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Sample records for superconducting rf srf

  1. JLEIC SRF cavity RF Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The initial design of a low higher order modes (HOM) impedance superconducting RF (SRF) cavity is presented in this paper. The design of this SRF cavity is for the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC). The electron ring of JLEIC will operate with electrons of 3 to 10 GeV energy. The ion ring of JLEIC will operate with protons of up to 100 GeV energy. The bunch lengths in both rings are ~12 mm (RMS). In order to maintain the short bunch length in the ion ring, SRF cavities are adopted to provide large enough gradient. In the first phase of JLEIC, the PEP II RF cavities will be reused in the electron ring to lower the initial cost. The frequency of the SRF cavities is chosen to be the second harmonic of PEP II cavities, 952.6 MHz. In the second phase of JLEIC, the same frequency SRF cavities may replace the normal conducting PEP II cavities to achieve higher luminosity at high energy. At low energies, the synchro-tron radiation damping effect is quite weak, to avoid the coupled bunch instability caused by the intense closely-spaced electron bunches, low HOM impedance of the SRF cavities combined with longitudinal feedback sys-tem will be necessary.

  2. Cryogenic rf test of the first plasma etched SRF cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Im, D; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2016-01-01

    Plasma etching has a potential to be an alternative processing technology for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. An apparatus and a method are developed for plasma etching of the inner surfaces of SRF cavities. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity is used. The single cell cavity is mechanically polished, buffer chemically etched afterwards and rf tested at cryogenic temperatures for a baseline test. This cavity is then plasma processed. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish segmented plasma processing. The cavity is rf tested afterwards at cryogenic temperatures. The rf test and surface condition results are presented.

  3. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  4. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Laxdal, Robert E.; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  5. SRF and RF systems for LEReC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fedotov, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Polizzo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Veshcherevich, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Low Energy RHIC electron Cooling (LEReC) is under development at BNL to improve RHIC luminosity at low energies. It will consist of a short electron linac and two cooling sections, one for blue and one for yellow rings. For the first stage of the project, LEReC-I, we will install a 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity and three normal conducting cavities operating at 9 MHz, 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz. The SRF cavity will boost the electron beam energy up to 2 MeV. The warm cavities will be used to correct the energy spread introduced in the SRF cavity. The paper describes layouts of the SRF and RF systems, their parameters and status.

  6. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Acceleration Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — SRF cavities enable accelerators to increase particle beam energy levels while minimizing the use of electrical power by all but eliminating electrical resistance....

  7. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S-I-S hetero-structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  8. RF and structural characterization of new SRF films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.-M. Valente-Feliciano,H. L. Phillips,C. E. Reece,X. Zhao,D. Gu,R. Lukaszew,B. Xiao,K. Seo

    2009-09-01

    In the past years, energetic vacuum deposition methods have been developed in different laboratories to improve Nb/Cu technology for superconducting cavities. Jefferson Lab is pursuing energetic condensation deposition via Electron Cyclotron Resonance. As part of this study, the influence of the deposition energy on the material and RF properties of the Nb thin film is investigated. The film surface and structure analyses are conducted with various techniques like X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Auger Electron Spectroscopy and RHEED. The microwave properties of the films are characterized on 50 mm disk samples with a 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system. This paper presents surface impedance measurements in correlation with surface and material characterization for Nb films produced on copper substrates with different bias voltages and also highlights emerging opportunities for developing multilayer SRF films with a new deposition system.

  9. RF and structural characterization of new SRF films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.-M. Valente-Feliciano,H. L. Phillips,C. E. Reece,X. Zhao,D. Gu,R. Lukaszew,B. Xiao,K. Seo

    2009-09-01

    In the past years, energetic vacuum deposition methods have been developed in different laboratories to improve Nb/Cu technology for superconducting cavities. Jefferson Lab is pursuing energetic condensation deposition via Electron Cyclotron Resonance. As part of this study, the influence of the deposition energy on the material and RF properties of the Nb thin film is investigated. The film surface and structure analyses are conducted with various techniques like X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Auger Electron Spectroscopy and RHEED. The microwave properties of the films are characterized on 50 mm disk samples with a 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system. This paper presents surface impedance measurements in correlation with surface and material characterization for Nb films produced on copper substrates with different bias voltages and also highlights emerging opportunities for developing multilayer SRF films with a new deposition system.

  10. Industrialization of Superconducting RF Accelerator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiniger, Michael; Pekeler, Michael; Vogel, Hanspeter

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) accelerator technology has basically existed for 50 years. It took about 20 years to conduct basic R&D and prototyping at universities and international institutes before the first superconducting accelerators were built, with industry supplying complete accelerator cavities. In parallel, the design of large scale accelerators using SRF was done worldwide. In order to build those accelerators, industry has been involved for 30 years in building the required cavities and/or accelerator modules in time and budget. To enable industry to supply these high tech components, technology transfer was made from the laboratories in the following three regions: the Americas, Asia and Europe. As will be shown, the manufacture of the SRF cavities is normally accomplished in industry whereas the cavity testing and module assembly are not performed in industry in most cases, yet. The story of industrialization is so far a story of customized projects. Therefore a real SRF accelerator product is not yet available in this market. License agreements and technology transfer between leading SRF laboratories and industry is a powerful tool for enabling industry to manufacture SRF components or turnkey superconducting accelerator modules for other laboratories and users with few or no capabilities in SRF technology. Despite all this, the SRF accelerator market today is still a small market. The manufacture and preparation of the components require a range of specialized knowledge, as well as complex and expensive manufacturing installations like for high precision machining, electron beam welding, chemical surface preparation and class ISO4 clean room assembly. Today, the involved industry in the US and Europe comprises medium-sized companies. In Japan, some big enterprises are involved. So far, roughly 2500 SRF cavities have been built by or ordered from industry worldwide. Another substantial step might come from the International Linear Collider (ILC) project

  11. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  12. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e⁺/e⁻ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  13. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  14. Where Next with SRF?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2013-06-01

    RF superconductivity (SRF) has become, over the last ~20 years, the technology of choice to produce RF cavities for particle accelerators. This occurred because of improvements in material and processing techniques as well as the understanding and remediation of practical limitations in SRF cavities. This development effort span ~40 years and Nb has been the material of choice for SRF cavity production. As the performances of SRF Nb cavities are approaching what are considered to be theoretical limits of the material, it is legitimate to ask what will be the future of SRF. In this article we will attempt to answer this question on the basis of near-future demands for SRF-based accelerators and the basic SRF properties of the available materials. Clearly, Nb will continue to play a major role in SRF cavities in the coming years but the use of superconductors with higher critical temperature than Nb is also likely to occur.

  15. Cs2Te normal conducting photocathodes in the superconducting rf gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J

    2010-01-01

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF gun) is one of the latest applications of superconducting rf technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting photocathodes with high quantum efficiency are yet unavailable, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the photocathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. Recently, a SRF gun with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated in Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. In this paper, we will present the physical properties of Cs2Te photocathodes in the SC cavity, such as the quantum efficiency, the lifetime, the rejuvenation, the charge saturation, and the dark current.

  16. Electron Source based on Superconducting RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianmu

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a Continuous Wave (CW) mode can provide high peak current as well as the high average current which are required for many advanced applications of accelerators facilities, for example, electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs). Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) has many advantages over other electron-injector technologies, especially when it is working in CW mode as it offers higher repetition rate. An 112 MHz SRF electron photo-injector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for electron cooling experiments. The gun utilizes a Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR) geometry for a compact structure and improved electron beam dynamics. The detailed RF design of the cavity, fundamental coupler and cathode stalk are presented in this work. A GPU accelerated code was written to improve the speed of simulation of multipacting, an important hurdle the SRF structure has to overcome in various locations. The injector utilizes high Quantum Efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes (K2CsSb) for generating electrons. The cathode fabrication system and procedure are also included in the thesis. Beam dynamic simulation of the injector was done with the code ASTRA. To find the optimized parameters of the cavities and beam optics, the author wrote a genetic algorithm Python script to search for the best solution in this high-dimensional parameter space. The gun was successfully commissioned and produced world record bunch charge and average current in an SRF photo-injector.

  17. RF Characterization of Superconducting Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, T; Welsch, C

    2009-01-01

    At CERN a compact Quadrupole Resonator has been re-commissioned for the RF characterization of superconducting materials at 400 MHz. In addition the resonator can also be excited at multiple integers of this frequency. Besides Rs it enables determination of the maximum RF magnetic field, the thermal conductivity and the penetration depth of the attached samples, at different temperatures. The features of the resonator will be compared with those of similar RF devices and first results will be presented.

  18. Study of AC/RF properties of SRF ingot niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Tsindlekht, Menachem I; Genkin, Valery M; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2013-09-01

    In an attempt to correlate the performance of superconducting radiofrequency cavities made of niobium with the superconducting properties, we present the results of the magnetization and ac susceptibility of the niobium used in the superconducting radiofrequency cavity fabrication. The samples were subjected to buffer chemical polishing (BCP) surface and high temperature heat treatments, typically applied to the cavities fabrications. The analysis of the results show the different surface and bulk ac conductivity for the samples subjected to BCP and heat treatment. Furthermore, the RF surface impedance is measured on the sample using a TE011 microwave cavity for a comparison to the low frequency measurements.

  19. RF Surface Impedance Characterization of Potential New Materials for SRF-based Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Binping [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Eremeev, Grigory V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Phillips, H. Lawrence [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    In the development of new superconducting materials for possible use in SRF-based accelerators, it is useful to work with small candidate samples rather than complete resonant cavities. The recently commissioned Jefferson Lab RF Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system can presently characterize the central region of 50 mm diameter disk samples of various materials from 2 to 40 K exposed to RF magnetic fields up to 14 mT at 7.4 GHz. We report the recent measurement results of bulk Nb, thin film Nb on Cu and sapphire substrates, Nb{sub 3}Sn sample, and thin film MgB{sub 2} on sapphire substrate provided by colleagues at JLab and Temple University.

  20. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  1. Operation of the superconducting RF photo gun at ELBE

    CERN Document Server

    Teichert, J; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Xiang, R; Kamps, T; Rudolph, J; Schenk, M; Klemz, G; Will, I

    2012-01-01

    As the first superconducting RF photo-injector (SRF gun) in practical operation, the SRF gun has been successfully connected to the superconducting linac ELBE at Forschungzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The injection with this new gun will improve the beam quality for the users of the radiation source. The SRF gun contains a 3½ cell superconducting accelerating cavity with a frequency of 1.3 GHz. The design is for use of normal conducting photocathodes. At present, caesium telluride photocathodes are applied which are illuminated by an ultraviolet laser beam. The kinetic energy of the produced electron beam is 3 MeV which belongs to a peak electric field of 16 MV/m in the cavity. The maximum bunch charge which is obtained and measured in a Faraday cup is about 400 pC (20 μA average current at a repetition rate of 50 kHz). The SRF gun injector is connected to the ELBE accelerator via a dogleg with two 45° deflection magnets. This connection beam line was commissioned in January 2010. A first beam injection into...

  2. Operation of the superconducting RF photo gun at ELBE

    CERN Document Server

    Teichert, J; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schneider, C; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Xiang, R; Kamps, T; Rudolph, J; Schenk, M; Klemz, G; Will, I

    2011-01-01

    As the first superconducting RF photo-injector (SRF gun) in practical operation, the SRF gun has been successfully connected to the superconducting linac ELBE at Forschungzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The injection with this new gun will improve the beam quality for the users of the radiation source. The SRF gun contains a 3½ cell superconducting accelerating cavity with a frequency of 1.3 GHz. The design is for use of normal conducting photocathodes. At present, caesium telluride photocathodes are applied which are illuminated by an ultraviolet laser beam. The kinetic energy of the produced electron beam is 3 MeV which belongs to a peak electric field of 16 MV/m in the cavity. The maximum bunch charge which is obtained and measured in a Faraday cup is about 400 pC (20 µA average current at a repetition rate of 50 kHz). The SRF gun injector is connected to the ELBE accelerator via a dogleg with two 45° deflection magnets. This connection beam line was commissioned in January 2010. A first beam injection into...

  3. Superconducting RF materials other than bulk niobium: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie

    2016-11-01

    For the past five decades, bulk niobium (Nb) has been the material of choice for superconducting RF (SRF) cavity applications. Alternatives such as Nb thin films and other higher-T c materials, mainly Nb compounds and A15 compounds, have been investigated with moderate effort in the past. In recent years, RF cavity performance has approached the theoretical limit for bulk Nb. For further improvement of RF cavity performance for future accelerator projects, research interest is renewed towards alternatives to bulk Nb. Institutions around the world are now investing renewed efforts in the investigation of Nb thin films and superconductors with higher transition temperature T c for application to SRF cavities. This paper gives an overview of the results obtained so far and challenges encountered for Nb films as well as other materials, such as Nb compounds, A15 compounds, MgB2, and oxypnictides, for SRF cavity applications. An interesting alternative using a superconductor-insulator-superconductor multilayer approach has been recently proposed to delay the vortex penetration in Nb surfaces. This could potentially lead to further improvement in RF cavities performance using the benefit of the higher critical field H c of higher-T c superconductors without being limited with their lower H c1.

  4. The elbe accelerator facility starts operation with the superconducting rf gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schneider, C; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J; Kamps, T; Rudolph, J; Schenk, M; Klemz, G; Will, I

    2010-01-01

    As the first superconducting rf photo-injector (SRF gun) in practice, the FZD 3+1/2 cell SRF gun is successfully connected to the superconducting linac ELBE. This setting will improve the beam quality for ELBE users. It is the first example for an accelerator facility fully based on superconducting RF technology. For high average power FEL and ERL sources, the combination of SRF linac and SRF gun provides a new chance to produce beams of high average current and low emittance with relative low power consumption. The main parameters achieved from the present SRF gun are the final electron energy of 3 MeV, 16 μA average current, and rms transverse normalized emittances of 3 mm mrad at 77 pC bunch charge. A modified 3+1/2 cell niobium cavity has been fabricated and tested, which will increase the rf gradient in the gun and thus better the beam parameters further. In this paper the status of the integration of the SRF gun with the ELBE linac will be presented, and the latest results of the beam experiments will ...

  5. Superconducting RF Technology R&D for Future Accelerator Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Reece, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting rf technology (SRF) is evolving rapidly as are its applications. While there is active exploitation of what one may term the current state-of-the-practice, there is also rapid progress expanding in several dimensions the accessible and useful parameter space. While state-of-the-art performance sometimes outpaces thorough understanding, the improving scientific understanding from active SRF research is clarifying routes to obtain optimum performance from present materials and opening avenues beyond the standard bulk niobium. The improving technical basis understanding is enabling process engineering to both improve performance confidence and reliability and also unit implementation costs. Increasing confidence in the technology enables the engineering of new creative application designs. We attempt to survey this landscape to highlight the potential for future accelerator applications.

  6. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  7. On active disturbance rejection based control design for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, John; Morris, Dan; Usher, Nathan; Gao, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Shen; Nicoletti, Achille; Zheng, Qinling

    2011-07-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are key components of modern linear particle accelerators. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is building a 3 MeV/u re-accelerator (ReA3) using SRF cavities. Lightly loaded SRF cavities have very small bandwidths (high Q) making them very sensitive to mechanical perturbations whether external or self-induced. Additionally, some cavity types exhibit mechanical responses to perturbations that lead to high-order non-stationary transfer functions resulting in very complex control problems. A control system that can adapt to the changing perturbing conditions and transfer functions of these systems would be ideal. This paper describes the application of a control technique known as "Active Disturbance Rejection Control" (ARDC) to this problem.

  8. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Ribeill, Guilhem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Dept. of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Xu Chen [Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Kelley, Michael J., E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  9. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Guilhem Ribeill, Chen Xu, Charles E. Reece, Michael J. Kelley

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  10. Extracting superconducting parameters from surface resistivity by using inside temperatures of SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, M; Padamsee, H; Shemelin, V

    2014-01-01

    The surface resistance of an RF superconductor depends on the surface temperature, the residual resistance and various superconductor parameters, e.g. the energy gap, and the electron mean free path. These parameters can be determined by measuring the quality factor Q0 of a SRF cavity in helium-baths of different temperatures. The surface resistance can be computed from Q0 for any cavity geometry, but it is not trivial to determine the temperature of the surface when only the temperature of the helium bath is known. Traditionally, it was approximated that the surface temperature on the inner surface of the cavity was the same as the temperature of the helium bath. This is a good approximation at small RF-fields on the surface, but to determine the field dependence of Rs, one cannot be restricted to small field losses. Here we show the following: (1) How computer simulations can be used to determine the inside temperature Tin so that Rs(Tin) can then be used to extract the superconducting parameters. The compu...

  11. The ESS Superconducting RF Cavity and Cryomodule Cryogenic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, C.; Elias, N.; Molloy, S.; Bosland, P.; Renard, B.; Bousson, S.; Olivier, G.; Reynet, D.; Thermeau, J. P.

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is one of Europe's largest research infrastructures, tobring new insights to the grand challenges of science and innovation in fields as diverse as material and life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage,solid-state and fundamental physics by the end of the decade. The collaborative project is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. A 5 MW, long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms and the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4% duty cycle). The choice of SRF technology is a key element in the development of the ESS linear accelerator (linac). The superconducting linacis composed of one section of spoke cavity cryomodules(352.21 MHz) and two sections of elliptical cavity cryomodules (704.42 MHz). These cryomodules contain niobium SRF cavities operating at 2 K, cooled by the accelerator cryoplantthrough the cryogenic distribution system. This paper presents the superconducting RF cavity and cryomodule cryogenic processes, which are developed for the technology demonstrators and to be ultimately integrated for the ESS tunnel operation.

  12. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); TESLA Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.).

  13. Activities on RF superconductivity at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheisen, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    At DESY the HERA electron storage ring is supplied with normal and superconducting cavities. The superconducting system transfers up to 1 MW klystron power to the beam. Experiences are reported on luminosity and machine study runs. Since 1993 one major activity in the field of RF superconducting cavities is the installation of the TESLA Test Facility. Set-up of hardware and first tests of s.c. resonators are presented. (R.P.). 11 refs.

  14. Film Deposition, Cryogenic RF Testing and Materials Analysis of a Nb/Cu Single Cell SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Palczerski, Ari [JLAB; Li, Yongming [Peking

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we present preliminary results on using a cathodic-arc-discharge Nb plasma ion source to establish a Nb film-coated single-cell Cu cavity for SRF research. The polycrystalline Cu cavity was fabricated and mirror-surface-finished by a centrifugal barrel polishing (CBP) process at Jefferson Lab. Special pre-coating processes were conducted, in order to create a template-layer for follow-on Nb grain thickening. A sequence of cryogenic RF testing demonstrated that the Nb film does show superconductivity. But the quality factor of this Nb/Cu cavity is low as a result of high residual surface resistance. We are conducting a thorough materials characterization to explore if some microstructural defects or hydrogen impurities, led to such a low quality factor.

  15. Superconducting RF cavity R&D for future accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, C M

    2009-01-01

    High-beta superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) elliptical cavities are being developed for several accelerator projects including Project X, the European XFEL, and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Fermilab has recently established an extensive infrastructure for SRF cavity R&D for future accelerators, including cavity surface processing and testing and cavity assembly into cryomodules. Some highlights of the global effort in SRF R&D toward improving cavity performance, and Fermilab SRF cavity R&D in the context of global projects are reviewed.

  16. SRF test facility for the superconducting LINAC ``RAON'' — RRR property and e-beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joo, Jongdae; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-02-01

    Equipment, such as a vacuum furnace, high pressure rinse (HPR), eddy current test (ECT) and buffered chemical polishing (BCP), are installed in the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) test facility. Three different sizes of cryostats (diameters of 600 mm for a quarter wave resonator (QWR), 900 mm for a half wave resonator (HWR), and 1200 mm for single spoke resonator 1&2 (SSR 1&2)) for vertical RF tests are installed for testing cavities. We confirmed that as-received niobium sheets (ASTM B393, RRR300) good electrical properties because they showed average residual resistance ratio (RRR) values higher than 300. However, serious RRR degradation occurred after joining two pieces of Nb by e-beam welding because the average RRR values of the samples were ˜179, which was only ˜60% of as-received RRR value. From various e-beam welding experiments in which the welding current and a speed at a fixed welding voltage were changed, we confirmed that good welding results were obtained at a 53 mA welding current and a 20-mm/s welding speed at a fixed welding voltage of 150 kV.

  17. Effect of RF Gradient upon the Performance of the Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, Robert [SRC U. Wisconsin-Madison; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    The performance of the Wisconsin 200-MHz SRF electron gun is simulated for several values of the RF gradient. Bunches with charge of 200 pC are modeled for the case where emittance compensation is completed during post-acceleration to 85 MeV in a TESLA module. We first perform simulations in which the initial bunch radius is optimal for the design gradient of 41 MV/m. We then optimize the radius as a function of RF gradient to improve the performance for low gradients.

  18. Buffer Chemical Polishing and RF Testing of the 56 MHz SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill,A.

    2009-01-01

    The 56 MHz cavity presents a unique challenge in preparing it for RF testing prior to construction of the cryomodule. This challenge arises due to the physical dimensions and subsequent weight of the cavity, and is further complicated by the coaxial geometry, and the need to properly chemically etch and high pressure rinse the entire inner surface prior to RF testing. To the best of my knowledge, this is the largest all niobium SRF cavity to be chemically etched and subsequently tested in a vertical dewar at 4K, and these processes will be the topic of this technical note.

  19. Compact Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerators and Innovative RF Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kephart, Robert [Fermilab; Chattopadhyay, Swaapan [Northern Illinois U.; Milton, Stephen [Colorado State U.

    2015-04-10

    We will present several new technical and design breakthroughs that enable the creation of a new class of compact linear electron accelerators for industrial purposes. Use of Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) cavities allow accelerators less than 1.5 M in length to create electron beams beyond 10 MeV and with average beam powers measured in 10’s of KW. These machines can have the capability to vary the output energy dynamically to produce brehmstrahlung x-rays of varying spectral coverage for applications such as rapid scanning of moving cargo for security purposes. Such compact accelerators will also be cost effective for many existing and new industrial applications. Examples include radiation crosslinking of plastics and rubbers, creation of pure materials with surface properties radically altered from the bulk, modification of bulk or surface optical properties of materials, sterilization of medical instruments animal solid or liquid waste, and destruction of organic compounds in industrial waste water effluents. Small enough to be located on a mobile platform, such accelerators will enable new remediation methods for chemical and biological spills and/or in-situ crosslinking of materials. We will describe one current design under development at Fermilab including plans for prototype and value-engineering to reduce costs. We will also describe development of new nano-structured field-emitter arrays as sources of electrons, new methods for fabricating and cooling superconducting RF cavities, and a new novel RF power source based on magnetrons with full phase and amplitude control.

  20. CW Superconducting RF Photoinjector Development for Energy Recovery Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann A.; Rao T.; Anders, W.; Dirsat, M.; Frahm, A. Jankowiak, A.; Kamps, T.; Knobloch, J.; Kugeler, O.; Quast, T.; Rudolph, J.; Schenk, M.; Schuster, M.; Smedley, J.; Sekutowicz, J.; Kneisel, P.; Nietubyc, R.; Will, I.

    2010-10-31

    ERLs have the powerful potential to provide very high current beams with exceptional and tailored parameters for many applications, from next-generation light sources to electron coolers. However, the demands placed on the electron source are severe. It must operate CW, generating a current of 100 mA or more with a normalized emittance of order 1 {micro}m rad. Beyond these requirements, issues such as dark current and long-term reliability are critical to the success of ERL facilities. As part of the BERLinPro project, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB) is developing a CWSRF photoinjector in three stages, the first of which is currently being installed at HZB's HoBiCaT facility. It consists of an SRF-cavity with a Pb cathode and a superconducting solenoid. Subsequent development stages include the integration of a high-quantum-efficiency cathode and RF components for high-current operation. This paper discusses the first stage towards an ERL-suitable SRF photoinjector, the present status of the facility and first cavity tests.

  1. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  2. RF and Surface Properties of Superconducting Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, T; Weingarten, W; Welsch, C

    2011-01-01

    At CERN a compact Quadrupole Resonator has been developed for the RF characterization of superconducting samples at different frequencies. In this paper, results from measurements on bulk niobium and niobium filmon copper substrate samples are presented. We show how different contributions to the surface resistance depend on temperature, applied RF magnetic field and frequency. Furthermore, measurements of the maximum RF magnetic field as a function of temperature and frequency in pulsed and CW operation are presented. The study is accompanied by measurements of the surface properties of the samples by various techniques.

  3. RF and data acquisition systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF cavity vertical test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Nehring, Roger; /Fermilab; Grenoble, Christiana; Powers, Thomas J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of its ILC program. The RF system for this facility is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Comprehensive data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment.

  4. Microscopic Investigation of Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2017-08-04

    Our overall goal is to contribute to the understanding of defects that limit the high accelerating gradient performance of Nb SRF cavities. Our approach is to develop a microscopic connection between materials defects and SRF performance. We developed a near-field microwave microscope to establish this connection. The microscope is based on magnetic hard drive write heads, which are designed to create very strong rf magnetic fields in very small volumes on a surface.

  5. Superconducting rf development at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Clifft, B.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India); Givens, J.; Potter, J.; Crandall, K. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Added, N. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    The ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linac began operation in 1978 and has operated nearly continuously since that time, while undergoing a series of upgrades and expansions, the most recent being the ``uranium upgrade`` completed earlier this year and described below. In its present configuration the ATLAS linac consists of an array of 64 resonant cavities operating from 48 to 145 MHz, which match a range of particle velocities .007 < {beta} = v/c < .2. The linac provides approximately 50 MV of effective accelerating potential for ions of q/m > 1/10 over the entire periodic table. Delivered beams include 5 {minus} 7 pnA of {sup 238}U{sup 39+} at 1535 MeV. At present more than 10{sup 6} cavity-hours of operation at surface electric fields of 15 MV/m have been accumulated. Superconducting structure development at ATLAS is aimed at improving the cost/performance of existing low velocity structures both for possible future ATLAS upgrades, and also for heavy-ion linacs at other institutions. An application of particular current interest is to develop structures suitable for accelerating radioactive ion beams. Such structures must accelerate very low charge to mass ratio beams and must also have very large transverse acceptance.

  6. Superconducting RF separator for Omega Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The photo shows an Nb-deflector for the superconducting RF separator ready for installation in its cryostat (visible at the back). Each deflector was about 3 m long. L. Husson and P. Skacel (Karlsruhe) stand on the left, A. Scharding (CERN) stands on the right. This particle separator, the result of a collaboration between the Gesellshaft für Kernforschung, Karlsruhe, and CERN was installed in the S1 beam line to Omega spectrometer. (See Annual Report 1977.)

  7. RF Control and Measurement of Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-14

    208047 New Haven, CT 06520 -8047 14-Sep-2014 ABSTRACT Final Report: RF Control and Measurement of Superconducting Qubits Report Title This is the final...project duration, to the generation a new architecture which, while taking into account the limitations discovered in the other research line of the...materials properties. Third, spurious electromagnetic modes, not accounted for in the Hamiltonian (1), can spuriously couple to the atoms or the

  8. rf superconducting quantum interference device metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-04-01

    A rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array in an alternating magnetic field is investigated with respect to its effective magnetic permeability, within the effective medium approximation. This system acts as an inherently nonlinear magnetic metamaterial, leading to negative magnetic response, and thus negative permeability above the resonance frequency of the individual SQUIDs. Moreover, the permeability exhibits oscillatory behavior at low field intensities, allowing its tuning by a slight change of the intensity of the applied field.

  9. Design of a high-bunch-charge 112-MHz superconducting RF photoemission electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, T.; Brutus, J. C.; Belomestnykh, Sergey A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Boulware, C. H.; Grimm, T. L.; Hayes, T.; Litvinenko, Vladimir N.; Mernick, K.; Narayan, G.; Orfin, P.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Severino, F.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, E.; Xiao, B.; Xie, H.; Zaltsman, A.

    2016-09-01

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a continuous wave (CW) mode are required for many advanced applications of particle accelerators, such as electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and free-electron lasers. Superconducting RF (SRF) has several advantages over other electron-gun technologies in CW mode as it offers higher acceleration rate and potentially can generate higher bunch charges and average beam currents. A 112 MHz SRF electron photoinjector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for the coherent electron cooling proof-of-principle experiment. The gun utilizes a quarter-wave resonator geometry for assuring beam dynamics and uses high quantum efficiency multi-alkali photocathodes for generating electrons.

  10. Design of a High-bunch-charge 112-MHz Superconducting RF Photoemission Electron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, T; Belomestnykh, Sergey A; Ben-Zvi, I; Boulware, C H; Grimm, T L; Hayes, T; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Mernick, K; Narayan, G; Orfin, P; Pinayev, I; Rao, T; Severino, F; Skaritka, J; Smith, K; Than, R; Tuozzolo, J; Wang, E; Xiao, B; Xie, H; Zaltsman, A

    2016-01-01

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a continuous wave (CW) mode are required for many advanced applications of particle accelerators, such as electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and free-electron lasers (FELs). Superconducting RF (SRF) has several advantages over other electron-gun technologies in CW mode as it offers higher acceleration rate and potentially can generate higher bunch charges and average beam currents. A 112 MHz SRF electron photoinjector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for the Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment. The gun utilizes a quarter-wave resonator (QWR) geometry for assuring beam dynamics, and uses high quantum efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes for generating electrons.

  11. Sensitivity of Niobium Superconducting RF Cavities to Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Gonnella, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) require hundreds of superconducting RF (SRF) cavities operating in continuous wave (CW) mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0). In order to reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping has been proposed as a cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1x10^10, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here we show that the sensitivity that a cavity has to ambient magnetic field is highly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120C baked cavities show a sensitivity of ~0.8 and ~0.6 nOhm/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a sensitivity of ~2 to 5 nOhm/mG trapped. Less doping results in weaker sensitivity. This difference in sensitivities is ...

  12. Mechanical Design and Fabrication Studies for SPL Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; Aviles Santillana, I; Capatina, O; Renaglia, T; Tardy, T; Valverde Alonso, N; Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s R&D programme on the Superconducting Proton Linac’s (SPL) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) elliptical cavities made from niobium sheets explores new mechanical design and consequently new fabrication methods, where several opportunities for improved optimization were identified. A stainless steel helium vessel is under design rather than a titanium helium vessel using an integrated brazed transition between Nb and the SS helium vessel. Different design and fabrication aspects were proposed and the results are discussed hereafter.

  13. Superconducting Quantum Arrays for Broadband RF Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, V.; Sharafiev, A.; Soloviev, I.; Kolotinskiy, N.; Mukhanov, O.

    2014-05-01

    Superconducting Quantum Arrays (SQAs), homogenous arrays of Superconducting Quantum Cells, are developed for implementation of broadband radio frequency (RF) systems capable of providing highly linear magnetic signal to voltage transfer with high dynamic range, including active electrically small antennas (ESAs). Among the proposed quantum cells which are bi-SQUID and Differential Quantum Cell (DQC), the latter delivered better performance for SQAs. A prototype of the transformer-less active ESA based on a 2D SQA with nonsuperconducting electric connection of the DQCs was fabricated using HYPRES niobium process with critical current density 4.5 kA/cm2. The measured voltage response is characterized by a peak-to-peak swing of ~100 mV and steepness of ~6500 μV/μT.

  14. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first SC heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerating System), which began regularly scheduled operation in 1978. To date, more than 40,000 hours of bean-on target operating time has been accumulated with ATLAS. The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop SC RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the SC linac has, up to the present, has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. It should be noted that this has been accomplished while at the same time maintaining a vigorous operating schedule in support of the nuclear and atomic physics research programs of the division. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began development of SC RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. This work has included the evaluation of RF properties of high-{Tc} oxide superconductors, both for the above and for other applications. The two divisions collaborated while they worked on several applications of RF SC, and also worked to develop the technology generally. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)∼ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3–2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  16. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  17. Survey of SRF guns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S.

    2011-07-25

    Developing Superconducting RF (SRF) electron guns is an active field with several laboratories working on different gun designs. While the first guns were based on elliptic cavity geometries, Quarter Wave Resonator (QWR) option is gaining popularity. QWRs are especially well suited for producing beams with high charge per bunch. In this talk we will describe recent progress in developing both types of SRF guns. SRF guns made excellent progress in the last two years. Several guns generated beams and one, at HZDR, injected beam into an accelerator. By accomplishing this, HZDR/ELBE gun demonstrated feasibility of the SRF gun concept with a normal-conducting Cs{sub 2}Te cathode. The cathode demonstrated very good performance with the lifetime of {approx}1 year. However, for high average current/high bunch charge operation CsK{sub 2}Sb is preferred as it needs green lasers, unlike UV laser for the Cs{sub 2}Te, which makes it easier to build laser/optics systems. Other high QE photocathodes are being developed for SRF guns, most notably diamond-amplified photocathode. Several QWR guns are under development with one producing beam already. They are very promising for high bunch charge operation. The field is very active and we should expect more good results soon.

  18. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Leibfritz, J; Baffes, C M; Carlson, K; Chase, B; Church, M D; Harms, E R; Klebaner, A L; Kucera, M; Martinez, A; Nagaitsev, S; Nobrega, L E; Piot, P; Reid, J; Wendt, M; Wesseln, S J

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Acccelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beamlines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750-MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5-GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF a...

  19. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  20. RF and Data Acquisition Systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF Cavity Vertical Test Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph P. Ozelis; Roger Nehring; Christiana Grenoble; Thomas J. Powers

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of a program to improve cavity performance reproducibility for the ILC. The RF system for this facility, using the classic combination of oscillator, phase detector/mixer, and loop amplifier to detect the resonant cavity frequency and lock onto the cavity, is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment. This software provides for amplitude and phase adjustment of incident RF power, and measures all relevant cavity power levels, cavity thermal environment parameters, as well as field emission-produced radiation. It also calculates the various cavity performance parameters and their associated errors. Performance during system commissioning and initial cavity tests will be presented.

  1. Latest Development in Superconducting RF Structures for beta=1 Particle Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel

    2006-06-26

    Superconducting RF technology is since nearly a decade routinely applied to different kinds of accelerating devices: linear accelerators, storage rings, synchrotron light sources and FEL's. With the technology recommendation for the International Linear Collider (ILC) a year ago, new emphasis has been placed on improving the performance of accelerating cavities both in Q-value and in accelerating gradients with the goal to achieve performance levels close to the fundamental limits given by the material parameters of the choice material, niobium. This paper will summarize the challenges to SRF technology and will review the latest developments in superconducting structure design. Additionally, it will give an overview of the newest results and will report on the developments in alternative materials and technologies.

  2. Fundamental Research in Superconducting RF Cavity Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg Hoffstaetter

    2012-11-13

    This is a 3-year SRF R&D proposal with two main goals: 1) to benefit near term high gradient SRF applications by understanding the causes of quench at high fields in present-day niobium cavities 2) to open the long-range prospects for SRF applications by experimentally verifying the recent exciting theoretical predication for new cavity materials such as Nb3Sn and MgB2. These predictions shwo that ultimately gradients of 100Mv/m to 200MV/m may become possible as material imperfections are overcome.

  3. Development of a CW Superconducting RF Booster Cryomodule for Future Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, Terry L; Bogle, Andrew; Deimling, Brian; Hollister, Jerry; II, Randall Jecks; Kolka, Ahren; Romel, Chandra

    2009-04-13

    Future light sources based on seeded free electron lasers (FEL) have the potential to increase the soft xray flux by several orders of magnitude with short bunch lengths to probe electron structure and dynamics. A low emittance, high rep-rate radio frequency (RF) photocathode electron gun will generate the electron beam that will require very stringent beam control and manipulation through the superconducting linear accelerator to maintain the high brightness required for an x-ray FEL. The initial or booster cavities of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linear accelerator will require stringent control of transverse kicks and higher order modes (HOM) during the beam manipulation and conditioning that is needed for emittance exchange and bunch compression. This SBIR proposal will develop, fabricate and test a continuous-wave SRF booster cryomodule specifically for this application. Phase I demonstrated the technical feasibility of the project by completing the preliminary SRF cavity and cryomodule design and its integration into an R&D test stand for beam studies at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The five-cell bulk niobium cavities operate at 750 MHz, and generate 10 MV each with strong HOM damping and special care to eliminate transverse kicks due to couplers. Due to continuous-wave operation at fairly modest beam currents and accelerating gradients the complexity of the two cavity cryomodule is greatly reduced compared to an ILC type system. Phase II will finalize the design, and fabricate and test the booster cryomodule. The cryomodule consists of two five-cell cavities that will accelerate megahertz bunch trains with nano-coulomb charge. The accelerating gradient is a very modest 10 MV/m with peak surface fields of 20 MV/m and 42.6 mT. The cryogenic system operates at 2 K with a design dynamic load of 20 W and total required cryogenic capacity of 45 W. The average beam current of up to 1 mA corresponds to a beam power of 10 kW per 5- cell

  4. High-power magnetron transmitter as an RF source for superconducting linear accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, Grigory; Flanagan, Gene; Marhauser, Frank; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Chase, Brian; Lebedev, Valeri; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Solyak, Nikolay; Quinn, Kenneth; Wolff, Daniel; Pavlov, Viatcheslav

    2014-01-01

    A concept of a high-power magnetron transmitter for operation within a wideband control feedback loop in phase and amplitude is presented. This transmitter is proposed to drive Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for intensity-frontier GeV-scale proton/ion linacs. The transmitter performance at the dynamic control was verified in experiments with CW, S-Band, 1 kW magnetrons. The wideband control of magnetrons, required for the superconducting linacs, was realized using the magnetrons, injection-locked by the phase-modulated signals. The capabilities of the magnetrons injection-locked by the phase-modulated signals and adequateness for feeding of SRF cavities were verified by measurements of the transfer function magnitude characteristics of single and 2-cascade magnetrons, by measurements the magnetrons phase performance and by measurements of spectra of the carrier frequency. At the ratio of power of locking signal to output power less than -13 dB (in 2-cascade scheme per magnetron, respectively) we demonstrat...

  5. High field rf superconductivity: to pulse or not to pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campisi, I.E.

    1984-10-01

    Experimental data on the behavior of superconductors under the application of rf fields of amplitude comparable to their critical fields are sporadic and not always consistent. In many cases the field level at which breakdown in superconducting rf cavities should be expected has not been clearly established. Tests conducted with very short (approx. 1 ..mu..s) rf pulses indicate that in this mode of operation fields close to the critical values can be consistently reached in superconducting cavities without breakdown. The advantages and disadvantages of the pulsed method are discussed compared to those of the more standard continuous wave (cw) systems. 60 references.

  6. Biased HiPIMS technology for superconducting rf accelerating cavities coating

    CERN Document Server

    G. Rosaz, G.; Sonato, D.; Calatroni, S.; Ehiasarian, A.; Junginger, T.; Taborelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. CERN already studied the possibility to use such a coating method for SRF accelerating cavities. Results are promising but not better from a RF point of view than dcMS coatings. Thanks to these results the next step is to go towards a biased HiPIMS approach. However the geometry of the cavities leads to complex changes in the coating setup in order to apply a bias voltage. Coating system tweaking and first superconducting properties of biased samples are presented.

  7. First Demonstration of Electron Beam Generation and Characterization with an All Superconducting Radio-frequency (SRF) Photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamps, T; Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A N; Neumann, A; Quast, T; Rudolph, J; Schubert, S G; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Sekutowicz, J K; Smedley, J; Volkov, V; Weinberg, G

    2011-09-01

    In preparation for a high brightness, high average current electron source for the energy-recovery linac BERLinPro an all superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector is now in operation at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin. The aim of this experiment is beam demonstration with a high brightness electron source able to generate sub-ps pulse length electron bunches from a superconducting (SC) cathode film made of Pb coated on the backwall of a Nb SRF cavity. This paper describes the setup of the experiment and first results from beam measurements.

  8. Characterization of superconducting nanometric multilayer samples for SRF applications: first evidence of magnetic screening effect

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, C Z; Bouat, S; Jacquot, J-F; Villegier, J-C; Lamura, G; Gurevich, A

    2010-01-01

    Best rf bulk niobium accelerating cavities have nearly reached their ultimate limits at rf equatorial magnetic field H ~ 200 mT close to the thermodynamic critical field Hc. In 2006 Gurevich proposed to use nanoscale layers of superconducting materials with high values of Hc > HcNb for magnetic shielding of bulk niobium to increase the breakdown magnetic field of SC rf cavities 1. Depositing good quality layers inside a whole cavity is rather difficult So as a first step, characterization of single layer coating and multilayers was conducted on high quality sputtered samples by applying the technique used for the preparation of superconducting electronics circuits. The samples were characterized by X-ray reflectivity, dc resistivity (PPMS) and dc magnetization (SQUID) measurements. Dc magnetization curves of a 250 nm thick Nb film have been measured, with and without a magnetron sputtered coating of a single or multiple stack of 15 nm MgO and 25 nm NbN layers. The Nb samples with/without the coatin...

  9. Surface studies of niobium chemically polished under conditions for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States)]. E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org; Wang Shancai [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Plucinski, Lukasz [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Smith, Kevin E. [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Nowell, Matthew M. [EDAX TSL (United States)

    2006-11-30

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially as influenced by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant datasets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (1 0 0), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3-1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is {+-}30% and that of the surface composition is {+-}5%.

  10. An RF input coupler for a superconducting single cell cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechner, B.; Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Mukugi, Ken [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Krawczyk, F.

    1999-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposes a high intensity proton accelerator for the Neutron Science Project. A superconducting linac is a main option for the high energy part of the accelerator. Design and development work for the superconducting accelerating cavities (resonant frequency of 600 MHz) is in progress. Superconducting cavities have an advantage of very high accelerating efficiency because RF wall loss is very small and much of the RF power fed to the cavity is consumed for the beam acceleration. On the other hand, an RF input coupler for the superconducting cavity has to be matched to the beam loading. Therefore, estimation of coupling coefficient or external quality factor (Qext) of the RF input coupler is important for the design of the couplers. In this work, Qext`s were calculated by the electromagnetic analysis code (MAFIA) and were compared with those by the measurements. A {beta} (ratio of the particle velocity to the light velocity) = 0.5 single-cell cavity with either axial coupler or side coupler was used in this work. In the experiments, a model cavity made by copper is applied. Both 2- and 3-dimensional calculations were performed in the axial coupler geometry and the results were compared. The agreements between calculated and measured values are good and this method for calculation of Qext is confirmed to be proper for the design of the RF input couplers. (author)

  11. Surface polishing of niobium for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Niobium cavities are important components in modern particle accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology. The interior of SRF cavities are cleaned and polished in order to produce high accelerating field and low power dissipation on the cavity wall. Current polishing methods, buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electro-polishing (EP), have their advantages and limitations. We seek to improve current methods and explore laser polishing (LP) as a greener alternative of chemical methods. The topography and removal rate of BCP at different conditions (duration, temperature, sample orientation, flow rate) was studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Differential etching on different crystal orientations is the main contributor to fine grain niobium BCP topography, with gas evolution playing a secondary role. The surface of single crystal and bi-crystal niobium is smooth even after heavy BCP. The topography of fine grain niobium depends on total removal. The removal rate increases with temperature and surface acid flow rate within the rage of 0~20 °C, with chemical reaction being the possible dominate rate control mechanism. Surface flow helps to regulate temperature and avoid gas accumulation on the surface. The effect of surface flow rate on niobium EP was studied with optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and power spectral density (PSD) analysis. Within the range of 0~3.7 cm/s, no significant difference was found on the removal rate and the macro roughness. Possible improvement on the micro roughness with increased surface flow rate was observed. The effect of fluence and pulse accumulation on niobium topography during LP was studied with optical microscopy, SEM, AFM, and PSD analysis. Polishing on micro scale was achieved within fluence range of 0.57~0.90 J/cm2, with pulse accumulation adjusted accordingly. Larger area treatment was proved possible by

  12. RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Harms, E; Chase, B; Cullerton, E; Hocker, A; Jensen, C; Joireman, P; Klebaner, A; Kubicki, T; Kucera, M; Legan, A; Leibfritz, J; Martinez, A; McGee, M; Nagaitsev, S; Nezhevenko, O; Nicklaus, D; Pfeffer, H; Pischalnikov, Y; Prieto, P; Reid, J; Schappert, W; Tupikov, V; Varghese, P; Branlard, J

    2012-01-01

    Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab.

  13. RF Processing of the Couplers for the SNS Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.Kang; I.E. Campisi; D. Stout; A. Vassioutchenko; M. Stirbet; M. Drury; T. Powers

    2005-07-10

    All eighty-one fundamental power couplers for the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the SNS linac have been RF conditioned and installed in the cryomodules successfully. The couplers were RF processed at JLAB or at the SNS in ORNL: more than forty couplers have been RF conditioned in the SNS RF Test Facility (RFTF) after the first forty couplers were conditioned at JLAB. The couplers were conditioned up to 650 kW forward power at 8% duty cycle in traveling and standing waves. They were installed on the cavities in the cryomodules and then assembled with the airside waveguide transitions. The couplers have been high power RF tested with satisfactory accelerating field gradients in the cooled cavities.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, Jean [ODU, JLAB; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini [ODU, JLAB

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  15. Karlsruhe: En route to a superconducting r.f. separator

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    A superconducting r.f. separator is under construction at Karlsruhe for use at the SPS in the beam-line to the Omega spectrometer. Tests on a section of the first 3 m deflector have given results close to the desired parameters.

  16. Performance of production SRF cavities for CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Kneisel, P.; Kushnick, P.; Mammosser, J.; Powers, T.

    1993-06-01

    Construction of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date. Over 250 of the eventual 338 SRF 1497 MHz cavities have been assembled into hermetic pairs and completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of Q[sub 0] = 2.4[times]10[sup 9] at 5 MV/m, the usual limiting phenomena are encountered field emission, quenching, Q-switching, will occasional multipacting. An analysis of the occurrence conditions and severity of these phenomena during production cavity testing is presented. The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m. The distributions of frequency and Q for a higher-order mode are also presented.

  17. Performance of production SRF cavities for CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Kneisel, P.; Kushnick, P.; Mammosser, J.; Powers, T.

    1993-06-01

    Construction of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date. Over 250 of the eventual 338 SRF 1497 MHz cavities have been assembled into hermetic pairs and completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of Q[sub 0] = 2.4[times]10[sup 9] at 5 MV/m, the usual limiting phenomena are encountered field emission, quenching, Q-switching, will occasional multipacting. An analysis of the occurrence conditions and severity of these phenomena during production cavity testing is presented. The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m. The distributions of frequency and Q for a higher-order mode are also presented.

  18. Linear beam dynamics and ampere class superconducting RF cavities at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaga, Rama R.

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a hadron collider designed to collide a range of ions from protons to gold. RHIC operations began in 2000 and has successfully completed five physics runs with several species including gold, deuteron, copper, and polarized protons. Linear optics and coupling are fundamental issues affecting the collider performance. Measurement and correction of optics and coupling are important to maximize the luminosity and sustain stable operation. A numerical approach, first developed at SLAC, was implemented to measure linear optics from coherent betatron oscillations generated by ac dipoles and recorded at multiple beam position monitors (BPMs) distributed around the collider. The approach is extended to a fully coupled 2D case and equivalence relationships between Hamiltonian and matrix formalisms are derived. Detailed measurements of the transverse coupling terms are carried out at RHIC and correction strategies are applied to compensate coupling both locally and globally. A statistical approach to determine BPM reliability and performance over the past three runs and future improvements also discussed. Aiming at a ten-fold increase in the average heavy-ion luminosity, electron cooling is the enabling technology for the next luminosity upgrade (RHIC II). Cooling gold ion beams at 100 GeV/nucleon requires an electron beam of approximately 54 MeV and a high average current in the range of 50-200 mA. All existing e-Coolers are based on low energy DC accelerators. The only viable option to generate high current, high energy, low emittance CW electron beam is through a superconducting energy-recovery linac (SC-ERL). In this option, an electron beam from a superconducting injector gun is accelerated using a high gradient (˜ 20 MV/m) superconducting RF (SRF) cavity. The electrons are returned back to the cavity with a 180° phase shift to recover the energy back into the cavity before being dumped. A design and development of a half

  19. Electron Bunch Train Excited Higher-Order Modes in a Superconducting RF Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yongfeng; Wang, Fang; Feng, Liwen; Zhuang, Dehao; Lin, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Hao, Jiankui; Quan, Shengwen; Liu, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    Higher-order mode (HOM) based intra-cavity beam diagnostics has been proved effectively and conveniently in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators. Our recent research shows that the beam harmonics in the bunch train excited HOM spectrum, which have much higher signal-to-noise ratio than the intrinsic HOM peaks, may also be useful for beam diagnostics. In this paper, we will present our study on bunch train excited HOMs, including the theoretic model and recent experiments carried out based on the DC-SRF photoinjector and SRF linac at Peking University.

  20. RF cavity design for KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Su, E-mail: jis@kirams.re.kr [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joonsun; Kim, Hyun Wook; Kim, Chang Hyeuk [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Key Ho [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Natural Sciences Campus, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-21

    The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) has developed a superconducting cyclotron for the carbon therapy, which is called KIRAMS-430. The cyclotron is designed to accelerate only {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions up to the energy of 430 MeV/u. It uses two normal conducting RF cavities. The RF frequency is about 70.76 MHz. The nominal dee voltage is 70 kV at the center and 160 kV at the extraction. The RF cavity was designed with 4 stems by using CST microwave studio (MWS). In this paper, we represent the simulation results and the optimized design of the RF cavity for the KIRAMS-430.

  1. First prototype Copper-Niobium RF Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is the first RF superconducting cavity made of copper with a very thin layer of pure niobium deposited on the inner wall by sputtering. This new developpment lead to a considerable increase of performance and stability of superconducting cavities and to non-negligible economy. The work was carried out in the ISR workshop. This technique was adopted for the LEP II accelerating cavities. At the centre is Cristoforo Benvenuti, inventor of this important technology, with his assistants, Nadia Circelli and Max Hauer, carrying the sputtering electrode. See also 8209255, 8312339.

  2. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-01

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push-pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  3. Characterization of a superconducting Pb photocathode in a superconducting rf photoinjector cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Kamps, T; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A; Neumann, A; Schmeißer, M; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Schubert S; Smedley J; Sekutowicz, J; Will, I

    2014-01-01

    Photocathodes are a limiting factor for the next generation of ultrahigh brightness photoinjectors. We studied the behavior of a superconducting Pb cathode in the cryogenic environment of a superconducting rf gun cavity to measure the quantum efficiency, its spatial distribution, and the work function. We will also discuss how the cathode surface contaminants modify the performance of the photocathode as well as the gun cavity and we discuss the possibilities to remove these contaminants.

  4. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  5. HOM Dampers or not in Superconducting RF Proton Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Circular machines are plagued by Coupled Bunch Instabilities, driven by impedance peaks, irrespectively of their frequency relation to machine lines; hence all cavity Higher Order Modes are possible drivers. This is the fundamental reason that all superconducting RF cavities in circular machines are equipped with HOM dampers. This raises the question if HOM damping would not be imperative also in high current proton linacs where a mechanism akin to CBI might exist. To clarify this question we have simulated the longitudinal bunched beam dynamics in linacs, allowing bunch-to-bunch variations in time-of-arrival. Simulations were executed for a generic proton linac with properties close to SNS or the planned SPL at CERN. It was found that for monopole HOMs with high Qext large beam scatter or even beam loss cannot be excluded. Therefore omitting HOM dampers on superconducting RF cavities in high current proton linacs, even pulsed ones, is a very risky decision.

  6. Nb3Sn SRF Cavities for Nuclear Physics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremeev, Grigory

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear physics experiments rely increasingly on accelerators, which employ superconducting RF (SRF) technology. CEBAF, SNS, FRIB, ESS, among others exploit the low surface resistance of SRF cavities to efficiently accelerate particle beams towards experimental targets. Niobium is the cavity material of choice for all current or planned SRF accelerators, but it has been long recognized that other superconductors with high superconducting transition temperatures have the potential to surpass niobium for SRF applications. Among the alternatives, Nb3Sn coated cavities are the most advanced on the path to practical applications: Nb3Sn coatings on R&D cavities have Tc consistently close the optimal 18 K, very low RF surface resistances, and very recently were shown to reach above Hc1 without anomalous RF surface resistance increase. In my talk I will discuss the prospects of Nb3Sn SRF cavities, the research efforts to realize Nb3Sn coatings on practical multi-cell accelerating structures, and the path toward possible inclusion in CEBAF. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics.

  7. Status of the SRF Gun Operation at ELBE

    CERN Document Server

    Teichert, J; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Xiang, R; Kamps, T; Rudolph, J; Schenk, M; Klemz, G; Will, I; Staufenbiel, F

    2010-01-01

    The superconducting RF photo-injector (SRF gun) at FZD is the first operating electron injector of its kind. The gun with a 3½-cell cavity and a frequency of 1.3 GHz produces an electron beam of 3 MeV with a maximum bunch charge of about 400 pC. Also the design values for the acceleration gradient could not be reached with the cavity which is in use at present, the SRF gun will improve the beam quality for ELBE users. In the winter shutdown of 2009/10 the beam line was installed which connects the SRF gun with the ELBE accelerator. The paper reports on the first tests and on the progress in applying the SRF gun for ELBE operation.

  8. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  9. Experience with the LEP Superconducting RF Accelerating System

    CERN Document Server

    Geschonke, Günther

    1998-01-01

    CERN is presently upgrading the large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) to higher energy by installing superconducting RF accelerating cavities. For a total installed circumferential voltage of about 2800 MV, 272 cavities operating at 352 MHz will be needed, representing an active length of 462 m and a cold surface of more than 1600 m2. The series production cavities are made out of copper, sputter-coated with a thin layer of niobium and cooled with liquid He to 4.5 K. The cavities are produced by industry and the acceptance testing is done at CERN. In 1996, 176 cavities had been installed and run successfully at their design gradient of 6 MV/m during physics at a beam energy of 86 GeV. As RF power sources 36 klystrons will finally be installed with a nominal RF output power of 1 MW each. In this paper the superconducting accelerating system in LEP will be described and experience gained during operation for physics as well as new developments will be presented.

  10. Optimal RF Systems for Lightly Loaded Superconducting Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, Townsend; Graves, William S; Wang, D; Zolfaghari, Abbi

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of RF accelerators have created a demand for power amplifiers that can support very high accelerating gradients, 15-25 MV/m, in superconducting structures with extremely low losses. Free electron lasers (FEL’s) with modest beam current, I< 10 uA, or based on energy recovery linacs (ERL’s) may have intrinsic power demands of less than 1 kW/m. We present the design of an amplifier and external tuner system that will efficiently meet this requirement. The RF amplifier, an Inductive Output Tube (IOT), offers high AC/RF efficiency, flexible power output and switching capability without the need for external modulation. The tuner circuit makes use of low loss ferrite phase shifters to create a moderate quality standing wave (Q~100-1000) between the amplifier and the superconducting cavity. An alternative design based on a shorter cavity structure and employing solid state amplifiers is also presented. The expected performance characteristics of both systems are described.

  11. Early prototype of a superconducting RF cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    As early as 1979, before LEP became an approved project, studies were located in the ISR Division. Although Cu-cavities were foreseen, certainly for the 1st energy-stage, superconducting cavities were explored as a possible alternative for the 2nd energy-stage. This began with very basic studies of manufacture and properties of Nb-cavities. This one, held by Mr.Girel, was made from bulk Nb-sheet, 2.5 mm thick. It was dimensioned for tests at 500 MHz (LEP accelerating RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 8004204, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  12. Design Topics for Superconducting RF Cavities and Ancillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Padamsee, H

    2014-01-01

    RF superconductivity has become a major subfield of accelerator science. There has been an explosion in the number of accelerator applications and in the number of laboratories engaged. The first lecture at this meeting of the CAS presented a review of fundamental design principles to develop cavity geometries to accelerate velocity-of-light particles (β = v/c ~ 1), moving on to the corresponding design principles for medium-velocity (medium-β) and low-velocity (low-β) structures. The lecture included mechanical design topics. The second lecture dealt with input couplers, higher-order mode extraction couplers with absorbers, and tuners of both the slow and fast varieties.

  13. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  14. Muon spin rotation studies of niobium for superconducting rf applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grassellino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigate superconducting properties of niobium samples via application of the muon spin rotation/relaxation (μSR technique. We employ for the first time the μSR technique to study samples that are cut out from large and small grain 1.5 GHz radio frequency (rf single cell niobium cavities. The rf test of these cavities was accompanied by full temperature mapping to characterize the rf losses in each of the samples. Results of the μSR measurements show that standard cavity surface treatments like mild baking and buffered chemical polishing performed on the studied samples affect their surface pinning strength. We find an interesting correlation between high field rf losses and field dependence of the sample magnetic volume fraction measured via μSR. The μSR line width observed in zero-field-μSR measurements matches the behavior of Nb samples doped with minute amounts of Ta or N impurities. A lower and an upper bound for the upper critical field H_{c2} of these cutouts is found.

  15. The ``Q disease'' in Superconducting Niobium RF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, J.

    2003-07-01

    Superconducting niobium cavities can achieve quality (Q0) factors of 1010-1011, more than six orders of magnitude higher than conventional copper cavities. However, to maintain this performance at high accelerating gradient (20 MV/m) the radio-frequency (rf) surface must be damage and dust free. Cavity preparation techniques therefore routinely include a chemical etch or electropolishing. Under certain conditions, these (and other) treatments can contaminate the niobium with hydrogen. Hydrides may then form when the cavity is cooled through 150 K, even if only a few atomic percent hydrogen are present. If hydrides are formed, the cavity quality can degrade substantially (Q disease). A rapid cooldown often inhibits the hydride formation. Other "cures" include degassing cavities at 900 °C to eliminate the hydrogen. A historical review of the Q disease is provided here, with the emphasis being placed on its discovery, symptoms, mechanism, and cures.

  16. Nonlinear RF spurious in a cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, Jordi; Collado, Carlos; Shaw, Timothy J.; O'Callaghan, Juan M.

    2002-08-01

    We have developed a method to calculate the distribution of fundamental and spurious fields in a metallic cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates in which signals at two different frequencies are injected. The nonlinearity in the superconductor produces the typical intermodulation effects if the frequencies of the injected signals are sufficiently close to each other and near a resonant mode. Our method uses harmonic balance to match the fields in the cavity with the currents on the endplates. The method can be used for a variety of nonlinear models of the superconducting endplate, and could be the base for a nondestructive procedure to extract the nonlinear parameters of an HTS sample from RF measurements. Our analysis is restricted to the TE0 1 1 mode, but the method can be applied to any propagating mode in the cylindrical cavity. Closed-form equations for the case of square-law nonlinearities in the superconductor are derived and used to check the validity of the harmonic balance calculation.

  17. Apparatus and method for plasma processing of SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Peshl, J; Bašović, M; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vuškovića, L

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are described for plasma etching of the inner surface of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Accelerator SRF cavities are formed into a variable-diameter cylindrical structure made of bulk niobium, for resonant generation of the particle accelerating field. The etch rate non-uniformity due to depletion of the radicals has been overcome by the simultaneous movement of the gas flow inlet and the inner electrode. An effective shape of the inner electrode to reduce the plasma asymmetry for the coaxial cylindrical rf plasma reactor is determined and implemented in the cavity processing method. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise way to establish segmented plasma columns. The test structure was a pillbox cavity made of steel of similar dimension to the standard SRF cavity. This was adopted to experimentally verify the plasma surface reaction on cylindrical structures with variable diameter using the segment...

  18. Performance of Production SRF Cavities for CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles; Benesch, Jay; Mammosser, John; Kneisel, Peter; Kushnick, Peter; Powers, Thomas

    1993-06-01

    Construction for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date.Over 250 of the eventual into hermetic pairs and completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Among these, 52% demonstrated usable gradients greater than 10 MV/m.although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of Q0=2.4 * 10^9 at 5 MV/m, the usual limiting phenomena during production cavity testing is presented.The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m.The distributions of frequency and Q for a higher-order mode are also presented.

  19. A coaxial HOM coupler for a superconducting RF cavity and its low-power measurement results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN An; TANG Ya-Zhe; ZHANG Li-Ping; LI Ying-Min; Han-Sung Kim

    2011-01-01

    A resonant buildup of beam-induced fields in a superconducting radio frequency(RF)cavity may make a beam unstable or a superconducting RF cavity quench. Higher-order mode(HOM)couplers are used for damping higher-order modes to avoid such a resonant buildup. A coaxial HOM coupler based on the TTF (TESLA Test Facility)HOM coupler has been designed for the superconducting RF cavities at the Proton Engineering Frontier Project(PEFP)in order to overcome notch frequency shift and feed-through tip melting issues. In order to confirm the HOM coupler design and finalize its structural dimensions, two prototype HOM couplers have been fabricated and tested. Low-power testing and measurement of the HOM couplers has shown that the HOM coupler has good filter properties and can fully meet the damping requirements of the PEFP low-beta superconducting RF linac.

  20. Study of Cavity Imperfection Impact on RF-Parameters and Multipole Components in a Superconducting RF-Dipole Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Olave, R G; Delayen, Jean Roger; De Silva, S U; Li, Z

    2014-01-01

    The ODU/SLAC superconducting rf-dipole cavity is under consideration for the crab-crossing system in the upcoming LHC luminosity upgrade. While the proposed cavity complies well within the rf-parameters and multipolar component restrictions for the LHC system, cavity imperfections arising from cavity fabrication, welding and frequency tuning may have a significant effect in these parameters. We report on an initial study of the impact of deviation from the ideal shape on the cavity’s performance in terms of rf-parameters and multipolar components.

  1. Cryostat for Testing HIE-Isolde Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Cuccuru, G; Pasini, M; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M; Vullierme, B

    2011-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities at CERN [1], with the objective of increasing the energy and intensity of the delivered radioactive ion beams (RIB). This project aims to fill the request for a more energetic post-accelerated beam by means of a new superconducting (SC) linac based on Quarter Wave Resonators (QWR). A research and development (R&D) programme looking at all the different aspects of the SC linac started in 2008 and continued throughout 2010. The R&D effort has particularly focused on the development of the high β cavities (β = 10.3%) for which the Nb sputtered on Cu substrate technology has been adopted. Two prototype cavities were manufactured and are undergoing RF cold tests. The pre-series cavity manufacturing is under way using 3D forged Cu billets. A single vacuum cryostat was designed and built to test these cavities at liquid helium temperatures. This paper details the main design concep...

  2. Technical training: RF superconductivity and accelerator cavity applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training

    2016-01-01

    We are happy to announce a new training course organised by the TE-VSC group in the field of the physics and applications of superconductors. The course provides an overview and update of the theory of radiofrequency and superconductors:   RF Superconductivity and Accelerator Cavity Applications https://cern.ch/course/?164VAC19 One timetable only:  Tuesday, 8 March 2016: from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, 9 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 10 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Monday, 14 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Tuesday, 15 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Wednesday, 16 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 17 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Target audience: Experts in radiofrequency or solid state physics (PhD level). Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of quantum physics and superc...

  3. Realization and Modeling of Metamaterials Made of rf Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trepanier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have prepared meta-atoms based on radio-frequency superconducting quantum-interference devices (rf SQUIDs and examined their tunability with dc magnetic field, rf current, and temperature. rf SQUIDs are superconducting split-ring resonators in which the usual capacitance is supplemented with a Josephson junction, which introduces strong nonlinearity in the rf properties. We find excellent agreement between the data and a model that regards the Josephson junction as the resistively and capacitively shunted junction. A magnetic field tunability of 80  THz/G at 12 GHz is observed, a total tunability of 56% is achieved, and a unique electromagnetically induced transparency feature at intermediate excitation powers is demonstrated for the first time. An rf SQUID metamaterial is shown to have qualitatively the same behavior as a single rf SQUID with regard to dc flux and temperature tuning.

  4. An Analysis of the Temperature and Field Dependence of the RF Surface Resistance of Nitrogen-Doped Niobium SRF Cavities with Respect to Existing Theoretical Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles E. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Palczewski, Ari D. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress with the reduction of rf surface resistance (Rs) of niobium SRF cavities via the use of high temperature surface doping by nitrogen has opened a new regime for energy efficient accelerator applications. For particular doping conditions one observes dramatic decreases in Rs with increasing surface magnetic fields. The observed variations as a function of temperature may be analyzed in the context of recent theoretical treatments in hopes of gaining insight into the underlying beneficial mechanism of the nitrogen treatment. Systematic data sets of Q0 vs. Eacc vs. temperature acquired during the high Q0 R&D work of the past year will be compared with theoretical model predictions..

  5. Experimental Studies of Light Emission Phenomena in Superconducting RF Cavitites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, P.L.; /SLAC; Delayen, J.R.; /Jefferson Lab; Fryberger, D.; /SLAC; Goree, W.S.; Mammosser, J.; /Jefferson Lab /SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Szalata, Z.M.; II, J.G.Weisend /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from {approx} 1/2 to {approx} 2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects {le} 1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

  6. Commissioning Results of the 2nd 3.5 Cell SRF Gun for ELBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A [HZDR, Dresden, Germany; Freitag, M [HZDR, Dresden, Germany; Murcek, Petr [HZDR, Dresden, Germany; Teichert, Jochen [HZDR, Dresden, Germany; Vennekate, H [HZDR, Dresden, Germany; Xiang, R [HZDR, Dresden, Germany; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Turlington, Larry D, [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    As in 2007 the first 3.5 cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) gun was taken into operation, it turned out that the specified performance has not been achieved. However, to demonstrate the full potential of this new type of electron source, a second and slightly modified SRF gun II was built in collaboration with Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF). We will report on commissioning and first results of the new gun, which includes in particular the characterization of the most important RF properties as well as their comparison with previous vertical test results.

  7. Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rašković

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7  μm/min⁡ using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

  8. Digital base-band rf control system for the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Konrad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The accelerating field in superconducting cavities has to be stabilized in amplitude and phase by a radio-frequency (rf control system. Because of their high loaded quality factor superconducting cavities are very susceptible for microphonics. To meet the increased requirements with respect to accuracy, availability, and diagnostics, the previous analog rf control system of the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC has been replaced by a digital rf control system. The new hardware consists of two components: An rf module that converts the signal from the cavity down to the base-band and a field-programmable gate array board including a soft CPU that carries out the signal processing steps of the control algorithm. Different algorithms are used for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities. To improve the availability of the control system, techniques for automatic firmware and software deployment have been implemented. Extensive diagnostic features provide the operator with additional information. The architecture of the rf control system as well as the functionality of its components will be presented along with measurements that characterize the performance of the system, yielding, e.g., an amplitude stabilization down to (ΔA/A_{rms}=7×10^{-5} and a phase stabilization of (Δϕ_{rms}=0.8° for superconducting cavities.

  9. Thermal design studies in superconducting rf cavities: Phonon peak and Kapitza conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aizaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design studies of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities involve two thermal parameters, namely the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Nb at low temperatures and the heat transfer coefficient at the Nb-He II interface, commonly known as the Kapitza conductance. During the fabrication process of the SRF cavities, Nb sheet is plastically deformed through a deep drawing process to obtain the desired shape. The effect of plastic deformation on low temperature thermal conductivity as well as Kapitza conductance has been studied experimentally. Strain induced during the plastic deformation process reduces the thermal conductivity in its phonon transmission regime (disappearance of phonon peak by 80%, which may explain the performance limitations of the defect-free SRF cavities during their high field operations. Low temperature annealing of the deformed Nb sample could not recover the phonon peak. However, moderate temperature annealing during the titanification process recovered the phonon peak in the thermal conductivity curve. Kapitza conductance measurements for the Nb-He II interface for various surface topologies have also been carried out before and after the annealing. These measurements reveal consistently increased Kapitza conductance after the annealing process was carried out in the two temperature regimes.

  10. Towards a 100mA Superconducting RF Photoinjector for BERLinPro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Axel; Anders, W; Burrill, Andrew; Jankowiak, Andreas; Kamps, T; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Lauinger, P; Matveenko, A N; Schmeisser, M; Volker, J; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Nietubyc, R; Schubert, S G; Smedley, John; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Volkov, V; Will, I; Zaplatin, Evgeny

    2013-09-01

    For BERLinPro, a 100 mA CW-driven SRF energy recovery linac demonstrator facility, HZB needs to develop a photo-injector superconducting cavity which delivers a at least 1mm*mr emittance beam at high average current. To address these challenges of producing a high peak brightness beam at high repetition rate, at first HZB tested a fully superconducting injector with a lead cathode*,followed now by the design of a SC cavity allowing operation up to 4 mA using CW-modified TTF-III couplers and inserting a normal conducting high quantum efficiency cathode using the HZDR-style insert scheme. This talk will present the latest results and an overview of the measurements with the lead cathode cavity and will describe the design and optimization process, the first production results of the current design and an outlook to the further development steps towards the full power version.

  11. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  12. Investigation of thermal acoustic effects on SRF cavities within CM1 at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, M W; Klebaner, A; Leibfritz, J; Martinez, A; Pischalnikov, Y; Schappert, W

    2016-01-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) power studies are in progress following the cryogenic commissioning of Cryomodule #1 (CM1) at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. These studies are complemented by the characterization of thermal acoustic effects on cavity microphonics manifested by apparent noisy boiling of helium involving vapor bubble and liquid vibration. The thermal acoustic measurements also consider pressure and temperature spikes which drive the phenomenon at low and high frequencies.

  13. Investigation of Thermal Acoustic Effects on SRF Cavities within CM1 at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, Mike [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Martinez, Alex [Fermilab; Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Schappert, Warren [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Two TESLA-style 8-cavity cryomodules have been operated at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST), formerly the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. Operational instabilities were revealed during Radio Frequency (RF) power studies. These observations were complemented by the characterization of thermal acoustic effects on cavity microphonics manifested by apparent noisy boiling of helium involving vapor bubble and liquid vibration. The thermal acoustic measurements also consider pressure and temperature spikes which drive the phenomenon at low and high frequencies.

  14. HiPIMS: a New Generation of Film Deposition Techniques for SRF Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie [JLAB

    2013-09-01

    Over the years, Nb/Cu technology, despite its shortcomings due to the commonly used magnetron sputtering, has positioned itself as an alternative route for the future of accelerator superconducting structures. Avenues for the production of thin films tailored for Superconducting RF (SRF) applications are showing promise with recent developments in ionized PVD coating techniques, i.e. vacuum deposition techniques using energetic ions. Among these techniques, High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is a promising emerging technique which combines magnetron sputtering with a pulsed power approach. This contribution describes the benefits of energetic condensation for SRF films and the characteristics of the HiPIMS technology. It describes the on-going efforts pursued in different institutions to exploit the potential of this technology to produce bulk-like Nb films and go beyond Nb performance with the development of film systems, based on other superconducting materials and multilayer structures.

  15. Magnesium Diboride thin Films, multilayers, and coatings for SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoxing [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities currently use low-temperature superconductor niobium, and the Nb SRF cavities have approached the performance levels predicted theoretically. Compared to Nb, MgB2 becomes superconducting at a much higher temperature and promises a better RF performance in terms of higher quality factor Q and higher acceleration capability. An MgB2 SRF technology can significantly reduce the operating costs of particle accelerators when these potentials are realized. This project aimed to advance the development of an MgB2 SRF technology. It had two main objectives: (1) materials issues of MgB2 thin films and multilayers related to their applications in SRF cavities; and (2) coating single-cell cavities for testing at RF frequencies. The key technical thrust of the project is the deposition of high quality clean MgB2 films and coatings by the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) technique, which was developed in my group. We have achieved technical progress in each of the two areas. For the first objective, we have confirmed that MgB2 thin film coatings can be used to effectively enhance the vortex penetration field of an SRF cavity. A vortex is a normal region in the shape of spaghetti that threads through a superconductor. Its existence is due to an applied magnetic field that is greater than a so-called lower critical field, Hc1. Once a vortex enters the superconductor, its movement leads to loss. This has been shown to be the reason for an SRF cavity to break down. Thus, enhancing the magnetic field for a vortex to enter the superconductor that forms the SRF cavity has be a goal of intense research. To this end, Gurevich proposed that a coating of thin superconductor layer can impede the vortex entrance. In this project, we have done two important experiment to test this concept. One, we showed that the enhancement of Hc1 can be

  16. Simulation of the RF Coupler for TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    The inductive RF coupler for the TRIUMF ISAC-II 106 MHz superconducting accelerating quarter wave resonators was used as a basis for the simulation model of stationary transmission processes of RF power and thermal fluxes. Electromagnetic simulation of the coupler was done with ANSOFT HFSS code. Transmission line theory was used for electromagnetic wave calculations along the drive line to the Coupler. An analogy between electric and thermal processes allows the thermal calculations to be expressed in terms of electrical circuits. The data obtained from the simulation are compared to measured values on the RF coupler.

  17. Status and running experience of the SRF gun at HZDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Rong; Arnold, Andre; Lu, Pengnan; Murcek, Petr; Teichert, Jochen; Vennekate, Hannes [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In order to achieve a high average current up to 1 mA with a low emittance of 1 mm mrad at 77 pC, an improved SRF gun has been installed and commissioned at HZDR since 2014. This new gun replaces the first 3.5-cell SRF gun at the superconducting linear accelerator ELBE which had been in operation since 2007. The new gun has been tested first with a Cu photocathode. The RF performance of the niobium cavity has been evaluated, the transverse and longitudinal beam parameters for low charge bunches have been measured, and the first beam has been guided into the ELBE beamline. The photocathode transfer system is also installed for the first high current beam test in 2015. In this contribution the status of the gun and the results of this first measurement period will be presented in detail.

  18. Multiphysics Analysis of Frequency Detuning in Superconducting RF Cavities for Proton Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awida, M. H. [Fermilab; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab; Sukanov, A. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2016-01-22

    Multiphysics analyses for superconducting cavities are essential in the course of cavity design to meet stringent requirements on cavity frequency detuning. Superconducting RF cavities are the core accelerating elements in modern particle accelerators whether it is proton or electron machine, as they offer extremely high quality factors thus reducing the RF losses per cavity. However, the superior quality factor comes with the challenge of controlling the resonance frequency of the cavity within few tens of hertz bandwidth. In this paper, we investigate how the multiphysics analysis plays a major role in proactively minimizing sources of frequency detuning, specifically; microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) in the stage of RF design of the cavity and mechanical design of the niobium shell and the helium vessel.

  19. Cryogenic Test of a Proof-of-Principle Superconducting RF-Dipole Deflecting and Crabbing Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2013-01-01

    Recent applications in need of compact low-frequency deflecting and crabbing cavities have initiated the design and development of new superconducting structures operating at high gradients with low losses. Previously, TM$_{110}$ -type deflecting and crabbing cavities were developed and have also been operated successfully. However, these geometries are not favorable designs for low operating frequencies. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is the first compact deflecting and crabbing geometry that has demonstrated high gradients and high shunt impedance. Since the fundamental operating mode is the lowest mode and is widely separated from the nearest higher order mode, the rf-dipole design is an attractive geometry for effective damping of the higher order modes in high current applications. A 400 MHz rf-dipole cavity was designed, fabricated, and tested as a proof-of-principle cavity. The cavity achieved high operating gradients, and the multipacting levels were easily processed and did not reoccur.

  20. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  1. RF Coupler Design for the TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, R L; Harmer, P; Laxdal, R E; Mitra, A K; Sekatchev, I; Waraich, B; Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    An RF Coupler for the ISAC-II medium beta (β=0.058 and 0.071) superconducting quarter wave resonators was designed and tested at TRIUMF. The main goal of this development was to achieve stable operation of superconducting cavities at high acceleration gradients and low thermal load to the helium refrigeration system. The cavities will operate at 6 MV/m acceleration gradient in overcoupled mode at a forward power 200 W at 106 MHz. The overcoupling provides ±20 Hz cavity bandwidth, which improves the stability of the RF control system for fast helium pressure fluctuations, microphonics and environmental noise. Choice of materials, cooling with liquid nitrogen, aluminum nitride RF window and thermal shields insure a small thermal load on the helium refrigeration system by the Coupler. An RF finger contact which causedμdust in the coupler housing was eliminated without any degradation of the coupler performance. RF and thermal calculations, design and test results on the coupler are p...

  2. Simulation Study Using an Injection Phase-locked Magnetron as an Alternative Source for SRF Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Plawski, Tomasz E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    As a drop-in replacement for the CEBAF CW klystron system, a 1497 MHz, CW-type high-efficiency magnetron using injection phase lock and amplitude variation is attractive. Amplitude control using magnetic field trimming and anode voltage modulation has been studied using analytical models and MATLAB/Simulink simulations. Since the 1497 MHz magnetron has not been built yet, previously measured characteristics of a 2.45GHz cooker magnetron are used as reference. The results of linear responses to the amplitude and phase control of a superconducting RF (SRF) cavity, and the expected overall benefit for the current CEBAF and future MEIC RF systems are presented in this paper.

  3. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. Additional measurements of mechanical stability under RF operation (frequency variation with He pressure, Lorentz detuning) and cryogenic and electric measurements of power dissipation are presented. (author). 3 refs.

  4. Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisognano, Joseph J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bissen, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bosch, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Efremov, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Eisert, D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Fisher, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Green, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Jacobs, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Keil, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kleman, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Rogers, G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Severson, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Yavuz, D. D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna [JLAB; Hovater, J. Curtis [JLAB; Plawski, Tomasz [JLAB; Powers, Thomas J. [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin has completed fabrication and commissioning of a low frequency (199.6 MHz) superconducting electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator (QWR) cavity. Its concept was optimized to be the source for a CW free electron laser facility. The gun design includes active tuning and a high temperature superconducting solenoid. We will report on the status of the Wisconsin SRF electron gun program, including commissioning experience and first beam measurements.

  5. Progress of the Rossendorf SRF Gun Project

    CERN Document Server

    Teichert, J; Büttig, H; Janssen, D; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Möller, K; Murcek, P; Schneider, C; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Xiang, R

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting rf photo electron injector (SRF gun) is under development at the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf. The project aims at several issues: improvement of the beam quality for the ELBE superconducting electron linac, demonstration of feasibility of this gun type, investigation of critical components, and parameter studies for future application (BESSY-FEL, 4GLS). In 2005, a substantial progress has been made. The two 3.5-cell niobium cavities for the gun have been delivered from the company ACCEL. The main parts for gun cryostat like vacuum vessel, cryogenic and magnetic shields are ready. Test benches for the cathode cooling system and the cavity tuner are being assembled. The photo cathode preparation lab has been arranged, and the diagnostic beam line has been designed (see T. Kamps et al., this conference). After delivering the gun cavities, their rf properties are being measured at room temperature and the warm tuning is being carried out. The set-up for this treatment and measurement as well as...

  6. Construction and Test of a Novel Superconducting RF Electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisognano, Joseph J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2014-04-16

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison has completed installation of a superconducting electron gun. Its concept was optimized to be the source for a CW free electron laser facility with multiple megahertz repetition rate end stations. This VHF superconducting configuration holds the promise of the highest performance for CW injectors. Initial commissioning efforts show that the cavity can achieve gradients of 35 MV/m at the cathode position. With the cathode inserted CW operation has been achieved at 20 MV/m with good control of microphonics, negligible dark current, and Q0 > 3×109 at 4 K. Bunch charges of ~100 pC have been delivered, and first simple beam measurements made. These preliminary results are very encouraging for production of 100s pC bunches with millimeter-milliradian or smaller normalized emittances. Plans are in place to carry out more definitive studies to establish the full capabilities. However, since the grant was not renewed, the electron gun is currently mothballed, and without supplemental fund the opportunity for further work will be lost.

  7. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  8. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-01

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  9. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan)

    2014-01-29

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  10. Present and next steps of the JAERI superconducting rf linac based FEL program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minehara, E.J.; Yamauchi, T.; Sugimoto, M. [FEL Laboratory at Tokai, Advanced Photon Research Center, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (JP)] (and others)

    2000-03-01

    The JAERI superconducting rf linac based FEL has successfully been lased to produce a 0.3 kW FEL light and 100 kW or larger electron beam output in quasi continuous wave operation in 1999. The 1 kW class output as our present program goal will be achieved to improve the optical out coupling method in the FEL optical resonator, the electron gun, and the electron beam optics in the JAERI FEL driver. As our next 5 year program goal is the 100 kW class FEL light and a few tens MW class electron beam output in average, quasi continuous wave operation of the light and electron beam will be planned in the JAERI superconducting rf linac based FEL facility. Conceptual design options needed for such a very high power operation and shorter wavelength light sources will be discussed to improve and to upgrade the exciting facility. (author)

  11. Beam simulations with initial bunch noise in superconducting RF proton linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, J

    2010-01-01

    Circular machines are plagued by coupled bunch instabilities (CBI), driven by impedance peaks, where then all cavity higher order modes (HOMs) are possible drivers. Limiting the CBI growth rate is the fundamental reason that all superconducting rf cavities in circular machines are equipped with HOM dampers. The question arises if for similar reasons HOM damping would not be imperative also in high current superconducting rf proton linacs. Therefore we have simulated the longitudinal bunched beam dynamics in such machines, also including charge and position noise on the injected bunches. Simulations were executed for a generic linac with properties close to the planned SPL at CERN, SNS, or Project X at FNAL. It was found that with strong bunch noise and monopole HOMs with high Qext large beam scatter, possibly exceeding the admittance of a receiving machine, cannot be excluded. A transverse simulation shows similar requirements. Therefore including initial bunch noise in any beam dynamic study on superconducti...

  12. Diagnostics Beamline for the SRF Gun Project

    CERN Document Server

    Kamps, T; Goldammer, K; Krämer, Dietrich; Kuske, P; Kuszynski, J; Lipka, D; Marhauser, F; Quast, T; Richter, R

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting rf photo electron injector (SRF gun) is currently under construction by a collaboration between BESSY, DESY, FZR and MBI. The project aims at the design and setup of an CW SRF gun including a diagnostics beamline for the ELBE FEL and to address R&D issues on low emittance injectors for future light sources such as the BESSY FEL. Of critical importance for the injector performance is the control of the electron beam parameters. For this reason a compact diagnostics beamline is under development serving a multitude of operation settings ranging from low-charge (77pC), low-emittance (1 pi mm mrad) mode to high-charge (2.5nC) operation of the gun. For these operation modes beam dynamics simulations are resulting in boundary conditions for the beam instrumentation. Proven and mature technology is projected wherever possible, for example for current and beam position monitoring. The layout of the beam profile and emittance measurement systems is described. For the bunch length, which varies be...

  13. Status and Plans for an SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Church, M; Nagaitsev, S

    2012-01-01

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is currently under construction at Fermilab. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, 40 MeV injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and performing beam experiments. With 3 cryomodules installed this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. The facility can accommodate up to 6 cryomodules for a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. This facility will be used to test SRF cryomodules under high intensity beam conditions, RF power equipment, instrumentation, and LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  14. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben Carcagno et al.

    2003-10-20

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented.

  15. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-04-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. (author). 3 refs.

  16. Development of a Solid State RF Amplifier in the kW Regime for Application with Low Beta Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Christian; Borisov, A; Kolesov, Sergej; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Projects based on the use of low beta superconducting cavities for ions are under operation or development at several labs worldwide. Often these cavities are individually driven by RF power sources in the kW regime. For an ongoing project a modular 2 kW, 176 MHz unconditionally stable RF amplifier for CW and pulsed operation was designed, built, and tested. Extended thermal analysis was used to develop a water cooling system in order to optimize the performance of the power transistors and other thermally loaded components. The paper will outline the design concept of the amplifier and present first results on the test of the amplifier with a superconducting cavity.

  17. Accuracy of Conventional PCR Targeting the 16S rRNA Gene with the Ot-16sRF1 and Ot-16sRR1 Primers for Diagnosis of Scrub Typhus: a Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choon-Mee; Cho, Min Keun; Kim, Dong-Min; Yun, Na-Ra; Kim, Seok Won; Jang, Sook Jin; Ahn, Young-Joon; Lim, Donghoon

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the accuracy of conventional PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene (16S C-PCR) using the Ot-16sRF1/Ot-16sRR1 primers for diagnosing scrub typhus. The diagnosis of Orientia tsutsugamushi infection by 16S C-PCR presented an increased sensitivity of 87.0% and specificity of 100% compared with those obtained with other targets and is thus a simple and clinically useful method with good diagnostic accuracy.

  18. Plasma Processing of Large Curved Surfaces for SRF Cavity Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The development of the technology based on Cl2/Ar plasma etching has to address several crucial parameters which influence the etching rate and surface roughness, and eventually, determine cavity performance. This includes dependence of the process on the frequency of the RF generator, gas pressure, power level, the driven (inner) electrode configuration, and the chlorine concentration in the gas mixture during plasma processing. To demonstrate surface layer removal in the asymmetric non-planar geometry, we are using a simple cylindrical cavity with 8 ports symmetrically distributed over the cylinder. The ports are used for diagnosing the plasma parameters and as holders for the samples to be etched. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (RF) circuit elements, chlorine concentration in the Cl2/Ar gas mixtures, residence...

  19. Overview of Superconducting Photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2009-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR-FELs is contingent upon the development of an appropriate source. Electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µm rad) and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required to meet the FEL specification [1]. An elegant way to create such an unique beam is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting RF photo injector with the superconducting technology to get a superconducting RF photo injector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches are under investigation at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, JLab, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Lot of progress could be achieved during the last years and first long term operation was demonstrated at the FZD [2]. In the near future, this effort will lead to SRF guns, which are indispensab...

  20. A 166.6 MHz superconducting rf system for the HEPS storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Hao, X.; Huang, T.; Li, Z.; Lin, H.; Meng, F.; Mi, Z.; Sun, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2017-07-01

    A superconducting 166.6 MHz quarter-wave beta=1 cavity was recently proposed for the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS), a 6 GeV kilometer-scale light source. Four 166.6 MHz cavities will be used for main acceleration in the newly planned on-axis beam injection scheme realized by a double-frequency RF system. The fundamental frequency, 166.6 MHz, was dictated by the fast injection kicker technology and the preference of using 499.8 MHz SC RF cavity as the third harmonic. Each 166.6 MHz cavity will be operated at 4.2 K providing 1.2 MV accelerating voltage and 150 kW of power to the electron beam. The input coupler will use single-window coaxial type graded up to 200 kW CW power. Each cavity will be equipped with a 200 kW solid-state amplifier and digital low-level RF system. This paper describes the 166.6 MHz RF system with a focus on the design and optimization of the RF cavity and its ancillaries, the LLRF system and the status of the solid-state amplifiers.

  1. Beam dynamics and expected RHIC performance with 56MHz RF upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov,A.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-05-04

    An upgrade of the RHIC storage RF system with a superconducting 56 MHz cavity was recently proposed. This upgrade will provide a significant increase in the acceptance of the RHIC 197 MHz storage RF bucket. This paper summarizes simulations of beam evolution due to intra-beam scattering (IBS) for beam parameters expected with the 56 MHz SRF cavity upgrade. Expected luminosity improvements are shown for Au ions at 100 GeV/nucleon and protons at 250 GeV.

  2. Free-electron laser operation with a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector at ELBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichert, J., E-mail: j.teichert@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Arnold, A.; Büttig, H.; Justus, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Kamps, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lehnert, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Lu, P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Michel, P.; Murcek, P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Rudolph, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schurig, R.; Seidel, W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Vennekate, H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Will, I. [Max-Born-Institut, Berlin, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Xiang, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-04-11

    At the radiation source ELBE a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector (SRF gun) was developed and put into operation. Since 2010 the gun has delivered beam into the ELBE linac. A new driver laser with 13 MHz pulse repetition rate allows now to operate the free-electron lasers (FELs) with the SRF gun. This paper reports on the first lasing experiment with the far-infrared FEL at ELBE, describes the hardware, the electron beam parameters and the measurement of the FEL infrared radiation output. - Highlights: • The superconducting RF gun produces beam with Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes. • The SRF gun operates as an injector for the ELBE linear accelerator. • First lasing of an infrared free-electron laser with an SRF gun.

  3. Morphology of superconducting FeSe thin films grown by MBE and RF-sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, Alexander; Venzmer, Eike; Haaf, Sebastian ten; Jourdan, Martin [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Maletz, Janek [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Leibniz-Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstoffforschung, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Tunneling spectroscopy on planar junctions is the most direct approach for the investigation of superconducting coupling mechanisms. However, it requires smooth interfaces at the tunneling barrier. The morphology of superconducting thin films of FeSe grown by MBE and co-sputtering (RF) from an iron and a selenium target are compared. MBE deposited films show an extreme sensitivity to stoichiometry, deposition temperature and choice of substrate. These films exhibit macroscopic crevices and a pronounced roughness, rendering the preparation of tunneling junctions impossible. However, sputter deposited epitaxial FeSe thin films clearly show a more favorable morphology. Optical microscopy, AFM and SEM demonstrate a smooth surface with segregations which are eliminated by proper choice of the deposition parameters.

  4. Operation of the 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity in RHIC during run 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-11

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). It is the first superconducting quarter wave resonator (QWR) operating in a high-energy storage ring. We discuss herein the cavity operation with Au+Au collisions, and with asymmetrical Au+He3 collisions. The cavity is a storage cavity, meaning that it becomes active only at the energy of experiment, after the acceleration cycle is completed. With the cavity at 300 kV, an improvement in luminosity was detected from direct measurements, and the bunch length has been reduced. The uniqueness of the QWR demands an innovative design of the higher order mode dampers with high-pass filters, and a distinctive fundamental mode damper that enables the cavity to be bypassed during the acceleration stage.

  5. Parameter scaling in the decoherent quantum-classical transition for chaotic rf superconducting quantum interference devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ting; Yu, Yang

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigated the quantum-classical transition in rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems coupled to a dissipative environment. It is found that chaos emerges and the degree of chaos, the maximal Lyapunov exponent lambda(m), exhibits nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the coupling strength D. By measuring the proximity of quantum and classical evolution with the uncertainty of dynamics, we show that the uncertainty is a monotonic function of lambda(m)/D. In addition, the scaling holds in SQUID systems to a relatively smaller variant Planck's over [symbol: see text], suggesting the universality for this scaling.

  6. Thermal Emittance Measurement of the Cs2Te Photocathode in FZD Superconducting RF

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Teichert, J

    2010-01-01

    The thermal emittance of the photocathode is an interesting physical property for the photoinjector, because it decides the minimum emittance the photoinjector can finally achieve. In this paper we will report the latest results of the thermal emittance of the Cs2Te photocathode in FZD Superconducting RF gun. The measurement is performed with solenoid scan method with very low bunch charge and relative large laser spot on cathode, in order to reduce the space charge effect as much as possible, and meanwhile to eliminate the wake fields and the effect from beam halos.

  7. Proc. of the workshop on pushing the limits of RF superconductivity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K-J., Eyberger, C., editors

    2005-04-13

    For three days in late September last year, some sixty experts in RF superconductivity from around the world came together at Argonne to discuss how to push the limits of RF superconductivity for particle accelerators. It was an intense workshop with in-depth presentations and ample discussions. There was added excitement due to the fact that, a few days before the workshop, the International Technology Recommendation Panel had decided in favor of superconducting technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC), the next major high-energy physics accelerator project. Superconducting RF technology is also important for other large accelerator projects that are either imminent or under active discussion at this time, such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) for nuclear physics, energy recovery linacs (ERLs), and x-ray free-electron lasers. For these accelerators, the capability in maximum accelerating gradient and/or the Q value is essential to limit the length and/or operating cost of the accelerators. The technological progress of superconducting accelerators during the past two decades has been truly remarkable, both in low-frequency structures for acceleration of protons and ions as well as in high-frequency structures for electrons. The requirements of future accelerators demand an even higher level of performance. The topics of this workshop are therefore highly relevant and timely. The presentations given at the workshop contained authoritative reviews of the current state of the art as well as some original materials that previously had not been widely circulated. We therefore felt strongly that these materials should be put together in the form of a workshop proceeding. The outcome is this report, which consists of two parts: first, a collection of the scholarly papers prepared by some of the participants and second, copies of the viewgraphs of all presentations. The presentation viewgraphs, in full color, are also available from the Workshop

  8. Some Experiences on BEPCII SRF System Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Tong-ming, Huang; Peng, Sha; Yi, Sun; Wei-min, Pan; Guang-wei, Wang; Jian-ping, Dai; Zhong-quan, Li; Qiang, Ma; Qun-yao, Wang; Guang-yuan, Zhao; Zheng-hui, Mi

    2014-01-01

    The Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) system of the upgrade project of Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII) has been in operation for almost 8 years. The SRF system has accelerated both electron and positron at the design beam current of 910 mA successfully, and a high beam intensity colliding of 860 mA (electron)*910 mA (positron) has been achieved in April 2014. Many problems were encountered during the operation, among which some were solved and some remain unsolved. This paper will describe some experiences on BEPCII SRF system operation, including the symptoms, causes and solutions.

  9. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Z. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hao, Z. K. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Liu, K. X. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zhao, H. Y. [OTIC, Ningxia (China); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high-efficiency high-gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  10. The Importance of the Electron Mean Free Path for Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Maniscalco, J T; Liepe, M

    2016-01-01

    Impurity-doping is an exciting new technology in the field of SRF, producing cavities with record-high quality factor $Q_0$ and BCS surface resistance that decreases with increasing RF field. Recent theoretical work has offered a promising explanation for this anti-Q-slope, but the link between the decreasing surface resistance and the short mean free path of doped cavities has remained elusive. In this work we investigate this link, finding that the magnitude of this decrease varies directly with the mean free path: shorter mean free paths correspond with stronger anti-Q-slopes. We draw a theoretical connection between the mean free path and the overheating of the quasiparticles, which leads to the reduction of the anti-Q-slope towards the normal Q-slope of long-mean-free-path cavities. We also investigate the sensitivity of the residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux, a property which is greatly enhanced for doped cavities, and calculate an optimal doping regime for a given amount of trapped flux. We f...

  11. Development of Low Level RF Control Systems for Superconducting Heavy Ion Linear Accelerators, Electron Synchrotrons and Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Kolesov, Sergej; Pekeler, Michael; Piel, Christian; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Since 2001 ACCEL Instruments is supplying low level RF control systems together with turn key cavity systems. The early LLRF systems used the well established technology based on discrete analogue amplitude and phase detectors and modulators. Today analogue LLRF systems can make use of advanced vector demodulators and modulators combined with a fast computer controlled analogue feed back loop. Feed forward control is implemented to operate the RF cavity in an open loop mode or to compensate for predictable perturbations. The paper will introduce the general design philosophy and show how it can be adapted to different tasks as controlling a synchrotron booster nc RF system at 500 MHz, or superconducting storage ring RF cavities, as well as a linear accelerator at 176 MHz formed by a chain of individually driven and controlled superconducting λ/2 cavities.

  12. Status of the 3½ Cell Superconducting RF Gun Project in Rossendorf

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Evtushenko, Pavel; Janssen, Dietmar; Lehnert, Ulf; Michel, Peter; Möller, Karsten; Schneider, Christof; Schurig, Rico; Staufenbiel, Friedrich; Teichert, Jochen; Kamps, Thorsten; Lipka, Dirk; Volkov, Vladimir; Stephan, J; Lehmann, W D; Will, Ingo

    2005-01-01

    In the paper, we report on the status and progress of the superconducting rf gun project in Rossendorf. The gun is designed for cw operation mode with 1mA current and 10 MeV electron energy. The gun will be installed at the ELBE superconducting electron linear accelerator. It will have a 3½ cell niobium cavity operating at 1.3 GHz. The cavity consists of three cells with TESLA geometry and a specially designed half-cell in which the photocathode will be placed. Two Nb cavities, with RRR 300 and 40 respectively, will be finished at the beginning of 2005. After delivery, the rf tests will be performed and the treatment of the cavities will be started. At the same time, the design of the cryostat is finished and the fabrication of its components is under way. Further activities are the design of the diagnostic beam line, the assembling of the new photocathode preparation system, and the upgrade of the 262 nm driver laser system.

  13. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arnold

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J. W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.557378] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1  μmrad, and high average current (hundreds of mA are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun. SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University. Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term operation was demonstrated at FZD [R. Xiang et al., in Proceedings of the 31st International Free Electron Laser Conference (FEL 09, Liverpool, UK (STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, 2009, p. 488]. In the near future SRF guns are expected to play an important role for linac-driven FEL facilities. In this paper we will review the concepts, the design parameters, and the status of the major SRF gun projects.

  14. Flange joint system for SRF cavities utilizing high force spring clamps for low particle generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-05

    A flange joint system for SRF cavities. The flange joint system includes a set of high force spring clamps that produce high force on the simple flanges of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities to squeeze conventional metallic seals. The system establishes the required vacuum and RF-tight seal with minimum particle contamination to the inside of the cavity assembly. The spring clamps are designed to stay within their elastic range while being forced open enough to mount over the flange pair. Upon release, the clamps have enough force to plastically deform metallic seal surfaces and continue to a new equilibrium sprung dimension where the flanges remain held against one another with enough preload such that normal handling will not break the seal.

  15. SRF MATERIALS OTHER THAN NIOBIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, Anne-Marie

    2008-02-12

    For the past three decades, bulk niobium has been the material of choice for SRF cavity applications. Alternative materials, mainly Nb compounds and A15 compounds have been investigated with moderate effort in the past. In the recent years, RF cavity performance has approached the theoretical limit for bulk niobium. For further improvement of RF cavity performance for future accelerator projects, research interest is renewed towards alternative materials to niobium. A few laboratories around the world are now investigating superconductors with higher transition temperature Tc for application to SRF cavities. This paper gives an overview of the results obtained and challenges encountered for Nb compounds and A15 compounds, as well as for MgB2, for SRF cavity applications. An interesting alternative has been recently proposed by Alex Gurevich with the Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor multilayer approach. This could potentially lead to further improvement in RF cavity performance using the benefit of the higher critical field Hc of higher-Tc superconductors without being limited with their lower Hc1.

  16. Dynamic compensation of an rf cavity failure in a superconducting linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Biarrotte

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator driven system (ADS for transmutation of nuclear waste typically requires a 600 MeV–1 GeV accelerator delivering a proton flux of a few mA for demonstrators, and of a few tens of mA for large industrial systems. Such a machine belongs to the category of the high-power proton accelerators, with an additional requirement for exceptional “reliability”: because of the induced thermal stress to the subcritical core, the number of unwanted “beam trips” should not exceed a few per year, a specification that is several orders of magnitude above usual performance. In order to meet this extremely high reliability, the accelerator needs to implement, to the maximum possible extent, a fault-tolerance strategy that would allow beam operation in the presence of most of the envisaged faults that could occur in its beam line components, and in particular rf systems’ failures. This document describes the results of the simulations performed for the analysis of the fault-tolerance capability of the XT-ADS superconducting linac in the case of an rf cavity failure. A new simulation tool, mixing transient rf behavior of the accelerating cavities with full 6D description of the beam dynamics, has been developed for this purpose. Fast fault-recovery scenarios are proposed, and required research and development is identified.

  17. Suppression of multipacting in high power RF couplers operating with superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kazakov, S.; Morris, D.; Larter, T.; Plastun, A. S.; Popielarski, J.; Wei, J.; Xu, T.

    2017-06-01

    Capacitive input couplers based on a 50 Ω coaxial transmission line are frequently used to transmit RF power to superconducting (SC) resonators operating in CW mode. It is well known that coaxial transmission lines are prone to multipacting phenomenon in a wide range of RF power level and operating frequency. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University includes two types of quarter wave SC resonators (QWR) operating at 80.5 MHz and two types of half wave SC resonators (HWR) operating at 322 MHz. As was reported in ref. [1] a capacitive input coupler used with HWRs was experiencing strong multipacting that resulted in a long conditioning time prior the cavity testing at design levels of accelerating fields. We have developed an insert into 50 Ω coaxial transmission line that provides opportunity to bias the RF coupler antenna and protect the amplifier from the bias potential in the case of breakdown in DC isolation. Two of such devices have been built and are currently used for the off-line testing of 8 HWRs installed in the cryomodule.

  18. Summary of the Superconducting RF Linac for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge; Garoby, R.; /CERN; Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Project-X is a proposed project to be built at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory with several potential missions. A primary part of the Project-X accelerator chain is a Superconducting linac, and In October 2009 a workshop was held to concentrate on the linac parameters. The charge of the workshop was to 'focus only on the SRF linac approaches and how it can be used'. The focus of Working Group 2 of this workshop was to evaluate how the different linac options being considered impact the potential realization of Muon Collider (MC) and Neutrino Factory (NF) applications. In particular the working group charge was, 'to investigate the use of a multi-megawatt proton linac to target, phase rotate and collect muons to support a muon collider and neutrino factory'. To focus the working group discussion, three primary questions were identified early on, to serve as a reference: (1) What are the proton source requirements for muon colliders and neutrino factories? (2) What are the issues with respect to realizing the required muon collider and neutrino factory proton sources - (a) General considerations and (b) Considerations specific to the two linac configurations identified by Project-X? (3) What things need to be done before we can be reasonably confident that ICD1/ICD2 can be upgraded to provide the neutrino factory/muon collider needs? A number of presentations were given, and are available at the workshop web-site. This paper does not summarize the individual presentations, but rather addresses overall findings as related to the three guiding questions listed above.

  19. FERMILAB CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF INTERLOCK SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Troy [Fermilab; Diamond, J. S. [Fermilab; McDowell, D. [Fermilab; Nicklaus, D. [Fermilab; Prieto, P. S. [Fermilab; Semenov, A. [Fermilab

    2016-10-12

    An interlock system has been designed for the Fermilab Cryo-module Test Stand (CMTS), a test bed for the cryo- modules to be used in the upcoming Linac Coherent Light Source 2 (LCLS-II) project at SLAC. The interlock system features 8 independent subsystems, one per superconducting RF cavity and solid state amplifier (SSA) pair. Each system monitors several devices to detect fault conditions such as arcing in the waveguides or quenching of the SRF system. Additionally each system can detect fault conditions by monitoring the RF power seen at the cavity coupler through a directional coupler. In the event of a fault condition, each system is capable of removing RF signal to the amplifier (via a fast RF switch) as well as turning off the SSA. Additionally, each input signal is available for re- mote viewing and recording via a Fermilab designed digitizer board and MVME 5500 processor.

  20. Cryogenic Test of a 750 MHz Superconducting RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [ODU; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-07-01

    A superconducting rf dipole cavity has been designed to address the challenges of a high repetition rate (750 MHz), high current for both electron/ion species (0.5/3 A per bunch), and large crossing angle (50 mrad) at the interaction points (IPs) crabbing system for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The cavity prototype built at Niowave, Inc. has been tested at the Jefferson Lab facilities. In this work we present a detailed analysis of the prototype cavity performance at 4 K and 2 K, corroborating the absence of hard multipacting barriers that could limit the desired transverse fields, along with the surface resistance (Rs) temperature dependency.

  1. JAERI superconducting RF linac-based free-electron laser-facility

    CERN Document Server

    Minehara, E J; Nagai, R; Kikuzawa, N; Sugimoto, M; Hajima, R; Shizuma, T; Yamauchi, T; Nishimori, N

    2000-01-01

    Recently, the JAERI superconducting RF linac based FEL has been successfully lased to produce 0.36 kW of FEL light using a 100 kW electron beam in quasi-continuous wave operation. A 1 kW class laser is our present program goal, and will be achieved by improving the optical out coupling in the FEL optical resonator, the electron gun, and the electron beam optics in the JAERI FEL driver. Our next 5-year program goal is to produce a 100 kW-class FEL laser and multi-MW class electron beam in average, quasi-continuous wave operation. Conceptual and engineering design options needed for such a very high-power operation will be discussed to improve and to upgrade the existing facility.

  2. Performance analysis of superconducting rf cavities for the CERN rare isotope accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatroni, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Rosaz, G.; Sublet, A.; Venturini Delsolaro, W.; Vaglio, R.; Palmieri, V.

    2016-09-01

    The first cryomodule of the new HIE-ISOLDE rare isotope accelerator has recently been commissioned with beam at CERN, with the second cryomodule ready for installation. Each cryomodule contains five superconducting low-beta quarter wave cavities, produced with the technology of sputtering a thin niobium film onto the copper substrate (Nb /Cu ). This technology has several benefits compared to the bulk niobium solution, but also drawbacks among which the most relevant is the increase of surface resistance with accelerating field. Recent work has established the possible connection of this phenomenon to local defects in the Nb /Cu interface, which may lead to increased thermal impedance and thus local thermal runaway. We have analyzed the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE cavities series production, as well as of a few prototypes', in terms of this model, and found a strong correlation between the rf properties and one of the model characteristic quantities, namely the total surface having increased interface thermal impedance.

  3. Development of Infrastructure Facilities for Superconducting RF Cavity Fabrication, Processing and 2 K Characterization at RRCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S. C.; Raghavendra, S.; Jain, V. K.; Puntambekar, A.; Khare, P.; Dwivedi, J.; Mundra, G.; Kush, P. K.; Shrivastava, P.; Lad, M.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-02-01

    An extensive infrastructure facility is being established at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) for a proposed 1 GeV, high intensity superconducting proton linac for Indian Spallation Neutron Source. The proton linac will comprise of a large number of superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities ranging from low beta spoke resonators to medium and high beta multi-cell elliptical cavities at different RF frequencies. Infrastructure facilities for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and performance characterization at 2 K are setup to take-up manufacturing of large number of cavities required for future projects of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). RRCAT is also participating in a DAE’s approved mega project on “Physics and Advanced technology for High intensity Proton Accelerators” under Indian Institutions-Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC). In the R&D phase of IIFC program, a number of high beta, fully dressed multi-cell elliptical SCRF cavities will be developed in collaboration with Fermilab. A dedicated facility for SCRF cavity fabrication, tuning and processing is set up. SCRF cavities developed will be characterized at 2K using a vertical test stand facility, which is already commissioned. A Horizontal Test Stand facility has also been designed and under development for testing a dressed multi-cell SCRF cavity at 2K. The paper presents the infrastructure facilities setup at RRCAT for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and testing at 2K.

  4. A technique for monitoring fast tuner piezoactuator preload forces for superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Branlard, J.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Edwards, H.; Orris, D.; Makulski, A.; McGee, M.; Nehring, R.; Poloubotko, V.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technology for mechanically compensating Lorentz Force detuning in superconducting RF cavities has already been developed at DESY. One technique is based on commercial piezoelectric actuators and was successfully demonstrated on TESLA cavities [1]. Piezo actuators for fast tuners can operate in a frequency range up to several kHz; however, it is very important to maintain a constant static force (preload) on the piezo actuator in the range of 10 to 50% of its specified blocking force. Determining the preload force during cool-down, warm-up, or re-tuning of the cavity is difficult without instrumentation, and exceeding the specified range can permanently damage the piezo stack. A technique based on strain gauge technology for superconducting magnets has been applied to fast tuners for monitoring the preload on the piezoelectric assembly. The design and testing of piezo actuator preload sensor technology is discussed. Results from measurements of preload sensors installed on the tuner of the Capture Cavity II (CCII)[2] tested at FNAL are presented. These results include measurements during cool-down, warmup, and cavity tuning along with dynamic Lorentz force compensation.

  5. Report on Superconducting RF Activities at CERN from 2001 to 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Losito, R; Chiaveri, Enrico; Montesinos, E; Tückmantel, Joachim; Valuch, D; 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity

    2003-01-01

    The main project on superconducting RF at CERN in the period from 2001 to 2003 has been the 400 MHz SC system for the LHC. Five modules, each containing four single-cell niobium (Nb) sputtered cavities, have been assembled and low-power tested at room temperature and at 4.5 K. Production of the first four power couplers has been delayed but high-power tests should start on the first module this autumn. A small program of R&D is maintained on the SPL. Both the beta = 0.7 and beta = 0.8 cavities have been high-power tested up to nominal field without particular problems. A detailed characterization of the cavity mechanical resonances is going on and some preliminary results are presented. A computer code has been written to predict the effects of Lorentz detuning and microphonics on the stability of the RF feedback loops in SC linacs where several cavities are driven by a single high power source. Fast ferrite phase shifters are being developed to allow the decoupling of the feedback loops of individual cav...

  6. Exploration of Anomalous Gravity Effects by rf-Pumped Magnetized High-T(c) Superconducting Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Tony; Litchford, Ron; Peters, Randall; Thompson, Byran; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A number of anomalous gravitational effects have been reported in the scientific literature during recent years, but there has been no independent confirmation with regard to any of these claims. Therefore, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in response to the propulsion challenges specified by NASA's Breakthrough Propulsion Physics (BPP) program, proposed to explore the possibility of observing anomalous gravitation behavior through the manipulation of Josephson junction effects in magnetized high-Tc superconducting oxides. The technical goal was to critically test this revolutionary physical claim and provide a rigorous, independent, empirical confirmation (or refutation) of anomalous effects related to the manipulation of gravity by radio frequency (rf)-pumped magnetized type-2 superconductors. Because the current empirical evidence for gravity modification is anecdotal, our objective was to design, construct, and meticulously implement a discriminating experiment, which would put these observations on a more firm footing within the scientific community. Our approach is unique in that we advocate the construction of an extremely sensitive torsion balance with which to measure gravity modification effects by rf-pumped type-2 superconductor test masses. This paper reviews the anecdotal evidence for anomalous gravity effects, describes the design and development of a simplified torsion balance experiment for empirically investigating these claims, and presents the results of preliminary experiments.

  7. An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg

    2011-09-01

    We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.

  8. Five-cell superconducting RF module with a PBG coupler cell: design and cold testing of the copper prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenyev, Sergey Andreyevich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shchegolkov, Dmitry [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boulware, Chase [Niowave, Lansing, MI (United States); Grimm, Terry [Niowave, Lansing, MI (United States); Rogacki, Adam [Niowave, Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-04-29

    We report the design and experimental data for a copper prototype of a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator module. The five-cell module has an incorporated photonic band gap (PBG) cell with couplers. The purpose of the PBG cell is to achieve better higher order mode (HOM) damping, which is vital for preserving the quality of high-current electron beams. Better HOM damping raises the current threshold for beam instabilities in novel SRF accelerators. The PBG design also increases the real-estate gradient of the linac because both HOM damping and the fundamental power coupling can be done through the PBG cell instead of on the beam pipe via complicated end assemblies. First, we will discuss the design and accelerating properties of the structure. The five-cell module was optimized to provide good HOM damping while maintaining the same accelerating properties as conventional elliptical-cell modules. We will then discuss the process of tuning the structure to obtain the desired accelerating gradient profile. Finally, we will list measured quality factors for the accelerating mode and the most dangerous HOMs.

  9. Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

    CERN Document Server

    Le Duff, J; Thomas, C

    2000-01-01

    Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

  10. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2011-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs) largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J.W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004)] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µmrad), and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term ...

  11. RF power upgrade at the superconducting 1.3 GHz CW LINAC “ELBE” with solid state amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Büttig, Hartmut, E-mail: buettig@hzdr.de [Radiation Source ELBE, Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Arnold, A.; Büchner, A.; Justus, M.; Kuntsch, M.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Schurig, R.; Staats, G.; Teichert, J. [Radiation Source ELBE, Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2013-03-11

    The RF power for the superconducting 1.3 GHz CW LINAC “ELBE” has been doubled from less than 10 kW to 20 kW per cavity. In January 2012 the four 10 kW klystrons used to drive the four superconducting cavities of the LINAC have been replaced by pairs of 10 kW solid state power amplifiers (SSPA). ELBE is now worldwide the first 1.3 GHz CW LINAC equipped with solid state RF power amplifiers. This technical note details on this project. -- Highlights: ► We report the first installation of 10 kW solid state RF-amplifiers at 1.3 GHz CW LINAC. ► The sc. cavities of “ELBE” are now driven by a pair of 10 kW solid state amplifiers (SSPA). ► The RF-power upgrade allows doubling the electron beam current (CW). ► Advantages of the new RF system are high reliability, easy service and lower costs.

  12. TRANSIENT BEAM LOADING EFFECTS IN RF SYSTEMS IN JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed electron bunch trains generated from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) linac to inject into the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) e-ring will produce transient beam loading effects in the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) systems that, if not mitigated, could cause unacceptably large beam energy deviation in the injection capture, or exceed the energy acceptance of CEBAF’s recirculating arcs. In the electron storage ring, the beam abort or ion clearing gaps or uneven bucket filling can cause large beam phase transients in the (S)RF cavity control systems and even beam loss due to Robinson instability. We have first analysed the beam stability criteria in steady state and estimated the transient effect in Feedforward and Feedback RF controls. Initial analytical models for these effects are shown for the design of the JLEIC e-ring from 3GeV to 12GeV.

  13. Development of the superconducting rf 2-cell cavity for cERL injector at KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Noguchi, S.; Kako, E.; Umemori, K.; Shishido, T.

    2013-06-01

    An injector cryomodule for the compact energy recovery linac (cERL) is under development at KEK. This injector cryomodule has 3 L-band 2-cell superconducting rf cavities. The cERL is required to accelerate a 10-mA CW electron beam to 5 MeV. The required accelerating gradient per cavity is 7.5-12.5 MV/m at ˜30 kW input power to the cavity and the beam. The operational frequency is 1300 MHz at 2 K and the mode of operation is CW. In this application, the critical hardware components are not the cavities, but the rf input couplers and higher-order-mode (HOM) dampers. Initially, a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler was chosen for HOM damping of the injector cavities. However, this HOM coupler had a heating problem at low gradients (a few MV/m) in CW operation. The components heated in the accelerating mode were the HOM body and the feedthrough that extracts HOM power from the cavity. To control the heating problem, a new HOM coupler was designed based on a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler, and the feedthrough was also modified based on a Kyocera N-R type connector to have better thermal conductivity. A prototype 2-cell cavity and 3 other 2-cell cavities with 5 new HOM couplers for actual operation were fabricated through May 2011. Vertical tests of these cavities were carried out after standard surface preparation at the KEK Superconducting Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-STF) through March 2012. The accelerating gradient achieved exceeded 50 MV/m without quenching during the vertical test using the prototype 2-cell cavity and feedthroughs. The magnetic field at the cell equator was 2127 Oe. Three 2-cell cavities passing the criteria of the High Pressure Gas Safety Institute of Japan exceeded 25 MV/m without field emissions. The cavities with the best performance were prepared in March 2012 for the cERL injector. The designs of the HOM couplers and feedthroughs and the results of the vertical tests to evaluate their performance are reported here.

  14. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  15. Analysis of High Order Modes in 1.3 GHZ CW SRF Electron Linac for a Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, A. [Fermilab; Vostrikov, A. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2013-01-01

    Design of a Light Source (LS) based on the continuous wave superconducting RF (CW SRF) electron linac is currently underway. This facility will provide soft coherent X-ray radiation for a braod spectrum of basic research applications. Quality of the X-ray laser radiation is affected by the electron beam parameters such as the stability of the transverse beam position and longitudinal and transverse beam emittances. High order modes (HOMs) excited in the SRF structures by a passing beam may deteriorate the beam quality and affect the beam stability. Deposition of HOM energy in the walls of SRF cavities adds to the heat load of he cryogenic system and leads to the increased cost of building and operation of the linac. In this paper we evaluate effects of HOMs in an LS CW SRF linac based on Tesla-type 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities. We analyze non-coherent losses and resonance excitation of HOMs. We estimate heat load due to the very high frequency HOMs. We study influence of the HOMs on the transverse beam dynamics.

  16. Atom-probe tomography analyses of niobium superconducting RF cavity materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, J.T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States); Seidman, D.N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States); Yoon, K.E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States)]. E-mail: megabass@northwestern.edu; Bauer, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Reid, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Boffo, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Norem, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    We present the first atom-probe tomographic (APT) measurements of niobium superconducting RF (SCRF) cavity materials. APT involves the atom-by-atom dissection of sharply pointed niobium tips, along with their niobium oxide coatings, via the application of a high-pulsed electric field and the measurement of each ion's mass-to-charge state ratio (m/n) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The resulting atomic reconstructions, typically containing at least 10{sup 5} atoms and with typical dimensions of 10{sup 5} nm{sup 3} (or less), show the detailed, nanoscale chemistry of the niobium oxide coatings, and of the underlying high-purity niobium metal. Our initial results show a nanochemically smooth transition through the oxide layer from near-stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} at the surface to near-stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O as the underlying metal is approached (after {approx}10 nm of surface oxide). The underlying metal, in the near-oxide region, contains a significant amount of interstitially dissolved oxygen ({approx}5-10 at.%), as well as a considerable amount of dissolved hydrogen. The experimental results are interpreted in light of current models of oxide and sub-oxide formation in the Nb-O system.

  17. X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering at the superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka, E-mail: hirotaka@post.kek.jp [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); Akemoto, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Araki, Sakae; Aryshev, Alexander; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fukuda, Shigeki; Haba, Junji; Hara, Kazufumi; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Honma, Teruya; Kako, Eiji; Kojima, Yuji; Kondo, Yoshinari; Lekomtsev, Konstantin; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miyoshi, Toshinobu [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    2015-02-01

    Quasi-monochromatic X-rays with high brightness have a broad range of applications in fields such as life sciences, bio-, medical applications, and microlithography. One method for generating such X-rays is via inverse Compton scattering (ICS). X-ray generation experiments using ICS were carried out at the superconducting RF test facility (STF) accelerator at KEK. A new beam line, newly developed four-mirror optical cavity system, and new X-ray detector system were prepared for experiments downstream section of the STF electron accelerator. Amplified pulsed photons were accumulated into a four-mirror optical cavity and collided with an incoming 40 MeV electron beam. The generated X-rays were detected using a microchannel plate (MCP) detector for X-ray yield measurements and a new silicon-on-insulator (SOI) detector system for energy measurements. The detected X-ray yield by the MCP detector was 1756.8±272.2 photons/(244 electron bunches). To extrapolate this result to 1 ms train length under 5 Hz operations, 4.60×10{sup 5} photons/1%-bandwidth were obtained. The peak X-ray energy, which was confirmed by the SOI detector, was 29 keV, and this is consistent with ICS X-rays.

  18. An rf separated kaon beam from the Main Injector: Superconducting aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Edwards

    1998-11-01

    ThE report is intended to focus on the superconducting aspects of a potential separated kaon beam facility for the Main Injector, and most of this document reflects that emphasis. However, the RF features cannot be divorced from the overall beam requirements, and so the next section is devoted to the latter subject. The existing optics design that meets the needs of the two proposed experiments is outliied, and its layout at Fermilab is shown. The frequency and deflection gradient choices present implementation dMiculties, and the section closes with some commentary on these issues. Sec. 3 provides an introduction to cavity design considerations, and, in particular carries forward the discussion of resonator shape and frequency selection. The R&D program is the subject of Sec. 4. Provisional parameter choices will be summarized. Initial steps toward cavity fabrication based `on copper models have been taken. The next stages in cavity fabrication will be reviewed in some detail. The infrastructure needs and availability will be discussed. Sec. 5 discusses what maybe characterized as the in~edlents of a point design. At this writing, some aspects are clear and some are not. The basic systems are reasonably clear and are described. The final section presents a cost and schedule estimate for both the Ft&D and production phase. Some supporting material and elaboration is provided in the Appendices.

  19. Status and plans for a SRF accelerator test faciliy at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Leibfritz, J; Carlson, K; Chase, B; Church, M; Harms, E; Klebaner, A; Kucera, M; Lackey, S; Martinez, A; Nagaitsev, S; Nobrega, L; Piot, P; Reid, J; Wendt, M; Wesseln, S

    2012-01-01

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. Expansion plans of the facility are underway that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power equipment, instrumentation, LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  20. ANALYZING SURFACE ROUGHNESS DEPENDENCE OF LINEAR RF LOSSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [JLAB, W& amp; M College; Xu, Chen [JLAB, W& amp; M College

    2012-09-01

    Topographic structure on Superconductivity Radio Frequency (SRF) surfaces can contribute additional cavity RF losses describable in terms of surface RF reflectivity and absorption indices of wave scattering theory. At isotropic homogeneous extent, Power Spectrum Density (PSD) of roughness is introduced and quantifies the random surface topographic structure. PSD obtained from different surface treatments of niobium, such Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP), Electropolishing (EP), Nano-Mechanical Polishing (NMP) and Barrel Centrifugal Polishing (CBP) are compared. A perturbation model is utilized to calculate the additional rough surface RF losses based on PSD statistical analysis. This model will not consider that superconductor becomes normal conducting at fields higher than transition field. One can calculate the RF power dissipation ratio between rough surface and ideal smooth surface within this field range from linear loss mechanisms.

  1. 50 years of success for SRF accelerators—a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsee, Hasan

    2017-05-01

    The past five decades have seen many successes in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) enabling a variety of accelerators. These successes are the result of steady progress in understanding the science behind the performance limitations, and in developing effective countermeasures to advance key performance aspects. SRF technology has developed in parallel to bring major accelerators to reality for a wide variety of fields from high energy physics, nuclear physics, and nuclear astro-physics to materials science.

  2. Formation and structure of the oxygen-centered lead thiolate cluster Pb5O(SRF)(8)center dot 2C(7)H(8) [R-F=2,4,6-tris(trifluoromethyl)phenyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelmann, FT; Buijink, JKF; Brooker, SA; Herbst-Irmer, R; Kilimann, U; Bohnen, FM

    2000-01-01

    The unusual pentanuclear lead thiolate cluster PbsO(SRF)(8).C2H8 (3) (C7H8 = toluene) has been obtained by oxidation of Pb(SRF)(2) (2) with dry air and structurally characterized. The central oxygen atom is coordinated to three lead atoms in a trigonal planar fashion. The coordination sphere of the

  3. Heat load of a GaAs photocathode in an SRF electron gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Er-Dong; ZHAO Kui; J(o)rg Kewisch; Ilan Ben-Zvi; Andrew Burrill; Trivini Rao; WU Qiong; Animesh Jain; Ramesh Gupta; Doug Holmes

    2011-01-01

    A great deal of effort has been made over the last decades to develop a better polarized electron source for high energy physics. Several laboratories operate DC guns with a gallium arsenide photocathode, which yield a highly polarized electron beam. However, the beam's emittance might well be improved by using a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) electron gun, which delivers beams of a higher brightness than that from DC guns because the field gradient at the cathode is higher. SRF guns with metal and CsTe cathodes have been tested successfully. To produce polarized electrons, a Gallium-Arsenide photo-cathode must be used: an experiment to do so in a superconducting RF gun is under way at BNL. Since a bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) photocathode is normal conducting, a problem arises from the heat load stemming from the cathode. We present our measurements of the electrical resistance of GaAs at cryogenic temperatures, a prediction of the heat load and verification by measuring the quality factor of the gun with and without the cathode at 2 K. We simulate heat generation and flow from the GaAs cathode using the ANSYS program. By following the findings with the heat load model, we designed and fabricated a new cathode holder (plug) to decrease the heat load from GaAs.

  4. CW SRF Electron Linac for Nuclear Physics Research: CEBAF 4 GeV, 6 GeV, and 12 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Reece, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, has been actively serving the nuclear physics research community as a unique forefront international resource since 1995. This CW electron linear accelerator (linac) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has continued to evolve as a precision tool for discerning the structure and dynamics within nuclei. Superconducting RF (SRF) technology has been the essential foundation for CEBAF, first as a 4 GeV machine, then 6 GeV, and currently capable of 12 GeV. We review the development, implementation, and performance of SRF systems for CEBAF from its early beginnings to the commissioning of the 12 GeV era.

  5. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  7. IBS and expected luminosity performance for RHIC beams at top energy with 56 MHz SRF cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov,A.

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of RF system in RHIC is to capture injected bunches, accelerate them to the top energy, and store bunches at the top energy for many hours. The accelerating RF system operates at harmonic number h=360 of the particle revolution frequency f=78.196 kHz, which corresponds to 28.15MHz. The storage RF system accepts the shortened bunches at top energy and provides longitudinal focusing to keep these bunches short during the store time (collision mode). The storage system operates at harmonic number h=7x360=2520, which corresponds to an RF frequency of 197.05 MHz [1]. Recently, an upgrade of storage RF system with a superconducting 56 MHz cavity was proposed [2]. This upgrade will provide significant increase in the acceptance of storage RF bucket. Presently, the short bunch length for collisions is obtained via RF gymnastics with bunch rotation (called re-bucketing), because the length of 197MHz bucket of 5 nsec is too short to accommodate long bunches otherwise. However, due to bucket non-linearity and hardware complications some increase in the longitudinal emittance occurs during re-bucketing. The 56MHz cavity will produce sufficiently short bunches which would allow one to operate without re-bucketing procedure. This Note summarizes simulation of beam evolution due to Intra-beam scattering (IBS) for beam parameters expected with the 56 MHz SRF cavity upgrade. Expected luminosity improvement is shown both for Au ions at 100 GeV/nucleon and for protons at 250 GeV.

  8. Cold RF test and associated mechanical features correlation of a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity built in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAIJing; JIN Song; WANG Fang; LIU Ke-Xin; R. L.Geng; ZHAO Kui; LU Xiang-Yang; QUAN Sheng-Wen; ZHANG Bao-Cheng; LIN Lin; HAO Jian-Kui; ZHU Feng; XU Wen-Can; HE Fei-Si

    2012-01-01

    The RF performance of a 1.3 G Hz 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity was evaluated at cryogenic temperatures following surface processing by using the standard ILC-style recipe.The cavity is a TESLA-style 9-ccll superconducting niobium cavity,with complete end group components including a higher order mode coupler,built in China for practical applications.An accelerating gradient of 28.6 MV/m was achieved at an unloaded quality factor of 4 × 109.The morphological property of mechanical features on the RF surface of this cavity was characterized through optical inspection.Correlation between the observed mechanical features and the RF performance of the cavity is attempted.

  9. Superconducting linac beam dynamics with high-order maps for RF resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, A A; Pardo, R C; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.11.177

    2004-01-01

    The arbitrary-order map beam optics code COSY Infinity has recently been adapted to calculate accurate high-order ion-optical maps for electrostatic and radio-frequency accelerating structures. The beam dynamics of the superconducting low-velocity positive-ion injector linac for the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab is used to demonstrate some advantages of the new simulation capability. The injector linac involves four different types of superconducting accelerating structures and has a total of 18 resonators. The detailed geometry for each of the accelerating cavities is included, allowing an accurate representation of the on- and off-axis electric fields. The fields are obtained within the code from a Poisson-solver for cylindrically symmetric electrodes of arbitrary geometry. The transverse focusing is done with superconducting solenoids. A detailed comparison of the transverse and longitudinal phase space is made with the conventional ray-tracing code LINRAY. The two codes are evaluated for ease ...

  10. High-gradient High-charge CW Superconducting RF gun with CsK2Sb photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Pinayev, Igor; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Boulware, Chase; Folz, Charles; Gassner, David; Grimm, Terry; Hao, Yue; Jamilkowski, James; Jing, Yichao; Kayran, Dmitry; Mahler, George; Mapes, Michael; Miller, Toby; Narayan, Geetha; Sheehy, Brian; Rao, Triveni; Skaritka, John; Smith, Kevin; Snydstrup, Louis; Than, Yatming; Wang, Erdong; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Binping; Xin, Tianmu; Zaltsman, Alexander; Altinbas, Z; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Curcio, Anthony; Di Lieto, Anthony; Meng, Wuzheng; Minty, Michiko; Orfin, Paul; Reich, Jonathan; Roser, Thomas; Smart, Loralie A; Soria, Victor; Theisen, Charles; Xu, Wencan; Wu, Yuan H; Zhao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    High-gradient CW photo-injectors operating at high accelerating gradients promise to revolutionize many sciences and applications. They can establish the basis for super-bright monochromatic X-ray free-electron lasers, super-bright hadron beams, nuclear- waste transmutation or a new generation of microchip production. In this letter we report on our operation of a superconducting RF electron gun with a record-high accelerating gradient at the CsK2Sb photocathode (i.e. ~ 20 MV/m) generating a record-high bunch charge (i.e., 3 nC). We briefly describe the system and then detail our experimental results. This achievement opens new era in generating high-power electron beams with a very high brightness.

  11. Study of quality and field limitation of superconducting 1.3 GHz 9-Cell RF-cavities at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlander, Felix

    2013-01-15

    The European XFEL and the International Linear Collider are based on superconducting rf cavities made of niobium. Their advantages are low ohmic losses which allow high duty cycles and the possibility to use a large beam aperture which is substantial to prevent wake fields at high current accelerators. To reach the theoretical limits of superconducting cavities, it is required to understand the present performance limitations. These are field emission, thermal breakdown (quench) and the ohmic losses dependent on the accelerating field, which are expressed in the quality factor. As the limiting mechanisms themselves are understood in general, the origin of the quench is often unclear. To determine the quench locations, a localisation tool for thermal breakdown using the second sound in superfluid helium has been installed at the cavity test facility at DESY and the results for a sample of about 30 cavities have been examined. The features of the distribution of the quench locations have been analysed and it has been found that the quench locations are in the area of the highest surface magnetic field and not necessarily at the equator of the cells. The data sample has been extended in an attempt to characterise the average behaviour of the quality factor related to the accelerating field. An analysis of the surface resistance of individual cavities shows that a recently developed model for the surface resistance of niobium is not able to describe the measurement in all detail, but the application of an additional mechanism showed promising results.

  12. Development of Nb and Alternative Material Thin Films Tailored for SRF Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Reece, C E; Spradlin, J K; Xiao, B; Zhao, X; Gu, Diefeng; Baumgart, Helmut; Beringer, Douglas; Lukaszew, Rosa

    2011-09-01

    Over the years, Nb/Cu technology, despite its shortcomings due to the commonly used magnetron sputtering, has positioned itself as an alternative route for the future of superconducting structures used in accelerators. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of energetic vacuum deposition techniques, showing promise for the production of thin films tailored for SRF applications. JLab is pursuing energetic condensation deposition via techniques such as Electron Cyclotron Resonance and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering. As part of this project, the influence of the deposition energy on the material and RF properties of the Nb thin film is investigated with the characterization of their surface, structure, superconducting properties and RF response. It has been shown that the film RRR can be tuned from single digits to values greater than 400. This paper presents results on surface impedance measurements correlated with surface and material characterization for Nb films produced on various substrates, monocrystalline and polycrystalline as well as amorphous. A progress report on work on NbTiN and AlN based multilayer structures will also be presented.

  13. Cryogenic testing of the 2.1 GHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A., E-mail: arsenyev@mit.edu; Temkin, Richard J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terrence L.; Rogacki, Adam R. [Niowave, Inc., 1012 North Walnut Street, Lansing, Michigan 48906 (United States)

    2016-05-30

    We present results from cryogenic tests of the multi-cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving high average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery-linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam break-up instability, caused by parasitic higher order modes (HOMs) interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The multi-cell cavity was designed and fabricated of niobium. Two cryogenic (vertical) tests were conducted. The high unloaded Q-factor was demonstrated at a temperature of 4.2 K at accelerating gradients up to 3 MV/m. The measured value of the unloaded Q-factor was 1.55 × 10{sup 8}, in agreement with prediction.

  14. Displacement detection with a vibrating rf superconducting interference device: beating the standard linear limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buks, Eyal; Zaitsev, Stav; Segev, Eran; Abdo, Baleegh; Blencowe, M P

    2007-08-01

    We study a configuration for displacement detection consisting of a nanomechanical resonator coupled to both a radio frequency superconducting interference device and to a superconducting stripline resonator. We employ an adiabatic approximation and rotating wave approximation and calculate the displacement sensitivity. We study the performance of such a displacement detector when the stripline resonator is driven into a region of nonlinear oscillations. In this region the system exhibits noise squeezing in the output signal when homodyne detection is employed for readout. We show that displacement sensitivity of the device in this region may exceed the upper bound imposed upon the sensitivity when operating in the linear region. On the other hand, we find that the high displacement sensitivity is accompanied by a slowing down of the response of the system, resulting in a limited bandwidth.

  15. Methods of Phase and Power Control in Magnetron Transmitters for Superconducting Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazadevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Lebedev, V. [Fermilab; Schappert, W. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Various methods of phase and power control in magnetron RF sources of superconducting accelerators intended for ADS-class projects were recently developed and studied with conventional 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons operating in pulsed and CW regimes. Magnetron transmitters excited by a resonant (injection-locking) phasemodulated signal can provide phase and power control with the rates required for precise stabilization of phase and amplitude of the accelerating field in Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of the intensity-frontier accelerators. An innovative technique that can significantly increase the magnetron transmitter efficiency at the widerange power control required for superconducting accelerators was developed and verified with the 2.45 GHz magnetrons operating in CW and pulsed regimes. High efficiency magnetron transmitters of this type can significantly reduce the capital and operation costs of the ADSclass accelerator projects.

  16. Reduction of RF accelerating voltage of Pohang Light Source-II superconducting RF cavity for stable top-up mode operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Y.; Yu, I.; Park, I.; Chun, M. H.; Sohn, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) is currently providing a top-up mode user-service operation with maximum available beam current of 400 mA and a beam emittance of below 10 nm-rad. The dimension of the beam bunch shortened to accomplish a low beam emittance of below 10 nm-rad from a high beam current of 400 mA increases the bunch charge density. As a result, the electron beam lifetime is significantly degraded and a high gradient of power is lost in the vacuum components of the storage ring. A study on how to reduce the bunch charge density without degrading beam emittance found that reducing the RF accelerating voltage (Vacc) can lower the bunch charge density by lengthening the bunch in the longitudinal direction. In addition, the Vacc required for stable operation with beam current of 400 mA can be reduced by lowering the external cavity quality factors (Qext values) of the superconducting cavities (SCs). To control the Qext values of SCs gradually without accessing the accelerator tunnel, a remote control motorized three-probe-tuner was installed in the transmission line of each SC. The optimum installation position of the three-probe-tuner was determined by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation and by experimenting on various installation positions of the three-probe-tuner. The Qext values of all the SCs were lowered to 1.40 × 105, and then, the Vacc required to store the beam current of 400 mA was decreased from 4.8 MV to 4.2 MV, which corresponds to 10% lengthening of the beam bunches. The stable operation with the reduced Vacc was confirmed during a 400 mA ten-day top-up mode user-service. Currently, the RF system of the PLS-II storage ring delivers the user-service operation with lowered Qext values to reduce the power loss at the vacuum components as well as the cryogenic heat load of SCs, and no significant problems have been found. This method of reducing the Vacc may also be applied in other synchrotron facilities.

  17. Experience with two large-scale Hell-cryostats for a superconducting RF particle separator working in closed cycle with a 300 W refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, W

    1976-01-01

    The contribution of the Karlsruhe Institut fur Experimental Kernphysik to the RF particle separator at the SPS/CERN consists of the two superconducting deflectors and their Hell-cryostats with the cryogenic and vacuum accessories. The cryostats have to fulfil specifications concerning tightness, thermal insulation, adjustment of the cavities to the beam and reliability. Corresponding cryogenic and RF tests are performed in Karlsruhe before a 300 W refrigerator simulating normal and emergency conditions. Following a description of cryostats design the results of these measurements are compared with the specifications. Operating experience with the cryostats in closed circuit with the refrigerator are reported. (5 refs).

  18. "Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Barber

    2012-07-08

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

  19. Cryogenic, superconducting and rf results of the SRFQ2 of PIAVE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Porcellato; G Bisoffi; V Andreev; G Bassato; G Bezzon; S Canella; F Chiurlotto; A Lombardi; L Bertazzo; D Conventi; G Galeazzi; S Marigo; V Palmieri; F Poletto; T Shirai; S Y Stark; F Stivanello

    2002-12-01

    SRFQ2 is the second RFQ superconducting (SC) structure of PIAVE, the positive ion injector of the SC LINAC for heavy ions ALPI, in operation at Legnaro. During 2001, SRFQ2 was extensively tested at cryogenic temperature reaching its design performance, i.e., 280 kV inter-electrode voltage (equivalent to 25 MV/m peak surface electrical field) at 7 W dissipated power. This paper describes the treatments, the main difficulties arisen during the tests, the way they were overcome and the measurement sequences that allowed the characterization of SRFQ2 behavior. A brief description of future programs is also given.

  20. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  1. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  2. Optimizing the configuration of a superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavity to increase the maximum achievable gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.

    2014-02-01

    We present a design of a superconducting rf photonic band gap (SRF PBG) accelerator cell with specially shaped rods in order to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and improve the effectiveness of the PBG structure for suppression of higher order modes (HOMs). The ability of PBG structures to suppress long-range wakefields is especially beneficial for superconducting electron accelerators for high power free-electron lasers (FELs), which are designed to provide high current continuous duty electron beams. Using PBG structures to reduce the prominent beam-breakup phenomena due to HOMs will allow significantly increased beam-breakup thresholds. As a result, there will be possibilities for increasing the operation frequency of SRF accelerators and for the development of novel compact high-current accelerator modules for the FELs.

  3. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to 6...

  4. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to...

  5. Design and simulation of a new type of 500 MHz single-cell superconducting RF cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chang-Wang; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; ZHENG Xiang; WEI Ye-Long; YU Hai-Bo; LI Zheng; XU Kai; LIU Jian-Fei; HOU Hong-Tao; MA Zhen-Yu; MAO Dong-Qing; FENG Zi-Qiang; ZHAO Shen-Jie; LUO Chen; ZHAO Yu-Bin

    2012-01-01

    This paper illustrates the design and simulation of a unique 500 MHz single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a fluted beam pipe and a coaxial-type fundamental power coupler.The simulation results show that the cavity has a high r/Q value,a low peak surface field and a large beam aperture,so it can be a candidate cavity for high current accelerators.With the help of a fluted beam tube,almost all the higher order modes can propagate out of the cavity,especially the first two dipole modes,TE111 and TM110,and the first higher monopole mode,TM011.The external quality factor of the coaxial fundamental power coupler is optimized to 1.2× 105,which will be useful when it is applied in the light source storage ring.

  6. The Design of a Five-Cell Superconducting RF Module with a PBG Coupler Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simakov, Evgenya I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-29

    We discuss the problem of incorporating a Photonic Band Gap (PBG) cell into a superconducting accelerating module of 5 cells designed for the operational frequency of 2.1 GHz. The reason for using a PBG cell is to provide a good accelerating mode confinement and good Higher Order Mode (HOM) suppression. PBG cell can potentially be used for placing HOM and fundamental mode couplers. However, because of the naturally higher ratio of the peak magnetic field to the accelerating field in the PBG cell, it should be designed to operate at a lower accelerating gradient than the other cells of the module. This ensures that the probability of quench in the PBG cell would be no higher than in other elliptical cells of the structure.

  7. Study of field-limiting defects in superconducting RF cavities for electron-accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderhold, Sebastian

    2015-02-15

    Superconducting radio-frequency resonators made from niobium are an integral part of many accelerator projects. Their main advantage are the low ohmic losses resulting in the possibility for a long pulse structure and high duty cycles up to continous wave (cw) operation. The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) are based on this technology. In some cases the resonators reach accelerating electric fields close to the theoretical limit of bulk niobium. Yet most resonators are limited at lower fields and mass production for large scale accelerator projects suffers from the spread in the achievable gradient per resonator. The main limitations are field emission and the breakdown of superconductivity (quench). While field emission is mostly attributed to the overall surface cleanliness of the resonator, quench is usually associated with local defects. Optical inspection of the inner surface of the resonators with unprecedented resolution, accuracy and a special illumination has been established at DESY and used to study such local surface defects. More than 30 resonators have been inspected. Distinctive features from these inspections have been catalogued and assessed for their potential risk for the performance of the resonator. Several confirmed quenching defects could be extracted for further analysis and could be traced back to likely origins in the production process. A new, automated set-up for optical inspection of large series of resonators, named OBACHT, has been developed and successfully commissioned. Its design includes the minimal need for operator interference, reproducibility, robustness and versatility, in order to fit the requirements for application both in a laboratory and in a production environment. To facilitate the comparison of the results obtained during the global R and D effort on resonators for the ILC, the ILC global yield database has been established. The yield and selection rules for the

  8. Devices for SRF material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudket, P.; Junginger, T.; Xiao, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    The surface resistance R s of superconducting materials can be obtained by measuring the quality factor of an elliptical cavity excited in a transverse magnetic mode (TM010). The value obtained has however to be taken as averaged over the whole surface. A more convenient way to obtain R s, especially of materials which are not yet technologically ready for cavity production, is to measure small samples instead. These can be easily manufactured at low cost, duplicated and placed in film deposition and surface analytical tools. A commonly used design for a device to measure R s consists of a cylindrical cavity excited in a transverse electric (TE110) mode with the sample under test serving as one replaceable endplate. Such a cavity has two drawbacks. For reasonably small samples the resonant frequency will be larger than frequencies of interest concerning SRF application and it requires a reference sample of known R s. In this article we review several devices which have been designed to overcome these limitations, reaching sub-nΩ resolution in some cases. Some of these devices also comprise a parameter space in frequency and temperature which is inaccessible to standard cavity tests, making them ideal tools to test theoretical surface resistance models.

  9. STRATEGY/RESULT FOR SRF TEST INFRASTRUCTURES

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    The report summarizes the requirements needed to further develop the technology of RF superconductivity for accelerator application beyond the present state of the art. In relation to emerging European accelerator projects present collaboration schemes are identified. The required test capacities are described and compared with the available ones. Based on a short historical review, the actual performance limits of superconducting cavities are evaluated and measures are proposed to overcome them.

  10. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y. M. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, Kexin [Peking University, Beijing (China); Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6-1.6 MV/m, 21-34 MV/m, 32-35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6-13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP's predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  11. Modified SRF Photoinjector for the ELBE at HZDR

    CERN Document Server

    Murcek, P; Buettig, H; Michel, P; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Kneisel, P

    2012-01-01

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF photoinjector) with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated under the collaboration of HZB, DESY, HZDR, and MBI.[1] In order to improve the gradient of the gun cavity and the beam quality, a new modified SRF gun (SRF-gun 2008) has been designed. The main updates of the new cavity design for the new photoinjector were publisched before. (ID THPPO022 on the SRF09 Berlin.) This cavity is being fabricated in Jefferson Lab. In this paper the new ideas of the further parts of the SRF-gun 2008 will be presented. The most important issue is the special design of half-cell and choke filter. The cathode cooler is also slightly changed, which simplifies the installation of the cathode cooler in the cavity. The next update is the separation of input and output of the liquid nitrogen supply, for the purpose of the stability of the nitrogen pressure as well as the better possibility of temperature measurement. Another key point is the implementation of the superco...

  12. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  13. Multipacting studies in elliptic SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ram; Jana, Arup Ratan; Kumar, Vinit

    2017-09-01

    Multipacting is a resonant process, where the number of unwanted electrons resulting from a parasitic discharge rapidly grows to a larger value at some specific locations in a radio-frequency cavity. This results in a degradation of the cavity performance indicators (e.g. the quality factor Q and the maximum achievable accelerating gradient Eacc), and in the case of a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity, it leads to a quenching of superconductivity. Numerical simulations are essential to pre-empt the possibility of multipacting in SRF cavities, such that its design can be suitably refined to avoid this performance limiting phenomenon. Readily available computer codes (e.g.FishPact, MultiPac,CST-PICetc.) are widely used to simulate the phenomenon of multipacting in such cases. Most of the contemporary two dimensional (2D) codes such as FishPact, MultiPacetc. are unable to detect the multipacting in elliptic cavities because they use a simplistic secondary emission model, where it is assumed that all the secondary electrons are emitted with same energy. Some three-dimensional (3D) codes such as CST-PIC, which use a more realistic secondary emission model (Furman model) by following a probability distribution for the emission energy of secondary electrons, are able to correctly predict the occurrence of multipacting. These 3D codes however require large data handling and are slower than the 2D codes. In this paper, we report a detailed analysis of the multipacting phenomenon in elliptic SRF cavities and development of a 2D code to numerically simulate this phenomenon by employing the Furman model to simulate the secondary emission process. Since our code is 2D, it is faster than the 3D codes. It is however as accurate as the contemporary 3D codes since it uses the Furman model for secondary emission. We have also explored the possibility to further simplify the Furman model, which enables us to quickly estimate the growth rate of multipacting without

  14. Large grain CBMM Nb ingot slices: An ideal test bed for exploring the microstructure-electromagnetic property relationships relevant to SRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Zu-Hawn, E-mail: ZSung@uss.com [The Applied Superconductivity Center, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee FL 32310, US (United States); Now at US-Steel, Pittsburgh, US (United States); Lee, Peter J., E-mail: lee@asc.magnet.fsu.edu; Polyanskii, Anatolii, E-mail: polyanskii@asc.magnet.fsu.edu; Balachandran, Shreyas, E-mail: shreyasb@asc.magnet.fsu.edu; Chetri, Santosh, E-mail: sc13ad@my.fsu.edu [The Applied Superconductivity Center, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee FL 32310, US (United States); Larbalestier, David C., E-mail: larbalestier@asc.magnet.fsu.edu [The Applied Superconductivity Center, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee FL 32310, US (United States); FSU/FAMU College of Engineering (United States); Wang, Mingmin, E-mail: wangmi22@msu.edu; Compton, Christopher, E-mail: compton@nscl.msu.edu; Bieler, Thomas R., E-mail: bieler@egr.msu.edu [Michigan State University, US (United States)

    2015-12-04

    High purity (RRR > 200), large grain (> 5-10 cm) niobium ingot slices have been successfully used to fabricate radio frequency (RF) cavities for particle accelerators. They offer significantly reduced fabrication cost by eliminating processing steps and furthermore they provide the opportunity to study the influence of individual grain boundaries in SRF Nb. Here we summarize our measurements of grain boundary (GB) effects on the superconducting properties of large grain high purity niobium sheet manufactured by CBMM. We show by magneto-optical (MO) imaging that GBs allow premature flux penetration, but only when they are oriented close to the direction of the magnetic field. However, even low angle GBs produced by minor deformations commensurate with half-cell forming produce localized flux penetration. The transport properties of grain boundaries were investigated by direct transport across them and evidence for preferential vortex flow along the GBs of SRF Nb was observed for the first time. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and micro crystallographic analysis with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), we were able to quantitatively characterize surface substructures that can lead to localized thermal breakdown of superconductivity. Important to these studies was the development of sample preparation techniques that made the cutout single, bi-crystal and tri-crystal Nb coupons as representative as possible of the surface properties of cavities manufactured by standard techniques.

  15. HIGH RESOLUTION AND FAST SCANNING SQUID BASED NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION SYSTEM OF NIOBIUM SHEETS FOR SRF CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHU, QUAN-SHENG

    2008-06-08

    Applications in high energy physics accelerators and other fields require the use of thousands of superconducting RF (SRF) cavities that are made of high purity Nb material and the purity of niobium is critical for these cavities to reach the highest accelerating fields. Tantalum is the most prolific of metal inclusions, which can cause thermal breakdown and prevent the cavities from reaching their theoretical performance limits of 45-50 MV/m, and DOE Labs are searching for a technology that could detect small impurities in superconducting Nb sheets reaching the highest possible accelerating fields. The proposed innovative SQUID-based Nondestructive system can scan Niobium sheets used in the manufacturing of SRF cavities with both high speed and high resolution. A highly sensitive SQUID system with a gradiometer probe, non-magnetic dewar, data acquisition system, and a scanning system will be developed for fast detection of impurities in planar Nb sheets. In phase I, we will modify our existing SQUID-based eddy current system to detect 100 micron size Ta defects and a great effort will focus on achieving fast scanning of a large number of niobium sheets in a shorter time and with reasonable resolution. An older system operated by moving the sample 1 mm, stopping and waiting for 1-2 seconds, then activating a measurement by the SQUID after the short settle time is modified. A preliminary designed and implemented a SQUID scanning system that is fast and is capable of scanning a 30 cm x 30 cm Nb sheet in 15 minutes by continuously moving the table at speeds up to 10 mm/s while activating the SQUID at 1mm interval is modified and reached the Phase I goal of 100mm resolution. We have successfully demonstrated the feasibility that a fast speed SQUID scanner without sacrificing the resolution of detection can be done, and a data acquisition and analysis system is also preliminary developed. The SQUID based scanner will help reach the highest accelerating field in SRF

  16. High-power magnetron transmitter as an RF source for the electron collider ring of the MEIC facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, G

    2014-01-01

    A novel concept of high-power transmitters utilizing the Continuous Wave (CW) magnetrons, frequency-locked by phase-modulated signals has been proposed to compensate energy losses caused by Synchrotron Radiation (SR) in the electron ring of the MEIC facility. At operating frequency of about 750 MHz the SR losses are ~2 MW. They can be compensated by some number of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities at the feeding power of about 100-200 kW per cavity. A high-power CW transmitters, based on magnetrons, frequency-locked by phase-modulated signal, allowing a wide-band control in phase and power, and associated with a wide-band closed feedback loop are proposed to feed the SRF cavities to compensate the SR losses of the electron beam in the MEIC collider electron ring.

  17. Application of superconducting magnesium diboride (MGB2) in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teng

    The superconductivity in magnesium diboride (MgB2) was discovered in 2001. As a BCS superconductor, MgB2 has a record-high Tc of 39 K, high Jc of > 107 A/cm2 and no weak link behavior across the grain boundary. All these superior properties endorsed that MgB2 would have great potential in both power applications and electronic devices. In the past 15 years, MgB2 based power cables, microwave devices, and commercial MRI machines emerged and the next frontier are superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. SRF cavities are one of the leading accelerator technologies. In SRF cavities, applied microwave power generates electrical fields that accelerate particle beams. Compared with other accelerator techniques, SRF cavity accelerators feature low loss, high acceleration gradients and the ability to accelerate continuous particle beams. However, current SRF cavities are made from high-purity bulk niobium and work at 2 K in superfluid helium. The construction and operational cost of SRF cavity accelerators are very expensive. The demand for SRF cavity accelerators has been growing rapidly in the past decade. Therefore, a lot of effort has been devoted to the enhancement of the performance and the reduction of cost of SRF cavities. In 2010, an acceleration gradient of over 50 MV/m has been reported for a Nb-based SRF cavity. The magnetic field at the inner surface of such a cavity is ~ 1700 Oe, which is close to the thermodynamic critical field of Nb. Therefore, new materials and technologies are required to raise the acceleration gradient of future SRF cavity accelerators. Among all the proposed approaches, using MgB2 thin films to coat the inner surface of SRF cavities is one of the promising tactics with the potential to raise both the acceleration gradient and the operation temperature of SRF cavity accelerators. In this work, I present my study on MgB2 thin films for their application in SRF cavities. C-epitaxial MgB2 thin films grown on SiC(0001) substrates

  18. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  19. Continuous wave superconducting radio frequency electron linac for nuclear physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Charles E.

    2016-12-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, has been actively serving the nuclear physics research community as a unique forefront international resource since 1995. This cw electron linear accelerator (linac) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has continued to evolve as a precision tool for discerning the structure and dynamics within nuclei. Superconducting rf (SRF) technology has been the essential foundation for CEBAF, first as a 4 GeV machine, then 6 GeV, and currently capable of 12 GeV. We review the development, implementation, and performance of SRF systems for CEBAF from its early beginnings to the commissioning of the 12 GeV era.

  20. Analysis list: Srf [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Srf Blood,Embryonic fibroblast,Muscle + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyush...u-u/mm9/target/Srf.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Srf.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Srf.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Srf.Blood....tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Srf.Embryonic_fibroblast....tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Srf.Muscle.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyu

  1. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  2. Diagnostics Beamline for the SRF Gun Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Kamps; V. Durr; K. Goldammer; D. Kramer; P. Kuske; J. Kuszynski; D. Lipka; F. Marhauser; T. Quast; D. Richter; U. Lehnert; P. Michel; J. Teichert; P. Evtushenko; I. Will

    2005-08-22

    A superconducting radio-frequency photo electron injector (SRF gun) is currently under construction by a collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZR and MBI. The project aims at the design and setup of a CW SRF gun including a diagnostics beamline for the ELBE FEL and to address R&D issues on low emittance injectors for future light sources such as the BESSY FEL. Of critical importance for the injector performance is the control of the electron beam parameters. For this reason a compact diagnostics beamline is under development serving a multitude of operation settings ranging from low-charge (77pC), low-emittance (1 mm mrad) mode to high-charge (2.5nC) operation of the gun. For these operation modes beam dynamics simulations are resulting in boundary conditions for the beam instrumentation. Proven and mature technology is projected wherever possible, for example for current and beam position monitoring. The layout of the beam profile and emittance measurement systems is described. For the bunch length, which varies between 5 ps and 50 ps, two schemes using electro-optical sampling and Cherenkov radiation are detailed. The beam energy and energy spread is measured with a 180-degree spectrometer.

  3. State of the Art SRF Cavity Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Lilje, L

    2004-01-01

    The paper will review superconducting RF cavity performance for β=1 cavities used in both linear and circular accelerators. These superconducting cavities are used in two kinds of applications: High current storage rings and efficient high duty cycle linacs. In recent years the performance of those cavities has been improving steadily. High accelerating gradients have been achieved using advanced surface preparation techniques like electropolishing and surface cleaning methods like high pressure water rinsing. High intensity beams can be handled with advanced higher-order-mode damping schemes.

  4. Optimization of SRF Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Tom [JLAB

    2013-09-01

    This work describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project.[1] The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs. The work was first published in an ICFA Beam Dynamics News Letter.[2] More recent additions to the software include the ability to save and restore input parameters as well as to adjust the Qo versus E parameters in order to explore the potential costs savings associated with doing so. Additionally, program changes now allow one to model the costs associated with a linac that makes use of energy recovery mode of operation.

  5. RF Design Optimization for New Injector Cryounit at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Hannon, Fay E.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kazimi, Reza; Preble, Joe; Rimmer, Robert A.

    2013-06-01

    A new injector superconducting RF (SRF) cryounit with one new 2-cell, B=0.6 cavity plus one refurbished 7-cell, B=0.97, C100 style cavity has been re-designed and optimized for the engineering compatibility of existing module for CEBAF operation. The optimization of 2-cell cavity shape for longitudinal beam dynamic of acceleration from 200keV to 533keV and the minimization of transverse kick due to the waveguide couplers to less than 1 mrad have been considered. Operating at 1497MHz, two cavities has been designed into a same footprint of CEBAF original quarter cryomodule to deliver an injection beam energy of 5MeV in less than 0.27{degree} rms bunch length and a maximum energy spread of 5keV.

  6. SRF niobium characterization using SIMS and FIB-TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevie, F. A. [Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, 2410 Campus Shore Dr., Raleigh, NC 27695, US (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Our understanding of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities has been improved by elemental analysis at high depth resolution and by high magnification microscopy. This paper summarizes the technique development and the results obtained on poly-crystalline, large grain, and single crystal SRF niobium. Focused ion beam made possible sample preparation using transmission electron microscopy and the images obtained showed a very uniform oxide layer for all samples analyzed. Secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen and the hydrogen content exhibited a relationship with improvement in performance. Depth profiles of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen did not show major differences with heat treatment. Niobium oxide less than 10 nm thick was shown to be an effective hydrogen barrier. Niobium with titanium contamination showed unexpected performance improvement.

  7. SRF niobium characterization using SIMS and FIB-TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevie, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities has been improved by elemental analysis at high depth resolution and by high magnification microscopy. This paper summarizes the technique development and the results obtained on poly-crystalline, large grain, and single crystal SRF niobium. Focused ion beam made possible sample preparation using transmission electron microscopy and the images obtained showed a very uniform oxide layer for all samples analyzed. Secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen and the hydrogen content exhibited a relationship with improvement in performance. Depth profiles of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen did not show major differences with heat treatment. Niobium oxide less than 10 nm thick was shown to be an effective hydrogen barrier. Niobium with titanium contamination showed unexpected performance improvement.

  8. Recent Progress on High-Current SRF Cavities at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Rimmer, William Clemens, James Henry, Peter Kneisel, Kurt Macha, Frank Marhauser, Larry Turlington, Haipeng Wang, Daniel Forehand

    2010-05-01

    JLab has designed and fabricated several prototype SRF cavities with cell shapes optimized for high current beams and with strong damping of unwanted higher order modes. We report on the latest test results of these cavities and on developments of concepts for new variants optimized for particular applications such as light sources and high-power proton accelerators, including betas less than one. We also report on progress towards a first beam test of this design in the recirculation loop of the JLab ERL based FEL. With growing interest worldwide in applications of SRF for high-average power electron and hadron machines, a practical test of these concepts is highly desirable. We plan to package two prototype cavities in a de-mountable cryomodule for temporary installation into the JLab FEL for testing with RF and beam. This will allow verification of all critical design and operational parameters paving the way to a full-scale prototype cryomodule.

  9. An efficient magnetron transmitter for superconducting accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakevich, G.; Lebedev, V.; Yakovlev, V.; Pavlov, V.

    2016-12-01

    A concept of a highly-efficient high-power magnetron transmitter allowing wide-band phase and the mid-frequency power control at the frequency of the locking signal is proposed. The proposal is aimed for powering Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of intensity-frontier accelerators. The transmitter is intended to operate with phase and amplitude control feedback loops allowing suppression of microphonics and beam loading in the SRF cavities. The concept utilizes injection-locked magnetrons controlled in phase by the locking signal supplied by a feedback system. The injection-locking signal pre-excites the magnetron and allows its operation below the critical voltage in free run. This realizes control of the magnetron power in an extended range (up to 10 dB) by control of the magnetron current. Experimental studies were carried out with 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons. They demonstrated stable operation of the magnetrons and the required range of power control at a low noise level. An analysis of the kinetics of the drifting charge within the framework of the presented model of phase focusing in magnetrons substantiates the concept and the experimental results.

  10. Development of high purity niobium used in SRF accelerating cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Niobium is widely used in SRF(Superconducting Radio Frequency)cavities due to its excellent superconductivity and workability.With the continuous development of technology,higher demands of material are raised.One of the key issues is that RRR(Residual Resistance Ratio)of the Nb material should be more than 300.which requires that the Nb ingot have even higher RRR.This article introduces the development and the experimental results of high purity niobium in OTIC in Ningxia(Ningxia Orient Tantalum Industry Co.Ltd.),and the test results of the single cell TESLA(Tera Electron volt energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator)shaped cavity manufactured by Peking University using Nb material from OTIC.

  11. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  12. Installation and Commissioning of the Super Conducting RF Linac Cryomodules for the Erlp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulden, A. R.; Bate, R.; Buckley, R. K.; Pattalwar, S. M.

    2008-03-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac Prototype (ERLP) is currently being constructed at Daresbury Laboratory, (UK) to promote the necessary skills in science & technology, particularly in photocathode electron gun and Superconducting RF (SRF), to enable the construction of a fourth generation light source, based on energy recovery linacs-4GLS [1]. The ERLP uses two identical cryomodules, one as a booster Linac used to accelerate the beam to 8.5 MeV, the other as an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) module with an energy gain of 26.5 MeV. Each module consists of two 9- cell cavities operating at a frequency of 1.3 GHz and a temperature of 2 K. As there is no energy recovery in the booster it requires a peak power of 53 kW; whereas the linac module only requires 8 kW. The RF power is supplied by Inductive Output Tube (IOT) amplifiers. The maximum heat load (or the cooling power) required in the SRF system is 180 W at 2 K and is achieved in two stages: a LN2 pre-cooled Linde TCF50 liquefier produces liquid helium at 4.5 K, followed by a 2 K cold box consisting of a JT valve, recuperator and an external room temperature vacuum pumping system. This presentation reports the experience gained during, installation, commissioning and the initial operation of the cryomodules.

  13. A new measurement tool for characterization of superconducting rf accelerator cavities using high-performance LTS SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Neubert, R [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Knaack, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Wittenburg, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Peters, A [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a new system to measure very low currents in an accelerator environment, using a cryogenic current comparator (CCC). In principle a CCC is a conventional current transformer using the high-performance SQUID technology to sense the magnetic fields caused by the beam current. Since the system is sensitive on a pA level, it is an optimum device to detect dark currents of superconducting cavities. The system presented here is designed for the test facilities of the superconducting accelerator modules for the European XFEL at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg. Measurements in a quiet environment showed that an intrinsic noise level of the CCC of 40 pA Hz{sup -1/2} could be achieved.

  14. Application of Phase Lock Loop in Superconducting RF Technology%锁相环在超导射频技术中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常玮; 何源; 李春龙; 高郑; 朱正龙; 薛纵横; 宋玉; 张锐

    2014-01-01

    利用压控振荡器锁相环路(VCO-PLL)锁定超导射频谐振腔体的本征频率,使腔体稳定谐振。在原理验证阶段,利用NI-Labview对实验原理做了仿真。得到的仿真结果显示,环路增益选取的不同会直接影响整个系统的锁定状态。在实验测试阶段,根据原理和仿真结果搭建了相应的实验平台,从而得到环路锁定的测试结果。最后在低温超导态测试阶段,用经过验证的实验平台对IMP-HWR010超导腔体进行了频率锁定测试,并得到了腔体频率随氦压变化的实际测量结果,df/dp约为0.73 Hz/Pa。%The main issue of this paper is to introduce the application of phase lock loop (PLL) in supercon-ducting RF technology. The voltage-controlled oscillator phase lock loop (VCO-PLL) can be used for locking the eigen frequency of the superconducting cavity. It can keep superconducting cavity resonant stably. In this paper, the principle of the cavity locking by the VCO-PLL is verified by a simulation, which is done by using NI-Labview software. The simulation result shows that the different gain of the PLL system can impact the locking situation of the whole system. In the test stage, the locking test plant is set up and passed validation. Finally, at the low temperature test stage, the frequency of the IMP-HWR010 superconducting cavity is locked by the test plant. The frequency change with helium pressure of the cavity is about 0.73 Hz/Pa.

  15. European infrastructures for R&D and test of superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryo-modules

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    The volume is copyright CERN and can be distributed under CC-BY license. The need for a European facility to build and test superconducting RF accelerating structures and cryo‐modules (SRF test facility) was extensively discussed during the preparation of EuCARD [1,2]. It comprised a distributed network of equipment across Europe to be assessed and, if needed, completed by hardware. It also addressed the quest for a deeper basic understanding, a better control and optimisation of the manufacture of superconducting RF structures with the aim of a substantial improvement of the accelerating gradient, a reduction of its spread and a cost minimisation. However, consequent to EU budget restrictions, the proposal was not maintained. Instead, a more detailed analysis was requested by a sub‐task inside the EuCARD Network [3] AccNet ‐ RFTech [4]. The main objective of this “SRF sub‐task” consists of intensifying a collaborative effort between European accelerator labs. The aim focused on planning and later...

  16. Fermilab experience of post-annealing losses in SRF niobium cavities due to furnace contamination and the ways to its mitigation: a pathway to processing simplification and quality factor improvement

    CERN Document Server

    Grassellino, A; Crawford, A; Melnychuk, O; Rowe, A; Wong, M; Cooper, C; Sergatskov, D; Bice, D; Trenikhina, Y; Cooley, L D; Ginsburg, C; Kephart, R D

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of high temperature treatments followed by only high-pressure water rinse (HPR) of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities. The objective is to provide a cost effective alternative to the typical cavity processing sequence, by eliminating the material removal step post furnace treatment while preserving or improving the RF performance. The studies have been conducted in the temperature range 800-1000C for different conditions of the starting substrate: large grain and fine grain, electro-polished (EP) and centrifugal barrel polished (CBP) to mirror finish. An interesting effect of the grain size on the performances is found. Cavity results and samples characterization show that furnace contaminants cause poor cavity performance, and a practical solution is found to prevent surface contamination. Extraordinary values of residual resistances ~ 1 nOhm and below are then consistently achieved for the contamination-free cavities. These results lead to a more cost-effective ...

  17. R&D ERL: SRF Electron Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill, A.

    2010-01-01

    When the BNL high current ERL was first envisioned the choice of injector went through several iterations before concluding that an SRF injector was the appropriate choice for the task at hand. The design requirements were quite stringent as the injector had to be designed to reach currents never before achieved in any injector. The overall goal was to design an injector capable of delivering up to 0.5 Ampere at 703.75 MHz. This criteria was set based on the need to demonstrate high average current energy recovery at the ERL so that future machines could be designed and built with confidence in the injector. For the ERL the injector needs to be capable of accelerating electrons to 2-2.5 MeV with charges ranging from 0.7 to 5 nC per bunch depending on the operational parameters being studied. These criteria led to a 1/2 cell photoinjector designed to accommodate a demountable photocathode utilizing a novel quarter wave choke joint for the cathode insertion mechanism. The cavity requires a total of 1 MW of power coupled to the beam in order to meet the high current application, necessitating two 500 kW RF power couplers. This AP note will review the overall physics design and analysis, the fabrication sequence, and the testing plan for this cavity.

  18. Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardan Upadhyay, Larry Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente

    2011-09-01

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

  19. Emittance minimization at the ELBE superconducting electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, K.; Arnold, A.; Lu, P.; Murcek, P.; Teichert, J.; Vennekate, H.; Xiang, R.

    2014-07-01

    The transverse emittance is one of the most important quantities which characterize the quality of an electron source. For high quality experiments low beam emittance is required. By means of theoretical considerations and simulation calculations we have studied how the emittance of the Rossendorf superconducting radio-frequency photoelectron source (SRF gun) can be minimized. It turned out that neither a solenoid magnet nor the effect of space charge forces is needed to create a pronounced emittance minimum. The minimum appears by just adjusting the starting phase of the electron bunch with respect to the RF phase of the gun in a suitable way. Investigation of various correlations between the properties of the beam particles led to an explanation on how the minimum comes about. It is shown that the basic mechanism of minimization is the fact that the longitudinal properties of the particles (energy) are strongly influenced by the starting phase. Due to the coupling of the longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom by the relativistic equation of motion the transverse degrees of freedom and thereby the emittance can be strongly influenced by the starting phase as well. The results obtained in this study will be applied to minimize the emittance in the commissioning phase of the SRF gun.

  20. Processing and Testing of the SRF Photoinjector Cavity for BERLinPro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill, Andrew; Anders, W; Frahm, A; Knobloch, Jens; Neumann, Axel; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Kneisel, Peter; Turlington, Larry; Zaplatin, Evgeny

    2014-07-01

    The BERLinPro project is a compact, c.w. SRF energy recovery linac (ERL) that is being built to develop the accelerator physics and technology required to operate the next generation of high current ERLs. The machine is designed to produce a 50 MeV 100 mA beam, with better than 1 mm-mrad emittance. The electron source for the ERL will be a SRF photoinjector equipped with a multi-alkali photocathode. In order to produce a SRF photoinjector to operate reliably at this beam current HZB has undertaken a 3 stage photoinjector development program to study the operation of SRF photoinjectors in detail. The 1.4 cell cavity being reported on here is the second stage of this development, and represents the first cavity designed by HZB for use with a high quantum efficiency multi-alkali photocathode. This paper will describe the work done to prepare the cavity for RF testing in the vertical testing dewar at Jefferson Laboratory as well as the results of these RF tests.

  1. Evaluations of MgB2 Coatings on 2'' Copper Discs for Superconducting Radio Frequency Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Lee, Namhoon; Banjade, Huta; Eremeev, Grigory; Welander, Paul; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie; Kustom, Robert; Wolak, Matthäus; Nassiri, Alireza; Xi, Xiaoxing

    We propose that coating the inner walls of copper RF cavities with superconducting MgB2 (Tc = 39 K) can result in a viable alternative to the already established niobium-based SRF technology. This approach improves the thermal conductivity, allows for operation at higher temperatures, and reduces the need for large helium refrigeration, thereby resulting in lower operational costs. For our studies, we grew MgB2 films via hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) on 2'' Cu substrates. Since Mg and Cu readily form an alloy at higher temperatures, the HPCVD setup was modified in order to achieve lower deposition temperatures, minimize alloy formation, and provide high quality MgB2 films. This method yielded MgB2 coatings on 2'' Cu discs with transition temperatures around 38 K. The samples were characterized with regards to their RF attributes and showed similar performance in comparison to Nb reference samples. The presented results show that MgB2 coated copper can be a suitable alternative for use in SRF cavities.

  2. Easing Gently into OpenSRF, Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Scott

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Open Service Request Framework (or OpenSRF, pronounced "open surf" is an inter-application message passing architecture built on XMPP (aka "jabber". The Evergreen open source library system is built on an OpenSRF architecture to support loosely coupled individual components communicating over an OpenSRF messaging bus. This article introduces OpenSRF, demonstrates how to build OpenSRF services through simple code examples, explains the technical foundations on which OpenSRF is built, and evaluates OpenSRF's value in the context of Evergreen. Part 1 of a 2 part article in this issue.

  3. Easing Gently into OpenSRF, Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Scott

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Open Service Request Framework (or OpenSRF, pronounced "open surf" is an inter-application message passing architecture built on XMPP (aka "jabber". The Evergreen open source library system is built on an OpenSRF architecture to support loosely coupled individual components communicating over an OpenSRF messaging bus. This article introduces OpenSRF, demonstrates how to build OpenSRF services through simple code examples, explains the technical foundations on which OpenSRF is built, and evaluates OpenSRF's value in the context of Evergreen. Part 2 of a 2 part article in this issue.

  4. How to Achieve the Best SRF Performance: (Practical) Limitations and Possible Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, Claire Z.

    2014-07-17

    This chapter presents in the first part the requirement for the surface preparation of RF Niobium cavities and its justification in term s of physical origin of limitation (e.g. cleanliness and field emission, influence of the surface treatments, morphology and surface damage, etc.). In the second part we discuss the different models describing the ultimate limits of SRF cavities, and we present one of the possible ways to overcome Niobium monopoly toward higher performances.

  5. Development of Nb3Sn coatings by magnetron sputtering for SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Rosaz, G.; Leaux, F.; Motschmann, F.; Mydlarz, Z.; Taborelli, M.; Vollenberg, W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first results obtained on DC magnetron sputtering of Nb3Sn thin films dedicated to superconducting radio frequency cavities (SRF). Nb/Sn ratio of 3.76 and 3.2 have been obtained for Ar coating pressures of respectively 1.10-3 mbar and 5.10-2 mbar. According to XRD analyses both coating pressures lead to amorphous Nb3Sn layers that are not superconducting. Afterward, one coating has been annealed at 700°C, 750°C and 800°C under vacuum for 24h and exhibited for the three different temperatures the A15 cubic phase.

  6. Plasma Processing of SRF Cavities for the next Generation Of Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuskovic, Leposava

    2015-11-23

    The cost-effective production of high frequency accelerating fields are the foundation for the next generation of particle accelerators. The Ar/Cl2 plasma etching technology holds the promise to yield a major reduction in cavity preparation costs. Plasma-based dry niobium surface treatment provides an excellent opportunity to remove bulk niobium, eliminate surface imperfections, increase cavity quality factor, and bring accelerating fields to higher levels. At the same time, the developed technology will be more environmentally friendly than the hydrogen fluoride-based wet etching technology. Plasma etching of inner surfaces of standard multi-cell SRF cavities is the main goal of this research in order to eliminate contaminants, including niobium oxides, in the penetration depth region. Successful plasma processing of multi-cell cavities will establish this method as a viable technique in the quest for more efficient components of next generation particle accelerators. In this project the single-cell pill box cavity plasma etching system is developed and etching conditions are determined. An actual single cell SRF cavity (1497 MHz) is plasma etched based on the pill box cavity results. The first RF test of this plasma etched cavity at cryogenic temperature is obtained. The system can also be used for other surface modifications, including tailoring niobium surface properties, surface passivation or nitriding for better performance of SRF cavities. The results of this plasma processing technology may be applied to most of the current SRF cavity fabrication projects. In the course of this project it has been demonstrated that a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge can be successfully used for etching curved niobium surfaces, in particular the inner walls of SRF cavities. The results could also be applicable to the inner or concave surfaces of any 3D structure other than an SRF cavity.

  7. Dislocation Substructures on the Functional Properties of Niobium for SRF Cavities, focusing on microstructural,microchemical, and electromagnetic characteristic for Florida State University.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati

    2016-04-01

    Funding is being requested pursuant to a proposal that was submitted and reviewed through the Portfolio Analysis and Management System (PAMS). PAMS Proposal ID: 222686. Superconducting cavities are the integral part of many energy-efficient particle accelerators around the world. The current material of choice for superconducting cavities is niobium, which is the material with the highest transition temperature among pure metals. The performance of SRF cavities are influenced by the fabrication and processing steps. We plan to study the microstructural, microchemical and electromagnetic properties of Nb that are processed similar to the cavity processing steps to identify and mitigate the limiting factors to improve the performance of SRF cavities.

  8. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  9. SRF Clean Rooms and Cryomodule Assembly

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Three primary cleanroom facilities used for the SRF cryomodule production program are available. All 3 clean rooms have class 10 and class 100 areas. The largest is...

  10. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, M W; Martinez, A; Pischalnikov, Y; Schappert, W

    2012-01-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule #1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  11. Vibrational Stability of SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M.W.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Recently developed, the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facilities at Fermilab support the International Linear Collider (ILC), High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These facilities; Meson Detector Building (MDB) and New Muon Lab (NML) have very different foundations, structures, relative elevations with respect to grade level and surrounding soil composition. Also, there are differences in the operating equipment and their proximity to the primary machine. All the future machines have stringent operational stability requirements. The present study examines both near-field and ambient vibration in order to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of near-field sources (e.g. compressors, ultra-high and standard vacuum equipment, klystrons, modulators, utility fans and pumps) and distant noise sources to the overall system displacements. Facility vibration measurement results and methods of possible isolation from noise sources are presented and discussed.

  12. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  13. Characterization of ingot material for SRF cavity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Jayanta [BARC, Mumbai; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Myneni, Ganapati Rao [JLAB; Mittal, K. C. [BARC-EBC, Mumbai

    2009-11-01

    In recent years, large-grain/single-crystal niobium has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6), high purity (RRR ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. In this contribution we present the results of a systematic study of the superconducting properties of samples obtained from four Niobium ingots (from CBMM, Brazil) of different purity. Measurements of bulk magnetization, surface pinning, critical temperature and thermal conductivity have been carried out on the samples subjected to different surface treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP), 6000C heat treatment, and low temperature baking (LTB). A correlation has been established between the LTB and the ratio . In addition, the phonon peak in the thermal conductivity data is suppressed by the presence of trapped magnetic vortices in the samples.

  14. Magnetic Flux Expulsion Studies in Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Martinello, Martina [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab; Trenikhina, Yulia [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of nitrogen doping treatment for SRF cavities, ultra-high quality factors at medium accelerating fields are regularly achieved in vertical RF tests. To preserve these quality factors into the cryomodule, it is important to consider background magnetic fields, which can become trapped in the surface of the cavity during cooldown and cause Q₀ degradation. Building on the recent discovery that spatial thermal gradients during cooldown can significantly improve expulsion of magnetic flux, a detailed study was performed of flux expulsion on two cavities with different furnace treatments that are cooled in magnetic fields amplitudes representative of what is expected in a realistic cryomodule. In this contribution, we summarize these cavity results, in order to improve understanding of the impact of flux expulsion on cavity performance.

  15. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  16. The interaction between a beam and a superconducting cavity module: Measurements in CESR and CESR-Phase 3 goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S.; Flynn, G.; Hartung, W.; Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Pisharody, M.; Veshcherevich, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Nuclear Studies

    1996-08-01

    Plans for the next generation of electron-positron colliders (B-factories and B-factory-like machines) call for high beam currents to produce luminosities of the order of 10 (exp 33). To store these high currents in a machine, special attention must be paied to the interaction of the beam with discontinuities in the surrounding vacuum chamber. RF cavities are among the biggest perturbations in accelerator vacuum chambers and are therefore among the biggest sources of beam instabilities. Accelerating structures of new machines are being designed to have smaller impedance to reduce the beam-cavity interaction. Prototypes for the cavity, input coupler, cryostat, and higher-order mode (HOM) loads were subjected and are tested in CESR. A superconducting (SRF) cavity was installed in addition to the four five-cell normal conducting cavities. As a result, the calorimetry and RF power results agree with predictions up to their respective uncertainties. The results of wake potential sampling suggested that the wake fields of the SRF cavity will not limit the performance of CESR in bunch train operation. No beam instabilities or dangerous HOMs were encountered while sweeping the HOM frequencies using the cavity tuner or while exciting multipole HOMs by displacing the beam off axis. (G.K.)

  17. Exploration of multi-fold symmetry element-loaded superconducting radio frequency structure for reliable acceleration of low- & medium-beta ion species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shichun [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Reliable acceleration of low- to medium-beta proton or heavy ion species is needed for future high-current superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerators. Due to the high-Q nature of an SRF resonator, it is sensitive to many factors such as electron loading (from either the accelerated beam or from parasitic field emitted electrons), mechanical vibration, and liquid helium bath pressure fluctuation etc. To increase the stability against those factors, a mechanically strong and stable RF structure is desirable. Guided by this consideration, multi-fold symmetry element-loaded SRF structures (MFSEL), cylindrical tanks with multiple (n>=3) rod-shaped radial elements, are being explored. The top goal of its optimization is to improve mechanical stability. A natural consequence of this structure is a lowered ratio of the peak surface electromagnetic field to the acceleration gradient as compared to the traditional spoke cavity. A disadvantage of this new structure is an increased size for a fixed resonant frequency and optimal beta. This paper describes the optimization of the electro-magnetic (EM) design and preliminary mechanical analysis for such structures.

  18. Nanostructural features affecting superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed using TEM and EELS

    CERN Document Server

    Trenikhina, Y; Kwon, J; Zuo, J -M; Zasadzinski, J F

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ~100nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120C bake.

  19. NbTiN Based SIS Multilayer Structures for SRF Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, Anne-marie; Eremeev, Grigory; Phillips, H; Reece, Charles; Spradlin, Joshua; Yang, Qiguang; Lukaszew, Rosa

    2013-09-01

    For the past three decades, bulk niobium has been the material of choice for SRF cavities applications. RF cavity performance is now approaching the theoretical limit for bulk niobium. For further improvement of RF cavity performance for future accelerator projects, Superconductor Insulator - Superconductor (SIS) multilayer structures (as recently proposed by Alex Gurevich) present the theoretical prospect to reach RF performance beyond bulk Nb, using thinly layered higher-Tc superconductors with enhanced Hc1. Jefferson Lab (JLab) is pursuing this approach with the development of NbTiN and AlN based multilayer SIS structures. This paper presents the results on the characteristics of NbTiN films and the first RF measurements on NbTiN-based multilayer structure on thick Nb films.

  20. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator; Etude et developpement d'un coupleur de puissance pour les cavites supraconductrices destinees aux accelerateurs de protons de haute intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souli, M

    2007-07-15

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q{sub c} in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  1. Status Of The Work On The Base Directions Of The "rf Superconductivity For Accelerators" Program At The Federate Problem Lab At Ihep

    CERN Document Server

    Sevryukova, L

    2004-01-01

    In this report result of the study of electrophysical phenomena on the superconducting cavity surface, including plasma, bifurcation, hysteresis, emission and diffusion phenomena are considered. Science intensive recourse -saving technologies of superconducting cavities are being studied on the base of these phenomena. The superconducting cavities are made of Nb and Nb film, alloy film or HTC ceramics, which cover the working surface of the weldless copper shells using ion-plasma technologies (axial and planar magnetron sputtering). Quality monitoring (optical, emission, electrochemical and high frequency) of the working surface condition of superconducting cavities is developed under the realization of new technologies. The brief review of the experimental equipment is used as training base for individual students, post-graduate students and research staff in the field of technologies that use superconductivity phenomenon and ionic-plasma, electrochemical and high-vacuum technologies as well. For realizat...

  2. Pushing the Gradient Limitations of Superconducting Photonic Band Gap Structure Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, William B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shchegolkov, Dmitry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, James F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    Superconducting photonic band gap resonators present us with unique means to place higher order mode couples in an accelerating cavity and efficiently extract HOMs. An SRF PBG resonator with round rods was successfully tested at LANL demonstrating operation at 15 MV/m. Gradient in the SRF PBG resonator was limited by magnetic quench. To increase the quench threshold in PBG resonators one must design the new geometry with lower surface magnetic fields and preserve the resonator's effectiveness for HOM suppression. The main objective of this research is to push the limits for the high-gradient operation of SRF PBG cavities. A NCRF PBG cavity technology is established. The proof-of-principle operation of SRF PBG cavities is demonstrated. SRF PBG resonators are effective for outcoupling HOMs. PBG technology can significantly reduce the size of SRF accelerators and increase brightness for future FELs.

  3. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  4. RRR Characteristics for SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Yoochul; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-01-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes were fabricated such as a quarter wave resonator (QWR), a half wave resonator (HWR) and a single spoke resonator (SSR). One of the critical factors determining performances of the superconducting cavities is a residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how much niobium is pure and how fast niobium can transmit heat as well. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to the impurity incorporation. Thus it is important to maintain RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level will be discussed.

  5. Observation of Stable Low Surface Resistance in Large-Grain Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, Shichun [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)/Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou (China)

    2016-05-01

    Low surface resistance, or high unloaded quality factor (Q0), superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are being pursued actively nowadays as their application in large-scale CW SRF accelerators can save capital and operational cost in cryogenics. There are different options in realization of such cavities. One of them is the large-grain (LG) niobium cavity. In this contribution, we present new experimental results in evaluation of LG niobium cavities cooled down in the presence of an external magnetic field. High Q0 values are achieved even with an ambient magnetic field of up to 100 mG. More over, it is observed that these high Q0 values are super-robust against repeated quench, literally not affected at all after the cavity being deliberately quenched for hundreds of times in the presence of an ambient magnetic field of up to 200 mG.

  6. Pulsed Mode Operation and Longitudinal Parameter Measurement of the Rossendorf SRF Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Teichert, J; Buettig, H; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Xiang, R; Klemz, G; Kamps, T; Rudolph, J; Schenk, M; Will, I

    2011-01-01

    The Rossendorf SRF gun with a 3½ cell cavity has been operated since 2007. It has produced CW beam with the electron energy of 3 MeV and the average current up to 16 μA. The electron beam of the gun has been successfully injected into the ELBE superconducting linac since 2010. The Nb cavity has shown constant quality during the operation and for the Cs2Te photocathode life time of months could be obtained. Recently the gun started to run in the pulsed mode with higher gradient. The longitudinal Parameters have been measured in this mode. The dark current arose from the high gradient is studied. The main field emission source has been found to be the half cell. In this paper the new status of the SRF gun will be presented, and the latest results of the beam experiments will be discussed.

  7. Dynamics of a liquid helium I SRF cryostat at the Canadian Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Chris

    2012-06-01

    The Canadian Light Source (CLS) is a third-generation synchrotron located inSaskatoon, Canada. A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity contained in a 4.43 Kliquid helium I cryostat is used at the CLS to replenish energy loss in the electron beam. Adynamic simulation of this cryostat has been generated to examine pressure and levelfluctuations due to variations in heat loading or other system parameters. This simulatorhas led to some interesting observations in system behavior, which have been shown tooccur in the actual system as well. For example, mass rates of vaporization appear to dropas heat loading increases under certain conditions. Also, the relationship between pressureand SRF tuning characteristics is examined, and the abilities and limitations of thesimulator are presented.

  8. Analysis of post wet chemistry heat treatment effects on Nb SRF surface resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2013-01-01

    Most of the current research in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is focused on ways to reduce the construction and operating cost of SRF based accelerators as well as on the development of new or improved cavity processing techniques. The increase in quality factors is the result of the reduction of the surface resistance of the materials. A recent test on a 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from ingot niobium of medium purity and heat treated at 1400 C in a ultra-high vacuum induction furnace resulted in a residual resistance of about 1nanoohm and a quality factor at 2.0 K increasing with field up to 5x10^10 at a peak magnetic field of 90 mT. In this contribution, we present some results on the investigation of the origin of the extended Q0-increase, obtained by multiple HF rinses, oxypolishing and heat treatment of all Nb cavities.

  9. RF electrodynamics in small particles of oxides - a review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Srinivasu, VV

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available RF electrodynamics, particularly, the low field rf absorption in small superconducting and manganite particles is reviewed and compared with their respective bulk counterparts. Experimental and theoretical aspects of the small particle...

  10. Calorimeters for Precision Power Dissipation Measurements on Controlled-Temperature Superconducting Radiofrequency Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Binping P.; Kelley, Michael J.; Reece, Charles E.; Phillips, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the surface impedance characterization (SIC) system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm dia. disk sample which is thermally isolated from the RF portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analysed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu, MgO, Nb and Si.

  11. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Wayne Rigby, John Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 deg C) and high ({approx}800 deg C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 deg C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 x 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 deg C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 deg C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  12. Cooling Dynamics Trough Transition Temperature of Niobium SRF Cavities Captured by Temperature Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, M; Checchin, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, A; Sergatskov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Cool-down dynamics of superconducting accelerating cavities became particularly important for obtaining very high quality factors in SRF cavities. Previous studies proved that when cavity is cooled fast, the quality factor is higher than when cavity is cooled slowly. This has been discovered to derive from the fact that a fast cool-down allows better magnetic field expulsion during the superconducting transition. In this paper we describe the first experiment where the temperature all around the cavity was mapped during the cavity cool-down through transition temperature, proving the existence of two different transition dynamics: a sharp superconducting-normal conducting transition during fast cool-down which favors flux expulsion and nucleation phase transition during slow cool-down, which leads to full flux trapping.

  13. Development of Vertical Buffered Electropolishing for Its Post-Treatment Technology on 1.5 GHz Niobium SRF Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Song; A. T. Wu; LU Xiang-Yang; R. A. Rimmer; LIN Lin; ZHAO Kui

    2011-01-01

    We report the latest research development of vertical buffered electropolishing on its post-treatment procedure as well as the effects of several major post-treatment techniques for buffered electropolishing (BEP) processed 1.5 GHz niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities.With the established post-treatment procedure,an accelerating gradient of 28.4MV/m is obtained on a single cell cavity of the cebaf shape.This is the best result in the history of BEP development.The cavity is limited by quench with a high quality factor over 1.2 × 1010 at the quench point.Analyses from optical inspection and temperature-mapping show that the quench should be originated from the pits that were already present on the cavity before this BEP treatment.All of these factors indicate that this procedure will have a great potential to produce better results if cavities without intrinsic performance limiting imperfections are used.Surface condition plays a critical role in the performance of a superconducting radio frequency (SRF)cavity.[1] Since the development of SRF niobium (Nb)cavities,research on the technique of surface treatments for SRF cavities has not stopped.As the technique of surface treatments on Nb SRF cavities evolved from buffered chemical polishing (BCP) to electropolishing (EP),the performance of SRF cavities improved greatly.[2-5] However,the yield of the nine-cell cavities is still not high enough to surpass the required 35MV/m for the International Linear Collider (ILC).[6] The variability of cavity performance has emerged as a major challenge.[7]%We report the latest research development of vertical buffered electropolishing on its post-treatment procedure as well as the effects of several major post-treatment techniques for buffered electropolishing (BEP) processed 1.5 GHz niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. With the established post-treatment procedure, an accelerating gradient of 28.4MV/m is obtained on a single cell

  14. Performance evaluation of three phase SRF-PLL and MAF-SRF-PLL

    OpenAIRE

    Ghoshal, Anirban; John, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous reference frame phase locked loop (SRF-PLL) is a well established technique used for maintaining synchronism of a grid connected VSI with an electric grid. Many methods of PLL are present in the literature to achieve improved performance under nonideal grid condition. These solutions are based on SRF-PLL structure along with some modification to achieve improved performance. It is observed that faster and better performance are achieved at the expense of more computations. Moving ...

  15. SRF Coloring: Stream Register File Allocation via Graph Coloring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Jun Yang; Yu Deng; Li Wang; Xiao-Bo Yan; Jing Du; Ying Zhang; Gui-Bin Wang; Tao Tang

    2009-01-01

    Stream Register File (SRF) is a large on-chip memory of the stream processor and its efficient management is essential for good performance. Current stream programming languages expose the management of SRF to the programmer, incurring heavy burden on the programmer and bringing difficulties to inheriting the legacy codes. SF95 is the language developed for FT64 which is the first 64-bit stream processor designed for scientific applications. SF95 conceals SRF from the programmer and leaves the management of SRF to its compiler. In this paper, we present a compiler approach named SRF Coloring to manage SRF automatically. The novelties of this paper are: first, it is the first time to use the graph coloring-based algorithm for the SRF management; second, an algorithm framework for SRF Coloring that is well suited to the FT64 architecture is proposed -- this framework is based on a well-understood graph coloring algorithm for register allocation, together with some modifications to deal with the unusual aspects of SRF problem; third, the SRF Coloring algorithm is implemented in SF95Compiler, a compiler designed for FT64 and SF95. The experimental results show that our approach represents a practical and promising solution to SRF allocation.

  16. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  17. rf SQUID metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-01-01

    An rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array in an alternating magnetic field is investigated with respect to its effective magnetic permeability, within the effective medium approximation. This system acts as an inherently nonlinear magnetic metamaterial, leading to negative magnetic response, and thus negative permeability, above the resonance frequency of the individual SQUIDs. Moreover, the permeability exhibits oscillatory behavior at low field intensities, allowing it...

  18. Tuner control system of spoke012 SRF cavity for C-ADS injector I at IHEP

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Na; Wang, Guang-Wei; Mi, Zheng-Hui; Lin, Hai-Ying; Wang, Qun-Yao; Liu, Rong; Ma, Xin-Peng

    2016-01-01

    A new tuner control system of spoke superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity has been developed and applied to cryomodule I (CM1) of C-ADS injector I at IHEP. We have successfully implemented the tuner controller based on Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) for the first time and achieved a cavity tuning phase error of 0.7degrees (about 4 Hz peak to peak) in the presence of electromechanical coupled resonance. This paper will present the preliminary experimental results based on PLC tuner controller under proton beam commissioning.

  19. SRF LINAC for future extension of the PEFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Seol, Kyoung Tae; Jang, Ji Ho; Cho, Yong Sub [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    A study on the superconducting RF linac is underway in order to increase the beam energy up to 1 GeV by extending the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) 100-MeV linac. The operating frequency of the PEFP superconducting linac (SCL) is 700 MHz, which is determined by the fact that the frequency of the existing normal conducting linac is 350 MHz. A preliminary study on the beam dynamics showed that two types of cavities with geometrical betas of 0.50 and 0.74 could cover the entire energy range from 100 MeV to 1 GeV. An inductive output tube (IOT) based RF system is under consideration as a high-power RF source for the SCL due to its low operating voltage and high efficiency. As a prototyping activity for a reduced beta cavity, a five-cell cavity with a geometrical beta of 0.42 was designed and fabricated. A vertical test of the prototype cavity at low temperatures was performed to check the performance of the cavity. The design study and the prototyping activity for the PEFP SCL will be presented in this paper.

  20. A temperature-mapping system for multi-cell SRF accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, M; Furuta, F; Smith, E; Liepe, M; Posen, S; Padamsee, H; Hartill, D; Mi, X

    2015-01-01

    A Temperature mapping (T-map) system for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities consists of a thermometer array positioned precisely on an exterior cavity wall, capable of detecting small increases in temperature; therefore it is a powerful tool for research on the quality factor (Q0) of SRF cavities. A new multi-cell T-mapping system is has been developed at Cornell University. The system has nearly two thousand thermometers to cover 7-cell SRF cavities for Cornell ERL project. A new multiplexing scheme was adopted to reduce number of wires. A 1mK resolution of the temperature increase Delta T is achieved. A 9-cell cavity of TESLA geometry was tested with the T-map system. By converting Delta T to power loss and quality factor, it has been found that for this cavity, most surface losses were generated by the first cell when the accelerating gradient is increased above 15MV/m. The comparison of Q-value between with and without hotspots shows the heating on cavity wall degraded cavity Q0 about 1.65 tim...

  1. Proof of Concept Thin Films and Multilayers Toward Enhanced Field Gradients in SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukaszew, R A; Beringer, D; Roach, W M; Eremeev, G V; Valente-Feliciano, A-M; Reece, C E; Xi, X

    2013-09-01

    Due to the very shallow penetration depth of the RF fields, SRF properties are inherently a surface phenomenon involving a material thickness of less than 1 micron thus opening up the possibility of using thin film coatings to achieve a desired performance. The challenge has been to understand the dependence of the SRF properties on the detailed characteristics of real surfaces and then to employ appropriate techniques to tailor these surface properties for greatest benefit. Our aim is to achieve gradients >100 MV/m and no simple material is known to be capable of sustaining this performance. A theoretical framework has been proposed which could yield such behavior [1] and it requires creation of thin film layered structures. I will present our systematic studies on such proof-of-principle samples. Our overarching goal has been to build a basic understanding of key nano-scale film growth parameters for materials that show promise for SRF cavity multilayer coatings and to demonstrate the ability to elevate the barrier for vortex entry in such layered structures above the bulk value of Hc1 for type-II superconductors and thus to sustain higher accelerating fields.

  2. Quench dynamics in SRF cavities: can we locate the quench origin with 2nd sound?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximenko, Yulia; /Moscow, MIPT; Segatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A newly developed method of locating quenches in SRF cavities by detecting second-sound waves has been gaining popularity in SRF laboratories. The technique is based on measurements of time delays between the quench as determined by the RF system and arrival of the second-sound wave to the multiple detectors placed around the cavity in superfluid helium. Unlike multi-channel temperature mapping, this approach requires only a few sensors and simple readout electronics; it can be used with SRF cavities of almost arbitrary shape. One of its drawbacks is that being an indirect method it requires one to solve an inverse problem to find the location of a quench. We tried to solve this inverse problem by using a parametric forward model. By analyzing the data we found that the approximation where the second-sound emitter is a near-singular source does not describe the physical system well enough. A time-dependent analysis of the quench process can help us to put forward a more adequate model. We present here our current algorithm to solve the inverse problem and discuss the experimental results.

  3. Unprecedented quality factors at accelerating gradients up to 45 MVm-1 in niobium superconducting resonators via low temperature nitrogen infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Checchin, M.; Martinello, M.; Melnychuk, O. S.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Crawford, A. C.; Aderhold, S.; Bice, D.

    2017-09-01

    We report the finding of new surface treatments that permits one to manipulate the niobium resonator nitrogen content in the first few nanometers in a controlled way, and the resonator fundamental Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance and residual resistance accordingly. In particular, we find surface ‘infusion’ conditions that systematically (a) increase the quality factor of these 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) bulk niobium resonators, up to very high gradients; (b) increase the achievable accelerating gradient of the cavity compared to its own baseline with state-of-the-art surface processing. Cavities subject to the new surface process have more than two times the state-of-the-art Q at 2 K for accelerating fields >35 MVm-1. Moreover, very high accelerating gradients ˜45 MVm-1 are repeatedly reached, which correspond to peak magnetic surface fields of 190 mT, among the highest measured for bulk niobium cavities. These findings open the opportunity to tailor the surface impurity content distribution to maximize performance in Q and gradients, and have therefore very important implications on future performance and cost of SRF based accelerators. They also help deepen the understanding of the physics of the RF niobium cavity surface.

  4. Multipacting simulation in accelerating RF structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusarova, M.A.; Kaminsky, V.I. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, State University (Russian Federation); Kravchuk, L.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kutsaev, S.V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, State University (Russian Federation)], E-mail: s_kutsaev@mail.ru; Lalayan, M.V.; Sobenin, N.P. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, State University (Russian Federation); Tarasov, S.G. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2009-02-01

    A new computer code for 3D simulation of multipacting phenomenon in axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric radio frequency (RF) structures is presented. The goal of the simulation is to determine resonant electron trajectories and electron multiplication in RF structure. Both SW and TW structures of normal and superconductivity have been studied. Simulation results are compared with theoretical calculations and experimental measurements.

  5. The Properties of Normal Conducting Cathodes in FZD Superconducting Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J

    2009-01-01

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF photoinjector) is one of the latest applications of SC technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting cathodes with high QE are not available up to now, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for the SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the cathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. The SRF gun with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated under the collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. In this paper, some experience gained in the gun commissioning will be concluded. The results of the properties of Cs2Te photocathode in the cavity will be presented, such as the Q.E., the life time, the dark current and the thermal emittance.

  6. RF Power and HOM Coupler Tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusnak, B

    2003-10-28

    Radio frequency (RF) couplers are used on superconducting cavities to deliver RF power for creating accelerating fields and to remove unwanted higher-order mode power for reducing emittance growth and cryogenic load. RF couplers in superconducting applications present a number of interdisciplinary design challenges that need to be addressed, since poor performance in these devices can profoundly impact accelerator operations and the overall success of a major facility. This paper will focus on critical design issues for fundamental and higher order mode (HOM) power couplers, highlight a sampling of reliability-related problems observed in couplers, and discuss some design strategies for improving performance.

  7. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  8. Integrated Surface Topography Characterization of Variously Polished Niobium for Superconducting Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, G. Ribeill

    2009-05-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro-and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents flow. Interior surface chemical polishing (BCP/EP) to remove mechanical damage leaves surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely-used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is being used to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of EP is reported, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography.

  9. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  10. First beam commissioning at BNL ERL SRF Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Altinbas, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Deonarine, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; DeSanto, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Gassner, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Gupta, R. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hahn, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Ho, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Jamilkoski, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Kankiya, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Kayran, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Kellerman, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Laloudakis, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liaw, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Litvinenko, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Mahler, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Masi, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Miller, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Philips, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Seda, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Sheehy, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Rao, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Steszyn, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tallerico, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tuozollo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Weiss, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Wiliniski, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    The 704 MHz SRF gun successfully generated the first photoemission beam in November of 2014. The configurations of the test and the sub-systems are described.The latest results of SRF commissioning, including the cavity performance, cathode QE measurements, beam current/energy measurements, are presented in the paper.

  11. Laser polishing of niobium for SRF applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, J. Michael [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael [W& M

    2013-09-01

    Smooth interior surfaces are desired for niobium SRF cavities, now obtained by buffered chemical polish (BCP) and/or electropolish (EP). Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from chemistry and in-process inspection. Here we show that laser polishing can produce smooth topography with Power Spectral Density (PSD) measurements similar to that obtained by EP. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damaging it. Computational modeling was used to simulate the surface temperature and explain the mechanism of laser polishing.

  12. Mal/SRF is dispensable for cell proliferation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Thompson

    Full Text Available The Mal/SRF transcription factor is regulated by the level of G-actin in cells and has important roles in cell migration and other actin-dependent processes in Drosophila. A recent report suggests that Mal/SRF and an upstream regulator, Pico, are required for cell proliferation and tissue growth in Drosophila. I find otherwise. Mutation of Mal or SRF does not affect cell proliferation in the fly wing. Furthermore, I cannot reproduce the reported effects of Pico RNAi or Pico overexpression on body size. Nevertheless, I can confirm that overexpression of Pico or Mal causes tissue overgrowth specifically in the fly wing--where SRF is most highly expressed. My results indicate that Mal/SRF can promote tissue growth when abnormally active, but is not normally required for tissue growth during development.

  13. Muon Ionisation Cooling in Reduced RF

    CERN Document Server

    Prior, G

    2010-01-01

    In Muon Ionisation Cooling, closely packed high-field RF cavities are interspersed with energy-absorbing material in order to reduce particle beam emittance. Transverse focussing of the muon beams is achieved by superconducting magnets. This results in the RF cavities sitting in intense magnetic fields. Recent studies have shown that this may limit the peak gradient that can be achieved in the RF cavities. In this paper, we study the effect that a reduced RF gradient may have on the cooling performance of the Neutrino Factory lattice and examine methods to mitigate the effect.

  14. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  15. UH-FLUX: Compact, Energy Efficient Superconducting Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC for Ultra-high Fluxes of X-ray and THz Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konoplev, Ivan [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). JAI, Dept. of Physics; Ainsworth, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Burt, Graeme [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Cockcroft Inst.; Seryi, Andrei [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). JAI, Dept. of Physics

    2016-06-01

    The conventional ERLs have limited peak beam current because increasing the beam charge and repetition rate leads to appearance of the beam break-up instabilities. At this stage the highest current, from the SRF ERL, is around 300 mA. A single-turn (the beam will be transported through the accelerating section, interaction point and deceleration section of the AERL only once) Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC (AERL) is proposed. The RF cells in different sections of the cavity are tuned in such a way that only operating mode is uniform inside all of the cells. The AERL will drive the electron beams with typical energies of 10 - 30 MeV and peak currents above 1 A, enabling the generation of high flux UV/X-rays and high power coherent THz radiation. We aim to build a copper prototype of the RF cavity for a compact AERL to study its EM properties. The final goal is to build AERL based on the superconducting RF cavity. Preliminary design for AERL's cavity has been developed and will be presented. The results of numerical and analytical models and the next steps toward the AERL operation will also be discussed.

  16. UH-FLUX: Compact, Energy Efficient Superconducting Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC for Ultra-high Fluxes of X-ray and THz Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konoplev, Ivan [JAI, UK; Ainsworth, Robert [Fermilab; Burt, Graeme [Lancaster U.; Seryi, Andrei [JAI, UK

    2016-06-01

    The conventional ERLs have limited peak beam current because increasing the beam charge and repetition rate leads to appearance of the beam break-up instabilities. At this stage the highest current, from the SRF ERL, is around 300 mA. A single turn (the beam will be transported through the accelerating section, interaction point and deceleration section of the AERL only once) Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC (AERL) is proposed. The RF cells in different sections of the cavity are tuned in such a way that only operating mode is uniform inside all of the cells. The AERL will drive the electron beams with typical energies of 10 - 30 MeV and peak currents above 1 A, enabling the generation of high flux UV/X-rays and high power coherent THz radiation. We aim to build a copper prototype of the RF cavity for a compact AERL to study its EM properties. The final goal is to build AERL based on the superconducting RF cavity. Preliminary design for AERL's cavity has been developed and will be presented. The results of numerical and analytical models and the next steps toward the AERL operation will also be discussed.

  17. Superconducting Radio Frequency Technology: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting RF cavities are becoming more often the choice for larger scale particle accelerator projects such as linear colliders, energy recovery linacs, free electron lasers or storage rings. Among the many advantages compared to normal conducting copper structures, the superconducting devices dissipate less rf power, permit higher accelerating gradients in CW operation and provide better quality particle beams. In most cases these accelerating cavities are fabricated from high purity bulk niobium, which has superior superconducting properties such as critical temperature and critical magnetic field when compared to other superconducting materials. Research during the last decade has shown, that the metallurgical properties--purity, grain structure, mechanical properties and oxidation behavior--have significant influence on the performance of these accelerating devices. This contribution attempts to give a short overview of the superconducting RF technology with emphasis on the importance of the material properties of the high purity niobium.

  18. The first operation of 56 MHz SRF cavity in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); DeSanto, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Goldberg, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harvey, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Orfin, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The cavity operates at 4.4 K with a “quiet helium source” to isolate the cavity from environmental acoustic noise. The cavity is a beam driven quarter wave resonator. It is detuned and damped during injection and acceleration cycles and is brought to operation only at store energy. For a first test operation, the cavity voltage was stabilized at 300 kV with full beam current. Within both Au + Au and asymmetrical Au + He3 collisions, luminosity improvement was detected from direct measurement, and the hourglass effect was reduced. One higher order mode (HOM) coupler was installed on the cavity. We report in this paper on our measurement of a broadband HOM spectrum excited by the Au beam.

  19. CEBAF SRF Performance during Initial 12 GeV Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Allison, Trent; Daly, Edward; Drury, Michael; Hovater, J; Lahti, George; Mounts, Clyde; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of eleven new 100 MV cryomodules (88 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. Not all the cavities were operated at the minimum gradient of 19.3 MV/m with the beam. Though the initial 12 GeV milestones were achieved during the initial commissioning of CEBAF, there are still some issues to be addressed for long term reliable operation of these modules. This paper reports the operational experiences during the initial commissioning and the path forward to improve the performance of C100 (100 MV) modules.

  20. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A. T.; Lu, X. Y.; Rimmer, R. A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I-V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson-Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  1. The low level radio frequency control system for DC-SRF photo-injector at Peking University

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fang; Lin, Lin; Hao, Jiankui; Quan, Shengwen; Zhang, Baocheng; Liu, Kexin

    2014-01-01

    A low level radio frequency (LLRF) control system is designed and constructed at Peking University, which is for the DC-SRF photo injector operating at 2K. Besides with continuous wave (CW), the system is also reliable with pulsed RF and pulsed beam, the stability of amplitude and phase can achieve 0.13% and 0.1{\\deg}respectively. It is worth noting that the system works perfectly when the cavity is driven at both generator driven resonator (GDR) and self-excited loop (SEL), the latter is useful in measuring the performance of the cavity.

  2. Mass, energy and material balances of SRF production process. Part 1: SRF produced from commercial and industrial waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Kärki, Janne

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the mass, energy and material balances of a solid recovered fuel (SRF) production process. The SRF is produced from commercial and industrial waste (C&IW) through mechanical treatment (MT). In this work various streams of material produced in SRF production process are analyzed for their proximate and ultimate analysis. Based on this analysis and composition of process streams their mass, energy and material balances are established for SRF production process. Here mass balance describes the overall mass flow of input waste material in the various output streams, whereas material balance describes the mass flow of components of input waste stream (such as paper and cardboard, wood, plastic (soft), plastic (hard), textile and rubber) in the various output streams of SRF production process. A commercial scale experimental campaign was conducted on an MT waste sorting plant to produce SRF from C&IW. All the process streams (input and output) produced in this MT plant were sampled and treated according to the CEN standard methods for SRF: EN 15442 and EN 15443. The results from the mass balance of SRF production process showed that of the total input C&IW material to MT waste sorting plant, 62% was recovered in the form of SRF, 4% as ferrous metal, 1% as non-ferrous metal and 21% was sorted out as reject material, 11.6% as fine fraction, and 0.4% as heavy fraction. The energy flow balance in various process streams of this SRF production process showed that of the total input energy content of C&IW to MT plant, 75% energy was recovered in the form of SRF, 20% belonged to the reject material stream and rest 5% belonged with the streams of fine fraction and heavy fraction. In the material balances, mass fractions of plastic (soft), plastic (hard), paper and cardboard and wood recovered in the SRF stream were 88%, 70%, 72% and 60% respectively of their input masses to MT plant. A high mass fraction of plastic (PVC), rubber material and non

  3. Tuner control system of Spoke012 SRF cavity for C-ADS injector I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Sun, Yi; Wang, Guang-Wei; Mi, Zheng-Hui; Lin, Hai-Ying; Wang, Qun-Yao; Liu, Rong; Ma, Xin-Peng

    2016-09-01

    A new tuner control system for spoke superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities has been developed and applied to cryomodule I of the C-ADS injector I at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. We have successfully implemented the tuner controller based on Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) for the first time and achieved a cavity tuning phase error of ±0.7° (about ±4 Hz peak to peak) in the presence of electromechanical coupled resonance. This paper presents preliminary experimental results based on the PLC tuner controller under proton beam commissioning. Supported by Proton linac accelerator I of China Accelerator Driven sub-critical System (Y12C32W129)

  4. Characterization of the srfA locus of Bacillus subtilis : only the valine-activating domain of srfA is involved in the establishment of genetic competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, D; Galli, G; Cosmina, P; de Ferra, F; Withoff, S; Venema, G; Grandi, G

    1993-01-01

    srfA is a locus required for the production of the lipopeptide antibiotic surfactin. This locus is also necessary for efficient sporulation and competence development. Mutations in the 5' portion of the srfA operon affect all three of these processes, whereas mutations in the 3' portion of srfA only

  5. Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities: fabrication, results, properties, and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, S.; Hall, D. L.

    2017-03-01

    A microns-thick film of Nb3Sn on the inner surface of a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity has been demonstrated to substantially improve cryogenic efficiency compared to the standard niobium material, and its predicted superheating field is approximately twice as high. We review in detail the advantages of Nb3Sn coatings for SRF cavities. We describe the vapor diffusion process used to fabricate this material in the most successful experiments, and we compare the differences in the process used at different labs. We overview results of Nb3Sn SRF coatings, including CW and pulsed measurements of cavities as well as microscopic measurements. We discuss special considerations that must be practised when using Nb3Sn cavities in applications. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the state-of-the-art and describing the outlook for this alternative SRF material.

  6. Mass, energy and material balances of SRF production process. Part 2: SRF produced from construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Kärki, Janne

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the fraction of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) complicated and economically not feasible to sort out for recycling purposes is used to produce solid recovered fuel (SRF) through mechanical treatment (MT). The paper presents the mass, energy and material balances of this SRF production process. All the process streams (input and output) produced in MT waste sorting plant to produce SRF from C&D waste are sampled and treated according to CEN standard methods for SRF. Proximate and ultimate analysis of these streams is performed and their composition is determined. Based on this analysis and composition of process streams their mass, energy and material balances are established for SRF production process. By mass balance means the overall mass flow of input waste material stream in the various output streams and material balances mean the mass flow of components of input waste material stream (such as paper and cardboard, wood, plastic (soft), plastic (hard), textile and rubber) in the various output streams of SRF production process. The results from mass balance of SRF production process showed that of the total input C&D waste material to MT waste sorting plant, 44% was recovered in the form of SRF, 5% as ferrous metal, 1% as non-ferrous metal, and 28% was sorted out as fine fraction, 18% as reject material and 4% as heavy fraction. The energy balance of this SRF production process showed that of the total input energy content of C&D waste material to MT waste sorting plant, 74% was recovered in the form of SRF, 16% belonged to the reject material and rest 10% belonged to the streams of fine fraction and heavy fraction. From the material balances of this process, mass fractions of plastic (soft), paper and cardboard, wood and plastic (hard) recovered in the SRF stream were 84%, 82%, 72% and 68% respectively of their input masses to MT plant. A high mass fraction of plastic (PVC) and rubber material was found in the reject material

  7. Design of an L-band normally conducting RF gun cavity for high peak and average RF power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonov, V.; Philipp, S.; Rybakov, I.; Skassyrskaya, A.; Stephan, F.

    2017-05-01

    To provide high quality electron bunches for linear accelerators used in free electron lasers and particle colliders, RF gun cavities operate with extreme electric fields, resulting in a high pulsed RF power. The main L-band superconducting linacs of such facilities also require a long RF pulse length, resulting in a high average dissipated RF power in the gun cavity. The newly developed cavity based on the proven advantages of the existing DESY RF gun cavities, underwent significant changes. The shape of the cells is optimized to reduce the maximal surface electric field and RF loss power. Furthermore, the cavity is equipped with an RF probe to measure the field amplitude and phase. The elaborated cooling circuit design results in a lower temperature rise on the cavity RF surface and permits higher dissipated RF power. The paper presents the main solutions and results of the cavity design.

  8. High intensity SRF proton linac workshop (vugraphs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusnak, B.A.

    1995-11-01

    The meeting is divided into four sections. The first section is the general introduction and included opening remarks and an overview of APT (accelerator product of tritium). The second section contains vugraphs from the cavity-structures working group. The third section is comprised of vugraphs from the couplers and rf working group. And the fourth section contains vugraphs of the system integration group.

  9. Operation experience with the LHC RF system

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaudon, L; Brunner, O; Butterworth, A

    2010-01-01

    The LHC ACS RF system is composed of 16 superconducting cavities, eight per ring, housed in a total of four cryomodules each containing four cavities. Each cavity is powered by a 300 kW klystron. The ACS RF power control system is based on industrial Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), with additional fast RF interlock protection systems. The Low Level RF (LLRF) is implemented in VME crates. Operational performance and reliability are described. A full set of user interfaces, both for experts and operators has been developed, with user feedback and maintenance issues as key points. Operational experience with the full RF chain, including the low level system, the beam control, the synchronization system and optical fibers distribution is presented. Last but not least overall performance and reliability based on experience with first beam are reviewed and perspectives for future improvement outlined.

  10. One Innovation of Mechanical Polishing Apparatus for Surface Treatment of 6 GHz TESLA Superconducting Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Guo-long; A.A.Rossi; R.K.Thakur; V.Palmieri

    2013-01-01

    6 GHz spinning seamless superconducting radio frequency(SRF)cavities are a very useful tool for testing alternative surface treatments in the fabrication of TESLA cavity.However,the surface is damaged in internal part for the using of the collapsible mandrel during spinning.The first important step of the

  11. Superconducting Cavity Cryomodule Designs for the Next Generation of CW Linacs: Challenges and Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, Thomas [Fermilab; Orlov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Peterson, Thomas [Fermilab; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    The designs of nearly all superconducting RF (SRF) linacs over the last several years, with one notable exception being CEBAF at Jefferson Lab, have assumed pulsed beam operation with relatively low duty factors. These include the XFEL at DESY, the ILC, the original configuration for Project X at Fermilab, as well as several others. Recently proposed projects, on the other hand, including the LCLS-II at SLAC, the newly configured low and medium energy sections for Project X, and FRIB at Michigan State, to name a few, assume continuous wave or CW operation on quite a large scale with ambitious gradients and cavity performance requirements. This has implications in the cavity design as well as in many parts of the overall cryomodule due to higher dynamic heat loads in the cavities themselves and higher heat loads in the input and high-order-mode (HOM) couplers. Piping internal to the cryomodule, the effectiveness of thermal intercepts, the size of integrated heat exchangers, and many other aspects of the overall design are also affected. This paper will describe some of these design considerations as we move toward the next generation of accelerator projects.

  12. RF Group Annual Report 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Betz, M; Brunner, O; Baudrenghien, P; Calaga, R; Caspers, F; Ciapala, E; Chambrillon, J; Damerau, H; Doebert, S; Federmann, S; Findlay, A; Gerigk, F; Hancock, S; Höfle, W; Jensen, E; Junginger, T; Liao, K; McMonagle, G; Montesinos, E; Mastoridis, T; Paoluzzi, M; Riddone, G; Rossi, C; Schirm, K; Schwerg, N; Shaposhnikova, E; Syratchev, I; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Völlinger, C; Vretenar, M; Wuensch, W

    2012-01-01

    The highest priority for the RF group in 2011 was to contribute to a successful physics run of the LHC. This comprises operation of the superconducting 400 MHz accelerating system (ACS) and the transverse damper (ADT) of the LHC itself, but also all the individual links of the injector chain upstream of the LHC – Linac2, the PSB, the PS and the SPS – don’t forget that it is RF in all these accelerators that truly accelerates! A large variety of RF systems had to operate reliably, often near their limit. New tricks had to be found and implemented to go beyond limits; not to forget the equally demanding operation with Pb ions using in addition Linac3 and LEIR. But also other physics users required the full attention of the RF group: CNGS required in 2011 beams with very short, intense bunches, AD required reliable deceleration and cooling of anti-protons, Isolde the post-acceleration of radioactive isotopes in Rex, just to name a few. In addition to the supply of beams for physics, the RF group has a num...

  13. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Srf.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Srf.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Srf All cell types SRX180899,SRX180900,SR...SRX262784,SRX018659,SRX262780,SRX262783 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Srf.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Srf.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Srf.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Srf All cell types SRX437637,SRX180899,SR...SRX262784,SRX262781,SRX970846,SRX262783 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Srf.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.EmF.05.Srf.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.05.Srf.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Srf Embryonic fibroblast SRX180899,SRX180...900,SRX262782,SRX262779,SRX262780,SRX262784,SRX262783,SRX262781 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.05.Srf.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Srf.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Srf.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Srf All cell types SRX180899,SRX180900,SR...SRX262784,SRX970845,SRX970846,SRX262783 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Srf.AllCell.bed ...

  17. Co-combustion of coal and SRF in an entrained flow reactor: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Glarborg, Peter; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2009-01-01

    Investigations on co-firing of SRF with two kinds of bituminous coal were carried out in an entrained flow reactor. The experimental results showed that co-combustion of coal and SRF increased the unburnt carbon in fly ashes. The emissions of NO and SO2 were reduced with an increasing share of SRF...

  18. File list: Oth.Bld.50.Srf.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.Srf.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Srf Blood SRX970848,SRX970847,SRX970844,S...RX970846,SRX970845 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.Srf.AllCell.bed ...

  19. ASC 84: applied superconductivity conference. Final program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations covering: superconducting device fabrication; applications of rf superconductivity; conductor stability and losses; detectors and signal processing; fusion magnets; A15 and Nb-Ti conductors; stability, losses, and various conductors; SQUID applications; new applications of superconductivity; advanced conductor materials; high energy physics applications of superconductivity; electronic materials and characterization; general superconducting electronics; ac machinery and new applications; digital devices; fusion and other large scale applications; in-situ and powder process conductors; ac applications; synthesis, properties, and characterization of conductors; superconducting microelectronics. (LEW)

  20. RF transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  1. Impact of nitrogen doping of niobium superconducting cavities on the sensitivity of surface resistance to trapped magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, Dan; Kaufman, John; Liepe, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac require hundreds of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium cavities operating in continuous wave mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0) to keep cryogenic losses within feasible limits. To reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping of niobium cavities has been selected as the cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1 × 1010, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here, we show that the sensitivity to RF losses from trapped magnetic field in a cavity's walls is strongly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120 °C baked cavities show a sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜0.6 and ˜0.8 nΩ/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a higher sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜1 to 5 nΩ/mG trapped. We show that this difference in sensitivities is directly related to the mean free path of the RF surface layer of the niobium: shorter mean free paths lead to less sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the dirty limit (ℓ ≪ ξ0), while longer mean free paths lead to lower sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the clean limit (ℓ ≫ ξ0). These experimental results are also shown to have good agreement with recent theoretical predictions for pinned vortex lines oscillating in RF fields.

  2. Upgrade of the Cryogenic CERN RF Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Pirotte, O; Brunner, O; Inglese, V; Koettig, T; Maesen, P; Vullierme, B

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  3. Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Koettig, T.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B.

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990's in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  4. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  5. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  6. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  7. The LHC Low Level RF

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  8. Buffered Electropolishing – A New Way for Achieving Extremely Smooth Surface Finish on Nb SRF Cavities to be Used in Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley

    2009-05-01

    Future accelerators require unprecedented cavity performance, which is strongly influenced by interior surface nano-smoothness. Electropolishing (EP) is the technique of choice to be developed for high-field superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and related techniques point to the electropolishing mechanism of Nb in a sulphuric and hydrofluoric acid electrolyte controlled by a compact surface salt film under F- diffusion-limited mass transport control. These and other findings are guiding a systematic characterization to form the basis for cavities process optimization.

  9. Superconducting Electronic Film Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-14

    cubic, yttria stabilized, zirconia (YSZ) single crystals with (100) orientation and ao = 0.512 to 0.516 nm. Films were magnetron-sputtered... Crown by Solid-State and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy," IEEE Trans. Uagn. 25(2), 2538 (1989). 6. J. H. Kang, R. T. Kampwirth, and K. E. Gray, "Superconductivity...summarized in Fig. 1, are too high for SrTiO3 or yttria- stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to be used in rf applications. MgO, LaAIO 3 , and LaGaO3 have a tan 6

  10. Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Prakash; T S Datta; B P Ajith Kumar; J Antony; P Barua; J Chacko; A Choudhury; G K Chadhari; S Ghosh; S Kar; S A Krishnan; Manoj Kumar; Rajesh Kumar; A Mandal; D S Mathuria; R S Meena; R Mehta; K K Mistri; A Pandey; M V Suresh Babu; B K Sahu; A Sarkar; S S K Sonti; A Rai; S Venkatramanan; J Zacharias; R K Bhowmik; A Roy

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports the construction of a superconducting linear accelerator as a booster to the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The LINAC will use superconducting niobium quarter wave resonators as the accelerating element. Construction of the linear accelerator has progressed sufficiently. Details of the entire accelerator system including the cryogenics facility, RF electronics development, facilities for fabricating niobium resonators indigenously, and present status of the project are presented.

  11. Coherent oscillations of driven rf SQUID metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng; Mukhanov, Oleg; Koshelets, V P; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Ott, Edward; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ustinov, Alexey V; Anlage, Steven M

    2017-05-01

    Through experiments and numerical simulations we explore the behavior of rf SQUID (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device) metamaterials, which show extreme tunability and nonlinearity. The emergent electromagnetic properties of this metamaterial are sensitive to the degree of coherent response of the driven interacting SQUIDs. Coherence suffers in the presence of disorder, which is experimentally found to be mainly due to a dc flux gradient. We demonstrate methods to recover the coherence, specifically by varying the coupling between the SQUID meta-atoms and increasing the temperature or the amplitude of the applied rf flux.

  12. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  13. HOMs of the SRF Electron Gun Cavity in the BNL ERL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Hammons, L.; Litvinenko, V.; Than, Y. R.; Todd, R.; Weiss, D.; Xu, Wencan

    The Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is operated as an R&D test bed for high-current, low emittance electron beams. It comprises a superconducting five-cell cavity and a half-cell superconducting RF photo-injector electron gun. The ERL is undergoing commissioning with focus on the performance of the electron gun, not the least on the cavity Higher Order Modes (HOM). Among the various alternative solutions, a beam tube damper based on a layer of ferrite tiles was adopted for the five-cell accelerator cavity. For the gun, a ceramic-ferrite damper consisting of a lossless ceramic cylinder surrounded by damping ferrite tiles has been investigated. This design is innovative in its damper approach and combines a variety of goals including broadband HOM damping and protection of the superconducting cavity vacuum from potential damage by the separately cooled absorber. In this paper the empirical performance of an installed ceramic-ferrite damper is described by the Q reduction of a few selected gun cavity resonances. The theoretical coupling impedance presented to a traversing beam is numerically analyzed in terms of radial waveguide modes in the damper section. Strong damping of the gun cavity HOMs by the fundamental power coupler (FPC) is found and discussed. Finally, the measured Q-values of the operational gun cavity without the ceramic-ferrite damper at superconducting temperatures are presented

  14. Defect Detection in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity Surface Using C + + and OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Samantha; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) uses superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities to accelerate an electron beam. If theses cavities have a small particle or defect, it can degrade the performance of the cavity. The problem at hand is inspecting the cavity for defects, little bubbles of niobium on the surface of the cavity. Thousands of pictures have to be taken of a single cavity and then looked through to see how many defects were found. A C + + program with Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) was constructed to reduce the number of hours searching through the images and finds all the defects. Using this code, the SRF group is now able to use the code to identify defects in on-going tests of SRF cavities. Real time detection is the next step so that instead of taking pictures when looking at the cavity, the camera will detect all the defects.

  15. RF Surface Impedance Measurement of Polycrystalline and Large Grain Nb Disk Sample at 7.5 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Binping [BNL; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [W& M, JLAB; Marhauser, Frank [JLAB; Phillips, H. Larry [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Wang, Haipeng [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    A Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system has been proposed at the 2005 SRF workshop and recently updated as detailed at the 2009 PAC conference. Currently the SIC system can measure samples in a temperature range from 2K to 20K exposed to an RF magnetic flux density of less than 3mT. We report on new results of a BCP etched large grain Nb sample measured with this system as compared with previous results of a BCP etched polycrystalline Nb sample. The design of an upgraded SIC system for use at higher magnetic flux densities is on the way to more efficiently investigate correlations between local material characteristics and associated SRF properties, both for preparation studies of bulk niobium and also new thin film SRF developments.

  16. Characterization Of Superconducting Samples With SIC System For Thin Film Developments: Status And Recent Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, H. Lawrence [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY (United States); Eremeev, Grigory V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Within any thin film development program directed towards SRF accelerating structures, there is a need for an RF characterization device that can provide information about RF properties of small samples. The current installation of the RF characterization device at Jefferson Lab is Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system. The data acquisition environment for the system has recently been improved to allow for automated measurement, and the system has been routinely used for characterization of bulk Nb, films of Nb on Cu, MgB{sub 2}, NbTiN, Nb{sub 3}Sn films, etc. We present some of the recent results that illustrate present capabilities and limitations of the system.

  17. Parameter Optimization for Laser Polishing of Niobium for SRF Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Klopf, John Michael [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Surface smoothness is critical to the performance of SRF cavities. As laser technology has been widely applied to metal machining and surface treatment, we are encouraged to use it on niobium as an alternative to the traditional wet polishing process where aggressive chemicals are involved. In this study, we describe progress toward smoothing by optimizing laser parameters on BCP treated niobium surfaces. Results shows that microsmoothing of the surface without ablation is achievable.

  18. Characterization of Nb SRF cavity materials by white light interferometry and replica techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chen [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); The Applied Science Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Reece, Charles [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Kelley, Michael, E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); The Applied Science Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Much work has shown that the topography of the interior surface is an important contributor to the performance of Nb superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities. Micron-scale topography is implicated in non-linear loss mechanisms that limit the useful accelerating gradient range and impact cryogenic cost. Aggressive final chemical treatments in cavity production seek to reliably obtain “smoothest” surfaces with superior performance. Process development suffers because the cavity interior surface cannot be viewed directly without cutting out pieces, rendering the cavities unavailable for further study. Here we explore replica techniques as an alternative, providing imprints of cavity internal surface that can be readily examined. A second matter is the topography measurement technique used. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven successful, but too time intensive for routine use in this application. We therefore introduce white light interferometry (WLI) as an alternative approach. We examined real surfaces and their replicas, using AFM and WLI. We find that the replica/WLI is promising to provide the large majority of the desired information, recognizing that a trade-off is being made between best lateral resolution (AFM) and the opportunity to examine much more surface area (WLI).

  19. Commissioning of the 112 MHz SRF Gun and 500 MHz bunching cavities for the CeC PoP Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Litvinenko, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); McIntosh, P. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Moss, A. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Narayan, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Orfin, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pinayev, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rao, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wheelhouse, A. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xin, T. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment at BNL includes a short electron linac. During Phase 1, a 112 MHz superconducting RF photo-emission gun and two 500 MHz normal conducting bunching cavities were installed and are under commissioning. The paper describes the Phase1 linac layout and presents commissioning results for the cavities and associated RF, cryogenic and other sub-systems

  20. NSLS-II RF Cryogenic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, J.; Dilgen, T.; Gash, B.; Gosman, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Papu, J.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, R.; Sitnikov, A.; Wilhelm, H.; Jia, Y.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. A new helium refrigerator system has been installed and commissioned to support the superconducting RF cavities in the storage ring. Special care was taken to provide very stable helium and LN2 pressures and flow rates to minimize microphonics and thermal effects at the cavities. Details of the system design along with commissioning and early operations data will be presented.

  1. At the RF Lab, EF Division

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A four-cell superconducting RF cavity ready for installation in its cryostat, the first one at CERN. From bottom to top, on the right, Herbert Lengeler, Jean-François Malo, Enrico Chiaveri and François Grabowski, Albert Insomby. On the left, ..?, Ernst Ullrich Haebel, ..?, Jean-Marie Maugain, Artur Scharding, Hansuli Preis, R. Romjin. The place is the EF hall next to Bld. 13. (see Annual Report 1980 p. 71)

  2. Materials and surface aspects in the development of SRF Niobium cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, C

    2012-01-01

    Foreword from author; When I joined the CEA Saclay SRF group in 1989, my initial background was physical chemistry and surface science, which I completed later on with solid state physics and metallurgy. Most accelerator physicists at that time had training in RF, plasma physics, nuclear or particle physics. We were very few with a background in material science. Working with people with a different background than yours reveals to be both challenging and funny: you can impress them with things you consider basic while they simply do not believe you for other things you consider so well admitted that you do not even remember where it comes from. At the end it obliges you to reconsider your basics and re-question many results, which opens many new and sometimes unexpected paths. Like usual in science, answering one question rises many new ones, and trying to improve cavities performance led to fascinating physics problems. Exploring some of these problems often requires techniques and expertise that are far be...

  3. Elemental balance of SRF production process: solid recovered fuel produced from municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Oinas, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    In the production of solid recovered fuel (SRF), certain waste components have excessive influence on the quality of product. The proportion of rubber, plastic (hard) and certain textiles was found to be critical as to the elemental quality of SRF. The mass flow of rubber, plastic (hard) and textiles (to certain extent, especially synthetic textile) components from input waste stream into the output streams of SRF production was found to play the decisive role in defining the elemental quality of SRF. This paper presents the mass flow of polluting and potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in SRF production. The SRF was produced from municipal solid waste (MSW) through mechanical treatment (MT). The results showed that of the total input chlorine content to process, 55% was found in the SRF and 30% in reject material. Of the total input arsenic content, 30% was found in the SRF and 45% in fine fraction. In case of cadmium, lead and mercury, of their total input content to the process, 62%, 38% and 30%, respectively, was found in the SRF. Among the components of MSW, rubber material was identified as potential source of chlorine, containing 8.0 wt.% of chlorine. Plastic (hard) and textile components contained 1.6 and 1.1. wt.% of chlorine, respectively. Plastic (hard) contained higher lead and cadmium content compared with other waste components, i.e. 500 mg kg(-1) and 9.0 mg kg(-1), respectively.

  4. Analysis of superconducting cavity quench events at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hong-Tao; LI Zheng; LIU Jian-Fei; ZHAO Yu-Bin; ZHAO Shen-jie; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; LUO Chen; FENG Zi-Qiang; MAO Dong-Qing; ZHENG Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Quench is important and dangerous to superconducting RF cavities. This paper illustrates the mechanism of quench and how a quench detector works, and analyzes the quench events happening during beam operations and cavity conditioning. We find that the quench protection is mostly triggered by some reasons such as fluctuation of cavity voltage, multipacting or arc, rather than a real cavity thermal breakdown. The results will be beneficial to optimize the operation parameters of superconducting cavities, to discover the real reasons for beam trip by quench interlock, and to improve the operation stability of superconducting RF systems.

  5. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  6. A new type of HTc superconducting film comb-shape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Hai-yan; WANG Fu-ren; MENG Shu-chao; MAO Bo; LI Zhuang-zhi; NIE Rui-juan; LIU Xin-yuan; DAI Yuan-dong

    2006-01-01

    A new type of HTc superconducting film combshape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (RF SQUID) has been designed.This new type of superconducting film comb-shape resonator is formed by a foursquare microstrip line without a flux concentrator.The range of the center frequency of this type of resonator varies from 800 MHz to 1300 MHz by changing the length of the teeth.In this paper,we report on simulating the relationship of the value of the center frequency and the length of the teeth,and testing the noise of HTc RF SQUID coupling this comb-shape resonator.

  7. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  8. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  9. Frequency choice of eRHIC SRF linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-05

    eRHIC is a FFAG lattice based multipass ERL [1]. The eRHIC SRF linac has been decided to change from 422 MHz 5-cell cavity to 647 MHz 5-cell cavity. There are several considerations affecting the frequency choice for a high current multipass-ERL: the beam structure, bunch length, energy spread, beam-break-up (BBU) threshold, SRF loss considerations. Beyond the physics considerations, cost and complexity or risk is an important consideration for the frequency choice, especially when we are designing a machine to be built in a few years. Although there are some benefits of using a 422 MHz cavity for eRHIC ERL, however, there are some very critical drawbacks, including lack of facilities to fabricate a 422 MHz 5-cell cavity, very few facilities to process such a cavity and no existing facility to test the cavity anywhere. As the cavity size is big and its weight is large, it is difficult to handle it during fabrication, processing and testing and no one has experience in this area. As the cavity size is large, the cryomodule becomes big as well. All of these considerations drive the risk of building eRHIC ERL with 422 MHz cavities to a very high level. Therefore, a decision was made to change the frequency of main linac to be 647 MHz 5-cell cavities. This note will compare these two linacs: 422MHz 5-cell cavity linac and 647Mz 5-cell cavity SRF linac, from both practical point of view and physics point of view.

  10. Coulomb blockade and BLOCH oscillations in superconducting Ti nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, J S; Zakharov, K; Arutyunov, K Yu

    2012-11-01

    Quantum fluctuations in quasi-one-dimensional superconducting channels leading to spontaneous changes of the phase of the order parameter by 2π, alternatively called quantum phase slips (QPS), manifest themselves as the finite resistance well below the critical temperature of thin superconducting nanowires and the suppression of persistent currents in tiny superconducting nanorings. Here we report the experimental evidence that in a current-biased superconducting nanowire the same QPS process is responsible for the insulating state--the Coulomb blockade. When exposed to rf radiation, the internal Bloch oscillations can be synchronized with the external rf drive leading to formation of quantized current steps on the I-V characteristic. The effects originate from the fundamental quantum duality of a Josephson junction and a superconducting nanowire governed by QPS--the QPS junction.

  11. X-ray excited luminescence of polystyrene composites loaded with SrF2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkiv, T. M.; Halyatkin, O. O.; Vistovskyy, V. V.; Hevyk, V. B.; Yakibchuk, P. M.; Gektin, A. V.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    The polystyrene film nanocomposites of 0.3 mm thickness with embedded SrF2 nanoparticles up to 40 wt% have been synthesized. The luminescent and kinetic properties of the polystyrene composites with embedded SrF2 nanoparticles upon the pulse X-ray excitation have been investigated. The luminescence intensity of the pure polystyrene scintillator film significantly increases when it is loaded with the inorganic SrF2 nanoparticles. The film nanocomposites show fast (∼2.8 ns) and slow (∼700 ns) luminescence decay components typical for a luminescence of polystyrene activators (p-Terphenyl and POPOP) and SrF2 nanoparticles, respectively. It is revealed that the fast decay luminescence component of the polystyrene composites is caused by the excitation of polystyrene by the photoelectrons escaped from the nanoparticles due to photoeffect, and the slow component is caused by reabsorption of the self-trapped exciton luminescence of SrF2 nanoparticles by polystyrene.

  12. Commissioning of the 400 MHz LHC RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Ciapala, Edmond; Baudrenghien, P; Brunner, O; Butterworth, A; Linnecar, T; Maesen, P; Molendijk, J; Montesinos, E; Valuch, D; Weierud, F

    2008-01-01

    The installation of the 400 MHz superconducting RF system in LHC is finished and commissioning is under way. The final RF system comprises four cryo-modules each with four cavities in the LHC tunnel straight section round IP4. Also underground in an adjacent cavern shielded from the main tunnel are the sixteen 300 kW klystron RF power sources with their high voltage bunkers, two Faraday cages containing RF feedback and beam control electronics, and racks containing all the slow controls. The system and the experience gained during commissioning will be described. In particular, results from conditioning the cavities and their movable main power couplers and the setting up of the low level RF feedbacks will be presented.

  13. RF multipole implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Latina, A

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic radio-frequency (RF) field of accelerating structures and crab-cavities can exhibit transverse field components due to asymmetries in the azimuthal direction of the element geometry. Tracking simulations must be performed to evaluate the impact of such transverse RF deflections on the beam dynamics. In an ultra-relativistic regime where the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is applicable, these RF deflections can be modeled via a multipolar expansion of the generating RF field similarly to what is done with static magnetic elements. The element implementing such RF multipolar fields has been called RF multipole. In this note we present an analytical formulation of a thin RF multipole Hamiltonian, and we explicitly calculate the RF kick and the elements of its first- and second- order transfer matrices. Also, we present the implementation of the corresponding code in MAD-X, plus some tests of tracking, simplecticity, consistency, and reflected maps that we successfully applied to verify the correctne...

  14. Raising gradient limitations in 2.1 GHz superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya I., E-mail: smirnova@lanl.gov; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Suvorova, Natalya A.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L. [Niowave, Inc., 1012 North Walnut Street, Lansing, Michigan 48906 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    We report results from recent 2.1 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) photonic band gap (PBG) resonator experiments at Los Alamos. Two 2.1 GHz PBG cells with elliptical rods were fabricated and tested at high power in a liquid helium bath at the temperatures of 4 K and below 2 K. The described SRF PBG cells were designed with a particular emphasis on changing the shape of the PBG rods to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and at the same time to preserve its effectiveness at damping higher-order-modes. The superconducting PBG cavities have great potential for damping long-range wakefields in SRF accelerator structures without affecting the fundamental accelerating mode. The cells performed in accordance with simulation's predictions and the maximum achieved accelerating gradient was 18.3 MV/m. This represents a 30% increase over gradients previously demonstrated in superconducting PBG cavities with round rods.

  15. Characterization of superconducting multilayers samples

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, C Z; Berry, S; Bouat, S; Jacquot, J F; Villegier, J C; Lamura, G; Gurevich, A

    2009-01-01

    Best RF bulk niobium accelerating cavities have nearly reached their ultimate limits at rf equatorial magnetic field H  200 mT close to the thermodynamic critical field Hc. In 2006 Gurevich proposed to use nanoscale layers of superconducting materials with high values of Hc > HcNb for magnetic shielding of bulk niobium to increase the breakdown magnetic field inside SC RF cavities [1]. Depositing good quality layers inside a whole cavity is rather difficult but we have sputtered high quality samples by applying the technique used for the preparation of superconducting electronics circuits and characterized these samples by X-ray reflectivity, dc resistivity (PPMS) and dc magnetization (SQUID). Dc magnetization curves of a 250 nm thick Nb film have been measured, with and without a magnetron sputtered coating of a single or multiple stack of 15 nm MgO and 25 nm NbN layers. The Nb samples with/without the coating clearly exhibit different behaviors. Because SQUID measurements are influenced by edge an...

  16. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  17. Stoichiometry and thickness dependence of superconducting properties of niobium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, Melissa R., E-mail: mrbeebe@email.wm.edu; Beringer, Douglas B.; Burton, Matthew C.; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, R. Alejandra [Department of Physics, The College of William & Mary, Small Hall, 300 Ukrop Way, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The current technology used in linear particle accelerators is based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities fabricated from bulk niobium (Nb), which have smaller surface resistance and therefore dissipate less energy than traditional nonsuperconducting copper cavities. Using bulk Nb for the cavities has several advantages, which are discussed elsewhere; however, such SRF cavities have a material-dependent accelerating gradient limit. In order to overcome this fundamental limit, a multilayered coating has been proposed using layers of insulating and superconducting material applied to the interior surface of the cavity. The key to this multilayered model is to use superconducting thin films to exploit the potential field enhancement when these films are thinner than their London penetration depth. Such field enhancement has been demonstrated in MgB{sub 2} thin films; here, the authors consider films of another type-II superconductor, niobium nitride (NbN). The authors present their work correlating stoichiometry and superconducting properties in NbN thin films and discuss the thickness dependence of their superconducting properties, which is important for their potential use in the proposed multilayer structure. While there are some previous studies on the relationship between stoichiometry and critical temperature T{sub C}, the authors are the first to report on the correlation between stoichiometry and the lower critical field H{sub C1}.

  18. High power RF systems for the BNL ERL project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2011-03-28

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  19. NB Coating Developments with HIPIMS for SRF Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Terenziani, G; Junginger, T; Santillana, I A; Ehiasarian, A P

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology [1]. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species [2,3] can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. A study is under way at CERN to apply this technology for the Nb coating of SRF 1.3-1.5 GHz Cu cavities, and in parallel at SHU the plasma physics and its correlation with film morphology are being investigated [2]. Recent results achieved with this technique are presented in the paper.

  20. PROSPECTS FOR A VERY HIGH POWER CW SRF LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Rimmer

    2010-06-01

    Steady development in SRF accelerator technology combined with the success of large scale installations such as CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory and the SNS Linac at ORNL gives credibility to the concept of very high average power CW machines for light sources or Proton drivers. Such machines would be powerful tools for discovery science in themselves but could also pave the way to reliable cost effective drivers for such applications as neutrino factories, an energy-frontier muon collider, nuclear waste transmutation or accelerator driven subcritical reactors for energy production. In contrast to machines such as ILC that need maximum accelerating gradient, the challenges in these machines are mainly in efficiency, reliability, beam stability, beam loss and of course cost. In this paper the present state of the art is briefly reviewed and options for a multi-GeV, multi-MW CW linac are discussed.

  1. SRF Cavity Surface Topography Characterization Using Replica Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Xu, M.J. Kelley, C.E. Reece

    2012-07-01

    To better understand the roll of topography on SRF cavity performance, we seek to obtain detailed topographic information from the curved practical cavity surfaces. Replicas taken from a cavity interior surface provide internal surface molds for fine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and stylus profilometry. In this study, we confirm the replica resolution both on surface local defects such as grain boundary and etching pits and compare the surface uniform roughness with the aid of Power Spectral Density (PSD) where we can statistically obtain roughness parameters at different scales. A series of sampling locations are at the same magnetic field chosen at the same latitude on a single cell cavity to confirm the uniformity. Another series of sampling locations at different magnetic field amplitudes are chosen for this replica on the same cavity for later power loss calculation. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

  2. Investigation of the surface resistance of superconducting materials

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, T

    2012-01-01

    In particle accelerators superconducting RF cavities are widely used to achieve high accelerating gradients and low losses. Power consumption is proportional to the surface resistance RS which depends on a number of external parameters, including frequency, temperature, magnetic and electric eld. Presently, there is no widely accepted model describing the increase of Rs with applied eld. In the frame of this project the 400MHz Quadrupole Resonator has been extended to 800 and 1200MHz to study surface resistance and intrinsic critical RF magnetic eld of superconducting samples over a wide parameter range, establishing it as a world-wide unique test facility for superconducting materials. Dierent samples were studied and it was shown that RS is mainly caused by the RF electric eld in the case of strongly oxidized surfaces. This can be explained by interface tunnel exchange of electrons between the superconductor and localized states in adjacent oxides. For well prepared surfaces, however, the majority of the di...

  3. Investigations of the surface resistance of superconducting materials

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, Tobias; Welsch, Carsten

    In particle accelerators superconducting RF cavities are widely used to achieve high accelerating gradients and low losses. Power consumption is proportional to the surface resistance RS which depends on a number of external parameters, including frequency, temperature, magnetic and electric field. Presently, there is no widely accepted model describing the increase of Rs with applied field. In the frame of this project the 400 MHz Quadrupole Resonator has been extended to 800 and 1200 MHz to study surface resistance and intrinsic critical RF magnetic field of superconducting samples over a wide parameter range, establishing it as a world-wide unique test facility for superconducting materials. Different samples were studied and it was shown that Rs is mainly caused by the RF electric field in the case of strongly oxidized surfaces. This can be explained by interface tunnel exchange of electrons between the superconductor and localized states in adjacent oxides. For well prepared surfaces, however, the majori...

  4. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  5. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  6. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  7. The New 2nd-Generation SRF R&D Facility at Jefferson Lab: TEDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles E.; Reilly, Anthony V.

    2012-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has funded a near-complete renovation of the SRF-based accelerator research and development facilities at Jefferson Lab. The project to accomplish this, the Technical and Engineering Development Facility (TEDF) Project has completed the first of two phases. An entirely new 3,100 m{sup 2} purpose-built SRF technical work facility has been constructed and was occupied in summer of 2012. All SRF work processes with the exception of cryogenic testing have been relocated into the new building. All cavity fabrication, processing, thermal treatment, chemistry, cleaning, and assembly work is collected conveniently into a new LEED-certified building. An innovatively designed 800 m2 cleanroom/chemroom suite provides long-term flexibility for support of multiple R&D and construction projects as well as continued process evolution. The characteristics of this first 2nd-generation SRF facility are described.

  8. Conceptual SPL RF Main Power Coupler design

    CERN Document Server

    Montesinos, Eric

    2011-01-01

    While the upgrade plans of the LHC injectors had to be reduced in scope in 2010, the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) remains a fundamental element of plans for a possible future neutrino facility. Prototyping work is therefore continuing at CERN and the current focus is on the test of a first four cavity SPL-like cryomodule with full power. This report summarizes the parameters for the Main Power Coupler design as discussed and approved within the ‘Review of SPL RF power couplers’, held at CERN in March 2010.

  9. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Z. A.; Ge, M.; Iwashita, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  10. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Physics Division; Ge, M. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2017-01-12

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  11. Multipacting studies of beta_g=0.61 and beta_g =0.9, 650 MHz Elliptical SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Ram; Kumar, Vinit

    2016-01-01

    Multipacting is seen as a performance limiting phenomenon for the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Numerical simulations are essential to pre-empt the experimentally observed multipacting conditions. Readily available codes(e.g. FISHPACT, MULTIPACT,CST etc.) are widely used to simulate the phenomenon of multipacting in such cases. Most of the contemporary two dimensional (2D) codes are unable to detect multipacting in the elliptical cavities because they use a simplistic secondary emission model, where a constant value of emission kinetic energy of secondary electrons is assumed. Some three-dimensional (3D) codes, which use a more realistic and sophisticated secondary emission model (Furman model) by following a probability distribution for the emission kinetic energy of secondary electrons, are able to correctly predict the occurance of multipacting. These 3D softwares however require large data handling and are slower than contemporary 2D codes. We have developed a 2D code for the multipactin...

  12. Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Coatings for Large Scale Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namhoon; Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Wolak, Matthaeus; Xi, Xiaoxing

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered to be a great candidate for next generation superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities due to its higher critical temperature Tc (40 K) and increased thermodynamic critical field Hc compared to other conventional superconductors. These properties significantly reduce the BCS surface resistance (RsBCS)and residual resistance (Rres) according to theoretical studies and suggest the possibility of an enhanced accelerating field (Eacc) . We have investigated the possibility of coating the inner surface of a 3 GHz SRF cavity with MgB2 by using a hybrid physical-vapor deposition (HPCVD) system which was modified for this purpose. To simulate a real 3 GHz SRF cavity, a stainless steel mock cavity has been employed for the study. The film quality was characterized on small substrates that were placed at selected locations within the cavity. MgB2 films on stainless steel foils, niobium pieces and SiC substrates showed transition temperatures of above 36 K. Dielectric resonance measurements resulted in promising Q values as obtained for the MgB2 films grown on the various substrates. By employing the HPCVD technique, a uniform film was achieved across the cavity interior, demonstrating the feasibility of HPCVD for MgB2 coatings for SRF cavities.

  13. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  14. Hardware and Initial Beam Commissioning of the LHC RF Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Linnecar, T; Arnaudon, L; Baudrenghien, P; Bohl, T; Brunner, O; Butterworth, A; Ciapala, Edmond; Dubouchet, F; Ferreira-Bento, J; Glenat, D; Hagmann, G; Höfle, Wolfgang; Julie, C; Killing, F; Kotzian, G; Landre, D; Louwerse, R; Maesen, P; Martinez-Yanez, P; Molendijk, J; Montesinos, E; Nicou, C; Noirjean, J; Papotti, G; Pashnin, A; Pechaud, G; Pradier, J; Rossi, V; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Schokker, M; Shaposhnikova, E; Sorokoletev, R; Stellfeld, D; Tückmantel, Joachim; Valuch, D; Wehrle, U; Weierud, F

    2008-01-01

    Hardware commissioning of the LHC RF Systems, the ACS Superconducting RF systems, ADT Transverse Dampers and APWL Wideband Longitudinal Monitors, started in late 2007 and was completed in time for the first LHC beams in 2008. The RF inter-machine synchroni-sation systems were in place and operational for the LHC synchronization tests in August 2008. The very first beams through IP4 were observed on the RF monitors and beam 2 was captured on 11th September. Measurements with beam on the damper systems were also pos-sible, preparing the way for closing the damper loop with beam. Major milestones during commissioning the ACS and ADT systems and results obtained during first capture tests are presented. Preparatory work for acceleration and multi-bunch operation is described as are the beam tests foreseen for 2009.

  15. Generation of N-qubit W state with rf-SQUID qubits by adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Z J; Gao, K L

    2006-01-01

    A simple scheme is presented to generate n-qubit W state with rf-superconducting quantum interference devices (rf-SQUIDs) in cavity QED through adiabatic passage. Because of the achievable strong coupling for rf-SQUID qubits embedded in cavity QED, we can get the desired state with high success probability. Furthermore, the scheme is insensitive to position inaccuracy of the rf-SQUIDs. The numerical simulation shows that, by using present experimental techniques, we can achieve our scheme with very high success probability, and the fidelity could be eventually unity with the help of dissipation.

  16. Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

  17. Preliminary Results of Nb Thin Film Coating for HIE-ISOLDE SRF Cavities Obtained by Magnetron Sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Sublet, A; Calatroni, S; D'Elia, A; Jecklin, N; Mondino, I; Prunet, S; Therasse, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zhang, P

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade at CERN, several new facilities for the niobium sputter coating of QWR-type superconducting RF accelerating cavities have been developed, built, and successfully operated. In order to further optimize the production process of these cavities the magnetron sputtering technique has been further investigated and continued as an alternative to the already successfully operational DC bias diode sputtering method. The purpose of this poster is to present the results obtained with this technique. The Nb thickness profile along the cavity and its correlation with the electro-magnetic field distribution inside the cavity are discussed. Film structure, morphology and Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) will be considered as well and compared with films obtained by DC bias diode sputtering. Finally these results will be compared with RF measurement of a production-like magnetron-coated cavity.

  18. Industrial RF Linac Experiences and Laboratory Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Peiniger, M

    2004-01-01

    Since more than two decades ACCEL Instruments GmbH at Bergisch Gladbach (formerly Siemens/Interatom) is supplying the worldwide accelerator labs with key components like rf cavities and power couplers, s.c. magnets, insertion devices, vacuum chambers and x-ray beamline equipment. Starting with the design and production of turn key SRF accelerating modules in the late 80th, meanwhile ACCEL is engineering, manufacturing, on site commissioning and servicing complete accelerators with guaranteed beam performance. Today, with a staff of more than 100 physicists and engineers and about the same number of manufacturing specialists in our dedicated production facilities, ACCEL's know how and sales volume in this field has accumulated to more than 2000 man years and several hundred Mio €, respectively. Basis of our steady development is a cooperative partnership with the world leading research labs in the respective fields. As an example, for the supply of a turn key 100 MeV injector linac for the Swiss Ligh...

  19. Feasibility of a Frequency-Multiplexed TES Read-Out Using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a feasibility study of a frequency multiplexed read-out scheme for large number transition edge sensor arrays. The read-out makes use of frequency up- and down-conversion and RF-to-DC conversion with superconducting-isolator-superconducting tunnel junctions operating at GHz frequencies,

  20. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  1. Modified 3½-Cell SC Cavity Made of Large Grain Niobium for the FZD SRF Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Murcek, P; Michel, P; Moeller, K; Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Freitag, M; Kneisel, P

    2010-01-01

    An SRF photoinjector has been successfully tested in FZD under the collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. In order to improve the gun cavity quality and thus reach a higher gradient, a new 3+1/2 superconducting cavity is being fabricated in cooperation with JLab. The modified cavity is made of large grain niobium, composed of one filter choke, one special designed half-cell (gun-cell) and three TESLA cavities. In this paper, the main updates of the new cavity design will be explained in detail. The deformation of the filter choke and the gun-cell, which is caused by pressure fluctuation in the He-line and also by the effect of the Lorentz force, will be minimized by stiffening between the filter choke and the gun-cell. Meanwhile, the cathode hole in the choke and gun-cell is enlarged for better rinsing. To simplify assembly, the NbTi pick-up will be welded directly on the wall of filter choke.

  2. Study of multipacting effect in superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng; ZHAO Ming-Hua

    2008-01-01

    A number of superconducting cavities of axis-symmetric geometry have been considered to study the effect in order to achieve the desired performance.It is shown that the multipacting effect is strongly dependent on the condition of the RF surface and can be suppressed with reconsideration of the geometry.The simulation result is compared with the result of the semi-analytical model in the end.

  3. PROGRESS ON LEAD PHOTOCATHODES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING INJECTORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; SEKUTOWICZ, J.; KNEISEL, P.; LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERTS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-05-16

    We present the results of our investigation of bulk lead, along with various types of lead films, as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. The quantum efficiency of each sample is presented as a function of the photon energy of the incident light, from 3.9 eV to 6.5 eV. Quantum efficiencies of 0.5% have been obtained. Production of a niobium cavity with a lead-plated cathode is underway.

  4. Progress on lead photocathodes for superconducting injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley, John; Rao, Triveni; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Kneisel, Peter; Langner, J; Strzyzewski, P; Lefferts, Richard; Lipski, Andrzej

    2005-05-16

    We present the results of our investigation of bulk lead, along with various types of lead films, as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. The quantum efficiency of each sample is presented as a function of the photon energy of the incident light, from 3.9 eV to 6.5 eV. Quantum efficiencies of 0.5% have been obtained. Production of a niobium cavity with a lead plated cathode is underway.

  5. Developments of RF Coil for P in vivo NMR Spectroscopy .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khushu

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available RF receiver coils are very important parts of an NMR System. The design of these coils is very critical and has a dramatic effect on the SNR of the NMR signal and are generally developed in TRA/REC mode. This paper reports the developments of a 3.5 cm TRA/REC 26 MHz RF coil for P spectroscopy of small organs like thyroid. The coil is small in size, fits well in the neck for thyroid spectroscopy and is successfully working with the 1.5 tesla whole body Superconducting NMR System available at INMAS.

  6. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Robert; Preble, Joseph P; Reece, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maint...

  7. Recent improvements to software used for optimization of SRF linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Tom J. [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    This work describes a software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, where operation costs includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. The program includes estimates for the associated cryogenic facility, and controls hardware. The software interface provides the ability to vary the cost of the different aspects of the machine as well as to change the cryomodule and cavity types. Additionally, this work will describe the recent improvements to the software that allow one to estimate the costs of energy-recovery based linacs and to enter arbitrary values of the low field Q0 and Q0 slope. The initial goal when developing the software was to convert a spreadsheet format to a graphical interface and to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand tradeoffs. An example of how it was used to independently investigate cost optimization tradeoffs for the LCLS-II linac will also be presented.

  8. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  9. RF gymnastics in synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R

    2011-01-01

    The RF systems installed in synchrotrons can be used to change the longitudinal beam characteristics. 'RF gymnastics' designates manipulations of the RF parameters aimed at providing such non-trivial changes. Some keep the number of bunches constant while changing bunch length, energy spread, emittance, or distance between bunches. Others are used to change the number of bunches. After recalling the basics of longitudinal beam dynamics in a hadron synchrotron, this paper deals with the most commonly used gymnastics. Their principle is described as well as their performance and limitations.

  10. RF Gymnastics in Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R

    2005-01-01

    The RF systems installed in synchrotrons can be used to change the longitudinal beam characteristics. "RF gymnastics" designates manipulations of the RF parameters aimed at providing such non-trivial changes. Some keep the number of bunches constant while changing bunch length, energy spread, emittance or distance between bunches. Others are used to change the number of bunches. After recalling the basics of longitudinal beam dynamics in a hadron synchrotron, this paper deals with the most commonly used gymnastics. Their principle is described as well as their performance and limitations.

  11. Geolocation of RF signals

    CERN Document Server

    Progri, Ilir

    2011-01-01

    ""Geolocation of RF Signals - Principles and Simulations"" offers an overview of the best practices and innovative techniques in the art and science of geolocation over the last twenty years. It covers all research and development aspects including theoretical analysis, RF signals, geolocation techniques, key block diagrams, and practical principle simulation examples in the frequency band from 100 MHz to 18 GHz or even 60 GHz. Starting with RF signals, the book progressively examines various signal bands - such as VLF, LF, MF, HF, VHF, UHF, L, S, C, X, Ku, and, K and the corresponding geoloca

  12. Tunable nonlinear superconducting metamaterials: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Melissa

    I present experimental and numerical simulation results for two types of nonlinear tunable superconducting metamaterials: 2D arrays of rf SQUIDs (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices) as magnetic metamaterials and arrays of Josephson junction-loaded wires as electric metamaterials. The effective inductance of a Josephson junction is sensitive to dc current, temperature, and rf current. I took advantage of this property to design arrays of Josephson junction-loaded wires that present a tunable cutoff frequency and thus a tunable effective permittivity for propagating electromagnetic waves in a one-conductor waveguide. I measured the response of the metamaterial to each tuning parameter and found agreement with numerical simulations that employ the RCSJ (resistively and capacitively shunted junction) model. An rf SQUID is an analogue of an SRR (split ring resonator) with the gap capacitance replaced with a Josephson junction. Like the SRR the SQUID is a resonant structure with a frequency-dependent effective permeability. The difference between the SQUID and the SRR is that the effective inductance and thus effective permeability of the SQUID can be tuned with dc and rf flux, and temperature. Individual rf SQUID meta-atoms and two-dimensional arrays were designed and measured as a function of each tuning parameter and I have found excellent agreement with numerical simulations. There is also an interesting transparency feature that occurs for intermediate rf flux values. The tuning of SQUID arrays has a similar character to the tuning of individual rf SQUID meta-atoms. However, I found that the coupling between the SQUIDs increases the resonant frequency, decreases dc flux tuning, and introduces additional resonant modes. Another feature of arrays is disorder which suppresses the coherence of the response and negatively impacts the emergent properties of the metamaterial. The disorder was experimentally found to be mainly due to a dc flux

  13. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N

    2000-01-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz(1/2) in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz(1/2) at 10 Hz) was present. Compute...

  14. Surface Impedance Measurements of Single Crystal MgB2 Films for Radiofrequency Superconductivity Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binping Xiao, Xin Zhao, Joshua Spradlin, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, Teng Tan, Xi Xiaoxing

    2012-07-01

    We report microstructure analyses and superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) measurements of large scale epitaxial MgB{sub 2} films. MgB{sub 2} films on 5 cm dia. sapphire disks were fabricated by a Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) technique. The electron-beam backscattering diffraction (EBSD) results suggest that the film is a single crystal complying with a MgB{sub 2}(0001) {parallel} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) epitaxial relationship. The SRF properties of different film thicknesses (200 nm and 350 nm) were evaluated under different temperatures and applied fields at 7.4 GHz. A surface resistance of 9 {+-} 2 {mu}{Omega} has been observed at 2.2 K.

  15. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  16. The Rise of Ingot Niobium as a Material for Superconducting Radiofrequency Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kneisel, P; Dhakal, P; Saito, K; Singer, W; Singer, X; Myneni, G R

    2013-01-01

    As a result of a collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer CBMM, ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This pioneering work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large grain niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this material. Most of the original expectations for this material of being less costly and allowing less expensive fabrication and treatment procedures at the same performance levels in cavities have been met. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown the performances comparable to the best cavities made from...

  17. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; /Los Alamos; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Melting Temperatures of SrF2and BaF2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-yu Huang; Xin-lu Cheng; Chao-lei Fan; Qiong Chen; Xiao-li Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The shell-model molecular dynamics method was applied to simulate the melting temper-atures of SrF2 and BaF2 at elevated temperatures and high pressures. The same method was used to calculate the equations of state for SrF2 and BaF2 over the pressure range of 0.1 MPa-3 GPa and 0.1 MPa-7 GPa. Compared with previous results for equations of state, the maximum errors are 0.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Considering the pre-melting in the fluorite-type crystals, we made the necessary corrections for the simulated melting temper-atures of SrF2 and BaF2. Consequently, the melting temperatures of SrF2 and BaF2 were obtained for high pressures. The melting temperatures of SrF2 and BaF2 that were obtained by the simulation are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  19. Severe myopathy in mice lacking the MEF2/SRF-dependent gene leiomodin-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenik, Bercin K.; Garg, Ankit; McAnally, John R.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Liu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of skeletal muscle structure and function requires a precise stoichiometry of sarcomeric proteins for proper assembly of the contractile apparatus. Absence of components of the sarcomeric thin filaments causes nemaline myopathy, a lethal congenital muscle disorder associated with aberrant myofiber structure and contractility. Previously, we reported that deficiency of the kelch-like family member 40 (KLHL40) in mice results in nemaline myopathy and destabilization of leiomodin-3 (LMOD3). LMOD3 belongs to a family of tropomodulin-related proteins that promote actin nucleation. Here, we show that deficiency of LMOD3 in mice causes nemaline myopathy. In skeletal muscle, transcription of Lmod3 was controlled by the transcription factors SRF and MEF2. Myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs), which function as SRF coactivators, serve as sensors of actin polymerization and are sequestered in the cytoplasm by actin monomers. Conversely, conditions that favor actin polymerization de-repress MRTFs and activate SRF-dependent genes. We demonstrated that the actin nucleator LMOD3, together with its stabilizing partner KLHL40, enhances MRTF-SRF activity. In turn, SRF cooperated with MEF2 to sustain the expression of LMOD3 and other components of the contractile apparatus, thereby establishing a regulatory circuit to maintain skeletal muscle function. These findings provide insight into the molecular basis of the sarcomere assembly and muscle dysfunction associated with nemaline myopathy. PMID:25774500

  20. Reconfigurable RF Filters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to build upon our existing space microelectronics and hardening technologies and products, to research and develop a novel rad hard/tolerant RF...

  1. Transverse Field Perturbation For PIP-II SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrutti, Paolo [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, Timergali N. [Fermilab; Lebedev, Valeri [Fermilab; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II) consists in a plan for upgrading the Fermilab proton accelerator complex to a beam power capability of at least 1 MW delivered to the neutrino production target. A room temperature section accelerates H⁻ ions to 2.1 MeV and creates the desired bunch structure for injection into the superconducting (SC) linac. Five cavity types, operating at three different frequencies 162.5, 325 and 650 MHz, provide acceleration to 800 MeV. This paper presents the studies on transverse field perturbation on particle dynamic for all the superconducting cavities in the linac. The effects studied include quadrupole defocusing for coaxial resonators, and dipole kick due to couplers for elliptical cavities. A multipole expansion has been performed for each of the cavity designs including effects up to octupole.

  2. SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-09

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

  3. Microbunching and RF Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  4. RF Measurement Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2014-01-01

    For the characterization of components, systems and signals in the radiofrequency (RF) and microwave ranges, several dedicated instruments are in use. In this article the fundamentals of the RF signal techniques are discussed. The key element in these front ends is the Schottky diode which can be used either as a RF mixer or as a single sampler. The spectrum analyser has become an absolutely indispensable tool for RF signal analysis. Here the front end is the RF mixer as the RF section of modern spectrum analyses has a ra ther complex architecture. The reasons for this complexity and certain working principles as well as limitations are discussed. In addition, an overview of the development of scalar and vector signal analysers is given. For the determination of the noise temperature of a one-port and the noise figure of a two-port, basic concepts and relations are shown as well as a brief discussion of commonly used noise-measurement techniques. In a further part of this article the operating principles of n...

  5. Apparatus and process for passivating an SRF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Wallace, John P

    2014-12-02

    An apparatus and process for the production of a niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided. The apparatus comprises a first chamber positioned within a second chamber, an RF generator and vacuum pumping systems. The process comprises placing the niobium cavity in a first chamber of the apparatus; thermally treating the cavity by high temperature in the first chamber while maintaining high vacuum in the first and second chambers; and applying a passivating thin film layer to a surface of the cavity in the presence of a gaseous mixture and an RF field. Further a niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients produced by the method of the invention is provided.

  6. Electromagnetic Design of New RF Power Couplers for the S-DALINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Marco; Brunken, M; Gräf, H D; Richter, Achim

    2004-01-01

    New rf power couplers for the Superconducting Darmstadt Linear Accelerator (S-DALINAC) injector have to be designed to transfer rf power of up to 2 kW to the electron beam. This allows injector operation at beam currents from 0.15 mA to 0.2 mA and electron energies up to 14 MeV. The new couplers should possibly provide a external Q of 5·106

  7. Itinerant Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karchev, Naoum

    2004-01-01

    Superconductivity has again become a challenge following the discovery of unconventional superconductivity. Resistance-free currents have been observed in heavy-fermion materials, organic conductors and copper oxides. The discovery of superconductivity in a single crystal of $UGe_2$, $ZrZn_2$ and $URhGe$ revived the interest in the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The experiments indicate that: i)The superconductivity is confined to the ferromagnetic phase. ii)The ferromag...

  8. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  9. Multipacting simulation and test results of BNL 704 MHz SRF gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu W.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Cullen, C. et al

    2012-05-20

    The BNL 704MHz SRF gun has a grooved choke joint to support the photo-cathode. Due to the distortion of grooves at the choke joint during the BCP for the choke joint, several multipacting barriers showed up when it was tested with Nb cathode stalk at JLab. We built a setup to use the spare large grain SRF cavity to test and condition the multipacting at BNL with various power sources up to 50kW. The test is carried out in three stages: testing the cavity performance without cathode, testing the cavity with the Nb cathode stalk that was used at Jlab, and testing the cavity with a copper cathode stalk that is based on the design for the SRF gun. This paper summarizes the results of multipacting simulation, and presents the large grain cavity test setup and the test results.

  10. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  11. Development of low angle grain boundaries in lightly deformed superconducting niobium and their influence on hydride distribution and flux perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Z.-H.; Wang, M.; Polyanskii, A. A.; Santosh, C.; Balachandran, S.; Compton, C.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Bieler, T. R.; Lee, P. J.

    2017-05-01

    This study shows that low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) can be created by small 5% strains in high purity (residual resistivity ratio ≥ 200) superconducting radio frequency (SRF)-grade single crystalline niobium (Nb) and that these boundaries act as hydrogen traps as indicated by the distribution of niobium hydrides (Nb1-xHx). Nb1-xHx is detrimental to SRF Nb cavities due to its normal conducting properties at cavity operating temperatures. By designing a single crystal tensile sample extracted from a large grain (>5 cm) Nb ingot slice for preferred slip on one slip plane, LAGBs and dense dislocation boundaries developed. With chemical surface treatments following standard SRF cavity fabrication practice, Nb1-xHx phases were densely precipitated at the LAGBs upon cryogenic cooling (8-10 K/min). Micro-crystallographic analysis confirmed heterogeneous hydride precipitation, which included significant hydrogen atom accumulation in LAGBs. Magneto-optical imaging analysis showed that these sites can then act as sites for both premature flux penetration and eventually flux trapping. However, this hydrogen related degradation at LAGBs did not completely disappear even after an 800 °C/2 h anneal typically used for hydrogen removal in SRF Nb cavities. These findings suggest that hydride precipitation at an LAGB is facilitated by a non-equilibrium concentration of vacancy-hydrogen (H) complexes aided by mechanical deformation and the hydride phase interferes with the recovery process under 800 °C annealing.

  12. Development of a 500 MHz high power RF test stand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Wei-Min; SHA Peng; HUANG Tong-Ming; MA Qiang; WANG Guang-Wei; LIN Hai-Ying; ZHAO Guang-Yuan; SUN Yi; XU Bo; WANG Qun-Yao

    2012-01-01

    A flexible high power RF test stand has been designed and constructed at IHEP to test a variety of 500 MHz superconducting RF components for the upgrade project of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC Ⅱ ),such as the input coupler,the higher order modes (HOMs) absorber and so on.A high power input coupler has been conditioned and tested with the RF power up to 250 kW in continuous wave (CW),traveling wave (TW) mode and 150 kW CW in standing wave (SW) mode.A prototype of the HOMs absorber has been tested to absorb power of 4.4 kW.An introduction of the test stand design,construction and high power tests is presented in this paper.

  13. Control of the LHC 400 MHz RF System (ACS)

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaudon, L; Maesen, P; Prax, M

    2004-01-01

    The LHC ACS RF system is composed of 16 superconducting cavities, eight per ring. Each ring has two cryomodules, each containing four cavities. Each cavity is powered by a 300 kW klystron. The klystrons are grouped in fours, the klystrons in each group sharing a common 58 kV power converter and HV equipment bunker. The ACS RF control system is based on modern industrial programmable controllers (PLCs). A new fast interlock and alarm system with inbuilt diagnostics has been developed. Extensive use of the FIPIO Fieldbus drastically decreases the cabling complexity and brings improved signal quality, increased reliability and easier maintenance. Features of the implementation, such as system layout, communication and the high-level software interface are described. Operational facilities such as the automatic switch on procedure are described, as well as the necessary specialist tools and interfaces. A complete RF chain, including high voltage, cryomodule and klystron is presently being assembled in order to ch...

  14. Root Causes of Field Emitters in SRF Cavities Placed in CEBAF Tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli

    2016-05-01

    It has been suspected that appearance of new field emitters can occur in SRF cavities after their placement in accelerator tunnel for long term beam operation. This apparently has been the case for CEBAF. However, no physical evidence has been shown in the past. In this contribution, we will report on the recent results concerning the root cause of field emitters in SRF cavities placed in CEBAF tunnel. We will discuss these results in the context of high-reliability and low-cryogenic-loss operation of CEBAF.

  15. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y.; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N.

    2000-11-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz1/2 in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz) was present. Computer simulation showed that the loss in this trilayer system was dominated by the high loss tangent of the dielectric film used for the separation of the upper and lower superconducting films. The rf coupling coefficient krf between the resonator and the flip-chip-coupled SQUID was also estimated. The values krf2≈14×10-3 obtained for the layout with two input coils, and krf2≈45×10-3 for the layout with the labyrinth resonator were considerably higher than the typical value of krf2≈7×10-3 for the single-layer coplanar resonator. These high coupling coefficients have compensated the somewhat degraded unloaded quality factor of the resonator, thus securing the optimum operation of the rf SQUID.

  16. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  17. Basics of RF electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, A

    2011-01-01

    RF electronics deals with the generation, acquisition and manipulation of high-frequency signals. In particle accelerators signals of this kind are abundant, especially in the RF and beam diagnostics systems. In modern machines the complexity of the electronics assemblies dedicated to RF manipulation, beam diagnostics, and feedbacks is continuously increasing, following the demands for improvement of accelerator performance. However, these systems, and in particular their front-ends and back-ends, still rely on well-established basic hardware components and techniques, while down-converted and acquired signals are digitally processed exploiting the rapidly growing computational capability offered by the available technology. This lecture reviews the operational principles of the basic building blocks used for the treatment of high-frequency signals. Devices such as mixers, phase and amplitude detectors, modulators, filters, switches, directional couplers, oscillators, amplifiers, attenuators, and others are d...

  18. Phase and Frequency Locked Magnetrons for SRF Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, Michael [Muons, Inc.; Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-12

    There is great potential for a magnetron power source that can be controlled both in phase and frequency. Such a power source could revolutionize many particle accelerator systems that require lower capital cost and/or higher power efficiency. Beyond the accelerator community, phase and frequency locked magnetons could improve radar systems around the world and make affordable phased arrays for wireless power transmission for solar powered satellites. This joint project of Muons, Inc., Fermilab, and L-3 CTL was supported by an STTR grant monitored by the Nuclear Physics Office of the DOE Office of Science. The object of the program was to incorporate ferrite materials into the anode of a magnetron and, with appropriate biasing of the ferrites, to maintain frequency lock and to allow for frequency adjustment of the magnetron without mechanical tuners. If successful, this device would have a dual use both as a source for SRF linacs and for military applications where fast tuning of the frequency is a requirement. In order to place the materials in the proper location, several attributes needed to be modeled. First the impact of the magnetron’s magnetic field needed to be shielded from the ferrites so that they were not saturated. And second, the magnetic field required to change the frequency of the magnetron at the ferrites needed to be shielded from the region containing the circulating electrons. ANSYS calculations of the magnetic field were used to optimize both of these parameters. Once the design for these elements was concluded, parts were fabricated and a complete test assembly built to confirm the predictions of the computer models. The ferrite material was also tested to determine its compatibility with magnetron tube processing temperatures. This required a vacuum bake out of the chosen material to determine the cleanliness of the material in terms of outgassing characteristics, and a subsequent room temperature test to verify that the characteristics of

  19. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  20. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  1. Theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Crisan, Mircea

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up t

  2. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  3. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise Christine [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  4. Simulation of ELBE SRF gun II for high-bunch-charge applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, P.; Arnold, A.; Teichert, J.; Vennekate, H.; Xiang, R.

    2016-09-01

    The SRF gun at ELBE will benefit most of the local user beamlines for future high-bunch-charge operations. Parallel to its development, simulation-based investigations have been performed to improve the beam quality for THz experiments and Compton backscattering experiments. These two applications have the most challenging requirements: THz experiments benefit significantly from short bunch lengths at the sub-ps level, while Compton backscattering experiments demand small transverse beam sizes of about 30 μm. The beam dynamics of the SRF gun are simulated with ASTRA and the beam transport is optimized using Elegant. Important physical effects included in simulations are introduced first, where the interesting phenomenon of "slice mismatch" is generally quantified and numerically studied. Afterwards, beam transport strategies and optimization methods are proposed which are based on the specific settings of ELBE but also applicable to similar accelerator setups. Finally, optimizations of the SRF gun and the beam transport in ELBE are presented. Results show that the SRF gun is capable of providing 500 pC bunches for both applications with better beam qualities than the currently 100 pC bunches supplied by the existing thermionic DC source.

  5. Status of the CERN-Karlsruhe superconducting RF particle separator

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, W; Dammertz, G; Grundner, M; Husson, L; Lengeler, H; Rathgeber, E

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of single cavity sections and of two joined sections are reported. The problem of storing heat treated sections until final assembly has been investigated. Flooding a cavity at room temperature with nitrogen deteriorates its performance, after the cavity was once excited to a peak electric field of 30 MV/m, corresponding to a peak magnetic field of 850 G and a deflecting field of 5.5 Mv/m. This effect is assumed to be due to a sensibilization of the surface oxides by field emission electrons. The effect is not observed after an electric field of up to 15 MV/m and it also does not appear when the cavity is flooded with argon. (14 refs).

  6. State of the Art Power Couplers for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isidoro Campisi

    2002-08-01

    Simulations are now routinely performed that allow the prediction of electromagnetic, multipacting, thermal, and mechanical properties of couplers. From these studies, better designs have been conceived which can minimize potential problems ahead of construction. Judicious use of materials and the implementation of clean practices and of careful conditioning have gradually increased the power levels at which couplers can safely operate. Machine operation at hundreds of kilowatts has been achieved in CW at KEK and Cornell, and in a pulsed mode at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). Test stand operations in CW at the megawatt level (Accelerator for the Production of Tritium) and in pulse mode at a peak power of 2 MW (Spallation Neutron Source, TTF version II) have been achieved. The recent progress indicates that the understanding of the behavior of fundamental power couplers is rapidly increasing and that optimal designs are being developed which will allow in the future to attain routine attainment of the megawatt power levels necessary for high-beam-power machines under construction and under study.

  7. Case Studies on Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ferracin, P

    2014-01-01

    During the CERN Accelerator School 'Superconductivity for accelerators', the students were divided into 18 groups, and 6 different exercises (case studies), involving the design and analysis of superconducting magnets and RF cavities, were assigned. The problems covered a broad spectrum of topics, from properties of superconducting materials to operation conditions and general dimensions of components. The work carried out by the students turned out to be an extremely useful opportunity to review the material explained during the lectures, to become familiar with the orders of magnitude of the key parameters, and to understand and compare different design options. We provide in this paper a summary of the activities related to the case studies on superconducting magnets and present the main outcomes.

  8. Remote RF Battery Charging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Pop, V.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a remote RF battery charger is discussed through the analysis and design of the subsystems of a rectenna (rectifying antenna): antenna, rectifying circuit and loaded DC-to-DC voltage (buck-boost) converter. Optimum system power generation performance is obtained by adopting a system in

  9. Dual-frequency eddy-current NDE based on high-T{sub c} rf SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, D.F.; Yoshizawa, M

    2002-12-15

    We developed a dual-frequency eddy-current NDE system based on High-T{sub c} RF superconducting quantum interference devices. This method could be used to decrease the unwanted signals caused by the variance of lift-off, to estimate the depth of crack flaw or to detect the thickness of metal structures by choosing appropriate excitation frequencies.

  10. A YBCO RF-squid variable temperature susceptometer and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luwei; Qiu, Jinwu; Zhang, Xianfeng; Tang, Zhimin; Cai, Yimin; Qian, Yongjia

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) susceptibility using a high-temperature radio-frequency (rf) SQUID and a normal metal pick-up coil is employed in testing weak magnetization of the sample. The magnetic moment resolution of the device is 1 x 10(exp -6) emu, and that of the susceptibility is 5 x 10(exp -6) emu/cu cm.

  11. First Experience with Dry-Ice Cleaning on SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Reschke, D

    2004-01-01

    The surface of superconducting (s.c.) accelerator cavities must be cleaned from any kind of contaminations, like particles or chemical residues. Contaminations might act as centers for field emission, thus limiting the maximum gradient. Today's final cleaning is based on high pressure rinsing with ultra pure water. Application of dry-ice cleaning might result in additional cleaning potential. Dry-ice cleaning using the sublimation-impulse method removes particulate and film contaminations without residues. As a first qualifying step intentionally contaminated niobium samples were treated by dry ice cleaning. It resulted in a drastic reduction of DC field emission up to fields of 100 MV/m as well as in the reduction of particle numbers. The dry ice jet caused no observable surface damage. First cleaning tests on single-cell cavities showed Q-values at low fields up to 4x1010

  12. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, P., E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Saito, K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Singer, W.; Singer, X. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Myneni, G.R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of E{sub acc}=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  13. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  14. Reliability engineering in RF CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis new developments are presented for reliability engineering in RF CMOS. Given the increase in use of CMOS technology in applications for mobile communication, also the reliability of CMOS for such applications becomes increasingly important. When applied in these applications, CMOS is typically referred to as RF CMOS, where RF stands for radio frequencies.

  15. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  16. DC SQUID RF magnetometer with 200 MHz bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanov, Vladimir; Lettsome, Nesco; Orozco, Antonio; Cawthorne, Alfred; Borzenets, Valery

    2012-02-01

    Because of periodic flux-to-voltage transfer function, Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers operate in a closed-loop regime [1], which linearizes the response, and increases the dynamic range and sensitivity. However, a transmission line delay between the SQUID and electronics fundamentally limits the closed-loop bandwidth at 20 MHz [1], although the intrinsic bandwidth of SQUIDs is in gigahertz range. We designed a DC SQUID based RF magnetometer capable of wideband sensing coherent magnetic fields up to 200 MHz. To overcome the closed-loop bandwidth limitation, we utilized a low-frequency flux-modulated closed-loop to simultaneously lock the quasi-static magnetic flux and provide AC bias for the RF flux. The SQUID RF voltage is processed by RF electronics based on a double lock-in technique. This yields a signal proportional to the amplitude and phase of the RF magnetic flux, with more than four decades of a linear response. For YBaCuO SQUID on bi-crystal SrTiO substrate at 77 K we achieved a flux noise density of 4 μφ0/Hz at 190 MHz, which is similar to that measured at kHz frequencies with conventional flux-locked loop. [1] D. Drung, et al., Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19, S235 (2006).

  17. 805 MHz and 201 MHz RF cavity development for MUCOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derun [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Corlett, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ladran, A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); MacGill, R [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wallig, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zisman, M [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Moretti, A [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Rowe, A [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Qian, Z B [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Wu, V [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Rimmer, R A [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Norem, J [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Summers, D [University of Mississippi at Oxford, MS 38677 (United States); Torun, Y [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2003-08-01

    A muon cooling channel calls for very high accelerating gradient RF structures to restore the energy lost by muons in the absorbers. The RF structures have to be operated in a strong magnetic field and thus the use of superconducting RF cavities is excluded. To achieve a high shunt impedance while maintaining a large enough aperture to accommodate a large transverse emittance muon beam, the cavity design adopted is a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be foils to terminate the electromagnetic field at the cavity iris. The possibility of using grids of thin-walled metallic tubes for the termination is also being explored. Many of the RF-related issues for muon cooling channels are being studied both theoretically and experimentally using an 805 MHz cavity that has a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be windows to terminate the cavity aperture. The design and performance of this cavity are reported here. High-power RF tests of the 805 MHz cavity are in progress at Lab G in Fermilab. The cavity has exceeded its design gradient of 30 MV m{sup -1}, reaching 34 MV m{sup -1} without external magnetic field. No surface damage was observed at this gradient. The cavity is currently under conditioning at Lab G with an external magnetic field of 2.5 T. We also present here a 201 MHz cavity design for muon cooling channels. The proposed cavity design is also suitable for use in a proof-of-principle muon ionization cooling experiment.

  18. 805 MHz and 201 MHz RF cavity development for MUCOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; Ladran, Tony; MacGill, R.; Wallig, J.; S. Zisman, Michael; Moretti, Alfred; Rowe, A; Qian, Zubao; Wu, Vincent; Rimmer, Robert; Norem, J.; Norem, Jim; Summers, Donald; Torun, Yagmur

    2003-08-01

    A muon cooling channel calls for very high accelerating gradient RF structures to restore the energy lost by muons in the absorbers. The RF structures have to be operated in a strong magnetic field and thus the use of superconducting RF cavities is excluded. To achieve a high shunt impedance while maintaining a large enough aperture to accommodate a large transverse emittance muon beam, the cavity design adopted is a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be foils to terminate the electromagnetic field at the cavity iris. The possibility of using grids of thin-walled metallic tubes for the termination is also being explored. Many of the RF-related issues for muon cooling channels are being studied both theoretically and experimentally using an 805 MHz cavity that has a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be windows to terminate the cavity aperture. The design and performance of this cavity are reported here. High-power RF tests of the 805 MHz cavity are in progress at Lab G in Fermilab. The cavit

  19. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  20. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  1. Design of Tunable Superconducting Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng; Anlage, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Our goal is to create a superconducting metamaterial utilizing deep sub-wavelength meta-atoms with a quickly-tunable index of refraction. To accomplish this we will combine two different materials: an array of rf SQUIDs (with tunable effective permeability) and an array of thin wires interrupted by Josephson junctions (with tunable effective permittivity). These materials have been designed to maximize tunablility in the range easily measured via X-band, Ku-band, and K-band waveguides. Various sizes of rf SQUIDs were designed to be non-hysteretic, be sufficiently insensitive to noise, and to have resonant frequencies ranging from 6.5 - 22 GHz. The wire array was designed so that the inductance of the Josephson junctions can completely cancel the geometric and kinetic inductance of the wires, giving rise to strong tunability. We will present the design considerations and simulation results for this new class of metamaterials. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI program through grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  2. Fiducialization of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cryomodules at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. J. Curtis; J. Dahlberg; W. Oren; J. Preble; K. Tremblay

    2006-09-26

    During the early 1990's the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), was under construction in Newport News, Virginia. The facility was to be the first of its kind in that it was to provide a continuous beam of electrons for experimental physics at energies of several GeV. One of the key elements of this unique machine was the 338 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities built into 42 cryomodules and arranged in two linacs. These were linked by arcs of conventional magnets which allowed recirculation through the linacs up to five times, in order to achieve the design energy of 4GeV. Within each cryomodule the cavities were aligned and referenced to external fiducials allowing alignment on the design beampath. This paper describes the process developed to achieve this, how it evolved with improving instrumentation, and the results obtained. Suggestions for alternative methods which may prove useful for future projects are also discussed.

  3. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  4. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  5. Superconducting material development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    A superconducting compound was developed that showed a transition to a zero-resistance state at 65 C, or 338 K. The superconducting material, which is an oxide based on strontium, barium, yttrium, and copper, continued in the zero-resistance state similar to superconductivity for 10 days at room temperature in the air. It was also noted that measurements of the material allowed it to observe a nonlinear characteristic curve between current and voltage at 65 C, which is another indication of superconductivity. The research results of the laboratory experiment with the superconducting material will be published in the August edition of the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

  6. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  7. RF Power Amplifier Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lokay

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available The special program is presented for the demonstration of RF power transistor amplifiers for the purposes of the high-school education in courses of radio transmitters. The program is written in Turbo Pascal 6. 0 and enables to study the waveforms in selected points of the amplifier and to draw the trajectories of the working point in a plot of output transistor characteristics.

  8. Microwave and RF engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sorrentino, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    An essential text for both students and professionals, combining detailed theory with clear practical guidance This outstanding book explores a large spectrum of topics within microwave and radio frequency (RF) engineering, encompassing electromagnetic theory, microwave circuits and components. It provides thorough descriptions of the most common microwave test instruments and advises on semiconductor device modelling. With examples taken from the authors' own experience, this book also covers:network and signal theory;electronic technology with guided electromagnetic pr

  9. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  10. Compensating microphonics in SRF cavities to ensure beam stability for future free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Axel

    2008-07-21

    In seeded High-Gain-Harmonic-Generation free electron lasers or energy recovery linear accelerators the requirements for the bunch-to-bunch timing and energy jitter of the beam are in the femtosecond and per mill regime. This implies the ability to control the cavity radiofrequency (RF) field to an accuracy of 0.02 in phase and up to 1.10{sup -4} in amplitude. For the planned BESSY-FEL it is envisaged to operate 144 superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities of the 2.3 GeV driver linac in continuous wave mode and at a low beam current. The cavity resonance comprises a very narrow bandwidth of the order of tens of Hertz. Such cavities have been characterized under accelerator like conditions in the HoBiCaT test facility. It was possible to measure the error sources affecting the field stability in continuous wave (CW) operation. Microphonics, the main error source for a mechanical detuning of the cavities, lead to an average fluctuation of the cavity resonance of 1-5 Hz rms. Furthermore, the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning and the helium pressure dependance of the cavity resonance have been measured. Single cavity RF control and linac bunch-to-bunch longitudinal phase space modeling containing the measured properties showed, that it is advisable to find means to minimize the microphonics detuning by mechanical tuning. Thus, several fast tuning systems have been tested for CW operation. These tuners consist of a motor driven lever for slow and coarse tuning and a piezo that is integrated into the tuner support for fast and fine tuning. Regarding the analysis of the detuning spectrum an adaptive feedforward method based on the least-mean-square filter algorithm has been developed for fast cavity tuning. A detuning compensation between a factor of two and up to a factor of seven has been achieved. Modeling the complete system including the fast tuning scheme, showed that the requirements of the BESSY-FEL are attainable. (orig.)

  11. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chet Nieter

    2010-12-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  12. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  13. RF Based Spy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robot Prerna Jain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this paper is to reduce human victims in terrorist attack such as 26/11. So this problem can be overcome by designing the RF based spy robot which involves wireless camera. so that from this we can examine rivals when it required. This robot can quietly enter into enemy area and sends us the information via wireless camera. On the other hand one more feature is added in this robot that is colour sensor. Colour sensor senses the colour of surface and according to that robot will change its colour. Because of this feature this robot can’t easily detected by enemies. The movement of this robot is wirelessly controlled by a hand held RF transmitter to send commands to the RF receiver mounted on the moving robot. Since human life is always Valueable, these robots are the substitution of soldiers in war areas. This spy robot can also be used in star hotels, shopping malls, jewelry show rooms, etc where there can be threat from intruders or terrorists.

  14. A Two-Level Sensorless MPPT Strategy Using SRF-PLL on a PMSG Wind Energy Conversion System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amina Echchaachouai; Soumia El Hani; Ahmed Hammouch; Imad Aboudrar

    2017-01-01

    ...) giving the six Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals to the active rectifier. The generator rotor speed and position required by the FOC and the sensorless MPPT are estimated using a Synchronous Reference Frame Phase Locked Loop (SRF-PLL...

  15. Automated Surface Classification of SRF Cavities for the Investigation of the Influence of Surface Properties onto the Operational Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2015-07-15

    Superconducting niobium radio-frequency cavities are fundamental for the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider. To use the operational advantages of superconducting cavities, the inner surface has to fulfill quite demanding requirements. The surface roughness and cleanliness improved over the last decades and with them, the achieved maximal accelerating field. Still, limitations of the maximal achieved accelerating field are observed, which are not explained by localized geometrical defects or impurities. The scope of this thesis is a better understanding of these limitations in defect free cavities based on global, rather than local, surface properties. For this goal, more than 30 cavities underwent subsequent surface treatments, cold RF tests and optical inspections within the ILC-HiGrade research program and the XFEL cavity production. An algorithm was developed which allows an automated surface characterization based on an optical inspection robot. This algorithm delivers a set of optical surface properties, which describes the inner cavity surface. These optical surface properties deliver a framework for a quality assurance of the fabrication procedures. Furthermore, they shows promising results for a better understanding of the observed limitations in defect free cavities.

  16. Superconducting tunnel junctions as direct detectors for submillimeter astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, John Daniel

    This thesis presents measurements on the of performance of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) as direct detectors for submillimeter radiation. Over the past several decades, STJ's have been successfully implemented as energy-resolving detectors of X-ray and optical photons. This work extends their application to ultra-sensitive direct detection of photons near 100 GHz. The focus of this research is to integrate the detector with a readout that is sensitive, fast, and able to be scaled for use in large format arrays. We demonstrate the performance of a radio frequency single electron transistor (RF-SET) configured as a transimpedance current amplifier as one such readout. Unlike traditional semiconductor amplifiers, the RF-SET is compatible with cryogenic operation and naturally lends itself to frequency domain multiplexing. This research progressed to the invention of RF-STJ, whereby the same RF reflectometry as used in the RF-SET is applied directly to the detector junction. This results in a greatly simplified design that preserves many of the advantages of the RF-SET while achieving comparable sensitivity. These experiments culminate in calibration of the detector with an on-chip, mesoscopic noise source. Millimeter wave Johnson noise from a gold microbridge illuminates the detector in situ. This allows for direct measurement of the "optical" properties of the detector and its RF readout, including the response time, responsivity and sensitivity.

  17. Development of 1.3GHz high-Tc rf SQUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xin-Yuan; Xie Fei-Xiang; Meng Shu-Chao; Dai Yuan-Dong; Li Zhuang-Zhi; Ma Ping; Yang Tao; Nie Rui-Juan; Wang Fu-Ren

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new high-Tc (HTc) rf SQUID working at around 1.3GHz has been developed to avoid electromagnetic interference such as growing mobile communication jamming. This new system works in a frequency range from 1.23 to 1.42GHz (centred at 1.3GHz), which is not occupied by commercial communication. The sensor used in the 1.3GHz rf SQUID is made of a HTc coplanar superconducting resonator and a large-area HTc superconducting film concentrator. We have achieved in the 1.3GHz HTc rf SQUID system a minimal flux noise of 2.5×10-5φ0/√Hz and a magnetic field sensitivity of 38fT/√Hz in white noise range, respectively. The effective area of the concentrator fabricated on a 15×15mm2 substrate is 1.35mm2. It is shown that the 1.3GHz rf SQUID system has a high field sensitivity. Design and implementation of 1.3GHz HTc rf SQUID offers a promising direction of rf SQUID development for higher working frequency ranges.

  18. Modifications of Superconducting Properties of Niobium Caused by Nitrogen Doping Recipes for High Q Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, Alexander [Fermilab; Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee [U. Chicago (main); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    A study is presented on the superconducting properties of niobium used for the fabrication of the SRF cavities after treating by recently discovered nitrogen doping methods. Cylindrical niobium samples have been subjected to the standard surface treatments applied to the cavities (electro-polishing, l 20°C bake) and compared with samples treated by additional nitrogen doping recipes routinely used to reach ultra-high quality factor values (>3· 1010 at 2 K, 16 MV/m). The DC magnetization curves and the complex magnetic AC susceptibility have been measured. Evidence for the lowered field of first flux penetration after nitrogen doping is found suggesting a correlation with the lowered quench fields. Superconducting critical temperatures Tc = 9.25 K are found to be in agreement with previous measurements, and no strong effect on the critical surface field (Bd) from nitrogen doping was found.

  19. RECENT XPS STUDIES OF THE EFFECT OF PROCESSING ON NB SRF SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian; Binping Xiao; Michael Kelley; Charles Reece; A. Demasi; L. Pipe; Kevin Smith

    2008-02-12

    XPS studies have consistently shown that Nb surfaces for SRF chiefly comprise of a few nm of Nb2O5 on top of Nb metal, with minor amounts of Nb sub-oxides. Nb samples after BCP/EP treatment with post-baking at the various conditions have been examined by using synchrotron based XPS. Despite the confounding influence of surface roughness, certain outcomes are clear. Lower-valence Nb species are always and only associated with the metal/oxide interface, but evidence for an explicit layer structure or discrete phases is lacking. Post-baking without air exposure shows decreased oxide layer thickness and increased contribution from lower valence species, but spectra obtained after subsequent air exposure cannot be distinguished from those obtained prior to baking, though the SRF performance improvement remains.

  20. Excited state absorption of Sm2+ in SrF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A.; Chase, L. L.; Krupke, William F.

    1988-10-01

    The excited state absorption spectrum of Sm2+ in SrF2 has been observed. The absorption peaks associated with the 5D0(4f6) excited state were found to be displaced by approximately 3000 cm-1 from the absorption bands arising from the 7F0(4f6) ground state (after taking the 5D0-7F0 energy separation into account). The observed peak separation is ascribed to the 4f-5d exchange interaction. From the measured peak positions, the exchange energy for the Sm2+ impurity was determined to be about the same order of magnitude as expected for the free ion. The implications of the properties of the excited state absorption bands for the performance of the SrF2:Sm2+ laser are considered.

  1. RECENT XPS STUDIES OF THE EFFECT OF PROCESSING ON NB SRF SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian; Binping Xiao; Michael Kelley; Charles Reece; A. Demasi; L. Pipe; Kevin Smith

    2008-02-12

    XPS studies have consistently shown that Nb surfaces for SRF chiefly comprise of a few nm of Nb2O5 on top of Nb metal, with minor amounts of Nb sub-oxides. Nb samples after BCP/EP treatment with post-baking at the various conditions have been examined by using synchrotron based XPS. Despite the confounding influence of surface roughness, certain outcomes are clear. Lower-valence Nb species are always and only associated with the metal/oxide interface, but evidence for an explicit layer structure or discrete phases is lacking. Post-baking without air exposure shows decreased oxide layer thickness and increased contribution from lower valence species, but spectra obtained after subsequent air exposure cannot be distinguished from those obtained prior to baking, though the SRF performance improvement remains.

  2. Pathway to a Post Processing Increase in Q0 of SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kugeler, O; Knobloch, J; Aull, S

    2013-01-01

    A significant improvement of the quality factor Q0 from values of 1.5x1010 to values around 3x1010 at 1.8 K has been repeatedly achieved in a fully dressed and horizontally operated TESLA type SRF cavity by thermal cycling, i.e. heating the cavity briefly above the 9.2 K transition temperature of niobium and subsequent cooling. Conceivable explanations for this effect reach from (a) changes in shielding efficacy of the magnetic shielding to (b) thermal currents to (c) hydrogen diffusion. Our experiments suggest that neither (a) nor (c) are responsible for the changes in quality factor. It appears that the dynamics on frozen flux at the transition temperature is responsible for the observed effect. The pathway to this finding is being presented and the application to SRF systems is elicited.

  3. STARS is essential to maintain cardiac development and function in vivo via a SRF pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson W Chong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: STARS (STriated muscle Activator of Rho Signaling is a sarcomeric protein expressed early in cardiac development that acts as an acute stress sensor for pathological remodeling. However the role of STARS in cardiac development and function is incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of STARS in heart development and function in the zebrafish model and in vitro. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression of zebrafish STARS (zSTARS first occurs in the somites by the 16 somite stage [17 hours post fertilization (hpf]. zSTARS is expressed in both chambers of the heart by 48 hpf, and also in the developing brain, jaw structures and pectoral fins. Morpholino-induced knockdown of zSTARS alters atrial and ventricular dimensions and decreases ventricular fractional shortening (measured by high-speed video microscopy, with pericardial edema and decreased or absent circulation [abnormal cardiac phenotypes in 126/164 (77% of morpholino-injected embryos vs. 0/152 (0% of control morpholino embryos]. Co-injection of zsrf (serum response factor mRNA rescues the cardiac phenotype of zSTARS knockdown, resulting in improved fractional shortening and ventricular end-diastolic dimensions. Ectopic over-expression of STARS in vitro activates the STARS proximal promoter, which contains a conserved SRF site. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrates that SRF binds to this site in vivo and the SRF inhibitor CCG-1423 completely blocks STARS proximal reporter activity in H9c2 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates for the first time that STARS deficiency severely disrupts cardiac development and function in vivo and revealed a novel STARS-SRF feed-forward autoregulatory loop that could play an essential role in STARS regulation and cardiac function.

  4. Longitudinal Space Charge Effects in the JLAB IR FEL SRF Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Behre, Chris; Benson, S V; Herman-Biallas, George; Boyce, James; Douglas, David; Dylla, Fred; Evans, Richard; Grippo, A; Gubeli, Joe; Hardy, David; Jordan, Kevin; Merminga, Lia; Neil, George; Preble, Joe; Shinn, Michelle D; Siggins, Tim; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn; Yunn, Byung; Zhang, Shukui

    2004-01-01

    Observations of energy spread asymmetry when operating the Linac on either side of crest and longitudinal emittance growth have been confirmed by extending PARMELA simulations from the injector to the end of the first SRF Linac module. The asymmetry can be explained by the interaction of the accelerating electric field with that from longitudinal space charge effects within the electron bunch. This can be a major limitation to performance in FEL accelerators.

  5. Short Rotation Forestry (SRF) in a Mediterranean Environment Under Limited Energy Inputs

    OpenAIRE

    Stella Lovelli; Nicola Moretti; Teodoro Di Tommaso; Luigi Todaro; Antonio Sergio De Franchi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is comparing the two year performance (diameter, total height and mortality) of twenty tree and shrub species in a semi arid environment. The research also wants to supply recommendation on the agronomic cropping techniques in areas where rainfall is the main limiting factor and water use is strictly limited. Woody biomass is gaining increasing importance for energy production in Italy. During the last five years, roughly 5000 ha of Short Rotation Forestry (SRF) have been...

  6. Performance characteristics of Jefferson Lab's new SRF infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Denny, Philip [JLAB; Reilly, Anthony [JLAB

    2013-09-01

    In the past two years, Jefferson Lab has reconfigured and renovated its SRF support infrastructure as part of the Technology and Engineering Development Facility project, TEDF. The most significant changes are in the cleanroom and chemistry facilities. We report the initial characterization data on the new ultra-pure water systems, cleanroom facilities, describe the reconfiguration of existing facilities and also opportunities for flexible growth presented by the new arrangement.

  7. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostrikov, Alexander

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS--II requirements on quality factor of 2. · 10 10 at acceleration field of 16~MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS--II.

  8. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, Alexander [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS–II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 ∙ 1010 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS–II.

  9. Observation of spatio-temporal pattern in magnetised rf plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, P; Konopka, U; Morfill, G

    2016-01-01

    We address an experimental observation of pattern formation in a magnetised rf plasma. The experiments are carried out in a electrically grounded aluminium chamber which is housed inside a rotatable superconducting magnetic coil. The plasma is formed by applying a rf voltage in parallel plate electrodes in push-pull mode under the background of argon gas. The time evolution of plasma intensity shows that a homogeneous plasma breaks into several concentric radial spatiotemoral bright and dark rings. These rings propagate radially at considerably low pressure and a constant magnetic field. These patterns are observed to trap small dust particles/grains in their potential. Exploiting this property of the patterns, a novel technique to measure the electric field associated with the patterns is described. The resulting estimates of the corresponding field intensity are presented. At other specific discharge parameters the plasma shows a range of special type of characteristic structures observed in certain other c...

  10. Growth and characterization of epitaxial SrF2 on InP(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharoy, S.; Hoffman, R. A.; Rieger, J. H.; Warner, J. D.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of 100-262.5-nm SrF2 films on n-type and p-type (100)InP in a conventional baked UHV system at base pressure about 200 ptorr, temperature 250-350 C, and growth rate from less than 100 to about 200 pm/s. Substrates are chemicomechanically polished, degreased, bombarded with 500-eV Ar ions for 3-4 min at 350 C, and annealed for 23-30 min at 350 C, producing a slightly In-rich (In/P = 1.02) In-island-free surface with a (4 x 1) or (1 x 1) LEED structure. Films grown at 350 C and less than 100 pm/s are found to be smooth and free of cracks in most cases, with a highly faceted (1 x 1) LEED structure. The electrical properties of the SrF2 films are found to be acceptable only when the ohmic contacts are applied prior to the substrate prior to SrF2 growth.

  11. Control of Dvr with Battery Energy Storage System Using Srf Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Kavitha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the best solutions to improve power quality is the dynamic voltage restorer (DVR. DVR is a kind of custom power devices that can inject active/reactive power to the power grids. This can protect loads from disturbances such as sag and swell. Usually DVR installed between sensitive loads feeder and source in distribution system. Its features include lower cost, smaller size, and its fast dynamic response to the disturbance. In this project SRF technique is used for conversion of voltage from rotating vectors to the stationary frame. SRF technique is also referred as park’s transformation. In this the reference load voltage is estimated using the unit vectors. The real power exchanged at the DVR output ac terminal is provided by the DVR input dc terminal by an external energy source or energy storage system. In this project three phase parallel or series load may be used along with SRF technique to compensate voltage sag and voltage swell. And also wind generator is also used as a load. This project presents the simulation of DVR system using MATLAB/SIMULINK.

  12. RF power generation

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, R G

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the main types of r.f. power amplifiers which are, or may be, used for particle accelerators. It covers solid-state devices, tetrodes, inductive output tubes, klystrons, magnetrons, and gyrotrons with power outputs greater than 10 kW c.w. or 100 kW pulsed at frequencies from 50 MHz to 30 GHz. Factors affecting the satisfactory operation of amplifiers include cooling, matching and protection circuits are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of the state of the art for the different technologies.

  13. Other RF power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkin, G.Ya. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1999-09-01

    The main subjects discussed in this paper are as follows. Triode tube; main characteristics of the equivalent schematic of the amplifying stage. Requirements for operation of a triode stage loaded with an accelerating cavity. Influence of parameters of the output stage and transmission line length on the output impedance of RF system for the beam. Typical design of the power output stage. Magnetron, travelling-wave tube, principles of operation, main parameters. Magnetron loaded with a microtron cavity, methods of coupling, requirements for stable operation. Magnicon - BHF generator with a circular deflection of the electron beam, principle of operation, results of development. (author)

  14. SPS RF cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. A power of up to 790 kW can be supplied to each giving a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities.

  15. Conceptual Design Of An Ideal Variable Coupler For Superconducting Radiofrequency 1.3GHz Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the development of over-moded RF component as an undulator, we explored another over-moded structure that could serve the variable coupling for SRF purpose. This application is to fulfill variation of S11 from 0 to -20db with CW power of 7 KW. The static heat loss in the coupler is trivial from calculation. An advantage of this coupler is that the thermal isolation between the 2K and 300K section is considerable by vacuum separation. Within this coupler, only a single propagation mode is allowed at each section, and thus, the fact that no energy is converted to high order mode bring almost full match without loss. The analytical and numerical calculation for a two window variable coupler is designed and optimized. A RF power variation is illustrated in the scattering matrix and coupling to cavity is also discussed.

  16. HIE-ISOLDE CRYO-MODULE Assembly - Superconducting Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Leclercq, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of the cryo-module components in SM18 cleanroom. The superconducting solenoid (housed inside its helium vessel) is cleaned, prepared then installed on the supporting frame of the cryo-module and connected to the helium tank, prior to the assembly of the RF cavities on the structure. The completed first 2 cryo-modules installed inside the HIE-ISOLDE-LINAC ready for beam operation is also shown.

  17. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  18. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  19. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  20. Meta-Atom Interactions and Coherent Response in rf SQUID Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng; Mukhanov, Oleg; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Koshelets, V. P.; Ustinov, Alexey; Anlage, Steven

    2015-03-01

    An rf SQUID (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device) metamaterial can be modeled as an array of coupled nonlinear oscillators with resonant frequencies that are extremely tunable with temperature, dc magnetic field, and rf current. The metamaterial is driven by an external rf field and its response to that field defines its metamaterial characteristics. In the presence of disorder (nonuniform applied dc magnetic flux for instance) the SQUIDs may or may not oscillate coherently in response to the external rf field. Since we are interested in metamaterial applications, a strong coherent response is desirable. The coherence is affected by a variety of factors including flux uniformity, array size, degree of coupling, strength of the driving field, and uniformity in SQUID parameters. In this talk we will present experimental and simulation results exploring the effect of these parameters on coherence. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE programs through Grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  1. A New First-Principles Calculation of Field-Dependent RF Surface Impedance of BCS Superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    There is a need to understand the intrinsic limit of radiofrequency (RF) surface impedance that determines the performance of superconducting RF cavities in particle accelerators. Here we present a field-dependent derivation of Mattis-Bardeen theory of the RF surface impedance of BCS superconductors based on the shifted density of states resulting from coherently moving Cooper pairs. Our theoretical prediction of the effective BCS RF surface resistance (Rs) of niobium as a function of peak surface magnetic field amplitude agrees well with recently reported record low loss resonant cavity measurements from JLab and FNAL with carefully, yet differently, prepared niobium material. The surprising reduction in resistance with increasing field is explained to be an intrinsic effect.

  2. Fundamentals of Superconducting Nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Anatolie

    2011-01-01

    This book demonstrates how the new phenomena in superconductivity on the nanometer scale (FFLO state, triplet superconductivity, Crossed Andreev Reflection, synchronized generation etc.) serve as the basis for the invention and development of novel nanoelectronic devices and systems. It demonstrates how rather complex ideas and theoretical models, like odd-pairing, non-uniform superconducting state, pi-shift etc., adequately describe the processes in real superconducting nanostructues and novel devices based on them. The book is useful for a broad audience of readers, researchers, engineers, P

  3. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  4. Superconducting optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  5. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  6. LANSCE RF System Refurbishment

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Daniel; Kwon, Sung-il; Lyles, John T M; Lynch, Michael; Prokop, Mark; Reass, William; Tallerico, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is in the planning phase of a refurbishment project that will sustain reliable facility operations well into the next decade. The LANSCE accelerator was constructed in the late 1960s and early 1970s and is a national user facility that provides pulsed protons and spallation neutrons for defense and civilian research and applications. We will be replacing all the 201 MHz RF systems and a substantial fraction of the 805 MHz RF systems and high voltage systems. The current 44 LANSCE 805 MHz, 1.25 MW klystrons have an average in-service time in excess of 110,000 hours. All 44 must be in service to operate the accelerator. There are only 9 spares left. The klystrons receive their DC power from the power system originally installed in 1960. Although this power system has been extremely reliable, gas analysis of the insulating oil is indicating age related degradation that will need attention in the next few years. This paper will provide the design details of the new R...

  7. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  8. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  9. Superconducting hot-electron nanobolometer with microwave bias and readout

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmin, A A; Shitov, S V; Abramov, N N; Ermakov, A B; Arndt, M; Wuensch, S H; Ilin, K S; Ustinov, A V; Siegel, M

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new detection technique based on radio-frequency (RF) bias and readout of an antenna-coupled superconducting nanobolometer. This approach is suitable for Frequency-Division-Multiplexing (FDM) readout of large arrays using broadband low-noise RF amplifier. We call this new detector RFTES. This feasibility study was made on demonstrator devices which are made in all-Nb technology and operate at 4.2 K. The studied RFTES devices consist of an antenna-coupled superconducting nanobolometer made of ultrathin niobium films with transition temperature Tc = 5.2 K. The 0.65-THz antenna and nanobolometer are embedded as a load into a GHz-range coplanar niobium resonator (Tc = 8.9 K, Q = 4000). To heat the superconducting Nb nanobolometer close to the Tc, the RF power at resonator frequency f = 5.8 GHz is applied via a transmission line which is weakly coupled (-11 dB) to the loaded resonator. The THz-antenna of RFTES was placed in the focus of a sapphire immersion lens inside a He4-cryostat equipped with an ...

  10. Improvement and protection of niobium surface superconductivity by atomic layer deposition and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proslier, T.; /IIT, Chicago /Argonne; Zasadzinski, J.; /IIT, Chicago; Moore, J.; Pellin, M.; Elam, J.; /Argonne; Cooley, L.; /Fermilab; Antoine, C.; /Saclay

    2008-11-01

    A method to treat the surface of Nb is described, which potentially can improve the performance of superconducting rf cavities. We present tunneling and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements at the surface of cavity-grade niobium samples coated with a 3 nm alumina overlayer deposited by atomic layer deposition. The coated samples baked in ultrahigh vacuum at low temperature degraded superconducting surface. However, at temperatures above 450 C, the tunneling conductance curves show significant improvements in the superconducting density of states compared with untreated surfaces.

  11. Broadband sample holder for microwave spectroscopy of superconducting qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averkin, A S; Karpov, A; Shulga, K; Glushkov, E; Abramov, N; Huebner, U; Il'ichev, E; Ustinov, A V

    2014-10-01

    We present a practical design and implementation of a broadband sample holder suitable for microwave experiments with superconducting integrated circuits at millikelvin temperatures. Proposed design can be easily integrated in standard dilution cryostats, has flat pass band response in a frequency range from 0 to 32 GHz, allowing the RF testing of the samples with substrate size up to 4 × 4 mm(2). The parasitic higher modes interference in the holder structure is analyzed and prevented via design considerations. The developed setup can be used for characterization of superconducting parametric amplifiers, bolometers, and qubits. We tested the designed sample holder by characterizing of a superconducting flux qubit at 20 mK temperature.

  12. Heavy-ion acceleration with a superconducting linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    This year, 1988, is the tenth anniversary of the first use of RF superconductivity to accelerate heavy ions. In June 1978, the first two superconducting resonators of the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) were used to boost the energy of a /sup 19/F beam from the tandem, and by September 1978 a 5-resonator linac provided an /sup 16/O beam for a nuclear-physics experiment. Since then, the superconducting linac has grown steadily in size and capability until now there are 42 accelerating structures and 4 bunchers. Throughout this period, the system was used routinely for physics research, and by now the total time with beam on target is 35,000 hours. Lessons learned from this long running experience and some key technical developments that made it possible are reviewed in this paper. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  14. Simulation of non-linear rf losses derived from characteristic Nb topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Xu, Chen; Kelley, Michael [W& M. JLAB

    2013-09-01

    A simplified model has been developed to simulate non-linear RF losses on Nb surfaces exclusively due to topographical enhancement of surface magnetic fields. If local sharp edges are small enough, at locations where local surface fields exceed Hc, small volumes of material may become normal conducting without thermal leading to quench. These small volumes of normal material yield increases in the effective surface resistance of the Nb. Using topographic data from typical BCP?d and EP?d fine grain niobium surfaces, we have simulated field-dependent losses and found that when extrapolated to resulting cavity performance, these losses correspond well to characteristic BCP/EP high field Q0 performance differences for fine grain Nb. We describe the structure of the model, its limitations, and the effects of this type of non-linear loss contribution on SRF cavities.

  15. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  16. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  17. Enhanced responsivity resonant RF photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R; Dev, S; Zhong, Y; Lu, R; Streyer, W; Allen, J W; Allen, M S; Wenner, B R; Gong, S; Wasserman, D

    2016-11-14

    The responsivity of room-temperature, semiconductor-based photodetectors consisting of resonant RF circuits coupled to microstrip buslines is investigated. The dependence of the photodetector response on the semiconductor material and RF circuit geometry is presented, as is the detector response as a function of the spatial position of the incident light. We demonstrate significant improvement in detector response by choice of photoconductive material, and for a given material, by positioning our optical signal to overlap with positions of RF field enhancement. Design of RF circuits with strong field enhancement are demonstrated to further improve detector response. The improved detector response demonstrated offers opportunities for applications in RF photonics, materials metrology, or single read-out multiplexed detector arrays.

  18. Modeling rf breakdown arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Huang, Dazhang; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Veitzer, Seth

    2010-01-01

    We describe breakdown in 805 MHz rf accelerator cavities in terms of a number of mechanisms. We devide the breakdown process into three stages: (1) we model surface failure using molecular dynamics of fracture caused by electrostatic tensile stress, (2) we model the ionization of neutrals responsible for plasma initiation and plasma growth using a particle in cell code, and (3) we model surface damage by assuming a process similar to unipolar arcing. Although unipolar arcs are strictly defined with equipotential boundaries, we find that the cold, dense plasma in contact with the surface produces very small Debye lengths and very high electric fields over a large area. These high fields produce strong erosion mechanisms, primarily self sputtering, compatible with the crater formation that we see. Results from the plasma simulation are included as a guide to experimental verification of this model.

  19. Superconducting cyclotrons at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, H. G.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes the status of the three superconducting cyclotrons which are in operation or under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The oldest of these, the K500, has been in operation since September 1982 supporting a national user program in heavy ion nuclear physics. A second large research cyclotron, the K800, is now nearing completion. This cyclotron will accelerate lighter heavy ions to 200 MeV/nuc and heavier particles up to energies given by 1200 Q2/ A MeV/nucleon. The magnet for this cyclotron came into operation in May 1984 and has performed smoothly and reliably in three extended operating periods. At present, K800 construction activity centers on fabrication and installation of the rf system, the extraction system, and the ECR injection line. The third NSCL superconducting cyclotron is a smaller 50 MeV deuteron cyclotron to be used for neutron therapy in the radiation oncology center of a major Detroit hospital (Harper Hospital). Design features of this small, application oriented, cyclotron are described in some detail.

  20. The NASA high temperature superconductivity program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    It has been recognized from the onset that high temperature superconductivity held great promise for major advances across a broad range of NASA interests. The current effort is organized around four key areas: communications and data, sensors and cryogenics, propulsion and power, and space materials technology. Recently, laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films on LaAIO produced far superior RF characteristics when compared to metallic films on the same substrate. This achievement has enabled a number of unique microwave device applications, such as low insertion loss phase shifters and high Q filters. Melt texturing and melt quenched techniques are being used to produce bulk materials with optimized magnetic properties. These yttrium enriched materials possess enhanced flux pinning characteristics and will lead to prototype cryocooler bearings. Significant progress has also occurred in bolometer and current lead technology. Studies are being conducted to evaluate the effect of high temperature superconducting materials on the performance and life of high power magneto-plasma-dynamic thrusters. Extended studies were also performed to evaluate the benefit of superconducting magnetic energy storage for LEO space station, lunar and Mars mission applications. The project direction and level of effort of the program are also described.