Patel, Dipak; Doshi, Kalpesh; Khristi, Yohan; Varmora, Pankaj; Chauhan, Pradeep; Jadeja, S.J.; Gupta, Pratibha; Pradhan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We have carried out work related with sub-nanoohm joints for superconducting Tokamak winding packs. • We have established fine tune QA/QC procedures for sub-nanoohm joints fabrication. • We have optimised welding parameters for cable in conduit conductors for fusion relevant magnets. • We have established precised measurement data acquisition system for low resistance measurements at cryogenic temperature. -- Abstract: The Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system of SST-1 has sixteen NbTi/Cu based coils with about one hundred Inter-Pancake (IP) and Inter-Coil (IC) joints. New box type helium leak tight, low DC resistance joints have been designed, fabricated and tested at 5 K temperature and 10 kA DC transport current. The prototype of this joint has been validated in laboratory as well as on spare TF coil winding pack. Moreover, the performance of these joints has been realised and validated on actual sixteen TF winding packs, the joint resistance of ∼0.5 nΩ repeatedly measured on hundreds of IP joints. The quality of terminations and joints was ensured at various stages of fabrication. The quality of joint box material was ensured by visual inspection, chemical analysis, radiography test, ultrasonic test, eddy current test, etc. This paper describes joint design drivers, joint design detail, prototype joint fabrication processes, quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) adopted during prototype and actual joint fabrication process, joint resistance measurement on actual TF coils and analysis of measured joint resistance in detail

  17. Cooling device of superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthil, R.; Lottin, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    This device is rotating around an horizontal axis. The superconducting coils are contained in a cryogenic enclosure feeded in liquid helium forced circulation. They are related to an electric generator by electric mains each of them comprising a gas exchanger, and an exchanger-evaporator set between the cryogenic device and those exchangers. The exchanger-evaporator is aimed at dissipating the heat arriving by conductors connected to the superconducting coils. According to the invention, the invention includes an annular canalization with horizontal axis in which the connection conductors bathe in liquid helium [fr

  18. Large superconducting coil fabrication development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.; Allred, E.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Burn, P.B.; Deaderick, R.I.; Henderson, G.M.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    Toroidal fields for some fusion devices will be produced by an array of large superconducting coils. Their size, space limitation, and field requirements dictate that they be high performance coils. Once installed, accessibility for maintenance and repairs is severely restricted; therefore, good reliability is an obvious necessity. Sufficient coil fabrication will be undertaken to develop and test methods that are reliable, fast, and economical. Industrial participation will be encouraged from the outset to insure smooth transition from development phases to production phases. Initially, practice equipment for three meter bore circular coils will be developed. Oval shape coil forms will be included in the practice facility later. Equipment that is more automated will be developed with the expectation of winding faster and obtaining good coil quality. Alternate types of coil construction, methods of winding and insulating, will be investigated. Handling and assembly problems will be studied. All technology developed must be feasible for scaling up when much larger coils are needed. Experimental power reactors may need coils having six meter or larger bores

  19. Superconducting poloidal coils for STARFIRE commercial reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Evans, K. Jr.; Turner, L.R.; Huang, Y.C.; Prater, R.; Alcorn, J.

    1979-01-01

    STARFIRE is considered to be the tenth commercial tokamak power plant. A preliminary design study on its superconducting poloidal coil system is presented. Key features of the design studies are: the elimination of the ohmic heating coil; the trade-off studies of the equilibrium field coil locations; and the development of a conceptual design for the superconducting equilibrium field coils. Described are the 100 kA cryostable conductor design, the coil structure, and evaluation of the coil forces

  20. Room Temperature Magnetic Determination of the Current Center Line for the ITER TF Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Lerch, Philippe; Buzio, Marco; Negrazus, Marco; Baynham, Elwyn; Sanfilippo, Stephane; Foussat, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    The ITER tokamak includes 18 superconducting D-shaped toroidal field (IT) coils. Unavoidable shape deformations as well as assembly errors will lead to field errors, which can be modeled with the knowledge of the current center line (CCL). Accurate survey during the entire manufacturing and assembly process, including transfer of survey points, is complex. In order to increase the level of confidence, a room temperature magnetic measurement of the CCL on assembled and closed winding packs is foreseen, prior to insertion into their cold case. In this contribution, we discuss the principle of the CCL determination and present a low frequency ac measurement system under development at PSI, within an ITER framework contract. The largest current allowed to flow in the TF coil at room temperature and the precision requirements for the determination of the CCL loci of the coil are hard boundaries. Eddy currents in the radial plates, the winding pack enclosures, and possibly from iron in the reinforced concrete floor...

  1. Superconducting cyclotron magnet coil short

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, M.L.; Blosser, H.G.; Clark, D.J.; Launer, H.; Lawton, D.; Miller, P.; Resmini, F.

    1982-01-01

    In February 1981, a short circuit appeared in the superconducting coil of the K500 cyclotron. The short is resistive in character and therefore has no effect on steady state operation of the magnet. The resistance of the short varies, sometimes being below threshold of detection as a heat load on the cooling system and sometimes being significant. The resistance under certain conditions shows approximately cyclic phenomena with time constants in the range of seconds and other approximately cyclic phenomena which correlate with gross operating parameters of the magnet (shifting current from one coil to another at high field and lowering and raising the liquid helium level). A number of diagnostic studies of the short have been made, using 1) an array of flux sensing loops to sense the magnetic effect of the short, 2) voltage comparisons between upper and lower sections of the coil, 3) comparisons of forces in the nine member coil support system and 4) the effect of the short on the thermal charactersitics of the coil. Insulation failure or a metal chip shorting out turns have been explored in some detail but a convincing determination of the exact cause of the short may never be available, (even the extreme step of unwinding the coil having a significant probability that an imperfection with the observed characteristics would pass unnoticed). Analysis of the characteristics of the short indicated that the most serious consequence would be failure of the coils mechanical support system in the event that the magnet was quickly discharged, as in a dump or quench. To deal with this hazard, the support system has been modified by installing solid supports which prevent the coil from moving by an amount sufficient to damage the support system. We have also reexamined the data and calculations used in the original coil design and have made some additional measurements of the properties of the materials (yield strength, friction coefficient, Young's modulus) used in the

  2. Study for Manufacturing of ITER TF Coil Radial Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, W.H.; Muetzel, W.

    2006-01-01

    During the previous design phase of ITER the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) has been built to verify the TF coil concept of ITER and to proof the feasibility of an industrial fabrication of such a coil. In April 2004, Forschungszentrum and BNG, started a Manufacturing Study for the full scale Radial Plates (RP) of the TF Coils in the frame of an EFDA task. The main part of the Study was to develop feasible concepts of the technology for the manufacturing of the Full Scale Radial Plates starting with the raw material until final testing. The Feasibility Study has covered all manufacturing steps that are necessary for production of the RP. It has included as well a basic layout for the manufacturing process. During the work several proposals for the single manufacturing work steps have been developed. After that an evaluation of the found proposals has taken place. The most feasible proposals have been combined to manufacturing concepts. Finally two main Concepts were elaborated and evaluated: Concept 1 includes the premachining of segments with grooves, the welding of the segments and the final machining of the RP. Concept 2 includes the welding of not machined small segments to the D-shape of the RP and the following machining of the surface and grooves. Both Concepts will be described in detail with a comparison of tooling and manufacturing details, achievement of technological requirements as well as with the requirements coming from the overall time schedule. Based on the results of the assessment of the different concepts and manufacturing techniques Concept 1 shows some advantages compared to Concept 2. These will be described in the paper. In addition a proposal about additional R(and)D in front of the later manufacturing will be made. (author)

  3. Development of manufacturing technology for ITER TF Coil Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Takeru, E-mail: sakurai.takeru@jaea.go.jp; Iguchi, Masahide; Nakahira, Masataka; Inagaki, Takashi; Matsui, Kunihiro; Koizumi, Norikiyo

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Heavy thick welding (Max. 287 mm) was performed by balance welding. • Figured out Attachment welding deformation including heavy thick welding. • The deformation of Segments welding was suppressed to 1/3 of previous method. • Based on this study, JAEA started actual ITER TF coil structure manufacturing. - Abstract: Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) performed a trial of A1 Segment manufacturing of Toroidal Field (TF) coil structure, which is a piece with a radius of curvature 3 m with square channel for coil. Even though both-side welding (balance welding) was preferred to one-side welding considering the welding deformation, it could not be applied to the previous trial due to the difficulty of overhead or horizontal welding by machine. Hence, one-side welding with strong restriction jig was applied in the previous trials. In the latest trial, JAEA adopted a manual balance welding with a development of manufacturing technology. As the result of A1 Segment Mainbody welding trial, welding deformation of the Outer Plate and the Side Plate could have been controlled closer to the target value. JAEA also tried Attachments welding, in which Pre-Compression Flange (PCF) and Extension are welded to A1 Segment Mainbody, and a Segments welding trial, which is a weld between A1 Segment and a part of A2 Segment. A2 Segment is a 3 m straight part with square channel for coil. The inclination of A1 Segment and A2 Segment due to the welding was 2.7 mm. By applying balance welding, the deformation by Segments welding was suppressed to about 1/3 of the one-side welding. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization.

  4. Cryogenic structures of superconducting coils for fusion experimental reactor 'ITER'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Iguchi, Masahide; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Shimamoto, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes both structural materials and structural design of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil and Central Solenoid (CS) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). All the structural materials used in the superconducting coil system of the ITER are austenitic stainless steels. Although 316LN is used in the most parts of the superconducting coil system, the cryogenic stainless steels, JJ1 and JK2LB, which were newly developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Japanese steel companies, are used in the highest stress area of the TF coil case and the whole CS conductor jackets, respectively. These two materials became commercially available based on demonstration of productivity and weldability of materials, and evaluations of 4 K mechanical properties of trial products including welded parts. Structural materials are classified into five grades depending on stress distribution in the TF coil case. JAEA made an industrial specification for mass production based on the ITER requirements. In order to simplify quality control in mass production, JAEA has used materials specified in the material section of 'Codes for Fusion Facilities - Rules on Superconducting Magnet Structure (2008)' issued by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) in October 2008, which was established using an extrapolation method of 4 K material strengths from room temperature strength and chemical compositions developed by JAEA. It enables steel suppliers to easily control the quality of products at room temperature. JAEA has already started actual production with several manufacturing companies. The first JJ1 product to be used in the TF coil case and the first JK2LB jackets for CS were completed in October and September 2013, respectively. (author)

  5. Short initial length quench on CICC of ITER TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicollet, S.; Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J.-L.; Lacroix, B.; Bessette, D.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.; Coatanea-Gouachet, M.; Gauthier, F.

    2014-01-01

    Previous quench studies performed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field (TF) Coils have led to identify two extreme families of quench: first 'severe' quenches over long initial lengths in high magnetic field, and second smooth quenches over short initial lengths in low field region. Detailed analyses and results on smooth quench propagation and detectability on one TF Cable In Conduit Conductor (CICC) with a lower propagation velocity are presented here. The influence of the initial quench energy is shown and results of computations with either a Fast Discharge (FD) of the magnet or without (failure of the voltage quench detection system) are reported. The influence of the central spiral of the conductor on the propagation velocity is also detailed. In the cases of a regularly triggered FD, the hot spot temperature criterion of 150 K (with helium and jacket) is fulfilled for an initial quench length of 1 m, whereas this criterion is exceed (Tmax ≈ 200 K) for an extremely short length of 5 cm. These analyses were carried out using both the Supermagnet(trade mark, serif) and Venecia codes and the comparisons of the results are also discussed

  6. Short initial length quench on CICC of ITER TF coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicollet, S.; Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J.-L.; Lacroix, B. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bessette, D.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Coatanea-Gouachet, M. [ELC Engineering, 350 chemin du Verladet, F-13290 Les Milles (France); Gauthier, F. [Soditech Ingenierie, 4 bis allée des Gabians, ZI La Frayère, 06150 Cannes (France)

    2014-01-29

    Previous quench studies performed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field (TF) Coils have led to identify two extreme families of quench: first 'severe' quenches over long initial lengths in high magnetic field, and second smooth quenches over short initial lengths in low field region. Detailed analyses and results on smooth quench propagation and detectability on one TF Cable In Conduit Conductor (CICC) with a lower propagation velocity are presented here. The influence of the initial quench energy is shown and results of computations with either a Fast Discharge (FD) of the magnet or without (failure of the voltage quench detection system) are reported. The influence of the central spiral of the conductor on the propagation velocity is also detailed. In the cases of a regularly triggered FD, the hot spot temperature criterion of 150 K (with helium and jacket) is fulfilled for an initial quench length of 1 m, whereas this criterion is exceed (Tmax ≈ 200 K) for an extremely short length of 5 cm. These analyses were carried out using both the Supermagnet(trade mark, serif) and Venecia codes and the comparisons of the results are also discussed.

  7. TF insert experiment log book. 2nd Experiment of CS model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Makoto; Isono, Takaaki; Matsui, Kunihiro

    2001-12-01

    The cool down of CS model coil and TF insert was started on August 20, 2001. It took almost one month and immediately started coil charge since September 17, 2001. The charge test of TF insert and CS model coil was completed on October 19, 2001. In this campaign, total shot numbers were 88 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was about 4 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. This is an experiment logbook for 2nd experiment of CS model coil and TF insert for charge test. (author)

  8. Superconducting Coil of Po Dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The Po superconducting dipole was built as a prototype beam transport magnet for the SPS extracted proton beam P0. Its main features were: coil aperture 72 mm, length 5 m, room-temperature yoke, NbTi cable conductor impregnated with solder, nominal field 4.2 T at 4.7 K (87% of critical field). It reached its nominal field without any quench.After this successful test up to its nominal field of 4.2 T, the power was not raised to reach a quench. The magnet was not installed in a beam and had no other further use. Nevertheless its construction provided knowledges and experience which became useful in the design and construction of the LHC magnets. The photo shows a detail of the inner layer winding before superposing the outer layer to form the complete coil of a pole. Worth noticing is the interleaved glass-epoxy sheet (white) with grooved channels for the flow of cooling helium. See also 8211532X.

  9. Cryogenic analysis of forced-cooled, superconducting TF magnets for compact tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Slack, D.S.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Current designs for compact tokamak reactors require the toroidal- field (TF) superconducting magnets to produce fields from 10 to 15 T at the winding pack, using high-current densities to high nuclear heat loads (greater than 1 kW/coil in some instances), which are significantly greater than the conduction and radiation heat loads for which cryogenic systems are usually designed. A cryogenic system for the TF winding pack for two such tokamak designs has been verified by performing a detailed, steady-state heat-removal analysis. Helium properties along the forced-cooled conductor flow path for a range of nuclear heat loads have been calculated. The results and implications of this analysis are presented. 12 refs., 6 figs

  10. Special remote tooling developed and utilized to tighten TFTR TF coil casing bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, T.W.; Walton, G.R.; Meighan, T.G.; Paul, B.L.

    1993-01-01

    Special tooling has been developed and used to tighten toroidal field (TF) coil casing bolts that have loosened from years of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) operation. Due to their location, many of the TF casing bolts cannot be directly accessed or viewed; their condition was first discovered during unrelated inspections in 1988. Engineering solutions were, sought until 1992, when a remotely operated wrench concept was successfully demonstrated on a TF coil mockup. The concept was developed into several working tools that have successfully been applied to tighten several thousand TF casing bolts during recent scheduled outages. This effort has improved the integrity and reliability of the TF coil system in preparing for the final experimental phase of the TFTR. This paper discusses the design and application of this tooling

  11. High-field superconducting nested coil magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverick, C.; Lobell, G. M.

    1970-01-01

    Superconducting magnet, employed in conjunction with five types of superconducting cables in a nested solenoid configuration, produces total, central magnetic field strengths approaching 70 kG. The multiple coils permit maximum information on cable characteristics to be gathered from one test.

  12. Superconducting coil development and motor demonstration: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1995-12-01

    Superconducting bismuth-cuprate wires, coils, and magnets are being produced by industry as part of a program to test the viability of using such magnets in Naval systems. Tests of prototype magnets, coils, and wires reveal progress in commercially produced products. The larger magnets will be installed in an existing superconducting homopolar motor and operated initially at 4.2K to test the performance. It is anticipated that approximately 400 Hp will be achieved by the motor. This article reports on the initial tests of the magnets, coils, and wires as well as the development program to improve their performance.

  13. Structural analysis of TFTR TF coils and support structure for 6 Tesla operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatz, I.J.; Cargulia, G.; Lontai, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), which has been on line since December 1982, has successfully operated at its design Toroidal Field (TF) of 5.2 Tesla. Analysis of test data has indicated that the measured peak D-D neutron power in supershots may be scaled to the fourth power of TF field. Increasing the TF field to 6 Tesla provides the opportunity to explore the possibility of improving the D-T fusion yield, with the use of tritium. This increase in TF field from 5.2 to 6.0 Tesla increases the centering force by 33% and the out-of-plane force by 15% over previous peak operating levels. To examine the impact of the increase in loads on the TF coil, case and supporting structure, finite element analyses (FEA) were performed with and without the presence of loose bolts in the TF case. Note that the loose bolts comprise a fraction of the total number of bolts fastening the TF case sidewalls to the inner and outer rings of the case. Extensive analysis was performed using the FEA results in conjunction with supplementary calculations. Results are presented for the TF case, bolts, copper conductors, insulation, and supporting structure which indicate that the TF coils can successfully operate at 6 Tesla for a reasonable number of pulses

  14. Design study of superconducting coils for the fusion DEMO plant at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, T.; Koizumi, N.; Okuno, K.; Kurihara, R.; Nishio, S.; Tobita, K.

    2006-01-01

    A design study of the TF coil for the fusion DEMO plant at JAERI is in progress. A major issue is to estimate the maximum fields generated by the TF coils for three tokamak options and two conductor options. Three tokamak options are proposed varying the aspect ratio and the role of the CS coil. Two kinds of conductors using advanced superconducting materials are candidates for the TF coils: Nb 3 Al and high temperature superconductor (HTS). In order to evaluate achievable magnetic fields, a simple method was adopted to calculate mechanical properties. The estimated maximum fields are 17-20 T by the HTS conductor and 16-17 T by the Nb 3 Al conductor. There is a possibility of a 0.7 T enhancement using grading of Nb 3 Al winding

  15. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1978-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started in aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pulsed coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  16. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1977-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started an aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pusled coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  17. Argonne National Laboratory superconducting pulsed coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.

    1979-01-01

    The main objectives are to develop high current (approx. 100 kA) cryostable cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to build a demonstration pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat. A 1.5-MJ cryostable pulsed superconducting coil has been developed and constructed at ANL. The coil has a peak field of 4.5 T at an operating current of 11.0 kA. A large inexpensive plastic cryostat has been developed for testing the pulsed coil. The coil has been pulsed with a maximum dB/dt of 11 T/s. The coil was pulsed more than 4000 cycles. Detailed results of the ac loss measurements and the current sharing of the cryostability will be described

  18. Internal trim coils for CBA superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Aronson, S.; Cottingham, J.G.; Garber, M.; Hahn, H.; Sampson, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    In order to correct iron saturation effects and shape the beam working line, superconducting trim coils have been constructed, which operate inside the main coils. Detailed studies of mechanical properties, quench behavior, fields produced, and hysteresis have lead to the production of accelerator-quality coils generating the required-strength harmonics up to cos (7theta). These are routinely installed in CBA main magnets and operate at 80% of short sample with negligible training in an ambient field of more than 5.3T

  19. Progress on large superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.; Beard, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    Large superconducting toroidal field coils of competing designs are being produced by six major industrial teams. In the US, teams headed by General Dynamics Convair, General Electric, and Westinghouse are under contract to design and fabricate one coil each to specifications established by the Large Coil Program. A facility for testing 6 coils in a toroidal array at fields to 8 to 12 tesla is under construction at Oak Ridge. Through an international agreement, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland will produce one coil each for testing with the US coils. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape winding bore and is designed to operate at a current of 10 to 18 kA at a peak field of 8T while subjected to pulsed fields of 0.14 T applied in 1.0 s. There are significant differences among the six coil designs: five use NbTi, one Nb 3 Sn; three are cooled by pool boiling helium, three by forced flow; five have welded or bolted stainless steel coil cases, one has aluminum plate structure. All are designed to be cryostable at 8T, with structural margin for extended operation. The three US coil teams are almost or completely finished with detailed design and are now procuring materials and setting up manufacturing equipment. The non-US teams are at various stages of verification testing and design. The GDC and GE coils are scheduled for delivery in the spring of 1981 and the others will be completed a year later. The 11-m diameter vessel at the test facility has been completed and major components of the test stand are being procured. Engineering and procurement to upgrade the helium liquifier-refrigerator system are under way

  20. Fault condition stress analysis of NET 16 TF coil model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, C.T.J.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the design process of the NET/ITER toroidal field coils (TFCs), the mechanical behaviour of the magnetic system under fault conditions has to be analysed in some detail. Under fault conditions, either electrical or mechanical, the magnetic loading of the coils becomes extreme and further mechanical failure of parts of the overall structure might occur (e.g. failure of the coil, gravitational support, intercoil structure). The mechanical behaviour of the magnetic system under fault conditions has been analysed with a finite element model of the complete TFC system. The analysed fault conditions consist of: a thermal fault, electrical faults and mechanical faults. The mechanical faults have been applied simultaneously with an electrical fault. This report described the work carried out to create the finite element model of 16 TFCs and contains an extensive presentation of the results, obtained with this model, of a normal operating condition analysis and 9 fault condition analyses. Chapter 2-5 contains a detailed description of the finite element model, boundary conditions and loading conditions of the analyses made. Chapters 2-4 can be skipped if the reader is only interested in results. To understand the results presented chapter 6 is recommended, which contains a detailed description of all analysed fault conditions. The dimensions and geometry of the model correspond to the status of the NET/ITER TFC design of May 1990. Compared with previous models of the complete magnetic system, the finite element model of 16 TFCs is 'detailed', and can be used for linear elastic analysis with faulted loads. (author). 8 refs.; 204 figs.; 134 tabs

  1. Switching transients in a superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made of the transients caused by the fast dump of large superconducting coils. Theoretical analysis, computer simulation, and actual measurements are used. Theoretical analysis can only be applied to the simplest of models. In the computer simulations two models are used, one in which the coil is divided into ten segments and another in which a single coil is employed. The circuit breaker that interrupts the current to the power supply, causing a fast dump, is represented by a time and current dependent conductance. Actual measurements are limited to measurements made incidental to performance tests on the MFTF Yin-yang coils. It is found that the breaker opening time is the critical factor in determining the size and shape of the transient. Instantaneous opening of the breaker causes a lightly damped transient with large amplitude voltages to ground. Increasing the opening time causes the transient to become a monopulse of decreasing amplitude. The voltages at the external terminals are determined by the parameters of the external circuit. For fast opening times the frequency depends on the dump resistor inductance, the circuit capacitance, and the amplitude on the coil current. For slower openings the dump resistor inductance and the current determine the amplitude of the voltage to ground at the terminals. Voltages to ground are less in the interior of the coil, where transients related to the parameters of the coil itself are observed

  2. Superconducting Coil Winding Machine Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogiec, J. M. [Fermilab; Kotelnikov, S. [Fermilab; Makulski, A. [Fermilab; Walbridge, D. [Fermilab; Trombly-Freytag, K. [Fermilab

    2016-10-05

    The Spirex coil winding machine is used at Fermilab to build coils for superconducting magnets. Recently this ma-chine was equipped with a new control system, which al-lows operation from both a computer and a portable remote control unit. This control system is distributed between three layers, implemented on a PC, real-time target, and FPGA, providing respectively HMI, operational logic and direct controls. The system controls motion of all mechan-ical components and regulates the cable tension. Safety is ensured by a failsafe, redundant system.

  3. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, J.; Purcell, J.

    1978-01-01

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  4. Mechanical study of 20 MJ superconducting pulse coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Yasuhide; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1985-09-01

    This paper describes calculation methods and computer codes of stress distribution in a circular-shaped superconducting pulsed coils. The stress problems of a large sized superconducting coil, for example, are discussed for 20 MJ pool-cooled pulse coil. Young's modulus of a stranded flat cable, low rigidity, is measured and evaluated. (author)

  5. Effects of insulation on potted superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeller, A.F.; DeKamp, J.C.; Magsig, C.T.; Nolen, J.A.; McInturff, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Test coils using identical wire but with either Formvar or Polyesterimid insulation were fabricated to determine the effects of insulation on training behavior. It was found that the type of insulation did not affect the training behavior. While considerable attention has been paid to epoxy formulations used for superconducting coils, little study has been devoted to the effects of the wire insulation on training behavior. If the insulation does not bind well with the epoxy, the wires will not be held securely in place, and training will be required to make the coil operate at its design limit. In fact, the coil may never reach its design current, showing considerable degredation. Conversely, if the epoxy-insulation reaction is to soften or weaken the insulation, then shorts and/or training may result. The authors have undertaken a study of the effects of the insulation on potted coils wet wound with Stycast 2850 FT epoxy. The wire was insulated with one of two insulting varnishes: Formvar (a polyvinyl formal resin) or Polyesterimid (a phenolic resin). Formvar is the standard insulation in the United States while Polyesterimid the European standard

  6. Shear strength of the ASDEX upgrade TF coil insulation: Rupture, fatigue and creep behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streibl, B.; Maier, E.A.; Perchermeier, J.; Cimbrico, P.L.; Varni, G.; Pisani, D.; Deska, R.; Endreat, J.

    1987-03-01

    This report is concerned with the interlaminar shear strength of the insulation system for the 16 toroidal field (TF) coils of ASDEX upgrade. The interlaminar shear properties of the glass-epoxy insulation are primarily determined by the resin system (ARALDIT-F, HT 907, DZ 40) and its curing procedure. The pure resin was therefore tested first in tension. The results were taken into account for setting up the method of curing the TF coils. Shear tests of the complete glass-epopxy system were then conducted with tubular torque specimens providing a nearly homogeneous stress distribution. In particular, the influence of the amount of flexibilizer (5, 10, 15 parts of resin weight = PoW) on the rupture and fatigue strengths was assessed at a temperature T=60 C, as also was the temperature dependence of the creep rate (40 C, 60 C, 80 C). The results obtained are not based on safe statistics. Nevertheless, they show clear trends. (orig.)

  7. A new meshless approach to map electromagnetic loads for FEM analysis on DEMO TF coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biancolini, Marco Evangelos; Brutti, Carlo; Giorgetti, Francesco; Muzzi, Luigi; Turtù, Simonetta; Anemona, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Generation and mapping of magnetic load on DEMO using radial basis function. • Good agreement between RBF interpolation and EM TOSCA computations. • Resultant forces are stable with respect to the target mesh used. • Stress results are robust and accurate even if a coarse cloud is used for RBF interpolation. - Abstract: Demonstration fusion reactors (DEMO) are being envisaged to be able to produce commercial electrical power. The design of the DEMO magnets and of the constituting conductors is a crucial issue in the overall engineering design of such a large fusion machine. In the frame of the EU roadmap of the so-called fast track approach, mechanical studies of preliminary DEMO toroidal field (TF) coil system conceptual designs are being enforced. The magnetic field load acting on the DEMO TF coil conductor has to be evaluated as input in the FEM model mesh, in order to evaluate the stresses on the mechanical structure. To gain flexibility, a novel approach based on the meshless method of radial basis functions (RBF) has been implemented. The present paper describes this original and flexible approach for the generation and mapping of magnetic load on DEMO TF coil system.

  8. Fatigue assessment of the ITER TF coil case based on JJ1 fatigue tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, K.; Nakajima, H.; Takano, K.; Kudo, Y.; Tsutsumi, F.; Okuno, K.; Jong, C.

    2005-01-01

    The material of the TF coil case in the ITER requires to withstand cyclic electromagnetic forces applied up to 3 x 10 4 cycles at 4.2 K. A cryogenic stainless steel, JJ1, is used in high stress region of TF coil case. The fatigue characteristics (S-N curve) of JJ1 base metal and welded joint at 4.2 K has been measured. The fatigue strength of base metal and welded joint at 3 x 10 4 cycles are measured as 1032 and 848 MPa, respectively. The design S-N curve is derived from the measured data taking account of the safety factor of 20 for cycle-to-failure and 2 for fatigue strength, and it indicates that an equivalent alternating stress of the case should be kept less than 516 MPa for the base metal and 424 MPa for the welded joint at 3 x 10 4 cycles. It is demonstrated that the TF coil case has enough margins for the cyclic operation. It is also shown the welded joint should be located in low cyclic stress region because a residual stress affects the fatigue life

  9. Full scale trials for qualification of the manufacture of the ITER TF coils in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Kunihiro, E-mail: matsui.kunihiro@jaea.go.jp; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Kajitani, Hideki; Yamane, Minoru; Mizutani, Takumi; Nakano, Toshihide; Takano, Katsutoshi; Ando, Shinji; Koizumi, Norikiyo

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • High accuracy conductor winding of 0.1% was achieved in TF coil fabrication. • Conductor elongation due to heat treatment satisfied with the expected value of 0.06% ± 0.02%. • Commissioning of a transfer tooling without adding strain to conductor was completed. • Commissioning of a conductor insulation and CP welding was successfully completed. - Abstract: JAEA performed full-scale trials to qualify and optimize manufacturing procedure of TF coil fabrication prior to series production. In the full-scale trials, conductor winding, heat treatment, conductor transfer, conductor insulation and cover plate (CP) welding trials were performed to resolve some technical issues and to demonstrate the fabrication procedure. The followings are major achievement. (1) High accuracy conductor winding of 0.01%, (2) the evaluation of 0.06% conductor elongation due to heat treatment, (3) conductor transfer in a radial plate (RP) groove with addition strain under 0.1%, (4) conductor insulation without breakage of the insulation tape and (5) flatness of 2 mm of the double pancake (DP) by CP welding. Then JAEA started the 1st TF coil fabrication from March 2014, and has already completed ten conductor windings and heat treatment of nine windings.

  10. Superconducting coil and method of stress management in a superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Peter M.; Shen, Weijun; Diaczenko, Nick; Gross, Dan A.

    1999-01-01

    A superconducting coil (12) having a plurality of superconducting layers (18) is provided. Each superconducting layer (18) may have at least one superconducting element (20) which produces an operational load. An outer support structure (24) may be disposed outwardly from the plurality of layers (18). A load transfer system (22) may be coupled between at least one of the superconducting elements (20) and the outer support structure (24). The load transfer system (22) may include a support matrix structure (30) operable to transfer the operational load from the superconducting element (20) directly to the outer support structure (24). A shear release layer (40) may be disposed, in part, between the superconducting element (20) and the support matrix structure (30) for relieving a shear stress between the superconducting element (20) and the support matrix structure (30). A compliant layer (42) may also be disposed, in part, between the superconducting element (20) and the support matrix structure (30) for relieving a compressive stress on the superconducting element (20).

  11. Potential minimum cost of electricity of superconducting coil tokamak power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Peng, Y-K. M.

    1989-01-01

    The potential minimum cost of electricity (COE) for superconducting tokamak power reactors is estimated by increasing the physics (confinement, beta limit, bootstrap current fraction) and technology [neutral beam energy, toroidal field (TF) coil allowable stresses, divertor heat flux, superconducting coil critical field, critical temperature, and quench temperature rise] constraints far beyond those assumed for ITER until the point of diminishing returns is reached. A version of the TETRA systems code, calibrated with the ITER design and modified for power reactors, is used for this analysis, limiting this study to reactors with the same basic device configuration and costing algorithms as ITER. A minimum COE is reduced from >200 to about 80 mill/kWh when the allowable design constraints are raised to 2 times those of ITER. At 4 times the ITER allowables, a minimum COE of about 60 mill/kWh is obtained. The corresponding tokamak has a major radius of approximately 4 m, a plasma current close to 10 MA, an aspect ratio of 4, a confinement H- factor ≤3, a beta limit of approximately 2 times the first stability regime, a divertor heat flux of about 20 MW/m 2 , a Β max ≤ 18 T, and a TF coil average current density about 3 times that of ITER. The design constraints that bound the minimum COE are the allowable stresses in the TF coil, the neutral beam energy, and the 99% bootstrap current (essentially free current drive). 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. New superconducting coil configuration for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokorabet, M.; Mailfert, A.; Colteu, A.

    1998-01-01

    Energy storage using superconducting coils involves the problem of electromagnetic field pollution outside the considered system. Different configurations are widely studied: the torus, the alone solenoid and multiple parallel solenoids enclosed in one container. A new configuration which minimizes the external pollution is studied in this paper. The theoretical system is composed of two spherical distributions of the current which are concentric. The analytical study uses solution of Laplace equations. Parametric study covers energy, flux density and geometrical data. The second study concerns the numerical approach of this design using coaxial solenoids. A comparison between this new system and the known systems is presented as a conclusion. (orig.)

  13. Investigation of the mechanical and electrical properties of superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, T.; Yamagiwa, T.; Hara, K.; Kojima, Y.; Hosoyama, K.; Mori, A.; Nojima, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Takabayashi, S.; Tanaka, T.

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of elastic (Young's) modulus of the superconducting coil and electrical punch-through test have been performed at LBL to understand the mechanical and electrical properties of the superconducting coils. The authors have investigated the elastic modulus of the superconducting coils with six kinds of insulators (made with polyimide-fiberglass-epoxy and all polyimide insulation with epoxy/polyimide adhesive) at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures using samples made of 10 stacks of superconducting cables. The samples are cured under varying compression to investigate the curing pressure dependence of Young's modulus of the coils with six kinds of the insulation system. The electrical punch-through test has also performed under compression at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures to investigate electrical integrity of the insulated coils. The tensile strength test of four kinds of polyimide films has been performed at various temperatures (between cryogenic and coil curing temperatures) to understand the mechanical properties of the films

  14. Detailed design studies at CEA for JT-60SA TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decool, P.; Marechal, J.L.; Portafaix, C.; Lacroix, B.; Gros, G.; Verger, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Following a first conceptual design activity in which the general design of the JT-60SA TF system was defined and frozen in agreement with all the participants in the project (CEA, ENEA, F4E), a second phase had to be launched to deal with the detailed design. In this paper, we present the work performed at CEA on the TF coil design during this second phase. Part of this work, concerns the determination of conductor hydraulic performances during operation as well as in factory. The thermohydraulic of the conductor was also assessed to confirm the need of helium inlets and a specific design was developed and qualified to be compatible with the available hydraulic performance of the cryoplant. The mechanical behavior is still to be assessed and qualified. Last but not least, the inner electrical joints of the coil have been modified with respect to the original twin-box design developed by CEA for the ITER coils in order to simplify the fabrication process. A dedicated qualification program for their manufacture is ongoing.

  15. TFTR D and D Project: Final Examination and Testing of the TFTR TF-Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatz, Irving J.

    2003-01-01

    In operation for nearly 15 years, TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) was not only a fusion science milestone, but a milestone of achievement in engineering as well. The TFTR DandD (Decommissioning and Decontamination) program provided a rare opportunity to examine machine components that had been exposed to a unique performance environment of greater than 100,000 mechanical and thermal load cycles. In particular, the possible examination of the TFTR toroidal-field (TF) coils, which met, then exceeded, the 5.2 Tesla magnetic field machine specification, could supply the answers to many questions that have been asked and debated since the coils were originally designed and built. A test program conducted in parallel with the DandD effort was the chance to look inside and examine, in detail, the TFTR TF coils for the first time since they were delivered encased to PPPL (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory). The results from such a program would provide data and insight that would not only be nefit PPPL and the fusion community, but the broader scientific community as well

  16. Superconducting coil system and methods of assembling the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Rochford, James H.; Ghoshal, Probir K.

    2016-01-19

    A superconducting magnet apparatus is provided. The superconducting magnet apparatus includes a power source configured to generate a current; a first switch coupled in parallel to the power source; a second switch coupled in series to the power source; a coil coupled in parallel to the first switch and the second switch; and a passive quench protection device coupled to the coil and configured to by-pass the current around the coil and to decouple the coil from the power source when the coil experiences a quench.

  17. Use of high current density superconducting coils in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1979-11-01

    Superconducting magnets will play an important role in fusion research in years to come. The magnets which are currently proposed for fusion research use the concept of cryostability to insure stable operation of the superconducting coils. This paper proposes the use of adiabatically stable high current density superconducting coils in some types of fusion devices. The advantages of this approach are much lower system cold mass, enhanced cryogenic safety, increased access to the plasma and lower cost

  18. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of LTS cables for the DEMO TF coil using simplified models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowska Monika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The conceptual design activities for the DEMOnstration reactor (DEMO – the prototype fusion power plant – are conducted in Europe by the EUROfusion Consortium. In 2015, three design concepts of the DEMO toroidal field (TF coil were proposed by Swiss Plasma Center (EPFL-SPC, PSI Villigen, Italian National Agency for New Technologies (ENEA Frascati, and Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA Cadarache. The proposed conductor designs were subjected to complete mechanical, electromagnetic, and thermal-hydraulic analyses. The present study is focused on the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the candidate conductor designs using simplified models. It includes (a hydraulic analysis, (b heat removal analysis, and (c assessment of the maximum temperature and the maximum pressure in each conductor during quench. The performed analysis, aimed at verification whether the proposed design concepts fulfil the established acceptance criteria, provides the information for further improvements of the coil and conductors design.

  19. Superconductive magnet having shim coils and quench protection circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwall, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    A superconductive magnet is described comprising: a first persistent current loop comprising a first superconductor and a main coil connected to the first superconductor, the main coil being operative in response to superconduction therein to generate a primary magnetic field; a second persistent current loop comprising a second superconductor and a shim coil connected thereto, the shim coil being operative in response to superconduction therein to generate a corrective field for correcting aberrations in a predetermined gradient in the primary magnetic field, the shim coil having fewer turns than the main coil and being inductively coupled therewith whereby small changes in the current in the main coil cause much greater changes in the current in the shim coil. The magnet is characterized by an improvement which consists of: a first heater connected across the second persistent loop in parallel with the shim coil, the first heater being normally inoperative to carry current while the shim coil and the second superconductor are superconducting, the first heater being operative in response to current therein to heat the shim coil to a resistive state; and protective circuit means comprising a second heater connected to the main coil for carrying current from the main coil upon quenching of the main coil, the second heater being disposed in thermal contact with the second superconductor to heat the second superconductor to a resistive state in response to the current from the main coil to thereby divert current in the second persistent loop through the second heater causing it to heat the shim coil to a resistive state and resistively dissipate energy therein

  20. EU ITER TF coil: Dimensional metrology, a key player in the Double Pancake integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncet, L.; Bellesia, B.; Oliva, A. Bonito; Boter Rebollo, E.; Cornelis, M.; Cornella Medrano, J.; Harrison, R.; Bue, A. Lo; Moreno, A.; Foussat, A.; Felipe, A.; Echeandia, A.; Barutti, A.; Caserza, B.; Barbero, P.; Stenca, S.; Da Re, A.; Silva Ribeiro, J.; Brocot, C.; Benaoun, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Development and qualification of a dimensional metrology procedure on wound superconductor trajectory based on Laser scanning system. • Dimensional control of the conductor centreline during winding, before and after heat treatment. • Radial Plate groove centreline length controlled using Laser Trackers. • Full scale wound Double Pancake prototype transferred inside Radial Plate prototype without any issues. - Abstract: The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system consists of 18 “D” shaped coils. Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Domestic Agency for ITER, is responsible for the supply of 10 out the 19 TF coils (18 installed plus one spare coil). Each TF coil, about 300 t in weight, is made of a stainless steel case containing a Winding Pack (WP). The European manufacturing of the Radial Plates (RPs) and WPs has been awarded to two different industrial partners, whose activities are strongly linked with each other. In order to manufacture a Double Pancake (DP), first, the conductor has to be bent onto a D-shaped double spiral trajectory, then heat treated and inserted in the grooves of the RP. This represents the most challenging manufacturing step: in order to fit inside the groove, the double spiral trajectory of the conductor must match almost perfectly the trajectory of the groove, over a length above 700 m. In order to achieve this, the conductor trajectory length must be controlled with an accuracy of 1 mm over a length of 350 m while the radial plate groove has to be machined with tolerances of ±0.2 mm over dimensions of more than 10 m. In order to succeed, it has been essential to develop a metrology process capable to control with high accuracy both the DP conductor and the RP groove trajectories. This paper reports on the work carried out on the development and qualification of the dimensional metrology to monitor the manufacturing of the conductor. Reference is made to the final dimensional check of the RP focusing on the

  1. Globally optimal superconducting magnets part II: symmetric MSE coil arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieng, Quang M; Vegh, Viktor; Brereton, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    A globally optimal superconducting magnet coil design procedure based on the Minimum Stored Energy (MSE) current density map is outlined. The method has the ability to arrange coils in a manner that generates a strong and homogeneous axial magnetic field over a predefined region, and ensures the stray field external to the assembly and peak magnetic field at the wires are in acceptable ranges. The outlined strategy of allocating coils within a given domain suggests that coils should be placed around the perimeter of the domain with adjacent coils possessing alternating winding directions for optimum performance. The underlying current density maps from which the coils themselves are derived are unique, and optimized to possess minimal stored energy. Therefore, the method produces magnet designs with the lowest possible overall stored energy. Optimal coil layouts are provided for unshielded and shielded short bore symmetric superconducting magnets.

  2. Superconducting toroidal field coil current densities for the TFCX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Hooper, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A major goal of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) study was to minimize the size of the device and achieve lowest cost. Two key factors influencing the size of the device employing superconducting magnets are toroidal field (TF) winding current density and its nuclear heat load withstand capability. Lower winding current density requires larger radial build of the winding pack. Likewise, lower allowable nuclear heating in the winding requires larger shield thickness between the plasma and coil. In order to achieve a low-cost device, it is essential to maximize the winding's current density and nuclear heating withhstand capability. To meet the above objective, the TFCX design specification adopted as goals a nominal winding current density of 3500 A/cm 2 with 10-T peak field at the winding and peak nuclear heat load limits of 1 MW/cm 3 for the nominal design and 50 MW/cm 3 for an advanced design. This study developed justification for these current density and nuclear heat load limits

  3. Quench simulation of SMES consisting of some superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, S.; Oga, Y.; Igarashi, H.

    2011-01-01

    A chain of quenches may be caused by a quench of one element coil when SMES is consists of many element coils. To avoid the chain of quenches, the energy stored in element coil has to be quickly discharged. The cause of the chain of the quenches is the short time constant of the decreasing current of the quenched coil. In recent years, many HTS superconducting magnetic energy storage (HTS-SMES) systems are investigated and designed. They usually consist of some superconducting element coils due to storing excessively high energy. If one of them was quenched, the storage energy of the superconducting element coil quenched has to be immediately dispersed to protect the HTS-SMES system. As the result, the current of the other element coils, which do not reach to quench, increases since the magnetic coupling between the quenched element coil and the others are excessively strong. The increase of the current may cause the quench of the other element coils. If the energy dispersion of the element coil quenched was failed, the other superconducting element coil would be quenched in series. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the behavior of the HTS-SMES after quenching one or more element coils. To protect a chain of quenches, it is also important to investigate the time constant of the coils. We have developed a simulation code to investigate the behavior of the HTS-SMES. By the quench simulation, it is indicated that a chain of quenches is caused by a quench of one element coil.

  4. Fault-current limiter using a superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boenig, H.J.; Paice, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    A novel circuit, consisting of solid-state diodes and a biased superconducting coil, for limiting the fault currents in three-phase ac systems is presented. A modification of the basic circuit results in a solid-state ac breaker with current-limiting features. The operating characteristics of the fault-current limiter and the ac breaker are analyzed. An optimization procedure for sizing the superconducting coil is derived

  5. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipole coil production tooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs

  6. Structural characteristics of proposed ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] TF [toroidal field] coil conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, C.R.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of transverse loading on a cable-in-conduit conductor which has been proposed for the toroidal field coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The primary components of this conductor are a loose cable of superconducting wires, a thin-wall tube for helium containment, and a U-shaped structural channel. A method is given where the geometry of this conductor can be optimized for a given set of operating conditions. It is shown, using finite-element modeling, that the structural channel is effective in supporting loads due to transverse forces and internal pressure. In addition, it is shown that the superconducting cable is effectively shielded from external transverse loads that might otherwise degrade its current carrying capacity. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Playing catch with energy between two superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Masayoshi; Shintomi, Takakazu; Asaji, Kiyoyuki.

    1979-03-01

    The first performance of playing catch with energy between two 100 kJ superconducting magnets has been presented. The mechanism of the energy transfer as an interface between the superconducting coils is a thyristorized DC-AC-DC converter. The obtained experimental efficiency of energy transfer has been compared with the theory and good agreement has been obtained. The method will offer a versatile extension of superconductive technique in energy problems. (author)

  8. Tore-Supra: a Tokamak with superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1987-07-01

    Tore Supra is a tokamak under construction on the site of Cen Cadarache by the Euratom-CEA Association. The machine technology integrates all problems related to the fabrication and the operation of large superconducting coils and of the associated cryogenic system. Tore Supra will provide a significant experience to prepare the next generation of machines for plasma physics and controlled fusion. Tore Supra is specially designed to implement a large physics program. The superconducting coils make possible the study of plasma confinement in long pulses (more than 60s), the impurities and the stability, and the efficiency of additional heating sources (neutral particle beams and radio frequency heating). The opportunity is taken to recall the particular features and requirements of the superconducting coils of the large future tokamaks in order to point out the problems that have to be faced by any new material (superconducting or not)

  9. New technique for wiring SSC superconducting sextupole corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, B.

    1985-01-01

    There exists in the electronics industry, a technology for the manufacture of printed circuit (PC) boards which is directly transferable into the creation of highly controlled coils, such as the SSC sextupole superconducting corrector coils. This technology, which uses a process of laying down insulated wire in highly controlled patterns has heretofore been confined exclusively to the manufacture of high density printed circuit (PC) boards, possibly due to an ignorance of its utility in the field of precision winding of coils. This ability to fix wires in a well defined location can be used to produce precision wound coils in a very cost-effective manner. These coils may be superior in quality to conventionally made coils. Before describing what can be created with this technology, it is necessary to take a look at this coil winding process, the MULTIWIRE process, and the industry which has utilized this technology

  10. A new technique for wiring SSC superconducting sextupole corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, B.

    1985-01-01

    There exists in the electronics industry, a technology for the manufacture of printed circuit (PC) boards which is directly transferable into the creation of highly controlled coils, such as the SSC sextupole superconducting corrector coils. This technology, which uses a process of laying down insulated wire in highly controlled patterns, has heretofore been confined excusively to the manufacture of high density printed circuit (PC) boards, possibly due to an ignorance of its utility in the field of precision winding of coils. This ability to fix wires in a well defined location can be used to produce precision wound coils in a very cost-effective manner. These coils may be superior in quality to conventionally made coils. Before describing what can be created with this technology, it is necessary to take a look at this coil winding process, the MULTIWIRE process, and the industry which has utilized this technology

  11. Development of superconducting pulsed poloidal coil in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, S.; Okuno, K.; Ando, T.; Tsuji, H.

    1990-01-01

    In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (JAERI), development work on pulsed superconductors and coils started in 1979, aiming at the demonstration of the applicability of superconducting technologies to pulsed poloidal coils in a fusion reactor. Initially our effort was concentrated mainly on the development of pool-cooled large-current pulsed conductors. Over the past ten years, superconducting technology has made great progress and the forced-flow cooled coil has assumed great importance in the development work. Now the Demo Poloidal Coil Project is in progress in JAERI, and three large forced-flow cooled coils have so far been fabricated and tested. Many improvements have been achieved in ac-loss performance and mechanical characteristics. (author)

  12. Protection of large-stored-energy superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircher, F.

    1975-11-01

    When the stored energy of superconducting magnets increases, the problem of the protection of the coil when a quench occurs becomes more and more important, especially if the structure of the coil is such that the energy can be dissipated only in a small part of the coil. The aim of this paper is first to describe a program which enables to predict the increase of temperature inside the coil for several kinds of protection and to give results for KEK pulsed dipoles (under construction and planned for TRISTAN). (auth.)

  13. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Electric Propulsion Systems for Large Aircraft, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The recent development of magnesium diboride superconducting wires makes possible the potential to have much lighter weight superconducting coils for heavy aircraft...

  14. Structural support system for a superconducting magnet coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuser, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the ESCAR (Experimental Superconducting Accelerator Ring) project, now under way at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is to gather data and experience in the design and operation of a relatively small synchrotron employing superconducting magnets. Such data are essential to ensure that the design of future large accelerators may proceed in a knowledgeable and responsible manner. One of the many engineering problems associated with a superconducting magnet is the design of the coil suspension system. The coil, maintained at the temperature of liquid helium, must be held rigidly by a structure that does not conduct too much heat into the liquid helium system. The suspension system used on the ESCAR magnets is described. Topics covered include the coil support system requirements, ESCAR magnet support system, and operating experience

  15. Hall probe for measuring high currents in superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferendeci, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Constructional details of a compact Hall probe for measuring high currents in superconducting coils are given. The Hall probe is easy to assemble and can be inserted or removed from the system without breaking the superconducting loop. Upper current limit of the probe can be increased by using larger magnetic core material. Shielding becomes necessary if the probe holder is to be placed near large current dependent magnetic fields

  16. Program NICOLET to integrate energy loss in superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.F.

    1978-08-01

    A voltage pickup coil, inductively coupled to the magnetic field of the superconducting coil under test, is connected so its output may be compared with the terminal voltage of the coil under test. The integrated voltage difference is indicative of the resistive volt-seconds. When multiplied with the main coil current, the volt-seconds yield the loss. In other words, a hysteresis loop is obtained if the integrated voltage difference phi = ∫ΔVdt is plotted as a function of the coil current, i. First, time functions of the two signals phi(t) and i(t) are recorded on a dual-trace digital oscilloscope, and these signals are then recorded on magnetic tape. On a CDC-6600, the recorded information is decoded and plotted, and the hysteresis loops are integrated by the set of FORTRAN programs NICOLET described in this report. 4 figures

  17. Pressure rise analysis in superconducting coils during dumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, E.; Shimamoto, S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes the ALPHE computer code, whose purpose is to calculate transient helium behavior in a poolboiling coil and to determine suitable characteristics of safety devices to minimize the maximum pressure and the liquid helium lost during dumping due to quench, or when discharging without normalcy. The analysis is compared with the measurements obtained in the domestic test of the Japanese LCT coil. Topics considered include basic equations (helium behavior, heat generation), manual dump without quench, and dumping due to quench. It is demonstrated that the transient behavior, calculated by ALPHE assuming quasi-static equilibrium between helium and coil, is in good agreement with the experimental measurements observed in the domestic test of the Japanese LCT coil. The engineering technique required for the design criteria of superconducting coils and safety device during dumping is established. ALPHE can be used to design an emergency safety system for a helium refrigerator during dumping

  18. Stability analysis of high temperature superconducting coil in liquid hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, T.; Yagai, T.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, it is expected that hydrogen plays an important role in energy source including electric power in near future. Liquid hydrogen has high potential for cooling down superconducting coil wound with high temperature superconductors (HTS), such as BSCCO, YBCO. In this paper, we study stabilities of the coils wound with BSCCO tapes, which are immersed in the liquid hydrogen, and compare stability results with those cooled by liquid helium. We treat a minimum propagation zone (MPZ) theory to evaluate the coil stability considering boiling heat flux of the liquid hydrogen, and specific heat, heat conduction and resistivity of HTS materials as a function of temperature. It is found that the coil cooled by the liquid hydrogen has higher stability margin than that cooled by the liquid helium. We compare the stability margins of both coils wound with Bi-2223/Ag tape and Bi-2212/Ag tape in liquid hydrogen. As a result, it is found that the stability of Bi-2212 coil is equivalent to that of Bi-2223 coil in low and high magnetic field, while the maximum current of Bi-2212 coil exceeds a little bit that of Bi-2223 coil in both magnetic fields

  19. Superconducting self-correcting harmonic coils for pulsed superconducting dipole or multipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dael, A.; Kircher, F.; Perot, J.

    1975-01-01

    Due to the zero resistance of a superconducting wire, an induced current in a closed superconducting circuit is continuously exactly opposed to its cause. This phenomenon was applied to the correction of the field harmonics of a pulsed magnet by putting short-circuited superconducting coils of particular symmetry in the useful aperture of the magnet. After a review of the main characteristics of such devices, the construction of two correcting coils (quadrupole and sextupole) is described. Experimental results of magnetic efficiency and time behavior are given; they are quite encouraging, since the field harmonics were reduced by one or two orders of magnitude

  20. The energizing of a NMR superconducting coil by a superconducting rectifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikkenga, J.; ten Kate, H.H.J.; van der Klundert, L.J.M.; Knoben, J.; Kraaij, G.J.; Spuorenberg, C.J.G.

    1985-01-01

    NMR magnets require a good homogeneity within a certain volume and an excellent field stability. The homogeneity can be met using a superconducting shim coil system. The field stability requires a constant current, although in many cases the current decay time constant is too low, due to imperfections in the superconducting wire and joints. This can be overcome using a rectifier. The rectifier can also be used to load the coil. The combination and interaction of the superconducting NMR coil (2.0 Tesla and 0.35 m cold bore) and the rectifier (20 W / 1 kA) is tested. The safety of the system is discussed. The shim coil system can compensate the strayfield of the rectifier. The field decay compensation will be discussed

  1. Epoxy resin casting of trim coils for superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajra, D.P.; Sarkar, S.C.; Saha, Subimal; Chaudhuri, J.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2006-01-01

    The life of any magnet depends on the soundness of the coil insulation, its aging properties and initial and final endurance limitations. The insulation of water-cooled trim coils for superconducting cyclotron is made of glass fibre tape with heat cured unfilled epoxy resin combination. This type of insulation has been selected to achieve excellent stability against thermal and electromagnetic stresses, tight dimensional control, good dielectric strength, non-hygroscopic and considerably low vapour-pressure as it will be inside rough vacuum. The process development and the difficulties encountered for appropriate selection of epoxy resin combination, potting, vacuum process, curing cycle, control of coil dimension to achieve a sound coil absolutely free from cracks, trapped air and voids has been discussed. (author)

  2. Studies on Nb3Sn field coils for superconducting machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, H.; Nose, S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies on several coils wound with multifilamentary (MF) Nb 3 Sn cables with reinforcing strip for superconducting rotating machine application. To use a Nb 3 Sn superconductor to field winding of a rotating machine, several coil performances of pre-reacted, bronze processed and stranded MF Nb 3 Sn cables were investigated, mainly in relation to stress effect. Bending strain up to 0.64% in strand and winding stress of 5 kg/mm 2 have resulted in nondegradation in coil performance. A pair of impregnated race-track coils designed for a 30 MVA synchronous condenser was energized successfully up to 80% of critical current without quench. 8 refs

  3. Mechanical properties of ISABELLE superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.; Bertsche, A.; Fuhrmann, J.; Greene, A.; Grove, E.; Repeta, L.; Short, F.; Tannenbaum, M.; Wanderer, P.

    1981-01-01

    As a part of the manufacturing processes, several mechanical measurements are made on ISABELLE dipoles. These are done both to control the process and to provide information for the evaluation of the behavior of the completed magnets. This paper discusses the Young's Modulus (E = 1-3 x 10 6 psi), the thermal contraction of the coil assembly (ΔL/L = 290 +- 17 x 10 -5 at 77 0 K), and the loss of applied prestress with time

  4. Current contact device for a superconducting magnet coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hieronymus, H.

    1987-01-01

    The invention concerns a current supply device for a superconducting magnet coil to be shortcircuited, with a separating device per coil end, which contains a fixed cooled contact and a moving contact connected to a power supply device and a mechanical actuating device for closing and opening the contacts. When closing the heated contact on to the cooled contact, relatively large quantities of heat can be transferred to the cooled contact and therefore to the connected superconducting coil end and can cause normal conduction there. The invention therefore provides that the mass ratio of the cooled contact to the moving contact is at least 5:1, preferably at least 10:1, and that the cooled contact part is provided, at the end away from the contact area, with means for increasing the area, for example cooling fins and is connected to the coil end has a thermal resistance between the contact area and the coil end of at least 0.2 k/W, preferably at least 0.5 k/W per 1000 A of current to be transmitted. (orig.) [de

  5. Analysis of mechanical characteristics of superconducting field coil for 17 MW class high temperature superconducting synchronous motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Park, S. I.; Im, S. H.; Kim, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting field coils using a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires with high current density generate high magnetic field of 2 to 5 [T] and electromagnetic force (Lorentz force) acting on the superconducting field coils also become a very strong from the point of view of a mechanical characteristics. Because mechanical stress caused by these powerful electromagnetic force is one of the factors which worsens the critical current performance and structural characteristics of HTS wire, the mechanical stress analysis should be performed when designing the superconducting field coils. In this paper, as part of structural design of superconducting field coils for 17 MW class superconducting ship propulsion motor, mechanical stress acting on the superconducting field coils was analyzed and structural safety was also determined by the coupling analysis system that is consists of commercial electromagnetic field analysis program and structural analysis program.

  6. SERPENTINE COIL TOPOLOGY FOR BNL DIRECT WIND SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARKER, B.; ESCALLIER, J.

    2005-01-01

    Serpentine winding, a recent innovation developed at BNL for direct winding superconducting magnets, allows winding a coil layer of arbitrary multipolarity in one continuous winding process and greatly simplifies magnet design and production compared to the planar patterns used before. Serpentine windings were used for the BEPC-II Upgrade and JPARC magnets and are proposed to make compact final focus magnets for the EC. Serpentine patterns exhibit a direct connection between 2D body harmonics and harmonics derived from the integral fields. Straightforward 2D optimization yields good integral field quality with uniformly spaced (natural) coil ends. This and other surprising features of Serpentine windings are addressed in this paper

  7. Characterization of superconducting coil for fault current limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polasek, Alexander; Dias, Rodrigo; Niedu, Daniel Brito; Ogasawara, Tsuneharu; Oliveira Filho, Orsino Borges de; Serra, Eduardo Torres; Gomes Junior, George; Amorim, Helio Salim

    2010-01-01

    The increasing power demand has been raising fault currents up to dangerous levels. Superconducting fault current limiters are a promising solution for this problem. In the present work, we studied a superconducting Bi-2212 coil that is used for fault current limitation. Samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM/EDS and measurement of critical temperature (Tc). The Rietveld method was employed for phase quantification. Relatively high Bi-2212 fractions were found. However, Tc varies from a sample to another one. Variations of local Tc are attributed to variations of oxygen content in Bi- 2212 phase. (author)

  8. Mechanical properties of ISABELLE superconducting coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, P.; Bertsche, A.; Fuhrmann, J.; Greene, A.; Grove, E.; Repeta, L.; Short, F.; Tannenbaum, M.; Wanderer, P.

    1981-01-01

    As a part of the manufacturing processes, several mechanical measurements are made on ISABELLE dipoles. These are done both to control the process and to provide information for the evaluation of the behavior of the completed magnets. This paper discusses the Young's Modulus (E = 1-3 x 10/sup 6/ psi), the thermal contraction of the coil assembly (..delta..L/L = 290 +- 17 x 10/sup -5/ at 77/sup 0/K), and the loss of applied prestress with time (approx. 20% for times 20 days).

  9. Magnetic field systems employing a superconducting D.C. field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartram, T.C.; Hazell, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    Method and equipment for transferring energy to or from a direct-current superconducting field coil to change the magnetic field generated by the coil in which a second direct-current superconducting coil is used as a storage coil, and energy transfer between the field coil and the storage coil is effected automatically in dependence upon a control program. Preferably, the control program acts upon a variable transformer which is coupled by respective rectifier/inverters to the field and storage coils and also serves for intital supply of energy to the coils

  10. Study of superconducting Nb3Sn coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivet, B.

    1963-01-01

    Composite superconducting Nb 3 Sn wires with a diameter of 0.5 mm and a length of about 100 m were made, and Hc-Ic diagrams were plotted up to fields of 80 kgauss for short lengths. Two solenoids producing fields of about 20 kgauss were studied. Nb 3 Sn solenoids, as opposed to those of Nb-Zr or Nb-Ti, appear to have a predictable behavior. Solenoids with less insulation produced stronger fields than heavily insulated solenoids. (author) [fr

  11. Analysis of quench-vent pressures for present design of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] TF [toroidal field] coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Japan, the European Community, the Union of the Soviet Union, and the United States. This paper examines the effects of a quench within the toroidal field (TF) coils based on current ITER design. It is a preliminary, rough analysis. Its intent is to assist ITER designers while more accurate computer codes are being developed and to provide a check against these more rigorous solutions. Rigorous solutions to the quench problem are very complex involving three-dimensional heat transfer, extreme changes in heat capacities and copper resistivity, and varying flow dynamics within the conductors. This analysis addresses all these factors in an approximate way. The result is much less accurate than a rigorous analysis. Results here could be in error as much as 30 to 40 percent. However, it is believed that this paper can still be very useful to the coil designer. Coil pressures and temperatures vs time into a quench are presented. Rate of helium vent, energy deposition in the coil, and depletion of magnetic stored energy are also presented. Peak pressures are high (about 43 MPa). This is due to the very long vent path length (446 m), small hydraulic diameters, and high current densities associated with ITER's cable-in-conduit design. The effects of these pressures as well as the ability of the coil to be self protecting during a quench are discussed. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Validation of special processes for the integration activities of the JT-60SA TF coils manufactured in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polli, Gian Mario, E-mail: gianmario.polli@enea.it [ENEA, UT-FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (Italy); Cucchiaro, Antonio; Cocilovo, Valter [ENEA, UT-FUS, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (Italy); Drago, Giovanni; Pesenti, Paolo; Cuneo, Stefano; Terzi, Franco [ASG Superconductors, Corso Perrone 73 r, Genova (Italy); Phillips, Guy; Tomarchio, Valerio [JT-60SA European Home Team, 85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Insertion. • Casing welding. • Casing embedding. - Abstract: In the framework of the Broader Approach Agreement for the construction of the JT-60SA tokamak, ENEA provides 9 of the 18 toroidal field (TF) coils of the JT-60SA magnet system. The 9 coils are being manufactured by ASG superconductors in Genoa under the supervision of ENEA in collaboration with the JT-60SA European home team. The manufacturing is composed of two main steps: one concerning winding pack assembly and impregnation, and the other devoted to the integration into the casing structure and associated final coil preparation. This paper describes the results of the validation activities set-up for the integration phase. Specifically, welding of casing components has been retained particularly critical for at least three reasons: (i) during welding the WP may be damaged by the intense heating; (ii) distortion caused by heating may determine incorrect coil geometry and then field errors; and (iii) flaws may reduce structural strength and then the overall lifetime of the machine. Similarly, final embedding has been demonstrated on a 1 m long mock-up of the coil. Main results and lessons learned are here described.

  13. Development of an air coil superconducting fault current limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naeckel, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Electrical power grids are the lifeline of technical infrastructure and fundamental for industry and modern lives. Fault Currents can disrupt the continuous supply of electrical energy, cause instable grid conditions and damage electrical equipment. The Air Coil Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (AC-SFCL) is a measure to effectively limit fault currents. The concept is investigated and proven experimentally by designing, building and successfully testing a 60 kV, 400 V, z=6% demonstrator.

  14. Structural design of superconducting magnets for the large coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.H.; Long, C.J.; Stoddart, W.C.T.

    1979-09-01

    The Large Coil Program (LCP) is a research, development, and demonstration effort specifically for the advancement of the technologies involved in the production of large superconducting magnets. This paper presents a review of the status of the structural designs, analysis methods, and verification tests being performed by the participating LCP design teams in the USA, Switzerland, Japan, and the Federal Republic of Germany. The significant structural mechanics concerns that are being investigated with the LCP are presented

  15. Design optimization of superconducting magnetic energy storage coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhunia, Uttam, E-mail: ubhunia@vecc.gov.in; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • We modeled the optimization formulation that minimizes overall refrigeration load into the SMES cryostat. • Higher the operating current reduces the dynamic load but increases static heat load into the cryostat. • Higher allowable hoop stress reduces both coil volume and refrigeration load. • The formulation can be in general be utilized for any arbitrary specification of SMES coil and conductor type. - Abstract: An optimization formulation has been developed for a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) solenoid-type coil with niobium titanium (Nb–Ti) based Rutherford-type cable that minimizes the cryogenic refrigeration load into the cryostat. Minimization of refrigeration load reduces the operating cost and opens up the possibility to adopt helium re-condensing system using cryo-cooler especially for small-scale SMES system. Dynamic refrigeration load during charging or discharging operational mode of the coil dominates over steady state load. The paper outlines design optimization with practical design constraints like actual critical characteristics of the superconducting cable, maximum allowable hoop stress on winding, etc., with the objective to minimize refrigeration load into the SMES cryostat. Effect of design parameters on refrigeration load is also investigated.

  16. Desgn of a 20-MJ superconducting ohmic-heating coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Murphy, J.H.; Janocko, M.A.; Haller, H.E.; Litz, D.C.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.; Thullen, P.

    1979-01-01

    Conceptual designs of 20-MJ superconducting coils which were developed to demonstrate the feasibility of an ohmic-heating system were discussed. The superconductor materials were NbTi and Nb 3 Sn for the pool boil and forced-flow cooling, respectively. The coils were designed to be cryostable for bipolar operation from +7 to -7 tesla maximum field within one second. The structural design addresses the distribution of structure and structural materials used in the pulsed field environment. The cyclic stresses anticipated and the fatigue limits of the structural materials were examined in view of the operating life of the coil. The coils were designed to generate the flux swings while simultaneously meeting the limitations imposed by cooling, insulation, current density and the stresses in the materials. Both the pool and forced cooled conductors have the same criterion for cryostability, i.e., the conductor must return to the superconducting state from an initial temperature of 20 0 K while the full transport current is flowing through the conductor

  17. Remote replacement of TF [toroidal field] and PF [poloidal field] coils for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.; Watkin, D.C.; Hollis, M.J.; DePew, R.E.; Kuban, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium fuel in the Compact Ignition Tokamak will require applying remote handling technology for ex-vessel maintenance and replacement of machine components. Highly activated and contaminated components of the fusion devices auxiliary systems, such as diagnostics and RF heating, must be replaced using remotely operated maintenance equipment in the test cell. In-vessel remote maintenance included replacement of divertor and first wall hardware, faraday shields, and for an in-vessel inspection system. Provision for remote replacement of a vacuum vessel sector, toroidal field coil or poloidal field ring coil was not included in the project baseline. As a result of recent coil failures experienced at a number of facilities, the CIT project decided to reconsider the question of remote recovery from a coil failure and, in January of 1990, initiated a coil replacement study. This study focused on the technical requirements and impact on fusion machine design associated with remote recovery from any coil failure

  18. An internal superconducting ''holding-coil'' for frozen spin targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutz, H.; Gehring, R.; Goertz, S.; Kraemer, D.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.; Thomas, A.

    1995-01-01

    A new concept of a small superconducting holding magnet, placed inside a polarizing refrigerator, has been developed for frozen spin targets. The superconducting wire has been wound on the inner cooling shield of the vertical dilution refrigerator of the Bonn frozen spin target. The maximum field of the magnet is 0.35 T. The total thickness of the superconducting coil consisting of the wire and the copper carrier is of the order of 500 μm. Based on this concept, a frozen spin target is under construction for the measurement of the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule with polarized real photons at the Mainz microtron MAMI and the Bonn electron stretcher accelerator ELSA. ((orig.))

  19. An internal superconducting ``holding-coil`` for frozen spin targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutz, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Gehring, R. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Goertz, S. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Kraemer, D. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Meyer, W. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Reicherz, G. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Thomas, A. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

    1995-03-01

    A new concept of a small superconducting holding magnet, placed inside a polarizing refrigerator, has been developed for frozen spin targets. The superconducting wire has been wound on the inner cooling shield of the vertical dilution refrigerator of the Bonn frozen spin target. The maximum field of the magnet is 0.35 T. The total thickness of the superconducting coil consisting of the wire and the copper carrier is of the order of 500 {mu}m. Based on this concept, a frozen spin target is under construction for the measurement of the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule with polarized real photons at the Mainz microtron MAMI and the Bonn electron stretcher accelerator ELSA. ((orig.))

  20. Qualification and preparatory activities for the manufacturing of 9 TF coils of the JT-60SA magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucchiaro, Antonio; Polli, Gian Mario; Cocilovo, Valter; Drago, Giovanni; Cuneo, Stefano; Terzi, Franco; Peyrot, Marc; Phillips, Guy; Tomarchio, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the Broader Approach Agreement for the construction of the JT-60SA tokamak, ENEA is in charge to provide 9 of the 18 Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The 9 coils are being manufactured by ASG superconductors in Genoa under the supervision of ENEA in collaboration with the JT-60SA European home team. Prior the manufacturing, a preparatory activity has been carried out aimed at designing, constructing and setting-up the relevant components to be realized. In order to get confidence of some special manufacturing process, several qualification activities have been performed. In this paper an overview of the principal milestones reached during the preparatory phase and a description of the qualification activities with relevant test results are presented

  1. Residual gas analysis of a cryostat vacuum chamber during the cool down of SST - 1 superconducting magnet field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, P.; Joshi, K.S.; Thankey, P.L.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important feature of Steady state Superconducting Tokamak -1 (SST-l) is the Nb-Ti superconducting magnet field coils. The coils will be kept in a high vacuum chamber (Cryostat) and liquid Helium will be flown through it to cool it down to its critical temperature of 4.5K. The coil along with its hydraulics has four types of joints (1) Stainless Steel (S.S.) to Copper (Cu) weld joints (2) S. S. to S. S. weld joints (3) Cu to Cu brazed joints and (4) G-10 to S. S. joints with Sti-cast as the binding material. The joints were leak tested with a Helium mass spectrometer leak detector in vacuum as well as in sniffer mode. However during the cool-down of the coil, these joints may develop leaks. This would deteriorate the vacuum inside the cryostat and coil cool-down would subsequently become more difficult. To study the effect of cooling on the vacuum condition of the Cryostat, a dummy Cryostat chamber was fabricated and a toroidal Field (TF) magnet was kept inside this chamber and cooled down to 4.5 K.A residual gas analyzer (RGA) was connected to the Cryostat chamber to study the behaviour of major gases inside this chamber with temperature. An analysis of the RGA data acquired during the coo-down has been presented in this chamber. (author)

  2. Qualifying tests for TRIAM-1M superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Nagao, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Shoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1984-09-01

    In the strong toroidal magnetic field experimental facility ''TRIAM-1M'' currently under construction, construction of the superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil and the following qualifying tests conducted on the full-scale superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil actually fabricated are described: (1) coil excitation test, (2) superconducting stability test, (3) external magnetic field application test, and (4) high-speed excitation test. On the basis of these test results, stability was evaluated of the superconducting coil being operated in the tokamak device. In normal tokamak operation, there occurs no normal conduction transition. At the time of plasma disruption, though this transition takes place in part of the coil, the superconducting state is immediately restored. By its electromagnetic force analysis, the superconducting coil is also stable in structure.

  3. Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Albert R.

    1985-01-01

    A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

  4. 30 MJ superconducting coil design and fabrication. Report No. GA-A16104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Bonneville 30 MJ superconducting stabilizing coil is being constructed by General Atomic under contract to LASL. Upon completion of the design, General Atomic began the procurement of materials and is now ready to start coil winding

  5. Pure tension superconducting toroidal-field coil system design studies for the Argonne Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Purcell, J.R.; Demichele, D.W.; Turner, L.R.

    1975-11-01

    As part of the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (TEPR) design studies, a toroidal field (TF) coil system has been designed. NbTi was chosen as the most suitable superconductor and 8T was regarded as a practical peak field level in this study. The 16-coil design was chosen as a reasonable compromise between 2 percent field ripple and 3 m access gap. To minimize the coil structure and the bending moments on the conductor, a pure tension coil shape is necessary. A correct approach for determining the pure tension coil profile in a bumpy TF coil system is given. Verification of the pure tension coil by a three-dimensional stress analysis is presented. For coil quench protection, a series-connected scheme is proposed

  6. Design of a vertical wiggler with superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huke, K.; Yamakawa, T.

    1980-01-01

    A vertical wiggler has been designed, which will be installed in the 2.5 GeV electron storage ring under construction at KEK-PF. The wiggler magnet with superconducting coils produces magnetic fields of 6 T and wiggles electron beams in a vertical plane. Synchrotron radiation generated by the wiggler has a critical wavelength of 0.5 Angstroem and has an electric field-vector in the vertical direction, which is very important for precise experiments in various fields of the material sciences. The wiggler consists of three pairs of superconducting coils, an iron magnetic shield, a beam pipe and a liquid helium cryogenic system and is contained in a vacuum vessel which can move up and down together with the wiggler. During the injection time, the vessel is pushed up, so that electron beams with a large spatial spread go through the lower part of the beam pipe, where the aperture of the beam pipe is large enough. After the beam size becomes small due to radiation damping, the vessel is pushed down so that the electron beams go through the narrow gap of the wiggler magnet. Using the iron magnetic shield with iron pole pieces, the ratio between the magnetic field in the gap and the maximum field on the superconductor coils is reduced to 1.1. (orig.)

  7. Current control of superconducting coils for fusion experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, T.; Etou, D.; Chikaraishi, H.; Takami, S.; Inoue, T.

    2003-01-01

    The LHD (Large Helical Device) has twelve superconducting coils and six dc power supplies, and following specifications are required for its control system; each coil current must be controlled independently, the steady state control error is less than 0.01% of the reference value, the current settling time for 0.1% of control error is less than 1 second, and the control system must be robust against turbulence caused by appearance and disappearance of the plasma, parameter errors and external electro-magnetic noises. In this paper, the design and test results of the coil current control system for the LHD are described. The good response and robustness are in the relation of trade off each other. H-infinity controller is one of schemes to guarantee robustness for stability. However, the independent responses of six coils were impossible by the H-infinity controller only. To resolve this problem, we applied a feed-forward control with the H-infinity control. Moreover, the advanced design method of H-infinity controller using μ-synthesis was applied to guarantee the control performance in the whole operating condition. As a result, good control results were obtained by experiments. (author)

  8. Simulation of the coil winder for the superconducting supercollider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnal, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    A unique apparatus has been designed to shape the magnet windings for the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC). The magnet windings of the SSC consist of conductor coils which are placed around a torus to generate a strong magnetic field within the torus. Several process variables must be controlled to demanding tolerances during the coil winding operation. The speed of conductor payout must be coordinated from a small spool through two stages of roll formers to the final coil shape on a large bobbin. The amount of plastic deformation in the conductor must be tightly controlled to pack it into the large bobbin with a certain desired force. The control problem consists of multiple interacting control loops. This paper describes a computer simulation of the coil winding apparatus. The Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) was used to encode a mathematical model of the system. The objectives of the simulation study were to understand the dynamic behavior of the system and to explore strategies for control. Although the funding for the SSC was canceled, the results of the research and development project for construction of this unique facility will find application in other large-scale construction and manufacturing problems

  9. Structure design of the Westinghouse superconducting magnet for the Large Coil Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domeisen, F.N.; Hackworth, D.T.; Stuebinger, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    In the on-going development of superconducting toroidal field coils for tokamak reactors, the Large Coil Program (LCP) managed by Union Carbide Corporation will include the design, fabrication, and testing of large superconducting coils to determine their feasibility for use in the magnetic fusion energy effort. Structural analysis of the large coil is essential to ensure adequate safety in the test coil design and confidence in the scalability of the design. This paper will discuss the action of tensile and shear loads on the various materials used in the coil. These loads are of magnetic and thermal origin

  10. A two-dimensional, finite-element methods for calculating TF coil response to out-of-plane Lorentz forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Toroidal field (TF) coils in fusion systems are routinely operated at very high magnetic fields. While obtaining the response of the coil to in-plane loads is relatively straightforward, the same is not true for the out-of-plane loads. Previous treatments of the out-of-plane problem have involved large, three-dimensional finite element idealizations. A new treatment of the out-of-plane problem is presented here; the model is two-dimensional in nature, and consumes far less CPU-time than three-dimensional methods. The approach assumes there exists a region of torsional deformation in the inboard leg and a bending region in the outboard leg. It also assumes the outboard part of the coil is attached to a torque frame/cylinder, which experiences primarily torsional deformation. Three-dimensional transition regions exist between the inboard and outboard legs and between the outboard leg and the torque frame. By considering several idealized problems of cylindrical shells subjected to moment distributions, it is shown that the size of these three-dimensional regions is quite small, and that the interaction between the torsional and bending regions can be treated in an equivalent two-dimensional fashion. Equivalent stiffnesses are derived to model penetration into and twist along the cylinders. These stiffnesses are then used in a special substructuring analysis to couple the three regions together. Results from the new method are compared to results from a 3D continuum model. (orig.)

  11. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments

  12. A study on nuclear heat load tolerable for NET/TF coils cooled by internal flow of helium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.

    1988-02-01

    NbTi cables cooled by internal flow of superfluid helium are considered an option for the design of NET/TF coils with about 11 T peak fields. Starting from an available winding cross section of 0.61x0.61 m 2 for a 8 MA turns coil made of a 16 kA conductor it is shown that sufficient hydraulic cross section can be provided within such cables to remove the expected thermal load resulting from nuclear heating with exponential decay from inboard to outboard side of the winding. The concept is a pancake type coil with 1.8 K helium fed-in the high field region of each pancake. The temperature distribution within such coils is calculated, and the local safety margin is determined from temperature and field. The calculation takes account of nuclear and a.c. heating, and of thermal conductance between the individual layers and the coil casing. It is shown that operation with 1.8 K inlet and about 3 K outlet temperature is possible. The electrical insulation with about 0.5 mm thickness proves to provide sufficient thermal insulation. No additional thermal shield is required between the coil casing and the winding package. Two different types of conductors are being considered: a) POLO type cable with quadratic cross section and a central circular coolant duct, and b) an LCT type cable with two conductors wound in hand. Both concepts with about 500 m length of the cooland channels are shown to meet the requirements resulting from a peak nuclear heat load of 0.3 mW/cm 3 in the inboard turns. The hydraulic diameters are sufficient to operate each coils with self-sustained fountain effect pumps. Even appreciably higher heat loads with up to 3 mW/cm 3 of nuclear heating can be tolerated for the POLO type cable when the hydraulic diameter is enlarged to its maximum of 17 mm. (orig.) [de

  13. Development of superconducting magnetic bearing using superconducting coil and bulk superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seino, H; Nagashima, K; Arai, Y [Railway Technical Research Institute, Hikari-cho 2-8-38, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: seino@rtri.or.jp

    2008-02-01

    The authors conducted a study on superconducting magnetic bearing, which consists of superconducting rotor and stator to apply the flywheel energy-storage system for railways. In this study, high temperature bulk superconductor (HTS bulk) was combined with superconducting coils to increase the load capacity of the bearing. In the first step of the study, the thrust rolling bearing was selected for application by using liquid nitrogen cooled HTS bulk. 60mm-diameter HTS bulks and superconducting coil which generated a high gradient of magnetic field by cusp field were adopted as a rotor and a stator for superconducting magnetic bearing, respectively. The results of the static load test and the rotation test, creep of the electromagnetic forces caused by static flux penetration and AC loss due to eccentric rotation were decreased to the level without any problems in substantial use by using two HTS bulks. In the result of verification of static load capacity, levitation force (thrust load) of 8900N or more was supportable, and stable static load capacity was obtainable when weight of 460kg was levitated.

  14. Development of superconducting magnetic bearing using superconducting coil and bulk superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, H; Nagashima, K; Arai, Y

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted a study on superconducting magnetic bearing, which consists of superconducting rotor and stator to apply the flywheel energy-storage system for railways. In this study, high temperature bulk superconductor (HTS bulk) was combined with superconducting coils to increase the load capacity of the bearing. In the first step of the study, the thrust rolling bearing was selected for application by using liquid nitrogen cooled HTS bulk. 60mm-diameter HTS bulks and superconducting coil which generated a high gradient of magnetic field by cusp field were adopted as a rotor and a stator for superconducting magnetic bearing, respectively. The results of the static load test and the rotation test, creep of the electromagnetic forces caused by static flux penetration and AC loss due to eccentric rotation were decreased to the level without any problems in substantial use by using two HTS bulks. In the result of verification of static load capacity, levitation force (thrust load) of 8900N or more was supportable, and stable static load capacity was obtainable when weight of 460kg was levitated

  15. Method of eliminating the training effect in superconducting coils by post-wind preload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The training effect in superconducting coils is eliminated by winding the coil with a composite material that includes both a superconductor and a normal material. Stresses are applied to the wound coil in the direction that electromagnetic stresses will be applied to the coil during normal use. The applied stresses are greater than the calculated magnitude of the greatest electromagnetic stresses to be applied to the coil

  16. Levitation properties of superconducting magnetic bearings using superconducting coils and bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Yuuki; Seino, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Ken [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38 Hikari-cho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    We have been developing a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) with 36 MJ energy capacity for a railway system with superconducting magnetic bearings (SMBs). We prepared two kinds of models using superconducting coils and bulk superconductors (SCs). One model demonstrated SMB load capacity of 20 kN and the other model proved non-contact stable levitation and non-contact rotation with SMBs. Combining these results, the feasibility of a 36 MJ energy capacity FESS with SMBs completely inside a cryostat has been confirmed. In this paper, we report the levitation properties of SMBs in these models.

  17. Levitation properties of superconducting magnetic bearings using superconducting coils and bulk superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yuuki; Seino, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Ken

    2010-01-01

    We have been developing a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) with 36 MJ energy capacity for a railway system with superconducting magnetic bearings (SMBs). We prepared two kinds of models using superconducting coils and bulk superconductors (SCs). One model demonstrated SMB load capacity of 20 kN and the other model proved non-contact stable levitation and non-contact rotation with SMBs. Combining these results, the feasibility of a 36 MJ energy capacity FESS with SMBs completely inside a cryostat has been confirmed. In this paper, we report the levitation properties of SMBs in these models.

  18. Quench characterization and thermo hydraulic analysis of SST-1 TF magnet busbar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, A.N., E-mail: ansharma@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Pradhan, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Duchateau, J.L. [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Khristi, Y.; Prasad, U.; Doshi, K.; Varmora, P.; Tanna, V.L.; Patel, D.; Panchal, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Details of SST-1 TF busbar quench detection. • Simulation of slow propagating normal zone. • Thermo hydraulic analyses of TF busbar in current feeder system. - Abstract: Toroidal field (TF) magnet system of steady-state superconducting tokamak-1 (SST-1) has 16 superconducting coils. TF coils are cooled with forced flow supercritical helium at 0.4 MPa, at 4.5 K and operate at nominal current of 10,000 A. Prior to TF magnet system assembly in SST-1 tokamak, each TF coil was tested individually in a test cryostat. During these tests, TF coil was connected to a pair of conventional helium vapor cooled current leads. The connecting busbar was made from the same base cable-in-conduit-conductor (CICC) of SST-1 superconducting magnet system. Quenches experimentally observed in the busbar sections of the single coil test setups have been analyzed in this paper. A steady state thermo hydraulic analysis of TF magnet busbar in actual SST-1 tokamak assembly has been done. The experimental observations of quench and results of relevant thermo hydraulic analyses have been used to predict the safe operation regime of TF magnet system busbar during actual SST-1 tokamak operational scenarios.

  19. Preliminary power supply design for the TF coil system of CIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, C.; Bronner, G.; Huttar, D.

    1989-01-01

    Initial operation of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is planned with a Toroidal Field (TF) of 8 Tesla and a flat top duration of 5 seconds. Ultimately, operation will be extended beyond 8 Tesla. The power supply to be used for the initial phase of operation has been modeled using the parameters of the thyristor rectifier power supplies which are now in service for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A subset of these existing units, or perhaps new units with similar ratings, are envisioned to be connected to the existing 138kV transmission line serving PPPL so as to take advantage of this power source for CIT. For the extended operation phase the equipment used for the initial phase of TF operation will be augmented with new equipment to permit operation up to 11 Tesla. This paper describes the preliminary design for the 8 Tesla power supply and presents results from simulation studies. In addition, issues concerning transient behavior and fault modes are discussed. 4 refs., 12 figs

  20. An A15 conductor design and its implications for the NET-II TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluekiger, R.; Arendt, F.; Hofmann, A.; Jeske, U.; Juengst, K.P.; Komarek, P.; Krauth, H.; Lehmann, W.; Luehning, J.; Manes, B.; Maurer, W.; Nyilas, A.; Specking, W.; Turowski, P.; Zehlein, H.

    1985-06-01

    The paper describes the results of studies for a NET toroidal field coil conductor carried out at KfK-Karlsruhe. The conductor concept is based on the same design principles as used in the Euratom-LCT coil, well proven in all conductor tests and the domestic tests of the coil. These principles are applied to the peculiarities of Nb 3 Sn for a rated current of 20 kA at 12 T, taking into account ac losses and nuclear heating. A flat Nb 3 Sn cable is soldered to a surrounding CuNi tape after reaction. Around this rectangular conductor core, Cu profiles are cabled on distance by the Roebel-process and subsequently soldered onto the CuNi tape. The whole system is surrounded by a steel conduit. The conductor data result from electric, thermohydraulic and stability calculations as well as mechanical evaluations. Expected fabrication processes are discussed, and measurements on a first simplified subsize conductor model are presented. (orig.) [de

  1. Considerations of coil protection and electrical connection schemes in large superconducting toroidal magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1976-03-01

    A preliminary comparison of several different coil protection and electrical connection schemes for large superconducting toroidal magnet systems (STMS) is carried out. The tentative recommendation is to rely on external dump resistors for coil protection and to connect the coils in the toroidal magnet in several parallel loops (e.g., every fourth coil is connected into a single series loop). For the fault condition when a single coil quenches, the quenched coil should be isolated from its loop by switching devices. The magnet, as a whole, should probably be discharged if more than a few coils have quenched

  2. Simulation of thermal processes in superconducting pancake coils cooled by GM cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebioda, M; Rymaszewski, J; Korzeniewska, E

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the thermal model of a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system with the closed cycle helium cryocooler. The authors propose the use of contact-cooled coils with maintaining the possibility of the system reconfiguring. The model assumes the use of the second generation superconducting tapes to make the windings in the form of flat discs (pancakes). The paper presents results for a field model of the single pancake coil and the winding system consisting of several coils.

  3. Study on the performance improvement of the high temperature superconducting coil with several separated coils at the edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguri, S.; Oka, T.; Fukui, S.; Ogawa, J.; Sato, T.

    2008-01-01

    In designing high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils, it is important to secure large magnetic fields and stored energy using shorter tape length. Thus, it is necessary to improve the transport current performance of the coils. The critical current and n-value of an HTS tape depend on magnetic fields and flux angles under constant temperature. Considering these dependencies, we established a model to analyze coil critical current. This model clarifies that relatively large electric fields are generated at the coil edges. This adversely affects the transport current performance. In this study, the coil edge is separated into several coils, keeping the total tape length constant. This increases the coil critical current, stored energy, central magnetic field, and also the coil volume, which contains vacancies created by the separation. To estimate coil performance, we calculated the stored energy density, whose denominator is the increased coil volume. This stored energy density reaches its maximum value when the number of the separated coils is eight. At this optimum separation, the central magnetic field increases by 13%, and the stored energy improves by 43%, compared to a rectangular coil wound with the same tape length

  4. A continuous winding scheme for superconducting tokamak coils with cable-in-conduit conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-ho; Chung, Kie-hyung; Lee, Deok Kyo

    2001-01-01

    Superconducting magnet coils are essential for steady-state or long-pulse operation of tokamaks. In an advanced tokamak, the central solenoid (CS) coils are usually divided into several pairs of modules to provide for an extra plasma shaping capability in addition to those available from the shaping (poloidal field) coils. In the conventional pancake winding scheme of superconducting coils, each coil consists of separate superconducting 'double-pancake' coils connected together in series; however, such joints are not superconducting, which is one of the major disadvantages, especially in pulsed operations. A new type of winding was adopted for the ITER CS coil, which consists of cylindrical shell 'layers' joined in series. A disadvantage of this layer winding is its inability to yield modular coils that can provide certain degree of plasma shaping. Joints can be removed in a coil winding pack with the conventional pancake winding scheme, if the conductor is sufficiently long and the winding machine is properly equipped. The compactness, however, cannot be preserved with this scheme. The winding compactness is important since the radial build of the CS coils is one of the major parameters that determine the machine size. In this paper, we present a continuous winding scheme that requires no joints, allows coil fabrication at minimum dimension, and meets the flux swing requirement and other practical aspects

  5. Open midplane designs based on sector coils in superconducting dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bruer, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the effects of opening up the midplane in conventional sector coil dipoles, also known as cosè-designs. The open midplane design is a candidate for the higher luminosity upgrade for the LHC, and also for the future beta beam project at CERN, which has the heat deposition mainly concentrated in the midplane of the dipoles. By opening up the midplane, the major part of the spray particles can be avoided, allowing the use of strong superconductive magnets. The aim of this study is to maintain good field quality after a gap in the midplane has been inserted. Short sample field and the electromagnetic force distribution will also be presented for some solutions.

  6. Analysis of reflection-coefficient by wireless power transmission using superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, In Sung; Choi, Hyo Sang; Chung, Dong Chul

    2017-01-01

    The use of electronic devices such as mobile phones and tablet PCs has increased of late. However, the power which is supplied through wires has a limitation of the free use of devices and portability. Magnetic-resonance wireless power transfer (WPT) can achieve increased transfer distance and efficiency compared to the existing electromagnetic inductive coupling. A superconducting coil can be applied to increase the efficiency and distance of magnetic-resonance WPT. As superconducting coils have lower resistance than copper coils, they can increase the quality factor (Q-factor) and can overcome the limitations of magnetic-resonance WPT. In this study, copper coils were made from ordinary copper under the same condition as the superconducting coils for a comparison experiment. Superconducting coils use liquid nitrogen to keep the critical temperature. As there is a difference of medium between liquid nitrogen and air, liquid nitrogen was also used in the normal conductor coil to compare the experiment with under the same condition. It was confirmed that superconducting coils have a lower reflection-coefficient(S11) than the normal conductor coils

  7. Analysis of reflection-coefficient by wireless power transmission using superconducting coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, In Sung; Choi, Hyo Sang [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Dong Chul [Korea Institute of Carbon Convergence Technology, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The use of electronic devices such as mobile phones and tablet PCs has increased of late. However, the power which is supplied through wires has a limitation of the free use of devices and portability. Magnetic-resonance wireless power transfer (WPT) can achieve increased transfer distance and efficiency compared to the existing electromagnetic inductive coupling. A superconducting coil can be applied to increase the efficiency and distance of magnetic-resonance WPT. As superconducting coils have lower resistance than copper coils, they can increase the quality factor (Q-factor) and can overcome the limitations of magnetic-resonance WPT. In this study, copper coils were made from ordinary copper under the same condition as the superconducting coils for a comparison experiment. Superconducting coils use liquid nitrogen to keep the critical temperature. As there is a difference of medium between liquid nitrogen and air, liquid nitrogen was also used in the normal conductor coil to compare the experiment with under the same condition. It was confirmed that superconducting coils have a lower reflection-coefficient(S11) than the normal conductor coils.

  8. Criteria of the efficiency for radiation protection of tokamak reactor superconducting magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Factors determining serviceability of the main elements (superconductor, stabilizing conductor, insulation) of superconducting magnet coils for tokamak reactors are discussed. It is suggested that the limiting values of total and specific energy release in the material of superconducting coils, increase in electric resistance of the stabilizing conductor, decrease in the superconductor critical current and damage of the superconducting magnet insulation should be used as criteria of the reactor internal radiation protection efficiency. The conclusion is made that neutron fluence in the magnet coil components considered can be used as a generalized criterion of the first approximation for the evaluation of the protection efficiency

  9. The Calculated and Measured Resistance for Splices between Conductors in a MICE Superconducting Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Dietderich, Dan; Higley, Hugh; Pan, Heng; Tam, Darren; Trillaud, Federic; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Xu, Feng Yu

    2009-01-01

    The resistance of superconducting joints within MICE coils is an important issue particularly for the coupling coils. The MICE tracker solenoids have only two superconducting joints in the three spectrometer set (end coil 1, the center coil and end coil 2). The AFC magnets may have only a single joint within the coil. The coupling coils may have as many as fifteen joints within the coil, due to relatively short piece lengths of the superconductor. LBNL and ICST looked at three types of coil joints. They are: (1) cold fusion butt joints, (2) side-by-side lap joints, and (3) up-down lap joints. A theoretical calculation of the joint resistance was done at LBNL and checked by ICST. After looking at the theoretical resistance of the three types of joints, it was decided that the cold welded butt joint was not an attractive alternative for joints within a MICE superconducting magnet coil. Side-by-side and up-down lap joints were fabricated at ICST using two types of soft solder between the conductors. These conductor joints were tested at LBNL at liquid helium temperatures over a range of magnetic fields. The joint resistance was compared with the theoretical calculations. Measurements of splice strength were also made at 300 K and 77 K.

  10. Effect of reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils having various FRP bobbins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, N.; Tada, S.; Higuchi, T.; Takao, T.; Yamanaka, A.; Fukui, S.

    2004-01-01

    We have demonstrated in our previous works that a use of the particular structural material for superconducting coils was effective to mechanical-loss reduction under AC operation. In this study, we measured losses to investigate influence of the mechanical losses in the coils having various fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) with different thermal expansion coefficients. The losses were small in the coils whose winding tension at coil-operating temperature were strong, on the contrary, the losses of the coil having the weak winding tension were large. The coil having the strongest winding tension at liquid helium temperature showed the smallest loss in all coils, and the loss agreed with a value from the Norris's analysis. We think that the mechanical loss becomes almost zero in this coil since the strong tension can prevent the periodic vibration of the superconducting wire. The dependence of the loss on the difference in surface conditions of the materials of the superconducting coil's bobbins was not observed, however, the mechanical losses in AC coils strongly depended on the winding tensions at cryogenic temperature

  11. Development of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] trim coil beam tube assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaritka, J.; Kelly, E.; Schneider, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses ≅9600 dipole magnets. The magnets have been carefully designed to exhibit minimal magnetic field harmonics. However, because of superconductor magnetization effects, iron saturation and conductor/coil positioning errors, certain harmonic errors are possible and must be corrected by use of multipole correctors called trim coils. For the most efficient use of axial space in the magnet, and lowest possible current, a distributed internal correction coil design is planned. The trim coil assembly is secured to the beam tube, a uhv tube with special strength, size, conductivity and vacuum. The report details the SSC trim coil/beam tube assembly specifications, history, and ongoing development

  12. Development work on superconducting coils for a Large Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, D.N.; Deis, D.W.; Harvey, A.R.; Hirzel, D.G.; Johnston, J.E.; Leber, R.L.; Nelson, R.L.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    This article has summarized development work directed toward obtaining the data required to design and build the superconducting coils for MFTF. The methods for fabricating the conductor and joining lengths of the conductor are almost finalized, and the building of the test coil and associated equipment is now well under way

  13. Construction and assembling of the trim coils for the Milan superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccaglioni, G.; Cartegni, G.C.; Fusetti, M.; Gini, L.; Grilli, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the main characteristics of the trim coils realized for the heavy ions superconducting cyclotron under construction at the Milan University. The guidelines in the choice of the conductor size, of the insulation and cooling parameters are discussed in some details. The main operations in the coils construction, as winding, impregnation, electrical tests and assembling, are described

  14. Design study for superconducting main field coils for the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Litherland, P.S.; Ballou, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The design study described here demonstrated the feasibility of replacing the existing ORIC coils with superconducting magnets. The design is quite conservative, requires no unusual technology, and should result in a coil system with good reliability and durability. The operating regime of ORIC will be considerably extended, and running costs should be reduced. A proposal to continue with detailed design and coil fabrication is currently under review and has been submitted to the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

  15. Superconducting coil manufacturing method for low current dc beam line magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of manufacturing superconducting multipole coils for 40 to 50 kG dc beam line magnets with low current is described. Small coils were built and tested successfully to short sample characteristics. The coils did not train after the first cooldown. The coils are porous and well cooled to cope with mechanical instability and energy deposited in the coil from the beam particles. The coils are wound with insulated strand cable. The cable is shaped rectangularly for winding simplicity and good tolerances. After the coil is wound, the insulated strands are electrically connected in series. This reduces the operating current and, most important, improves the coil quench propagation due to heat conduction of one strand adjacent to the other. A well distributed quench allows the magnet energy to distribute more uniformly to the copper in the superconductor wire, giving self-protected coils. A one-meter long, 43 kG, 6-inch bore tube superconducting dipole is now being fabricated. The porous coil design and coil winding methods are discussed

  16. Mechanical behavior of the mirror fusion test Facility superconducting magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical response to winding and electromagnetic loads of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) superconducting coil pack is presented. The 375-ton (3300 N) MFTF Yin-Yang magnet, presently the world's largest superconducting magnet, is scheduled for acceptance cold-testing in May of 1981. The assembly is made up of two identical coils which together contain over 15 miles (24 km) of superconductor wound in 58 consecutive layers of 24 turns each. Topics associated with mechanical behavior include physical properties of the coil pack and its components, winding pre-load effects, finite element analysis, magnetic load redistribution, and the design impact of predicted conductor motion

  17. Structural design of the superconducting Poloidal Field coils for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment concept design uses superconducting coils made from cable-in-conduit conductor to accomplish both magnetic confinement and plasma initiation. The Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system is divided into two subsystems, the central solenoid and the outer ring coils, the latter is focus of this paper. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is excessive for a case type construction; therefore, a ''no case'' design has been chosen. This ''no case'' design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation (fiberglass/epoxy wrap) as a structural adhesive. The model integrates electromagnetic analysis and structural analysis into the finite element code ANSYS to solve the problem. PF coil design is assessed by considering a variety of coil current wave forms, corresponding to various operating modes and conditions. The structural analysis shows that the outer ring coils are within the requirements of the fatigue life and fatigue crack growth requirements. The forces produced by the Toroidal Field coils on the PF coils have little effect on the maximum stresses in the PF coils. In addition in an effort to reduce the cost of the coils new elongated PF coils design was proposed which changes the aspect ratio of the outer ring coils to reduce the number of turns in the coils. The compressive stress in the outer ring coils is increased while the tensile stress is decreased

  18. Use of a High-Temperature Superconducting Coil for Magnetic Energy Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagnard, J-F; Crate, D; Jamoye, J-F; Laurent, Ph; Mattivi, B; Cloots, R; Ausloos, M; Genon, A; Vanderbemden, Ph

    2006-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage device (SMES) has been realised using a 350 m-long BSCCO tape wound as a ''pancake'' coil. The coil is mounted on a cryocooler allowing temperatures down to 17.2 K to be achieved. The temperature dependence of coil electrical resistance R(T) shows a superconducting transition at T = 102.5 K. Measurements of the V(I) characteristics were performed at several temperatures between 17.2 K and 101.5 K to obtain the temperature dependence of the critical current (using a 1 μV/cm criterion). Critical currents were found to exceed 100 A for T < 30 K. An electronic DC-DC converter was built in order to control the energy flow in and out of the superconducting coil. The converter consists of a MOS transistor bridge switching at a 80 kHz frequency and controlled with standard Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) techniques. The system was tested using a 30 V squared wave power supply as bridge input voltage. The coil current, the bridge input and output voltages were recorded simultaneously. Using a 10 A setpoint current in the superconducting coil, the whole system (coil + DC-DC converter) can provide a stable output voltage showing uninterruptible power supply (UPS) capabilities over 1 s

  19. Core/coil assembly for use in superconducting magnets and method for assembling the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassner, David A.

    1979-01-01

    A core/coil assembly for use in a superconducting magnet of the focusing or bending type used in syncronous particle accelerators comprising a coil assembly contained within an axial bore of the stacked, washer type, carbon steel laminations which comprise the magnet core assembly, and forming an interference fit with said laminations at the operating temperature of said magnet. Also a method for making such core/coil assemblies comprising the steps of cooling the coil assembly to cryogenic temperatures and drawing it rapidly upwards into the bore of said stacked laminations.

  20. Large Coil Program magnetic system design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, S.D.; Johnson, N.E.

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting coils to provide a basis for the design principles, materials, and fabrication techniques proposed for the toroidal magnets for the THE NEXT STEP (TNS) and other future tokamak devices. This paper documents a design study of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in which the structural response of the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils and the supporting structure was evaluated under simulated reactor conditions. The LCP test facility structural system consists of six TF Coils, twelve coil-to-coil torsional restraining beams (torque rings), a central bucking post with base, and a Pulse Coil system. The NASTRAN Finite Element Structural Analysis computer Code was utilized to determine the distribution of deflections, forces, and stresses for each of the TF Coils, torque rings, and the central bucking post. Eleven load conditions were selected to represent probable test operations. Pulse Coils suspended in the bore of the test coil were energized to simulate the pulsed field environment characteristic of the TNS reactor system. The TORMAC Computer Code was utilized to develop the magnetic forces in the TF Coils for each of the eleven loading conditions examined, with or without the Pulse Coils energized. The TORMAC computer program output forces were used directly as input load conditions for the NASTRAN analyses. Results are presented which demonstrate the reliability of the LCTF under simulated reactor operating conditions

  1. Enhancing the design of a superconducting coil for magnetic energy storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indira, Gomathinayagam; UmaMaheswaraRao, Theru; Chandramohan, Sankaralingam

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High magnetic flux density of SMES coil to reduce the size. • YBCO Tapes for the construction of HTS magnets. • Relation between energy storage and length of the coil wound by various materials. • Design with a certain length of second-generation HTS. - Abstract: Study and analysis of a coil for Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system is presented in this paper. Generally, high magnetic flux density is adapted in the design of superconducting coil of SMES to reduce the size of the coil and to increase its energy density. With high magnetic flux density, critical current density of the coil is degraded and so the coil is wound with High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) made of different materials. A comparative study is made to emphasize the relationship between the energy storage and length of the coil wound by Bi2223, SF12100, SCS12100 and YBCO tapes. Recently for the construction of HTS magnets, YBCO tapes have been used. Simulation models for various designs have been developed to analyze the magnetic field distribution for the optimum design of energy storage. The design which gives the maximum stored energy in the coil has been used with a certain length of second-generation HTS. The performance analysis and the results of comparative study are done

  2. Enhancing the design of a superconducting coil for magnetic energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indira, Gomathinayagam, E-mail: gindu80@gmail.com [EEE Department, Prince Shri Venkateshwara Padmavathy Engineering College, Chennai (India); UmaMaheswaraRao, Theru, E-mail: umesh.theru@gmail.com [Divison of Power Engineering and Management, Anna University, Chennai (India); Chandramohan, Sankaralingam, E-mail: cdramo@gmail.com [Divison of Power Engineering and Management, Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • High magnetic flux density of SMES coil to reduce the size. • YBCO Tapes for the construction of HTS magnets. • Relation between energy storage and length of the coil wound by various materials. • Design with a certain length of second-generation HTS. - Abstract: Study and analysis of a coil for Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system is presented in this paper. Generally, high magnetic flux density is adapted in the design of superconducting coil of SMES to reduce the size of the coil and to increase its energy density. With high magnetic flux density, critical current density of the coil is degraded and so the coil is wound with High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) made of different materials. A comparative study is made to emphasize the relationship between the energy storage and length of the coil wound by Bi2223, SF12100, SCS12100 and YBCO tapes. Recently for the construction of HTS magnets, YBCO tapes have been used. Simulation models for various designs have been developed to analyze the magnetic field distribution for the optimum design of energy storage. The design which gives the maximum stored energy in the coil has been used with a certain length of second-generation HTS. The performance analysis and the results of comparative study are done.

  3. Test equipment for a flywheel energy storage system using a magnetic bearing composed of superconducting coils and superconducting bulks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, M; Matsue, H; Yamashita, T; Hasegawa, H; Nagashima, K; Maeda, T; Matsuoka, T; Mukoyama, S; Shimizu, H; Horiuchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Energy storage systems are necessary for renewable energy sources such as solar power in order to stabilize their output power, which fluctuates widely depending on the weather. Since ‘flywheel energy storage systems’ (FWSSs) do not use chemical reactions, they do not deteriorate due to charge or discharge. This is an advantage of FWSSs in applications for renewable energy plants. A conventional FWSS has capacity limitation because of the mechanical bearings used to support the flywheel. Therefore, we have designed a superconducting magnetic bearing composed of a superconducting coil stator and a superconducting bulk rotor in order to solve this problem, and have experimentally manufactured a large scale FWSS with a capacity of 100 kWh and an output power of 300 kW. The superconducting magnetic bearing can levitate 4 tons and enables the flywheel to rotate smoothly. A performance confirmation test will be started soon. An overview of the superconducting FWSS is presented in this paper. (paper)

  4. A 1.5 MJ cryostatic stable superconducting ohmic-heating coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.-T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1978-01-01

    As early as FY 1975, ANL had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and proposed a five-year pulsed coil and power supply development program to ERDA. With modest funding made available by ERDA in FY 1977 and the use of substantial equipment inventory at ANL, a small but agressive development program was advanced to the construction of a 1.5 MJ model coil. The principle objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil with a dB/dt ranging from 2 T/s up to 14 T/s. The results of basic cable development and tests will be described. The design and construction of a prototype 1.5 MJ cryostable pulsed coil and its nonmetallic cryostat will be presented. (author)

  5. An experimental mechanical switch for 3 kA driven by superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, H.J.; Ten Haken, B.; Van de Klundert, L.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Usually mechanical switches that are built for use in superconducting circuits are driven in some way by a rod which is controlled at room temperature. In this paper, an alternative method to drive the electrodes of the switch is reported. In fact the new device is a superconducting relay that uses an antiseries connection of two superconducting air-core coils. The repulsing force of these relay coils enables the switch to be closed by applying a pressure to the electrodes. The off-state is effected by a set of springs which interrupt the electrodes when the coil current is switched off. We realized that this electro-magnetic method of producing large forces could be promising for driving a mechanical switch. The desired method was demonstrated by an experimental model. A switch-on resistance of 8*10 -8 Ω with a switch current of 3 kA and a contact force of 20 kN was measured

  6. Design Aspects on Winding of an MgB2 Superconducting Generator Coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, N.; Eliassen, J.C.; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2015-01-01

    copper conductors at room temperature at one tenth of the wire cost per unit carried current. In the framework of the European project INNWIND.EU, an MgB2 superconducting generator pole will be designed, built and tested. Some of the design aspects of this work with emphasis on the winding process...... and associated coil insulation are discussed. An overall high current density in the coil is of crucial importance to obtain clear benefits compared to conventional solutions. The wire itself may be the most important parameter in that respect. However, the overall current density of the coil is also influenced......% compared to the use of an additional, dedicated, electrical insulation like Kapton for wet-winding or glass-fibre for dry-winding followed by vacuum impregnation. We show the results of a trial winding of 500 m of MgB2 superconducting wire into a double pancake coil using the wet-winding technique...

  7. Static stress analysis of coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly for muon ionization cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Heng; Wang Li; Wu Hong; Guo Xinglong; Xu Fengyu

    2010-01-01

    The stresses in the coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly, which is applied in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), are critical for the structure design and mechanical stability because of a large diameter and relative high magnetic field. This paper presents an analytical stress solution for the MICE coupling coil assembly. The stress due to winding tension is calculated by assuming the coil package as a set of combined cylinders. The thermal and electromechanical stresses are obtained by solving the partial differential equations of displacement based on the power series expansion method. The analytical stress solution is proved to be feasible by calculating stresses in a tested superconducting solenoid with 2.58 m bore at room temperature. The analytical result of the MICE coupling coil is in good agreement with that of the finite element which shows that the transverse shear stress induced by Lorentz force is principally dominant to magnet instability. (authors)

  8. High-T /SUB c/ Superconducting integrated circuit: a dc SQUID with input coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Iorio, M.S.; Beasley, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    We have fabricated a high transition temperature superconducting integrated circuit consisting of a dc SQUID and an input coupling coil. The purpose is to ascertain the generic problems associated with constructing a high-T /SUB c/ circuit as well as to fabricate a high performance dc SQUID. The superconductor used for both the SQUID and the input coil is Nb 3 Sn which must be deposited at 800 0 C. Importantly, the insulator separating SQUID and input coil maintains its integrity at this elevated temperature. A hole in the insulator permits contact to the innermost winding of the coil. This contact has been achieved without significant degradation of the superconductivity. Consequently, the device operates over a wide temperature range, from below 4.2 K to near T /SUB c/

  9. Design of Tokamak plasma with high Tc superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchimoto, T.; Miya, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Yamada, T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a design of tokamak plasma in light of how the small ignited tokamak is possible with use of the HTSC coils as plasma stabilizer. The same data base and formulas as ITER are here used and any innovative technology other than the HTSC stabilizing coils is not assumed. (author)

  10. Cooling device of superconducting coils. Dispositif de refroidissement de bobinages supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duthil, R; Lottin, J C

    1985-08-30

    This device is rotating around an horizontal axis. The superconducting coils are contained in a cryogenic enclosure feeded in liquid helium forced circulation. They are related to an electric generator by electric mains each of them comprising a gas exchanger, and an exchanger-evaporator set between the cryogenic device and those exchangers. The exchanger-evaporator is aimed at dissipating the heat arriving by conductors connected to the superconducting coils. According to the invention, the invention includes an annular canalization with horizontal axis in which the connection conductors bathe in liquid helium.

  11. Application of superconducting coils to VAR control in electric power systems: a proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1979-11-01

    During the last eight years, static VAR-control systems with thyristor-controlled, room-temperature reactors have been used in electrical systems for voltage control and system stabilization. In this proposal, we describe a new static VAR-control system that uses an asymmetrically controlled Graetz bridge and a superconducting dc coil. Preliminary studies indicate that the proposed system will have lower overall losses and that its capital cost and electrical characteristics are comparable to those of a conventional system. Three- and four-year programs for developing the electronic circuitry and superconducting coils for VAR control, culminating in the installation and testing of an approx. 40-MVAR system, are proposed

  12. Static Measurements on HTS Coils of Fully Superconducting AC Electric Machines for Aircraft Electric Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Hunker, Keith R.; Hartwig, Jason; Brown, Gerald V.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing the high efficiency and high-power density superconducting (SC) electric machines in full support of electrified aircraft propulsion (EAP) systems for a future electric aircraft. A SC coil test rig has been designed and built to perform static and AC measurements on BSCCO, (RE)BCO, and YBCO high temperature superconducting (HTS) wire and coils at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In this paper, DC measurements on five SC coil configurations of various geometry in zero external magnetic field are measured to develop good measurement technique and to determine the critical current (Ic) and the sharpness (n value) of the super-to-normal transition. Also, standard procedures for coil design, fabrication, coil mounting, micro-volt measurement, cryogenic testing, current control, and data acquisition technique were established. Experimentally measured critical currents are compared with theoretical predicted values based on an electric-field criterion (Ec). Data here are essential to quantify the SC electric machine operation limits where the SC begins to exhibit non-zero resistance. All test data will be utilized to assess the feasibility of using HTS coils for the fully superconducting AC electric machine development for an aircraft electric propulsion system.

  13. Pulsed field losses and intentional quenches of superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Pulsed field losses of several 5-20 kJ coils have been measured under triangular field variations. The conductors, developed as potential subcables of 25-50 kA cables, consist of Cu wires and NbTi strands with or without CuNi barriers. Losses of soft-soldered subcables are compared with those of well-compacted cables. The coils were quenched intentionally by pulsing the coils above the critical current to observe loss variations due to possible conductor damage. The method of measurements, and effects of soldering and compactness of the conductors on the pulsed field losses will be presented

  14. Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo [ed.

    2005-07-01

    Research on superconductivity at ENEA is mainly devoted to projects related to the ITER magnet system. In this framework, ENEA has been strongly involved in the design, manufacturing and test campaigns of the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), which reached a world record in operating current (up to 80 kA). Further to this result, the activities in 2004 were devoted to optimising the ITER conductor performance. ENEA participated in the tasks launched by EFDA to define and produce industrial-scale advanced Nb3Sn strand to be used in manufacturing the ITER high-field central solenoid (CS) and toroidal field (TF) magnets. As well as contributing to the design of the new strand and the final conductor layout, ENEA will also perform characterisation tests, addressing in particular the influence of mechanical stress on the Nb3Sn performance. As a member of the international ITER-magnet testing group, ENEA plays a central role in the measurement campaigns and data analyses for each ITER-related conductor and coil. The next phase in the R and D of the ITER magnets will be their mechanical characterisation in order to define the fabrication route of the coils and structures. During 2004 the cryogenic measurement campaign on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by-pass diode stacks was completed. As the diode-test activity was the only LHC contract to be finished on schedule, the 'Centre Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire' (CERN) asked ENEA to participate in an international tender for the cold check of the current leads for the LHC magnets. The contract was obtained, and during 2004, the experimental setup was designed and realised and the data acquisition system was developed. The measurement campaign was successfully started at the end of 2004 and will be completed in 2006.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigation of mechanical disturbances in epoxy-impregnated superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasa, Y.; Bobrov, E.S.; Tsukamoto, O.; Takaghi, T.; Fujita, H.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical correlation between shear stress and epoxy resin fracture developed in an earlier paper was verified experimentally using a series of epoxy-impregnated, thin-walled superconducting test coils. In test coils with both ends rigidly clamped, cracks occurred as transport current was increased; during a training sequence the test was terminated by a premature quench. Using acoustic emission and voltage signals, each premature quench was linked directly to a crack occurring near one of the ends. Test coils which had both ends unsupported, giving the winding freedom to expand radially, did not experience epoxy fracture and showed no premature quenches. (author)

  16. Development of superconducting poloidal field coils for medium and large size tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, H.-G.; Forster, S.; Hofmann, A.

    1983-01-01

    Large long pulse tokamak fusion experiments require the use of superconducting poloidal field (PF) coils. In the past not much attention has been paid to the development of such coils. Therefore a development programme has been initiated recently at KfK. In this report start with summarizing the relevant PF coil parameters of some medium and large size tokamaks presently under construction or design, respectively. The most important areas of research and development work are deduced from these parameters. Design considerations and first experimental results concerning low loss conductors, cooling concepts and structural components are given

  17. Program NICOLET to integrate energy loss in superconducting coils. [In FORTRAN for CDC-6600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H.F.

    1978-08-01

    A voltage pickup coil, inductively coupled to the magnetic field of the superconducting coil under test, is connected so its output may be compared with the terminal voltage of the coil under test. The integrated voltage difference is indicative of the resistive volt-seconds. When multiplied with the main coil current, the volt-seconds yield the loss. In other words, a hysteresis loop is obtained if the integrated voltage difference phi = ..integral delta..Vdt is plotted as a function of the coil current, i. First, time functions of the two signals phi(t) and i(t) are recorded on a dual-trace digital oscilloscope, and these signals are then recorded on magnetic tape. On a CDC-6600, the recorded information is decoded and plotted, and the hysteresis loops are integrated by the set of FORTRAN programs NICOLET described in this report. 4 figures.

  18. 1-GWh diurnal load-leveling superconducting magnetic energy storage system reference design. Appendix A: energy storage coil and superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schermer, R.I.

    1979-09-01

    The technical aspects of a 1-GWh Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil for use as a diurnal load-leveling device in an electric utility system are presented. The superconductor for the coil is analyzed, and costs for the entire coil are developed

  19. Stability tests of the Westinghouse coil in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Fehling, D.T.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1987-09-01

    The Westinghouse coil is one of three forced-flow coils in the six-coil toroidal array of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is wound with an 18-kA, Nb 3 Sn/Cu, cable-in-conduit superconductor structurally supported by aluminum plates and cooled by 4-K, 15-atm supercritical helium. The coil is instrumented to permit measurement of helium temperature, pressure, and flow rate; structure temperature and strain; field; and normal zone voltage. A resistive heater has been installed to simulate nuclear heating, and inductive heaters have been installed to facilitate stability testing. The coil has been tested both individually and in the six-coil array. The tests covered charging to full design current and field, measuring the current-sharing threshold temperature using the resistive heaters, and measuring the stability margin using the pulsed inductive heaters. At least one section of the conductor exhibits a very broad resistive transition (resistive transition index = 4). The broad transition, though causing the appearance of voltage at relatively low temperatures, does not compromise the stability margin of the coil, which was greater than 1.1 J/cm 3 of strands. In another, nonresistive location, the stability margin was between 1.7 and 1.9 J/cm 3 of strands. The coil is completely stable in operation at 100% design current in both the single- and six-coil modes

  20. Results of the international Large Coil Task: a milestone for superconducting magnets in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Fietz, W.A.; Gauss, S.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the Large Coil Task (LCT) was to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting toroidal field coils and to prove the design principles and fabrication techniques to be applied for the magnets in a tokamak experimental power reactor. This has been achieved by an international development effort involving the US DOE, EURATOM, JAERI and the Swiss government. Six different D-shaped test coils were separately designed, developed and constructed by the LCT participants, then extensively tested together in a compact toroidal array. Detailed information on coil design and manufacture and all test data were shared among the LCT participants. The full six-coil array tests were carried out in a continuous period from the beginning of 1986 until September 1987. Beside the originally planned tests to reach an 8 T design point performance, the tests went well beyond this goal, reaching 9 T peak field in each coil. The experiments also delineated the limits of operability and demonstrated the coil safety under abnormal conditions. For fusion application the transient a.c. field behaviour in the coils was also of great interest. Three of the coils have been tested in this respect and showed excellent performance, with loss values in agreement with the theoretical predictions. (author)

  1. Estimate of thermoelastic heat production from superconducting composites in pulsed poloidal coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.K.; Gray, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    In the design of the cryogenic system and superconducting magnets for the poloidal field system in a tokamak, it is important to have an accurate estimate of the heat produced in superconducting magnets as a result of rapidly changing magnetic fields. A computer code, PLASS (Pulsed Losses in Axisymmetric Superconducting Solenoids), was written to estimate the contributions to the heat production from superconductor hysteresis losses, superconductor coupling losses, stabilizing material eddy current losses, and structural material eddy current losses. Recently, it has been shown that thermoelastic dissipation in superconducting composites can contribute as much to heat production as the other loss mechanisms mentioned above. A modification of PLASS which takes into consideration thermoelastic dissipation in superconducting composites is discussed. A comparison between superconductor thermoelastic dissipation and the other superconductor loss mechanisms is presented in terms of the poloidal coil system of the ORNL Experimental Power Reactor design

  2. Design and operation of a novel Faraday-magnetometer using superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koebler, U.; Deloie, F.

    1976-06-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the construction and operating procedures of a novel Faraday balance system which uses separate superconducting coils for field and field gradient. Special attention is given to all calibration problems, and hence to the limitations of accuracy with which magnetization measurements can be performed. (orig./WBU) [de

  3. Design of a low temperature superconducting coil to be applied to current regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Tabares, L.; Grau Carles, A

    1998-05-01

    We study the magnetic design and the cryogenic stability of a superconducting coil cooled with liquid helium, which works both in DC and AC modes. In DC mode, we obtain the maximum quench current; while in AC mode, we analyze Joule losses produced by the superconductor magnetization and the generation of eddy currents inside the copper matrix. (Author)

  4. Fabrication and testing of a superconducting coil: Phase 3 of the Maglev development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fife, A A; Lee, S; Tillotson, M [CTF Systems Inc., Port Coquitlam, BC (Canada)

    1989-03-01

    This report documents developmental research on superconducting magnet technology suitable for the levitation and propulsion units of the Canadian Maglev vehicle. The contract work involved the design, fabrication and testing of a racetrack coil fabricated using epoxy-impregnated windings of copper stabilized NbTi wire. The following results were achieved: successful fabrication and testing of a superconducting racetrack magnet with strength {gt} 400,000 A-turns integrated in a support frame; selection and characterization of cryogenic strain gauges; characterization of strain in solenoidal and racetrack superconducting magnets; design, fabrication and testing of high current persistent switches; and operation of superconducting magnets in persistent mode. The racetrack coil reached the design current after the third quench and short sample critical current after the eighth quench. This behavior is essentially identical to that observed with a superconducting solenoid fabricated during a previous phase. The strain measured perpendicular to the straight sides of the racetrack coil was proportional to the square of the energizing current. Persistent switches were fabricated, one type with low resistance (10{sup -2} ohm) and the other with high resistance (1.2 ohm) in their normal states. The low resistance switch could be operated in 1-Tesla fields with stabel characteristics up to about 800A drive current and the high resistance switch to 475A.

  5. Application of high-temperature superconducting coil for internal ring devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Yuichi [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)]. E-mail: ogawa@ppl.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Morikawa, Junji [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Mito, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yanagi, Nagato [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Iwakuma, Masataka [Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    A high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil is applied for plasma confinement devices, where plasma is confined with a magnetic field of a floating HTS coil. The internal coil device mini-RT with a BSCCO tape has been constructed, in which the coil major radius and magnetomotive force are 0.15 m and 50 kA, respectively. The coil is cooled to 20 K with a helium gas by using a demountable transfer tube and check valve system. The coil current is directly excited by the external power supply with demountable electrodes. To reduce the heat load, the electrodes were cooled with liquid nitrogen. The levitation experiment of the HTS coil has been carried out. The position of the HTS coil is measured by laser sensors, and is feedback-controlled with the levitation coil current. We have succeeded in levitating the HTS coil during 1 h with accuracy of less than 20 {mu}m. The magnetic field strength near the internal coil is around 0.1 T, and a radio-frequency wave of 2.45 GHz is applied for the plasma production. At the floating condition of the HTS coil, a high-density plasma with more than 10{sup 17} m{sup -3}, which is higher than the cut-off density of a 2.45 GHz microwave, has been produced. A new device RT-1 with a major radius of 0.25 m and a magnetomotive force of 250 kA is under construction, and a persistent current has been demonstrated. The feasibility on YBCO tape is briefly discussed.

  6. Current control system for superconducting coils of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikaraishi, H.; Yamada, S.; Inoue, T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper introduce a coil current control system of the LHD. The main part of this system consists of two VME based real time computers and a risc based work station which are connected by optical fiber link. In this computer system, a coil current controller for steady state operation of LHD which based on a state variable control theory is installed. Also advanced current control scheme, which are now developing for dynamic current control in phase II operation of LHD, are introduced. (author)

  7. Current high-temperature superconducting coils and applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, four projects for the application of Bi-based superconducting magnets to practical apparatus are currently underway. These projects involve the development of an insert magnet for a 1 GHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, a magnet for a silicon single-crystal pulling apparatus, a magnet for a magnetic separation system, and a 1 T pulse magnet for a superconducting magnet energy storage system. For example, the magnet for the silicon single-crystal pulling apparatus is of the class with stored energy of 1 MJ to be operated at around 20 K. This review focuses on the present status of the development of these magnets, followed by a discussion of the problems of the present superconducting tapes that need to be overcome for future applications. (author)

  8. Mechanical design features of the MSU K-800 cyclotron superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, D.; Blosser, H.G.; Moskalik, J.M.; Stork, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The winding of the K-800 cyclotron superconducting magnet coil was completed in late 1983. The windings consist of four separate coils (symmetrical large and small coils on each side of the median plane). The coils are wound in vertical layers in a spiral fashion. The large coils are 32 layers with 2329 total turns each (59,000 feet of wire) and the small coils are 32 layers with 1544 turns each (39,000 feet of wire). The spiral winding was achieved by supporting the first turn of a layer by a set of gradually increasing spacers with subsequent turns supported by previous turns. Winding was done on the 10 foot diameter table vertical lathe. The winding apparatus was mounted on the lathe's tool arm which had an automatic vertical feed to match the spiral path of the wire. The superconducting cable has a retangular cross section (with rounded corners) of dimentions .207 inches x .150 inches. Approximately 200 niobium titanium filaments are contained in a .04 inch x .06 inches copper insert that is soldered (50/50 lead tin) in a slot in the side of the copper conductor substrate

  9. Mechanical thermal and electric measurements on materials and components of the main coils of the Milan superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acerbi, E.; Rossi, L.

    1988-01-01

    The coils of the Milan Superconducting Cyclotron are the largest superconducting devices built up to now in Italy and constitute the first superconducting magnet for accelerator in Europe. Because of the large stored energy (more than 40 MJ), of the high stresses and of of the need of reliability, a lot of measurements were carried out as well on materials used for the coils, both on superconducting cable and structural materials, as on the main components of the coils and on two double pancakes prototypes (wound with full copper cable). In this paper the results on these measurements are reported and the results of tests on the prototypes are discussed. The aim is to provide an easy source of data for superconducting coils useful to verify calculations or to improve the performances

  10. Offset coil designs for superconducting magnets, a logical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, T.

    1986-03-01

    Dipoles and quadrupoles for any new, large proton ring must be stronger, smaller and have better field shape (systematic error) than those used in the Doubler. The present two-shell designs are rigid in that the coils are too thin but cannot be relatively fatter without destroying the field quality. An examination of the coil shapes for dipoles and quadrupoles which produce perfect fields from a uniform current density shows clearly that our persistent use of a circular form for the inner surface of the coils is a poor approximation. When this is corrected by ''offsets'' there is a striking improvement both in the strength of fields and in the field quality. The same analysis makes clear that the efficient use of superconductor and the overall magnet size is determined by the perfect coil shapes. Any reasonable magnet will not differ significantly from the ideal for these parameters. This will be particularly helpful in setting design goals for very large quadrupoles. The offset two-shell dipole design preserves the mechanical features of the highly successful, resilient doubler magnets while greatly extending the performance

  11. Thermal aspects of a superconducting coil for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1975-01-01

    Computer models are used to simulate both localized and extensive thermal excursions in a large superconducting magnet for fusion reactor. Conditions for the failure of fusion magnet due to thermal excursion are delineated. Designs to protect the magnet against such thermal excursion are evaluated

  12. Design of MgB2 Superconducting coils for the Ignitor Experiment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, G.; Penco, R.; Berta, S.; Coppi, B.; Giunchi, G.

    2009-11-01

    A feasibility study for the adoption of MgB2 superconducting cables for the largest (about 5 m in diameter) of the poloidal field coils of the Ignitor machine is being carried out. This initiative was prompted by the progress made in the fabrication of MgB2 long cables, and related superconducting magnets of relatively large dimensions. These magnets will be cryocooled at the operating temperature of 10-15 K that is compatible with the He-gas cryogenic cooling system of Ignitor as well as with the projected superconducting current density of the MgB2 material, at the magnetic field values (˜4-5 T) in which these coils are designed to operate. The optimal cable configuration has been identified that can provide an efficient cooling of the MgB2 conductors over times compatible with the machine duty cycles. MgB2 superconductors hold the promise of becoming suitable for high field magnets by appropriate doping of the material and of replacing gradually the normal conducting coils adopted, by necessity, in high field experiments. Therefore, an appropriate R&D program on the development of improved MgB2 material and related superconducting cabling options has been undertaken, involving different institutions.

  13. Serpentine Coil Topology for BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Brett

    2005-01-01

    BNL direct wind technology, with the conductor pattern laid out without need for extra tooling (no collars, coil presses etc.) began with RHIC corrector production. RHIC patterns were wound flat and then wrapped on cylindrical support tubes. Later for the HERA-II IR magnets we improved conductor placement precision by winding directly on a support tube. To meet HERA-II space and field quality goals took sophisticated coil patterns, (some wound on tapered tubes). We denote such patterns, topologically equivalent to RHIC flat windings, "planar patterns." Multi-layer planar patterns run into trouble because it is hard to wind across existing turns and magnet leads get trapped at poles. So we invented a new "Serpentine" winding style, which goes around 360 degrees while the conductor winds back and forth on the tube. To avoid making solenoidal fields, we wind Serpentine layers in opposite handed pairs. With a Serpentine pattern each turn can have the same projection on the coil axis and integral field harmonics t...

  14. 10-kA pulsed power supply for superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehsani, M.; Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A new 4-MW inductor-converter bridge (ICB) for supplying power to pulsed superconducting magnets is under construction at Argonne National Laoratory. This is a second-generation ICB built at Argonne Lab. The analytical, design, and control techniques developed for the first prototype have been used in the design of the new system. The paper presents the important considerations in the design of the new ICB. A brief description of the operation of the circuit is also given

  15. Cryogenics - Its influence on the selection of the ASTROMAG superconducting magnet coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    ASTROMAG, a particle astrophysics experimental facility proposed for running alongside a Space Station, has a large superconducting magnet to analyze particles coming from deep space. Several types of magnets were investigated for use in the ASTROMAG central facility. The factors which influence the selection of the magnet coil design include: (1) the upper limit of particle momentum resolved (proportional to the integrated field) as a function of solid angle; (2)cryogenic design and its effect on cryogen lifetime for a given central facility mass; and (3) the overall cost of the magnet coils and cryostat. Four magnet types are analyzed in this paper. These include a simple two-coil solenoid (the baseline design),two disk coils at the ends of the helium tank, a two-coil toroid and a thin solenoid plus bucking coil. A balance must be struck between cryostat lifetime, total mass and the integrated field through the detectors. This balance tends to favor coils which are in the same vacuum vessel as the cryogen.

  16. Theoretical and experimental study on the magnetomechanical behavior of superconducting helical coils for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaghi, T.; Miya, K.; Yamada, H.; Takagi, T.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetomechanical behavior of superconducting helical coils for a magnetic fusion reactor was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Deformations of straight and torus type helical coils were caused due to static electromagnetic forces in the liquid helium cryostat and were analysed with the finite element computer code made here. Despite of a large scatter of experimental data due to a non-uniform friction force between the helical coil and the torus of stainless steel, the numerical results are very close to the mean value of the data. Numerical analysis of the force distribution acting on the helical coils was also performed for a Heliotron's coil system to characterize its nature. The force could be categorized conveniently as an extensional force, a tangential force and a toroidal force which correspond respectively to the kind of forces acting on toroidal field coils. Additionally, the effect of mechanical constraint on the magnetomechanical behavior is discussed and shows that the location of the constraint significantly affects the stress distributions in the coils. (orig.)

  17. Thermal anchoring of wires in large scale superconducting coil test experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Dipak; Sharma, A.N.; Prasad, Upendra; Khristi, Yohan; Varmora, Pankaj; Doshi, Kalpesh; Pradhan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We addressed how thermal anchoring in large scale coil test is different compare to small cryogenic apparatus? • We did precise estimation of thermal anchoring length at 77 K and 4.2 K heat sink in large scale superconducting coil test experiment. • We addressed, the quality of anchoring without covering entire wires using Kapton/Teflon tape. • We obtained excellent results in temperature measurement without using GE Varnish by doubling estimated anchoring length. -- Abstract: Effective and precise thermal anchoring of wires in cryogenic experiment is mandatory to measure temperature in milikelvin accuracy and to avoid unnecessary cooling power due to additional heat conduction from room temperature (RT) to operating temperature (OT) through potential, field, displacement and stress measurement instrumentation wires. Instrumentation wires used in large scale superconducting coil test experiments are different compare to cryogenic apparatus in terms of unique construction and overall diameter/area due to errorless measurement in large time-varying magnetic field compare to small cryogenic apparatus, often shielded wires are used. Hence, along with other variables, anchoring techniques and required thermal anchoring length are entirely different in this experiment compare to cryogenic apparatus. In present paper, estimation of thermal anchoring length of five different types of instrumentation wires used in coils test campaign at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India has been discussed and some temperature measurement results of coils test campaign have been presented

  18. A 12 coil superconducting bumpy torus magnet facility for plasma research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    A summary is presented of the performance of the two-coil superconducting pilot rig which preceded the NASA Lewis bumpy torus. This pilot rig was operated for 550 experimental runs over a period of 7 years. The NASA Lewis bumpy torus facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each with a 19 cm in diameter and capable of producing magnetic field strengths of 3.0 teslas on their axes. The magnets are equally spaced around a major circumference 1.52 m in diameter, and are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.59 m in diameter. The design value of maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis (3.0 teslas) was reached and exceeded. A maximum magnetic field of 3.23 teslas was held for a period of 60 minutes, and the coils did not go to normal. When the coils were charged to a maximum magnetic field of 3.35 teslas, the coil system was driven normal without damage to the facility.

  19. Evolution and results of LCT, international collaboration of superconducting coil development for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Susumu

    1987-01-01

    This international collaboration has been promoted centering around the International Energy Agency since ten years ago. This work is that of advancing joint experiments on the equal footing by several countries gathering with large hardwares. As the result, unlike the international collaboration carried out so far, much experiences have been brought in. Now this work is going to be successfully completed. At this time, the realities of the international collaboration experienced through this work are reported while referring to a part of the technical results. Superconductors were found at the end of 1950s, and the technical development of superconducting coils has been advanced mainly for the equipment of high energy physics in foreign countries, while in Japan, for MHD electricity generation and magnetic levitation train. The TFTR (USA), JET (Euratom) and JT-60 (Japan) aiming at the attainment of critical plasma use normal conduction coils, but the agreement on the LCT project was signed in the autumn of 1977, which aims at the development of the superconducting coils for fusion experimental reactors. The development of coil manufacture in respective countries and the experiments in Japan and Euratom, some episode in the negotiation, the experiment on six coils and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Protection for low current superconducting coils wound with insulated strand cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, J.

    1980-09-01

    The insulated strand cable concept for winding of low current superconducting coil leads to an ideal quench protection by induction coupling. A superconducting secondary loop was made within a cable of a 6.2 Henry dipole coil. When quenching occurred, current was induced in the secondary strand above the critical value. The normal strand quenched the whole cable due to good thermal contact. The secondary loop works as a heater turned on as the wire becomes normal throughout the coil. With a well spread quench, the energy dissipation density is decreased thus preventing local burnout. The mechanism is possible because of close coupling that is present in the insulated cable as in bifilar winding. For the coil tested a 12 strand cable was used, thus a favorable 11 to 1 turn ratio was obtained for the primary to secondary. The superconductor in the secondary had a lower resistance until the critical current was achieved. A theoretical explanation is described for a simplified circuit. Test on the dipole coil with four individual shells showed that the one shell protected with the induced coupling heater always had a more rapid reduction of current. The induced coupling heater tested and explained in this paper works automatically and does not rely on mechanical or electrical devices

  1. 3D-computation of a thermal process in a superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1995-01-01

    This study deals with the resistive zone propagation in a superconducting coil during a quench, taking into account both the flux density distribution and the anisotropy of the thermal parameters. A Finite Difference Method is used to solve the heat diffusion equation and the flux density is calculated by means of a semi-analytical method. The 3-D model is suitable to describe the quench of thick coils and it can be applied to the study of thermal stability. As an application, a 10 kJ-solenoid is studied

  2. Design and fabrication of forced-flow superconducting poloidal coils for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Mizumaki, S.; Yamakoshi, T.; Kanai, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Wachi, Y.; Ushijima, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kai, T.; Takahata, K.; Yamamoto, J.; Satow, T.; Motojima, O.

    1995-01-01

    Three pairs of superconducting poloidal coils for the LHD (Large Helical Device) have been designed and fabricated using NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductors cooled with forced-flow supercritical helium (SHE). In the LHD poloidal coils, high field accuracy as well as high reliability are required. To meet these requirements, detailed field and structural analyses have been performed and key parameters including winding pattern and size and locations of conductor joints have been determined. Compact conductor joint, where NbTi filaments are directly bonded, has also been developed using the solid state bonding technique. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic levitation using high temperature superconducting pancake coils as composite bulk cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, A; Hopkins, S C; Baskys, A; Glowacki, B A; Kalitka, V; Molodyk, A

    2015-01-01

    Stacks of superconducting tape can be used as composite bulk superconductors for both trapped field magnets and for magnetic levitation. Little previous work has been done on quantifying the levitation force behavior between stacks of tape and permanent magnets. This paper reports the axial levitation force properties of superconducting tape wound into pancake coils to act as a composite bulk cylinder, showing that similar stable forces to those expected from a uniform bulk cylinder are possible. Force creep was also measured and simulated for the system. The geometry tested is a possible candidate for a rotary superconducting bearing. Detailed finite element modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics was also performed including a full critical state model for induced currents, with temperature and field dependent properties and 3D levitation force models. This work represents one of the most complete levitation force modeling frameworks yet reported using the H-formulation and helps explain why the coil-like stacks of tape are able to sustain levitation forces. The flexibility of geometry and consistency of superconducting properties offered by stacks of tapes, make them attractive for superconducting levitation applications. (paper)

  4. Analysis of an HTS coil for large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Se Yeon; Choi, Kyeong Dal; Park, Sang Ho; Hong, Gye Won; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Woo Seok [Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Kwang [Woosuk University, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    It has been well known that a toroid is the inevitable shape for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil as a component of a large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) because it is the best option to minimize a magnetic field intensity applied perpendicularly to the HTS wires. Even though a perfect toroid coil does not have a perpendicular magnetic field, for a practical toroid coil composed of many HTS pancake coils, some type of perpendicular magnetic field cannot be avoided, which is a major cause of degradation of the HTS wires. In order to suggest an optimum design solution for an HTS SMES system, we need an accurate, fast, and effective calculation for the magnetic field, mechanical stresses, and stored energy. As a calculation method for these criteria, a numerical calculation such as an finite element method (FEM) has usually been adopted. However, a 3-dimensional FEM can involve complicated calculation and can be relatively time consuming, which leads to very inefficient iterations for an optimal design process. In this paper, we suggested an intuitive and effective way to determine the maximum magnetic field intensity in the HTS coil by using an analytic and statistical calculation method. We were able to achieve a remarkable reduction of the calculation time by using this method. The calculation results using this method for sample model coils were compared with those obtained by conventional numerical method to verify the accuracy and availability of this proposed method. After the successful substitution of this calculation method for the proposed design program, a similar method of determining the maximum mechanical stress in the HTS coil will also be studied as a future work.

  5. Analysis of an HTS coil for large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Se Yeon; Choi, Kyeong Dal; Park, Sang Ho; Hong, Gye Won; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Woo Seok; Lee, Ji Kwang

    2015-01-01

    It has been well known that a toroid is the inevitable shape for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil as a component of a large scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) because it is the best option to minimize a magnetic field intensity applied perpendicularly to the HTS wires. Even though a perfect toroid coil does not have a perpendicular magnetic field, for a practical toroid coil composed of many HTS pancake coils, some type of perpendicular magnetic field cannot be avoided, which is a major cause of degradation of the HTS wires. In order to suggest an optimum design solution for an HTS SMES system, we need an accurate, fast, and effective calculation for the magnetic field, mechanical stresses, and stored energy. As a calculation method for these criteria, a numerical calculation such as an finite element method (FEM) has usually been adopted. However, a 3-dimensional FEM can involve complicated calculation and can be relatively time consuming, which leads to very inefficient iterations for an optimal design process. In this paper, we suggested an intuitive and effective way to determine the maximum magnetic field intensity in the HTS coil by using an analytic and statistical calculation method. We were able to achieve a remarkable reduction of the calculation time by using this method. The calculation results using this method for sample model coils were compared with those obtained by conventional numerical method to verify the accuracy and availability of this proposed method. After the successful substitution of this calculation method for the proposed design program, a similar method of determining the maximum mechanical stress in the HTS coil will also be studied as a future work

  6. Superconductive coil characterization for next dipoles and quadrupoles generation

    CERN Document Server

    Khalil, Malathe

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is the most sophisticated scientific machine ever built as a device that allows the scientists to explore the universe and its origin. Scientists from all over the world are working to upgrade the LHC to open the door for new physics. HL-LHC (high luminosity LHC) project is the core project at CERN which was approved in 2013 by CERN’s council. In order to increase the integrated luminosity up to 3000 fb-1 within this decade. To do so it is crucial to design cutting edge superconducting magnets that can elevate the magnetic field up to 20T, which is Nb$_{3}$Sn. However this material is brittle when it functions as superconductor, which makes it hard to be used as a cold magnet. So in this report the fabrication of 10 stacks of Nb$_{3}$Sn superconducting multifilament wires was investigated as well as primary test using experimental setup and creating material model for Nb$_{3}$Sn with the finite element analysis [ANSYS] is carried out.

  7. Influence of dump voltage and allowable temperature rise on stabilizer requirements in superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenterly, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    A superconducting winding must have enough stabilizer to satisfy two sets of criteria. During normal operation, the amount of stabilizer must be large enough either to make the coil unconditionally stable or to give a certain desired stability margin. Once a dump occurs, the amount of stabilizer must be large enough to carry the current without generating excessive dump voltages or allowing the winding to exceed a certain maximum temperature (and maximum pressure, in the case of force-cooled coils). The voltage criterion often dominates for very large coil systems, but it is frequently ignored in initial design studies. This paper gives some simple relations between the dump voltage and the stored energy, temperature rise, and coil geometry that are useful in scooping the required amount of stabilizer. Comparison with some recently proposed fusion magnet system designs indicates that excessive dump voltages could result in some cases. High-temperature superconductors may require more stabilizer than the conventional alloys. Calculations with simple model coil systems indicate how trade-offs between various coil parameters affect the dump voltage. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Analysis of transmission efficiency of the superconducting resonance coil according the materials of cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu Kyeong; Hwang, Jun Won; Choi, Hyo Sang [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The wireless power transfer (WPT) system using a magnetic resonance was based on magnetic resonance coupling of the transmission and the receiver coils. In these system, it is important to maintain a high quality-factor (Q-factor) to increase the transmission efficiency of WPT system. Our research team used a superconducting coil to increase the Q-factor of the magnetic resonance coil in WPT system. When the superconductor is applied in these system, we confirmed that transmission efficiency of WPT system was higher than normal conductor coil through a preceding study. The efficiency of the transmission and the receiver coil is affected by the magnetic shielding effect of materials around the coils. The magnetic shielding effect is dependent on the type, thickness, frequency, distance, shape of materials. Therefore, it is necessary to study the WPT system on the basis of these conditions. In this paper, the magnetic shield properties of the cooling system were analyzed using the High-Frequency Structure Simulation (HFSS, Ansys) program. We have used the shielding materials such as plastic, aluminum and iron, etc. As a result, when we applied the fiber reinforced polymer (FRP), the transmission efficiency of WPT was not affected because electromagnetic waves went through the FRP. On the other hand, in case of a iron and aluminum, transmission efficiency was decreased because of their electromagnetic shielding effect. Based on these results, the research to improve the transmission efficiency and reliability of WPT system is continuously necessary.

  9. Conceptual designs of 50 kA 20 MJ superconducting ohmic heating coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Murphy, J.H.; Janocko, M.A.; Haller, H.E.; Litz, D.C.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.; Thullen, P.

    1979-01-01

    Two designs of 20 Mj superconducting coils are described which were developed to demonstrate the feasibility of an ohmic heating system. NbTi and Nb;sub 3;Sn superconductors were considered for both 7 tesla and 9 tesla maximum fields. Cabled and braided conductors were investigated and the braided conductor is identified as the best alternative due to its high operating current densities and because of its porosity. The coils are designed to be cryostable for bipolar operation from +7 tesla to -7 tesla and from +9 tesla to -9 tesla maximum fields within 1 sec. The structural design addresses the distribution of structure and structural materials used in the pulsed field environment. Immersion cooled (pool boil) and forced flow cooled coils are described. 2 refs

  10. Alternative power supply and dump resistor connections for similar, mutually coupled, superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Alternative methods of connecting similar mutually coupled coils to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for both operating and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the currents induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, combined resistors and series and parallel dump resistors. A new circuit that contains ''coupling'' resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed. The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are used as an example

  11. Alternative power supply and dump resistor connections for similar, mutally coupled, superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Alternative methods of connecting similar mutually coupled coils to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for both operating and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the currents induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, combined resistors and series and parallel dump resistors. A new circuit that contains coupling resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed. The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are used as an example

  12. Coil protection for a utility scale superconducting magnetic energy storage plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyd, R.J.; Schoenung, S.M.; Rogers, J.D.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Purcell, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is proposed for electric utility load leveling. Attractive costs, high diurnal energy efficiency (≥ 92%), and rapid response are advantages relative to other energy storage technologies. Recent industry-led efforts have produced a conceptual design for a 5000 MWh/1000 MW energy storage plant which is technically feasible at commercially attractive estimated costs. The SMES plant design includes a protection system which prevents damage to the magnetic coil if events require a rapid discharge of stored energy. This paper describes the design and operation of the coil protection system, which is primarily passive and uses the thermal capacity of the coil itself to absorb the stored electromagnetic energy

  13. A 25 kA, 2T, 78 kJ, 52 litre superconducting test coil. Strength calculations and construction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Holtslag, A.H.M.; Knoben, J.; Steffens, H.A.; van de Klundert, L.J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Within the scope of our research program for a 25 kA superconducting rectifier, we have built a 25 kA s.c. coil being a single layer solenoid with a bore of 0.45 meter and a volume of 52 litre. The starting point for the design was to avoid any metallic structural material. This unique coil consists

  14. Analysis of the electrodynamics of subcable current distribution in the superconducting POLO coil cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihler, C.; Heller, R.; Maurer, W.; Ulbricht, A.; Wuechner, F.

    1995-10-01

    Unexpected ramp rate limitations (RRL) found in superconducting magnets during the development of magnet systems can be attributed to a current imbalance amongst the cabled strands which leads to a lower than expected quench current. In superconducting magnets the current distribution in the cable during ramping depends mainly on the electromagnetic properties of the system. A detailed analysis of principle causes for RRL phenomena was performed with a model for one half of the POLO coil considering the complete inductance matrix of the cable and the fact that all turns are mutually coupled. The main results of these calculations are that unequal contact resistances can not be responsible for RRL phenomena in coils with parameters comparable to those of the POLO coil and that already minor geometrical disturbances in the cable structure can lead to major and lasting imbalances in the current distribution of cables with insulated and non-insulated strands. During the POLO experiment the half-coil model was employed to get a better understanding of the measured compensated subcable voltages during quench. The good agreement of the calculated and measured results demonstrates the validity of the model for RRL analyses. (orig.)

  15. Experiment study on an inductive superconducting fault current limiter using no-insulation coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, D.; Li, Z. Y.; Gu, F.; Huang, Z.; Zhao, A.; Hu, D.; Wei, B. G.; Huang, H.; Hong, Z.; Ryu, K.; Jin, Z.

    2018-03-01

    No-insulation (NI) coil made of 2 G high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes has been widely used in DC magnet due to its excellent performance of engineering current density, thermal stability and mechanical strength. However, there are few AC power device using NI coil at present. In this paper, the NI coil is firstly applied into inductive superconducting fault current limiter (iSFCL). A two-winding structure air-core iSFCL prototype was fabricated, composed of a primary copper winding and a secondary no-insulation winding using 2 G HTS coated conductors. Firstly, in order to testify the feasibility to use NI coil as the secondary winding, the impedance variation of the prototype at different currents and different cycles was tested. The result shows that the impedance increases rapidly with the current rises. Then the iSFCL prototype was tested in a 40 V rms/ 3.3 kA peak short circuit experiment platform, both of the fault current limiting and recovery property of the iSFCL are discussed.

  16. Requirements for accuracy of superconducting coils in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K; Yanagi, N; Ji, H; Kaneko, H; Ohyabu, N; Satow, T; Morimoto, S; Yamamoto, J; Motojima, O [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Chikusa, Nagoya (Japan); LHD Design Group

    1993-01-01

    Irregular magnetic fields resonate with the rational surface of the magnetic confinement systems, form magnetic islands and ergodic layers, and destruct the plasma confinement. To avoid this confinement destruction the requirement of an accuracy of 10[sup -4] in the magnetic field is adopted as the magnetic-accuracy design criterion for the LHD machine. Following this criterion the width of the undesirable magnetic island is kept less than one tenth of the plasma radius. The irregular magnetic field from the superconducting (SC) helical and poloidal coils is produced by winding irregularity, installing irregularity, cooling-down deformations and electromagnetic deformations. The local irregularities such as feeders, layer connections, adjacent-conductor connections of the coils also produce an error field. The eddy currents on the supporting shell structure of SC coils, the cryostat, etc. are also evaluated. All irregular effects are analyzed using Fourier decomposition and field mapping methods for the LHD design, and it is confirmed that the present design of the superconducting coil system satisfies the design criterion for these field irregularities. (orig.).

  17. Pool-cooled superconducting coils: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Dawson, A.M.

    1985-08-01

    An overview of large magnet systems which have been studied, constructed, or operated in the last 12 years is presented and shows a substantial advance in overall current density, stored energy, and magnet complexity. The preferable coolant mode for very large magnets is still a bath of helium I, but it is clear that other coolant modes are gaining acceptance. The data base for design using stability criteria dependent on transients has expanded to the point where the risk is often acceptable, compared to the lower current density, low risk, steady state stability criteria which launched large superconducting magnet technology. The limitation imposed by structure and protection on increasing overall current density in large magnets is discussed and a simple model is used to illustrate the extreme requirements imposed on a winding without direct helium contact. The latter implies that a significant technological step is required before conduction cooling or indirect cooling will be used in the large magnets envisioned for the future and that helium contact with the conductor will remain the key ingredient for risk reduction in large magnet design

  18. Investigation of transient electrical, magnetic, and mechanical phenomena in large superconducting magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihler, C.

    1996-07-01

    The progress in the field of technology for superconducting magnets led to the necessity of transferring existing calculation methods from electrical power engineering, modifying these tools to satisfy the boundary conditions for superconducting magnets, and also developing new calculation methods for special purposes. In this work suitable calculation methods are elaborated. Their validity and applicability is demonstrated in employing these scientific engineering tools to actual developments of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. In detail this work deals with: 1. calculating eddy current and force densities in the conducting environment of a superconducting magnet or magnet system. 2. the effects of eddy current forces in experimental engineering; 3. transient effects of electrical surges acting on new coil designs; and 4. the electrical and magnetic properties of superconducting cables. Especially, the magnetic properties can lead to an inhomogeneous current distribution in the cable and, thus, to a considerable reduction of the current carrying capacity of the whole magnet. These investigations demonstrate that a detailed analysis of electrodynamic phenomena is indispensable in order to find the optimum technical way to make use of the physical potential of superconductivity. (orig./MM) [de

  19. Model of vortex dynamics in superconducting films in two-coil measurements of the coherence length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Thomas; Loh, Yen Lee

    In two-coil measurements on superconducting films, a magnetic field from a small coil is applied to the center of the film. When the amplitude of the ac field is increased, the film undergoes a transition from the ``Meissner'' state to a state with vortices and antivortices. Ultimately, the vortex density matches the applied magnetic field and field screening is negligible. Experimentally, the field at the transition is related to the superconducting coherence length, although a full theory of the relationship is lacking. We show that the mutual inductance between drive and pickup coils, on opposite sides of the film, as a function of ac field amplitude is well-described by a phenomenological model in which vortices and antivortices appear together in the film at the radius where the induced supercurrent is strongest, and then they move through a landscape of moderately strong vortex pinning sites. Work at OSU supported by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences through Grant No. FG02-08ER46533.

  20. Characteristics of persistent-current mode of HTS coil on superconducting electromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.Y.; Kim, J.; Han, Y.J.; Kang, B.; Chung, Y.D.; Yoon, Y.S.; Chu, S.Y.; Hwang, Y.J.; Jo, H.C.; Jang, J.Y.; Ko, T.K.

    2011-01-01

    The levitation gap of an electromagnetic suspension (EMS) system affects the current decay rate of superconducting electromagnet. The presence of iron core provides a significant benefit in the PCM performance of SC coil. The increased levitation gap of the EMS model with the SC-EM could negatively affect the design of SC-EM operated in PCM. This paper investigates the way in which the levitation gap of an electromagnetic suspension (EMS) system affects the current decay rate of superconducting electromagnet (SC-EM) operated in persistence-current mode (PCM). Using inductance analyzed from the magnetic circuit of an EMS model, the current decay rate caused by the variation in the levitation gap was simulated. In order to experimentally verify the simulation results, we fabricated a small-scale EMS model with SC coil operated in PCM and measured the current decay rates at different levitation gaps. The result showed that the presence of iron core provides a significant benefit in the PCM performance of SC coil, but the benefit decreased as the levitation gap increases. This study revealed that the increased levitation gap of the EMS model with the SC-EM could negatively affect the design of SC-EM operated in PCM.

  1. A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, W.J.; Fang, X.Y.; Fang, J.; Wei, B.; Hou, J.Z.; Liu, L.F.; Lu, K.K.; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a novel quench detection method mainly based on phase for HTS coil. • We showed theory model and numerical simulation system by LabVIEW. • Experiment results are showed and analyzed. • Little quench voltage will cause obvious change on phase. • The approach can accurately detect quench resistance voltage in real-time. - Abstract: A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is proposed, which is mainly based on phase angle between voltage and current of two coils to detect the quench resistance voltage. The approach is analyzed theoretically, verified experimentally and analytically by MATLAB Simulink and LabVIEW. An analog quench circuit is built on Simulink and a quench alarm system program is written in LabVIEW. Experiment of quench detection is further conducted. The sinusoidal AC currents ranging from 19.9 A to 96 A are transported to the HTS coils, whose critical current is 90 A at 77 K. The results of analog simulation and experiment are analyzed and they show good consistency. It is shown that with the increase of current, the phase undergoes apparent growth, and it is up to 60° and 15° when the current reaches critical value experimentally and analytically, respectively. It is concluded that the approach proposed in this paper can meet the need of precision and quench resistance voltage can be detected in time.

  2. A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, W.J., E-mail: songwenjuan@bjtu.edu.cn [School of Electrical Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China); China Electric Power Research Institute, Beijing (China); Fang, X.Y. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, PO Box 1700, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Fang, J., E-mail: fangseer@sina.com [School of Electrical Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China); Wei, B.; Hou, J.Z. [China Electric Power Research Institute, Beijing (China); Liu, L.F. [Guangzhou Metro Design & Research Institute Co., Ltd, Guangdong (China); Lu, K.K. [School of Electrical Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China); Li, Shuo [College of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We proposed a novel quench detection method mainly based on phase for HTS coil. • We showed theory model and numerical simulation system by LabVIEW. • Experiment results are showed and analyzed. • Little quench voltage will cause obvious change on phase. • The approach can accurately detect quench resistance voltage in real-time. - Abstract: A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is proposed, which is mainly based on phase angle between voltage and current of two coils to detect the quench resistance voltage. The approach is analyzed theoretically, verified experimentally and analytically by MATLAB Simulink and LabVIEW. An analog quench circuit is built on Simulink and a quench alarm system program is written in LabVIEW. Experiment of quench detection is further conducted. The sinusoidal AC currents ranging from 19.9 A to 96 A are transported to the HTS coils, whose critical current is 90 A at 77 K. The results of analog simulation and experiment are analyzed and they show good consistency. It is shown that with the increase of current, the phase undergoes apparent growth, and it is up to 60° and 15° when the current reaches critical value experimentally and analytically, respectively. It is concluded that the approach proposed in this paper can meet the need of precision and quench resistance voltage can be detected in time.

  3. Cool-down performance of CICC superconducting coils for the CHMFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Li, J.; Ouyang, Z. R.

    2017-10-01

    A hybrid magnet composed of a water-cooled magnet and a superconducting magnet was developed at the High Magnetic Field Laboratory of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The superconducting coils made of Nb3Sn CICC were cooled by the forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.5 K. The paper presents the cryogenic system framework, and reports the characteristics of the supercritical helium in a cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC), including the friction factor change during the cooling process, the heat transfer coefficient from 4.6 K to 6.8 K, and the helium mass flow rate distribution. After the 23-day cooling process, the temperature reached 4.5 K. The operation process was introduced in the paper.

  4. Quench protection system for 1 MJ superconducting magnet coil for SMES Project at VECC, Kolkata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, S.K.; Bera, A.; Kumar, Y.; Bhunia, U.; Pradhan, J.; Saha, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the indigenous development of a system which is used for quench detection, protection and monitoring the parameters of superconducting coil of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system. Resistive voltage measurement method is used for detecting the quench. The voltage across each current lead is also monitored and over voltage across the current lead is detected by comparing it with a set voltage limit. By using isolation amplifier and timer circuit, false quench trigging due to noise and spikes are minimized. If quench is detected a relay operated to turn-off the SMES power supply followed by the release of stored energy of the magnet to the external dump resistance by closing a switch. (author)

  5. An optimization of robust SMES with specified structure H∞ controller for power system stabilization considering superconducting magnetic coil size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngamroo, Issarachai

    2011-01-01

    Even the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is the smart stabilizing device in electric power systems, the installation cost of SMES is very high. Especially, the superconducting magnetic coil size which is the critical part of SMES, must be well designed. On the contrary, various system operating conditions result in system uncertainties. The power controller of SMES designed without taking such uncertainties into account, may fail to stabilize the system. By considering both coil size and system uncertainties, this paper copes with the optimization of robust SMES controller. No need of exact mathematic equations, the normalized coprime factorization is applied to model system uncertainties. Based on the normalized integral square error index of inter-area rotor angle difference and specified structured H ∞ loop shaping optimization, the robust SMES controller with the smallest coil size, can be achieved by the genetic algorithm. The robustness of the proposed SMES with the smallest coil size can be confirmed by simulation study.

  6. About the Toroidal Magnetic Field of a Tokamak Burning Plasma Experiment with Superconducting Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucato, E.

    2002-01-01

    In tokamaks, the strong dependence on the toroidal magnetic field of both plasma pressure and energy confinement is what makes possible the construction of small and relatively inexpensive burning plasma experiments using high-field resistive coils. On the other hand, the toroidal magnetic field of tokamaks using superconducting coils is limited by the critical field of superconductivity. In this article, we examine the relative merit of raising the magnetic field of a tokamak plasma by increasing its aspect ratio at a constant value of the peak field in the toroidal magnet. Taking ITER-FEAT as an example, we find that it is possible to reach thermonuclear ignition using an aspect ratio of approximately 4.5 and a toroidal magnetic field of 7.3 T. Under these conditions, fusion power density and neutron wall loading are the same as in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor], but the normalized plasma beta is substantially smaller. Furthermore, such a tokamak would be able to reach an energy gain of approximately 15 even with the deterioration in plasma confinement that is known to occur near the density limit where ITER is forced to operate

  7. A quantitative investigation of the effect of a close-fitting superconducting shield on the coil factor of a solenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Morten; Monaco, R.; Koshelet, V.

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting shields are commonly used to suppress external magnetic interference. We show, that an error of almost an order of magnitude can occur in the coil factor in realistic configurations of the solenoid and the shield. The reason is that the coil factor is determined by not only...... the geometry of the solenoid, but also the nearby magnetic environment. This has important consequences for many cryogenic experiments involving magnetic fields such as the determination of the parameters of Josephson junctions, as well as other superconducting devices. It is proposed to solve the problem...

  8. Analysis of magnetic energy stored in superconducting coils with and without ferromagnetic inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Y.S.

    1993-01-01

    Inductance and energy of superconducting coils are calculated by (1) a long-solenoid approximation, (2) a finite-element model, and (3) working formulas and tables. The results of the finite-element model compare favorably with those of the working formulas. The long-solenoid approximation overpredicts the energy and inductance compared to the other two methods. The difference decreases with increasing length-to-diameter ratio. Energy stored in a coil with a ferromagnetic insert is calculated by using a long-solenoid approximation and a finite-element model. The analysis shows that the gain in energy ratio is equal to the relative permeability of the insert (which decreases with increasing current or current density). Even though large gains can be achieved at relatively low currents, the energy level itself is too low. The stored energy increases with current, but the gain decreases with increasing current because relative permeability decreases. If a coil with a diameter of 0.3 m and a length of 0.3 m is required to store 10 kJ of energy, the current density must equal 4000 A/cm 2 . The gain in energy ratio is equal to 2.55 when the insert is used

  9. Superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1980-01-01

    Fusion reactors will soon be employing superconducting magnets to confine plasma in which deuterium and tritium (D-T) are fused to produce usable energy. At present there is one small confinement experiment with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils: Tokamak 7 (T-7), in the USSR, which operates at 4 T. By 1983, six different 2.5 x 3.5-m D-shaped coils from six manufacturers in four countries will be assembled in a toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing at fields up to 8 T. Soon afterwards ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-P) will begin operation at Oak Ridge with superconducting TF coils. At the same time there will be tokamaks with superconducting TF coils 2 to 3 m in diameter in the USSR and France. Toroidal field strength in these machines will range from 6 to 9 T. NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, bath cooling and forced flow, cryostable and metastable - various designs are being tried in this period when this new application of superconductivity is growing and maturing

  10. Large superconducting detector magnets with ultra thin coils for use in high energy accelerators and storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1977-08-01

    The development of a new class of large superconducting solenoid magnets is described. High energy physics on colliding beam machines sometimes require the use of thin coil solenoid magnets. The development of these magnets has proceeded with the substitution of light materials for heavy materials and by increasing the current density in the coils. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has developed a radical approach to the problem by having the coil operate at very high current densities. This approach and its implications are described in detail

  11. Conceptual design of superconducting magnet systems for the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Turner, L.R.; Mills, F.E.; DeMichele, D.W.; Smelser, P.; Kim, S.H.

    1976-01-01

    As an integral effort in the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor Conceptual Design, the conceptual design of a 10-tesla, pure-tension superconducting toroidal-field (TF) coil system has been developed in sufficient detail to define a realistic design for the TF coil system that could be built based upon the current state of technology with minimum technological extrapolations. A conceptual design study on the superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coils and the superconducting equilibrium-field (EF) coils were also completed. These conceptual designs are developed in sufficient detail with clear information on high current ac conductor design, cooling, venting provision, coil structural support and zero loss poloidal coil cryostat design. Also investigated is the EF penetration into the blanket and shield

  12. Introduction of fuzzy logic theorem for quench detection in the superconducting coil system of a Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Yamato; Ninomiya, Akira; Uriu, Yoshihisa; Ishigohka, Takeshi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Imagawa, Shinsaku; Yanagi, Nagato; Sekiguchi, Haruo; Yamada, Shuichi

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed the state of the superconducting coil system in a LHD at NIFS (National Institute of Fusion Science) using a fuzzy logic theorem to detect quenching at an early stage. In this method, the 'warning coefficient' of the coil system is calculated. As for the fuzzy variables, 'effective stored heat' in the coil is introduced in addition to the voltage signal in order to improve quench detection and state estimation. The 'effective stored heat' is an integrated value of the heat generated in the coil on the assumption that instantaneous heat in the conductor is continuously cooled by liquid helium. Experiments conducted using the LHD coils confirmed that quench alarm signals can be issued with sufficient lead time before quenching. On the other hand, in the case of small local disturbances, the system shows only a small increase in the caution level. (author)

  13. Large coil test facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.; Mann, T.L.

    1978-02-01

    In the development of a superconducting toroidal field (TF) magnet for The Next Step (TNS) tokamak reactor, several different TF coils, about half TNS size, will be built and tested to permit selection of a design and fabrication procedure for full-scale TNS coils. A conceptual design has been completed for a facility to test D-shaped TF coils, 2.5 x 3.5-m bore, operating at 4-6 K, cooled either by boiling helium or by forced-flow supercritical helium. Up to six coils can be accommodated in a toroidal array housed in a single vacuum tank. The principal components and systems in the facility are an 11-m vacuum tank, a test stand providing structural support and service connections for the coils, a liquid nitrogen system, a system providing helium both as saturated liquid and at supercritical pressure, coils to produce a pulsed vertical field at any selected test coil position, coil power supplies, process instrumentation and control, coil diagnostics, and a data acquisition and handling system. The test stand structure is composed of a central bucking post, a base structure, and two horizontal torque rings. The coils are bolted to the bucking post, which transmits all gravity loads to the base structure. The torque ring structure, consisting of beams between adjacent coils, acts with the bucking structure to react all the magnetic loads that occur when the coils are energized. Liquid helium is used to cool the test stand structure to 5 K to minimize heat conduction to the coils. Liquid nitrogen is used to precool gaseous helium during system cooldown and to provide thermal radiation shielding

  14. Application of AE technique for on-line monitoring of quenching in racetrack superconducting coil at cryogenic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Hyun; Lee, Min Rae; Shon, Myung Hwan; Kwon, Young Kil

    1998-01-01

    An acoustic emission(AE) technique has been used to monitor and diagnose quenching phenomenon in racetrack shaped superconducting magnets at cryogenic environment of 4.2 K. The ultimate goal is to ensure the safety and reliability of large superconducting magnet systems by being able to identity and locate the sources of quench in superconducting magnets. The characteristics of AE parameters have been analyzed by correlating with quench number, winding tension of superconducting coil and charge rate by transport current. It was found in this study that there was good correlation between quench current and AE parameters. The source location of quenching in superconducting magnet was also discussed on the hashing of correlation between magnet voltage and AE energy.

  15. Winding machines for the manufacturing of superconductive coils of the main European fusion research machines

    CERN Document Server

    Cazzaniga, R; D’Urzo, C

    2005-01-01

    The successfull construction of large magnets passes through the development and application of non-conventional manufacturing processes. A difficult and delicate step in the manufacturing of superconducting coils is the conductor winding technique. It is often a challenging and technologically advanced process, developed according to the requirements of each project. An important aspect during the winding is to avoid any deformation of the cable cross section leading to a damage of the strands and to maintain the design features of the cable. A second aspect is to assure the suitable repeatability and a production rate for an industrial process. The winding line is a system of different machines linked and tuned together properly designed for each project. An adapted software assures the overall process control. TPA realized for ANSALDO Superconduttori the winding lines for many projects: TFMC (NET-TEAM), CMS (INFN-CERN), WENDELSTEIN W7-X (Max Planck Institute, IPP), etc. The experience acquired in this fiel...

  16. Analysis of a dc commutator machine for exchange of energy with a superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.F.

    1978-08-01

    A 500-kW dc commutator machine, C, is analyzed for use in an LC circuit with a ringing period of approximately 4 s with a superconducting coil, L. Electrical measurements and the important design equations and characteristics are listed. Attention is paid to the calculation of the commutating voltage, which is an important design feature because it sets a limit to the current allowable in the LC circuit, amounting to 6 times rated machine current. The equations for the energy loss components of the generator are given and fitted to experimental coast-down data. With a fitting accuracy of 1.2%, the loss coefficients for the bearing loss, brush loss, windage loss, and tooth eddy current loss in the remanent stator field are thus determined

  17. Orsay cyclotron design with superconducting coils and the associated accelerating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report ends the theoretical and technical studies of the project of new accelerating unit proposed by IPN at Orsay. The isochronous cyclotron with superconducting coils is coupled to two different injections: an axial one with polarized or not ion sources for light ions or multicharged ion sources for heavy ions; a radial injection from the reviewed tandem MP13Met. The following points are underlined: 1) the specificity of the machine 2) the theoretical and technical feasibility of a compact high frequency accelerating system suited to this type of machine 3) the development of an extraction device of the beam 4) the feasibility of an axial injection along the optical axis coupled to a unique central region of the cyclotron 5) the criterions to define, the choices to make to get a radial injection of the beam coming from the tandem in the cyclotron [fr

  18. Cryogenic magnetic coil and superconducting magnetic shield for neutron electric dipole moment searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, S.; Swank, C. M.; Biswas, A.; Carr, R.; Escribano, J.; Filippone, B. W.; Griffith, W. C.; Mendenhall, M.; Nouri, N.; Osthelder, C.; Pérez Galván, A.; Picker, R.; Plaster, B.

    2017-08-01

    A magnetic coil operated at cryogenic temperatures is used to produce spatial, relative field gradients below 6 ppm/cm, stable for several hours. The apparatus is a prototype of the magnetic components for a neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) search, which will take place at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using ultra-cold neutrons (UCN). That search requires a uniform magnetic field to mitigate systematic effects and obtain long polarization lifetimes for neutron spin precession measurements. This paper details upgrades to a previously described apparatus [1], particularly the introduction of super-conducting magnetic shielding and the associated cryogenic apparatus. The magnetic gradients observed are sufficiently low for the nEDM search at SNS.

  19. Design of a 28 MW pulse facility for testing superconducting coils to several hundred megajoules capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    Railway traction motors are available in unit sizes convenient for installation and series-parallel grouping. They are rugged. Industry builds and refurbishes them with good economy and in quantities replenishing the rolling stock. We find them well suited for reversing the current in a superconducting winding. We focus on a pulsed energy of 20 to 100 MJ, discussing our analysis and facility planning. Limitations are imposed by the following maximum numbers tolerated by the motor - pulsed current of 3.0 to 3.5 kA, current change of 40 kA/s, and pulsed voltage of 1.8 kV. Hence, the number of machines needed in parallel follows from the coil current and its rate of change. The number in series is determined by the voltage. The power transfer is limited by the torsional strength of the motor shaft to a value affected by the flywheel mass

  20. Higher magnetic field multipoles generated by superconductor magnetization within a set of nested superconducting correction coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Correction elements in colliding beam accelerators such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) can be the source of undesirable higher magnetic field multipoles due to magnetization of the superconductor within the corrector. Quadrupole and sextupole correctors located within the main dipole will produce sextupole and decapole due to magnetization of the superconductor within the correction coils. Lumped nested correction coils can produce a large number of skew and normal magnetization multipoles which may have an adverse effect on a stored beam at injection into a high energy colliding beam machine such as the SSC. Multipole magnetization field components have been measured within the HERA storage ring dipole magnets. Calculations of these components using the SCMAG04 code, which agree substantially with the measured multipoles, are presented in the report. As a result, in the proposed continuous correction winding for the SSC, dipoles have been replaced with lumped correction elements every six dipole magnets (about 120 meters apart). Nested lumped correction elements will also produce undesirable higher magnetization multipoles. This report shows a method by which the higher multipole generated by nested correction elements can be identified. (author)

  1. Improvements in or relating to superconductive magnet coils and their formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, I.L.

    1977-01-01

    A method of manufacturing a superconductive magnet coil is described comprising winding on to a former a wire containing the components of a superconductive intermetallic compound and heating the assembly to a temperature such that the components of the compound react to form the intermetallic compound. The former should be made of metal, such as steel or stainless steel, of melting point higher than that at which the reaction occurs, and should have on all portions of its surface contacted by the wire a coating of a refractory material, such as Al 2 O 3 , non reactive with the metal and the wire. The wire may contain, after reaction, filaments of the intermetallic compound, and adjacent strands of wire in a single layer may be insulated one from the other by refractory material. A flange is formed on one end of the former, which may be cylindrical in shape. The refractory coating of the former may be flame sprayed into the metal. (U.K.)

  2. Mechanical configuration for a superconducting ignition tokamak (TIBER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.; Johnston, B.M.

    1985-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is evaluating the engineering feasibility and economics of a superconducting ignition tokamak. Two major operational requirements had to be satisfied: (1) the conductive heat leak to the refrigerated structure had to be minimized, and (2) assembly and maintenance of the entire experiment had to be possible with remotely operated tools. The middle poloidal ''push coil'' must have many annular disks to transfer the TF-coil inward force to the post without crushing superconductor. The toppling moment on the TF-coil vertical legs is huge. A method of keying together the TF-coil cases has been developed. This forms an integrated structure that resists torque. The joining technique permits linear motion for simple assembly/disassembly. the topping moment on the outer vertical legs of the TF coils is very large. To react that moment and avoid great coil-case bulk, we have developed a method that allows the PF coil support structure to assist the TF case structure. Finite element techniques were used to determine the ability of the coal case and conductor to react the magnetic loads. The entire cold-coil structure is mounted on a circular plate that is suspended by several large tension rods, similar to the MFTF-B yin-yang support rods. The vacuum vessel is all at room temperature and is configured like a bell jar with sixteen side doors, one for each shield module

  3. In vivo MR imaging of the human skin at subnanoliter resolution using a superconducting surface coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laistler, Elmar; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Lambert, Simon A; Dubuisson, Rose-Marie; Girard, Olivier M; Moser, Ewald; Darrasse, Luc; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a highly sensitive superconducting surface coil for microscopic MRI of the human skin in vivo in a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T) scanner. A 12.4-mm high-temperature superconducting coil was used at 1.5T for phantom and in vivo skin imaging. Images were inspected to identify fine anatomical skin structures. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement by the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, as compared to a commercial MR microscopy coil was quantified from phantom imaging; the gain over a geometrically identical coil made from copper (cooled or not) was theoretically deduced. Noise sources were identified to evaluate the potential of HTS coils for future studies. In vivo skin images with isotropic 80 μm resolution were demonstrated revealing fine anatomical structures. The HTS coil improved SNR by a factor 32 over the reference coil in a nonloading phantom. For calf imaging, SNR gains of 380% and 30% can be expected over an identical copper coil at room temperature and 77 K, respectively. The high sensitivity of HTS coils allows for microscopic imaging of the skin at 1.5T and could serve as a tool for dermatology in a clinical setting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Design of superconducting toroidal magnet coils and testing facility in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Thompson, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    In the U.S. Large Coil Program, three industrial teams are presently designing test coils to general specifications prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with guidance from USERDA. Each test coil is approximately half the bore size of reactor coils, being oval or D-shaped, with a bore of 2.5 x 3.5 m. The dimensions and operating requirements of the coils are identical for all test coils. The coils are designed to produce a peak field of at least 8 tesla at the winding of a selected coil operated at its design current. This condition is met when the selected coil is operated in a compact toroidal array of 6 coils, with the other five coils being operated at 0.8 of their design current. The six coils are of three different designs. Both pool boiling and forced flow designs are included. The coils are housed in a single large vacuum chamber for economy and testing convenience. Auxiliary coils provide a pulse field over the test coil winding volume. This auxiliary system is designed to produce a pulse field which rises to a peak of 0.14 T in 1 sec. With the exception of material damage due to neutron irradiation, all reactor requirements and environments will be either duplicated, approximated, or simulated. The test facility is being designed to accept coils producing up to 12 tesla in later phases of the program

  5. Persistent current analysis of superconducting coils in a linear synchronous motor for maglev passenger transport system. Fujoshiki tetsudoyo linear doki motor ni okeru teijisoku mode chodendo coil denryu no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azusawa, T [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-05-20

    The simple analysis method of persistent current induced in on-board superconducting coils was proposed for the vehicle of a superconducting magnetically-suspended train which is running in the magnetic field generated by armature coil current of a linear synchronous motor installed along a guideway, and the performance of the method is discussed through calculation based on typical models. As fluctuation of persistent current due to running was calculated with various parameter values under a normal running condition, fluctuation of persistent current induced was less then 1% of an initial magnetomotive force, having no adverse effect on the stability and reliability of superconducting magnets. Electromagnetic forces under a normal running condition could be predicted accurately enough by relatively easy-to-calculate constant current mode analysis. Double-layered armature coils were preferred to single-layered ones to enhance the stability of superconducting magnets by reducing fluctuation of persistent current. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The IEA Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, D.S.; Klose, W.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1988-01-01

    A multinational program of cooperative research, development, demonstrations, and exchanges of information on superconducting magnets for fusion was initiated in 1977 under an IEA agreement. The first major step in the development of TF magnets was called the Large Coil Task. Participants in LCT were the U.S. DOE, EURATOM, JAERI, and the Departement Federal de l'Interieur of Switzerland. The goals of LCT were to obtain experimental data, to demonstrate reliable operation of large superconducting coils, and to prove design principles and fabrication techniques being considered for the toroidal magnets of thermonuclear reactors. These goals were to be accomplished through coordinated but largely independent design, development, and construction of six test coils, followed by collaborative testing in a compact toroidal test array at fields of 8 T and higher. Under the terms of the IEA Agreement, the United States built and operated the test facility at Oak Ridge and provided three test coils. The other participants provided one coil each. Information on design and manufacturing and all test data were shared by all. The LCT team of each participant included a government laboratory and industrial partners or contractors. The last coil was completed in 1985, and the test assembly was completed in October of that year. Over the next 23 months, the six-coil array was cooled down and extensive testing was performed. Results were gratifying, as tests achieved design-point performance and well beyond. (Each coil reached a peak field of 9 T.) Experiments elucidated coil behavior, delineated limits of operability, and demonstrated coil safety. (orig./KP)

  7. Magnetic study of extraction elements of compact cyclotron beam with AGOR superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, S.

    1991-12-01

    The extraction system of the superconducting cyclotrons is normally making a large use of electric extractors followed by magnetostatic elements. The electric field limit initially hoped for (14 MV/m) has been shown to be too optimistic. A more realistic value is around 10 MV/m in the concerned geometries. The first element of the AGOR extraction system is an electrostatic channel where the maximum electric field is limited to 10.5 MV/m. The smaller separation between the internal beam and the extracted beam at the entrance of the first magnetic element is compensated by the replacement of the usual magnetostatic channels with high power electromagnetic channels placed in the reduced space close to the internal beam and where the horizontal position can be adjusted according to the kind of ion accelerated and its energy. The fringing field very close to the channels is controlled with the help of correction coils reducing the perturbations of the internal beam trajectories to an acceptable level

  8. Winding machines for the manufacturing of superconductive coils of the main European fusion research machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazzaniga, Rodolfo; Valle, N.; D'Urzo, C.

    2005-01-01

    The successful construction of large magnets passes through the development and application of non-conventional manufacturing processes. A difficult and delicate step in the manufacturing of superconducting coils is the conductor winding technique. It is often a challenging and technologically advanced process, developed according to the requirements of each project. An important aspect during the winding is to avoid any deformation of the cable cross section leading to a damage of the strands and to maintain the design features of the cable. A second aspect is to assure the suitable repeatability and a production rate for an industrial process. The winding line is a system of different machines linked and tuned together properly designed for each project. An adapted software assures the overall process control. TPA realized for ANSALDO Superconduttori the winding lines for many projects: TFMC (NET-TEAM), CMS (INFN-CERN), WENDELSTEIN W7-X (Max Planck Institute, IPP), etc. The experience acquired in this field by ANSALDO Superconduttori and by TPA (as manufacturing tools and equipments supplier) has been acknowledged by CERN with 'The CMS Gold Award' of the Year 2004. The paper describes the main features of the winding lines, the main problems, the technical solutions used for the above mentioned projects and the new ideas for the forthcoming ones

  9. High voltage investigations for ITER coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, S.; Fietz, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting ITER magnets will be excited with high voltage during operation and fast discharge. Because the coils are complex systems the internal voltage distribution can differ to a large extent from the ideal linear voltage distribution. In case of fast excitations internal voltages between conductor and radial plate of a TF coil can be even higher than the terminal voltage of 3.5 kV to ground which appears during a fast discharge without a fault. Hence the determination of the transient voltage distribution is important for a proper insulation co-ordination and will provide a necessary basis for the verification of the individual insulation design and the choice of test voltages and waveforms. Especially the extent of internal overvoltages in case of failures, e. g. malfunction of discharge units and / or arcing is of special interest. Transient calculations for the ITER TF coil system have been performed for fast discharge and fault scenarios to define test voltages for ITER TF. The conductor and radial plate insulation of the ITER TF Model Coil were exposed at room temperature to test voltages derived from the results from these calculations. Breakdown appeared during the highest AC voltage step. A fault scenario for the TF fast discharge system is presented where one fault triggers a second fault, leading to considerable voltage stress. In addition a FEM model of Poloidal Field Coil 3 for the determination of the parameters of a detailed network model is presented in order to prepare detailed investigations of the transient voltage behaviour of the PF coils. (author)

  10. Study of superconducting magnetic bearing applicable to the flywheel energy storage system that consist of HTS-bulks and superconducting-coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Ken; Tanaka, Yoshichika; Nakauchi, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    The Railway Technical Research Institute conducted a study to develop a superconducting magnetic bearing applicable to the flywheel energy-storage system for railways. In the first step of the study, the thrust rolling bearing was selected for application, and adopted liquid-nitrogen-cooled HTS-bulk as a rotor, and adopted superconducting coil as a stator for the superconducting magnetic bearing. Load capacity of superconducting magnetic bearing was verified up to 10 kN in the static load test. After that, rotation test of that approximately 5 kN thrust load added was performed with maximum rotation of 3000rpm. In the results of bearing rotation test, it was confirmed that position in levitation is able to maintain with stability during the rotation. Heat transfer properties by radiation in vacuum and conductivity by tenuous gas were basically studied by experiment by the reason of confirmation of rotor cooling method. The experimental result demonstrates that the optimal gas pressure is able to obtain without generating windage drag. In the second stage of the development, thrust load capacity of the bearing will be improved aiming at the achievement of the energy capacity of a practical scale. In the static load test of the new superconducting magnetic bearing, stable 20kN-levitation force was obtained.

  11. Design and implementation of quench detection instrumentation for TF magnet system of SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristi, Y.; Sharma, A.N.; Doshi, K.; Banaudha, M.; Prasad, U.; Varmora, P.; Patel, D.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India is now in engineering validation phase. The assembled Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system of SST-1 will be operated at 10 kA of nominal current at helium cooled condition of 4.5 K. A reliable and fail proof quench detection (QD) system is essential for the safety and the investment protection requirements of the magnets. This QD system needs to continuously monitor all the superconducting coils, which include 16 TF magnets, return-loop, bus bars and current leads. In case of any event initiating the normal resistive zone and reaching thermal run-away, the QD system needs to trigger the magnet protection circuits. Precision instrumentation and control system with 204 signal channels had been developed for detection of quench anywhere in the entire TF magnet system. In the present configuration of quench detection scheme, the voltage drop across each double pancake (DP) of each TF coil are compared with its two adjacent DPs for the detection of normal zone and cancelation of inductive couples. Two identical redundant systems with one out of two configurations are successfully commissioned and tested at IPR. This paper describes the design and implementation of the QD system, Installation experience, validation test and initial results from the recent SST-1 magnet system charging

  12. TIBER-II TF [toroidal-field] winding pack design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Miller, J.R.; Slack, D.S.; Summers, L.T.

    1987-01-01

    The superconducting, toroidal-field (TF) coils in the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER II) are designed with cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) using Nb 3 Sn composite strands. To design the CICC winding pack, we used an optimization technique that maximizes the conductor stability without violating the constraints imposed by the structure, electrical insulation, quench protection, and fabrication technique. Detailed helium-properties codes calculate the heat removal along a flow path, and detailed field calculations determine the temperature, current, and stability margins. The conductor sheath is designed as distributed structure to partially support the combined in-plane and out-of-plane loads generated within the winding pack. Pancakes of the coil are wound, reacted, and insulated before being potted in the case. This design is aggressive but fully consistent with good engineering practice. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Effect of capacitive feedback on the characteristics of direct current superconducting quantum interference device coupled to a multiturn input coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minotani, T.; Enpuku, K.; Kuroki, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Distortion of voltage versus flux (V endash Φ) relation of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) coupled to a multiturn input coil is studied. First, resonant behavior of the coupled SQUID due to the so-called input coil resonance is clarified. It is shown that large rf noise flux is produced by the input coil resonance. This rf flux is added to the SQUID, and results in large rf voltage across the SQUID. In the case where parasitic capacitance exists between the input coil and the ground of the SQUID, this rf voltage produces the rf flux again, i.e., a feedback loop for the rf flux is formed. Taking into account this capacitive feedback, we study the V endash Φ relation of the coupled SQUID. Numerical simulation shows that the V endash Φ relation is distorted considerably by the feedback mechanism. The simulation result explains well the experimental V endash Φ relation of the coupled SQUID. The combination of the input coil resonance with the capacitive feedback is the most likely mechanism for the distorted V endash Φ curve of the coupled SQUID. The condition for occurrence of the distorted V endash Φ curve due to the capacitive feedback is also obtained, and methods to prevent degradation are discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. Study on the optimum design of a high temperature superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguri, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ogawa, Jun; Sato, Takao

    2005-01-01

    It is in particular of importance for HTS coils to secure a larger central magnetic field, a large stored energy, etc. with shorter length of HTS tapes. The critical current of an HTS tape depends on both the flux density and the flux angle with respect to tapes. In view of this, the performance improvement of HTS coils is taken into account with an analytical model. As a coil shape, the minimum volume coil derived from the Fabry Factor constant curve is taken up, which is often employed at low temperature coils. The electric field distribution within a coil cross-section is calculated to examine effects on a current carrying capability. It is clear that high electric field portions appear at the coil edge region due primarily to inclined magnetic fluxes against HTS tapes. Considering this, a grade winding method of a coil is proposed, where the winding density of conductors is reduced at coil edge portions. With this coil winding structure, the critical current of an HTS coil is improved since the magnetic field is reduced at edge portions. The stored energy per HTS tape length and the central magnetic field of the coil can be remarkably increased by this kind of grade winding method

  15. Effect of epoxy impregnation on strain distribution of materials in Bi2223 superconducting coils by using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xinzhe, E-mail: xinzhe.jin@riken.jp [Center for Life Science Technologies, RIKEN, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Osamura, Kozo [Research Institute for Applied Sciences, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8202 (Japan); Machiya, Shutaro [Daido University, Minami-ku, Nagoya 457-8530 (Japan); Kajiwara, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Shobu, Takahisa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Maeda, Hideaki [Center for Life Science Technologies, RIKEN, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan)

    2015-11-25

    Synchrotron X-rays have been used to observe strain distributions in composite materials such as superconducting wires with a thickness of less than about 2 mm. In applications that employ wound coils of superconducting wire, it is necessary to understand the strain distribution within the coiled wire. Superconducting wires such as Bi2223 and REBCO wires approximately 4–5 mm wide are commercially available. Coiled wires of this width are too thick to easily measure using conventional X-ray techniques, especially the inner strain, because the penetration depth tends to be around 2 mm. Therefore, the beam penetration must be improved, and it is known that the penetration depth of an X-ray beam depends upon the beam energy, beam intensity, measurement material, and measurement method. In this study, we used a white X-ray diffractometer at SPring-8 to develop a method of observing the strain distribution in Bi2223 superconducting coils winded by a 4.5 mm wide Bi2223 wire. We successfully observed a clear (400) peak of the Bi2223 phase by an appropriate measurement condition, and then observed the strains of each material in the Bi2223 coils with and without epoxy impregnation. This is the first time that we have obtained the strain of a Bi2223 phase in coiled wire using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Further synchrotron-based study of superconducting coils will be useful in the development of advanced high-field magnets. The appropriate measurement method and the obtained measurement results are presented in this paper. - Highlights: • We successfully obtained clear peaks of Bi2223 phase in 4.5 mm thick coils. • The strain behaviors of materials in the coil correspond to a three turn cycle model. • A uniform strain distribution of the Bi2223 phase was obtained by epoxy impregnation.

  16. Conceptual design report for a superconducting coil suitable for use in the large solenoid detector at the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Krebs, H.J.; Kephart, R.D.; Theriot, D.; Wands, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    The conceptual design of a large superconducting solenoid suitable for a magnetic detector at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) was done at Fermilab. The magnet will provide a magnetic field of 1.7 T over a volume 8 m in diameter by 16 m long. The particle-physics calorimetry will be inside the field volume and so the coil will be bath cooled and cryostable; the vessels will be stainless steel. Predictability of performance and the ability to safely negotiate all probable failure modes, including a quench, are important items of the design philosophy. Our conceptual design of the magnet and calorimeter has convinced us that this magnet is a reasonable extrapolation of present technology and is therefore feasible. The principal difficulties anticipated are those associated with the very large physical dimensions and stored energy of the magnet. 5 figs

  17. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-01-01

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans. PMID:28367906

  18. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-04-10

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans.

  19. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish M; Rushinski J; Myatt L; Brooks A; Dahlgren F; Chrzanowski J; Reiersen W; Freudenberg K.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements

  20. Superconducting toroidal field coil power supply and protection system for NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    A power supply and quench protection system is proposed in which alternate coils are connected in series to produce two separate circuits, each with 8 coils. Both circuits are provided with power supplies comprising rectifier transformers and thyristor equipped Graetz bridges, which are operated at maximum forward voltage (125 V) to charge the coils to 24 kA, 17.75 GJ in ≅ 2 hours and are fully inverted for scheduled discharges. Pulsed firing of the thyristors allows the same power supplies to be used to maintain the currents against resistive losses, without increasing the reactive power consumption or harmonic current generation. Rapid discharges are initiated by opening d.c. circuit breakers to introduce discharge resistors between the coils of each circuit. The maximum possible value of peak voltage-to-ground is then limited to 2.25 times the discharge voltage applied to each coil. A 5 kV discharge voltage allows the coils to be discharged with a time constant of 18.5 s, which is sufficiently rapid to limit the quench ''hot spot'' temperature to 68 K. The coil connections impose sufficient symmetry on the coil current distribution to ensure that no out-of-plane forces are produced on the coils. Even if one circuit breaker fails to interrupt, the variation of coil currents is sufficiently small that the resulting symmetric variation of radial centring forces is acceptable

  1. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Kose, Katsumi

    2016-10-11

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (~54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach.

  2. Localization of Electrical Insulation Failures in Superconducting Collared Coils by Analysis of the Distortion of a Pulsed Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Komorowski, P A

    2000-01-01

    The localization of possible electrical faults in superconducting accelerator magnets may, in most cases, be a complex, expensive and time-consuming process. In particular, inter-turn short circuits and failures of the ground insulation are well detectable when the magnet is collared, but often disappear after disassembly for repair due to the release of the pre-stress in the coils. The fault localization method presented in this paper is based on the measurement and analysis of the magnetic field generated inside the magnet aperture by a high voltage pulse. The presence of the fault modifies the distribution of the current in the coils and produces a distortion of the magnetic field. The described method aims at locating both the longitudinal and azimuthal position of the fault-affected area. The test method, the transient case FEM models and the implemented experimental set-up are presented and discussed for the LHC dipole models.

  3. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    KODAMA, Nao; KOSE, Katsumi

    2016-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (∼54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach. PMID:27001398

  4. Numerical analyses of magnetic field and force in toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage using unit coils (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamaru, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Amemiya, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is more useful than other systems of electric energy storage because of its larger amounts of stored energy and its higher efficiency. There are two types of SMES. One is the solenoid type and the other is the toroidal type. Some models of solenoid-type SMES are designed in the U.S. and in Japan. But the large scale SMES causes a high magnetic field in the living environment, and causes the erroneous operation of electronic equipment. The authors studied some suitable designs of magnetic shielding for the solenoidal-type SMES to reduce the magnetic field in the living environment. The toiroidal type SMES is studied in this article. The magnetic leakage flux of the toiroidal-type SMES is generally lower than that of the solenoid-type SMES. The toroidal-type SMES is constructed of unit coils, which are convenient for construction. The magnetic leakage flux occurs between unit coils. The electromagnetic force of the coils is very strong. Therefore analyses of the leakage flux and electromagnetic force are important to the design of SMES. The authors studied the number, radius, and length of unit coils. The storage energy is 5 G Wh. The numerical analyses of magnetic fields in the toroidal type SMES are obtained by analytical solutions. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. Productive international collaboration in the large coil task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Komarek, P.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1987-01-01

    The Large Coil Task (LCT), initiated in 1977, has been very productive of useful technical information about superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil design and manufacture. Moreover, it has demonstrated close international collaboration in fusion technology development, including integration of large components built in four different countries. Each of six 40-t test coils was designed and produced by a major industrial team, with government laboratory guidance, to a common set of specifications. The six were assembled into a toroidal array for testing in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge. Testing was done by a team of representatives of EURATOM, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States, with each participant having full access to all data. Coils were thoroughly instrumented, enabling penetrating analysis of behavior

  6. DEALS: a maintainable superconducting magnet system for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hseih, S.Y.; Danby, G.; Powell, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of demountable superconducting magnet systems has been examined in a design study of a DEALS [Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress] TF magnet for an HFITR [High Field Ignition Test Reactor] Tokamak device. All parts of the system appear feasible, including the demountable superconducting joints. Measurements on small scale prototype joints indicate that movable pressure contact joints exhibit acceptable electrical, mechanical, and cryogenic performance. Such joints permit a relatively simple support structure and are readily demountable. Assembly and disassembly sequences are described whereby any failed portion of the magnet, or any part of the reactor inside the TF coils can be removed and replaced if necessary

  7. Experimental and calculating study on the stressed state of superconducting coils of toroidal field in the T-15 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaulina, I.G.; Gusev, S.V.; Sivkova, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    Results of calculational and experimental atudy of stress-deformed state of superconducting coils of the T-15 tokamak toroidal field are presented. The calculations are made using the method of finite elements and refined theory of cores. Experimental studies were carried out using elastic tensometric model of polymer materials. Test results are compared with the calculational results. Divergence between calculational and experimental values of displacement of characteristic points in the unit does not exceed 20 %. Results of model studies confirm the expediency of the calculational model used for designing SOTP unit for the T-15 tokamak

  8. Role of the large coil program in the development of superconducting magnets for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.

    1978-01-01

    Three U.S. industrial teams are designing and will build one coil each to a common set of specifications. Coil specifications and test conditions were chosen to insure maximum relevance to fusion program needs. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape bore, will contain about 7 MA-turns, and must operate at a peak field of 8 T while subjected to pulsed fields up to 0.14 T in a test stand that can accommodate up to 6 coils in a compact toroidal array. Coils by General Dynamics/Convair and General Electric will use different NbTi conductors cooled by pool-boiling helium. The Westinghouse coil will use Nb 3 Sn cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. These coils will be delivered in 1980 and 1981 for testing in the Large Coil Test Facility at Oak Ridge in a compact toroidal array with three coils from outside the U.S. These will be produced by EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland for testing under an International Energy Agency agreement

  9. Results of measurements with a superconducting niobium coil resonator at 106 MHz: the story of a coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piosczyk, B.

    A number of tests were performed with a newly developed coil. The surface was treated by conventional surface treatment methods. In the first tests, breakdown occurred at field strengths E/sub max/ approximately equal to 11 to 14 MV/m. The reason for the early breakdown was presumed to reside in small sites with increased losses which expand above a critical field strength. Only after a series of treatment steps in which a total of about 160 μ had been removed from the coil surface were maximum surface fields of up to E/sub max/ approximately equal to 29 MV/m and B/sub max/ approximately equal to 1050 Oe (greater than or equal to E/sub TW/ approximately equal to 4.0 MV/m) reached. Subsequently, breakdown is usually caused by electrons. A comparison of anodized and unanodized resonators showed no significant difference for the maximum attainable field strengths or in the characteristics with regard to electron loading and sensitivity to gas contamination. In two long-term tests for up to 800 h, the resonator was operated at high HF-field strengths (E/sub max/ approximately equal to 18 to 24 MV/m). An abrupt increase of e-loading, which was connected with increased resonator losses, was observed at certain time intervals. Subsequent He-conditioning for a few minutes reduced this elevated e-loading. With increasing operating time, an increase of surface losses was observed which were evidently caused by electrons impinging on the surface (radiation damage). The magnitude of the radiation damage appears to be rather uncritical for application. This radiation damage does not heal during heating to room temperature. However, light oxidative polishing suffices to eliminate the radiation damage

  10. Effect of plasma current breakaway on the operating stability of the superconducting coil of the toroidal magnetic field in the T-10M installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostenko, A.I.; Kravchenko, M.Yu.; Monoszon, N.A.; Trokhachev, G.V.

    1979-01-01

    The method and calculation results of stability of a superconducting coil of the toroidal magnetic field in the T-10M installation to plasma current breakaway are presented. The calculations were performed for two values of the magnetic field induction in the centre of the plasma cross section: 3.5 and 5 T. The calculation of energy losses and heating of the superconducting coil was performed assuming the plasma current in case of breakaway decreases to zero with an infinite rate, so that the estimations obtained are maxiaum. It is shown that in case of 3.5 T induction the superconducting coil exhibits resistance to plasma current breakaways, and in case of 5 T it is necessary to use electromagnetic screening to provide stability

  11. Heat treatment trials for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Kunihiro; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Nakajima, Hideo; Kimura, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari

    2012-01-01

    Cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductors using Nb 3 Sn strands are used in ITER toroidal fields (TF) coils. Heat treatment generates thermal strain in CIC conductors because of the difference in thermal expansion between the Nb 3 Sn strands and the stainless-steel jacket. The elongation/shrinkage of the TF conductor may make it impossible to insert a wound TF conductor into the groove of a radial plate. In addition, it is expected that the deformation of the winding due to heat treatment-based release of the residual force in the jacket may also make it impossible to insert the winding in the groove, and that correcting the winding geometry to allow insertion of the winding may influence the superconducting performance of the TF conductor. The authors performed several trials using heat treatment as the part of activities in Phase II of TF coil procurement aiming to resolve the above-mentioned technical issues, and evaluated the elongations of 0.064, 0.074 and 0.072% for the straight and curved conductors and 1/3-scale double-pancake (DP) winding, respectively. It was confirmed that correction if the deformed winding did not influence the superconducting performance of the conductor. (author)

  12. Microstructures and superconducting properties of Y-Ba-Cu and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu oxide wires and coils prepared by the explosive compaction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagino, S.; Suzuki, M.; Takeshita, T.; Takashima, K.; Tonda, H.

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that explosive compaction technique can be used to densify metal, and ceramics powders and their mixtures. The authors discuss how they applied this technique to produce silver sheathed superconducting oxide wires and coils (Y-B-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O). The wires and coils to be compacted were placed into metal tube and the tube was filled with SiC powder as a pressure propagating medium and the tube was compacted by a cylindrically axisymmetric method. The wires and coils compacted were then heat-treated in order to improve grain boundary connections of superconducting oxide crystalline grains. The oxide cores heat-treated were seen to be very dense, and a part of a Y-Ba-Cu oxide coil which was heat-treated optimally was found to have a critical current density higher than 13,000A/cm 2 at 77K

  13. A novel no-insulation winding technique of high temperature-superconducting racetrack coil for rotating applications: A progress report in Korea university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y H; Song, J B; Yang, D G; Kim, Y G; Hahn, S; Lee, H G

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents our recent progress on core technology development for a megawatt-class superconducting wind turbine generator supported by the international collaborative R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning. To outperform the current high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) magnet technology in the wind turbine industry, a novel no-insulation winding technique was first proposed to develop the second-generation HTS racetrack coil for rotating applications. Here, we briefly report our recent studies on no-insulation (NI) winding technique for GdBCO coated conductor racetrack coils in the following areas: (1) Charging-discharging characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils with respect to external pressures applied to straight sections; (2) thermal and electrical stabilities of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils encapsulated with various impregnating materials; (3) quench behaviors of no-insulation racetrack coils wound with GdBCO conductor possessing various lamination layers; (4) electromagnetic characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils under time-varying field conditions. Test results confirmed that this novel NI winding technique was highly promising. It could provide development of a compact, mechanically dense, and self-protecting GdBCO magnet for use in real-world superconducting wind turbine generators.

  14. A novel no-insulation winding technique of high temperature-superconducting racetrack coil for rotating applications: A progress report in Korea university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y. H.; Song, J. B.; Yang, D. G.; Kim, Y. G.; Hahn, S.; Lee, H. G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents our recent progress on core technology development for a megawatt-class superconducting wind turbine generator supported by the international collaborative R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning. To outperform the current high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) magnet technology in the wind turbine industry, a novel no-insulation winding technique was first proposed to develop the second-generation HTS racetrack coil for rotating applications. Here, we briefly report our recent studies on no-insulation (NI) winding technique for GdBCO coated conductor racetrack coils in the following areas: (1) Charging-discharging characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils with respect to external pressures applied to straight sections; (2) thermal and electrical stabilities of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils encapsulated with various impregnating materials; (3) quench behaviors of no-insulation racetrack coils wound with GdBCO conductor possessing various lamination layers; (4) electromagnetic characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils under time-varying field conditions. Test results confirmed that this novel NI winding technique was highly promising. It could provide development of a compact, mechanically dense, and self-protecting GdBCO magnet for use in real-world superconducting wind turbine generators.

  15. Fabrication of the KSTAR toroidal field coil structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.H.; Sa, J.W.; Park, H.K.; Hong, K.H.; Shin, H.; Kim, H.T.; Bak, J.S.; Lee, G.S.; Kwak, J.H.; Moon, H.G.; Yoon, H.H.; Lee, J.W.; Lee, S.K.; Song, J.Y.; Nam, K.M.; Byun, S.E.; Kim, H.C.; Ha, E.T.; Ahn, H.J.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, J.S.; Park, K.H.; Hong, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR toroidal field (TF) coil structure is under fabrication upon completion of engineering design and prototype construction. The prototype TF coil structure has been fabricated within allowable tolerances. Encasing of the prototype TF coil (TF00) in the prototype structure has been carried out through major processes involving a coil encasing, an enclosing weld, a vacuum pressure impregnation, and an outer surface machining. During the enclosing weld of the TF00 coil structure, we have measured temperatures and stresses on the coil surface. Assembly test had been performed with the TF00 coil structure. We have chosen Type 316LN as material of the TF coil structure. We used the narrow-gap TIG welding method. Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Company (DHI) will complete the fabrication of the TF coil structure in Feb. 2006. (author)

  16. Results from a model system of superconducting solenoids and phase shifting bridge for pulsed power studies for proposed tokamak EF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.; Smith, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A matched pair of superconducting solenoids and a phase-shifting bridge circuit has been constructed to study energy storage and transfer for application to tokamak EF coils. The intrinsically stable solenoids, each with 4 H self-inductance, incorporate sufficient cooling to allow charging at several hundred volts, corresponding to B approximately equal 1 T/sec. The three-phase inductor-convertor capacitive bridge network operating at up to 150 V rms transfers energy reversibly and at controllable rates from the storage coil to the load coil

  17. Results from a model system of superconducting solenoids and phase shifting bridge for pulsed power studies for proposed tokamak EF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.; Smith, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A matched pair of superconducting solenoids and a phase-shifting bridge circuit has been constructed to study energy storage and transfer for application to tokamak EF coils. The intrinsically stable solenoids, each with 4 H self-inductance, incorporate sufficient cooling to allow charging at several hundred volts, corresponding to B = 1 T/sec. The three-phase inductor-convertor capacitive bridge network operating at up to 150 V rms transfers energy reversibly and at controllable rates from the storage coil to the load coil

  18. An active magnetic bearing with high Tc superconducting coils and ferromagnetic cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.V.; DiRusso, E.; Provenza, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    A proof-of-feasibility demonstration showed that high-T c , superconductor (HTS) coils can be used in a high-load, active magnetic bearing in LN 2 . A homopolar radial bearing with commercially wound HTS (Bi 2223) bias and control coils produced over 890 N (200 lb) radial load capacity (measured nonrotating) and supported a shaft to 14000 rpm. The goal was to show that HTS coils can operate stably with ferromagnetic cores in a feedback controlled system at a current density similar to that for Cu in LN 2 . The bias coil, wound with nontwisted, multifilament HTS conductor, dissipated negligible power for its direct current. The control coils, wound with monofilament HTS sheathed in Ag, dissipated negligible power for direct current. AC losses increased rapidly with frequency and quadratically with AC amplitude. Above about 2 Hz, the effective resistance of the control coils exceeds that of the silver which is in electrical parallel with the oxide superconductor. These results show that twisted multifilament conductor is not needed for stable levitation but may be desired to reduce control power for sizable dynamic loads

  19. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.; Punchard, W.F.B.

    1977-01-01

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 18 0 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  20. Composite coils for toroidal field coils and method of using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R. G.; Trujillo, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A composite toroidal field (TF) generating means consisting of segmented magnetic coil windings is disclosed. Each coil winding of the TF generating means consists of a copper or copper alloy conductor segment and an aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segment. The conductor segments are joined at a high strength, low electrical resistance joint and the joint may either be a mechanical or metallurgical one. The use of the aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segments improves the neutron economy of the reactor with which the TF coil is associated and reduces TF coil nuclear heating and heating gradients, and activation in the TF coils

  1. Superconducting magnet systems for the ANL EPR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Huang, Y.C.; Smith, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnet systems for the current Argonne experimental power reactor (EPR) design build on the earlier designs but incorporate a number of improvements. The toroidal field (TF) coil system consists of 16 coils of the constant tension shape, with NbTi, copper, and stainless steel as superconductor, stabilizer, and support material respectively. They are designed for 10 T operation at 3.7 K or 9 T operation at 4.2 K. Two changes from earlier designs permit a saving in material requirements. The coils are wound with the conductor in precompression and the support material in pretension so that when the coils are energized, the stainless steel experiences a stress of 60,000 psi while the copper stress does not exceed 15,000 psi. Both the copper and NbTi are graded, with higher current densities where magnetic and radiation effects are smaller. The ohmic heating (OH) coil system consists of a central solenoid plus ten other coils, all located outside the TF coils for ease of maintenance. The NbTi-copper coils are cryostable and operate at 4.2 K. The solenoid is segmented, with rings of insulation between segments to transfer the centering force from the TF coils to an insulating cylinder inside the OH solenoid. Locating the OH solenoid inside the support cylinder plus raising the central field to 8 T, enables the OH system to develop more volt-seconds than the earlier designs, even though the plasma major radius is smaller. The superconducting equilibrium field coils, also outside the TF coils, provide the field pattern required for a D-shaped plasma

  2. Thermal, Electrical and Mechanical Response to a Quench in Nb3Sn Superconducting Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferracin, F.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.R.; Imbasciati, L.; Lietzke, A.F.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    During a quench, significant temperatures can arise as a magnet's stored energy is dissipated in the normal zone. Temperature gradients during this process give rise to localized strains within the coil. Reactive forces in the magnet structure balance the electromagnetic and thermal forces and maintain on equilibrium. In this paper we present a complete 3D finite element analysis of a racetrack coil. Specifically, the analysis focuses on thermal, electrical and mechanical conditions in a 10 T Nb 3 Sn coil built and tested as part of LBNL's Subscale Magnet Program. The study attempts to simulate time history of the temperature and voltage rise during quench propagation. The transient thermal stress after the quench is then evaluated and discussed

  3. High magnetic field multipoles generated by superconductor magnetization within a set of nested superconducting correction coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1990-04-01

    Correction elements in colliding beam accelerators such as the SSC can be the source of undesirable higher magnetic field multipoles due to magnetization of the superconductor within the corrector. Quadrupole and sextupole correctors located within the main dipole will produce sextupole and decapole due to magnetization of the superconductor within the correction coils. Lumped nested correction coils can produce a large number of skew and normal magnetization multipoles which may have an adverse effect on a stored beam at injection into a high energy colliding beam machine such as the SSC. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Structural analysis of superconducting coils for fusion reactors taking into account the slip between conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, R.E.; Schrefler, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    A finite element formulation of friction effects for multilayered superconductors based on partially bonded beam systems is shown. The stiffness matrix of superconductor elements is derived, which takes into account the effects of friction between conductors. Examples relating to superconductors proposed for the NET toroidal and poloidal field coils show that the effects of slip are not negligible and should be taken into account in a structural analysis of the coil system. Also parametric studies with varying widths and heights of the insulation layer are shown

  5. A Full-size High Temperature Superconducting Coil Employed in a Wind Turbine Generator Set-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Mijatovic, Nenad; Kellers, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A full-size stationary experimental set-up, which is a pole pair segment of a 2 MW high temperature superconducting (HTS) wind turbine generator, has been built and tested under the HTS-GEN project in Denmark. The performance of the HTS coil is crucial to the set-up, and further to the development...... is tested in LN2 first, and then tested in the set-up so that the magnetic environment in a real generator is reflected. The experimental results are reported, followed by a finite element simulation and a discussion on the deviation of the results. The tested and estimated Ic in LN2 are 148 A and 143 A...

  6. Measurement of AC losses in a racetrack superconducting coil made from YBCO coated conductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiler, Eugen; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Kovac, Jan

    2012-01-01

    to reinforce it. The AC loss is measured versus the transport current Ia with the coil immersed in liquid nitrogen. Measurements at frequencies 21 Hz, 36 Hz and 72 Hz are compared. The AC losses follow I2 a dependence at low current amplitudes and I3 a at high amplitudes. After cutting the inner steel frame...

  7. Upgrade of DC power supply system in ITER CS model coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimono, Mitsugu; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Keita; Kawano, Katsumi; Isono, Takaaki

    2014-03-01

    Objective of the ITER CS Model Coil Test Facility is to evaluate a large scale superconducting conductor for fusion using the Central Solenoid (CS) Model Coil, which can generate a 13T magnetic field in the inner bore with a 1.5 m diameter. The facility is composed of a helium refrigerator / liquefier system, a DC power supply system, a vacuum system and a data acquisition system. The DC power supply system supplies currents to two superconducting coils, the CS Model Coil and an insert coil. A 50-kA DC power supply is installed for the CS Model Coil and two 30 kA DC power supplies are installed for an insert coil. In order to evaluate superconducting performance of a conductor used for ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coils whose operating current is 68 kA, the line for an insert coil is upgraded. A 10 kA DC power supply was added, DC circuit breakers were upgraded, bus bars and current measuring instrument were replaced. In accordance to the upgrade, operation manual was revised. (author)

  8. Development of special machines for production of large number of superconducting coils for the spool correctors for the main dipole of LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntambekar, A.M.; Karmarkar, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting (Sc) spool correctors of different types namely Sextupole, (MCS) Decapole (MCD) and Octupole (MCO) are incorporated in each of the main dipole of Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In all 2464 MCS and 1232 MCDO magnets are required to equip all 1232 Dipoles of LHC. The coils wound from thin rectangular section Sc wires are the heart of magnet assembly and its performance for the field quality and cold quench training largely depends on the precise and robust construction of these coils. Under DAE-CERN collaboration CAT was entrusted with the responsibility of making these magnets for LHC. Starting with development of manual fixtures and prototyping using soldering, a more advances special Automatic Coils Winding and Ultrasonic Welding (USW) system for production of large no. of coils and magnets were built at CAT. The paper briefly describes the various developments in this area. (author)

  9. Influence of the spacers on the stability of channel cooled superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuris, C.

    1980-10-01

    In a previous paper, the thermal stability of channel cooled superconducting magnets was experimentally studied. Stable normal zones were observed within a range of currents and local disturbance energies. Usual theories fail to fully explain these results, owing to the fact that they take into account a heat transfer to liquid helium only function of the temperature of the conductor, whatever the position is. In a simplified theoretical analysis, it is shown that in a locally uncooled superconducting wire several stationary normal zones can exist. A criterion is derived that yields the recovery current as a function of the length of the uncooled region. Besides, a detailed numerical analysis determines the evolution of a normal zone in a channel cooled magnet. Theoretical calculations are compared with experimental results

  10. Superconducting Quadrupoles for the ISR High Luminosity insertion Coil cross section

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This picture shows a cut out section of an ISR High Luminosity (low beta) Quadrupole. One can clearly see the distribution of conductors and spacers which produces the wanted quadrupolar field. The spacers are made of pure copper and the central pole of stainless steel.The superconducting wire may be seen in photo 8008591X. See also pictures 7702690X, 8008591X, 7702698X.

  11. Superconducting magnets of SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subrata Pradhan; Saxena, Y.C.; Sarkar, B.; Bansal, G.; Sharma, A.N.; Thomas, K.J.; Bedakihale, V.; Doshi, B.; Dhard, C.P.; Prasad, U.; Rathod, P.; Bahl, R.; Varadarajulu, A.; Mankani, A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnet System of SST-1 comprises of sixteen superconducting D-shaped Toroidal Field (TF) coils, nine superconducting Poloidal Field (PF) coils and a pair of resistive PF coils inside the vacuum vessel. TF magnets generate the basic 3.0 T field at the major radius of 1.1 m. Low resistance lap inter-pancake joints within and inter-coil joints between the coils have been made. Magnets are cooled with supercritical helium at 4 bar and 4.5 K, which is fed at the high field region in the middle of each of the double pancake over a hydraulic path length of 47 m. Voltage taps across joints and termination location are used for quench detection. The quench detection front-end electronics ensures fail proof quench detection based on subtraction logic. Quench detection system sends the quench trigger to the power supply system directly on a dedicated fiber optic link. Flow meters at the inlet of the TF and PF magnets, temperature sensors at the critical joint locations and at the outlet of the flow paths for enthalpy estimation, hall probes for field direction and magnitude measurements are the other sensors. A 20 V, 10 kA power supply will excite the TF magnets whereas the PF power supplies have voltages from few volts to in excess of 100 V to cater the fast current ramp-up of the PF magnets during start-up scenarios. All power supplies have been equipped with dump resisters of appropriate ratings in parallel with a series combination of DC circuit interrupters and pyro-breakers. (author)

  12. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.W.B.; Noakes, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    This book is an elementray introduction into superconductivity. The topics are the superconducting state, the magnetic properties of superconductors, type I superconductors, type II superconductors and a chapter on the superconductivity theory. (WL)

  13. Comparison of AC losses, magnetic field/current distributions and critical currents of superconducting circular pancake coils and infinitely long stacks using coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Weijia; Campbell, A M; Hong, Z; Ainslie, M D; Coombs, T A, E-mail: wy215@cam.ac.u [Electronic, Power and Energy Conversion Group, Electrical Engineering Division, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    A model is presented for calculating the AC losses, magnetic field/current density distribution and critical currents of a circular superconducting pancake coil. The assumption is that the magnetic flux lines will lie parallel to the wide faces of tapes in the unpenetrated area of the coil. Instead of using an infinitely long stack to approximate the circular coil, this paper gives an exact circular coil model using elliptic integrals. A new efficient numerical method is introduced to yield more accurate and fast computation. The computation results are in good agreement with the assumptions. For a small value of the coil radius, there is an asymmetry along the coil radius direction. As the coil radius increases, this asymmetry will gradually decrease, and the AC losses and penetration depth will increase, but the critical current will decrease. We find that if the internal radius is equal to the winding thickness, the infinitely long stack approximation overestimates the loss by 10% and even if the internal radius is reduced to zero, the error is still only 60%. The infinitely long stack approximation is therefore adequate for most practical purposes. In addition, the comparison result shows that the infinitely long stack approximation saves computation time significantly.

  14. Design of the pancake-winding central solenoid coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Nishi, Masataka; Tsuji, Hirosi

    1995-01-01

    There was a debate over whether a pancake-winding or layer-winding technique is more appropriate for the Central Solenoid (CS) coil for ITER superconducting magnet. The layer-winding CS has the advantage of homogeneous winding supporting the TF centering force without weak joints, but has many difficulties during manufacturing and quality control. On other hand, the pancake-winding has the advantage of better quality control during manufacturing and module testing but has difficulties with joints and feeders, and pipes located in the load path of the bucking force from the toroidal field coils. The compact joints, reinforcement by preformed amour, sharp bending, and double seals are applied to the design of pancake-winding CS coil and demonstrated by hardware developments. The pancake-winding CS coil by using modified existing technology is compatible with the bucking concept of the ITER magnet system. (author)

  15. Process optimization of helium cryo plant operation for SST-1 superconducting magnet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, P.; Panchal, R.; Patel, R.; Mahesuriya, G.; Sonara, D.; Srikanth G, L. N.; Garg, A.; Christian, D.; Bairagi, N.; Sharma, R.; Patel, K.; Shah, P.; Nimavat, H.; Purwar, G.; Patel, J.; Tanna, V.; Pradhan, S.

    2017-02-01

    Several plasma discharge campaigns have been carried out in steady state superconducting tokamak (SST-1). SST-1 has toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) superconducting magnet system (SCMS). The TF coils system is cooled to 4.5 - 4.8 K at 1.5 - 1.7 bar(a) under two phase flow condition using 1.3 kW helium cryo plant. Experience revealed that the PF coils demand higher pressure heads even at lower temperatures in comparison to TF coils because of its longer hydraulic path lengths. Thermal run away are observed within PF coils because of single common control valve for all PF coils in distribution system having non-uniform lengths. Thus it is routine practice to stop the cooling of PF path and continue only TF cooling at SCMS inlet temperature of ˜ 14 K. In order to achieve uniform cool down, different control logic is adopted to make cryo stable system. In adopted control logic, the SCMS are cooled down to 80 K at constant inlet pressure of 9 bar(a). After authorization of turbine A/B, the SCMS inlet pressure is gradually controlled by refrigeration J-T valve to achieve stable operation window for cryo system. This paper presents process optimization for cryo plant operation for SST-1 SCMS.

  16. 3D Cones Acquisition of Human Extremity Imaging Using a 1.5T Superconducting Magnet and an Unshielded Gradient Coil Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-05-16

    We developed ultrashort echo-time (UTE) imaging sequences with 3D Cones trajectories for a home-built compact MRI system using a 1.5T superconducting magnet and an unshielded gradient coil set. We achieved less than 7 min imaging time and obtained clear in vivo images of a human forearm with a TE of 0.4 ms. We concluded that UTE imaging using 3D Cones acquisition was successfully implemented in our 1.5T MRI system.

  17. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  18. Iberdrola project engineering in the manufacture of the ITER superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felipe, A.; Merino, A.

    2012-01-01

    ITER in a large-scale project that aims to demonstrate that it is possible to produce commercial energy from fusion. During its operational lifetime, ITER will test key technologies necessary for the next step: the demonstration fusion power plant that will prove that it is possible to capture fusion energy for commercial use. IBERDROLA Ingenieria y Construccion is the leader of a Consortium with ASG superconductors (Italy) and Elytt Energy (Spain) that is in charge of the manufacturing of one of the most relevant component: 10 Toroidal Field Coils. the development of this project presents significant technological challenges, where the main processes are the one related to high accuracy required during all manufacturing processes. (Author)

  19. NET model coil test possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, J.; Gruenhagen, A.; Herz, W.; Jentzsch, K.; Komarek, P.; Lotz, E.; Malang, S.; Maurer, W.; Noether, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Vogt, A.; Zahn, G.; Horvath, I.; Kwasnitza, K.; Marinucci, C.; Pasztor, G.; Sborchia, C.; Weymuth, P.; Peters, A.; Roeterdink, A.

    1987-11-01

    A single full size coil for NET/INTOR represents an investment of the order of 40 MUC (Million Unit Costs). Before such an amount of money or even more for the 16 TF coils is invested as much risks as possible must be eliminated by a comprehensive development programme. In the course of such a programme a coil technology verification test should finally prove the feasibility of NET/INTOR TF coils. This study report is almost exclusively dealing with such a verification test by model coil testing. These coils will be built out of two Nb 3 Sn-conductors based on two concepts already under development and investigation. Two possible coil arrangements are discussed: A cluster facility, where two model coils out of the two Nb 3 TF-conductors are used, and the already tested LCT-coils producing a background field. A solenoid arrangement, where in addition to the two TF model coils another model coil out of a PF-conductor for the central PF-coils of NET/INTOR is used instead of LCT background coils. Technical advantages and disadvantages are worked out in order to compare and judge both facilities. Costs estimates and the time schedules broaden the base for a decision about the realisation of such a facility. (orig.) [de

  20. Development of manufacturing technology of radial plate in superconducting coil for fusion reactor by diffusion bonding by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Katsutoshi; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Masuo, Hiroshi; Natsume, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    The radial plates (RPs), which is used in Toroidal field (TF) coil in ITER, are quite large, such as 13 m tall and 9 m wide, but thin, such as 10 cm thick, and are made of stainless steel. Even though they are very large structures, they require very high manufacturing tolerances and high mechanical strength at 4 K. The similar requirements will be required in the next generation fusion reactor. Therefore, the authors intend to develop efficient manufacturing methods in parallel with ITER TF coil RP manufacture. The authors therefore performed trial manufacture of the RP segments using a diffusion bonding method, namely Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). As a result of trials, it was clarified that even when HIPping is applied, the mechanical characteristic of base metal is not deteriorated. The machining period can be reduced by about 1/3 compared with the traditional manufacturing method. On the other hand, mechanical strength at 4 K is degraded due to weak bonding, that is no grain growth through joint, by HIPping. However, additional test indicates promising possibility of much better joint by higher temperature and joint surface treated HIPpings. These results justified that RP segment manufacturing is not only possible, but it is a technically valid manufacturing method that satisfies all requirements. (author)

  1. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries

  2. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onnes, H.K.

    1988-01-01

    The author traces the development of superconductivity from 1911 to 1986. Some of the areas he explores are the Meissner Effect, theoretical developments, experimental developments, engineering achievements, research in superconducting magnets, and research in superconducting electronics. The article also mentions applications shown to be technically feasible, but not yet commercialized. High-temperature superconductivity may provide enough leverage to bring these applications to the marketplace

  3. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Mortensen, K.

    1988-12-01

    This report contains lecture notes of the basic lectures presented at the 1st Topsoee Summer School on Superconductivity held at Risoe National Laboratory, June 20-24, 1988. The following lecture notes are included: L.M. Falicov: 'Superconductivity: Phenomenology', A. Bohr and O. Ulfbeck: 'Quantal structure of superconductivity. Gauge angle', G. Aeppli: 'Muons, neutrons and superconductivity', N.F. Pedersen: 'The Josephson junction', C. Michel: 'Physicochemistry of high-T c superconductors', C. Laverick and J.K. Hulm: 'Manufacturing and application of superconducting wires', J. Clarke: 'SQUID concepts and systems'. (orig.) With 10 tabs., 128 figs., 219 refs

  4. Fault Analysis of ITER Coil Power Supply System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Ho; Jun, Tao; Benfatto, Ivone

    2009-01-01

    The ITER magnet coils are all designed using superconductors with high current carrying capability. The Toroidal Field (TF) coils operate in a steadystate mode with a current of 68 kA and discharge the stored energy in case of quench with using 9 interleaved Fast Discharge Units (FDUs). The Central Solenoid (CS) coils and Poloidal Field (PF) coils operate in a pulse mode with currents of up to 45 kA and require fast variation of currents inducing more than 10 kV during normal operation on the coil terminals using Switching Network (SN) systems (CSs, PF1 and 6) and Booster and VS converters (PF2 to 5), which are series connected to Main converters. SN and FDU systems comprise high current DC circuit breakers and resistors for generating high voltage (SN) and to dissipate magnetic energy (FDUs). High transient voltages can arise due to the switching operation of SN and FD and the characteristics of resistors and stray components of DC distribution systems. Also, faults in power supply control such as shorts or grounding faults can produce higher voltages between terminals and between terminal and ground. Therefore, the design of the coil insulation, coil terminal regions, feeders, feed throughs, pipe breaks and instrumentation must take account of these high voltages during normal and abnormal conditions. Voltage insulation level can be defined and it is necessary to test the coils at higher voltages, to be sure of reliable performance during the lifetime of operation. This paper describes the fault analysis of the TF, CS and PF coil power supply systems, taking account of the stray parameter of the power supply and switching systems and inductively coupled superconducting coil models. Resistor grounding systems are included in the simulation model and all fault conditions such as converter hardware and software faults, switching system hardware and software faults, DC short circuits and single grounding faults are simulated. The occurrence of two successive faults

  5. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on superconductivity the absence of electrical resistance has always fascinated the mind of researchers with a promise of applications unachievable by conventional technologies. Since its discovery superconductivity has been posing many questions and challenges to solid state physics, quantum mechanics, chemistry and material science. Simulations arrived to superconductivity from particle physics, astrophysic, electronics, electrical engineering and so on. In seventy-five years the original promises of superconductivity were going to become reality: a microscopical theory gave to superconductivity the cloth of the science and the level of technological advances was getting higher and higher. High field superconducting magnets became commercially available, superconducting electronic devices were invented, high field accelerating gradients were obtained in superconductive cavities and superconducting particle detectors were under study. Other improvements came in a quiet progression when a tornado brought a revolution in the field: new materials had been discovered and superconductivity, from being a phenomenon relegated to the liquid Helium temperatures, became achievable over the liquid Nitrogen temperature. All the physics and the technological implications under superconductivity have to be considered ab initio

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  7. Magnetics and superconductivity section annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubell, M.S.; Dresner, L.

    1977-06-01

    The Magnetics and Superconductivity Section has the responsibility for developing superconducting magnet systems for tokamak fusion machines. This is being accomplished by carrying out those research and development needs which will provide the physics understanding and engineering data necessary to design, fabricate, and test large toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) coils. This information, in addition, supports the Large Coil Program (LCP). A number of design projects have been performed, some in support of other programs and some of a continuing nature. These efforts support the goals and requirements for both the TF and PF magnet systems. Examples are the magnet designs for the EPR, Demo, EBTR, EBT-II, and preliminary scoping for the INS project. The principal effort was expended on the iteration of the EPR Reference Design. Three features of the original reference design--the honeycomb coil structure, the oval coil shape, and the forced-flow cooling of the conductor by supercritical helium--remain as key features of the TF coils. Considerable progress has been made in the theoretical understanding of forced-flow-cooled conductors, and optimized designs with maximum stability margin can be designed to meet specific applications. Experiments which will test the theory are in progress

  8. Optimization of the protective energy removal parameters for tokamak HT7-U superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostenko, P.P.; Chudnovsky, A.N.; Posadsky, I.A. [RRC ' Kurchatov Inst.' , Nuclear Fusion Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Bi, Y.F.; Cheng, S.M.; He, Y.X. [Academia Sinica, Hefei, Anhui (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    1998-07-01

    The design of the HT-7U superconducting tokamak is in progress now. The design incorporates superconducting magnets of the toroidal field and poloidal field systems. Toroidal field system consists of 16 D-shape coils and poloidal field system consists of 12 coils. All coils will be use NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit conductor cooled with forced-flow supercritical helium at 4.5 K, 4 Bar. Quench in the superconducting magnets is accompanied byconversion of the stored magnetic field energy into a thermal one which is spent on heating of both the coil part which made transition into a normal state and dump resistors. A non-uniform heating of the coil part results in the emergence of thermomechanical stresses which can cause its destruction. The protective removal of a current is realized to prevent the coil destruction at the emergence of the quench. In that case, the faster the current removal occurs, the less the coil heating is. On the other hand, the current removal rate should not be too high in order to avoid an electric breakdown by the excited inductive voltage. Optimization of the protective energy removal parameters both for TF and PF superconducting magnets is presented. (author)

  9. Optimization of the protective energy removal parameters for tokamak HT7-U superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostenko, P.P.; Chudnovsky, A.N.; Posadsky, I.A.; Bi, Y.F.; Cheng, S.M.; He, Y.X.

    1998-01-01

    The design of the HT-7U superconducting tokamak is in progress now. The design incorporates superconducting magnets of the toroidal field and poloidal field systems. Toroidal field system consists of 16 D-shape coils and poloidal field system consists of 12 coils. All coils will be use NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit conductor cooled with forced-flow supercritical helium at 4.5 K, 4 Bar. Quench in the superconducting magnets is accompanied by conversion of the stored magnetic field energy into a thermal one which is spent on heating of both the coil part which made transition into a normal state and dump resistors. A non-uniform heating of the coil part results in the emergence of thermomechanical stresses which can cause its destruction. The protective removal of a current is realized to prevent the coil destruction at the emergence of the quench. In that case, the faster the current removal occurs, the less the coil heating is. On the other hand, the current removal rate should not be too high in order to avoid an electric breakdown by the excited inductive voltage. Optimization of the protective energy removal parameters both for TF and PF superconducting magnets is presented. (author)

  10. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakani, S.L.; Kakani, Shubhra

    2007-01-01

    The monograph provides readable introduction to the basics of superconductivity for beginners and experimentalists. For theorists, the monograph provides nice and brief description of the broad spectrum of experimental properties, theoretical concepts with all details, which theorists should learn, and provides a sound basis for students interested in studying superconducting theory at the microscopic level. Special chapter on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates is devoted

  11. Design and Fabrication of the KSTAR Poloidal Field Coil Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. K.; Choi, C. H.; Sa, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR magnet system consists of 16 toroidal field(TF) coils. 4 pairs of central solenoid(CS) coils, and 3 pairs of outer poloidal field(PF) coils. The TF coils are encased in a structure to enhance mechanical stability. The CS coil structure is supported on top of the TF coil structure and supplies a vertical compression of 15 MN to prevent lateral movement due to a repulsive force between the CS coils. The PF coil system is vertically symmetry to the machine mid-plane and consists of 6 coils and 80 support structures(i.e, 16 for PF5, 32 for PF6 and 32 fort PF7). All PF coil structures should absorb the thermal contraction difference between TF coil structure and PF coils due to cool down and endure the vertical and radial magnetic forces due to current charging. In order to satisfy these structural requirements. the PF5 coil structure is designed base on hinges and both of PF6 and PF7 coil structures based on flexible plates. The PF coil structures are assembled on the TF coil structure with an individual basement that is welded on the TF coil structure

  12. A novel approach to calculate inductance and analyze magnetic flux density of helical toroidal coil applicable to Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage systems (SMES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh Pahlavani, M.R.; Shoulaie, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, formulas are proposed for the self and mutual inductance calculations of the helical toroidal coil (HTC) by the direct and indirect methods at superconductivity conditions. The direct method is based on the Neumann's equation and the indirect approach is based on the toroidal and the poloidal components of the magnetic flux density. Numerical calculations show that the direct method is more accurate than the indirect approach at the expense of its longer computational time. Implementation of some engineering assumptions in the indirect method is shown to reduce the computational time without loss of accuracy. Comparison between the experimental measurements and simulated results for inductance, using the direct and the indirect methods indicates that the proposed formulas have high reliability. It is also shown that the self inductance and the mutual inductance could be calculated in the same way, provided that the radius of curvature is >0.4 of the minor radius, and that the definition of the geometric mean radius in the superconductivity conditions is used. Plotting contours for the magnetic flux density and the inductance show that the inductance formulas of helical toroidal coil could be used as the basis for coil optimal design. Optimization target functions such as maximization of the ratio of stored magnetic energy with respect to the volume of the toroid or the conductor's mass, the elimination or the balance of stress in some coordinate directions, and the attenuation of leakage flux could be considered. The finite element (FE) approach is employed to present an algorithm to study the three-dimensional leakage flux distribution pattern of the coil and to draw the magnetic flux density lines of the HTC. The presented algorithm, due to its simplicity in analysis and ease of implementation of the non-symmetrical and three-dimensional objects, is advantageous to the commercial software such as ANSYS, MAXWELL, and FLUX. Finally, using the

  13. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruana, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Despite reports of new, high-temperature superconductive materials almost every day, participants at the First Congress on Superconductivity do not anticipate commercial applications with these materials soon. What many do envision is the discovery of superconducting materials that can function at much warmer, perhaps even room temperatures. Others hope superconductivity will usher in a new age of technology as semiconductors and transistors did. This article reviews what the speakers had to say at the four-day congress held in Houston last February. Several speakers voiced concern that the Reagan administration's apparent lack of interest in funding superconductivity research while other countries, notably Japan, continue to pour money into research and development could hamper America's international competitiveness

  14. Performance of cold compressors in a cooling system of an R and D superconducting coil cooled with subcooled helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Yanagi, N.; Takahata, K.; Maekawa, R.; Mito, T.

    2006-01-01

    The helical coils of large helical device (LHD) have been operated in saturated helium at 4.4 K and plasma experiments have been carried out at magnetic fields lower than 3 T for 8 years. Now, it is considered that the cooling system of helical coils will be improved to enhance magnetic fields in 2006. In the improvement, the helical coils will be cooled with subcooled helium and the operating temperature of helical coils will be lowered to achieve the designed field of 3 T and enhance cryogenic stabilities. Two cold compressors will be used in the cooling system of helical coils to generate subcooled helium. In the present study, the performance of cold compressors has been investigated, using a cooling system of R and D coil, to apply cold compressors to the cooling system of helical coils. Actual surge lines of cold compressors were observed and the stable operation area was obtained. Automatic operations were also performed within the area. In the automatic operations, the suitable pressure of a saturated helium bath, calculated from the rotation speed of the 1st cold compressor, was regulated by bypass valve. From these results, stable operations will be expected in the cooling system of helical coils

  15. The giant superconducting magnet system of 10,000 tons mass for fusion experiment at Cadarache, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) being built at Cadarache, France has many unique features and is one of the biggest scientific adventures in the history of science and technology. Seven partners (India, EU, US, China, Japan, Korea and Russia) have made an International Organization situated at Cadarache, France to provide direction and co-ordination for R and D and construction of this project. The R and D labs and manufacturing industries are spread in these seven partner countries. Components manufactured in these countries will be transported to Cadarache in France for assembly. Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat is coordinating this project activities on behalf of India. The magnet system, required for confinement and control of plasma leading to fusion reaction in ITER is one of the key systems of this project. There are 18 TF (Toroidal Field) Coils, 6 PF (Poloidal Field) coils, 6 CS (Central Solenoid) coils and 18 correction coils (CC), all of which are of superconducting type. All TF and CS coils have Nb3Sn superconductor and all PF and CC coils have NbTi superconductor. Each TF coil has height 15 m and width 9 m and 330 tons mass. The biggest PF coil has diameter 24 m and 300 tons mass. The total mass of these superconducting magnet systems is about 10000 tons. Use of Nb3Sn superconductor for manufacturing superconducting cables for successful use had not reached a matured stage earlier and this project gave a thrust for significant R and D activities worldwide and now due to this project, it is a matured and reliable technology. The jacketing and manufacturing of long cables need up to about 760 m long special infrastructure at Industry. The special building built for PF coil winding at ITER, Cadarache site is of size 250 m X 45 m. All these coils are made using cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC). These long CICCs have to carry current as high as 68 kA in case of TF coils. Due to this high current and

  16. Updating the Design of the Poloidal Field Coils for the ITER Magnet System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Mitchell, N.; Jong, C.; Bessette, D.

    2006-01-01

    The ITER superconducting coil system consists of 18 Toroidal Field coils, six Poloidal Field (PF) coils, six Central Solenoid (CS) modules, 18 Correction Coils and their feeders. The six PF coils are attached to the TF coil cases through flexible plates or sliding supports allowing radial displacements. The PF coils and CS modules provide suitable magnetic fields for plasma shaping and position control. The PF coils use NbTi superconductor, cooled by supercritical helium. This gives a substantial cost saving compared to Nb 3 Sn and the elimination of a reaction heat treatment greatly simplifies the insulation of such large diameter coils. The cable configuration is 6 sub-cables arranged around a central cooling space. The conductors have a heavy square walled stainless steel jacket. The latest parameters of conductor design are evaluated by analysis of the minimum quench energy and hotspot temperature. The PF coils are self supporting as regards the radial magnetic loads. The vertical loads on each PF coil are transmitted to the TF coil cases. Load transmission is through flexible plates for the PF2 to PF5 coils or sliding supports for the PF1 and PF6 coils with fibreslip bearing surfaces. The supports for the PF winding consist of a set of clamping plates and stud bolts. The shape of the clamping plates has been designed to minimize stresses in the winding pack insulation. Bolts are pre-tensioned to keep pressure between the winding pack and clamping plate. Because of the difficulties in replacing the PF coils, the most unreliable component (the coil insulation) is designed with extra redundancy. There are two insulation layers with a thin metal screen in between. By monitoring the voltage of the intermediate screen, it is possible to detect an incipient short, defined as a short in only one of the two insulation layers. Adjustment of the screen voltage level may allow the shot growth to the stopped once it is detected. Alternately the faulty double pancake must

  17. Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

  18. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  19. Electronics and instrumentation for the SST-1 superconducting magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristi, Yohan; Pradhan, Subrata; Varmora, Pankaj; Banaudha, Moni; Praghi, Bhadresh R.; Prasad, Upendra

    2015-01-01

    Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India is now in operation phase. The SST-1 magnet system consists of sixteen superconducting (SC), D-shaped Toroidal Field (TF) coils and nine superconducting Poloidal Field (PF) coils together with a pair of resistive PF coils, inside the vacuum vessel of SST-1. The magnets were cooled down to 4.5 K using either supercritical or two-phase helium, after which they were charged up to 10 kA of transport current. Precise quench detection system, cryogenic temperature, magnetic field, strain, displacement, flow and pressure measurements in the Superconducting (SC) magnet were mandatory. The Quench detection electronics required to protect the SC magnets from the magnet Quench therefore system must be reliable and prompt to detect the quench from the harsh tokamak environment and high magnetic field interference. A ∼200 channels of the quench detection system for the TF magnet are working satisfactorily with its design criteria. Over ∼150 channels Temperature measurement system was implemented for the several locations in the magnet and hydraulic circuits with required accuracy of 0.1K at bellow 30K cryogenic temperature. Whereas the field, strain and displacement measurements were carried out at few predefined locations on the magnet. More than 55 channels of Flow and pressure measurements are carried out to know the cooling condition and the mass flow of the liquid helium (LHe) coolant for the SC Magnet system. This report identifies the different in-house modular signal conditioning electronics and instrumentation systems, calibration at different levels and the outcomes for the SST-1 TF magnet system. (author)

  20. Active internal corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.; Dahl, P.

    1986-01-01

    Trim or corrector coils to correct main magnet field errors and provide higher multipole fields for beam optics purposes are a standard feature of superconducting magnet accelerator systems. This paper describes some of the design and construction features of powered internal trim coils and a sampling of the test results obtained

  1. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  2. Eccentric Coil Test Facility (ECTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, P.B.; Walstrom, P.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for testing superconducting coils under some conditions peculiar to tokamak systems is given. A primary element of the proposed facility is a large 25 MJ background solenoid. Discussions of the mechanical structure, the stress distribution and the thermal stability for this coil are included. The systems for controlling the facility and diagnosing test coil behavior are also described

  3. Stress analysis of the conceptual design configurations of constant tension D-shaped superconducting toroidal field coils for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernades, R.; Smith, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Conceptual design configurations of D-shaped toroidal field coils applicable to the TNS program are studied under the action of the toroidal field loading condition and the vertical field loading condition, but not the fault condition. Although the analysis is specific to an 8 Tesla design using a niobium titanium superconductor, the results can be extended to a coil with a different conductor material and subjected to a field of different magnitude provided the condition of linear elasticity is not violated. The analysis technique used is the finite element method, with three dimensional finite elements defined in the ANSYS computer code, and supplemented by closed form analytical solutions

  4. Mathematical model to determine the dimensions of superconducting cylindrical coils with a given central field – the case study for MgB{sub 2} conductors with isotropic I{sub c}(B) characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitel, Jozef, E-mail: jozef.pitel@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Melišek, Tibor [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Tropeano, Matteo; Nardelli, Davide; Tumino, Andrea [Columbus Superconductors, Via delle Terre Rosse 30, I-16133 Genova (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Influence of the winding geometry on central field of cylindrical coils is studied. • Procedure to determine dimensions of coils with a given central field is developed. • The model is applied to MgB{sub 2}/Ni/Cu conductors with isotropic I{sub c}(B) characteristic. • Influence of the thickness of stabilizing copper on coil parameters is analyzed. • Optimization with respect to coil operating current and wire length is discussed. - Abstract: In this work, we present a mathematical model which enables to design cylindrical coils with a given central field, made of the superconducting conductor with isotropic I{sub c}(B) characteristic. The model results in a computer code that enables to find out the coil dimensions, and to calculate the coil parameters such as critical current, maximum field in the winding and field non-uniformity on the coil axis. The I{sub c}(B) characteristic of the conductor is represented by the set of data measured in discrete points. This approach allows us to express the I{sub c}(B) as a function linearized in parts. Then, it is possible to involve the central field of the coil, coil dimensions, and parameters of the conductor, including its I{sub c}(B) characteristic, in one equation which can be solved using ordinary numerical non-linear methods. Since the coil dimensions and conductor parameters are mutually linked in one equation with respect to a given coil central field, it is possible to analyze an influence of one parameter on the other one. The model was applied to three commercially available MgB{sub 2}/Ni/Cu conductors produced by Columbus Superconductors. The results of simulations with the I{sub c}(B) data at 20 K illustrate that there exists a set of winding geometries that generate a required central field, changing from a disc shape to long thin solenoid. Further, we analyze how the thickness of stabilizing copper influences the coil dimensions, overall conductor length, coil critical current, maximum

  5. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlikar, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Amongst the numerous scientific discoveries that the 20th century has to its credit, superconductivity stands out as an exceptional example of having retained its original dynamism and excitement even for more than 80 years after its discovery. It has proved itself to be a rich field by continually offering frontal challenges in both research and applications. Indeed, one finds that a majority of internationally renowned condensed matter theorists, at some point of their career, have found excitement in working in this important area. Superconductivity presents a unique example of having fetched Nobel awards as many as four times to date, and yet, interestingly enough, the field still remains open for new insights and discoveries which could undeniably be of immense technological value. 1 fig

  6. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book profiles the research activity of 42 companies in the superconductivity field, worldwide. It forms a unique and comprehensive directory to this emerging technology. For each research site, it details the various projects in progress, analyzes the level of activity, pinpoints applications and R and D areas, reviews strategies and provides complete contact information. It lists key individuals, offers international comparisons of government funding, reviews market forecasts and development timetables and features a bibliography of selected articles on the subject

  7. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buller, L.; Carrillo, F.; Dietert, R.; Kotziapashis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Superconductors are materials which combine the property of zero electric resistance with the capability to exclude any adjacent magnetic field. This leads to many large scale applications such as the much publicized levitating train, generation of magnetic fields in MHD electric generators, and special medical diagnostic equipment. On a smaller-scale, superconductive materials could replace existing resistive connectors and decrease signal delays by reducing the RLC time constants. Thus, a computer could operate at much higher speeds, and consequently at lower power levels which would reduce the need for heat removal and allow closer spacing of circuitry. Although technical advances and proposed applications are constantly being published, it should be recognized that superconductivity is a slowly developing technology. It has taken scientists almost eighty years to learn what they now know about this material and its function. The present paper provides an overview of the historical development of superconductivity and describes some of the potential applications for this new technology as it pertains to the electronics industry

  8. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    During 2007, a large amount of the work was centred on the ITER project and related tasks. The activities based on low-temperature superconducting (LTS) materials included the manufacture and qualification of ITER full-size conductors under relevant operating conditions, the design of conductors and magnets for the JT-60SA tokamak and the manufacture of the conductors for the European dipole facility. A preliminary study was also performed to develop a new test facility at ENEA in order to test long-length ITER or DEMO full-size conductors. Several studies on different superconducting materials were also started to create a more complete database of superconductor properties, and also for use in magnet design. In this context, an extensive measurement campaign on transport and magnetic properties was carried out on commercially available NbTi strands. Work was started on characterising MgB 2 wire and bulk samples to optimise their performance. In addition, an intense experimental study was started to clarify the effect of mechanical loads on the transport properties of multi-filamentary Nb 3 Sn strands with twisted or untwisted superconducting filaments. The experimental activity on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials was mainly focussed on the development and characterisation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-X (YBCO) based coated conductors. Several characteristics regarding YBCO deposition, current transport performance and tape manufacture were investigated. In the framework of chemical approaches for YBCO film growth, a new method, developed in collaboration with the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca (TUCN), Romania, was studied to obtain YBCO film via chemical solution deposition, which modifies the well-assessed metallic organic deposition trifluoroacetate (MOD-TFA) approach. The results are promising in terms of critical current and film thickness values. YBCO properties in films with artificially added pinning sites were characterised in collaboration with

  9. Large coil task and results of testing US coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1986-01-01

    The United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland have collaborated since 1978 in development of superconducting toroidal field coils for fusion reactor applications. The United States provided a test facility nd three coils; the other participants, one coil each. All coils have the same interface dimensions and performance requirements (stable at 8 T), but internal design was decided by each team. Two US coil teams chose bath-cooled NbTi, 10-kA conductors. One developed a Nb 3 Sn conductor, cooled by internal flow, rated at 18 kA. All US coils have diagnostic instrumentation and imbedded heaters that enable stability tests and simulated nuclear heating experiments. In single-coil tests, each coil operated at full current in self-field (6.4 T). In six-coil tests that began in July 1986, one US coil and the Japanese coil hve been successfully operated at full current at 8 T. The other coils have operated as background coils while awaiting their turn as test coil. Coil tests have been informative and results gratifying. The facility has capably supported coil testing and its operation has provided information that will be useful in designing future fusion systems. Coil capabilities beyond nominal design points will be determined

  10. Status of the cold test facility for the JT-60SA tokamak toroidal field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Maksoud, Walid, E-mail: walid.abdelmaksoud@cea.fr; Bargueden, Patrick; Bouty, André; Dispau, Gilles; Donati, André; Eppelle, Dominique; Genini, Laurent; Guiho, Patrice; Guihard, Quentin; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Kuster, Olivier; Médioni, Damien; Molinié, Frédéric; Sinanna, Armand; Solenne, Nicolas; Somson, Sébastien; Vieillard, Laurence

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The 5 K cryogenic loop includes a 500 W refrigerator and a She cold pump. • The coils are energized thanks to a 25.7 kA power supply and HTS current leads. • Temperature margin tests between 5 K and 7.5 K will be made on each coil. • A magnet safety system protects each double pancake of the coil in case of quench. • Instrumentation is monitored on a 1 Hz to 10 kHz fast acquisition system. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a fusion experiment which is jointly constructed by Japan and Europe and which shall contribute to the early realization of fusion energy, by providing support to the operation of ITER, and by addressing key physics issues for ITER and DEMO. In order to achieve these goals, the existing JT-60U experiment will be upgraded to JT-60SA by using superconducting coils. The 18 TF coils of the JT-60SA device will be provided by European industry and tested in a Cold Test Facility (CTF) at CEA Saclay. The coils will be tested at the nominal current of 25.7 kA and will be cooled with supercritical helium between 5 K and 7.5 K to check the temperature margin against a quench. The main objective of these tests is to check the TF coils performance and hence mitigate the fabrication risks. The most important components of the facility are: a 11.5 m × 6.5 m large cryostat in which the TF coils will be thermally insulated by vacuum; a 500 W helium refrigerator and a valve box to cool the coils down to 5 K and circulate 24 g/s of supercritical helium through the winding pack and through the casing; a power supply and HTS current leads to energize the coil; the control and instrumentation equipment (sensors, PLC's, supervision system, fast data acquisition system, etc.) and the Magnet Safety System (MSS) that protects the coils in case of quench. The paper will give an overview of the design of this large facility and the status of its realization.

  11. Effect of a superconducting coil as a fault current limiter on current density distribution in BSCCO tape after an over-current pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallouli, M; Yamaguchi, S.; Shyshkin, O.

    2017-01-01

    The development of power transmission lines based on long-length high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes is complicated and technically challenging task. A serious problem for transmission line operation could become HTS power cable damage due to over-current pulse conditions. To avoid the cable damage in any urgent case the superconducting coil technology, i.e. superconductor fault current limiter (SFCL) is required. Comprehensive understanding of the current density characteristics of HTS tapes in both cases, either after pure over-current pulse or after over-current pulse limited by SFCL, is needed to restart or to continue the operation of the power transmission line. Moreover, current density distribution along and across the HTS tape provides us with the sufficient information about the quality of the tape performance in different current feeding regimes. In present paper we examine BSCCO HTS tape under two current feeding regimes. The first one is 100A feeding preceded by 900A over-current pulse. In this case none of tape protection was used. The second scenario is similar to the fist one but SFCL is used to limit an over-current value. For both scenarios after the pulse is gone and the current feeding is set up at 100A we scan magnetic field above the tape by means of Hall probe sensor. Then the feeding is turned of and the magnetic field scanning is repeated. Using the inverse problem numerical solver we calculate the corresponding direct and permanent current density distributions during the feeding and after switch off. It is demonstrated that in the absence of SFCL the current distribution is highly peaked at the tape center. At the same time the current distribution in the experiment with SFCL is similar to that observed under normal current feeding condition. The current peaking in the first case is explained by the effect of an opposite electric field induced at the tape edges during the overcurrent pulse decay, and by degradation of

  12. Two tests of electric fields, second-order in source-velocity terms of closed, steady currents: (1) an electron beam; (2) a superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    One particular prediction of Maxwell's theory that has been previously neglected is that the motion of charges traveling in closed loops produces no constant electric fields. This study presents and analyzes the results of two new experiments designed to test for second-order, source-velocity electric fields from steady, closed currents and analyzes another experiment in light of these fields. The first experiment employed an electron beam. The second used a niobium-titanium coil designed so that the voltage measurement configuration could be easily switched from a Faraday to a non-faraday configuration between sets of runs. The implications of the observation of a null charge on magnetically suspended superconducting spheres vis-a-vis the second-order, source-velocity fields were discussed as the third case. The observation of a null potential corresponding to a null effective charge from a hypothetical velocity-squared field in both the beam and the coil experiment placed the upper bound on a field term at 0.02 with respect a Coulomb term. An observed null charge on the suspended spheres reduced this bound to 0.001. Such an upper bound is strong evidence against alternative theories predicting a relative contribution of the order of unity for a simple velocity-squared term. A simple velocity-squared electric field would be indistinguishable from a velocity-squared charge variation. The latter test limits such a charge variation to 0.001 of the total charge. The suspended-spheres test allowed the previously neglected issue of a general second-order, source-velocity electric field to be addressed. The observed null charge in this test contradicts and thus eliminates a hypothesized, general, electric field expression containing three second-order, source-velocity terms

  13. Quench propagation and quench detection in the TF system of JT-60SA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, Benoit; Duchateau, Jean-Luc; Meuris, Chantal; Ciazynski, Daniel; Nicollet, Sylvie; Zani, Louis; Polli, Gian-Mario

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The JT-60SA primary quench detection system will be based on voltage measurements. • The early quench propagation was studied in the JT-60SA TF conductor. • The impact of the conductor jacket on the hot spot criterion was quantified. • The detection parameters were investigated for different quench initiations. -- Abstract: In the framework of the JT-60SA project, France and Italy will provide to JAEA 18 Toroidal Field (TF) coils including NbTi cable-in-conduit conductors. During the tokamak operation, these coils could experience a quench, an incidental event corresponding to the irreversible transition from superconducting state to normal resistive state. Starting from a localized disturbance, the normal zone propagates along the conductor and dissipates a large energy due to Joule heating, which can cause irreversible damages. The detection has to be fast enough (a few seconds) to trigger the current discharge, so as to dump the stored magnetic energy into an external resistor. The JT-60SA primary quench detection system will be based on voltage measurements, which are the most rapid technology. The features of the detection system must be adjusted so as to detect the most probable quenches, while avoiding inopportune fast safety discharges. This requires a reliable simulation of the early quench propagation, performed in this study with the Gandalf code. The conductor temperature reached during the current discharge must be kept under a maximal value, according to the hot spot criterion. In the present study, a hot spot criterion temperature of 150 K was taken into account and the role of each conductor component (strands, helium and conduit) was analyzed. The detection parameters were then investigated for different hypotheses regarding the quench initiation

  14. LHC bending magnet coil

    CERN Multimedia

    A short test version of coil of wire used for the LHC dipole magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair.

  15. Conceptual design of a superconducting coil system cooled by forced flow HE II for the central column of net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J.L.; Turck, B.

    1987-01-01

    In order to increase the maximum flux sweep, a present trend is to design ohmic coils producing fields as high as II teslas. In Niobium-Titanium, critical current densities of 10 9 A/m 2 at 1.8 K under a field of 11 teslas are now claimed by several manufacturers. This in addition enables to make use of the outstanding cooling properties of He II. The forced flow technics can again be envisaged for He II to remove the heat load. Two solutions are investigated. The first one uses a 40 kA cable wound in double pancakes. The second one makes use of several conductors layer wound and current supplied in parallel

  16. Method and apparatus for balancing the magnetic field detecting loops of a cryogenic gradiometer using trimming coils and superconducting disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutes, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus for and a method of measuring the difference in intensity between two coplanar magnetic field vector components at two different points in space. The device is comprised of two interconnected, relatively large, loop patterns of opposite, flux cancelling, winding sense. One or both loops include a trimming element that is itself formed of two interconnected, relatively small, loop patterns of opposite, flux cancelling, winding sense. The device is analyzed for imbalance between the two large loops and is then balanced by placing a balancing superconducting disk of the proper characteristic in or near one of the two small loops of the trimming element. The so-trimmed apparatus forms a gradiometer of substantially improved mensuration

  17. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed

  18. Operation of SST-1 TF power supply during SST-1 campaigns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Vora, Murtuza M.; Ojha, Amit; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Bhavsar, Chirag

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • SST-1 TF power supply is 12 pulse SCR converter circuit. • TF power supply protection, measurement and control scheme are explained. • Quench, emergency and normal shot process is explained and results of SST-1 campaigns are shown. • Dynamic control of TF current. • The paper shows the results of last ten SST-1 campaigns. - Abstract: SST-1 TF power supply provides the direct current for the required magnetic field of TF coil. TF power supply includes transformer, 12-pulse converter, bus bar, water-cooled cable, protection and measuring equipments, and isolator, VME DAC system and GUI software. TF power supply is operated through GUI software built in TCL/Tk. VME DAC system monitors the parameters, provides On/Off commands, voltage and current references and initiates predefined reference to emergency shutdown. The emergency shutdown is hardwired to TF power supply from central control. During quench power supply converter opens DCCB and dump resistor is connected in the circuit and VME DAC system acquires bus bar voltage, dump voltage and dump current. Operation of TF power supply also requires monitoring of SCR and transformer temperature and water flow rate of water-cooled cable during high current long pulse shot. Before start up of TF power supply a quench simulation is performed to check the readiness of protection. This paper describes pre startup operation, normal shot operation, emergency and quench process, dynamic control and complete shutdown operation of TF power supply.

  19. Operation of SST-1 TF power supply during SST-1 campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar, E-mail: dinesh@ipr.res.in; Vora, Murtuza M.; Ojha, Amit; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Bhavsar, Chirag

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • SST-1 TF power supply is 12 pulse SCR converter circuit. • TF power supply protection, measurement and control scheme are explained. • Quench, emergency and normal shot process is explained and results of SST-1 campaigns are shown. • Dynamic control of TF current. • The paper shows the results of last ten SST-1 campaigns. - Abstract: SST-1 TF power supply provides the direct current for the required magnetic field of TF coil. TF power supply includes transformer, 12-pulse converter, bus bar, water-cooled cable, protection and measuring equipments, and isolator, VME DAC system and GUI software. TF power supply is operated through GUI software built in TCL/Tk. VME DAC system monitors the parameters, provides On/Off commands, voltage and current references and initiates predefined reference to emergency shutdown. The emergency shutdown is hardwired to TF power supply from central control. During quench power supply converter opens DCCB and dump resistor is connected in the circuit and VME DAC system acquires bus bar voltage, dump voltage and dump current. Operation of TF power supply also requires monitoring of SCR and transformer temperature and water flow rate of water-cooled cable during high current long pulse shot. Before start up of TF power supply a quench simulation is performed to check the readiness of protection. This paper describes pre startup operation, normal shot operation, emergency and quench process, dynamic control and complete shutdown operation of TF power supply.

  20. Toroidal field coils for the PDX machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnell, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the engineering design features of the TF coils for the PDX machine. Included are design details of the electrical insulation, water cooling, and coil segment joint which allows access to the central machine area. A discussion of the problems anticipated in the manufacture and the planned solutions are presented

  1. Development of superconducting equipment for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Masayuki; Ueda, Toshio; Hiue, Hisaaki; Ohgushi, Kouzou

    1993-01-01

    At Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., the development of superconductivity was started from 1960, and superconducting equipment for fusion device has been developed for ten years. The superconducting equipment, which is developed for fusion by Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., are able to be grouped in three categories which are current lead, superconducting coil and superconducting bus-line. The current lead is an electrical feeder between a superconducting coil and an electrical power supply. The rated current of developed current lead is 30kA at continuous use and 100kA at short time use respectively. The advanced disk type coil is developed for the toroidal field coil and some coils are developed for critical current measurement. Superconductor is applied to the superconducting bus-line between the superconducting coils and the current leads, and the bus-line is being developed for the Large Helical Device. This report describes an abstract of these equipment. (author)

  2. Study of superconducting Nb{sub 3}Sn coils; Etude de bobinages supraconducteurs en Nb{sub 3}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivet, B

    1963-07-01

    Composite superconducting Nb{sub 3}Sn wires with a diameter of 0.5 mm and a length of about 100 m were made, and Hc-Ic diagrams were plotted up to fields of 80 kgauss for short lengths. Two solenoids producing fields of about 20 kgauss were studied. Nb{sub 3}Sn solenoids, as opposed to those of Nb-Zr or Nb-Ti, appear to have a predictable behavior. Solenoids with less insulation produced stronger fields than heavily insulated solenoids. (author) [French] Une etude des fils composites supraconducteurs de Nb{sub 3}Sn a ete entreprise au C.E.N. Saclay, en collaboration avec la Societe S.O.D.E.R.X. Des fils de 0,5 mm de diametre et d'une centaine de metres de longueur ont ete produits de facon experimentale. Des diagrammes Hc-Ic ont pu etre traces, jusqu'en des champs de 80 kG, sur des echantillons de petite longueur. Deux solenoides ont ete etudies produisant les champs de l'ordre de 20 kg. Il semble que, contrairement aux alliages Nb-Zr ou Nb-Ti, les solenoides en Nb{sub 3}Sn aient un comportement previsible d'apres les tests sur des echantillons courts. On montrera d'autre part qu'un bobinage a faible isolement peut produire un champ notablement plus eleve qu'un bobinage isole. Une production plus extensive permettra, dans les semaines a venir, la fabrication de solenoides de plus grosse dimension et produisant des champs plus eleves. (auteur)

  3. Startup of large coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils. (author)

  4. Supporting device for Toroidal coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Takao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the response of a toroidal coil supporting device upon earthquakes and improve the earthquake proofness in a tokamak type thermonuclear device. Constitution: Structural materials having large longitudinal modulus and enduring great stresses, for example, stainless steels are used as the toroidal coil supporting legs and heat insulating structural materials are embedded in a nuclear reactor base mats below the supporting legs. Furthermore, heat insulating concretes are spiked around the heat insulating structural materials to prevent the intrusion of heat to the toroidal coils. The toroidal coils are kept at cryogenic state and superconductive state for the conductors. In this way, the period of proper vibrations of the toroidal coils and the toroidal coil supporting structures can be shortened thereby decreasing the seismic response. Furthermore, since the strength of the supporting legs is increased, the earthquake proofness of the coils can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  6. Design and modelling of a SMES coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Weijia; Campbell, A M; Coombs, T A, E-mail: wy215@cam.ac.u [EPEC Superconductivity group, Engineering Department, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    The design of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil wound by coated conductors has been presented. Based on an existing model for coated conductor pancake coils, this paper analysed the magnetic field and current density distribution of the coil at two different operation temperatures, 77K and 22K. A comparison table of the critical currents and AC losses at these two temperatures has been presented. Several steps to improve the transport current of the coil have been suggested as well.

  7. Superconducting magnet and cryostat for a space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, W. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Smith, L. H.; Taylor, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes the design concepts, development, and testing of a superconducting coil and cryostat for an orbiting superconducting magnetic spectrometer. Several coils were subject to overall thermal performance and coil charging tests. The coils have low but persistent currents and have proven themselves to be rugged and reliable for mobile balloon flights. Satellite experiments will be conducted on a new, similar design.

  8. Large coil program support structure conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to perform tests on both pool boiling and force cooled superconducting toroidal field coils. The tests will attempt to approximate conditions anticipated in an ignition tokamak. The test requirements resulted in a coil support design which accommodates up to six (6) test coils and is mounted to a structure capable of resisting coil interactions. The steps leading to the present LCP coil support structure design, details on selected structural components, and the basic assembly sequence are discussed

  9. A code for calculating force and temperature of a bitter plate type toroidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, U.

    1989-01-01

    To assist the design effort of the TF coils for CIT, a set of programs was developed to calculate the transient spatial distribution of the current density, the temperature and the forces in the TF coil conductor region. The TF coils are of the Bitter (disk) type design and therefore have negligible variation of current density in the toroidal direction. During the TF pulse, voltages are induced which cause the field and current to diffuse in the minor radial direction. This penetration, combined with the increase of resistance due to the temperature rise determines the distribution of the current. After the current distribution has been determined, the in-plane (TF-TF) and the out-of-plane (TF-PF) forces in the conductor are computed. The predicted currents and temperatures have been independently corroborated using the SPARK code which has been modified for this type of problem. 6 figs

  10. Electromagnetic design of superconducting quadrupoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rossi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We study how the critical gradient depends on the coil layout in a superconducting quadrupole for particle accelerators. We show that the results relative to a simple sector coil are well representative of the coil layouts that have been used to build several quadrupoles in the past 30 years. Using a semianalytical approach, we derive a formula that gives the critical gradient as a function of the coil cross-sectional area, of the magnet aperture, and of the superconducting cable parameters. This formula is used to evaluate the efficiency of several types of coil layouts (shell, racetrack, block, open midplane.

  11. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-01-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb 3 Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting μ meson channel and π meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration

  12. Superconducting energy storage magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyssa, Y.M.; Boom, R.W.; Young, W.C.; McIntosh, G.E.; Abdelsalam, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting magnet is described comprising: (a) a first, outer coil of one layer of conductor including at least a superconducting composite material; (b) a second, inner coil of one layer of conductor including at least a superconducting composite material. The second coil disposed adjacent to the first coil with each turn of the second inner coil at substantially the same level as a turn on the first coil; (c) an inner support structure between the first and second coils and engaged to the conductors thereof, including support rails associated with each turn of conductor in each coil and in contact therewith along its length at positions on the inwardly facing periphery of the conductor. The rail associated with each conductor is electrically isolated from other rails in the inner support structure. The magnetic field produced by a current flowing in the same direction through the conductors of the first and second coils produces a force on the conductors that are directed inwardly toward the inner support structure

  13. Design considerations for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb 3 Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the U.S. TIBER concept. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils

  14. CERN News: Selection of the type of superconducting coil for the Omega project; New intensity records at the proton synchrotron; Progress with the Spiral Reader film measuring equipment; New technique at transition energy on the proton synchrotron; CERN Courier 10th anniversary; Equipment travelling from and to Serpukhov

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    CERN News: Selection of the type of superconducting coil for the Omega project; New intensity records at the proton synchrotron; Progress with the Spiral Reader film measuring equipment; New technique at transition energy on the proton synchrotron; CERN Courier 10th anniversary; Equipment travelling from and to Serpukhov

  15. Critical current density and flux pinning in superconducting wires and coils of silver-clad Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, S.X.; Liu, H.K.; Apperley, M.H.; Song, K.H.; Sorrell, C.C.; Guo, S.J.; Loberg, B.; Easterling, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    The critical current density (J c ) of Ag-clad of Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O has been measured to be about 12,000 A/cm 2 at 77 K in zero field. This wire was rolled into a tape of thickness 0.1 mm and width of 2 to 3 mm, and a coil of 35 mm diameter was formed. The J c of this coil was measured to be about 2,000 A/cm 2 at 77 K over the full length (1.00 meter) of the coil. In this paper compositions, heat treatment parameters, and cold-deformation for enhancement of J c are presented. The microstructure is characterized and pinning interactions as well as possible weak links are emphasised. (orig.)

  16. Study on usage of fluorocarbon for toroidal field coil cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Arai, Takashi

    1998-09-01

    In JT-60 machine, usage of fluorocarbon as an alternate coolant to a cooling channel of toroidal field coil (TF coil) in which a crack was detected is investigated. Fluorinert (a registered trademark of 3M) liquid which is one of fluorocarbon was reviewed, and liquid 'FC-43' was found as an appropriate one for TF coils cooling because of its physical properties about boiling point and thermal capacity. Fortunately, Fluorinert does not have impact on the greenhouse effect for the earth under the temperature of its boiling point. And thermal analysis shows that the cooling effectiveness obtained with liquid 'FC-43' for TF coils is rather well. Moreover, corrosion tests were carried out between liquid 'FC-43' and materials used in JT-60 by considering deterioration of TF coils. The test results demonstrate that there is no problem in applying liquid 'FC-43' as a coolant to cooling channel of TF coils. Results obtained above conclude that usage of fluorocarbon is one of the effective means to perform further experiments in JT-60. (author)

  17. Superconductivity in power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings volume presents 24 conference papers and 15 posters dealing with the following aspects: 1) Principles and elementary aspects of high-temperature superconductivity (3 plenary lectures); 2) Preparation, properties and materials requirements of metallic or oxide superconductors (critical current behaviour, soldered joints, structural studies); 3) Magnet technology (large magnets for thermonuclear fusion devices; magnets for particle accelerators and medical devices); 4) Magnetic levitation and superconductivity; 5) Cryogenics; 6) Energy storage systems using superconducting coils (SMES); 7) Superconducting power transmission cables, switches, transformers, and generator systems for power plant; 8) Supporting activities, industrial aspects, patents. There are thirty-eight records in the ENERGY database relating to individual conference papers. (MM) [de

  18. Calculation of alternating current losses in stacks and coils made of second generation high temperature superconducting tapes for large scale applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zermeno, Victor M. R.; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    A homogenization method to model a stack of second generation High Temperature Superconducting tapes under AC applied transport current or magnetic field has been obtained. The idea is to find an anisotropic bulk equivalent for the stack such that the geometrical layout of the internal alternatin...

  19. Test results for a Bi-2223 HTS racetrack coil for generator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salasoo, L.; Herd, K.G.; Laskaris, E.T.; Hart, H.R. Jr.; Chari, M.V.K.

    1996-01-01

    Testing, results and analysis of a Bi-2223 model superconducting generator coil produced under the DOE Superconductivity Partnership Initiative are presented. The test arrangement enables coil energization with dc and transient currents over a range of operating temperatures to explore coil performance under conditions analogous to those that would be experienced by a superconducting generator field coil. Analytical calculations of coil ac and ohmic losses and temperature rise compare well with experimental measurements. Good performance is predicted for a typical 3-phase fault condition. Coil steady state and transient performance can be predicted with confidence for full scale superconductor application

  20. Status of the GA/MCA 12 Tesla Coil Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, J.S.; Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.Y.; Hsu, Y.H.

    1980-09-01

    The current status of the Team One effort of the DOE/OFE/D and T 12 Tesla Coil Development Program is presented. Subatmospheric, helium bath cooled, NbTiTa alloy is employed for the test coil, and ETF TF-coil concept. General Atomic is the Team One leader, with Magnetic Corporation of American as industrial subcontractor

  1. Insulating process for HT-7U central solenoid model coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Yimin; Pan Wanjiang; Wu Songtao; Wan Yuanxi

    2003-01-01

    The HT-7U superconducting Tokamak is a whole superconducting magnetically confined fusion device. The insulating system of its central solenoid coils is critical to its properties. In this paper the forming of the insulating system and the vacuum-pressure-impregnating (VPI) are introduced, and the whole insulating process is verified under the super-conducting experiment condition

  2. Superconducting accelerator magnet design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting dipoles, quadrupoles and correction magnets are necessary to achieve the high magnetic fields required for big accelerators presently in construction or in the design phase. Different designs of superconducting accelerator magnets are described and the designs chosen at the big accelerator laboratories are presented. The most frequently used cosθ coil configuration is discussed in detail. Approaches for calculating the magnetic field quality including coil end fields are presented. Design details of the cables, coils, mechanical structures, yokes, helium vessels and cryostats including thermal radiation shields and support structures used in superconducting magnets are given. Necessary material properties are mentioned. Finally, the main results of magnetic field measurements and quench statistics are presented. (orig.)

  3. Remote maintenance of tandem mirror hybrid coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid Coils (superconducting coils with normal conducting inserts) are being employed with increasing frequency on Tandem Mirror Devices to obtain high field strengths. The normal conducting copper inserts are short lived in comparison to their encircling superconductors. It becomes desirable, therefore, to devise design features and maintenance procedures to replace the inner normal conducting coils without simultaneously replacing the longer lived (and significantly more costly) superconducting coils. The high neutron wall loadings require that the task be accomplished by remote control. The approach is to permanently mount the coil assemblies on track mounted carriages which serve, during machine operation merely as structural supports, but during maintenance procedures as moveable transport devices. The carriages incorporate all necessary provisions to facilitate remote maintenance operations and to adjust and align the coil assemblies with respect to adjacent machine components. The vacuum vessel is severed on both sides of the hybrid coil by means of a remote cutting machine. The entire coil is transported horizontally, normal to the machine axis to a nearby repair station. Prepositioned carriage mounted repair equipment at the repair station withdraws the damaged normal coil as a single entity and inserts a preassembled spare unit. The repaired hybrid coil is reassembled to the reactor. A cost and risk effective procedure has been evolved to maintain one of the more critical components of a Tandem Mirror Machine

  4. Impact of maximum TF magnetic field on performance and cost of an advanced physics tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of variation in the maximum value of the field at the toroidal field (TF) coils on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, quasi-steady-state tokamak. Marginal ignition, inductive current startup plus 100 s of inductive burn, and a constant value of epsilon (inverse aspect ratio) times beta poloidal were global conditions imposed on this study. A maximum TF field of approximately 10 T was found to be appropriate for this device

  5. Thermal and hydraulic analyses of TFTR cooling water system and magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.Y.

    1975-10-01

    The TFTR toroidal field coils, ohmic heating, hybrid and equilibrium field coils are cooled by water from the machine area cooling water system. The system has the following major equipment and capacities: flow rate of 3600 gpm; ballast tank volume of 5500 gal; pumps of 70.4 m head; chiller refrigeration rating of 3300 tons and connecting pipe of 45.7 cm I.D. The performance of the closed loop system was analyzed and found to be adequate for the thermal loads. The field coils were analyzed with detailed thermal and hydraulic models, including a simulation of the complete water cooling loop. Under the nominal operating mode of one second of toroidal field flat top time and 300 seconds of pulse cycle time, the maximum temperature for the TF coils is 53 0 C; for the OH coils 46 0 C and for the EF coils 39 0 C, which are well below the coil design limit of 120 0 C. The maximum TF coil coolant temperature is 33 0 C which is below the coolant design limit of 100 0 C. The overall pressure loss of the system is below 6.89 x 10 5 Pa (100 psi). With the given chiller refrigeration capacity, the TF coils can be operated to yield up to 4 seconds of flat top time. The TF coils can be operated on a steady state basis at up to 20% of the pulsed duty design current rating of 7.32 kA/coil

  6. Design considerations for the TF center conductor post for the Ignition Spherical Torus (IST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, G.R.; Haines, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    A trade-off study has been carried out to compare the differential costs of using high-strength alloy copper versus oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper for the center legs of the toroidal field (TF) coils of an Ignition Spherical Torus (IST). The electrical heating, temperatures, stresses, cooling requirements, material costs, pump costs, and power to drive the TF coils and pumps are all assessed for both materials for a range of compact tokamak reactors. The alloy copper material is found to result in a more compact reactor and to allow use of current densities of up to 170 MA/m 2 versus 40 MA/m 2 for the OFHC copper. The OFHC conductor system with high current density is $24 million less expensive than more conventional copper systems with 30 MA/m 2 . The alloy copper system costs $32 million less than conventional systems. Therefore, the alloy system offers a net savings of $8 million compared to the 50% cold-worked OFHC copper system. Although the savings are a significant fraction of the center conductor post cost, they are relatively insignificant in terms of the total device cost. It is concluded that the use of alloy copper contributes very little to the economic or technical viability of the compact IST. It is recommended that a similar systematic approach be applied to evaluating coil material and current density trade-offs for other compact copper-TF-coil tokamak designs. 9 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs

  7. Testing electrical insulation of LCT coils and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.; Ulbricht, A.R.; Ellis, J.F.; Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.; Okuno, K.; Siewerdt, L.O.; Zahn, G.R.; Zichy, J.A.

    1986-09-01

    Three of the superconducting test coils in the Large Coil Task (LCT) use conductors cooled internally by forced flow of helium. In the other three coils, the conductors are cooled externally by a bath of helium. The coils and facility are designed for rapid discharges (dumps) at voltages up to 2.5 kV, depending on coil design. Many coil sensors are connected electrically to the conductors. These sensor leads and signal conditioning equipment also experience high voltage. High-potential tests of ground insulation were performed on all components of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF). Coil insulation was also tested by ring-down tests that produced voltage distributions within the coils like those occurring during rapid discharge. Methods were developed to localize problem areas and to eliminate them. The effect on breakdown voltage near the Paschen minimum of magnetic fields up to 2 T was investigated

  8. Hybrid equilibrium field coils for the ORNL TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J; Dory, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    In this study, we make a comparative study of the power supplies required by interior and exterior [to the toroidal field (TF) coils] equilibrium field coils that are separately appropriate for high-β, D-shaped plasmas in TNS. It is shown that the interior coils need power supplies that are an order of magnitude below those required by the exterior coils (while the latter case is much less difficult to build than the former). A hybrid EF coil concept is proposed that combines the interior and the exterior coils to retain their advantages in avoiding large interior coils while lowering the power supplied to the exterior coils by an order of magnitude

  9. Superconducting magnets and leads thereto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biltcliffe, M.N.; Hanley, P.E.; McKinnon, J.B.; Wheatley, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The magnet described comprises a cryostat containing a superconducting coil for the generation of a magnetic field, with a short-circuiting superconducting link connected across the coil, and electrical leads extending through the cryostat to the coil; these leads are provided with joints within the cryostat to enable them to be detached from the coil and removed from the cryostat without interrupting the current through the coil, thus reducing heat conduction to the cryostat through the leads. The joints are arranged so that the leads can be readily detached and re-attached to the coil from outside the cryostat. Gas-tight seals are provided where the leads pass through the outer wall of the cryostat, with caps that can be secured after removal of the leads. This kind of magnet can provide a stable magnetic field continuously over long periods, such as is required in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers. (U.K.)

  10. Program for development of toroidal superconducting magnets for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, H.M.; Lubell, M.S.

    1976-04-01

    Research progress on the following subprograms is described/: (1) system design, (2) coil design, (3) conductor selection and test, (4) radiation effects on superconducting coils, (5) coil protection, eddy current shielding, and power supply, (6) structural analysis and materials investigation, (7) cryogenics and refrigeration, (8) subsize coil fabrication, (9) large coil project, (10) coil testing and evaluation, (11) administrative plan, and (12) quality assurance and reliability

  11. Complete Fabrication of a Traversable 3 µm Thick NbN Film Superconducting Coil with Cu plated layer of 42m in Length in a Spiral Three-Storied Trench Engraved in a Si Wafer of 76.2 mm in Diameter Formed by MEMS Technology for a Compact SMES with High Energy Storage Volume Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Iguchi, Nobuhiro; Adachi, Kazuhiro; Ichiki, Akihisa; Hioki, Tatsumi; Hsu, Che-Wei; Sato, Ryoto; Kumagai, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Noh, Joo-Hyong; Sakurahara, Yuuske; Okabe, Kyohei; Takai, Osamu; Honma, Hideo; Watanabe, Hideo; Sakoda, Hitoshi; Sasagawa, Hiroaki; Doy, Hideyuki; Zhou, Shuliang; Hori, H.; Nishikawa, Shigeaki; Nozaki, Toshihiro; Sugimoto, Noriaki; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2017-09-01

    Based on the concept of a novel approach to make a compact SMES unit composed of a stack of Si wafers using MEMS process proposed previously, a complete fabrication of a traversable 3 µam thick NbN film superconducting coil lined with Cu plated layer of 42m in length in a spiral three-storied trench engraved in and extended over a whole Si-wafer of 76.2 mm in diameter was attained for the first time. With decrease in temperature, the DC resistivity showed a metallic decrease indicating the current pass was in the Cu plated layer and then made a sudden fall to residual contact resistance indicating the shift of current pass from the Cu plated layer to the NbN film at the critical temperature Tc of 15.5K by superconducting transition. The temperature dependence of I-V curve showed the increase in the critical current with decrease in the temperature and the highest critical current measured was 220 mA at 4K which is five times as large as that obtained in the test fabrication as the experimental proof of concept presented in the previous report. This completion of a one wafer superconducting NbN coil is an indispensable step for the next proof of concept of fabrication of series-connected two wafer coils via superconductive joint which will read to series connected 600 wafer coils finally, and for replacement of NbN by high Tc superconductor such as YBa2Cu3O7-x for operation under the cold energy of liquid hydrogen or liquid nitrogen.

  12. Distortion of magnetic field lines caused by radial displacements of ITER toroidal field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoskov, V.M., E-mail: sytch@niiefa.spb.su [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gribov, Y.V. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lamzin, E.A.; Sytchevsky, S.E. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    An assessment of distortions of ideal (circle) field lines caused by random radial displacements of the TF coils by |∆R| ≤ 5 mm has been performed from the statistical analysis assuming a uniform probability density function for displacements.

  13. ORPUS 1: a pulsed superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwall, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A recent series of reference designs for Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR's) has indicated that superconducting poloidal field (PF) coils will be necessary for successful operation of these devices. It would also be desirable to use superconducting PF coils in earlier tokamak fusion devices if such coils could be developed quickly enough. The PF coil performance requirements are briefly reviewed and some implications for the coil design are developed. A small coil (stored energy 14 kJ) has been built using construction techniques similar to those which could be employed for PF coils. The coil has been charged at rates up to 2 T/sec. Both maximum field and charging rate were limited by available power supplies. Loss measurements were carried out during pulsed operation and data for hysteretic and eddy current loss are presented. The loss measurement system used allows considerable insight into the effects of conductor motion and training

  14. Potential damage to dc superconducting magnets due to high frequency electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, G. J.; Burkhart, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of a d.c. superconducting magnet coil indicate that the large coil behaves as a straight waveguide structure. Voltages between layers within the coil sometimes exceeded those recorded at terminals where protective resistors are located. Protection of magnet coils against these excessive voltages could be accomplished by impedance matching throughout the coil system. The wave phenomenon associated with superconducting magnetic coils may create an instability capable of converting the energy of a quiescent d.c. superconducting coil into dissipative a.c. energy, even in cases when dielectric breakdown does not take place.

  15. Power loss problems in EXTRAP coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1977-02-01

    The Ohmic power loss in the coils of external ring traps is minimized with respect to the thermonuclear power production. In the case of the DT-reaction this leads to dimensions and power densities being relevant to full-scale reactors. Not only superconducting or refrigerated coil windings can thus be used, but also hot-coil systems which are operated at several hundred degrees centrigrade and form part of a steam cycle and power extraction system. For hot coils the problems of void formation and tritium regeneration have to be further examined. The high beta value leads to moderately large coil stresses. Finally, replacement and repair become simplified by the present coil geometry. (Auth.)

  16. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  17. Electrical Conduction and Superconductivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    When an electric field is applied, this electron can be lifted to this higher energy ... By such a virtual process two electrons .... using superconducting coils has come to be a reality. ... nance imaging techniques used in medical diagnostics. Com ...

  18. 12 tesla test coil. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Plasma Fusion Center at MIT has been charged with responsibility for the design, development, fabrication and test operation of a Niobium-3-Tin Superconducting Test Coil. Research is described on DOE's 12 tesla coil demonstration program in which several one-meter diameter superconducting test coils will be inserted and tested in DOE's High Field Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratories. The work was initiated at the start of FY 79. FY 79 saw the completion of our Preliminary Design and the initiation of three (3) subcontracts: (1) Westinghouse review of the Preliminary Design, (II) Supercon, Inc. development of a tubular copper matrix, Nb 3 Sn Superconductor and (III) Airco optimization of the LCP-W Nb 3 Sn superconductor for 12T service. In addition, Airco was charged with the production of a 1000 foot length of model 15,000A conductor. Coil winding exercises were initiated at the Everson Electric Company

  19. The SMES model coil. Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Takahashi, Nobuji

    1998-01-01

    A SMES model coil was fabricated as R and D item in the development of component technologies for a 480 MJ/20 MW SMES pilot plant. The coil consists of four double-pancake windings. The coil is the same diameter but half the number of pancakes that will be needed for a SMES pilot plant. The NbTi cable-in-conduit conductor and superconducting joints between the double pancakes are cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. Prior to fabrication, various characteristics of the cable-in-conduit were measured by full-sized short samples from actual conductors and by scaled short samples from scaled conductors. The critical current of the scaled short samples was in agreement with that calculated from one strand of the conductor. The impedance between arbitrary dual-oxide coated strands in the full-size conductor was measured to be smaller than that obtained from two Cr-plated strands, which showed a good degree of stability in another coil. It was estimated that oxide-coated conductors would have high stability. Through fabrication of a model coil, it was demonstrated that a large forced-flow coil for a small-scale 100 kWh SMES device could be manufactured. (author)

  20. The SMES model coil. Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanai, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Takahashi, Nobuji [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)] [and others

    1998-07-01

    A SMES model coil was fabricated as R and D item in the development of component technologies for a 480 MJ/20 MW SMES pilot plant. The coil consists of four double-pancake windings. The coil is the same diameter but half the number of pancakes that will be needed for a SMES pilot plant. The NbTi cable-in-conduit conductor and superconducting joints between the double pancakes are cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. Prior to fabrication, various characteristics of the cable-in-conduit were measured by full-sized short samples from actual conductors and by scaled short samples from scaled conductors. The critical current of the scaled short samples was in agreement with that calculated from one strand of the conductor. The impedance between arbitrary dual-oxide coated strands in the full-size conductor was measured to be smaller than that obtained from two Cr-plated strands, which showed a good degree of stability in another coil. It was estimated that oxide-coated conductors would have high stability. Through fabrication of a model coil, it was demonstrated that a large forced-flow coil for a small-scale 100 kWh SMES device could be manufactured. (author)

  1. Critical current studies of a HTS rectangular coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Z. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Chudy, M., E-mail: Michal.chudy@stuba.sk [Graduate School of Technology Management, University of Pretoria (South Africa); Institute of Power and Applied Electrical Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia); Ruiz, H.S. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Zhang, X.; Coombs, T. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Unique square pancake coil was manufactured. • Measurements in relatively high magnetic field were performed. • Different sections of the coil were characterized. • Parts of the coil which are limiting critical current were identified. - Abstract: Nowadays, superconducting high field magnets are used in numerous applications due to their superior properties. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are usually used for production of circular pancake or racetrack coils. However different geometries of HTS coils might be required for some specific applications. In this study, the HTS coil wound on a rectangular frame was fully characterized in homogeneous DC background field. The study contains measurements of critical current angular dependencies. The critical current of the entire coil and two selected strands under different magnitudes and orientations of external magnetic fields are measured. The critical regions of the coil in different angular regimes are determined. This study brings better understanding of the in- field performance of HTS coils wound on frames with right-angles.

  2. Design of the coolant system for the Large Coil Test Facility pulse coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridgman, C.; Ryan, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The pulse coils will be a part of the Large Coil Test Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is designed to test six large tokamak-type superconducting coils. The pulse coil set consists of two resistive coaxial solenoid coils, mounted so that their magnetic axis is perpendicular to the toroidal field lines of the test coil. The pulse coils provide transient vertical fields at test coil locations to simulate the pulsed vertical fields present in tokamak devices. The pulse coils are designed to be pulsed for 30 s every 150 s, which results in a Joule heating of 116 kW per coil. In order to provide this capability, the pulse coil coolant system is required to deliver 6.3 L/s (100 gpm) of subcooled liquid nitrogen at 10-atm absolute pressure. The coolant system can also cool down each pulse coil from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. This paper provides details of the pumping and heat exchange equipment designed for the coolant system and of the associated instrumentation and controls

  3. Preliminary study on AC superconducting machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Ishigohka, T.; Shimohka, T.; Mizukami, N.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the issues involved in developing AC superconducting machines. In the first phase, as a preliminary experiment, a 4kVa AC superconducting coil which employs 100A class 50/60Hz superconductors is made and tested. And, in the second phase, as an extension of the 4kVa coil, a model superconducting transformer is made and examined. The transformer has a novel quench protection system with an auxiliary coil only in the low voltage side. The behavior of the overcurrent protection system is confirmed

  4. NSTX Protection And Interlock Systems For Coil And Powers Supply Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Lawson, J.; Neumeyer, C.; Marsala, R.; Schneider, H.

    2009-01-01

    NSTX at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) requires sophisticated plasma positioning control system for stable plasma operation. TF magnetic coils and PF magnetic coils provide electromagnetic fields to position and shape the plasma vertically and horizontally respectively. NSTX utilizes twenty six coil power supplies to establish and initiate electromagnetic fields through the coil system for plasma control. A power protection and interlock system is utilized to detect power system faults and protect the TF coils and PF coils against excessive electromechanical forces, overheating, and over current. Upon detecting any fault condition the power system is restricted, and it is either prevented from initializing or suppressed to de-energize coil power during pulsing. Power fault status is immediately reported to the computer system. This paper describes the design and operation of NSTX's protection and interlocking system and possible future expansion.

  5. BPX toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzenvoeder, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the toroidal field (TF) coil system of the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) which consists of (18) beryllium copper magnets arrayed in a wedged configuration with a major radius of 2.6 meters and a field strength capability on axis of 9.0 Tesla. The toroidal array is constructed from six (3)-coil modules to facilitate remote recovery in the event of a magnet failure after nuclear activation precludes hands-on servicing. The magnets are of a modified Bitter plate design with partial cases of type 316-LN stainless steel welded with Inconel 182 weld wire. The coil turn plates are fabricated from CDA C17510 beryllium copper with optimized mechanical, thermal, and electrical characteristics. joints within the turns and between turns are made by welding with C17200 filler wire. Cryogenic cooling is employed to reduce power dissipation and to enhance performance. The magnets are cooled between experimental pulses by pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through channels in the edges of the coil turns. This arrangement makes possible one full-power pulse per hour. Electrical insulation consists of polyimide-glass sheets bonded in place with vacuum-pressure impregnated epoxy/glass

  6. Dual levitated coils for antihydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, J. D.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    Two coaxial superconducting magnetic coils that carry currents in the same direction and that are simultaneously levitated may serve for antihydrogen plasma confinement. The configuration may be suitable for use by a collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator facility to test fundamental symmetries between the properties of hydrogen and antihydrogen. Nested Penning traps are currently used to confine recombining antihydrogen plasma. Symmetry studies require the production of sufficiently cold antihydrogen. However, plasma drifts within nested Penning traps can increase the kinetic energy of antiprotons that form antihydrogen atoms. Dual levitated coils may serve to confine relatively large, cold, dense non-drifting recombining antihydrogen plasmas. A minimum-B magnetic field that is produced by the coils could provide for atom trapping. A toroidal plasma is confined between the coils. High density plasmas may be possible, by allowing plasma pressure to balance mechanical pressure to keep the coils apart. Progress is reported on theoretical and experimental efforts. The theoretical effort includes the development of a classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation of confinement. The experimental effort includes levitation of a NdFeB permanent ring magnet, which produces a magnetic field that is qualitatively similar to the field that would be produced by the two coaxial superconducting magnetic coils. Liquid-nitrogen-cooled Bi-2223 high-temperature-superconducting components, with a critical temperature of 108 K, were used to levitate the ring magnet. An issue concerning keeping the plane of the levitated ring horizontal is discussed.

  7. Technical aspects and manufacturing methods for JT-60SA toroidal field coil casings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.rossi@enea.it [ENEA, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Cucchiaro, A.; Brolatti, G.; Cocilovo, V.; Ginoulhiac, G.; Polli, G. [ENEA, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Gabriele, M.; Di Muzio, F. [Walter Tosto, Via Erasmo Piaggio, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Philips, G.; Tomarchio, V. [JT-60SA European Home Team, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. • Design and manufacturing of mock-ups representative of straight and curved legs of the casings have been completed. • Final design of the casings has been completed and manufacturing activities have already started and are ongoing. • The completion of the first three casings will be completed within the end of 2013 and the production of all the 18 casings is foreseen by the end of 2015. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a superconducting tokamak machine to be assembled in Naka site, Japan, designed to contribute to the early realization of fusion energy by supporting the exploitation of ITER and research toward DEMO. In the frame of the Broader Approach Agreement a contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto (Chieti, Italy) started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. Two different sets of 9 casings each will be progressively delivered, from 2013 to the end of 2015, to ASG Superconductors (Genoa, Italy) and to Alstom (Belfort, France), where the integration of the winding pack into the casing will be carried out. Each TF coil casing (height 7.5 m and width 4.5 m) consists of four main components: one “Straight Leg Outboard” and one “Curved Leg Outboard” both with their own covers, “Straight Leg Inboard” and “Curved Leg Inboard”. The casing components are segmented in forgings and plates made of FM316LNL. The straight leg outboard is composed of two wings welded to a central core and two elbows welded at the ends with a cooling channel installed inside. Elbows of straight leg outboard are segmented in two half-elbows machined from 1 rough forging and welded to the central core made by plate. Welding of wings to the central core is performed in EBW (electron beam welding) and the straight part is welded to the elbows by NGTIG (TIG narrow gap) process. The curved leg outboard is composed of two

  8. Technical aspects and manufacturing methods for JT-60SA toroidal field coil casings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Paolo; Cucchiaro, A.; Brolatti, G.; Cocilovo, V.; Ginoulhiac, G.; Polli, G.; Gabriele, M.; Di Muzio, F.; Philips, G.; Tomarchio, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. • Design and manufacturing of mock-ups representative of straight and curved legs of the casings have been completed. • Final design of the casings has been completed and manufacturing activities have already started and are ongoing. • The completion of the first three casings will be completed within the end of 2013 and the production of all the 18 casings is foreseen by the end of 2015. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a superconducting tokamak machine to be assembled in Naka site, Japan, designed to contribute to the early realization of fusion energy by supporting the exploitation of ITER and research toward DEMO. In the frame of the Broader Approach Agreement a contract between ENEA and Walter Tosto (Chieti, Italy) started on July 2012 for the construction of 18 TF coil casings for JT-60SA. Two different sets of 9 casings each will be progressively delivered, from 2013 to the end of 2015, to ASG Superconductors (Genoa, Italy) and to Alstom (Belfort, France), where the integration of the winding pack into the casing will be carried out. Each TF coil casing (height 7.5 m and width 4.5 m) consists of four main components: one “Straight Leg Outboard” and one “Curved Leg Outboard” both with their own covers, “Straight Leg Inboard” and “Curved Leg Inboard”. The casing components are segmented in forgings and plates made of FM316LNL. The straight leg outboard is composed of two wings welded to a central core and two elbows welded at the ends with a cooling channel installed inside. Elbows of straight leg outboard are segmented in two half-elbows machined from 1 rough forging and welded to the central core made by plate. Welding of wings to the central core is performed in EBW (electron beam welding) and the straight part is welded to the elbows by NGTIG (TIG narrow gap) process. The curved leg outboard is composed of two

  9. Superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus structural support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Gregory J.; Meier, Stephen W.; Walter, Robert J.; Child, Michael D.; DeGraaf, Douglas W.

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus comprising a cylindrical superconducting coil; a cylindrical coil containment vessel enclosing the coil and adapted to hold a liquid, such as liquefied helium; and a cylindrical vacuum vessel enclosing the coil containment vessel and located in a restraining structure having inner and outer circumferential walls and a floor; the apparatus being provided with horizontal compression members between (1) the coil and the coil containment vessel and (2) between the coil containment vessel and the vacuum vessel, compression bearing members between the vacuum vessel and the restraining structure inner and outer walls, vertical support members (1) between the coil bottom and the coil containment vessel bottom and (2) between the coil containment vessel bottom and the vacuum vessel bottom, and external supports between the vacuum vessel bottom and the restraining structure floor, whereby the loads developed by thermal and magnetic energy changes in the apparatus can be accommodated and the structural integrity of the apparatus be maintained.

  10. Preliminary results of the US pool-boiling coils from the IFSMTF full-array tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Large Coil Task to develop superconducting magnets for fusion reactors, is now in the midst of full-array tests in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Included in the test array are two pool-boiling coils designed and fabricated by US manufacturers, General Dynamics/Convair Division and General Electric/Union Carbide Corporation. So far, both coils have been energized to full design currents in the single-coil tests, and the General Dynamics coil has reached the design point in the first Standard-I full-array test. Both coils performed well in the charging experiments. Extensive heating tests and the heavy instrumentation of these coils have, however, revealed some generic limitations of large pool-boiling superconducting coils. Details of these results and their analyses are reported

  11. The development of superconducting equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Ueda, T; Hiue, H

    2003-01-01

    Fuji Electric has been developing various types of superconducting equipment for over a quarter of a century. This paper describes the development results achieved for superconducting equipment and especially focuses on large-capacity current leads and superconducting transmission systems, the development of which is being promoted for application to the field of nuclear fusion. High temperature superconductor (HTS) is becoming the mainstream in the field of superconductivity, and the HTS floating coil and conduction-cooled HTS transformed are also introduced as recent developments for devices that utilize this technology. (author)

  12. CS model coil experimental log book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  13. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of builtup, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  14. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of built-up, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  15. Analysis and experimental study of wireless power transfer with HTS coil and copper coil as the intermediate resonators system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiufang; Nie, Xinyi; Liang, Yilang; Lu, Falong; Yan, Zhongming; Wang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated a kind of system architecture with three coils which the repeater is copper coil or HTS coil. • We simulated the different repeater system and obtained the magnetic field distribution at different distance. • We used helical coil instead of pancake coil which does not use capacitors. • HTS intermediate coil has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance than copper intermediate coil. - Abstract: Intermediate resonator (repeater) between transmitter and receiver can significantly increase the distance of wireless power transfer (WPT) and the efficiency of wireless power transfer. The wireless power transfer via strongly coupled magnetic resonances with an high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil and copper coil as intermediate resonators was presented in this paper. The electromagnetic experiment system under different conditions with different repeating coils were simulated by finite element software. The spatial distribution patterns of magnetic induction intensity at different distances were plotted. In this paper, we examined transfer characteristics with HTS repeating coil and copper repeating coil at 77 K and 300 K, respectively. Simulation and experimental results show that HTS and copper repeating coil can effectively enhance the space magnetic induction intensity, which has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance. We found that the efficiency and the distance of wireless power transfer system with an HTS coil as repeater is much higher by using of copper coil as repeater.

  16. Analysis and experimental study of wireless power transfer with HTS coil and copper coil as the intermediate resonators system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiufang [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Nie, Xinyi [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Liang, Yilang [School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Lu, Falong [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Yan, Zhongming, E-mail: wangxiufanghappy@163.com [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Wang, Yu [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • We investigated a kind of system architecture with three coils which the repeater is copper coil or HTS coil. • We simulated the different repeater system and obtained the magnetic field distribution at different distance. • We used helical coil instead of pancake coil which does not use capacitors. • HTS intermediate coil has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance than copper intermediate coil. - Abstract: Intermediate resonator (repeater) between transmitter and receiver can significantly increase the distance of wireless power transfer (WPT) and the efficiency of wireless power transfer. The wireless power transfer via strongly coupled magnetic resonances with an high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil and copper coil as intermediate resonators was presented in this paper. The electromagnetic experiment system under different conditions with different repeating coils were simulated by finite element software. The spatial distribution patterns of magnetic induction intensity at different distances were plotted. In this paper, we examined transfer characteristics with HTS repeating coil and copper repeating coil at 77 K and 300 K, respectively. Simulation and experimental results show that HTS and copper repeating coil can effectively enhance the space magnetic induction intensity, which has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance. We found that the efficiency and the distance of wireless power transfer system with an HTS coil as repeater is much higher by using of copper coil as repeater.

  17. The IEA large coil task test results in IFSMTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubell, M.S.; Clinard, J.A.; Dresner, L.

    1987-01-01

    The Large Coil Task (LCT) is an international collaboration of the United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland to develop large superconducting magnets for fusion reactors. The testing phase of LCT was completed on September 3, 1987. All six coils exceeded the design goals, both as single coils and in six-coil toroidal tests. In addition, a symmetric torus test was performed in which a maximum field of 9 T was reached in all coils simultaneously. These are by far the largest magnets (either in size, weight, or stored energy) ever to achieve such a field. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Instrumentation and test of the Swiss LCT-coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zichy, J.A.; Horvath, I.; Jakob, B.; Marinucci, C.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1985-01-01

    Just before Christmas 1983 the fabrication of the Swiss LCT-coil was finished. Tests at ambient temperature were performed on the factory site and after delivery in Oak Ridge. To avoid an undesirable delay of the rescheduled Partial-Array Test it was agreed to install the coil without its superconducting bus. In July 1984 the Swiss LCT-coil was successfully cooled down to LHe temperature together with the other two fully installed coils. Besides the cooling system, the instrumentation, measured parameters of the coil and some preliminary results obtained during the ongoing Partial-Array Test are presented

  19. AC loss in superconducting wires operating in a wind turbine like generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiler, Eugen; Zirngibl, Thomas; Mijatovic, Nenad

    2010-01-01

    We have manufactured a small circular superconducting coil impregnated with epoxy fibreglass. The coil was wound from a Bi-2223/Ag superconducting wire and it was tested in liquid nitrogen at 77 K. Current-voltage characteristic and the AC losses of the coil were measured and compared...

  20. Magnetoelastic stability and vibrations of superconducting magnets. Progress report, September 1, 1975--March 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, F.C.

    1976-05-01

    Buckling and vibration problems in small superconducting models of tokamak coils are studied. Observations are reported on thermoelastic buckling of epoxy potted superconducting coils producing significant out of plane deformations due to differences in thermal expansion coefficients. The damping of free vibrations in the coils is also investigated

  1. Fabrication of Nb3Sn cables for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Takaaki; Tsutsumi, Fumiaki; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Hideo; Ishibashi, Tatsuji; Sato, Go; Chida, Kenji; Suzuki, Rikio; Tanji, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER toroidal field (TF) coils will be operated at 68 kA and 11.8 T. The cable is composed of 1,422 strands with a diameter of 0.82 mm. There were two options for initial procurement. For option 2, the twist pitches at lower stages are longer than in option 1. Trials were performed to assess the feasibility of these options. In the trials for option 1, the nominal outer diameter of sub-cables and reduction schedule of final cables were evaluated and finalized. In the trials for option 2, problems were encountered at the third stage cabling. These problems were resolved through increasing the die size in that stage and improving the tension balance of the second-stage cables to reduce friction between the die and the cable, and also through avoiding loose twisting at both edges of the third cables. Option 2 was finally selected in 2009 based on superconducting performance enhancement of the cable. After the qualification of the fabrication procedure using fabrication of a 760-m dummy cable and a 415-m superconducting cable, mass production of the cables started in March 2010. (author)

  2. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils

  3. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils

  4. Device to measure elastic modulus of superconducting windings

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    This device was made to measure elastic modulus of the Po dipole superconducting coils. More elaborated devices, but based on the same concept, were later used to measure the apparent elastic moduli of the LHC superconducting magnet coils. See also 7903547X, 7901386.

  5. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boenig, Heinrich J.

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage coil connected in parallel between converters of two or more ac power systems provides load leveling and stability improvement to any or all of the ac systems. Control is provided to direct the charging and independently the discharging of the superconducting coil to at least a selected one of the ac power systems.

  6. Two-finger (TF) SPUDT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Guenter; Biryukov, Sergey V; Schmidt, Hagen; Steiner, Bernd; Wall, Bert

    2011-03-01

    SPUDT cells including two fingers are only known thus far for so-called NSPUDT directions. In that case, usual solid-finger cells are used. The purpose of the present paper is to find SPUDT cell types consisting of two fingers only for pure mode directions. Two-finger (TF) cells for pure mode directions on substrates like 128°YX LiNbO(3) and YZ LiNbO(3) were found by means of an optimization procedure. The forward direction of a TF-cell SPUDT on 128°YX LiNbO(3) was determined experimentally. The properties of the new cells are compared with those of conventional SPUDT cells. The reflectivity of TF cells on 128°YX LiNbO(3) turns out to be two to three times larger than that of distributed acoustic reflection transducer (DART) and Hanma-Hunsinger cells at the same metal layer thickness.

  7. A tokamak with nearly uniform coil stress based on virial theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, H.

    2002-01-01

    A novel tokamak concept with a new type of toroidal field (TF) coils and a central solenoid (CS) whose stress is much reduced to a theoretical limit determined by the virial theorem has been devised. Recently, we had developed a tokamak with force-balanced coils (FBCs) which are multi-pole helical hybrid coils combining TF coils and a CS coil. The combination reduces the net electromagnetic force in the direction of major radius. In this work, we have extended the FBC concept using the virial theorem. High-field coils should accordingly have same averaged principal stresses in all directions, whereas conventional FBC reduces stress in the toroidal direction only. Using a shell model, we have obtained the poloidal rotation number of helical coils which satisfy the uniform stress condition, and named the coil as virial-limited coil (VLC). VLC with circular cross section of aspect ratio A=2 reduces maximum stress to 60% compared with that of TF coils. In order to prove the advantage of VLC concept, we have designed a small VLC tokamak Todoroki-II. The plasma discharge in Todoroki-II will be presented. (author)

  8. Sweeping a persisting superconducting magnet with a transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, G.F.; Alexander, P.W.; Ihas, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    A method for sweeping a persisting superconducting magnet is described. The field sweep is achieved by including in the superconducting loop of the magnet a coil which acts as the secondary coil of a transformer. Variation of the current in the primary coil of the transformer, controlled from outside the cryostat, causes the field-sweeping action through flux-linking with the superconducting loop. Compared to directly changing the current in a magnet, this technique improves control by the ratio of the magnet's inductance to the transformer's inductance. The advantages of using an all-metal vacuum-tight superconducting feedthrough are discussed. (author)

  9. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a DC superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinis, J.M.; Hilbert, C.; Clarke, J.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of amplifying a radiofrequency signal consisting of: disposing a single symmetrically biased dc SQUID and an input coil within a superconducting shield, the dc SQUID having a superconducting ring interrupted by two shunted Josephson junctions, and the input coil being inductively coupled solely to the ring of the single SQUID, establishing a constant magnetic flux threading the SQUID ring, applying the radiofrequency signal to the input coil from outside of the superconducting shield, obtaining an amplified radiofrequency signal solely from across the ring of the single SQUID, transmitting the amplified radiofrequency signal from across the SQUID ring to the outside of the superconducting shield

  10. Operation of a 400MHz NMR magnet using a (RE:Rare Earth)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting coil: Towards an ultra-compact super-high field NMR spectrometer operated beyond 1GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Y; Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Kominato, K; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Jin, X; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2014-12-01

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS) are the key technology to achieve super-high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers with an operating frequency far beyond 1GHz (23.5T). (RE)Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7- x (REBCO, RE: rare earth) conductors have an advantage over Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10- x (Bi-2223) and Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8- x (Bi-2212) conductors in that they have very high tensile strengths and tolerate strong electromagnetic hoop stress, thereby having the potential to act as an ultra-compact super-high field NMR magnet. As a first step, we developed the world's first NMR magnet comprising an inner REBCO coil and outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils. The magnet was successfully charged without degradation and mainly operated at 400MHz (9.39T). Technical problems for the NMR magnet due to screening current in the REBCO coil were clarified and solved as follows: (i) A remarkable temporal drift of the central magnetic field was suppressed by a current sweep reversal method utilizing ∼10% of the peak current. (ii) A Z2 field error harmonic of the main coil cannot be compensated by an outer correction coil and therefore an additional ferromagnetic shim was used. (iii) Large tesseral harmonics emerged that could not be corrected by cryoshim coils. Due to those harmonics, the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectra are ten-fold lower than those for a conventional LTS NMR magnet. As a result, a HSQC spectrum could be achieved for a protein sample, while a NOESY spectrum could not be obtained. An ultra-compact 1.2GHz NMR magnet could be realized if we effectively take advantage of REBCO conductors, although this will require further research to suppress the effect of the screening current. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of a Conduction Cooled Nb3Sn Racetrack Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HS; Kovacs, C.; Rochester, J.; Sumption, MD; Tomsic, M.; Peng, X.; Doll, D.

    2017-12-01

    Use of superconducting coils for wind turbines and electric aircraft is of interest because of the potential for high power density and weight reduction. Here we test a racetrack coil developed as a proof-of-concept for cryogen-free superconducting motors and generators. The coil was wound with 1209 m of 0.7-mm-diameter insulated tube-type Nb3Sn wire. The coil was epoxy-impregnated, instrumented, covered with numerous layers of aluminized mylar insulation, and inserted vertically into a dewar. The system was cooled to 4.2 K, and a few inches of liquid helium was allowed to collect at the bottom of the dewar but below the coil. The coil was cooled by conduction via copper cooling bars were attached to the coil but also were immersed in the liquid helium at their lower ends. Several current tests were performed on the coil, initially in voltage mode, and one run in current mode. The maximum coil Ic at 4.2 K was 480 A, generating 3.06 T at the surface of the coil. The coil met the design targets with a noticeable margin.

  12. Up gradation of VME based data acquisition for SST-1 superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varmora, Pankaj; Parghi, Bhadresh; Banaudha, Moni; Prasad, Upendra

    2017-01-01

    SST-1 magnet system consists of sixteen Toroidal Field (TF) coils and nine Poloidal Field (PF) superconducting coils along with a pair of vertical field coils and air core ohmic transformer. These magnets are instrumented with various cryogenic compatible sensors and voltage taps for its monitoring, operation, protection, and control during different machine operational scenarios like cryogenic cool down, current charging cycles including ramp up, flat top, plasma breakdown, dumping/ramp down and warm up. A VME hardware based data acquisition system has been developed for data monitoring, acquisition and control of magnet operation. A java platform based client and server utility has been developed for this data acquisition system. Upgradation of this java software utility has been carried out with enhance features, fast operating performance and new tools additions. Upgradation features includes larger data file sizes, highlights of critical data indicators, new file generation, online mass flow calculations etc. This poster describes basis hardware details, upgradation of previous software utility, testing and troubleshooting during software development. (author)

  13. Resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1980-11-01

    This paper analyzes the optimization of the geometry of resistive TF coils of rectangular bore for tokamak fusion test reactors and practical neutron generators. In examining the trade-offs between geometric parameters and magnetic field for reactors giving a specified neutron wall loading, either the resistive power loss or the lifetime coil cost can be minimized. Aspects of cooling, magnetic stress, and construction are addressed for several reference designs. Bending moment distributions in closed form have been derived for rectangular coils on the basis of the theory of rigid frames. Candidate methods of fabrication and of implementing demountable joints are summarized

  14. Design of self-correction coils in a superferric dipole magnet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Design of self-correction coils in a superferric dipole magnet is carried out. By adopting the self-correction coil (SCC) scheme, we can do online correction of unwanted fields inside the magnet aperture during the whole operating cycle irrespective of their origin. The self-correction coils are short-circuited superconducting ...

  15. Axicell MFTF-B superconducting-magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Bulmer, R.; Hanson, C.; Hinkle, R.; Kozman, T.; Shimer, D.; Tatro, R.; VanSant, J.; Wohlwend, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Axicell MFTF-B magnet system will provide the field environment necessary for tandem mirror plasma physics investigation with thermal barriers. The performance of the device will stimulate DT to achieve energy break-even plasma conditions. Operation will be with deuterium only. There will be 24 superconducting coils consisting of 2 sets of yin-yang pairs, 14 central-cell solenoids, 2 sets of axicell mirror-coil pairs, and 2 transition coils between the axicell mirror coil-pairs and the yin-yang coils. This paper describes the progress in the design and construction of MFTF-B Superconducting-Magnet System

  16. Stabilization of superconducting dry solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, M.; Maeda, H.

    1989-01-01

    Premature quenches in superconducting solenoids, wound with Formvar coated NbTi conductors, have been studied. Some model coils were tested wound with various winding tensions. The experimental results are discussed considering the calculated stress distribution for coil winding, cool-down to liquid helium temperature, and energization at 4.2 K. /Some mechanisms of premature quenches are classified by the winding tension. Some stabilization methods are presented based on these quench mechanisms

  17. Superconducting current generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genevey, P.

    1970-01-01

    After a brief summary of the principle of energy storage and liberation with superconducting coils,two current generators are described that create currents in the range 600 to 1400 A, used for two storage experiments of 25 kJ and 50 kJ respectively. The two current generators are: a) a flux pump and b) a superconducting transformer. Both could be developed into more powerful units. The study shows the advantage of the transformer over the flux pump in order to create large currents. The efficiencies of the two generators are 95 per cent and 40 to 60 per cent respectively. (author) [fr

  18. Superconductive energy storage magnet study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, S.W.

    1982-01-01

    Among many methods of energy storages the superconducting energy storage has been considered as the most promising method. Many related technical problems are still unsolved. One of the problems is the magnetizing and demagnetizing loss of superconducting coil. This loss is mainly because of hysteresis of pinning force. In this paper the hysteresis loss is calculated and field dependence of the a.c. losses is explained. The ratio of loss and stored energy is also calculated. (Author)

  19. COMPASS magnetic field coils and structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossland, R.T.; Booth, J.A.; Hayward, R.J.; Keogh, P.; Pratt, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    COMPASS is a new experimental toroidal assembly of compact design and with a wide range of physics objectives. It is required to operate either as a Tokamak or as a Reversed Field Pinch with interchangeable circular and dee-section vacuum vessels. The Toroidal field is produced by 16 rectangular coils of 4 turns with tapered conductors on the inside which nest together to form a vault to resist the centering forces. The coils are designed to produce a maximum field on axis of 2.1T which requires a current of 91 kA per turn. Two central solenoids and five pairs of coils symmetrically positioned above and below the machine equator provide the poloidal field. Both coil systems are supported form a mechanical support structure which surrounds the machine. This is primarily designed to resist out-of-plane forces on the TF coils but also acts as the base support for the PF coils and vacuum vessels. An illustration of the COMPASS Load Assembly is given and shows the D-shaped vacuum vessel, the major components and the various field windings

  20. Design of superconducting corrector magnets for LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynham, D.E.; Coombs, R.C.; Ijspeert, A.; Perin, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require a range of superconducting corrector magnets. This paper presents the design of sextupole and decapole corrector coils which will be included as spool pieces adjacent to reach main ring dipole. The paper gives detailed 3D field computations of the coil configurations to meet LHC beam dynamics requirements. Coil protection within a long string environment is addressed and mechanical design outlines are presented

  1. Design of superconducting corrector magnets for LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynham, D. E.; Coombs, R. C.; Ijspeert, A.; Perin, R.

    1994-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require a range of superconducting corrector magnets. This paper presents the design of sextupole and decapole corrector coils which will be included as spool pieces adjacent to each main ring dipole. The paper gives detailed 3D field computations of the coil configurations to meet LHC beam dynamics requirements. Coil protection within a long string environment is addressed and mechanical design outlines are presented.

  2. Conceptual Design of Alborz Tokamak Poloidal Coils System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. One of the most important parts of tokamak design is the design of the poloidal field system. This part includes the numbers, individual position, currents and number of coil turns of the magnetic field coils. Circular cross section tokamaks have Vertical Field system but since the elongation and triangularity of plasma cross section shaping are important in improving the plasma performance and stability, the poloidal field coils are designed to have a shaped plasma configuration. In this paper the design of vertical field system and the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma, as given by the Grad-Shafranov equation will be discussed. The poloidal field coils system consists of 12 circular coils located symmetrically about the equator plane, six inner PF coils and six outer PF coils. Six outer poloidal field coils (PF) are located outside of the toroidal field coils (TF), and six inner poloidal field coils are wound on the inner legs and are located outside of a vacuum vessel.

  3. Manufacture and mechanical test of a TORE SUPRA model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.; Claudet, G.; Disdier, F.; Hamelin, J.; Libeyre, P.; Mayaux, G.; Meuris, C.; Parain, J.; Torossian, A.

    1980-09-01

    Inside the qualifying test programme, supporting the Tore Supra Design, a reduced scale model of a Bsub(T) coil was fabricated by a large industrial firm. This model coil is provided with the same features as those retained for the complete magnet. Tests of this model coil have been carried out in such a way that most of stresses which will arise in Tore Supra windings are simulated; simultaneously its cryogenic supply is fully representative of the system retained for the complete machine. Operation of the model coil has been found highly stable; under the conditions of applied field and forces a coil transition could be triggered, by an electrical heater located inside the coil, only when the temperature of the superfluid helium bath was close to Tsub(lambda). Thus, design and manufacturing techniques have been qualified satisfactorily to proceed to the next step: fabrication of the superconducting Bsub(T) coils of Tore Supra

  4. Demonstration poloidal coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masahiko; Kawano, Katumi; Tada, Eisuke

    1989-01-01

    A new compact cryogenic cold compressor was developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in collaboration with Isikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI) in order to produce the supercritical helium below 4.2 K for Demonstration Poloidal Coils (DPC) which are forced-flow cooled type superconducting pulse coils. This compressor is one of key components for DPC test facility. The cold compressor reduces pressure in liquid helium bath, which contains liquid helium of around 3,000 l, down to 0.5 atm efficiently. Consequently, supercritical helium down to 3.5 K is produced and supplied to the DPC coils. A centrifugal compressor with dynamic gas bearing is selected as a compressor mechanism to realize high adiabatic efficiency and large flow rate. In this performance tests, the compressor was operated for 220 h at saturated condition from 0.5 to 1.0 atm without any failure. High adiabatic efficiency (more than 60 %) is achieved with wide flow range (25-65 g/s) and the design value is fully satisfied. The compressor can rotate up to 80,000 rpm at maximum then the coil supply temperature of supercritical helium is 3.5 K. (author)

  5. Superconducting Panofsky quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    A design for a rectangular aperture quadrupole magnet without pole-tips was introduced by Hand and Panofsky in 1959. This design was quite radical but simple to construct. Few magnets of this design were ever built because of the large power needed. With the advent of superconducting coils there has been a renewed interest in them. The mathematical basis, field characteristics, and present and future construction of these magnets are described

  6. Low AC-Loss Superconducting Cable Technology for Electric Aircraft Propulsion, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The availability of low AC loss magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting wires enables much lighter weight superconducting stator coils than with any other metal or...

  7. Split coil made of (RE)BCO pancake coils for IC(B) anisotropy measurements of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolek, L; Pardo, E; Gömöry, F; Šouc, J; Pitel, J

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the I c (B) anisotropy is standard characterization of superconducting tapes, wires or cables. This contribution presents a split coil consisting on two superconducting pancake coils in order to generate the magnetic field necessary for this kind of measurement. Both coils were made using (RE)BCO – based second generation (2G) coated conductor tape with cross section 0.1 mm × 12 mm. The individual turns of the tape were insulated by a fiberglass tape without impregnation. These coils have identical inner and outer diameter and number of turns. Their inner and outer diameters are 50 mm and 80 mm, respectively, and they have 62 turns. The length of conductor in each coil is approximately 13 m. The distance between both pancake coils is 22 mm. Individual coils and the complete split coil were characterized in liquid nitrogen bath. Their parameters, like the critical currents, E(I) characteristics and magnetic field of complete split coil, were measured and interpreted. The split coil can be used up to magnetic fields of 210 mT. The length between the potential taps on the sample can be up to 20 mm, while the magnetic field decrease is lower than 1% on this length.

  8. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1985-04-16

    The present invention is a current transformer for operating currents larger than 2kA (two kiloamps) that is capable of detecting a millivolt level resistive voltage in the presence of a large inductive voltage. Specifically, the present invention includes substantially cylindrical primary turns arranged to carry a primary current and substantially cylindrical secondary turns arranged coaxially with and only partially within the primary turns, the secondary turns including an active winding and a dummy winding, the active and dummy windings being coaxial, longitudinally separated and arranged to mutually cancel voltages excited by commonly experienced magnetic fields, the active winding but not the dummy winding being arranged within the primary turns.

  9. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1980-02-01

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the ..beta.. limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor).

  10. Switching transients in the MFTF yin-yang coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    This report is a study of the transients caused by the fast dump of large superconducting coils. Theoretical analysis, computer simulation, and actual measurements are used. Theoretical analysis can only be applied to the simplest of models. In the computer simulations two models are used, one in which the coil is divided into ten segments and another in which a single coil is employed. The circuit breaker that interrupts the current to the power supply, causing a fast dump, is represented by a time and current dependent conductance. Actual measurements are limited to measurements made incidental to the coils' performance tests

  11. JT-60SA TF magnet industrial manufacturing preparation and qualifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decool, P.; Cloez, H.; Gros, G.; Marechal, J.L.; Torre, A.; Verger, J.M.; Nusbaum, M.; Billotte, G.; Crepel, B.; Bourquard, A.; Davis, S.; Phillips, G.

    2014-01-01

    The general design of the JT-60SA toroidal field system was defined in agreement with all the participants in the project (CEA, ENEA, F4E), the detailed design was issued by the Voluntary Contributors. For the French part including the procurement of 9 of the 18 TF winding packs and their integration in the casings, an industrial contract was signed mid-2011 with Alstom (France). After agreement on manufacturing drawings and QA documentation, the manufacturing process was defined giving the guidelines for the workshop organization and the definition of the required tooling. The critical manufacturing points were identified in the process and, regarding technical requirements, have led to the definition of a set of qualification mockups. They are related to helium inlets, conductor winding and insulation, local conductor bending, electrical joint and terminal areas for the winding pack (WP), as well as winding embedding, case welding, and impregnations for WP integration in the casing. The fabrication processes have been improved and shall be qualified thanks to the manufacture and testing of 12 corresponding mockups. The successful achievement of several key mock-ups gives confidence in the feasibility of the manufacture, and their completion will give the green light to the industrial coils manufacture. (authors)

  12. Superconducting current transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, M.; Ozelis, J.P.

    1990-10-01

    The construction and performance of an electric current meter that operates in liquid He and mechanically splits apart to permit replacement of the current carrying conductor is described. It permits the measurement of currents induced in a loop of superconducting cable and expeditious exchange of such loops. It is a key component for a short sample cable testing facility that requires no high current power supplies nor high current leads. Its superconducting pickup circuit involves a non-magnetic core toroidal split-coil that surrounds the conductor and a solenoid whose field is sensed by a Hall probe. This toroidal split-coil is potted inside another compensating toroidal split-coil. The C shaped half toroids can be separated and brought precisely together from outside the cryostat. The Hall probe is energized and sensed by a lock-in amplifier whose output drives a bipolar power supply which feeds the compensating coil. The output is the voltage across a resistor in this feedback circuit. Currents of up to 10 kA can be measured with a precision of 150 mA. 3 refs., 4 figs

  13. Protection of toroidal field coils using multiple circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Langton, W.G.; Mann, W.R.; Pillsbury, R.D.; Tarrh, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The protection of toroidal field (TF) coils using multiple circuits is described. The discharge of a single-circuit TF system is given for purposes of definition. Two-circuit TF systems are analyzed and the results presented analytically and graphically. Induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and discharge time constants are compared to the single-circuit system. Three-circuit TF systems are analyzed. In addition to induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and time constants, several different discharge scenarios are included. The impacts of having discharge rates versus final maximum coil temperatures as requirements are examined. The out-of-plane forces which occur in the three-circuit system are analyzed using an approximate model. The analysis of multiplecircuit TF systems is briefly described and results for a Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) scale device are given based on computer analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of using multiple-circuit systems are summarized and discussed. The primary disadvantages of multiple circuits are the increased circuit complexity and potential for out-of-plane forces. These are offset by the substantial reduction in maximum discharge voltages, as well as other design options which become available when using multiple circuits

  14. TfR Binding Peptide Screened by Phage Display Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To screen an hTfR affinity peptide and investigate its activity in vitro. Methods: hTfR ... Keywords: Peptide, hTfR, Transferrin receptor, Phage display technology, Enhanced green ..... mediated uptake of peptides that bind the human.

  15. Design of an 18 Tesla, tandem mirror, fusion reactor, hybrid choke coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmer, J.F.; Agarwal, K.; Gurol, H.; Mancuso, A.; Michels, P.H.; Peck, S.D.; Burgeson, J.; Dalder, E.N.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid, part normal part superconducting 18-Tesla solenoid choke coil is designed for a tandem mirror fusion reactor. The present state of the art is represented by the 12-Tesla, superconducting NbSn coil. Future applications other than tandem mirror fusion devices needing high field solenoids might require hybrid magnets of the type described herein. The hybrid design was generated because of critical field performance limitations on present, practical superconducting wires. A hybrid design might be required (due to structural limits) even if the critical field were higher. Also, hybrids could be a cost-effective way of getting very high fields for certain applications. The 18-Tesla solenoid described is composed of an inner coil made of water-cooled, high-strength zirconium copper which generates 3 Tesla. A superconducting NbSn background coil contributes the remaining 15 Tesla. The focus of the design study was on the inner coil. Demonstration fabrication and testing was performed

  16. Exploring the limits of a very large Nb3Sn conductor: the 80 kA conductor of the ITER toroidal field model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Ciazynski, D.; Guerber, O.; Park, S.H.; Zani, L.

    2003-01-01

    In Phase II experiment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) the operation limits of its 80 kA Nb 3 Sn conductor were explored. To increase the magnetic field on the conductor, the TFMC was tested in presence of another large coil: the EURATOM-LCT coil. Under these conditions the maximum field reached on the conductor, was around 10 tesla. This exploration has been performed at constant current, by progressively increasing the coil temperature and monitoring the coil voltage drop in the current sharing regime. Such an operation was made possible thanks to the very high stability of the conductor. The aim of these tests was to compare the critical properties of the conductor with expectations and assess the ITER TF conductor design. These expectations are based on the documented critical field and temperature dependent properties of the 720 superconducting strands which compose the conductor. In addition the conductor properties are highly dependent on the strain, due to the compression appearing on Nb 3 Sn during the heat treatment of the pancakes and related to the differential thermal compression between Nb 3 Sn and the stainless steel jacket. No precise model exists to predict this strain, which is therefore the main information, which is expected from these tests. The method to deduce this strain from the different tests is presented, including a thermalhydraulic analysis to identify the temperature of the critical point and a careful estimation of the field map across the conductor. The measured strain has been estimated in the range -0.75% to -0.79 %. This information will be taken into account for ITER design and some adjustment of the ITER conductor design is under examination. (authors)

  17. Superconductivity in the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekly, Z.J.J.

    1990-01-01

    Superconducting magnets, coils or windings are the basis for a range of major applications in the energy area such as energy storage in superconducting coils, magnets for fusion research, and rotating machinery. Other major applications of superconductivity include high energy physics where 1000 superconducting magnets are operated continuously in the Tevatron at Fermilab in Illinois, over 12,000 superconducting magnets will be required for the superconducting Super Collider being build near Dallas. The largest commercial application of superconductors is in magnets for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - a new medical diagnostic imaging technique with about 2,000 systems installed worldwide. These form a sizable technology base on which to evaluate and push forward applications such as magneto hydrodynamic propulsion of seagoing vessels. The attractiveness of which depends ultimately on the characteristics of the superconducting magnet. The magnet itself is a combination of several technology areas - the conductors, magnetics, structures and cryogenics. This paper reviews state-of-the-art in each of the technology areas as they relate to superconductors

  18. Superconducting magnets for HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.

    1987-01-01

    The Hadron-Electron-Ring Accelerator (HERA) presently under construction at DESY, Hamburg, consists of an electron storage ring of 30 GeV and a proton storage ring of 820 GeV. Superconducting magnets are used for the proton ring. There are 416 superconducting bending magnets of 4.698 T central field and 8.824 m magnetic length, 224 superconducting quadrupoles of 91.2 T/m central gradient and many superconducting correction dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles. The main dipoles and quadrupoles consist of two-layer coils of 75 mm inner diameter clammed with aluminium (for the dipoles) or stainless steel laminations (for the quadrupoles). The collared coils are surrounded by a laminated cold iron yoke and supported inside a low loss cryostat. The protection system uses cold diodes to bypass the current around a quenching magnet. The magnets are cooled with one phase helium supplied by a 3 block central refrigeration system of 20 kW refrigeration power at 4.3 K. Two helium is returned through the magnets in good thermal contact with the one phase helium in the dipoles for temperature control. This paper describes the magnet system and gives the results obtained for prototype magnets

  19. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  20. STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF THE DIII-D TOROIDAL FIELD COIL TO INCREASED LATERAL LOADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REIS, E.E; CHIN, E.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Recent calibration shots in which full toroidal field (TF) coil current interacted with the maximum poloidal field coils have produced increased lateral loads on the outer sections of the TF-coil. The increased lateral loads have resulted in deflections that have been sufficient to cause the TF-coil to contact adjacent equipment and produce a transient short to ground within the coil. The six outer turns of each TF-coil bundle are clamped together by insulated preloaded studs to provide increased bending stiffness. These sections of the outer bundles depend on friction to react the lateral loads as a bundle rather than six individual turns. A major concern is that the increased loads will produce slip between turns resulting in excessive lateral deflections and possible damage to the insulating sleeve on the preloaded studs. A finite element structural model of the TF-coil was developed for the calculation of deflections and the shear load distribution throughout the coil for the applied lateral loads from a full current calibration shot. The purpose of the updated structural model is to correlate the applied lateral loads to the total shear force between the unbonded sections of the outer turns. An allowable integrated lateral load applied to the outer turns is established based on the maximum shear force that can be reacted by friction. A program that calculates the magnetic fields and integrated lateral load along the outer turns can be incorporated into the plasma control system. The integrated load can then be compared to the calculated allowable value prior to execution of calibration shots. Calibration shots with a calculated total lateral load greater than the allowable value will be prevented

  1. Superconducting generators and motors and methods for employing same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsic, Michael J.; Long, Larry

    2017-08-29

    A superconducting electrical generator or motor having a plurality of cryostats is described. The cryostats contain coolant and a first cryostat encloses at least one of a plurality of superconducting coils. A first coil is in superconducting electrical communication with a second coil contained in a second cryostat through a superconducting conduction cooling cable enclosing a conductor. The first cryostat and the second cryostat may be in fluid communication through at least one cryogen channel within the at least one superconducting conduction cooling cable. In other embodiments, none of the plurality of cryostats may be in fluid communication and the cable may be cooled by conduction along the conductor from the first or second cryostat, or from both. The conductor may have different segments at temperatures equal to or above the temperature of the coolant and the superconducting conduction cooling cables may be connected through quick connect fittings.

  2. Experimental study of the effects of alternating fields on HTS coils according to the winding insulation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y J; Lee, T S; Lee, W S; Ko, T K; Ahn, M C

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of alternating fields on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils according to the winding insulation condition. Alternating fields can occur in synchronous machines (armature reaction, faults) and other devices. In superconducting synchronous machines, alternating fields affect the operational characteristics of the machine and the superconducting field coil. Therefore, a method of reducing the effects of alternating fields is necessary in superconducting synchronous design. In this study, the effects of alternating fields on the HTS field coil according to the winding insulation condition were experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that HTS coils made using the no-insulation technique can be a solution for reducing the effects of the alternating field. These results are expected to suggest useful data for applications of HTS field coils in superconducting synchronous machines. (paper)

  3. A liquid helium piston pump with a superconducting drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, C.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes a bellows pump where the driving force is achieved by an arrangement of three superconducting coils. The pump was designed for use in the supercritical helium flow circuit of the LCT-conductor test facility. The main advantage of the superconducting drive, compared to conventional pumps with external drive, is the compact design. Force transferring parts between 4.2 K and room temperature are not necessary. The pump was tested in a closed loop arrangement. The superconducting drive for a piston pump consists of a moving coil in a constant background field. Other coil configurations and the upscaling of the pump design are discussed

  4. Elastic-plastic analysis of the toroidal field coil inner leg of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, T.

    1987-07-01

    Elastic-plastic analyses were made for the inner leg of the Compact Ignition Tokamak toroidal field (TF) coil, which is made of copper-Inconel composite material. From the result of the elastic-plastic analysis, the effective Young's moduli of the inner leg were determined by the analytical equations. These Young's moduli are useful for the three-dimensional, elastic, overall TF coil analysis. Comparison among the results of the baseline design (R = 1.324 m), the bucked pressless design, the 1.527-m major radius design, and the 1.6-m major radius design was also made, based on the elastic-plastic TF coil inner leg analyses

  5. Analysis of NSTX TF Joint Voltage Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley R

    2005-01-01

    This report presents findings of analyses of recorded current and voltage data associated with 72 electrical joints operating at high current and high mechanical stress. The analysis goal was to characterize the mechanical behavior of each joint and thus evaluate its mechanical supports. The joints are part of the toroidal field (TF) magnet system of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) pulsed plasma device operating at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Since there is not sufficient space near the joints for much traditional mechanical instrumentation, small voltage probes were installed on each joint and their voltage monitoring waveforms have been recorded on sampling digitizers during each NSTX ''shot''

  6. TNS superconducting ohmic-heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Fuja, R.; Kim, S.H.; Kustom, R.L.; Praeg, W.F.; Thompson, K.; Turner, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    The superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) system is the selected design for the General Atomics Co./Argonne National Laboratory TNS tokamak design studies. The key features of the OH system design are: (1) parallel coil connection, (2) better utilization of flux core by embedding support cylinder of the toroidal-field coil within the OH inner radius, (3) independent trim coils for correcting the stray fields, (4) low-loss high-current cryostable cable design and (5) OH coil cycling circuit using a reversing bridge. Detailed designs are presented

  7. Inductive voltage compensation in superconducting magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.; Goddard, J.S.; Shen, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper details several techniques of inductive voltage compensation developed for quench detection in superconducting magnet systems with multiple coils and power supplies, with particular application for the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF). Sources of noise, their magnitudes, and the sensitivity required for normal zone detection to avoid damage to the magnets are discussed. Two passive compensation schemes (second difference and central difference) are introduced and illustrated by parameters of LCTF; these take advantage of coil symmetries and other system characteristics. An active compensation scheme based on current rate input fom pickup coils and utilizing theory on ac loss voltage for calibration was tested, and the experimental setup and test results are discussed

  8. Conception of Brownian coil

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiayuan

    2018-01-01

    This article proposes a conception of Brownian coil. Brownian coil is a tiny coil with the same size of pollen. Once immersed into designed magnetic field and liquid, the coil will be moved and deformed macroscopically, due to the microscopic thermodynamic molecular collisions. Such deformation and movement will change the magnetic flux through the coil, by which an ElectroMotive Force (EMF) is produced. In this work, Brownian heat exchanger and Brownian generator are further designed to tran...

  9. Studies on a Stellarator reactor of the Helias type: The modular coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Rau, F.; Wobig, H.

    1993-02-01

    Helias Stellarator Reactors (HSR) are considered, focussing on the superconducting modular coil system which generates the magnetic field, aiming to clarify critical issues of such systems. The development of the coil system is presented and the properties of the vacuum magnetic field are discussed. Electromagnetic forces and the resulting mechanical stresses and strains inside the coils and the surrounding structure are calculated. Parameter studies are made varying the major radius R 0 between 18 m and 24 m in order to investigate the engineering parameters for the superconducting coil system. The total mass and the fusion power output of HSR are compared with values evaluated for tokamak reactors. (orig.). 36 figs

  10. Mechanical behavior of the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Acerbi, E; Alessandria, F; Berthier, R; Broggi, F; Daël, A; Dudarev, A; Mayri, C; Miele, P; Reytier, M; Rossi, L; Sorbi, M; Sun, Z; ten Kate, H H J; Vanenkov, I; Volpini, G

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been developed and constructed to verify the design parameters and the manufacture techniques of the Barrel Toroid coils (BT) that are under construction for the ATLAS Detector. Essential for successful operation is the mechanical behavior of the superconducting coil and its support structure. In the ATLAS magnet test facility, a magnetic mirror is used to reproduce in the model coil the electromagnetic forces of the BT coils when assembled in the final Barrel Toroid magnet system. The model coil is extensively equipped with mechanical instrumentation to monitor stresses and force levels as well as contraction during a cooling down and excitation up to nominal current. The installed set up of strain gauges, position sensors and capacitive force transducers is presented. Moreover the first mechanical results in terms of expected main stress, strain and deformation values are presented based on detailed mechanical analysis of the design. (7 refs).

  11. Analysis and test to predict the fatigue life of the ISX-B toroidal field coils' finger joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, J.A.; Ojalvo, I.U.; Raynor, G.E.; Zatz, I.J.; Johnson, N.E.; Walls, J.C.; Nelson, B.E.; Cain, W.D.; Walstrom, P.L.; Pearce, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A new and more rigorous structural evaluation of the ISX toroidal field (TF) coil fingers joints was undertaken to assess the effects of high-/beta/ operation of ISX-B. A new poloidal field (PF) coil set which allows high-/beta/ operation and produces larger out-of-plane loads on the TF coils was installed as part of the change to ISX-B. It was determined that the iron core significantly affects the out-of-plane load distribution and forces were calculated using the GFUN-3D code which considers 3-D iron core effects. These loads were applied to a half-symmetric finite element NASTRAN code model in which the TF coils were modeled as a string of beam elements. 8 refs

  12. Modeling the static fringe field of superconducting magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeglic, P; Lebar, A; Apih, T; Dolinsek, J

    2001-05-01

    The resonance frequency-space and the frequency gradient-space relations are evaluated analytically for the static fringe magnetic field of superconducting magnets used in the NMR diffusion measurements. The model takes into account the actual design of the high-homogeneity magnet coil system that consists of the main coil and the cryoshim coils and enables a precise calibration of the on-axis magnetic field gradient and the resonance frequency inside and outside of the superconducting coil. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Quench and safety tests on a toroidal field coil of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciazynski, D.; Cure, C.; Duchateau, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    As a part of the safety analysis of the magnet, three quenches have been initiated in one of the TF coils in the Saclay test facility. While transporting a given current, the coil is insulated from the refrigerator: the temperatures of the helium and of the coil increase slowly on account of thermal losses. At the current sharing temperature a quench rapidly propagates and the protection system makes the coil discharge in the dump resistor. At three levels of current, electrical, thermal and hydraulic measurements have been performed. All these results are taken into account for the safety design of TORE SUPRA

  14. Split-coil-system SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecsey, G.

    1992-08-01

    The high field superconductor test facility SULTAN started operation successfully in May 1992. Originally designed for testing full scale conductors for the large magnets of the next generation fusion reactors, the SULTAN facility installed at PSI (Switzerland) was designed as a common venture of three European Laboratories: ENEA (Italy), ECN (Netherlands) and PSI, and built by ENEA and PSI in the framework of the Euratom Fusion Technology Program. Presently the largest facility in the world, with its superconducting split coil system generating 11 Tesla in a 0.6 m bore, it is ready now for testing superconductor samples with currents up to 50 kA at variable cooling conditions. Similar tests can be arranged also for other applications. SULTAN is offered by the European Community as a contribution to the worldwide cooperation for the next step of fusion reactor development ITER. First measurements on conductor developed by CEA (Cadarache) are now in progress. Others like those of ENEA and CERN will follow. For 1993, a test of an Italian 12 TZ model coil for fusion application is planned. SULTAN is a worldwide unique facility marking the competitive presence of Swiss technology in the field of applied superconductivity research. Based on development and design of PSI, the high field Nb 3 Sn superconductors and coils were fabricated at the works of Kabelwerke Brugg and ABB, numerous Swiss companies contributed to the success of this international effort. Financing of the Swiss contribution of SULTAN was made available by NEFF, BEW, BBW, PSI and EURATOM. (author) figs., tabs., 20 refs

  15. Superconductors for W VII-X coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, W.

    1987-01-01

    Superconductor concepts are discussed with respect to operational current, cooling and bending behavior, and ac losses. The encouraging results for NbTi superconducting technology are recalled. It is argued that the WVII-X stellarator modular superconducting coils can be built just as the modular Cu coils for WVII-AS. Special attention must be paid to the dB/dt allowed for the conductor. Shape and price depend on the means used to avoid ac losses. Formula to elucidate the main physical parameters influencing ac loss behavior of superconductors are given. Configurations investigated with respect to plasma behavior are compared. Masses to be cooled were estimated for two configurations. The estimated cooling power is of the order of 3kW

  16. Analysis and tests of TF magnet insulation samples for the JET upgrade to 4 tesla

    CERN Document Server

    Miele, P; Bettinali, L; Kaye, A; Last, J; Papastergiou, S; Riccardo, V; Visca, E

    2000-01-01

    The JET Toroidal Field (TF) coils were originally designed for operation at 3.4 tesla. In order to upgrade the field to 4 tesla and thus improve the performance of the JET machine, new mechanical tests and analysis were carried out on the insulation of TF coil samples. They are aimed at investigating the mechanical properties and the status of the insulation in order to set allowable stresses and force limits. In particular since the shear stress in the insulation is strongly affected by the shear modulus of elasticity G, it is important to measure this parameter. A method for the measurement of G in glass-resin fibres, the V-notched beam method (Iosipescu method) , was applied. The particular shape of the rectangular Iosipescu V- notched sample and the particular modality of force application produce pure shear stress for a reliable measurement of the G value and of the shear strength of the insulation. The effect of temperature on these mechanical properties was also investigated. Results show higher averag...

  17. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 32, Coil assembly documentation. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document is intended to address the contract requirement for providing coil assembly documentation, as required in the applicable Statement of Work: 'Provide preliminary procedures and preliminary design and supporting analysis of the equipment, fixtures, and hardware required to integrate and align the impregnated coil assemblies with the coil cases and intercoil structure. Each of the three major processes associated with the coil case and intercoil structure (ICS), TF Case Fabrication, Coil Preparation for Case Assembly are examined in detail. The specific requirements, processes, equipment, and technical concerns for each of these assembly processes is presented

  18. Superconducting inductive displacement detection of a microcantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinante, A.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a superconducting inductive technique to measure the displacement of a micromechanical resonator. In our scheme, a type I superconducting microsphere is attached to the free end of a microcantilever and approached to the loop of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometer. A local magnetic field as low as 100 μT, generated by a field coil concentric to the SQUID, enables detection of the cantilever thermomechanical noise at 4.2 K. The magnetomechanical coupling and the magnetic spring are in good agreement with image method calculations assuming pure Meissner effect. These measurements are relevant to recent proposals of quantum magnetomechanics experiments based on levitating superconducting microparticles.

  19. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toral, F

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques

  20. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, Fernando

    2014-07-17

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques.

  1. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toral, F [Madrid, CIEMAT (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques.

  2. Toroid field coil shear key installation study, DOE task No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Meier, R.W.; Yuen, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for fitting and installation of the scissor keys, triangular keys, and truss keys in the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Coil Assembly were developed and evaluated. In addition, the process of remote removal and replacement of a failed TF coil was considered. Two concepts were addressed: central solenoid installed last (Naka Option 1) and central solenoid installed first (Naka Option 2). In addition, a third concept was developed which utilized the favorable features of both concepts. A time line for installation was estimated for the Naka Option 1 concept

  3. Prototype superconducting magnet for the FFAG accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Mori, Y.; Fujii, T.; Iwasa, M.; Orikasa, T.

    2006-01-01

    A study of a superconducting magnet for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator has been performed. The FFAG accelerator requires static magnetic field, and it is suitable for superconducting magnet applications, because problems associated with time varying magnetic field such as eddy current loss can be eliminated. The superconducting magnet, which can generate high magnetic field, is possible to realize a higher beam energy with a given accelerator size or the size to be smaller for a given beam energy. The FFAG accelerator magnet is demanded to have a complicated nonlinear magnetic field with high accuracy. As a first prototype superconducting coil, the coil configuration which consists of left-right asymmetric cross-section and large aperture has been designed. The prototype coil has been successfully developed by using a 6-axis Computer Numerical Control (CNC) winding machine. The magnetic field of the prototype coil has been demonstrated in warm measurement. As a consequence, the technical feasibility has been verified with the prototype coil development and the performance test. In addition, the technology components developed in the prototype coil have a possibility to transfer to a fusion magnet

  4. LLNL high-field coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is presented of the LLNL High-Field Superconducting Magnet Development Program wherein the technology is being developed for producing fields in the range of 15 T and higher for both mirror and tokamak applications. Applications requiring less field will also benefit from this program. In addition, recent results on the thermomechanical performance of cable-in-conduit conductor systems are presented and their importance to high-field coil design discussed

  5. Experience of superconducting current feeders system of SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.C.; Garg, A.; Sonara, D.

    2014-01-01

    The superconducting current feeder system for SST-1 which has been installed and commissioned recently along with SST-1, felicitates to energize the SST-1. The CFS consists of ten pairs of 10,000 Ampere (A) rating helium vapor cooled conventional current leads, interconnecting Cu-SC joints, three numbers of cryo-compatible SC feeders ducts, current leads assembly chamber, hydraulic network and three numbers of joint boxes operated at different current rating to charge Toroidal Field and Poloidal Field coils separately. During the last three campaigns, it was possible to achieve a controlled cool down up to 4 K and showed its rated operational performance. Actively cooled liquid nitrogen shield showed temperature profile in the temperature range of 80-85K and the whole system was evacuated up to 6x10 -6 mbar. The measured LHe consumption rates from TF VCCL were 0.3 g/s and 0.35 g/s at zero current and 1 kA respectively. (author)

  6. Evaluation of mechanical strength of the joints in JT-60 toroidal field coil conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Monoru; Sasajima, Hiroshi

    1980-04-01

    Toroidal field (TF) coils of JT-60 produce a toroidal field of 45 kG at a plasma axis, they have an inner bore of 3.90 m and a weight of about 80 metric tons per coil. Eighteen TF coils are located around a torus axis at regular intervals. TF coil conductors are mostly jointed by high frequency induction brazing, the rest jointed by welding. In deciding the details of the jointing procedures, the conductor size and the requested mechanical strength are mainly taken into consideration. Described are non-destructive inspection methods for the brazed joints, strength evaluation, and the inspection criteria. Ultrasonic testing method is found to be the most effective in evaluation of mechanical properties of the brazed joints especially in terms of fatigue strength. In section 1, specifications of the TF coils are given. In section 2, the ultrasonic inspection method and the detectability of this apparatus are described in detail, the defects of known size are compared with the indication values and display figures. The apparatus developed for JT-60 is operated automatically also recording the inspectionresults. In section 3, mechanical strength of the brazed joints with initial defects is discussed on the basis of Fracture Mechanics theory and results of the fatigue crack growth test. The inspection criteria in accordance with the descriptions of section 2 and 3 are given in section 4. (author)

  7. Conceptual design study of the moderate size superconducting spherical tokamak power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi, Keii; Ono, Yasushi; Nakamura, Makoto; Someya, Youji; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tobita, Kenji; Ono, Masayuki

    2015-06-01

    A new conceptual design of the superconducting spherical tokamak (ST) power plant was proposed as an attractive choice for tokamak fusion reactors. We reassessed a possibility of the ST as a power plant using the conservative reactor engineering constraints often used for the conventional tokamak reactor design. An extensive parameters scan which covers all ranges of feasible superconducting ST reactors was completed, and five constraints which include already achieved plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and confinement parameters in ST experiments were established for the purpose of choosing the optimum operation point. Based on comparison with the estimated future energy costs of electricity (COEs) in Japan, cost-effective ST reactors can be designed if their COEs are smaller than 120 mills kW-1 h-1 (2013). We selected the optimized design point: A = 2.0 and Rp = 5.4 m after considering the maintenance scheme and TF ripple. A self-consistent free-boundary MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil configuration of the ST reactor were designed by modifying the neutral beam injection system and plasma profiles. The MHD stability of the equilibrium was analysed and a ramp-up scenario was considered for ensuring the new ST design. The optimized moderate-size ST power plant conceptual design realizes realistic plasma and fusion engineering parameters keeping its economic competitiveness against existing energy sources in Japan.

  8. A step towards controlled fusion reactors: Tore Supra tokamak with superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1988-01-01

    Tore Supra technology has to solve all the problems related to the development and the installaion of superconducting coils and associated cryogenic devices. Tore Supra will allow to get a significative experience to prepare next machines. Specifications and needs of tokamaks concerning the superconducting coils of future machines are recalled [fr

  9. CS model coil experimental log book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  10. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1980-02-01

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the β limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR

  11. Considerations against a force compensated coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    The cost of structural components in a large superconducting coil may well exceed the coil and cryostat cost. As a result, the idea of constructing a system composed of two different coil types assembled in such a way that the sources balance and reduce the total structural requirement is oft proposed. A suitable geometry has never been found for the fundamental reason that there can be no force compensated solution. In this paper, the general problem is presented and an analysis of the energy stored and stresses produced in the structure are described in a fundamental way. Finally, the relation between structural mass M and stored energy E, M ≥/rho/E/σ/sub w/, that is valid for all magnetic systems is developed, where /rho/ is the density of the structure and σ/sub w/ is the working stress in the structure. 12 refs., 2 figs

  12. Considerations against a force compensated coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    The cost of structural components in a large superconducting coil may well exceed the coil and cryostat cost. As a result, the idea of constructing a system composed of two different coil types assembled in such a way that the forces balance and reduce the total structural requirement is oft proposed. A suitable geometry has never been found for the fundamental reason that there can be no force compensated solution. In this paper, the general problem is presented and an analysis of the energy stored and stresses produced in the structure are described in a fundamental way. Finally, the relation between structural mass M and stored energy E, M ≥ /rho/E/σ/sub w/, that is valid for all magnetic systems is developed, where /rho/ is the density of the structure and σ/sub w/ is the working stress in the structure. 8 refs., 2 figs

  13. Extending TF1: Argument parsing, function composition, and vectorization

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang Mang Kin, Arthur Leonard

    2017-01-01

    In this project, we extend the functionality of the TF1 function class in root. We add argument parsing, making it possible to freely pass variables and parameters into pre-defined and user-defined functions. We also introduce a syntax to use certain compositions of functions, namely normalized sums and convolutions, directly in TF1. Finally, we introduce some simple vectorization functionality to TF1 and demonstrate the potential to speed up parallelizable computations.

  14. Structural analysis of the NET toroidal field coils and conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.; Collier, D.; Gori, R.

    1989-01-01

    The NET toroidal field coils will utilise A15-type superconductor at 4.2 K to generate fields up to 11.5 T. The superconductor strands themselves are sensitive to strain, which causes degradation of their current carrying capacity, and thus the detailed behaviour of the coil conductor must be analysied so that the strian can be minimised. This analysis must include the manufacturing processes of the conductor as well as the normal and abnormal loperational loads. The conductor will be insulated and bonded by glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin, with limited bonding shear strength, and the overall support of the complete coil system must be designed to reduce these shear stresses. The coils will be subjected to pulse loads form the poloidal field coils, and analysis of the slip between the various coil components, such as conductors and the coil case, giving rise to frictional heating and possible loss of superconducting properties is another important factor, which has been investigated by a number of stress analyses. The manufacturing, thermal and normal magnetic loads on the coils and the analysis leading to the proposed structural design are described. In addition to the normal operating conditions, there is a range of abnormal load conditions which could result from electrical or mechanical faults on the coils. The effect of these potential faults has been analysed and the coil design modified to prevent catastrophic structural failure. (author). 13 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  15. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downer, J.R.; Anastas, G.V. Jr.; Bushko, D.A.; Flynn, F.J.; Goldie, J.H.; Gondhalekar, V.; Hawkey, T.J.; Hockney, R.L.; Torti, R.P.

    1992-12-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation has completed a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 program to develop a Superconducting Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension (LAMS) for the NASA Langley Research Center. The Superconducting LAMS was a hardware demonstration of the control technology required to develop an advanced momentum exchange effector. The Phase 2 research was directed toward the demonstration for the key technology required for the advanced concept CMG, the controller. The Phase 2 hardware consists of a superconducting solenoid ('source coils') suspended within an array of nonsuperconducting coils ('control coils'), a five-degree-of-freedom positioning sensing system, switching power amplifiers, and a digital control system. The results demonstrated the feasibility of suspending the source coil. Gimballing (pointing the axis of the source coil) was demonstrated over a limited range. With further development of the rotation sensing system, enhanced angular freedom should be possible

  16. Test results of a 5 kW fully superconducting homopolar motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. K. [Woosuk University, Wanju (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, S.; Joo, H. G.; Kim, W. S.; Choi, K. [Korea Polytechnic University,Siheong (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, S. Y. [Electrical Engineering and Science Research Institute,Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The superconducting Homopolar motor is manufactured and tested. Homopolar motor system is simple and solid as the field coil of the motor is fixed near the stator coil without rotating system. In this paper, a 5 kW fully superconducting homopolar motor which has high temperature superconducting armature and field coils is manufactured and tested in liquid nitrogen. The critical current test results of the used 2G superconducting wire, pancake coil for rotor winding and race-track coils for armature winding are reported. Also, the test result of rotating and operating performance is presented. The operating frequency is to be 5 Hz for low-speed rotating. The developed fully superconducting Homopolar motor is the world's first.

  17. Test results of a 5 kW fully superconducting homopolar motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. K.; Park, S. H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, S.; Joo, H. G.; Kim, W. S.; Choi, K.; Hahm, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    The superconducting Homopolar motor is manufactured and tested. Homopolar motor system is simple and solid as the field coil of the motor is fixed near the stator coil without rotating system. In this paper, a 5 kW fully superconducting homopolar motor which has high temperature superconducting armature and field coils is manufactured and tested in liquid nitrogen. The critical current test results of the used 2G superconducting wire, pancake coil for rotor winding and race-track coils for armature winding are reported. Also, the test result of rotating and operating performance is presented. The operating frequency is to be 5 Hz for low-speed rotating. The developed fully superconducting Homopolar motor is the world's first.

  18. Water cooling coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Ito, Y; Kazawa, Y

    1975-02-05

    Object: To provide a water cooling coil in a toroidal nuclear fusion device, in which coil is formed into a small-size in section so as not to increase dimensions, weight or the like of machineries including the coil. Structure: A conductor arranged as an outermost layer of a multiple-wind water cooling coil comprises a hollow conductor, which is directly cooled by fluid, and as a consequence, a solid conductor disposed interiorly thereof is cooled indirectly.

  19. Safety concerns for superconducting magnets of upcoming fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    -Several fusion experiments being constructed (Tore Supra) or contemplated (DCT 8, Alcator DCT) feature superconducting coils. These coils introduce the following safety concerns: 1. Internally Cooled Conductor (ICC). ICC's are found to be highly stable against short heat pulses, even when the coolant is stagnant or moving at low steady-state velocity. However, a large heat pulse is certain to quench the conductor. Thus, determining the stability limits is vital. 2. Helium II Cooling. Helium II has both unique advantages as a coolant and unique safety problems. 3. Shorted Turns. In magnets with shorts from operational accidents, the current can switch back and forth between the short and the shorted turns, as those alternatively go normal and superconducting. 4. Hybrid Superconducting-Normal Conducting Coil System. The possibility of unequal currents in the different magnets and thus of unexpected forces on the superconducting magnets is much greater than for an all-superconducting system. Analysis of these problems are presented

  20. Toroidal field magnet and poloidal divertor field coil systems adapted to reactor requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.

    1985-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade is a tokamak experiment with external poloidal field coils, that is now under construction at IPP Garching. It can produce elongated single-null (SN), double-null (DN) and limiter (L) configurations. The SN is the reference configuration with asymmetric load distributions in the poloidal field (PF) system and the toroidal field (TF) magnet. Plasma control and stabilization requires a rigid passive conductor close to the plasma. The design principles of the coils and support structure are described. (orig.)

  1. The ASDEX upgrade toroidal field magnet and poloidal divertor field coil system adapted to reactor requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.; Blaumoser, M.; Ennen, K.; Gruber, J.; Gruber, O.; Jandl, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kollotzek, H.; Kotzlowski, H.; Lackner, E.; Lackner, K.; Larcher, T. von; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Pillsticker, M.; Poehlchen, R.; Preis, H.; Schneider, H.; Seidel, U.; Sombach, B.; Speth, E.; Streibl, B.; Vernickel, H.; Werner, F.; Wesner, F.; Wieczorek, A.

    1986-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade is a tokamak experiment with external poloidal field coils that is now under construction at IPP Garching. It can produce elongated single-null (SN), double-null (DN) , and limiter (L) configurations. The SN is the reference configuration with asymmetric load distributions in the poloidal field (PF) system and the toroidal field (TF) magnet. Plasma control and stabilization require a rigid passive conductor close to the plasma. The design principles of the coils and support structure are described. (orig.)

  2. The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.D.; Bulmer, R.J.; Chaplin, M.R.; O'Connor, T.G.; Slack, D.S.; Wong, R.L.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Schultz, J.H.; Diatchenko, N.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics eXperiment (TPX) will be the first all superconducting magnet system for a Tokamak, where the poloidal field coils, in addition to the toroidal field coils are superconducting. The magnet system is designed to operate in a steady state mode, and to initiate the plasma discharge ohmically. The toroidal field system provides a peak field of 4.0 Tesla on the plasma axis at a plasma major radius of 2.25 m. The peak field on the niobium 3-tin, cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is 8.4 Tesla for the 16 toroidal field coils. The toroidal field coils must absorb approximately 5 kW due to nuclear heating, eddy currents, and other sources. The poloidal field system provides a total of 18 volt seconds to initiate the plasma and drive a plasma current up to 2 MA. The poloidal field system consists of 14 individual coils which are arranged symmetrically above and below the horizontal mid plane. Four pairs of coils make up the central solenoid, and three pairs of poloidal ring coils complete the system. The poloidal field coils all use a cable-in-conduit conductor, using either niobium 3-tin (Nb 3 Sn) or niobium titanium (NbTi) superconducting strands depending on the operating conditions for that coil. All of the coils are cooled by flowing supercritical helium, with inlet and outlet connections made on each double pancake. The superconducting magnet system has gone through a conceptual design review, and is in preliminary design started by the LLNL/MIT/PPPL collaboration. A number of changes have been made in the design since the conceptual design review, and are described in this paper. The majority of the design and all fabrication of the superconducting magnet system will be ,accomplished by industry, which will shortly be taking over the preliminary design. The magnet system is expected to be completed in early 2000

  3. Low noise niobium dc SQUID with a planar input coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, V. J.; van den Hamer, P.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    1983-02-01

    A practical all-niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a niobium spiral input coil has been developed. The SQUID utilizes submicron Josephson junctions. The best intrinsic energy resolution obtained with a 1-nH SQUID is 4×10-32 J/Hz. A 20-turn 1.2-μH input coil is coupled to a 2.3-nH SQUID with an efficiency of 0.5. The energy resolution with respect to the coil is 1×10-30 J/Hz.

  4. Low noise niobium dc SQUID with a planar input coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Waal, V.J.; van den Hamer, P.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1983-02-15

    A practical all-niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a niobium spiral input coil has been developed. The SQUID utilizes submicron Josephson junctions. The best intrinsic energy resolution obtained with a 1-nH SQUID is 4 x 10/sup -32/ J/Hz. A 20-turn 1.2-..mu..H input coil is coupled to a 2.3-nH SQUID with an efficiency of 0.5. The energy resolution with respect to the coil is 1 x 10/sup -30/ J/Hz.

  5. Development of superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the commercial activities in the field of superconducting machines, particularly superconducting wind turbine generators, are reviewed and presented. Superconducting generators have the potential to provide a compact and light weight drive train at high torques and slow rotational...... speeds, because high magnetic fields can be produced by coils with very little loss. Three different superconducting wind turbine generator topologies have been proposed by three different companies. One is based on low temperature superconductors; one is based on high temperature superconductors......; and one is a fully superconducting generator based on MgB2. It is concluded that there is large commercial interest in superconducting machines, with an increasing patenting activity. Such generators are, however, not without their challenges. The superconductors have to be cooled down to somewhere...

  6. Development of Superconducting Wind Turbine Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the commercial activities in the field of superconducting machines, particularly superconducting wind turbine generators, are reviewed and presented. Superconducting generators have the potential to provide a compact and light weight drive train at high torques and slow rotational...... speeds, because high magnetic fields can be produced by coils with very little loss. Three different superconducting wind turbine generator topologies have been proposed by three different companies. One is based on low temperature superconductors (LTS); one is based on high temperature superconductors...... (HTS); and one is a fully superconducting generator based on MgB2. It is concluded that there is large commercial interest in superconducting machines, with an increasing patenting activity. Such generators are however not without their challenges. The superconductors have to be cooled down...

  7. 1-D thermal-hydraulic analysis of the high temperature superconducting current leads for the ITER magnet system from 5 K to 300 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Enrico, E-mail: enrico.rizzo@kit.edu [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bauer, Pierre [ITER Organization, Cadarache (France); Heller, Reinhard [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Richard, Laura Savoldi; Zanino, Roberto [Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A global, predictive picture of the ITER HTS current lead is not yet available. • A predictive 1-D, steady state thermal-hydraulic analysis of the full length HTS current leads has been performed. • For the heat exchanger, correlations previously derived by the same authors have been used. • The results have been compared with the ITER relevant requirements. • According to our results, the ITER HTS current leads will fulfill the requirements. -- Abstract: The magnet system of ITER includes high temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads with a maximum current of 68 kA for the toroidal field (TF) coils, 55 kA for the poloidal field (PF)/central solenoid (CS) coils and 10 kA for the control coils (CC), respectively. Although different in terms of size and operative conditions, the ITER HTS current leads have been all designed on the basis of an established concept, which was successfully developed for the LHC at CERN and proven by the so-called 70 kA “demonstrator” lead made by KIT and by the ITER pre-prototypes made by ASIPP in China. A broad R and D campaign has been undertaken by ASIPP and CERN in order to find optimized designs for each component of the leads. Nevertheless, a comprehensive picture of the performance of the entire HTS current leads is not yet available. In this paper, a steady state, full length, thermal-hydraulic 1-D modeling is applied to the study of the three types (TF, PF/CS, CC) of ITER HTS current leads. The results of this predictive analysis are then compared with relevant ITER requirements. It was found that the present design of the HTS current leads will fulfill these specifications.

  8. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  9. Variable temperature superconducting microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Yeh, W. J.

    2000-03-01

    We have developed and tested a promising type of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope, which can be used to detect vortex motion and can operate in magnetic fields over a large temperature range. The system utilizes a single-loop coupling transformer, consisting of a patterned high Tc superconducting thin film. At one end of the transformer, a 20 μm diam detecting loop is placed close to the sample. At the other end, a large loop is coupled to a NbTi coil, which is connected to a low Tc SQUID sensor. Transformers in a variety of sizes have been tested and calibrated. The results show that the system is capable of detecting the motion of a single vortex. We have used the microscope to study the behavior of moving vortices at various positions in a YBa2Cu3O7 thin film bridge.

  10. NCSX Trim Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish, M.; Brooks, A.; Rushinski, J.; Upcavage, R.

    2009-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory before work was stopped in 2008. The objective of this experiment was to develop the stellarator concept and evaluate it's potential as a model for future fusion power plants. Stellarator design requires very precisely positioned Modular Coils of complex shape to form 3D plasmas. In the design of NCSX, Trim Coils were required to compensate for both the positioning of the coils during assembly and the fabrication tolerances of the Modular Coils. Use of the Trim Coils allowed for larger tolerances increasing ease of assembly and decreasing overall cost. A set of Trim coils was developed to suppress the toroidal flux in island regions due to misalignment, magnetic materials, and eddy currents. The requirement imposed upon the design forced the toroidal flux in island regions below 10% of the total toroidal flux in the plasma. An analysis was first performed to evaluate candidate Trim Coil configurations iterating both the size, number, and position of the coils. The design was optimized considering both performance and cost while staying within the tight restraints presented by the space limited geometry. The final design of the Trim Coils incorporated a 48 Coil top bottom symmetric set. Fabrication costs were minimized by having only two coil types and using a planar conventional design with off the shelf commercial conductor. The Trim Coil design incorporated supports made from simple structural shapes assembled together in a way which allowed for adjustment as well as accommodation for the tolerance build up on the mating surfaces. This paper will summarize the analysis that led to the optimization of the Trim Coils set, the trim coil mechanical design, thermal and stress analysis, and the design of the supporting Trim Coil structure

  11. A superconducting electron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Huebel, H.; Grumbkow, A. von

    1983-03-01

    The set-up and tests of an electron spectrometer for in-beam conversion electron measurements are described. A superconducting solenoid is used to transport the electrons from the target to cooled Si(Li) detectors. The solenoid is designed to produce either a homogeneous axially symmetric field of up to 2 Tesla or a variety of field profiles by powering the inner and outer set of coils of the solenoid separately. The electron trajectories resulting for various field profiles are discussed. In-beam electron spectra taken in coincidence with electrons, gammas and alpha-particles are shown. (Auth.)

  12. Letter report for the Superconducting Magnet Development Program, April 1, 1977--June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, W.A.; Lubell, M.S.

    1977-11-01

    The results and accomplishments of the Superconducting Magnet Development Program (SCMDP) for the second quarter of the calendar year 1977 are summarized. The presentations are arranged according to projects rather than the group organization by discipline of the Magnetics and Superconductivity Section. The design, procurement, and fabrication of the Large Coil Segment are well under way. Significant progress is reported on the conductor stability and loss experiments for both toroidal field coils and poloidal field coils

  13. Applied superconductivity. Handbook on devices and applications. Vol. 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Paul (ed.) [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik, AG Tieftemperaturphysik

    2015-07-01

    The both volumes contain the following 12 chapters: 1. Fundamentals; 2. Superconducting Materials; 3. Technology, Preparation, and Characterization (bulk materials, thin films, multilayers, wires, tapes; cooling); 4, Superconducting Magnets; 5. Power Applications (superconducting cables, superconducting current leads, fault current limiters, transformers, SMES and flywheels; rotating machines; SmartGrids); 6. Superconductive Passive Devices (superconducting microwave components; cavities for accelerators; superconducting pickup coils; magnetic shields); 7. Applications in Quantum Metrology (superconducting hot electron bolometers; transition edge sensors; SIS Mixers; superconducting photon detectors; applications at Terahertz frequency; detector readout); 8. Superconducting Radiation and Particle Detectors; 9. Superconducting Quantum Interference (SQUIDs); 10. Superconductor Digital Electronics; 11. Other Applications (Josephson arrays as radiation sources. Tunable microwave devices) and 12. Summary and Outlook (of the superconducting devices).

  14. Applied superconductivity. Handbook on devices and applications. Vol. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The both volumes contain the following 12 chapters: 1. Fundamentals; 2. Superconducting Materials; 3. Technology, Preparation, and Characterization (bulk materials, thin films, multilayers, wires, tapes; cooling); 4, Superconducting Magnets; 5. Power Applications (superconducting cables, superconducting current leads, fault current limiters, transformers, SMES and flywheels; rotating machines; SmartGrids); 6. Superconductive Passive Devices (superconducting microwave components; cavities for accelerators; superconducting pickup coils; magnetic shields); 7. Applications in Quantum Metrology (superconducting hot electron bolometers; transition edge sensors; SIS Mixers; superconducting photon detectors; applications at Terahertz frequency; detector readout); 8. Superconducting Radiation and Particle Detectors; 9. Superconducting Quantum Interference (SQUIDs); 10. Superconductor Digital Electronics; 11. Other Applications (Josephson arrays as radiation sources. Tunable microwave devices) and 12. Summary and Outlook (of the superconducting devices).

  15. Application of superconductivity in cyclotron construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blosser, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews major concepts and design features of the new class of cyclotrons which use superconducting coils to provide main magnet excitation. The discussion begins with a brief historical review tracing the evolution of these ''superconducting'' cyclotrons and the impact of this application of superconductivity in pushing back traditional cyclotron construction limits. This is followed by a review of the principal phenomena which come into play to set new limits on the operating regime, and the nature of these limits, some of which arise from orbit properties and some of which result from construction intricacies in the coil and in the rf system. Conclusions anticipate a future widely encompassing role in the application of superconductivity to cyclotron

  16. Superconductivity - applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the following subjects: 1) Electronics and high-frequency technology, 2) Superconductors for energy technology, 3) Superconducting magnets and their applications, 4) Electric machinery, 5) Superconducting cables. (WBU) [de

  17. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  18. A-10/TF34 Turbine Engine Monitoring System (TEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    The hardware and software development of the A-10/TF34 turbine engine monitoring system (TEMS) is described. The operation and interfaces of the A-10/TF34 TEMS hardware are discussed with particular emphasis on function, capabilities, and limitations. The TEMS data types are defined and the various data acquisition modes are explained. Potential data products are also discussed.

  19. A superconductive electromagnet for nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, J.; Srnka, A.; Studenik, J.

    1989-01-01

    The superconductive magnet includes at least three concentric frames mounted onto each other; they can be dismantled, or readjusted by axial or rotary motion. The frames carry the main coils and the inner and outer balancing coils. This arrangement offers a higher number of degrees of freedom for the calculation of the system geometry so as to attain the optimum magnetic field configuration. The design also allows the superconductive magnet to be operated at a liquid helium level depressed below the upper magnet plate. (J.B.). 1 fig

  20. Superconducting augmented rail gun (SARG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, C.G.; Cummings, C.E.; Fowler, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Superconducting augmentation consists of a superconducting coil operating in the persistent mode closely coupled magnetically with a normally conducting rail gun. A theoretical investigation of the effect of this system on a rail gun has shown that two benefits occur. Projectile velocities and launch efficiencies increase significantly depending on the magnetic coupling between the rail and augmentation circuits. Previous work evaluated an idealized system by neglecting energy dissipation effects. In this paper, the authors extend the analysis to include the neglected terms and show improved actual launch efficiencies for the SARG configuration. In this paper, the authors discuss details of projectile design in depth and present preliminary results of rail gun performance

  1. Progress on axicell MFTF-B superconducting magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kozman, T.A.; Hanson, C.L.; Shimer, D.W.; VanSant, J.H.; Zbasnik, J.

    1983-01-01

    Since the entire Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) Magnet System was reconfigured from the original A-cell to an axicell design, much progress has been made on the design, fabrication, and installation planning. The axicell MFTF-B magnet array consists of a total of 26 large superconducting main coils. This paper provides an engineering overview of the progress of these coils. Recent studies on the effects of field errors on the plasma at the recircularizing region (transition coils) show that small field errors will generate large displacements of the field lines. These field errors might enhance radial electron heat transport and deteriorate the plasma confinement. Therefore, 16 superconducting trim coils have been designed to correct the coil misalignments. Progress of the trim coils are reported also

  2. Steady-state resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1979-12-01

    If spatially-averaged values of the beta ratio can reach 5 to 10% in tokamaks, as now seems likely, resistive toroidal-field coils may be advantageous for use in reactors intended for fusion-neutron applications. The present investigation has parameterized the design of steady-state water-cooled copper coils of rectangular cross section in order to maximize figures of merit such as the ratio of fusion neutron wall loading to coil power dissipation. Four design variations distinguished by different ohmic-heating coil configurations have been examined. For a wall loading of 0.5 MW/m 2 , minimum TF-coil lifetime costs (including capital and electricity costs) are found to occur with coil masses in the range 2400 to 4400 tons, giving 200 to 250 MW of resistive dissipation, which is comparable with the total power drain of the other reactor subsystems

  3. ITER central solenoid model coil heat treatment complete and assembly started

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Okuno, K.

    1998-01-01

    A major R and D task in the ITER program is to fabricate a Superconducting Model Coil for the Central Solenoid to establish the design and fabrication methods for ITER size coils and to demonstrate conductor performance. Completion of its components is expected in 1998, to be followed by assembly with structural components and testing in a facility at JAERI

  4. Electromagnetic and structural global model of the TF magnet system in ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zammuto, I., E-mail: irene.zammuto@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Streibl, B.; Giannone, L.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Mertens, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► An electromagnetic and structural FE 3D model is set up for ASDEX Upgrade. ► The model is benchmarked against the old design results, present displacement measurements. ► The benchmarked model is applied to the present plasma configurations, which have a different poloidal field distribution with respect to the design case. ► The different poloidal field influences the out-of-plane force distribution, thus requiring an update of the TF safety system. -- Abstract: The enhancements carried out in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) are oriented toward the preparation of the future physics-related activities of ITER and DEMO. To address the main ITER issues, plasma configurations with a wider operational limit (e.g. higher triangularity) are planned for the future experimental campaigns in AUG. To evaluate the mechanical impact on the toroidal field (TF) magnet system a combined electromagnetic and structural finite element model was set up. At first extensive benchmarks of the models are carried out against the AUG reference design configurations with respect to stress [1–3], lateral displacement measurements and poloidal flux pattern. The numerical model was then applied to a set of actual high triangularity (HT) configurations generated by a more favorable poloidal field (PF) current distribution made possible by an extension of the power supply system. The resulting change of the poloidal flux pattern and the lateral force distribution has consequences for the coil shear stress and vault stability. Both aspects are monitored by a safety system measuring the PF flux placed on top and bottom of the outer surface of two TF coils (TFCs) between vault and the TFC supporting structure, so called Turn Over Structure (TOS). The range of the new HT configurations has induced a modification of the flux pattern, so that an adaptation of safety system is required to protect the TFCs system. Following the same criteria of the old safety system [4,5], a new

  5. Biomaterials Made from Coiled-Coil Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conticello, Vincent; Hughes, Spencer; Modlin, Charles

    The development of biomaterials designed for specific applications is an important objective in personalized medicine. While the breadth and prominence of biomaterials have increased exponentially over the past decades, critical challenges remain to be addressed, particularly in the development of biomaterials that exhibit highly specific functions. These functional properties are often encoded within the molecular structure of the component molecules. Proteins, as a consequence of their structural specificity, represent useful substrates for the construction of functional biomaterials through rational design. This chapter provides an in-depth survey of biomaterials constructed from coiled-coils, one of the best-understood protein structural motifs. We discuss the utility of this structurally diverse and functionally tunable class of proteins for the creation of novel biomaterials. This discussion illustrates the progress that has been made in the development of coiled-coil biomaterials by showcasing studies that bridge the gap between the academic science and potential technological impact.

  6. Study of a 5-Tesla large aperture coil for the CLIC detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cure, B

    2011-01-01

    The present design of a CLIC detector foresees a large solenoid magnet with a 6 m aperture and a magnetic induction of 5 T at the interaction point. This can be achieved by a thin superconducting coil. This report gives the typical main parameters of such a coil and presents the feasibility based on and compared with the CMS and Atlas solenoid coil designs, indicating the limits on the conductor and the identified R&D prospects.

  7. Development of superconducting magnets for the Canadian electrodynamic Maglev vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, A.A.; Ensing, H.J.; Tillotson, M.; Westera, W.

    1986-01-01

    A review is presented on the current status of superconducting magnet developments for the Canadian electrodynamic Maglev transportation system. Various design aspects of the levitation and linear synchronous motor magnets, appropriate for the current vehicle concepts, are discussed. In addition, recent experimental work is outlined on the development of a suitable epoxy impregnation technology for the superconducting coils

  8. Reviews of large superconducting machines: Metallurgy, fabrication, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogner, G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews large superconducting machines presently in place or in experiment. The ''Cello'' particle detector magnet for the positron-electron colliding beam facility PETRA at DESY in Hamburg is shown, and the Fermi Lab, and the Brookhaven ISABELLE also described. Electrodynamic levitation systems are specified, as researched and developed in Germany and Japan. Of superconducting coils for magnetic separation, a high gradient magnetic separator with superconducting magnet and steel wool, and a Jones type high gradient magnetic separator are schematicized. Turbogenerators with superconductor field winding are studied. Superconducting high power cables include the flexible coaxial cable core consisting of a perforated polyethylene tube and test cables at Siemens and at Brookhaven. Magnet systems for fusion reactors include tokamaks and tandem mirrors, and the toroidal coil experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is described, among others. Superconducting magnets for MHD plants, and superconducting magnet energy storage (SME storage) are also discussed

  9. Design and AC loss analysis of a superconducting synchronous motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Q [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Majoros, M [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University (United States); Hong, Z [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Campbell, A M [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Coombs, T A [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    This paper gives a conceptual design of a superconducting synchronous motor consisting of both high-temperature superconducting rotating field winding and armature winding. The AC losses of the armature winding of the motor have been investigated experimentally and numerically, by considering the self-field of the superconducting coils and the rotating magnetic field exposed on the armature winding. The recent developments of YBCO-coated conductors present the possibility of achieving a wholly superconducting machine of significantly smaller size and weight than a conventional machine. Both the rotating field winding and the armature winding are composed of YBCO high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils. A low AC loss armature winding design has been developed for this superconducting synchronous motor. The performance of the machine was investigated by modelling with the finite-element method. The machine's torque is calculated from first principles by considering the angle between the field and the armature main flux lines.

  10. Quench detector for large pulsed coils and quench analysis for the LASL/Westinghouse 20 MJ coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennessy, M.J.; Heintz, A.W.; Eckels, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    A detection scheme has been devised for use in the test of the 20 Mj Induction Heating Coil. This scheme allows the sensing of plus or minus voltages less than 320 mv resistive in magnitude in coils which will have inductive voltage components as high as /plus or minus/2.5 kv. The network which achieves this sensitivity is stable to less than 12.8 ppm. This method adopted involves the bucking out of the inductive voltage with two secondary co-wound flux sensing coils tapped at locations adjacent to voltage taps in the main superconducting coil. The detection scheme is recommended if large ripple or control voltages exist subsequent to the coil pulse. The most severe event which might quench the coil and/or damage the winding is exposure of the coil to gaseous cooling through lack of proper liquid level control. The detection scheme will protect the coil against this and other abnormal conditions that could damage the coil

  11. Development of Ground Coils with Low Eddy Current Loss by Applying the Compression Molding Method after the Coil Winding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Aiba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Ota, Satoru; Okada, Shigenori

    In a magnetically levitated transportation (MAGLEV) system, a huge number of ground coils will be required because they must be laid for the whole line. Therefore, stable performance and reduced cost are essential requirements for the ground coil development. On the other hand, because the magnetic field changes when the superconducting magnet passes by, an eddy current will be generated in the conductor of the ground coil and will result in energy loss. The loss not only increases the magnetic resistance for the train running but also brings an increase in the ground coil temperature. Therefore, the reduction of the eddy current loss is extremely important. This study examined ground coils in which both the eddy current loss and temperature increase were small. Furthermore, quantitative comparison for the eddy current loss of various magnet wire samples was performed by bench test. On the basis of the comparison, a round twisted wire having low eddy current loss was selected as an effective ground coil material. In addition, the ground coils were manufactured on trial. A favorable outlook to improve the size accuracy of the winding coil and uneven thickness of molded resin was obtained without reducing the insulation strength between the coil layers by applying a compression molding after winding.

  12. Completion of the ITER central solenoid model coils installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, H.

    1999-01-01

    The short article details how dozens of problems, regarding the central solenoid model coils installation, were faced and successfully overcome one by one at JAERI-Naga. A black and white photograph shows K. Kwano, a staff member of the JAERI superconducting magnet laboratory, to be still inside the vacuum tank while the lid is already being brought down..

  13. Parallel connecting poloidal coil system for a doublet tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffolo, W.E.; Chen, W.Y.; Purcell, J.R.; Wesley, J.C.

    1977-09-01

    A method has been developed for parallel connection of the ohmic heating (OH) coil. The method involves subdividing the OH-coil into a number of parallel connected subcoils, with each subcoil having about 20 turns. Each of the field shaping coils (F-coils) also contains 20 turns, so that when connected to a common power supply, the OH and F-coils are decoupled. The advantages resulting from the scheme are numerous: (1) each F-coil contains a much smaller number of turns compared with the previous design concept, thus the construction and maintenance will be easier; (2) the parallel connected OH-coils form a constant flux envelope, resulting in an inherently lower error field at the plasma and the TF coil region, and this low error field is not sensitive to the variation in location of the OH-coils; (3) the voltage and current ratings of the individual OH coil conductors are reduced; and (4) the low impedance of the OH-coil system greatly improves the possibility of using a homopolar motor generator as a means of achieving flux reversal during startup and plasma current control during the burn cycle

  14. Pre-conceptual studies and R and D for DEMO superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzone, Pierluigi, E-mail: pierluigi.bruzzone@psi.ch

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of DEMO parameters vs. ITER for TF coils. • Hybridization of winding pack, Nb/Nb{sub 3}Sn, by graded layer winding. • Use of react and wind method opposite to wind and react with related advantages. • Feasibility, reliability and cost competitiveness for DEMO. - Abstract: The DEMO plant will demonstrate by mid century the feasibility of electric power generation by nuclear fusion. Since 2011, conceptual design studies are coordinated by the EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) Division, with the aim of identifying requirements, propose design approaches and start R and D for the magnet system of DEMO. The input and generic boundary conditions are given by the system codes: the major radius of the tokamak is about 9 m. The proposed operating current at 13.6 T peak field is 82 kA, placing the DEMO TF conductor at substantially higher performance compared to ITER TF (68 kA/11.5 T). The innovative winding layout is a graded, layer wound with Nb{sub 3}Sn/NbTi hybridization, aiming at minimizing the size and the cost of the superconductor. Two options are considered for the Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor: one a “wind and react” cable-in-conduit (CICC) with reduced void fraction and rectangular shape. The other conductor is a “react and wind” flat cable with copper segregation and thick steel conduit assembled by longitudinal weld. The conductor designs were first drafted in 2012 and updated in 2013 based on a first round of assessments, which includes electromagnetic, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical analysis. The manufacture of full size prototype conductors is planned in 2014. The technical requirement of the DEMO superconducting magnets is highlighted in comparison to ITER and other fusion devices. The large size of the DEMO tokamak is the main challenge for the demonstration of the feasibility of power generation by fusion. Together with the technical issues, the cost of the superconducting magnets will be eventually the

  15. Development of a superconducting claw-pole motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, E.; Kikukawa, K.; Satoh, Y.; Torii, S.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed and produced a superconducting claw-pole motor for a trial purpose as a method to make the best use of the characteristic of superconductivity without collector rings or rotating superconducting coils that need to be cryocooled, and made some examinations. The unique feature in this motor is to have the mechanism that supports the reaction magnetic force generated in the axial direction

  16. Magnetic design of a FFAG superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Nakamoto, T.; Sasaki, K.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Mori, Y.; Orikasa, T.

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting magnet for a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator has been proposed. The required magnetic field is static and proportional to the k-th power of the orbit radius where k is the geometrical field index of the accelerator. In 2D, the required magnetic field can be generated with the optimized cross section of the coil. The cross section of the coils is a left-right asymmetry to simplify the cross section and ellipse to downsize the magnet. Local and integral 3D fields along the beam trajectory are evaluated with using new type of 3D coil configuration

  17. BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ghosh, A.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Muratore, A.; Wanderer, P.

    2011-09-12

    BNL developed Direct Wind magnet technology is used to create a variety of complex multi-functional multi-layer superconducting coil structures without the need for creating custom production tooling and fixturing for each new project. Our Direct Wind process naturally integrates prestress into the coil structure so external coil collars and yokes are not needed; the final coil package transverse size can then be very compact. Direct Wind magnets are produced with very good field quality via corrections applied during the course of coil winding. The HERA-II and BEPC-II Interaction Region (IR) magnet, J-PARC corrector and Alpha antihydrogen magnetic trap magnets and our BTeV corrector magnet design are discussed here along with a full length ILC IR prototype magnet presently in production and the coils that were wound for an ATF2 upgrade at KEK. A new IR septum magnet design concept for a 6.2 T combined-function IR magnet for eRHIC, a future RHIC upgrade, is introduced here.

  18. Thermal results of the Japanese LCT coil's domestic test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Eisuke; Hiyama, Tadao; Kato, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes thermal results obtained in the domestic test of the Japanese LCT coil which was constructed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in order to develop large superconducting coils for fusion in international collaboration proposed by the IEA. The domestic test was carried out from May 13 to June 17 in 1982 by using the test facility named as SETF (Superconducting Engineering Test Facility) which was composed of a 350-l/h helium cryogenic system, a vacuum system, a 30 KA-DC power supply and protection system, and a PDP-11/70 computer system. The cool-down characteristics, heat load, fast discharge characteristics, stability, and warm-up characteristics of the LCT coil were successfully measured in the test. The details of thermal test results acquired in the cool-down, heat load measurement, fast discharge, and warm-up, and the comparison between measurements and calculations are described in this paper. (author)

  19. Design and Manufacture of the Conduction Cooled Torus Coils for The Jefferson Laboratory 12-GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiseman, M. [Jefferson Lab; Elementi, L. [Fermilab; Elouadhiri, L. [Jefferson Lab; Gabrielli, G. [Fermilab; Gardner, T. J. [Fermilab; Ghoshal, P. K. [Jefferson Lab; Kashy, D. [Jefferson Lab; Kiemschies, O. [Fermilab; Krave, S. [Fermilab; Makarov, A. [Fermilab; Robotham, B. [Fermilab; Szal, J. [Fermilab; Velev, G. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    The design of the 12-GeV torus required the construction of six superconducting coils with a unique geometry required for the experimental needs of Jefferson Laboratory Hall B. Each of these coils consists of 234 turns of copper-stabilized superconducting cable conduction cooled by 4.6 K helium gas. The finished coils are each roughly 2 × 4 × 0.05 m and supported in an aluminum coil case. Because of its geometry, new tooling and manufacturing methods had to be developed for each stage of construction. The tooling was designed and developed while producing a practice coil at Fermi National Laboratory. This paper describes the tooling and manufacturing techniques required to produce the six production coils and two spare coils required by the project. Project status and future plans are also presented.

  20. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for diurnal load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks are being developed. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is also being developed by LASL. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch and 1-to-2-s slow tokamak energy transfer systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of an SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given for a 1-GWh reference design load-leveling unit, for a 30-MJ coil proposed stabilization unit, and for tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are also presented. The common technology base for the systems is discussed