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Sample records for superconducting radiofrequency srf

  1. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Acceleration Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — SRF cavities enable accelerators to increase particle beam energy levels while minimizing the use of electrical power by all but eliminating electrical resistance....

  2. Optimization of Pulsed Operation of the Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) Cavities at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Campisi, Isidoro E.

    2007-01-01

    In order to address the optimization in a pulsed operation, a systematic computational analysis has been made in comparison with operational experiences in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). From the analysis it appears that the SNS SRF cavities can be operated at temperatures higher than 2.1 K, a fact resulting from both the pulsed nature of the superconducting cavities, the specific configuration of the existing cryogenic plant and the operating frequency

  3. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991

  4. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-01-15

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991.

  5. RADIOFREQUENCY SUPERCONDUCTIVITY: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency is already playing an important role in the beam acceleration system for the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at the Japanese KEK Laboratory and new such systems are being prepared for other major machines. Thus the fourth Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity, organized by KEK under the chairmanship of local specialist Yuzo Kojima and held just before the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators, had much progress to review and even more to look forward to

  6. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-10-15

    The Second Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity was held at CERN from 23-27 July, four years after the first, organized at Karlsruhe. 35 invited talks were presented to the about 80 participants from Australia, Brazil, Europe, Japan and the United States. For the first time, ten Laboratories operating or planning superconducting accelerators for heavy ions participated and shared their experience with the community proposing the use of superconducting accelerating sections for electron accelerators.

  7. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The Second Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity was held at CERN from 23-27 July, four years after the first, organized at Karlsruhe. 35 invited talks were presented to the about 80 participants from Australia, Brazil, Europe, Japan and the United States. For the first time, ten Laboratories operating or planning superconducting accelerators for heavy ions participated and shared their experience with the community proposing the use of superconducting accelerating sections for electron accelerators

  8. Thin Film Approaches to the SRF Cavity Problem: Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Douglas B.

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities are responsible for the acceleration of charged particles to relativistic velocities in most modern linear accelerators, such as those employed at high-energy research facilities like Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory's CEBAF and the LHC at CERN. Recognizing SRF as primarily a surface phenomenon enables the possibility of applying thin films to the interior surface of SRF cavities, opening a formidable tool chest of opportunities by combining and designing materials that offer greater benefit. Thus, while improvements in radio frequency cavity design and refinements in cavity processing techniques have improved accelerator performance and efficiency - 1.5 GHz bulk niobium SRF cavities have achieved accelerating gradients in excess of 35 MV/m - there exist fundamental material bounds in bulk superconductors limiting the maximally sustained accelerating field gradient (approximately 45 MV/m for Niobium) where inevitable thermodynamic breakdown occurs. With state of the art niobium based cavity design fast approaching these theoretical limits, novel material innovations must be sought in order to realize next generation SRF cavities. One proposed method to improve SRF performance is to utilize thin film superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) multilayer structures to effectively magnetically screen a bulk superconducting layer such that it can operate at higher field gradients before suffering critically detrimental SRF losses. This dissertation focuses on the production and characterization of thin film superconductors for such SIS layers for radio-frequency applications.

  9. SUPERCONDUCTING RADIO-FREQUENCY MODULES TEST FACILITY OPERATING EXPERIENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R and D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service the SRF R and D needs. The project's first stage has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single-cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at Meson Detector Building (MDB) results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project

  10. Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsee, Hasan S.

    2014-10-01

    Superconducting cavities have been operating routinely in a variety of accelerators with a range of demanding applications. With the success of completed projects, niobium cavities have become an enabling technology, offering upgrade paths for existing facilities and pushing frontier accelerators for nuclear physics, high-energy physics, materials science, and the life sciences. With continued progress in basic understanding of radio-frequency superconductivity, the performance of cavities has steadily improved to approach theoretical capabilities.

  11. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    1993-01-01

    Full text: With superconducting radiofrequency playing a major role in the push for new machines to break fresh physics frontiers, it has become a tradition for experts and newcomers in this field from all over the world to meet every second year to hear progress reports from laboratories and to discuss common problems and possible solutions. The sixth such workshop was held from 4-8 October under the chairmanship of Ron Sundelin at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) under construction in Newport News, Virginia. With 170 participants from 14 countries including Eastern Europe and China, it reflected the growing interest in the field - looking back to 1984, when CERN was the host laboratory, the second workshop had less than 100 participants. The CEBAF meeting began with laboratory status reports, covering both high beam energy ('high beta') applications with 'spherical' cavities (as with CERN's LEP200), all using niobium as superconductor and working between 352 MHz and 3 GHz, and lower energy (low beta') applications with geometrically more complicated shapes such as quarter or half wave, split ring or spoke resonators, some using electrodeposited lead as superconductor and working around 100 MHz. During these talks it became clear that more and more laboratories have focused on routine problems, such as reliable series production and testing, running cavities with ancillaries in the machines, or building complete prototypes for projects to be approved by critical funding authorities. This contrasts with the heady days just a few years ago when - at least in the high beta community - the main objective was to explore new ideas. State-of-the-art summaries showed how at 1.3 and 3 GHz 25-30 MV/m have been reached by several laboratories using different preparation methods. Newer developments for common problems included r.f. windows, couplers, controls, and especially field emission, public enemy number one for

  12. Ignition and monitoring technique for plasma processing of multicell superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleans, Marc

    2016-12-01

    An in-situ plasma processing technique has been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in operation. The technique uses a low-density reactive neon-oxygen plasma at room-temperature to improve the surface work function, to help remove adsorbed gases on the RF surface, and to reduce its secondary emission yield. SNS SRF cavities have six accelerating cells and the plasma typically ignites in the cell where the electric field is the highest. This article details the technique to ignite and monitor the plasma in each cell of the SNS cavities.

  13. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Ribeill, Guilhem; Xu, Chen; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  14. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hui; Ribeill, Guilhem; Xu Chen; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  15. Defect Detection in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity Surface Using C + + and OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Samantha; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) uses superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities to accelerate an electron beam. If theses cavities have a small particle or defect, it can degrade the performance of the cavity. The problem at hand is inspecting the cavity for defects, little bubbles of niobium on the surface of the cavity. Thousands of pictures have to be taken of a single cavity and then looked through to see how many defects were found. A C + + program with Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) was constructed to reduce the number of hours searching through the images and finds all the defects. Using this code, the SRF group is now able to use the code to identify defects in on-going tests of SRF cavities. Real time detection is the next step so that instead of taking pictures when looking at the cavity, the camera will detect all the defects.

  16. Thin Film Approaches to the SRF Cavity Problem Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beringer, Douglas [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities are responsible for the acceleration of charged particles to relativistic velocities in most modern linear accelerators, such as those employed at high-energy research facilities like Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory’s CEBAF and the LHC at CERN. Recognizing SRF as primarily a surface phenomenon enables the possibility of applying thin films to the interior surface of SRF cavities, opening a formidable tool chest of opportunities by combining and designing materials that offer greater performance benefit. Thus, while improvements in radio frequency cavity design and refinements in cavity processing techniques have improved accelerator performance and efficiency – 1.5 GHz bulk niobium SRF cavities have achieved accelerating gradients in excess of 35 MV/m – there exist fundamental material bounds in bulk superconductors limiting the maximally sustained accelerating field gradient (≈ 45 MV/m for Nb) where inevitable thermodynamic breakdown occurs. With state of the art Nb based cavity design fast approaching these theoretical limits, novel material innovations must be sought in order to realize next generation SRF cavities. One proposed method to improve SRF performance is to utilize thin film superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) multilayer structures to effectively magnetically screen a bulk superconducting layer such that it can operate at higher field gradients before suffering critically detrimental SRF losses. This dissertation focuses on the production and characterization of thin film superconductors for such SIS layers for radio frequency applications. Correlated studies on structure, surface morphology and superconducting properties of epitaxial Nb and MgB2 thin films are presented.

  17. Probing the fundamental limit of niobium in high radiofrequency fields by dual mode excitation in superconducting radiofrequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari

    2011-01-01

    We have studied thermal breakdown in several multicell superconducting radiofrequency cavity by simultaneous excitation of two TM 010 passband modes. Unlike measurements done in the past, which indicated a clear thermal nature of the breakdown, our measurements present a more complex picture with interplay of both thermal and magnetic effects. JLab LG-1 that we studied was limited at 40.5 MV/m, corresponding to B peak = 173 mT, in 89 mode. Dual mode measurements on this quench indicate that this quench is not purely magnetic, and so we conclude that this field is not the fundamental limit in SRF cavities

  18. Surface studies of niobium chemically polished under conditions for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.; Wang, Shancai; Plucinski, Lukasz; Smith, Kevin E.; Nowell, Matthew M.

    2006-11-01

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially as influenced by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant datasets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (1 0 0), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3-1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is ±30% and that of the surface composition is ±5%.

  19. Surface studies of niobium chemically polished under conditions for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States)]. E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org; Wang Shancai [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Plucinski, Lukasz [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Smith, Kevin E. [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Nowell, Matthew M. [EDAX TSL (United States)

    2006-11-30

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially as influenced by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant datasets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (1 0 0), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3-1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is {+-}30% and that of the surface composition is {+-}5%.

  20. Surface Studies of Niobium Chemically Polished Under Conditions for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Cavity Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian,H.; Reece, C.; Kelley, M.; Wang, S.; Plucinski, L.; Smith, K.; Nowell, M.

    2006-01-01

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially as influenced by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant datasets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (1 0 0), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3-1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is {+-}30% and that of the surface composition is {+-}5%.

  1. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a DC superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinis, J.M.; Hilbert, C.; Clarke, J.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of amplifying a radiofrequency signal consisting of: disposing a single symmetrically biased dc SQUID and an input coil within a superconducting shield, the dc SQUID having a superconducting ring interrupted by two shunted Josephson junctions, and the input coil being inductively coupled solely to the ring of the single SQUID, establishing a constant magnetic flux threading the SQUID ring, applying the radiofrequency signal to the input coil from outside of the superconducting shield, obtaining an amplified radiofrequency signal solely from across the ring of the single SQUID, transmitting the amplified radiofrequency signal from across the SQUID ring to the outside of the superconducting shield

  2. Thermal behaviour analysis of SRF cavities and superconducting HOM couplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouaidy, M.; Junquera, T.

    1993-01-01

    Two individual papers appear in this report, titled Thermal model calculations in superconducting RF cavities, and Thermal study of HOM couplers for superconducting RF cavities. Both were indexed separately for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  3. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Zhao; G. Ciovati; T. R. Bieler

    2010-01-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical micro...

  4. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  5. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Denise C; Cooley, Lance D; Seidman, David N

    2013-01-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium–hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities. (paper)

  6. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, P., E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Saito, K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Singer, W.; Singer, X. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Myneni, G.R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of E{sub acc}=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  7. Initial Beam Dynamics Simulations of a High-Average-Current Field-Emission Electron Source in a Superconducting RadioFrequency Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohsen, O. [Northern Illinois U.; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Kephart, R. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Solyak, N. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, J. C. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2018-01-05

    High-power electron beams are sought-after tools in support to a wide array of societal applications. This paper investigates the production of high-power electron beams by combining a high-current field-emission electron source to a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity. We especially carry out beam-dynamics simulations that demonstrate the viability of the scheme to form $\\sim$ 300 kW average-power electron beam using a 1+1/2-cell SRF gun.

  8. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Denise Christine

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities---hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon---in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I present the beginning of a model to describe magnetic

  9. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise Christine [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  10. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, G.; Geng, R.; Lushtak, Y.; Manini, P.; Maccallini, E.; Stutzman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. The results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.

  11. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, G., E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Geng, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Lushtak, Y.; Manini, P.; Maccallini, E. [SAES Getters, S.p.A, Viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, MI (Italy); Stutzman, M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2017-01-11

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. The results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.

  12. Calorimeters for Precision Power Dissipation Measurements on Controlled-Temperature Superconducting Radiofrequency Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Binping P.; Kelley, Michael J.; Reece, Charles E.; Phillips, H. L.

    2012-01-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the surface impedance characterization (SIC) system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm dia. disk sample which is thermally isolated from the RF portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analysed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al 2 O 3 , Cu, MgO, Nb and Si

  13. Surface polishing of niobium for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Niobium cavities are important components in modern particle accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology. The interior of SRF cavities are cleaned and polished in order to produce high accelerating field and low power dissipation on the cavity wall. Current polishing methods, buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electro-polishing (EP), have their advantages and limitations. We seek to improve current methods and explore laser polishing (LP) as a greener alternative of chemical methods. The topography and removal rate of BCP at different conditions (duration, temperature, sample orientation, flow rate) was studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Differential etching on different crystal orientations is the main contributor to fine grain niobium BCP topography, with gas evolution playing a secondary role. The surface of single crystal and bi-crystal niobium is smooth even after heavy BCP. The topography of fine grain niobium depends on total removal. The removal rate increases with temperature and surface acid flow rate within the rage of 0~20 °C, with chemical reaction being the possible dominate rate control mechanism. Surface flow helps to regulate temperature and avoid gas accumulation on the surface. The effect of surface flow rate on niobium EP was studied with optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and power spectral density (PSD) analysis. Within the range of 0~3.7 cm/s, no significant difference was found on the removal rate and the macro roughness. Possible improvement on the micro roughness with increased surface flow rate was observed. The effect of fluence and pulse accumulation on niobium topography during LP was studied with optical microscopy, SEM, AFM, and PSD analysis. Polishing on micro scale was achieved within fluence range of 0.57~0.90 J/cm2, with pulse accumulation adjusted accordingly. Larger area treatment was proved possible by

  14. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Hydroformed Tubular Materials for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Sung

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities represent a well established technology benefiting from some 40 years of research and development. An increasing demand for electron and positron accelerators leads to a continuing interest in improved cavity performance and fabrication techniques. Therefore, several seamless cavity fabrication techniques have been proposed for eliminating the multitude of electron-beam welded seams that contribute to the introduction of performance-reducing defects. Among them, hydroforming using hydraulic pressure is a promising fabrication technique for producing the desired seamless cavities while at the same time reducing manufacturing cost. This study focused on experimental and numerical analysis of hydroformed niobium (Nb) tubes for the successful application of hydroforming technique to the seamless fabrication of multi-cell SRF cavities for particle acceleration. The heat treatment, tensile testing, and bulge testing of Cu and Nb tubes has been carried out to both provide starting data for models of hydroforming of Nb tube into seamless SRF cavities. Based on the results of these experiments, numerical analyses using finite element modeling were conducted for a bulge deformation of Cu and Nb. In the experimental part of the study samples removed from representative tubes were prepared for heat treatment, tensile testing, residual resistance ratio (RRR) measurement, and orientation imaging electron microscopy (OIM). After being optimally heat treated Cu and Nb tubes were subjected to hydraulic bulge testing and the results analyzed. For numerical analysis of hydroforming process, two different simulation approaches were used. The first model was the macro-scale continuum model using the constitutive equations (stress-strain relationship) as an input of the simulation. The constitutive equations were obtained from the experimental procedure including tensile and tube bulge tests in order to investigate the influence of loading

  15. Suppression of hydride precipitates in niobium superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-10-01

    Niobium hydride is a suspected contributor to degraded niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity performance by Q slope and Q disease. The concentration and distribution of hydrogen atoms in niobium can be strongly affected by the cavity processing treatments. This study provides guidance for cavity processing based on density functional theory calculations of the properties of common processing impurity species—hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon—in the body-centered cubic (bcc) niobium lattice. We demonstrate that some fundamental properties are shared between the impurity atoms, such as anionic character in niobium. The strain field produced, however, by hydrogen atoms is both geometrically different and substantially weaker than the strain field produced by the other impurities. We focus on the interaction between oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the lattice, and demonstrate that the elastic interactions between these species and the bcc niobium lattice cause trapping of hydrogen and oxygen atoms by bcc niobium lattice vacancies. We also show that the attraction of oxygen to a lattice vacancy is substantially stronger than the attraction of hydrogen to the vacancy. Additionally, hydrogen dissolved in niobium tetrahedral interstitial sites can be trapped by oxygen, nitrogen and possibly carbon atoms dissolved in octahedral interstitial sites. These results indicate that the concentration of oxygen in the bcc lattice can have a strong impact on the ability of hydrogen to form detrimental phases. Based on our results and a literature survey, we propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature annealing step applied to niobium SRF cavities. We also recommend further examination of nitrogen and carbon in bcc niobium, and particularly the role that nitrogen can play in preventing detrimental hydride phase formation.

  16. Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close, a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and the study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider, Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X also supports development of a Muon Collider as a future facility at the energy frontier.

  17. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q0 applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, S.; Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-01

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb3Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb3Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q0 out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q0 at quench of 8 × 109. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above Hc1, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q0 values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb3Sn cavities in future applications.

  18. Investigation of niobium surface structure and composition for improvement of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenikhina, Yulia

    Nano-scale investigation of intrinsic properties of niobium near-surface is a key to control performance of niobium superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Mechanisms responsible for the performance limitations and their empirical remedies needs to be justified in order to reproducibly control fabrication of SRF cavities with desired characteristics. The high field Q-slope and mechanism behind its cure (120°C mild bake) were investigated by comparison of the samples cut out of the cavities with high and low dissipation regions. Material evolution during mild field Q-slope nitrogen treatment was characterized using the coupon samples as well as samples cut out of nitrogen treated cavity. Evaluation of niobium near-surface state after some typical and novel cavity treatments was accomplished. Various TEM techniques, SEM, XPS, AES, XRD were used for the structural and chemical characterization of niobium near-surface. Combination of thermometry and structural temperature-dependent comparison of the cavity cutouts with different dissipation characteristics revealed precipitation of niobium hydrides to be the reason for medium and high field Q-slopes. Step-by-step effect of the nitrogen treatment processing on niobium surface was studied by analytical and structural characterization of the cavity cutout and niobium samples, which were subject to the treatment. Low concentration nitrogen doping is proposed to explain the benefit of nitrogen treatment. Chemical characterization of niobium samples before and after various surface processing (Electropolishing (EP), 800°C bake, hydrofluoric acid (HF) rinsing) showed the differences that can help to reveal the microscopic effects behind these treatments as well as possible sources of surface contamination.

  19. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Ciovati, G.; Bieler, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. The local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  20. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots” were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD, and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations. All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. The local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  1. Effect of low-temperature baking on the radio-frequency properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2004-01-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some 'anomalous' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low-temperature (100-150 deg. C) 'in situ' bake under ultrahigh vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from 'anomalous' losses (so-called 'Q drop') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth, and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with nuclear reaction analysis. The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models. This paper

  2. Model for initiation of quality factor degradation at high accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzyuba, A; Romanenko, A; Cooley, L D

    2010-01-01

    A model for the onset of the reduction in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration H pen . Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens (1998 Physica C 294 257), whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of H pen when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower H pen was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of κ. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by ∼ 20%, and that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model

  3. Effect of low-temperature baking on the radio-frequency properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2004-08-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some "anomalous" losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low-temperature (100-150°C) "in situ" bake under ultrahigh vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from "anomalous" losses (so-called "Q drop") without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37-280K and resonant frequency shift between 6-9.3K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth, and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with nuclear reaction analysis. The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models. This paper describes

  4. Model for initiation of quality factor degradation at high accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyuba, A.; Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    A model for the onset of the reduction in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration Hpen. Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens (1998 Physica C 294 257), whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of Hpen when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower Hpen was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of κ. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by ~ 20%, and that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model was

  5. Prototype superconducting radio-frequency cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    This niobium superconducting cavity was part of the prototype stages for an upgrade to LEP, known as LEP-2. Superconducting cavities would eventually replace the traditional copper cavities and allow beam energies of 100 GeV.

  6. Superconducting linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) for particle accelerators have been demonstrated by successful operation of systems in the TRISTAN and LEP electron-positron collider rings respectively at the Japanese KEK Laboratory and at CERN. If performance continues to improve and costs can be lowered, this would open an attractive option for a high luminosity TeV (1000 GeV) linear collider

  7. A superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the phase space of pion beams at LAMPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, J.M.; Davis, J.; DeHaven, R.A.; Gray, E.; Johnson, R.; Lomax, R.E.; McCloud, B.J.; McGill, J.A.; Morris, C.L.; Novak, J.; Rusnak, B.; Tubb, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Applegate, J.M.; Averett, T.D.; Beck, J.; Ritchie, B.G. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)); Haebel, E. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Kiehlmann, D.; Klein, U.; Peniger, M.; Schaefer, P.; Vogel, H. (Siemens AG, Accelerator and Magnet Technology, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany)); Ward, H.; Moore, C.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

    1992-07-15

    The SCRUNCHER is a superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the longitudinal phase space of the secondary pion beam from the low energy pion channel at LAMPF. Test results of the cavity performance and initial results from in-beam tests are presented. (orig.).

  8. A superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the phase space of pion beams at LAMPF

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. M.; Davis, J.; DeHaven, R. A.; Gray, E.; Johnson, R.; Lomax, R. E.; McCloud, B. J.; McGill, J. A.; Morris, C. L.; Novak, J.; Rusnak, B.; Tubb, G.; Applegate, J. M.; Averett, T. D.; Beck, J.; Ritchie, B. G.; Haebel, E.; Kiehlmann, D.; Klein, U.; Peiniger, M.; Schäfer, P.; Vogel, H.; Ward, H.; Fred Moore, C.

    1992-07-01

    The SCRUNCHER is a superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the longitudinal phase space of the secondary pion beam from the low energy pion channel at LAMPF. Test results of the cavity performance and initial results from in-beam tests are presented.

  9. Laser Processing on the Surface of Niobium Superconducting Radio-Frequency Accelerator Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, Senthilraja; Klopf, Michael; Krafft, Geoffrey; Kelley, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting Radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities are at the heart of an increasing number of particle accelerators.~ Their performance is dominated by a several nm thick layer at the interior surface. ~Maximizing its smoothness is found to be critical and aggressive chemical treatments are employed to this end.~ We describe laser-induced surface melting as an alternative ``greener'' approach.~ Modeling guided selection of parameters for irradiation with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.~ The resulting topography was examined by SEM, AFM and Stylus Profilometry.

  10. Test of superconducting radio-frequency cavity bombarded by protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. M.; McCloud, B. J.; Morris, C. L.; McClelland, J. B.; Rusnak, B.; Thiessen, H. A.; Langenbrunner, J. L.

    1992-05-01

    A beam of 2 × 10 10 protons/s was focused onto a small area on the high-field iris of a superconducting cavity operating at the resonance frequency. The input, reflected, and stored power were monitored. The cavity remained in steady state during this test. We conclude that such superconducting cavities will remain viable in the high-proton-flux environments proposed in the design of a superconducting accelerator for pions (PILAC).

  11. Test of superconducting radio-frequency cavity bombarded by protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, J.M.; McCloud, B.J.; Morris, C.L.; McClelland, J.B.; Rusnak, B.; Thiessen, H.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Langenbrunner, J.L. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States))

    1992-05-10

    A beam of 2x10{sup 10} protons/s was focused onto a small area on the high-field iris of a superconducting cavity operating at the resonance frequency. The input, reflected, and stored power were monitored. The cavity remained in steady state during this test. We conclude that such superconducting cavities will remain viable in the high-proton-flux environments proposed in the design of a superconducting accelerator for pions (PILAC). (orig.).

  12. Multipacting studies in elliptic SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ram; Jana, Arup Ratan; Kumar, Vinit

    2017-09-01

    Multipacting is a resonant process, where the number of unwanted electrons resulting from a parasitic discharge rapidly grows to a larger value at some specific locations in a radio-frequency cavity. This results in a degradation of the cavity performance indicators (e.g. the quality factor Q and the maximum achievable accelerating gradient Eacc), and in the case of a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity, it leads to a quenching of superconductivity. Numerical simulations are essential to pre-empt the possibility of multipacting in SRF cavities, such that its design can be suitably refined to avoid this performance limiting phenomenon. Readily available computer codes (e.g.FishPact, MultiPac,CST-PICetc.) are widely used to simulate the phenomenon of multipacting in such cases. Most of the contemporary two dimensional (2D) codes such as FishPact, MultiPacetc. are unable to detect the multipacting in elliptic cavities because they use a simplistic secondary emission model, where it is assumed that all the secondary electrons are emitted with same energy. Some three-dimensional (3D) codes such as CST-PIC, which use a more realistic secondary emission model (Furman model) by following a probability distribution for the emission energy of secondary electrons, are able to correctly predict the occurrence of multipacting. These 3D codes however require large data handling and are slower than the 2D codes. In this paper, we report a detailed analysis of the multipacting phenomenon in elliptic SRF cavities and development of a 2D code to numerically simulate this phenomenon by employing the Furman model to simulate the secondary emission process. Since our code is 2D, it is faster than the 3D codes. It is however as accurate as the contemporary 3D codes since it uses the Furman model for secondary emission. We have also explored the possibility to further simplify the Furman model, which enables us to quickly estimate the growth rate of multipacting without

  13. Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavities for Low-Beta Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael

    2012-01-01

    High-power proton and ion linac projects based on superconducting accelerating cavities are driving a worldwide effort to develop and build superconducting cavities for beta < 1. Laboratories and institutions building quarter-wave, halfwave and single- or multi-spoke cavities continue to advance the state of the art for this class of cavities, and the common notion that low-beta SRF cavities fill a need in niche applications and have low performance is clearly no longer valid. This article reviews recent developments and results for SC cavity performance for cavities with beta up to approximately 0.5. The considerable ongoing effort on reduced beta elliptical cell cavities is not discussed. An overview of associated subsystems required to operate low-beta cavities, including rf power couplers and fast and slow tuners, is presented.

  14. Quench detection on a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Ru-Yu; Spirn, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We study quench detection in superconducting accelerator cavities cooled with He-II. A rigorous mathematical formula is derived to localize the quench position from dynamical data over a finite time interval at a second sound detector.

  15. Mechanical design of SXLS [Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source] radio-frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, P.; Sharma, S.; Keane, J.; Thomas, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design of a Radio-Frequency (RF) cavity to be used on a compact storage ring for Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source (SXLS). Various design features of this cavity are discussed, including basic geometrical configuration, structural design, initial and operational tuning, vacuum multipactoring, power window, and damping of higher order modes. A second application of this cavity design for beam life extension in an existing storage ring is also described. 2 refs., 6 figs

  16. Mechanical design of SXLS (Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source) radio-frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, P.; Sharma, S.; Keane, J.; Thomas, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design of a Radio-Frequency (RF) cavity to be used on a compact storage ring for Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source (SXLS). Various design features of this cavity are discussed, including basic geometrical configuration, structural design, initial and operational tuning, vacuum multipactoring, power window, and damping of higher order modes. A second application of this cavity design for beam life extension in an existing storage ring is also described. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Shahid, E-mail: shahid.ahmed@ieee.org [BML Munjal University, Gurgaon, Haryana 123413 (India); Mammosser, John D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar–O{sub 2} (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM{sub 010}-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  18. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D.

    2015-07-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar-O2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM010-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  19. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D.

    2015-01-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar–O 2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM 010 -mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper

  20. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D

    2015-07-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar-O2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM010-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  1. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (∼120 °C) and high (∼800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ∼1 × 10(-5) Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ∼2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  2. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q{sub 0} applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posen, S., E-mail: sep93@cornell.edu; Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L. [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb{sub 3}Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb{sub 3}Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q{sub 0} out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q{sub 0} at quench of 8 × 10{sup 9}. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above H{sub c1}, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q{sub 0} values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb{sub 3}Sn cavities in future applications.

  3. Electron bunch train excited higher-order modes in a superconducting RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong-Feng; Huang, Sen-Lin; Wang, Fang; Feng, Li-Wen; Zhuang, De-Hao; Lin, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Hao, Jian-Kui; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2017-04-01

    Higher-order mode (HOM) based intra-cavity beam diagnostics has been proved effective and convenient in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators. Our recent research shows that the beam harmonics in the bunch train excited HOM spectrum, which have much higher signal-to-noise ratio than the intrinsic HOM peaks, may also be useful for beam diagnostics. In this paper, we will present our study on bunch train excited HOMs, including a theoretical model and recent experiments carried out based on the DC-SRF photoinjector and SRF linac at Peking University. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275014)

  4. Design and application possibilities of superconducting radio-frequency quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schempp, A.; Deitinghoff, H.

    1990-01-01

    In recent experiments, cw surface electric fields in excess of 100 MV/m have been obtained in a superconducting rf quadrupole (SCRFQ) device. In this paper we explore some design and application possibilities of SCRFQs which have been opened by these results. For example, SCRFQs may be able to accelerate higher cw currents than is now possible. Also, highly-modulated SCRFQs could be designed to provide compact, high-longitudinal-gradient devices. Some conceptual designs and applications will be discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs

  5. SRF for neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory calls for nearly 500 meters of 200 MHz SRF cavities to provide 7.5 GV. Such a facility is more demanding than the largest SRF installation to date, i.e., LEP-II, where 500 m of niobium-coated copper cavities provided more than 3 GV of acceleration. Based on the high real estate gradient desired to minimize muon loss, superconducting cavities are selected to provide active gradients of 15 - 17 MV/m, and a real estate gradient of 7.5 MV/m. At such high gradients, the peak RF power demand for copper cavities would become prohibitively expensive. By virtue of low losses, SC cavities can be filled slowly (rise time 3 ms) reducing the peak power demand to roughly half MW per cell. (author)

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  7. RF Power Requirements for PEFP SRF Cavity Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2011-01-01

    For the future extension of the PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) Proton linac, preliminary study on the SRF (superconducting radio-frequency) cavity is going on including a five-cell prototype cavity development to confirm the design and fabrication procedures and to check the RF and mechanical properties of a low-beta elliptical cavity. The main parameters of the cavity are like followings. - Frequency: 700 MHz - Operating mode: TM010 pi mode - Cavity type: Elliptical - Geometrical beta: 0.42 - Number of cells: 5 - Accelerating gradient: 8 MV/m - Epeak/Eacc: 3.71 - Bpeak/Eacc: 7.47 mT/(MV/m) - R/Q: 102.3 ohm - Epeak: 29.68 MV/m (1.21 Kilp.) - Geometrical factor: 121.68 ohm - Cavity wall thickness: 4.3 mm - Stiffening structure: Double ring - Effective length: 0.45 m For the test of the cavity at low temperature of 4.2 K, many subsystems are required such as a cryogenic system, RF system, vacuum system and radiation shielding. RF power required to generate accelerating field inside cavity depends on the RF coupling parameters of the power coupler and quality factor of the SRF cavity and the quality factor itself is affected by several factors such as operating temperature, external magnetic field level and surface condition. Therefore, these factors should be considered to estimate the required RF power for the SRF cavity test

  8. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; Wang, H.; Wilson, K.; Zhang, S.

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods and surface resistance resolution of ~ 1 micro-Ohm at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was...

  9. Electromagnetic characterization of superconducting radio-frequency cavities for gw detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantini, R.; Bernard, Ph; Chincarini, A.; Gemme, G.; Parodi, R.; Picasso, E.

    2004-03-01

    The electromagnetic properties of a prototype gravitational wave detector, based on two coupled superconducting microwave cavities, were tested. The radio-frequency (rf) detection system was carefully analysed. With the use of piezoelectric crystals small harmonic displacements of the cavity walls were induced and the parametric conversion of the electromagnetic field inside the cavities explored. Experimental results of bandwidth and sensitivity of the parametric converter versus stored energy and voltage applied to the piezoelectric crystal are reported. A rf control loop, developed to stabilize phase changes on signal paths, gave a 125 dBc rejection of the drive mode on a time scale of 1 h.

  10. Electromagnetic characterization of superconducting radio-frequency cavities for gw detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballantini, R; Bernard, Ph; Chincarini, A; Gemme, G; Parodi, R; Picasso, E

    2004-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of a prototype gravitational wave detector, based on two coupled superconducting microwave cavities, were tested. The radio-frequency (rf) detection system was carefully analysed. With the use of piezoelectric crystals small harmonic displacements of the cavity walls were induced and the parametric conversion of the electromagnetic field inside the cavities explored. Experimental results of bandwidth and sensitivity of the parametric converter versus stored energy and voltage applied to the piezoelectric crystal are reported. A rf control loop, developed to stabilize phase changes on signal paths, gave a 125 dBc rejection of the drive mode on a time scale of 1 h

  11. Application of radiofrequency superconductivity to accelerators for high-current ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-current, high-brightness ion beam. During the last few years, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam halo, cumulative beam breakup and alternating-phase focusing have also yielded important results. This paper su-summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of superconducting accelerator technology for high-current ion beams

  12. Optimization of cathodic arc deposition and pulsed plasma melting techniques for growing smooth superconducting Pb photoemissive films for SRF injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietubyć, Robert; Lorkiewicz, Jerzy; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Smedley, John; Kosińska, Anna

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting photoinjectors have a potential to be the optimal solution for moderate and high current cw operating free electron lasers. For this application, a superconducting lead (Pb) cathode has been proposed to simplify the cathode integration into a 1.3 GHz, TESLA-type, 1.6-cell long purely superconducting gun cavity. In the proposed design, a lead film several micrometres thick is deposited onto a niobium plug attached to the cavity back wall. Traditional lead deposition techniques usually produce very non-uniform emission surfaces and often result in a poor adhesion of the layer. A pulsed plasma melting procedure reducing the non-uniformity of the lead photocathodes is presented. In order to determine the parameters optimal for this procedure, heat transfer from plasma to the film was first modelled to evaluate melting front penetration range and liquid state duration. The obtained results were verified by surface inspection of witness samples. The optimal procedure was used to prepare a photocathode plug, which was then tested in an electron gun. The quantum efficiency and the value of cavity quality factor have been found to satisfy the requirements for an injector of the European-XFEL facility.

  13. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-01-01

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ∼1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR∼260 and RRR∼100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material

  14. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-01

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ˜1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR˜260 and RRR˜100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material.

  15. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; Wang, H.; Wilson, K.; Zhang, S.

    2012-03-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about 2.4 mm and surface resistance resolution of ˜1 μΩ at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in detail in this contribution.

  16. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, G; Anlage, Steven M; Baldwin, C; Cheng, G; Flood, R; Jordan, K; Kneisel, P; Morrone, M; Nemes, G; Turlington, L; Wang, H; Wilson, K; Zhang, S

    2012-03-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about 2.4 mm and surface resistance resolution of ~1 μΩ at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in detail in this contribution.

  17. The importance of the electron mean free path for superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniscalco, J. T.; Gonnella, D.; Liepe, M.

    2017-01-01

    Impurity-doping of niobium is an exciting new technology in the field of superconducting radio-frequency accelerators, producing cavities with record-high quality factor Q0 and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance that decreases with increasing radio-frequency field. Recent theoretical work has offered a promising explanation for this so-called "anti-Q-slope," but the link between the decreasing surface resistance and the shortened electron mean free path of doped cavities has remained elusive. In this work, we investigate this link, finding that the magnitude of this decrease varies directly with the mean free path: shorter mean free paths correspond to stronger anti-Q-slopes. We draw a theoretical connection between the mean free path and the overheating of the quasiparticles, which leads to the reduction of the anti-Q-slope towards the normal Q-slope of long-mean-free-path cavities. We also investigate the sensitivity of the residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux, a property that is greatly enhanced for doped cavities, and calculate an optimal doping regime for a given amount of trapped flux.

  18. European infrastructures for R&D and test of superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryo-modules

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    The volume is copyright CERN and can be distributed under CC-BY license. The need for a European facility to build and test superconducting RF accelerating structures and cryo‐modules (SRF test facility) was extensively discussed during the preparation of EuCARD [1,2]. It comprised a distributed network of equipment across Europe to be assessed and, if needed, completed by hardware. It also addressed the quest for a deeper basic understanding, a better control and optimisation of the manufacture of superconducting RF structures with the aim of a substantial improvement of the accelerating gradient, a reduction of its spread and a cost minimisation. However, consequent to EU budget restrictions, the proposal was not maintained. Instead, a more detailed analysis was requested by a sub‐task inside the EuCARD Network [3] AccNet ‐ RFTech [4]. The main objective of this “SRF sub‐task” consists of intensifying a collaborative effort between European accelerator labs. The aim focused on planning and later...

  19. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q 0 -values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3–1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100–150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q 0 -value of 2 × 10 10 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. The performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching. (paper)

  20. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q 0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3-1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100-150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q 0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. The performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X., E-mail: kxliu@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D., E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  2. A scanning Auger electron spectrometer for internal surface analysis of Large Electron Positron 2 superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, C.; Cosso, R.; Genest, J.; Hauer, M.; Lacarrère, D.; Rijllart, A.; Saban, R.

    1996-08-01

    A computer-controlled surface analysis instrument, incorporating static Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning Auger mapping, and secondary electron imaging, has been designed and built at CERN to study and characterize the inner surface of superconducting radio-frequency cavities to be installed in the Large Electron Positron collider. A detailed description of the instrument, including the analytical head, the control system, and the vacuum system is presented. Some recent results obtained from the cavities provide examples of the instrument's capabilities.

  3. Field limit and nano-scale surface topography of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of extreme type II superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The field limit of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of type II superconductor with a large Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied with taking effects of nano-scale surface topography into account. If the surface is ideally flat, the field limit is imposed by the superheating field. On the surface of cavity, however, nano-defects almost continuously distribute and suppress the superheating field everywhere. The field limit is imposed by an effective superheating field given by the pro...

  4. Advances in development of Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, Sam; Liepe, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached Bp k>50 mT , well above Bc 1=25 ±7 mT , without the strong Q -slope observed in previous Nb3Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q0 of approximately 1 ×1 010 at >10 MV /m , far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ˜55 mT , apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a Tc of 18.0 ±0.1 K , close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near Tc, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb3Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q -slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb3Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  5. Advances in development of Nb_{3}Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Posen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A 1.3 GHz Nb_{3}Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached B_{pk}>50  mT, well above B_{c1}=25±7  mT, without the strong Q-slope observed in previous Nb_{3}Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q_{0} of approximately 1×10^{10} at >10  MV/m, far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ∼55  mT, apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a T_{c} of 18.0±0.1  K, close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near T_{c}, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb_{3}Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q-slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb_{3}Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  6. High temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device system for detection of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzell, Alf

    2012-01-01

    This doctoral thesis was aimed at establishing a set-up with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) radio-frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technology for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and in particular for testing applications of magnetic nanoparticle immunoassays. It was part of the EU-project ''Biodiagnostics'' running from 2005 to 2008. The method of magnetic binding assays was developed as an alternative to other methods of concentration determination like enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or fluorescent immunoassay. The ELISA has sensitivities down to analyte-concentrations of pg/ml. Multiple incubation and washing steps have to be performed for these techniques, the analyte has to diffuse to the site of binding. The magnetic assay uses magnetic nanoparticles as markers for the substance to be detected. It is being explored by current research and shows similar sensitivity compared to ELISA but in contrast - does not need any washing and can be read out directly after binding - can be applied in solution with opaque media, e.g. blood or muddy water - additionally allows magnetic separation or concentration - in combination with small magnetoresistive or Hall sensors, allows detection of only a few particles or even single beads. For medical or environmental samples, maybe opaque and containing a multitude of substances, it would be advantageous to devise an instrument, which allows to be read out quickly and with high sensitivity. Due to the mentioned items the magnetic assay might be a possibility here.

  7. Status and future prospects of SRF gun developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichert, Jochen

    2006-01-01

    While the concepts of DC and normal-conducting photo-injectors are well proofed, the SRF gun development still possesses a high risk. Challenges are the thermal and contaminant isolation needed between the cathode and superconducting cavity, the choice of the right photocathode and its life time, the difficulty of coupling high-average power into the gun, and beam excitation of higher order cavity modes. But in combination with SRF linacs, the SRF guns are the best solution for high current and CW operation. Thus, several R and D projects of SRF gun have been launched. The talk will give an overview of the history and progress of the SRF gun development. In more detail the technical concept, performance, and status of the Rossendorf superconducting RF gun project, a collaboration of BESSY, DESY, MBI and FZR, will be presented. (author)

  8. SRF technology at accel for worldwide accelerator projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, S.; Griep, B.; Peiniger, M.; Pekeler, M.; Piel, C.; Stein, P. vom; Vogel, H.

    2003-01-01

    Within the last two years activities at ACCEL for international accelerator projects using superconducting cavities have steadily increased. We report on our production work for CERN (HOM couplers for LHC cavities), DESY (TESLA cavities and couplers), Forschungszentrum Juelich (turn key low beta SRF module), SRRC, CLS and Cornell (turn key 500 MHz SRF modules. The production a superconducting Landau accelerator module for BESSY has started recently. In addition studies are under way for a superconducting 40 MeV proton/deuteron linac and for superconducting low beta multi gap structures. (author)

  9. Investigation of the superconducting properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    Radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities are widely used to increase the energy of a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The maximum gradients of cavities made of bulk niobium have constantly improved over the last ten years and they are approaching the theoretical limit of the material. Nevertheless, rf tests of niobium cavities are still showing some "anomalous" losses (so-called "Q-drop"), characterized by a marked increase of the surface resistance at high rf fields, in absence of field emission. A low temperature "in-situ" baking under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied by several laboratories to reduce those losses and improve the cavity's quality factor. Several models have been proposed to explain the cause of the Q-drop and the baking effect. We investigated the effect of baking on niobium material parameters by measuring the temperature dependence of a cavity's surface impedance and comparing it with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer's theory of superconductivity. It was found that baking allows interstitial oxygen to diffuse from the surface deeper into the bulk. This produces a significant reduction of the normal electrons' mean free path, which causes an increase of the quality factor. The optimum baking parameters are 120°C for 24-48 h. We were also able to identify the origin of the Q-drop as due to a high magnetic field, rather then electric field, by measuring the quality factor of a cavity as function of the rf field in a resonant mode with only magnetic field present on the surface. With the aid of a thermometry system, we were able to localize the losses in the high magnetic field region. We measured the Q-drop in cavities which had undergone different treatments, such as anodization, electropolishing and post-purification, and with different metallurgical properties and we study the effectiveness of baking in each case. As a result, none of the models proposed so far can explain all the experimental observations. We

  10. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  11. Metal forming technology for the fabrication of seamless Superconducting radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The world of Particle accelerators is rather unique, since in a few high-energy Physics great laboratories, such at CERN for example, there have been built the largest technological installations ever conceived by humankind. The Radiofrequency resonant cavities are the pulsing heart of an accelerator. In case of superconducting accelerators, bulk niobium cavities, able to perform accelerating gradients up to 40 MeV/m, are just a jewel of modern technology. The standard fabrication technology foresees the cutting of circular blanks, their deep-drawing into half-cells, and its further joining by electron beam welding under ultra high vacuum environment that takes several hours. However, proposals such as the International Linear Collider, to which more than 900 scientists from all over the world participate, foresee the installation of 20.000 cavities. In numbers, it means the electron beam weld one by one under Ultra High Vacuum of 360,000 hemi-cells. At a cost of 500 €/Kg of high purity Niobium, this will mean a couple of hundreds of millions of Euros only for the bare material. In this panorama it is evident that a cost reducing approach must be considered. In alternative the author has proposed a seamless and low cost fabrication method based on spinning of fully resonators. Preliminary RF tests at low temperatures have proved that high accelerating gradients are achievable and that they are not worse than those obtainable with the standard technology. Nevertheless up to when the next accelerator will be decided to be built there is still room for improvement.

  12. Conceptual design of a sapphire loaded coupler for superconducting radio-frequency 1.3 GHz cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Tantawi, Sami

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores a hybrid mode rf structure that served as a superconducting radio-frequency coupler. This application achieves a reflection S(1 ,1 ) varying from 0 to -30 db and delivers cw power at 7 KW. The coupler has good thermal isolation between the 2 and 300 K sections due to vacuum separation. Only one single hybrid mode can propagate through each section, and no higher order mode is coupled. The analytical and numerical analysis for this coupler is given and the design is optimized. The coupling mechanism to the cavity is also discussed.

  13. Miniature scanning electron microscope for investigation of the interior surface of a superconducting Nb radiofrequency accelerating cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathewson, A.G.; Grillot, A.

    1982-01-01

    A miniature scanning electron microscope with an electron beam diameter approx.1 μm has been constructed for high resolution examination at room temperature of the interior surface of a superconducting Nb radiofrequency accelerating cavity. Various objects and surface structures were observed, some of which could be correlated with lossy regions or ''hot spots'' detected previously on the outside surface during cavity operation at < or =4.2 K by a chain of carbon resistors. No internal surface features were observed which could conclusively be correlated with field emitting electron sources

  14. Conceptual design of a sapphire loaded coupler for superconducting radio-frequency 1.3 GHz cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a hybrid mode rf structure that served as a superconducting radio-frequency coupler. This application achieves a reflection S_{(1,1} varying from 0 to −30  db and delivers cw power at 7 KW. The coupler has good thermal isolation between the 2 and 300 K sections due to vacuum separation. Only one single hybrid mode can propagate through each section, and no higher order mode is coupled. The analytical and numerical analysis for this coupler is given and the design is optimized. The coupling mechanism to the cavity is also discussed.

  15. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  16. Special features of radio-frequency system for the superconducting cyclotron at VECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Som, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Radio-frequency system of Superconducting (Sc) cyclotron consists of three accelerating electrodes, called Dees, located in the valleys of the magnet at 120 degree apart between each other. It has been developed in the frequency range of 9 - 27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.5 degC. Each dee along with half-wave coaxial cavity develops peak voltage of 100kV having fed with rf power 80 kW from each of the three high power final rf amplifiers. Three numbers of Dee-cavities as well as three numbers of amplifier cavities are tuned by moveable sliding short. The tapered inner conductor (under vacuum) of the main Dee-cavity has been used to minimize power dissipation in the cavity and also to avoid mode interference. Each of the four identical Bridge-T network in the grid of each amplifier is driven with rf power of 150 watts. The amplifier is based on Eimac 4CW - 150000E tetrode and is operated in class-AB mode with power gain 22 dB. It requires dc power supplies (P/S) like, Filament P/S 15.5V/215A, Grid P/S -200V to -500V, Anode P/S 20kV/22.5A and Screen P/S 1.5kV/lA, at its four terminals. A PC-based stepper motor controlled sliding-short movement system is used for tuning the cavities at different frequencies. The closed-loop amplitude and phase regulators are based on RF modulator and I and Q modulation technique respectively. Dee voltage pick-off signals are used as feedback. A PLC-based interlock system protects the rf system as well as operating personnel. Measurements of rf parameters at various resonant frequencies of the amplifier cavity have been done. The frequency response of the input circuit of the amplifier has been measured using VNA. The warm rf test of the amplifier performed well with 70kW output power at 50 Ohm water-cooled dummy load. (author)

  17. Commissioning of the Superconducting Linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Campisi, Isidoro E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities in particle accelerator is becoming more widespread. Among the projects that make use of that technology is the Spallation Neutron Source, where H-ions are accelerated to about 1 GeV, mostly making use of niobium elliptical cavities. SNS will use the accelerated short (about 700 ns) sub-bunches of protons to generate neutrons by spallation, which will in turn allow probing structural and magnetic properties of new and existing materials. The SNS superconducting linac is the largest application of RF superconductivity to come on-line in the last decade. The SRF cavities, operated at 805 MHz, were designed, built and integrated into cryomodules at Jefferson Lab and installed and tested at SNS. SNS is also the first proton-like accelerator which uses SRF cavities in a pulse mode. Many of the details of the cavity performance are peculiar to this mode of operation, which is also being applied to lepton accelerators (TESLA test facility and X-FEL at DESY and the international linear collider project). Thanks to the low frequency of the SNS superconducting cavities, operation at 4.2 K has been possible without beam energy degradation, even though the cavities and cryogenic systems were originally designed for 2.1 K operation. The testing of the superconducting cavities, the operating experience with beam and the performance of the superconducting linac will be presented

  18. HOM frequency control of SRF cavity in high current ERLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2018-03-01

    The acceleration of high-current beam in Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities is a challenging but essential for a variety of advanced accelerators. SRF cavities should be carefully designed to minimize the High Order Modes (HOM) power generated in the cavities by the beam current. The reduction of HOM power we demonstrate in a particular case can be quite large. This paper presents a method to systematically control the HOM resonance frequencies in the initial design phase to minimize the HOM power generation. This method is expected to be beneficial for the design of high SRF cavities addressing a variety of Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) applications.

  19. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  20. Effect of cooldown and residual magnetic field on the performance of niobium–copper clad superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2017-01-01

    Here, we present the results of rf measurements on a niobium–copper clad superconducting radio-frequency cavity with different cooldown conditions and residual magnetic field in a vertical test Dewar in order to explore the effect of thermal current induced magnetic field and its trapping on the performance of the cavity. The residual resistance, extracted from the Q 0 (T) curves in the temperature range 4.3–1.5 K, showed no dependence on a temperature gradient along the cavity during the cooldown across the critical temperature up to ~50 K m –1 . The rf losses due to the trapping of residual magnetic field during the cavity cooldown were found to be ~4.3 nΩ μT –1 , comparable to the values measured in bulk niobium cavities. An increase of residual resistance following multiple cavity quenches was observed along with evidence of trapping of magnetic flux generated by thermoelectric currents.

  1. Surface Characterization of Nb Samples Electro-polished Together With Real Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerator Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Rong-Li; Tyagi, P.V.; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kato, Shigeki; Nishiwaki, Michiru; Saeki, Takayuki; Sawabe, Motoaki

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of surface characterizations of niobium (Nb) samples electropolished together with a single cell superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity. These witness samples were located in three regions of the cavity, namely at the equator, the iris and the beam-pipe. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was utilized to probe the chemical composition of the topmost four atomic layers. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray for elemental analysis (SEM/EDX) was used to observe the surface topography and chemical composition at the micrometer scale. A few atomic layers of sulfur (S) were found covering the samples non-uniformly. Niobium oxide granules with a sharp geometry were observed on every sample. Some Nb-O granules appeared to also contain sulfur.

  2. Status of Cryogenic System for Spallation Neutron Source's Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ting; Casagrande, Fabio; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Strong, William Herb

    2011-01-01

    Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is building an independent cryogenic system for its Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility (SRFTF). The scope of the system is to support the SNS cryomodule test and cavity test at 2-K (using vacuum pump) and 4.5K for the maintenance purpose and Power Upgrade Project of SNS, and to provide the part of the cooling power needed to backup the current CHL to keep Linac at 4.5-K during CHL maintenance period in the future. The system is constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is to construct an independent 4K helium refrigeration system with helium Dewar and distribution box as load interface. It is schedule to be commissioned in 2013. Here we report the concept design of the system and the status of the first phase of this project.

  3. Compact state-space models for complex superconducting radio-frequency structures based on model order reduction and concatenation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flisgen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The modeling of large chains of superconducting cavities with couplers is a challenging task in computational electrical engineering. The direct numerical treatment of these structures can easily lead to problems with more than ten million degrees of freedom. Problems of this complexity are typically solved with the help of parallel programs running on supercomputing infrastructures. However, these infrastructures are expensive to purchase, to operate, and to maintain. The aim of this thesis is to introduce and to validate an approach which allows for modeling large structures on a standard workstation. The novel technique is called State-Space Concatenations and is based on the decomposition of the complete structure into individual segments. The radio-frequency properties of the generated segments are described by a set of state-space equations which either emerge from analytical considerations or from numerical discretization schemes. The model order of these equations is reduced using dedicated model order reduction techniques. In a final step, the reduced-order state-space models of the segments are concatenated in accordance with the topology of the complete structure. The concatenation is based on algebraic continuity constraints of electric and magnetic fields on the decomposition planes and results in a compact state-space system of the complete radio-frequency structure. Compared to the original problem, the number of degrees of freedom is drastically reduced, i.e. a problem with more than ten million degrees of freedom can be reduced on a standard workstation to a problem with less than one thousand degrees of freedom. The final state-space system allows for determining frequency-domain transfer functions, field distributions, resonances, and quality factors of the complete structure in a convenient manner. This thesis presents the theory of the state-space concatenation approach and discusses several validation and application examples. The examples

  4. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of higher order mode (HOM) damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  5. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Arsenyev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of higher order mode (HOM damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs. Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  6. Multipacting in a coaxial coupler with bias voltage for SRF operation with a large beam current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.-K.; Wang, Ch.; Chang, F.-Y.; Chang, L.-H.; Chang, M.-H.; Chen, L.-J.; Chung, F.-T.; Lin, M.-C.; Lo, C.-H.; Tsai, C.-L.; Tsai, M.-H.; Yeh, M.-S.; Yu, T.-C.

    2016-09-01

    A superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) module is commonly used for a high-energy accelerator; its purpose is to provide energy to the particle beam. Because of the low power dissipation and smaller impedance of a higher-order mode for this module, it can provide more power to the particle beam with better stability through decreasing the couple bunch instability. A RF coupler is necessary to transfer the high power from a RF generator to the cavity. A coupler of coaxial type is a common choice. With high-power operation, it might suffer from multipacting, which is a resonance phenomenon due to re-emission of secondary electrons. Applying a bias voltage between inner and outer conductors of the coaxial coupler might increase or decrease the strength of the multipacting effect. We studied the effect of a bias voltage on multipacting using numerical simulation to track the motion of the electrons. The simulation results and an application for SRF operation with a large beam current are presented in this paper.

  7. Technology challenges for SRF guns as ERL sources in view of Rossendorf work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Dietmar; Buettig, Hartmut; Evtushenko, Pavel; Lehnert, Ulf; Michel, Peter; Moeller, Karsten; Murcek, Petr; Schneider, Christof; Schurig, Rico; Staufenbiel, Friedrich; Teichert, Jochen; Xiang, Rong; Stephan, Juergen; Lehmann, Wolf-Dietrich; Kamps, Thorsten; Lipka, Dirk; Volkov, Vladimir; Will, Ingo

    2006-01-01

    After successful tests of a SRF gun with a superconducting half-cell cavity a new SRF photoinjector for cw operation at the ELBE linac is under development. The paper discuss the design of the injector, the technological challenges of different components, the status of manufacturing and the expected parameters

  8. CW SRF systems with ingot niobium and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myneni, Ganapati

    2011-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator systems are needed not only for discovery science initiatives through out the world but they are also expected to find applications in a wide variety of programs including advanced reactor cycles using thorium as nuclear fuel, commercial and university compact linacs and FEL's. However these state of the art particle accelerator systems are very expensive to build and consume significant power in their operations. In the present world economic, energy sustainability and global warming concerns, we must improve the efficiency of the CW SRF accelerator systems considerably and in a cost effective manner. In this presentation I will review the current status of the CW SRF systems including the recent advances in improving the quality factor of the SRF cavities at very much reduced costs with simplified process procedures. (author)

  9. CEBAF's SRF cavity manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benesch, J.F.; Reece, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Construction of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date. The accelerating structures in CEBAF are 169 pairs of 1.5 GHz superconducting rf cavities -- 9 pairs in an injector and 80 pairs each in two linacs. The beam is to be recirculated up to five passes through each linac. Data is presented on mechanical tolerances achieved by the industrial fabricator of the rf cavities (Siemens). Liquid helium leak rates integrated over 22 vacuum seals have been measured on over 110 cavity pairs. A roughly normal distribution of the log 10 (leak rate) is seen, centered about a rate of 10 -10.4 torr-l/s. Over 140 pairs of the cavities have been assembled and have completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Among these, 54% demonstrated usable accelerating gradients greater than 10 MV/m. Although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of 5 MV/m at Q 0 = 2.4x10 9 , the usual limiting phenomena are encountered: field emission, quenching, and occasional multipacting. A discussion of the occurrence conditions and severity of these phenomena during production cavity testing is presented. The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m

  10. SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STOVALL, J.; NATH, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac is comprised of both normal and superconducting rf (SRF) accelerating structures. The SRF linac accelerates the beam from 186 to 1250 MeV through 117 elliptical, multi-cell niobium cavities. This paper describes the SRF linac architecture, physics design considerations, cavity commissioning, and the expected beam dynamics performance

  11. New Insights into the Limitations on the Efficiency and Achievable Gradients in Nb3Sn SRF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel Leslie

    The A15 superconductor Nb3Sn has shown great promise to replace niobium as the material of choice for the construction of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities. It promises, at least on paper, greater efficiency and higher accelerating gradients, with the potential to enable the construction of smaller yet more powerful accelerators than can be constructed using niobium. Although the state-of-the-art performance of cavities coated with Nb3Sn has shown great potential, the achievable limits in cavity quality factor Q0 and accelerating gradient Eacc are still below that expected given theoretical limits. In this work we present and discuss results of experiments carried out to understand the current limitations on Q0 and Eacc, and propose methods to improve these further. We will conclude with an outlook to the future, and the prospects that Nb3Sn could enable.

  12. Status of superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    For several reasons, a brief historical review seems appropriate at this time. The twenty-fifth anniversary of the first acceleration of beam with a superconducting cavity will occur shortly [1,2,3]. Also, the scope of accelerator applications of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) devices has, within the last few months, begun to increase rapidly [4] - to the point that it seems likely that early expectations for this technology will largely be fulfilled. Since the object is to accelerate beam, a simple one parameter measure of the technology is the total of how much beam has been accelerated. Figure 1 shows the total accumulated voltage in tests and/or operation of superconducting accelerating cavities with beam, up to the time indicated, as reported in the open literature [4-35]. This parameter has been divided into two terms: first, the subtotal for electron accelerating velocity-of-light structures, and second the subtotal for low-velocity, ion accelerating structures. To restate: each of these terms represents as a function of time an integrated, accumulative total voltage produced by SRF hardware and demonstrated with beam. 56 refs., 4 figs

  13. Radio-Frequency Illuminated Superconductive Disks: Reverse Josephson Effects and Implications for Precise Measuring of Proposed Gravity Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David A.; Koczor, Ronald J.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported results using a high precision gravimeter to probe local gravity changes in the neighborhood of large bulk-processed high-temperature superconductors. It have been indicated three essential components to achieve anomalous gravity effects, namely large, two-layer high-temperature YBCO superconductors, magnetic levitation and AC input in the form of radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. We report experiments on RF-illuminated (1-15 MHz) superconducting disks with corresponding gravity readings indicating an apparent increase in observed gravity of approximately 3-5 x l0(exp -5)cm/sq s, above and to the side of the superconductor. In this preliminary study, RF- illumination is achieved using a series of large radius (15 cm) spiral antenna with RF power inputs equal to or greater than 90 W. The observed gravitational modification range is significantly lower than the 2.1% gravity modification. The error analyses of thermal and electromagnetic interference in a magnetically shielded gravimeter with vacuum enclosures, Faraday cages and shielded instrument leads, are outlined both experimentally and theoretically. The nearly exact correspondence between the peak gravity effects reported and the well-known peak in AC resistance in superconductors (2-7 MHz, owing to reverse Josephson quantum effects) suggests that electrical resistance will arise in this frequency range and subsequently any trapped magnetic fields in the superconductor may disperse partially into the measuring instrument's local environment. Implications for propulsion initiatives and RF-heating in superconductors will be discussed.

  14. Field limit and nano-scale surface topography of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of extreme type II superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    The field limit of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of a type II superconductor with a large Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied, taking the effects of nano-scale surface topography into account. If the surface is ideally flat, the field limit is imposed by the superheating field. On the surface of cavity, however, nano-defects almost continuously distribute and suppress the superheating field everywhere. The field limit is imposed by an effective superheating field given by the product of the superheating field for an ideal flat surface and a suppression factor that contains the effects of nano-defects. A nano-defect is modeled by a triangular groove with a depth smaller than the penetration depth. An analytical formula for the suppression factor of bulk and multilayer superconductors is derived in the framework of the London theory. As an immediate application, the suppression factor of the dirty Nb processed by electropolishing is evaluated by using results of surface topographic study. The estimated field limit is consistent with the present record field of nitrogen-doped Nb cavities. Suppression factors of surfaces of other bulk and multilayer superconductors, and those after various surface processing technologies, can also be evaluated by using the formula.

  15. Investigation of in-house superconducting radio-frequency 9-cell cavity made of large grain niobium at KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmae, Takeshi; Umemori, Kensei; Yamanaka, Masashi; Watanabe, Yuichi; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    The first in-house, 9-cell, superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of large grain Nb was fabricated at KEK. Some characteristic techniques were employed for the fabrication that were not used for fine grain (FG) Nb. Even though a penetrated hole was created during electron beam welding, it was successfully repaired and did not affect the cavity performance. The completed cavity then underwent vertical tests (VTs) via several surface treatment processes. A defect that caused quenches was found after a VT at 25 mm from the equator where the typical local grinding machine developed at KEK could not be utilized. A new local grinding machine using a 3D printer was thus developed for the first time, and it completely removed this defect. Finally, the cavity achieved a maximum Q0 value of 3.8 ×1010 and accelerating gradient of 38 MV/m. The obtained Q0 value is about 1.5 times higher than that for the KEK in-house FG cavity.

  16. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.W.B.; Noakes, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    This book is an elementray introduction into superconductivity. The topics are the superconducting state, the magnetic properties of superconductors, type I superconductors, type II superconductors and a chapter on the superconductivity theory. (WL)

  17. Cryostat for superconducting radio-frequency cavity program at VECC Kolkata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.K.; Bajirao, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Nandi, C.; Bhattacharyya, T.K.; Som, S.; Pal, G.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    A cryostat is being designed for testing superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity. The cryostat has an inner helium vessel where the SCRF cavity will be immersed in a pool of liquid helium. A liquid nitrogen shield surrounds the liquid helium vessel. The liquid helium vessel and liquid nitrogen shield shall be enclosed inside a vacuum chamber to reduce heat load. Different designs for the test cryostat have been evaluated. The thickness of inner vessel, outer vessel, head and all the flanges for test cryostat have been calculated for external and internal pressure and for bolt load required for sealing. Garlock Helicoflex spring energized seal are planned to be used for sealing the flanges at 4.5 K. Thermal calculations have been carried out to access the heat leak in the designs. The paper presents the structural and thermal design of the test cryostat. (author)

  18. Tunneling study of SRF cavity-grade niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proslier, T.; Zasadzinski, J.; Cooley, L.; Pellin, M.; Norem, J.; Elam, J.; Antonine, C. Z.; Rimmer, R.; Kneisel, P.

    2009-01-01

    Niobium, with its very high H C1 , has been used in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for accelerator systems for 40 years with continual improvement. The quality factor of cavities (Q) is governed by the surface impedance R BCS , which depends on the quasiparticle gap, delta, and the superfluid density. Both of these parameters are seriously affected by surface imperfections (metallic phases, dissolved oxygen, magnetic impurities). Loss mechanism and surface treatments of Nb cavities found to improve the Q factor are still unsolved mysteries. We present here an overview of the capabilities of the point contact tunneling spectroscopy and Atomic layer deposition methods and how they can help understanding the High field Q-drop and the mild baking effect. Tunneling spectroscopy was performed on Nb pieces from the same processed material used to fabricate SRF cavities. Air exposed, electropolished Nb exhibited a surface superconducting gap Delta = 1.55 meV, characteristic of clean, bulk Nb, however the tunneling density of states (DOS) was broadened significantly. Nb pieces treated with the same mild baking used to improve the Q-slope in SRF cavities revealed a much sharper DOS. Good fits to the DOS are obtained using Shiba theory suggesting that magnetic scattering of quasiparticles is the origin of the degraded surface superconductivity and the Q-slope problem of Nb SRF cavities

  19. Devices for SRF material characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudket, Philippe; Xiao, B.; Junginger, T.; Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    2016-01-01

    The surface resistance Rs of superconducting materials can be obtained by measuring the quality factor of an elliptical cavity excited in a transverse magnetic mode (TM010). The value obtained has however to be taken as averaged over the whole surface. A more convenient way to obtain Rs, especially of materials which are not yet technologically ready for cavity production, is to measure small samples instead. These can be easily man ufactured at low cost, duplicated and placed in film deposition and surface analytical tools. A commonly used design for a device to measure Rs consists of a cylindrical cavity excited in a transverse electric (TE110) mode with the sample under test serving as one replaceable endplate. Such a cavity has two drawbacks. For reasonably small samples the resonant frequency will be larger than frequencies of interest concerning SRF application and it requires a reference sample of known Rs. In this article we review several devices which have been designed to overcome these limitations, reaching sub - nΩ resolution in some cases. Some of these devices also comprise a parameter space in frequency and temperature which is inaccessible to standard cavity tests, making them ideal tools to test theoretical surface resistance models.

  20. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Wang

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ∼140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ∼140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ∼140 MV

  1. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  2. Automated optical inspection and image analysis of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenskat, M.

    2017-05-01

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. For an investigation of this inner surface of more than 100 cavities within the cavity fabrication for the European XFEL and the ILC HiGrade Research Project, an optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed. To analyze up to 2325 images per cavity, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. The accuracy of this code is up to 97 % and the positive predictive value (PPV) 99 % within the resolution of 15.63 μm. The optical obtained surface roughness is in agreement with standard profilometric methods. The image analysis algorithm identified and quantified vendor specific fabrication properties as the electron beam welding speed and the different surface roughness due to the different chemical treatments. In addition, a correlation of ρ = -0.93 with a significance of 6 σ between an obtained surface variable and the maximal accelerating field was found.

  3. Automated optical inspection and image analysis of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-15

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. For an investigation of this inner surface of more than 100 cavities within the cavity fabrication for the European XFEL and the ILC HiGrade Research Project, an optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed. To analyze up to 2325 images per cavity, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. The accuracy of this code is up to 97% and the PPV 99% within the resolution of 15.63 μm. The optical obtained surface roughness is in agreement with standard profilometric methods. The image analysis algorithm identified and quantified vendor specific fabrication properties as the electron beam welding speed and the different surface roughness due to the different chemical treatments. In addition, a correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ between an obtained surface variable and the maximal accelerating field was found.

  4. Automated optical inspection and image analysis of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-01

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. For an investigation of this inner surface of more than 100 cavities within the cavity fabrication for the European XFEL and the ILC HiGrade Research Project, an optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed. To analyze up to 2325 images per cavity, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. The accuracy of this code is up to 97% and the PPV 99% within the resolution of 15.63 μm. The optical obtained surface roughness is in agreement with standard profilometric methods. The image analysis algorithm identified and quantified vendor specific fabrication properties as the electron beam welding speed and the different surface roughness due to the different chemical treatments. In addition, a correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ between an obtained surface variable and the maximal accelerating field was found.

  5. SRF and RF systems for LEReC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fedotov, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Polizzo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Veshcherevich, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Low Energy RHIC electron Cooling (LEReC) is under development at BNL to improve RHIC luminosity at low energies. It will consist of a short electron linac and two cooling sections, one for blue and one for yellow rings. For the first stage of the project, LEReC-I, we will install a 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity and three normal conducting cavities operating at 9 MHz, 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz. The SRF cavity will boost the electron beam energy up to 2 MeV. The warm cavities will be used to correct the energy spread introduced in the SRF cavity. The paper describes layouts of the SRF and RF systems, their parameters and status.

  6. Towards a Cryogen-Free MgB2-Based Superconducting Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Alireza

    Studies on the application of Magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting films have shown promise for use with the radio-frequency (SRF) accelerating cavities. MgB2\\ coating is a potential candidate to replace bulk niobium (Nb) SRF cavities. The ultimate goal of our research is to demonstrate MgB2 coating on copper cavities to allow operation at about 20 K or so as a result of the high transition temperature (Tc) of MgB2 and taking advantage of the excellent thermal conductivity of copper. Here, we will report on our recent experimental results of applying hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) to grow MgB2 films on 2-inch diameter copper discs as well as on a 2.8 GHz resonator cavity *Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06H11357.

  7. Status of the SNS superconducting linac and future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho

    2008-01-01

    The use of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities in particle accelerator is becoming more widespread. Among the projects that make use of that technology is the Spallation Neutron Source, where H- ions are accelerated to about 1 GeV, mostly making use of niobium elliptical cavities. SNS generates neutrons by the spallation reaction with the accelerated short (about 700 ns) sub-bunches of protons, which will in turn allow probing structural and magnetic properties of new and existing materials. The SNS superconducting linac is the largest application of RF superconductivity to come on-line in the last decade and has been operating with beam for almost two years. As the first operational pulsed superconducting linac, many of the aspects of its performance were unknown and unpredictable. A lot of experiences and data have been gathered on the pulsed behavior of cavities and cryomodules at various repetition rates and at various temperatures during the commissioning of its components and beam operations. This experience is of great value in determining future optimizations of SNS as well in guiding in the design and operation of future pulsed superconducting linacs. The testing of the superconducting cavities, the operating experience with beam, the performance of the superconducting linac and the future plans will be presented.

  8. Modified SRF Photoinjector for the ELBE at HZDR

    CERN Document Server

    Murcek, P; Buettig, H; Michel, P; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Kneisel, P

    2012-01-01

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF photoinjector) with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated under the collaboration of HZB, DESY, HZDR, and MBI.[1] In order to improve the gradient of the gun cavity and the beam quality, a new modified SRF gun (SRF-gun 2008) has been designed. The main updates of the new cavity design for the new photoinjector were publisched before. (ID THPPO022 on the SRF09 Berlin.) This cavity is being fabricated in Jefferson Lab. In this paper the new ideas of the further parts of the SRF-gun 2008 will be presented. The most important issue is the special design of half-cell and choke filter. The cathode cooler is also slightly changed, which simplifies the installation of the cathode cooler in the cavity. The next update is the separation of input and output of the liquid nitrogen supply, for the purpose of the stability of the nitrogen pressure as well as the better possibility of temperature measurement. Another key point is the implementation of the superco...

  9. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries

  10. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onnes, H.K.

    1988-01-01

    The author traces the development of superconductivity from 1911 to 1986. Some of the areas he explores are the Meissner Effect, theoretical developments, experimental developments, engineering achievements, research in superconducting magnets, and research in superconducting electronics. The article also mentions applications shown to be technically feasible, but not yet commercialized. High-temperature superconductivity may provide enough leverage to bring these applications to the marketplace

  11. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Mortensen, K.

    1988-12-01

    This report contains lecture notes of the basic lectures presented at the 1st Topsoee Summer School on Superconductivity held at Risoe National Laboratory, June 20-24, 1988. The following lecture notes are included: L.M. Falicov: 'Superconductivity: Phenomenology', A. Bohr and O. Ulfbeck: 'Quantal structure of superconductivity. Gauge angle', G. Aeppli: 'Muons, neutrons and superconductivity', N.F. Pedersen: 'The Josephson junction', C. Michel: 'Physicochemistry of high-T c superconductors', C. Laverick and J.K. Hulm: 'Manufacturing and application of superconducting wires', J. Clarke: 'SQUID concepts and systems'. (orig.) With 10 tabs., 128 figs., 219 refs

  12. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on superconductivity the absence of electrical resistance has always fascinated the mind of researchers with a promise of applications unachievable by conventional technologies. Since its discovery superconductivity has been posing many questions and challenges to solid state physics, quantum mechanics, chemistry and material science. Simulations arrived to superconductivity from particle physics, astrophysic, electronics, electrical engineering and so on. In seventy-five years the original promises of superconductivity were going to become reality: a microscopical theory gave to superconductivity the cloth of the science and the level of technological advances was getting higher and higher. High field superconducting magnets became commercially available, superconducting electronic devices were invented, high field accelerating gradients were obtained in superconductive cavities and superconducting particle detectors were under study. Other improvements came in a quiet progression when a tornado brought a revolution in the field: new materials had been discovered and superconductivity, from being a phenomenon relegated to the liquid Helium temperatures, became achievable over the liquid Nitrogen temperature. All the physics and the technological implications under superconductivity have to be considered ab initio

  13. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to 6...

  14. Frequency-tunable SRF cavities for microwave opto-mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Alessandro; Martinez, Luis; Pate, Jacob; Thompson, Johnathon; Chiao, Raymond; Sharping, Jay

    Three dimensional SRF (Superconducting Radio Frequency) cavities are known for achieving high quality factors (Q =109 or higher) but suffer from limited frequency tunability once fabricated and cooled to superconducting temperatures. Our end-wall design allows for numerous applications of cavity tuning at temperatures as low as 40 millikelvin. Using a bimorphic piezoelectric transducer, we demonstrate approximately 15 MHz of resonance tunability for the TE011 mode at cryogenic temperatures in a cylindrical reactor grade niobium (Nb) cavity (10% of the range at room temperature). This range doubles when using tunable end-walls on both cavity ends. We report on techniques for improving the Q of multi-component cavities including the use of concave end-walls to reduce fields near the cylinder ends and indium O-rings to reduce resistive losses at the gaps. Three-dimensional SRF cavities of this type have potential applications to quantum information science, precision displacement metrology, and quantum electro-dynamics.

  15. Analysis list: Srf [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Srf Blood,Embryonic fibroblast,Muscle + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyush...u-u/mm9/target/Srf.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Srf.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Srf.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Srf.Blood....tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Srf.Embryonic_fibroblast....tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Srf.Muscle.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyu

  16. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakani, S.L.; Kakani, Shubhra

    2007-01-01

    The monograph provides readable introduction to the basics of superconductivity for beginners and experimentalists. For theorists, the monograph provides nice and brief description of the broad spectrum of experimental properties, theoretical concepts with all details, which theorists should learn, and provides a sound basis for students interested in studying superconducting theory at the microscopic level. Special chapter on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates is devoted

  17. The external Q factor of a dual-feed coupling for superconducting radio frequency cavities: Theoretical and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Xu, Wencan

    2013-11-01

    We propose a theoretical model based on network analysis to study the external quality factor (Q factor) of dual-feed coupling for superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. Specifically, we apply our model to the dual-feed 704 MHz half-cell SRF gun for Brookhaven National Laboratory's prototype Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). The calculations show that the external Q factor of this dual-feed system is adjustable from 104 to 109 provided that the adjustment range of a phase shifter covers 0°-360°. With a period of 360°, the external Q factor of the coupling system changes periodically with the phase difference between the two coupling arms. When the RF phase of both coupling arms is adjusted simultaneously in the same direction, the external Q factor of the system also changes periodically, but with a period of 180°.

  18. Diagnostics Beamline for the SRF Gun Project

    CERN Document Server

    Kamps, T; Goldammer, K; Krämer, Dietrich; Kuske, P; Kuszynski, J; Lipka, D; Marhauser, F; Quast, T; Richter, R

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting rf photo electron injector (SRF gun) is currently under construction by a collaboration between BESSY, DESY, FZR and MBI. The project aims at the design and setup of an CW SRF gun including a diagnostics beamline for the ELBE FEL and to address R&D issues on low emittance injectors for future light sources such as the BESSY FEL. Of critical importance for the injector performance is the control of the electron beam parameters. For this reason a compact diagnostics beamline is under development serving a multitude of operation settings ranging from low-charge (77pC), low-emittance (1 pi mm mrad) mode to high-charge (2.5nC) operation of the gun. For these operation modes beam dynamics simulations are resulting in boundary conditions for the beam instrumentation. Proven and mature technology is projected wherever possible, for example for current and beam position monitoring. The layout of the beam profile and emittance measurement systems is described. For the bunch length, which varies be...

  19. Characterization of Nb SRF cavity materials by white light interferometry and replica techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chen [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); The Applied Science Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Reece, Charles [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Kelley, Michael, E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); The Applied Science Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Much work has shown that the topography of the interior surface is an important contributor to the performance of Nb superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities. Micron-scale topography is implicated in non-linear loss mechanisms that limit the useful accelerating gradient range and impact cryogenic cost. Aggressive final chemical treatments in cavity production seek to reliably obtain “smoothest” surfaces with superior performance. Process development suffers because the cavity interior surface cannot be viewed directly without cutting out pieces, rendering the cavities unavailable for further study. Here we explore replica techniques as an alternative, providing imprints of cavity internal surface that can be readily examined. A second matter is the topography measurement technique used. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven successful, but too time intensive for routine use in this application. We therefore introduce white light interferometry (WLI) as an alternative approach. We examined real surfaces and their replicas, using AFM and WLI. We find that the replica/WLI is promising to provide the large majority of the desired information, recognizing that a trade-off is being made between best lateral resolution (AFM) and the opportunity to examine much more surface area (WLI).

  20. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  1. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruana, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Despite reports of new, high-temperature superconductive materials almost every day, participants at the First Congress on Superconductivity do not anticipate commercial applications with these materials soon. What many do envision is the discovery of superconducting materials that can function at much warmer, perhaps even room temperatures. Others hope superconductivity will usher in a new age of technology as semiconductors and transistors did. This article reviews what the speakers had to say at the four-day congress held in Houston last February. Several speakers voiced concern that the Reagan administration's apparent lack of interest in funding superconductivity research while other countries, notably Japan, continue to pour money into research and development could hamper America's international competitiveness

  2. Engineering, design and prototype tests of a 3.9 GHz transverse-mode superconducting cavity for a radiofrequency-separated kaon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark S. Champion et al.

    2001-01-01

    A research and development program is underway to construct superconducting cavities to be used for radiofrequency separation of a Kaon beam at Fermilab. The design calls for installation of twelve 13-cell cavities operating in the 3.9 GHz transverse mode with a deflection gradient of 5 MV/m. They present the mechanical, cryogenic and vacuum design of the cavity, cryomodule, rf power coupler, cold tuner and supporting hardware. The electromagnetic design of the cavity is presented in a companion paper by Wanzenberg and McAshan. The warm tuning system (for field flatness) and the vertical test system is presented along with test results of bench measurements and cold tests on single-cell and five-cell prototypes

  3. Vol. 33 - Compact State-Space Models for Complex Superconducting Radio-Frequency Structures Based on Model Order Reduction and Concatenation Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Flisgen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The modeling of large chains of superconducting cavities with couplers is a challeng- ing task in computational electrical engineering. The direct numerical treatment of these structures can easily lead to problems with more than ten million degrees of freedom. Problems of this complexity are typically solved with the help of parallel programs running on supercomputing infrastructures. However, these infrastructures are expensive to purchase, to operate, and to maintain. The aim of this thesis is to introduce and to validate an approach which allows for modeling large structures on a standard workstation. The novel technique is called State-Space Concatena- tions and is based on the decomposition of the complete structure into individual segments. The radio-frequency properties of the generated segments are described by a set of state-space equations which either emerge from analytical considera- tions or from numerical discretization schemes. The model order of these equations is reduced...

  4. Inductance mode characteristics of a ceramic YBa2Cu3O7-x radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device at 77 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Il'ichev, E. V.; Andreev, A. V.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results on some radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf-SQUID) signal properties are presented. The quantum interferometer was made of ceramic YBa2Cu3O7−x and was due to a low critical current operated in the inductance or nonhysteretic mode. With bias current...... as reference, amplitude variation, and phase shift of the voltage over the tank circuit coupled to the SQUID were measured simultaneously. It is shown that there is qualitative agreement between calculations based on the resistivity shunted junction model and the data. Moreover, using phase detection, signal...... instabilities predicted for the rf-SQUID inductance mode were observed. These signal instabilities may be exploited to enhance the transfer coefficient for measured flux-to-output signal. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  5. Magnesium Diboride thin Films, multilayers, and coatings for SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoxing [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities currently use low-temperature superconductor niobium, and the Nb SRF cavities have approached the performance levels predicted theoretically. Compared to Nb, MgB2 becomes superconducting at a much higher temperature and promises a better RF performance in terms of higher quality factor Q and higher acceleration capability. An MgB2 SRF technology can significantly reduce the operating costs of particle accelerators when these potentials are realized. This project aimed to advance the development of an MgB2 SRF technology. It had two main objectives: (1) materials issues of MgB2 thin films and multilayers related to their applications in SRF cavities; and (2) coating single-cell cavities for testing at RF frequencies. The key technical thrust of the project is the deposition of high quality clean MgB2 films and coatings by the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) technique, which was developed in my group. We have achieved technical progress in each of the two areas. For the first objective, we have confirmed that MgB2 thin film coatings can be used to effectively enhance the vortex penetration field of an SRF cavity. A vortex is a normal region in the shape of spaghetti that threads through a superconductor. Its existence is due to an applied magnetic field that is greater than a so-called lower critical field, Hc1. Once a vortex enters the superconductor, its movement leads to loss. This has been shown to be the reason for an SRF cavity to break down. Thus, enhancing the magnetic field for a vortex to enter the superconductor that forms the SRF cavity has be a goal of intense research. To this end, Gurevich proposed that a coating of thin superconductor layer can impede the vortex entrance. In this project, we have done two important experiment to test this concept. One, we showed that the enhancement of Hc1 can be

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  7. Study into the mechanisms of hydrogen contamination of niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency cavities. Molecular dynamics studies for simulation of the hydrogen diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, B.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency cavities were chosen for most of the future particle accelerators. In the case of pure niobium cavities, several laboratories have observed degradation of superconducting properties related to the conditions of the cooling down process. This effect seems to stem from hydrogen contamination which occurs during surface treatments. With the aim to study the influence of different surface treatments on the hydrogen contamination depth concentration profiling of the near surface region (the first 200 nm) was first carried out by the classical ERDA technique with 30 nm depth resolution. In order to better localize hydrogen, the initial particle selecting device (Teflon foil) was replaced by an electromagnetic (ExB) filter improving then the depth resolution by a factor three. This study reveals an hydrogen segregation at the niobium surface. Such a result is in contradiction with the relative high experimental value of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient given by the literature. To understand the trapping mechanism of hydrogen, a simulation by molecular dynamics of this impurity diffusion process was performed. This approach requires the knowledge of the interatomic potential. The potential parameters were fitted with static and dynamic tests. Nb-Nb interaction is based on many body potential. Nb-H is represented by two body potential. The Arrhenius diagram of the diffusion coefficient achieved by dynamic for a single crystal provides too small activation energy in comparison with experimental results. However, in presence of defects, a simulation proves a large increase of these values. It is only around 1000 K that the diffusion of hydrogen is not altered by defects. This conclusion confirms the experimental results concerning a good characteristic of superconducting cavities after thermal treatments. (orig.)

  8. Proposal for an Accelerator R&D User Facility at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Edwards, H. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Harms, E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Henderson, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Holmes, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lumpkin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kephart, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Levedev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Leibfritz, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Nagaitsev, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Piot, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Prokop, C. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Shiltsev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sun, Y. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Valishev, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Fermilab is the nation’s particle physics laboratory, supported by the DOE Office of High Energy Physics (OHEP). Fermilab is a world leader in accelerators, with a demonstrated track-record— spanning four decades—of excellence in accelerator science and technology. We describe the significant opportunity to complete, in a highly leveraged manner, a unique accelerator research facility that supports the broad strategic goals in accelerator science and technology within the OHEP. While the US accelerator-based HEP program is oriented toward the Intensity Frontier, which requires modern superconducting linear accelerators and advanced highintensity storage rings, there are no accelerator test facilities that support the accelerator science of the Intensity Frontier. Further, nearly all proposed future accelerators for Discovery Science will rely on superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) acceleration, yet there are no dedicated test facilities to study SRF capabilities for beam acceleration and manipulation in prototypic conditions. Finally, there are a wide range of experiments and research programs beyond particle physics that require the unique beam parameters that will only be available at Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). To address these needs we submit this proposal for an Accelerator R&D User Facility at ASTA. The ASTA program is based on the capability provided by an SRF linac (which provides electron beams from 50 MeV to nearly 1 GeV) and a small storage ring (with the ability to store either electrons or protons) to enable a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop transformative approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation which cannot be done elsewhere. It will also establish a unique resource for R&D towards Energy Frontier facilities and a test-bed for SRF accelerators and high brightness beam applications in support of the OHEP

  9. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, W [DESY (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. The equator welds are particularly critical. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on halfcells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The established procedure is suitable for large series production. The main aspects of quality assurance management are mentioned. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and EBW. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35–45 MV·m–1 can be achieved by applying Electropolishing (EP) treatment. Furthermore, the single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is promising. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the

  10. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  11. Multilayer coating for higher accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities: a review of theoretical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    The theory of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) multilayer structure for application in superconducting accelerating cavities is reviewed. The theoretical field limit, optimum layer thicknesses and material combination, and surface resistance are discussed for the SIS structure and are also reviewed for the superconductor-superconductor bilayer structure.

  12. Multilayer coating for higher accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities: a review of theoretical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Theory of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (S-I-S) multilayer structure in superconducting accelerating cavity application is reviewed. The theoretical field limit, optimum layer thicknesses and material combination, and surface resistance are discussed. Those for the S-S bilayer structure are also reviewed.

  13. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlikar, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Amongst the numerous scientific discoveries that the 20th century has to its credit, superconductivity stands out as an exceptional example of having retained its original dynamism and excitement even for more than 80 years after its discovery. It has proved itself to be a rich field by continually offering frontal challenges in both research and applications. Indeed, one finds that a majority of internationally renowned condensed matter theorists, at some point of their career, have found excitement in working in this important area. Superconductivity presents a unique example of having fetched Nobel awards as many as four times to date, and yet, interestingly enough, the field still remains open for new insights and discoveries which could undeniably be of immense technological value. 1 fig

  14. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book profiles the research activity of 42 companies in the superconductivity field, worldwide. It forms a unique and comprehensive directory to this emerging technology. For each research site, it details the various projects in progress, analyzes the level of activity, pinpoints applications and R and D areas, reviews strategies and provides complete contact information. It lists key individuals, offers international comparisons of government funding, reviews market forecasts and development timetables and features a bibliography of selected articles on the subject

  15. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buller, L.; Carrillo, F.; Dietert, R.; Kotziapashis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Superconductors are materials which combine the property of zero electric resistance with the capability to exclude any adjacent magnetic field. This leads to many large scale applications such as the much publicized levitating train, generation of magnetic fields in MHD electric generators, and special medical diagnostic equipment. On a smaller-scale, superconductive materials could replace existing resistive connectors and decrease signal delays by reducing the RLC time constants. Thus, a computer could operate at much higher speeds, and consequently at lower power levels which would reduce the need for heat removal and allow closer spacing of circuitry. Although technical advances and proposed applications are constantly being published, it should be recognized that superconductivity is a slowly developing technology. It has taken scientists almost eighty years to learn what they now know about this material and its function. The present paper provides an overview of the historical development of superconductivity and describes some of the potential applications for this new technology as it pertains to the electronics industry

  16. Geometric optimization of the 56 MHz SRF cavity and its frequency table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2008-01-01

    It is essential to know the frequency of a Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavity at its 'just being fabricated' stage because frequency is the key parameter in constructing the cavity. In this paper, we report our work on assessing it. We can estimate the frequency change from stage to stage theoretically and/or by simulation. At the operating stage, the frequency can be calculated accurately, and, from this value, we obtain the frequencies at other stages. They are listed in a table that serves to check the processes from stage to stage. Equally important is optimizing the geometric shape of the SRF cavity so that the peak electric-field and peak magnetic-field are as low as possible. It is particularly desirable in the 56MHz SRF cavity of RHIC to maximize the frequency sensitivity of the slow tuner. After undertaking such optimization, our resultant peak electric-field is only 44.1MV/m, and the peak magnetic-field is 1049G at 2.5MV of voltage across the cavity gap. To quench superconductivity in an SRF cavity, it is reported that the limit of the peak magnetic-field is 1800G (1), and that of the peak electric-field is more than l00MV/m for a SRF cavity (2). Our simulations employed the codes Superfish and Microwave Studio

  17. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhauser, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  18. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dhakal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q_{0} values of the order of 2×10^{10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B_{p} of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q_{0} value of (5±1×10^{10} at 2.0 K and B_{p}=90  mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  19. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, P.; Ciovati, G.; Myneni, G. R.; Gray, K. E.; Groll, N.; Maheshwari, P.; McRae, D. M.; Pike, R.; Proslier, T.; Stevie, F.; Walsh, R. P.; Yang, Q.; Zasadzinzki, J.

    2013-04-01

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800-1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q0 values of the order of 2×1010 at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (Bp) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q0 value of (5±1)×1010 at 2.0 K and Bp=90mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  20. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, P.; Ciovati, G.; Myneni, G. R.; Gray, K. E.; Groll, N.; Maheshwari, P.; McRae, D. M.; Pike, R.; Proslier, T.; Stevie, F.; Walsh, R. P.; Yang, Q.; Zasadzinzki, J.

    2013-04-01

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q{sub 0} values of the order of 2×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B{sub p}) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q{sub 0} value of (5±1)×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and B{sub p}=90mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  1. Apparatus and method for plasma processing of SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, J.; Im, Do; Peshl, J.; Bašović, M.; Popović, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Phillips, L.; Vušković, L.

    2016-05-01

    An apparatus and a method are described for plasma etching of the inner surface of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Accelerator SRF cavities are formed into a variable-diameter cylindrical structure made of bulk niobium, for resonant generation of the particle accelerating field. The etch rate non-uniformity due to depletion of the radicals has been overcome by the simultaneous movement of the gas flow inlet and the inner electrode. An effective shape of the inner electrode to reduce the plasma asymmetry for the coaxial cylindrical rf plasma reactor is determined and implemented in the cavity processing method. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise way to establish segmented plasma columns. The test structure was a pillbox cavity made of steel of similar dimension to the standard SRF cavity. This was adopted to experimentally verify the plasma surface reaction on cylindrical structures with variable diameter using the segmented plasma generation approach. The pill box cavity is filled with niobium ring- and disk-type samples and the etch rate of these samples was measured.

  2. Radiofrequency Neurotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your specific symptoms. What you can expect Before radiofrequency neurotomy Let your doctor know if you take ... tobacco products the day of your procedure. During radiofrequency neurotomy Radiofrequency neurotomy is an outpatient procedure, so ...

  3. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    During 2007, a large amount of the work was centred on the ITER project and related tasks. The activities based on low-temperature superconducting (LTS) materials included the manufacture and qualification of ITER full-size conductors under relevant operating conditions, the design of conductors and magnets for the JT-60SA tokamak and the manufacture of the conductors for the European dipole facility. A preliminary study was also performed to develop a new test facility at ENEA in order to test long-length ITER or DEMO full-size conductors. Several studies on different superconducting materials were also started to create a more complete database of superconductor properties, and also for use in magnet design. In this context, an extensive measurement campaign on transport and magnetic properties was carried out on commercially available NbTi strands. Work was started on characterising MgB 2 wire and bulk samples to optimise their performance. In addition, an intense experimental study was started to clarify the effect of mechanical loads on the transport properties of multi-filamentary Nb 3 Sn strands with twisted or untwisted superconducting filaments. The experimental activity on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials was mainly focussed on the development and characterisation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-X (YBCO) based coated conductors. Several characteristics regarding YBCO deposition, current transport performance and tape manufacture were investigated. In the framework of chemical approaches for YBCO film growth, a new method, developed in collaboration with the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca (TUCN), Romania, was studied to obtain YBCO film via chemical solution deposition, which modifies the well-assessed metallic organic deposition trifluoroacetate (MOD-TFA) approach. The results are promising in terms of critical current and film thickness values. YBCO properties in films with artificially added pinning sites were characterised in collaboration with

  4. Easing Gently into OpenSRF, Part 2

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Open Service Request Framework (or OpenSRF, pronounced "open surf") is an inter-application message passing architecture built on XMPP (aka "jabber"). The Evergreen open source library system is built on an OpenSRF architecture to support loosely coupled individual components communicating over an OpenSRF messaging bus. This article introduces OpenSRF, demonstrates how to build OpenSRF services through simple code examples, explains the technical foundations on which OpenSRF is built, and...

  5. Easing Gently into OpenSRF, Part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Open Service Request Framework (or OpenSRF, pronounced "open surf") is an inter-application message passing architecture built on XMPP (aka "jabber"). The Evergreen open source library system is built on an OpenSRF architecture to support loosely coupled individual components communicating over an OpenSRF messaging bus. This article introduces OpenSRF, demonstrates how to build OpenSRF services through simple code examples, explains the technical foundations on which OpenSRF is built, and...

  6. Mirror-smooth surfaces and repair of defects in superconducting RF cavities by mechanical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, C. A. [Fermilab; Cooley, L. D. [Fermilab

    2012-11-22

    Mechanical techniques for polishing the inside surface of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities have been systematically explored. By extending known techniques to fine polishing, mirror-like finishes were produced, with <15 nm RMS (root mean square) roughness over 1 mm2 scan area. This is an order of magnitude less than the typical roughness produced by the electropolishing of niobium cavities. The extended mechanical polishing (XMP) process was applied to several SRF cavities which exhibited equator defects that caused quench at <20 MV m-1 and were not improved by further electropolishing. Cavity optical inspection equipment verified the complete removal of these defects, and minor acid processing, which dulled the mirror finish, restored performance of the defective cells to the high gradients and quality factors measured for adjacent cells when tested with other harmonics. This innate repair feature of XMP could be used to increase manufacturing yield. Excellent superconducting properties resulted after initial process optimization, with quality factor Q of 3 × 1010 and accelerating gradient of 43 MV m-1 being attained for a single-cell TESLA cavity, which are both close to practical limits. Several repaired nine-cell cavities also attained Q > 8 × 109 at 35 MV m-1, which is the specification for the International Linear Collider. Future optimization of the process and pathways for eliminating requirements for acid processing are also discussed.

  7. Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo [ed.

    2005-07-01

    Research on superconductivity at ENEA is mainly devoted to projects related to the ITER magnet system. In this framework, ENEA has been strongly involved in the design, manufacturing and test campaigns of the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), which reached a world record in operating current (up to 80 kA). Further to this result, the activities in 2004 were devoted to optimising the ITER conductor performance. ENEA participated in the tasks launched by EFDA to define and produce industrial-scale advanced Nb3Sn strand to be used in manufacturing the ITER high-field central solenoid (CS) and toroidal field (TF) magnets. As well as contributing to the design of the new strand and the final conductor layout, ENEA will also perform characterisation tests, addressing in particular the influence of mechanical stress on the Nb3Sn performance. As a member of the international ITER-magnet testing group, ENEA plays a central role in the measurement campaigns and data analyses for each ITER-related conductor and coil. The next phase in the R and D of the ITER magnets will be their mechanical characterisation in order to define the fabrication route of the coils and structures. During 2004 the cryogenic measurement campaign on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by-pass diode stacks was completed. As the diode-test activity was the only LHC contract to be finished on schedule, the 'Centre Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire' (CERN) asked ENEA to participate in an international tender for the cold check of the current leads for the LHC magnets. The contract was obtained, and during 2004, the experimental setup was designed and realised and the data acquisition system was developed. The measurement campaign was successfully started at the end of 2004 and will be completed in 2006.

  8. Impact of cool-down conditions at T_{c} on the superconducting rf cavity quality factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Vogt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many next-generation, high-gradient accelerator applications, from energy-recovery linacs to accelerator-driven systems (ADS rely on continuous wave (CW operation for which superconducting radio-frequency (SRF systems are the enabling technology. However, while SRF cavities dissipate little power, they must be cooled by liquid helium and for many CW accelerators the complexity as well as the investment and operating costs of the cryoplant can prove to be prohibitive. We investigated ways to reduce the dynamic losses by improving the residual resistance (R_{res} of niobium cavities. Both the material treatment and the magnetic shielding are known to have an impact. In addition, we found that R_{res} can be reduced significantly when the cool-down conditions during the superconducting phase transition of the niobium are optimized. We believe that not only do the cool-down conditions impact the level to which external magnetic flux is trapped in the cavity but also that thermoelectric currents are generated which in turn create additional flux that can be trapped. Therefore, we investigated the generation of flux and the dynamics of flux trapping and release in a simple model niobium-titanium system that mimics an SRF cavity in its helium tank. We indeed found that thermal gradients along the system during the superconducting transition can generate a thermoelectric current and magnetic flux, which subsequently can be trapped. These effects may explain the observed variation of the cavity’s R_{res} with cool-down conditions.

  9. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Laxdal, Robert E.; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  10. Plasma processing of large curved surfaces for superconducting rf cavity modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Upadhyay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities. We have demonstrated surface layer removal in an asymmetric nonplanar geometry, using a simple cylindrical cavity. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (rf circuit elements, gas pressure, rf power, chlorine concentration in the Cl_{2}/Ar gas mixtures, residence time of reactive species, and temperature of the cavity. Using variable radius cylindrical electrodes, large-surface ring-shaped samples, and dc bias in the external circuit, we have measured substantial average etching rates and outlined the possibility of optimizing plasma properties with respect to maximum surface processing effect.

  11. Modeling the interaction of a heavily beam loaded SRF cavity with its low-level RF feedback loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zong-Kai; Wang, Chaoen; Chang, Lung-Hai; Yeh, Meng-Shu; Chang, Fu-Yu; Chang, Mei-Hsia; Chang, Shian-Wen; Chen, Ling-Jhen; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Lin, Ming-Chyuan; Lo, Chih-Hung; Yu, Tsung-Chi

    2018-06-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity provides superior stability to power high intensity light sources and can suppress coupled-bunch instabilities due to its smaller impedance for higher order modes. Because of these features, SRF cavities are commonly used for modern light sources, such as the TLS, CLS, DLS, SSRF, PLS-II, TPS, and NSLS-II, with an aggressive approach to operate the light sources at high beam currents. However, operating a SRF cavity at high beam currents may result with unacceptable stability problems of the low level RF (LLRF) system, due to drifts of the cavity resonant frequency caused by unexpected perturbations from the environment. As the feedback loop gets out of control, the cavity voltage may start to oscillate with a current-dependent characteristic frequency. Such situations can cause beam abort due to the activation of the interlock protection system, i.e. false alarm of quench detection. This malfunction of the light source reduces the reliability of SRF operation. Understanding this unstable mechanism to prevent its appearance becomes a primary task in the pursuit of highly reliable SRF operation. In this paper, a Pedersen model, including the response of the LLRF system, was used to simulate the beam-cavity interaction of a SRF cavity under heavy beam loading. Causes for the onset of instability at high beam current will be discussed as well as remedies to assure the design of a stable LLRF system.

  12. SRF Clean Rooms and Cryomodule Assembly

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Three primary cleanroom facilities used for the SRF cryomodule production program are available. All 3 clean rooms have class 10 and class 100 areas. The largest is...

  13. Study of RF flux penetration on Nb for SRF Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oripov, Bakhrom; Anlage, Steven

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities are being widely used in new generation particle accelerators. Based on the needs of the SRF community to identify defects on Nb surfaces, a novel near-field magnetic field microwave microscope was successfully built using a magnetic writer from a conventional perpendicular magnetic recording hard-disk drive. Using our probe, we performed microwave measurement of both third P3f\\ (Pf,T) and fifth P5f (Pf,T) harmonic responses and its dependence on temperature and rf input power by applying a strong and localized RF magnetic field on high quality Nb films. Our preliminary results show significant difference in low-field and high-field harmonic responses. Above a temperature-dependent onset field H1 periodic structures in the harmonic response vs rf field amplitude data emerges. Similar behavior is observed in both bulk Nb and thin film Nb samples. We attribute this periodic response to vortex nonlinearity. Using our microscope, we are able to measure a local lower critical field for vortex formation Hc,v (in arbitrary units), and compare the Hc,v's of samples produced with different techniques and chemical treatments. This work is funded by US Department of Energy through Grant # DE-SC0012036T and CNAM.

  14. Optimizing SRF Gun Cavity Profiles in a Genetic Algorithm Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofler, Alicia; Evtushenko, Pavel; Marhauser, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Automation of DC photoinjector designs using a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization is an accepted practice in accelerator physics. Allowing the gun cavity field profile shape to be varied can extend the utility of this optimization methodology to superconducting and normal conducting radio frequency (SRF/RF) gun based injectors. Finding optimal field and cavity geometry configurations can provide guidance for cavity design choices and verify existing designs. We have considered two approaches for varying the electric field profile. The first is to determine the optimal field profile shape that should be used independent of the cavity geometry, and the other is to vary the geometry of the gun cavity structure to produce an optimal field profile. The first method can provide a theoretical optimal and can illuminate where possible gains can be made in field shaping. The second method can produce more realistically achievable designs that can be compared to existing designs. In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation for these two methods for generating field profiles for SRF/RF guns in a GA based injector optimization scheme and provide preliminary results.

  15. Vibrational Stability of SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M.W.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Recently developed, the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facilities at Fermilab support the International Linear Collider (ILC), High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These facilities; Meson Detector Building (MDB) and New Muon Lab (NML) have very different foundations, structures, relative elevations with respect to grade level and surrounding soil composition. Also, there are differences in the operating equipment and their proximity to the primary machine. All the future machines have stringent operational stability requirements. The present study examines both near-field and ambient vibration in order to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of near-field sources (e.g. compressors, ultra-high and standard vacuum equipment, klystrons, modulators, utility fans and pumps) and distant noise sources to the overall system displacements. Facility vibration measurement results and methods of possible isolation from noise sources are presented and discussed.

  16. Hydroforming SRF Three-cell Cavity from Seamless Niobium Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Masashi [KEK, Tsukuba; Dohmae, Takeshi [KEK, Tsukuba; Hocker, Andy [Fermilab; Inoue, Hitoshi [KEK, Tsukuba; Park, Gunn-Tae [KEK, Tsukuba; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos; Umemori, Kensei [KEK, Tsukuba

    2016-06-01

    We are developing the manufacturing method for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities by using a hydroforming instead of using conventional electron beam welding. We expect higher reliability and reduced cost with hydroforming. For successful hydroforming, high-purity seamless niobium tubes with good formability as well as advancing the hydroforming technique are necessary. Using a seamless niobium tube from ATI Wah Chang, we were able to successfully hydroform a 1.3 GHz three-cell TESLA-like cavity and obtained an Eacc of 32 MV/m. A barrel polishing process was omitted after the hydroforming. The vertical test was carried out with very rough inside surface. We got amazing and interesting result.

  17. Performance of 3.9 GHz SRF cavities at Fermilab's ILCTA_MDB nhorizontal test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Elvin; Hocker, Andy; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    Fermilab is building a cryomodule containing four 3.9 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) facility at the Deutsches Elektronen-SYnchrotron (DESY) laboratory. Before assembling the cavities into the cryomodule, each individual cavity is tested at Fermilab's Horizontal Test Stand (HTS). The HTS provides the capability to test fully-dressed SRF cavities at 1.8 K with high-power pulsed RF in order to verify that the cavities achieve performance requirements under these conditions. The performance at the HTS of the 3.9 GHz cavities built for FLASH is presented here.

  18. A SRF niobium cylindrical cavity with a large silicon nitride niobium-coated membrane as one end-wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Castelli, Alessandro; Pate, Jacob; Thompson, Johnathon; Delmas, William; Sharping, Jay; Chiao, Raymond; Chiao Team; Sharping Team

    The development of large silicon nitride membranes and niobium film deposition techniques motivate new architectures in opto-mechanics and microwave devices that can exploit the extremely high Q's obtainable with superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities. We present a X-band SRF cylindrical cavity-membrane system in which one end-wall of the cavity is replaced by a niobium coated centimeter-sized silicon nitride membrane. We report moderately high Q factors above 10 million. Experimental results characterizing the system and potential future applications for such schemes in microwave devices and optomechanics are discussed.

  19. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Medium-Beta 650 MHz SRF Cavity Prototypes for Project-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhauser, F.; Clemens, W.A.; Henry, J.; Kneisel, P.; Martin, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Slack, G.; Turlington, L.; Williams, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    A new type of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity shape with a shallow equator dome to reduce electron impact energies for suppressing multipacting barriers has been proposed. The shape is in consideration for the first time in the framework of Project-X to design a potential multi-cell cavity candidate for the medium-beta section of the SRF proton CW linac operating at 650 MHz. Rationales covering the design of the multi-cell cavity, the manufacture, post-processing and high power testing of two single-cell prototypes are presented.

  20. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e⁺/e⁻ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  1. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e@@@/e@@@ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  2. Cs2Te normal conducting photocathodes in the superconducting rf gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J

    2010-01-01

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF gun) is one of the latest applications of superconducting rf technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting photocathodes with high quantum efficiency are yet unavailable, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the photocathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. Recently, a SRF gun with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated in Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. In this paper, we will present the physical properties of Cs2Te photocathodes in the SC cavity, such as the quantum efficiency, the lifetime, the rejuvenation, the charge saturation, and the dark current.

  3. Industrialization of the nitrogen-doping preparation for SRF cavities for LCLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, D.; Aderhold, S.; Burrill, A.; Daly, E.; Davis, K.; Grassellino, A.; Grimm, C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Marhauser, F.; Melnychuk, O.; Palczewski, A.; Posen, S.; Ross, M.; Sergatskov, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Wilson, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is a new state-of-the-art coherent X-ray source being constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. It employs 280 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in order operate in continuous wave (CW) mode. To reduce the overall cryogenic cost of such a large accelerator, nitrogen-doping of the SRF cavities is being used. Nitrogen-doping has consistently been shown to increase the efficiency of SRF cavities operating in the 2.0 K regime and at medium fields (15-20 MV/m) in vertical cavity tests and horizontal cryomodule tests. While nitrogen-doping's efficacy for improvement of cavity performance was demonstrated at three independent labs, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and Cornell University, transfer of the technology to industry for LCLS-II production was not without challenges. Here we present results from the beginning of LCLS-II cavity production. We discuss qualification of the cavity vendors and the first cavities from each vendor. Finally, we demonstrate that nitrogen-doping has been successfully transferred to SRF cavity vendors, resulting in consistent production of cavities with better cryogenic efficiency than has ever been achieved for a large-scale accelerator.

  4. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  5. Three-dimensional model of a liquid-cooled, low energy booster, radio-frequency cavity tuner at the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, R.; Propp, A.; Campbell, B.; Dao, B.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational heat transfer and fluid flow model was developed to analyze a forced-flow, liquid-cooled, low energy booster (LEB), radio-frequency (RF) cavity, tuner concept. The results for a commercial dielectric heat transfer fluid indicated safe temperatures in the ferrite

  6. Observation of Stable Low Surface Resistance in Large-Grain Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, Shichun [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)/Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou (China)

    2016-05-01

    Low surface resistance, or high unloaded quality factor (Q0), superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are being pursued actively nowadays as their application in large-scale CW SRF accelerators can save capital and operational cost in cryogenics. There are different options in realization of such cavities. One of them is the large-grain (LG) niobium cavity. In this contribution, we present new experimental results in evaluation of LG niobium cavities cooled down in the presence of an external magnetic field. High Q0 values are achieved even with an ambient magnetic field of up to 100 mG. More over, it is observed that these high Q0 values are super-robust against repeated quench, literally not affected at all after the cavity being deliberately quenched for hundreds of times in the presence of an ambient magnetic field of up to 200 mG.

  7. Flange joint system for SRF cavities utilizing high force spring clamps for low particle generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2017-09-05

    A flange joint system for SRF cavities. The flange joint system includes a set of high force spring clamps that produce high force on the simple flanges of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities to squeeze conventional metallic seals. The system establishes the required vacuum and RF-tight seal with minimum particle contamination to the inside of the cavity assembly. The spring clamps are designed to stay within their elastic range while being forced open enough to mount over the flange pair. Upon release, the clamps have enough force to plastically deform metallic seal surfaces and continue to a new equilibrium sprung dimension where the flanges remain held against one another with enough preload such that normal handling will not break the seal.

  8. Evaluation Of Silicon Diodes As IN-SITU Cryogenic Field Emission Detectors For SRF Cavity Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli

    2012-01-01

    We performed in-situ cryogenic testing of four silicon diodes as possible candidates for field emission (FE) monitors of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities during qualification testing and in accelerator cryo-modules. We evaluated diodes from 2 companies - from Hamamatsu corporation model S1223-01; and from OSI Optoelectronics models OSD35-LR-A, XUV-50C, and FIL-UV20. The measurements were done by placing the diodes in superfluid liquid helium near the top of a field emitting 9-cell cavity during its vertical test. For each diode, we will discuss their viability as a 2K cryogenic detector for FE mapping of SRF cavities and the directionality of S1223-01 in such environments. We will also present calibration curves between the diodes and JLab's standard radiation detector placed above the Dewar's top plate.

  9. A Family of L-band SRF Cavities for High Power Proton Driver Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, Robert; Marhauser, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Recent global interest in high duty factor or CW superconducting linacs with high average beam power highlights the need for robust and reliable SRF structures capable of delivering high average RF power to the beam with moderate HOM damping, low interception of halo and good efficiency. Potential applications include proton or H- drivers for spallation neutron sources, neutrino physics, waste transmutation, subcritical reactors, and high-intensity high-energy physics experiments. We describe a family of SRF cavities with a range of Betas capable of transporting beam currents in excess of 10 mA CW with large irises for minimal interception of halo and HOM and power couplers capable of supporting high average power operation. Goals include an efficient cell shape, high packing factor for efficient real-estate gradient and strong HOM damping to ensure stable beam operation,

  10. Industrialization of Superconducting RF Accelerator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiniger, Michael; Pekeler, Michael; Vogel, Hanspeter

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) accelerator technology has basically existed for 50 years. It took about 20 years to conduct basic R&D and prototyping at universities and international institutes before the first superconducting accelerators were built, with industry supplying complete accelerator cavities. In parallel, the design of large scale accelerators using SRF was done worldwide. In order to build those accelerators, industry has been involved for 30 years in building the required cavities and/or accelerator modules in time and budget. To enable industry to supply these high tech components, technology transfer was made from the laboratories in the following three regions: the Americas, Asia and Europe. As will be shown, the manufacture of the SRF cavities is normally accomplished in industry whereas the cavity testing and module assembly are not performed in industry in most cases, yet. The story of industrialization is so far a story of customized projects. Therefore a real SRF accelerator product is not yet available in this market. License agreements and technology transfer between leading SRF laboratories and industry is a powerful tool for enabling industry to manufacture SRF components or turnkey superconducting accelerator modules for other laboratories and users with few or no capabilities in SRF technology. Despite all this, the SRF accelerator market today is still a small market. The manufacture and preparation of the components require a range of specialized knowledge, as well as complex and expensive manufacturing installations like for high precision machining, electron beam welding, chemical surface preparation and class ISO4 clean room assembly. Today, the involved industry in the US and Europe comprises medium-sized companies. In Japan, some big enterprises are involved. So far, roughly 2500 SRF cavities have been built by or ordered from industry worldwide. Another substantial step might come from the International Linear Collider (ILC) project

  11. SRF Accelerator Technology Transfer Experience from the Achievement of the SNS Cryomodule Production Run

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, John; Daly, Edward; Drury, Michael A; Fischer, John; Hiatt, Tommy; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Preble, Joseph P; Whitlatch, Timothy; Wilson, Katherine; Wiseman, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss the technology transfer aspect of superconducting RF expertise, as it pertains to cryomodule production, beginning with the original design requirements through testing and concluding with product delivery to the end user. The success of future industrialization, of accelerator systems, is dependent upon a focused effort on accelerator technology transfer. Over the past twenty years the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has worked with industry to successfully design, manufacture, test and commission more superconducting RF cryomodules than any other entity in the United States. The most recent accomplishment of Jefferson Lab has been the successful production of twenty-four cryomodules designed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Jefferson Lab was chosen, by the United States Department of Energy, to provide the superconducting portion of the SNS linac due to its reputation as a primary resource for SRF expertise. The successful partnering with, and d...

  12. Five-cell superconducting RF module with a PBG coupler cell: design and cold testing of the copper prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenyev, Sergey Andreyevich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shchegolkov, Dmitry [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boulware, Chase [Niowave, Lansing, MI (United States); Grimm, Terry [Niowave, Lansing, MI (United States); Rogacki, Adam [Niowave, Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-04-29

    We report the design and experimental data for a copper prototype of a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator module. The five-cell module has an incorporated photonic band gap (PBG) cell with couplers. The purpose of the PBG cell is to achieve better higher order mode (HOM) damping, which is vital for preserving the quality of high-current electron beams. Better HOM damping raises the current threshold for beam instabilities in novel SRF accelerators. The PBG design also increases the real-estate gradient of the linac because both HOM damping and the fundamental power coupling can be done through the PBG cell instead of on the beam pipe via complicated end assemblies. First, we will discuss the design and accelerating properties of the structure. The five-cell module was optimized to provide good HOM damping while maintaining the same accelerating properties as conventional elliptical-cell modules. We will then discuss the process of tuning the structure to obtain the desired accelerating gradient profile. Finally, we will list measured quality factors for the accelerating mode and the most dangerous HOMs.

  13. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arnold

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J. W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.557378] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1  μmrad, and high average current (hundreds of mA are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun. SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University. Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term operation was demonstrated at FZD [R. Xiang et al., in Proceedings of the 31st International Free Electron Laser Conference (FEL 09, Liverpool, UK (STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, 2009, p. 488]. In the near future SRF guns are expected to play an important role for linac-driven FEL facilities. In this paper we will review the concepts, the design parameters, and the status of the major SRF gun projects.

  14. Overview of ten-year operation of the superconducting linear accelerator at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-H.; Afanador, R.; Barnhart, D. L.; Crofford, M.; Degraff, B. D.; Doleans, M.; Galambos, J.; Gold, S. W.; Howell, M. P.; Mammosser, J.; McMahan, C. J.; Neustadt, T. S.; Peters, C.; Saunders, J. W.; Strong, W. H.; Vandygriff, D. J.; Vandygriff, D. M.

    2017-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has acquired extensive operational experience of a pulsed proton superconducting linear accelerator (SCL) as a user facility. Numerous lessons have been learned in its first 10 years operation to achieve a stable and reliable operation of the SCL. In this paper, an overview of the SNS SCL design, qualification of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and ancillary subsystems, an overview of the SNS cryogenic system, the SCL operation including SCL output energy history and downtime statistics, performance stability of the SRF cavities, efforts for SRF cavity performance recovery and improvement at the SNS, and maintenance activities for cryomodules are introduced.

  15. Overview of ten-year operation of the superconducting linear accelerator at the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Afanador, Ralph; Barnhart, Debra L.; Crofford, Mark T.; Degraff, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has acquired extensive operational experience of a pulsed proton superconducting linear accelerator (SCL) as a user facility. Numerous lessons have been learned in its first 10 years operation to achieve a stable and reliable operation of the SCL. In this paper, an overview of the SNS SCL design, qualification of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and ancillary subsystems, an overview of the SNS cryogenic system, the SCL operation including SCL output energy history and downtime statistics, performance stability of the SRF cavities, efforts for SRF cavity performance recovery and improvement at the SNS, and maintenance activities for cryomodules are introduced.

  16. Simulation Study Using an Injection Phase-locked Magnetron as an Alternative Source for SRF Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Plawski, Tomasz E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    As a drop-in replacement for the CEBAF CW klystron system, a 1497 MHz, CW-type high-efficiency magnetron using injection phase lock and amplitude variation is attractive. Amplitude control using magnetic field trimming and anode voltage modulation has been studied using analytical models and MATLAB/Simulink simulations. Since the 1497 MHz magnetron has not been built yet, previously measured characteristics of a 2.45GHz cooker magnetron are used as reference. The results of linear responses to the amplitude and phase control of a superconducting RF (SRF) cavity, and the expected overall benefit for the current CEBAF and future MEIC RF systems are presented in this paper.

  17. Development of optical inspection system of L-band SRF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Yujiro; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Hayano, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require about 15,000 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerating cavities with high accelerating gradient (>35 MV/m) in its main linac. The high yield (80%) of successful high gradient cavities is necessary. Both of the yield and the accelerating gradient of SRF cavities does not reach the required level at present. We think that the gradient of the SRF cavities is limited by irregularities on the interior surface of the cavities, for example, fine dusts (1μm), balls (100μm) and pits (100μm): electrons emitted from the fine dusts by the tunnel effect are accelerated in the electric field, and consume the stored energy of the cavities (Field Emission). The balls and pits cause a breakdown by a magnetic field enhancement or a thermal current concentration (Thermal Breakdown). To prevent these problems the interior surface are treated by polishing and rinsing. The relation between the surface states and the gradient limitations, however, is still not clarified. To study the relation, we are developing an optical inspection system of the interior surface. (author)

  18. Additive manufacturing method for SRF components of various geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Robert; Frigola, Pedro E; Murokh, Alex Y

    2015-05-05

    An additive manufacturing method for forming nearly monolithic SRF niobium cavities and end group components of arbitrary shape with features such as optimized wall thickness and integral stiffeners, greatly reducing the cost and technical variability of conventional cavity construction. The additive manufacturing method for forming an SRF cavity, includes atomizing niobium to form a niobium powder, feeding the niobium powder into an electron beam melter under a vacuum, melting the niobium powder under a vacuum in the electron beam melter to form an SRF cavity; and polishing the inside surface of the SRF cavity.

  19. LEP superconducting cavities go into storage

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities from the LEP-2 phase (1996-2000) are put into storage in the tunnel that once housed the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), the world’s first proton collider, located at CERN.

  20. Integrated Surface Topography Characterization of Variously Polished Niobium for Superconducting Particle Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Hui; Reece, Charles; Kelley, Michael; Ribeill, G.

    2009-01-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro-and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents flow. Interior surface chemical polishing (BCP/EP) to remove mechanical damage leaves surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely-used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is being used to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of EP is reported, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography.

  1. SNS superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundelin, Ronald M.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) decided in early 2000 to use superconducting RF (SRF) in the linac at energies above 185 MeV. Since the SNS duty cycle is 6%, the SRF and normal conducting approaches have capital costs which are about the same, but operating costs and future upgradability are improved by using SRF. The current status of cavity and cryomodule development and procurement, including the basis for decisions made, is discussed. The current plan includes use of 805 MHz, 6-cell cavities with geometrical betas of 0.61 and 0.81. There are 33 medium beta and 60 high beta cavities in 11 and 15 cryomodules, respectively. Each cavity (except the 93rd) is powered by a 550 kW pulsed klystron. Issues addressed include choice of peak surface gradient, optimization of cavity shape, selection of a scaled KEK input power coupler, selection of scaled TESLA higher mode couplers, and control of the effects of higher order modes on the beam. (author)

  2. Heat load of a GaAs photocathode in an SRF electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Erdong; Zhao Kui; Jorg Kewisch; Ilan Ben-Zvi; Andrew Burrill; Trivini Rao; Wu Qiong; Animesh Jain; Ramesh Gupta; Doug Holmes

    2011-01-01

    A great deal of effort has been made over the last decades to develop a better polarized electron source for high energy physics. Several laboratories operate DC guns with a gallium arsenide photocathode, which yield a highly polarized electron beam. However, the beam's emittance might well be improved by using a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) electron gun, which delivers beams of a higher brightness than that from DC guns because the field gradient at the cathode is higher. SRF guns with metal and CsTe cathodes have been tested successfully. To produce polarized electrons, a Gallium-Arsenide photo-cathode must be used: an experiment to do so in a superconducting RF gun is under way at BNL. Since a bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) photocathode is normal conducting, a problem arises from the heat load stemming from the cathode. We present our measurements of the electrical resistance of GaAs at cryogenic temperatures, a prediction of the heat load and verification by measuring the quality factor of the gun with and without the cathode at 2 K. We simulate heat generation and flow from the GaAs cathode using the ANSYS program. By following the findings with the heat load model, we designed and fabricated a new cathode holder (plug) to decrease the heat load from GaAs. (authors)

  3. Strategies for waveguide coupling for SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, L.R.

    1998-01-01

    Despite widespread use of coaxial couplers in SRF cavities, a single, simple waveguide coupling can be used both to transmit generator power to a cavity, and to remove a large class of Higher Order Modes (HOMs, produced by the beam). There are balances and tradeoffs to be made, such as the coupling strength of the various frequencies, the transverse component of the coupler fields on the beam axis, and the magnitude of the surface fields and currents. This paper describes those design constraints, categories of solutions, and examples from the CEBAF Energy Upgrade studies

  4. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity

  5. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity.

  6. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2011-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs) largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J.W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004)] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µmrad), and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term ...

  7. Dependence of trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain Nb superconducting radio-frequency cavity on spatial temperature gradient during cooldown through Tc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shichun; Kubo, Takayuki; Geng, R. L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies by Romanenko et al. revealed that cooling down a superconducting cavity under a large spatial temperature gradient decreases the amount of trapped flux and leads to reduction of the residual surface resistance. In the present paper, the flux expulsion ratio and the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain cavity cooled down under a spatial temperature gradient up to 80 K /m are studied under various applied magnetic fields from 5 to 20 μ T . We show the flux expulsion ratio improves as the spatial temperature gradient increases, independent of the applied magnetic field: our results support and enforce the previous studies. We then analyze all rf measurement results obtained under different applied magnetic fields together by plotting the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance normalized by the applied magnetic field as a function of the spatial temperature gradient. All the data can be fitted by a single curve, which defines an empirical formula for the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance as a function of the spatial temperature gradient and applied magnetic field. The formula can fit not only the present results but also those obtained by Romanenko et al. previously. The sensitivity rfl of surface resistance from trapped magnetic flux of fine-grain and large-grain niobium cavities and the origin of d T /d s dependence of Rfl/Ba are also discussed.

  8. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  9. Superconducting versus normal conducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Podlech, Holger

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important issues of high-power hadron linacs is the choice of technology with respect to superconducting or room-temperature operation. The favour for a specific technology depends on several parameters such as the beam energy, beam current, beam power and duty factor. This contribution gives an overview of the comparison between superconducting and normal conducting cavities. This includes basic radiofrequency (RF) parameters, design criteria, limitations, required RF and plug power as well as case studies.

  10. The Properties of Normal Conducting Cathodes in FZD Superconducting Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J

    2009-01-01

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF photoinjector) is one of the latest applications of SC technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting cathodes with high QE are not available up to now, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for the SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the cathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. The SRF gun with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated under the collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. In this paper, some experience gained in the gun commissioning will be concluded. The results of the properties of Cs2Te photocathode in the cavity will be presented, such as the Q.E., the life time, the dark current and the thermal emittance.

  11. BNL 703 MHz SRF cryomodule demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Dalesio, L.; Dottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hoff, L.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lambiase, R.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present the preliminary results of the testing of the 703 MHz SRF cryomodule designed for use in the ampere class ERL under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The preliminary cavity tests, carried out at Thomas Jefferson Laboratory, demonstrated cavity performance of 20 MV/m with a Qo of 1 x 10 10 , results we expect to reproduce in the horizontal configuration. This test of the entire string assembly will allow us to evaluate all of the additional cryomodule components not previously tested in the VTA and will prepare us for our next milestone test which will be delivery of electrons from our injector through the cryomodule to the beam dump. This will also be the first demonstration of an accelerating cavity designed for use in an ampere class ERL, a key development which holds great promise for future machines

  12. Near-Field Microwave Magnetic Nanoscopy of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Tamin; Ghamsari, Behnood G.; Bieler, Thomas R.; Tan, Teng; Xi, X. X.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    A localized measurement of the RF critical field on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity materials is a key step to identify specific defects that produce quenches of SRF cavities. Two new measurements are performed to demonstrate these capabilities with a novel near-field scanning probe microwave microscope. The first is a third harmonic nonlinear measurement on a high Residual- Resistance-Ratio bulk Nb sample showing strong localized nonlinear response for the first time, with surfa...

  13. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    Dhavale, Asavari S.; Dhakal, Pashupati; Polyanskii, Anatolii A.; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculat...

  14. Superconducting radio frequency technology: Expanding the horizons of physics and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Leemann, C.W.; Sundelin, R.M.; Hartline, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a major new technology supporting the further evolution of accelerators: superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology, which is today on the verge of large-scale application in accelerators. Originally foreseen in the early 1960s as a promising technology, SRF only recently has overcome several technological and practical hurdles. SRF accelerating structures promise low rf losses and high gradients under cw operation. High-quality, intense cw beams can be accelerated without risk of melting the structure and without requiring enormous amounts of input rf power

  15. Fundamental of cryogenics (for superconducting RF technology)

    CERN Document Server

    Pierini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This review briefly illustrates a few fundamental concepts of cryogenic engineering, the technological practice that allows reaching and maintaining the low-temperature operating conditions of the superconducting devices needed in particle accelerators. To limit the scope of the task, and not to duplicate coverage of cryogenic engineering concepts particularly relevant to superconducting magnets that can be found in previous CAS editions, the overview presented in this course focuses on superconducting radio-frequency cavities.

  16. Plasma ignition and tuning in different cells of a 1.3 GHz nine-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity: Proof of principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Moss, Andrew; Goudket, Philippe; Pattalwar, Shrikant; Herbert, Joe; Valizadeh, Reza; McIntosh, Peter

    2018-06-01

    Field emission is one of the critical issues in the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and can degrade their accelerating gradient during operation. The contamination present at top surface of the SRF cavity is one of the foremost reasons for field emission. Plasma based surface processing can be a viable option to eliminate such surface contaminants and enhance performance of the SRF cavity especially for in-situ applications. These days, 1.3 GHz nine-cell SRF cavity has become baseline standard for many particle accelerators, it is of interest to develop plasma cleaning technique for such SRF cavities. In the development of the plasma processing technique for SRF cavities, the most challenging task is to ignite and tune the plasma in different cells of the SRF cavity. At Daresbury laboratory, UK, we have successfully achieved plasma ignition in different cells of a 1.3 GHz nine-cell SRF cavity. The plasma ignition in different cells of the cavity was accomplished at room temperature towards room temperature plasma cleaning of the SRF cavity surface. Here, we report the successful demonstration of the plasma ignition in different cells of a 1.3 GHz nine-cell SRF cavity.

  17. Adaptive compensation of Lorentz force detuning in superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Schappert, Warren [Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities and considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate. Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  18. Mass, energy and material balances of SRF production process. Part 1: SRF produced from commercial and industrial waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Kärki, Janne

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the mass, energy and material balances of a solid recovered fuel (SRF) production process. The SRF is produced from commercial and industrial waste (C&IW) through mechanical treatment (MT). In this work various streams of material produced in SRF production process are analyzed for their proximate and ultimate analysis. Based on this analysis and composition of process streams their mass, energy and material balances are established for SRF production process. Here mass balance describes the overall mass flow of input waste material in the various output streams, whereas material balance describes the mass flow of components of input waste stream (such as paper and cardboard, wood, plastic (soft), plastic (hard), textile and rubber) in the various output streams of SRF production process. A commercial scale experimental campaign was conducted on an MT waste sorting plant to produce SRF from C&IW. All the process streams (input and output) produced in this MT plant were sampled and treated according to the CEN standard methods for SRF: EN 15442 and EN 15443. The results from the mass balance of SRF production process showed that of the total input C&IW material to MT waste sorting plant, 62% was recovered in the form of SRF, 4% as ferrous metal, 1% as non-ferrous metal and 21% was sorted out as reject material, 11.6% as fine fraction, and 0.4% as heavy fraction. The energy flow balance in various process streams of this SRF production process showed that of the total input energy content of C&IW to MT plant, 75% energy was recovered in the form of SRF, 20% belonged to the reject material stream and rest 5% belonged with the streams of fine fraction and heavy fraction. In the material balances, mass fractions of plastic (soft), plastic (hard), paper and cardboard and wood recovered in the SRF stream were 88%, 70%, 72% and 60% respectively of their input masses to MT plant. A high mass fraction of plastic (PVC), rubber material and non

  19. Mechanical Design and Fabrication Studies for SPL Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; Aviles Santillana, I; Capatina, O; Renaglia, T; Tardy, T; Valverde Alonso, N; Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s R&D programme on the Superconducting Proton Linac’s (SPL) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) elliptical cavities made from niobium sheets explores new mechanical design and consequently new fabrication methods, where several opportunities for improved optimization were identified. A stainless steel helium vessel is under design rather than a titanium helium vessel using an integrated brazed transition between Nb and the SS helium vessel. Different design and fabrication aspects were proposed and the results are discussed hereafter.

  20. The elbe accelerator facility starts operation with the superconducting rf gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schneider, C; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J; Kamps, T; Rudolph, J; Schenk, M; Klemz, G; Will, I

    2010-01-01

    As the first superconducting rf photo-injector (SRF gun) in practice, the FZD 3+1/2 cell SRF gun is successfully connected to the superconducting linac ELBE. This setting will improve the beam quality for ELBE users. It is the first example for an accelerator facility fully based on superconducting RF technology. For high average power FEL and ERL sources, the combination of SRF linac and SRF gun provides a new chance to produce beams of high average current and low emittance with relative low power consumption. The main parameters achieved from the present SRF gun are the final electron energy of 3 MeV, 16 μA average current, and rms transverse normalized emittances of 3 mm mrad at 77 pC bunch charge. A modified 3+1/2 cell niobium cavity has been fabricated and tested, which will increase the rf gradient in the gun and thus better the beam parameters further. In this paper the status of the integration of the SRF gun with the ELBE linac will be presented, and the latest results of the beam experiments will ...

  1. Analysis Of Post-Wet-Chemistry Heat Treatment Effects On Nb SRF Surface Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2014-01-01

    Most of the current research in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is focused on ways to reduce the construction and operating cost of SRF-based accelerators as well as on the development of new or improved cavity processing techniques. The increase in quality factors is the result of the reduction of the surface resistance of the materials. A recent test on a 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from ingot niobium of medium purity and heat treated at 1400 °C in a ultra-high vacuum induction furnace resulted in a residual resistance of ∼ 1nΩ and a quality factor at 2.0 K increasing with field up to ∼ 5A-10 10 at a peak magnetic field of 90 mT. In this contribution, we present some results on the investigation of the origin of the extended Q 0 -increase, obtained by multiple HF rinses, oxypolishing and heat treatment of A ''all NbA'' cavities

  2. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A. T.; Lu, X. Y.; Rimmer, R. A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I-V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson-Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  3. SQUID-based Nondestructive Testing Instrument of Dished Niobium Sheets for SRF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Q. S. Shu; I. Ben-Zvi; G. Cheng; I. M. Phipps; J. T. Susta; P. Kneisel; G. Myneni; J. Mast; R. Selim

    2007-01-01

    Currently available technology can only inspect flat sheets and allow the elimination of defective flat sheets before the expensive forming and machining of the SRF cavity half-cells, but it does not eliminate the problem of remaining or uncovered surface impurities after partial chemical etching of the half-cells, nor does it detect any defects that may have been added during the fabrication of the half-cells. AMAC has developed a SQUID scanning system based on eddy current technique that allows the scanning of curved Nb samples that are welded to make superconducting RF cavity half-cells. AMAC SQUID scanning system successfully located the defects (Ta macro particles about 100 mm diameter) in a flat Nb sample (top side) and was able to also locate the defects in a cylindrical surface sample (top side). It is more significant that the system successfully located the defects on the backside of the flat sample and curved sample or 3-mm from the top surface. The 3-D SQUID-based Nondestructive instrument will be further optimized and improved in making SRF cavities and allow inspection and detection during cavity manufacturing for achieving highest accelerating fields

  4. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A.T.; Lu, X.Y.; Rimmer, R.A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I–V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson–Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  5. Radiofrequency radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, J.A.; Czerski, P.A.; Stuchly, M.A.; Mild, K.H.; Sheppard, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    High-level radiofrequency radiation is a source of thermal energy that carries all of the known implications of heating for biological systems, including burns, temporary and permanent changes in reproduction, cataracts, and death. In general, no changes in chromosomes, DNA or the reproductive potential of animals exposed to RF radiation have been reported in the absence of significant rises in temperature, though there are limited data on DNA and chromosomal changes at non-thermal levels. Human data are currently limited and do not provide adequate information about the relationship between prolonged low-level RF radiation exposure and increased mortality or morbidity, including cancer incidence. In epidemiological studies and clinical reports of RF effects in man, the problems of quantification are numerous and include uncertainties about ''dose'', health effects, latent periods, dose-response relationships, and interactions with other physical or chemical agents. 228 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Mass, energy and material balances of SRF production process. Part 2: SRF produced from construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Kärki, Janne

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the fraction of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) complicated and economically not feasible to sort out for recycling purposes is used to produce solid recovered fuel (SRF) through mechanical treatment (MT). The paper presents the mass, energy and material balances of this SRF production process. All the process streams (input and output) produced in MT waste sorting plant to produce SRF from C&D waste are sampled and treated according to CEN standard methods for SRF. Proximate and ultimate analysis of these streams is performed and their composition is determined. Based on this analysis and composition of process streams their mass, energy and material balances are established for SRF production process. By mass balance means the overall mass flow of input waste material stream in the various output streams and material balances mean the mass flow of components of input waste material stream (such as paper and cardboard, wood, plastic (soft), plastic (hard), textile and rubber) in the various output streams of SRF production process. The results from mass balance of SRF production process showed that of the total input C&D waste material to MT waste sorting plant, 44% was recovered in the form of SRF, 5% as ferrous metal, 1% as non-ferrous metal, and 28% was sorted out as fine fraction, 18% as reject material and 4% as heavy fraction. The energy balance of this SRF production process showed that of the total input energy content of C&D waste material to MT waste sorting plant, 74% was recovered in the form of SRF, 16% belonged to the reject material and rest 10% belonged to the streams of fine fraction and heavy fraction. From the material balances of this process, mass fractions of plastic (soft), paper and cardboard, wood and plastic (hard) recovered in the SRF stream were 84%, 82%, 72% and 68% respectively of their input masses to MT plant. A high mass fraction of plastic (PVC) and rubber material was found in the reject material

  7. Development of a high brightness, high current SRF photo-electron source for ERL applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Axel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Collaboration: bERLinPro Team

    2016-07-01

    Energy recovery linacs (ERL) offer the potential to combine major beam properties of the two main domains of particle accelerators: The low emittance of linear accelerators and the high average beam current of storage rings, while also allowing to compress to short bunches below the ps regime. This makes among other applications ERLs an ideal candidate for future light sources. The beam properties of the ERL are given by the performance of the injection section and hence of the beam source. Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin is currently designing and building a high average current all superconducting CW driven ERL as a prototype to demonstrate low normalized beam emittance of 1 mm*mrad at 100 mA and short pulses of about 2 ps. In this contribution we discuss the development of this class of a high brightness, high current SRF photo-electron source and present recent commissioning results. Also, alternative approaches at other laboratories are shortly reviewed.

  8. Optimizing Centrifugal Barrel Polishing For Mirror Finish SRF Cavity And RF Tests At Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli; Tian, Hui

    2012-01-01

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on a 1.3 GHz fine grain TESLA single cell cavity and 1.5 GHz fine grain CEBAF high gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) single cell cavity following a modified recipe originally developed at Fermi National Accelerator Lab (FNAL). We were able to obtain a mirror like surface similar to that obtained at FNAL, while reducing the number of CBP steps and total processing time. This paper will discuss the change in surface and subsequent cavity performance post CBP, after a 800 C bake (no pre-bake chemistry) and minimal controlled electro-polishing (10 micron). In addition to Q vs. E ACC thermometry mapping with preheating characteristics and optical inspection of the cavity after CBP will also be shown.

  9. Tuner control system of Spoke012 SRF cavity for C-ADS injector I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Sun, Yi; Wang, Guang-Wei; Mi, Zheng-Hui; Lin, Hai-Ying; Wang, Qun-Yao; Liu, Rong; Ma, Xin-Peng

    2016-09-01

    A new tuner control system for spoke superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities has been developed and applied to cryomodule I of the C-ADS injector I at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. We have successfully implemented the tuner controller based on Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) for the first time and achieved a cavity tuning phase error of ±0.7° (about ±4 Hz peak to peak) in the presence of electromechanical coupled resonance. This paper presents preliminary experimental results based on the PLC tuner controller under proton beam commissioning. Supported by Proton linac accelerator I of China Accelerator Driven sub-critical System (Y12C32W129)

  10. Investigations of Residual Stresses and Mechanical Properties of Single Crystal Niobium for SRF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Ricker, Richard E.

    2007-08-01

    This work investigates properties of large grained, high purity niobium with respect to the forming of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities from such large grained sheets. The yield stresses were examined using tensile specimens that were essentially single crystals in orientations evenly distributed in the standard projection triangle. No distinct yield anisotropy was found, however, vacuum annealing increased the yield strength by a factor 2…3. The deep drawing forming operation of the half cells raises the issues of elastic shape changes after the release of the forming tool (springback) and residual stresses, both of which are indicated to be negligible. This is a consequence of the low yield stress (sheet metal forming). However, the significant anisotropy of the transversal plastic strains after uniaxial deformation points to potentially critical thickness variations for large grained / single crystal half cells, thus raising the issue of controlling grain orientation or using single crystal sheet material.

  11. Studies of HOMs in chains of SRF cavities using state-space concatenation scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galek, Tomasz; Heller, Johann; Flisgen, Thomas; Brackebusch, Korinna; Rienen, Ursula van [Institut fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik, Universitaet Rostock (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The design of modern superconducting radio frequency cavities for acceleration of charged particle bunches requires intensive numerical simulations, as they typically arise as modules of several multi-cell cavities. A wide variety of parameters vital to the proper operation of accelerating cavities must be optimized and studied. One of the most important issues concerning the SRF cavities is the influence of the higher order modes on the beam quality, in this contribution. For TESLA-like structures with 1.3 GHz accelerating mode, higher order modes are calculated up to 4 GHz, the external quality factor and the shunt/geometrical impedance spectra are analyzed. To compute properties of complete RF modules the state-space concatenation scheme is used. The aspects of the concatenation scheme and its application to the bERLinPro's chain of cavities is discussed.

  12. Cs_{2}Te normal conducting photocathodes in the superconducting rf gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Xiang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF gun is one of the latest applications of superconducting rf technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting photocathodes with high quantum efficiency are yet unavailable, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the photocathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. Recently, a SRF gun with Cs_{2}Te cathode has been successfully operated in Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. In this paper, we will present the physical properties of Cs_{2}Te photocathodes in the SC cavity, such as the quantum efficiency, the lifetime, the rejuvenation, the charge saturation, and the dark current.

  13. Impurity Content Optimization to Maximize Q-Factors of Superconducting Resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Fermilab; Checchin, Mattia [IIT, Chicago; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab; Zasadzinski, John [IIT, Chicago (main)

    2017-05-01

    Quality factor of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities is degraded whenever magnetic flux is trapped in the cavity walls during the cooldown. In this contribution we study how the trapped flux sensitivity, defined as the trapped flux surface resistance normalized for the amount of trapped flux, depends on the mean free path. A systematic study of a variety of 1.3 GHz cavities with different surface treatments (EP, 120 C bake and different N-doping) is carried out. A bell shaped trend appears for the range of mean free path studied. Over-doped cavities fall at the maximum of this curve defining the largest values of sensitivity. In addition, we have studied the trend of the BCS surface resistance contribution as a function of mean free path, showing that N-doped cavities follow close to the theoretical minimum. Adding these results together we show that the 2/6 N-doping treatment gives the highest Q-factor values at 2 K and 16 MV/m, as long as the magnetic field fully trapped during the cavity cooldown is lower than 10 mG.

  14. Tailoring Surface Impurity Content to Maximize Q-factors of Superconducting Resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Quality factor of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities is degraded whenever magnetic flux is trapped in the cavity walls during the cooldown. In this contribution we study how the trapped flux sensitivity, defined as the trapped flux surface resistance normalized for the amount of flux trapped, depends on the mean free path. A variety of 1.3 GHz cavities with different surface treatments (EP, 120 C bake and different N-doping) were studied in order to cover the largest range of mean free path nowadays achievable, from few to thousands of nanometers. A bell shaped trend appears for the range of mean free path studied. Over doped cavities falls at the maximum of this curve defining the largest values of sensitivity. In addition, we have also studied the trend of the BCS surface resistance contribution as a function of mean free path, revealing that N-doped cavities follow close to the theoretical minimum of the BCS surface resistance as a function of the mean free path. Adding these results together we unveil that optimal N-doping treatment allows to maximize Q-factor at 2 K and 16 MV/m until the magnetic field fully trapped during the cavity cooldown stays below 10 mG.

  15. SNS Superconducting RF cavity modeling-iterative learning control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.-I.; Regan, Amy; Wang, Y.-M.

    2002-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Superconducting RF (SRF) linear accelerator is operated with a pulsed beam. For the SRF control system to track the repetitive electromagnetic field reference trajectory, both feedback and feedforward controllers have been proposed. The feedback controller is utilized to guarantee the closed loop system stability and the feedforward controller is used to improve the tracking performance for the repetitive reference trajectory and to suppress repetitive disturbances. As the iteration number increases, the feedforward controller decreases the tracking error. Numerical simulations demonstrate that inclusion of the feedforward controller significantly improves the control system performance over its performance with just the feedback controller

  16. SNS Superconducting RF cavity modeling-iterative learning control

    CERN Document Server

    Kwon, S I; Wang, Y M

    2002-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Superconducting RF (SRF) linear accelerator is operated with a pulsed beam. For the SRF control system to track the repetitive electromagnetic field reference trajectory, both feedback and feedforward controllers have been proposed. The feedback controller is utilized to guarantee the closed loop system stability and the feedforward controller is used to improve the tracking performance for the repetitive reference trajectory and to suppress repetitive disturbances. As the iteration number increases, the feedforward controller decreases the tracking error. Numerical simulations demonstrate that inclusion of the feedforward controller significantly improves the control system performance over its performance with just the feedback controller.

  17. Performance experience with the CEBAF SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Drury, M.; Hovater, C.; Mammosser, J.; Preble, J.

    1995-01-01

    The full complement of 169 pairs of niobium superconducting cavities has been installed in the CEBAF accelerator. This paper surveys the performance characteristics of these cavities in vertical tests, commissioning in the tunnel, and operational experience to date. Although installed performance exceeds specifications, and 3.2 GeV beam has been delivered on target, present systems do not consistently preserve the high performance obtained in vertical dewar tests as operational capability. Principal sources of these limitations are discussed

  18. Superconducting RF for energy-recovery linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepe, M.; Knobloch, J.

    2006-01-01

    Since superconducting RF for particle accelerators made its first appearance in the 1970s, it has found highly successful application in a variety of machines. Recent progress in this technology has made so-called Energy-Recovery Linacs (ERLs)-originally proposed in 1965-feasible, and interest in this type of machine has increased enormously. A superconducting linac is the driving heart of ERLs, and emittance preservation and cost efficiency is of utmost importance. The resulting challenges for the superconducting cavity technology and RF field control are manifold. In March 2005 the first international workshop on ERLs was held at Newport News, VA, to explore the potential of ERLs and to discuss machine-physics and technology challenges and their solutions. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in superconducting RF and RF control for ERLs, and summarizes the discussions of the SRF working group on this technology during the ERL2005 workshop

  19. Electron color centers in SrF2-Na crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachan, S.I.; Chornij, Z.P.

    2006-01-01

    A radiation-induced memory effect in SrF 2 -Na crystals is studied. It was shown that optical bleaching of M + A color centers at 80 K in SrF 2 -Na crystals causes the core of an M + A -center to transform into the V + a Me + V + a configuration, in which all three point defects are arranged diagonally in the cube cell. Reirradiation of an optically bleached crystal by X-rays generates F D centers in it. The F D →M + A transformation in SrF 2 -Na crystals occurs at T = 135 K, in contrast to the F A →M + A transformations, which take place at T > 200 K [ru

  20. Effect of low temperature baking on the RF properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2004-01-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some ''anomalous'' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' bake under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from ''anomalous'' losses (so-called ''Q-drop'') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37 K-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6 K-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models

  1. Design of half-reentrant SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meidlinger, M.; Grimm, T.L.; Hartung, W.

    2006-01-01

    The shape of a TeSLA inner cell can be improved to lower the peak surface magnetic field at the expense of a higher peak surface electric field by making the cell reentrant. Such a single-cell cavity was designed and tested at Cornell, setting a world record accelerating gradient [V. Shemelin et al., An optimized shape cavity for TESLA: concept and fabrication, 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, Travemuende, Germany, September 8-12, 2003; R. Geng, H. Padamsee, Reentrant cavity and first test result, Pushing the Limits of RF Superconductivity Workshop, Argonne National Laboratory, September 22-24, 2004]. However, the disadvantage to a cavity is that liquids become trapped in the reentrant portion when it is vertically hung during high pressure rinsing. While this was overcome for Cornell's single-cell cavity by flipping it several times between high pressure rinse cycles, this may not be feasible for a multi-cell cavity. One solution to this problem is to make the cavity reentrant on only one side, leaving the opposite wall angle at six degrees for fluid drainage. This idea was first presented in 2004 [T.L. Grimm et al., IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 15(6) (2005) 2393]. Preliminary designs of two new half-reentrant (HR) inner cells have since been completed, one at a high cell-to-cell coupling of 2.1% (high-k cc HR) and the other at 1.5% (low-k cc HR). The parameters of a HR cavity are comparable to a fully reentrant cavity, with the added benefit that a HR cavity can be easily cleaned with current technology

  2. An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg

    2011-09-01

    We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.

  3. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  4. Review of the superconducting approach to linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1992-01-01

    For the next linear collider of 500 GeV CM energy, the beam energy needs to be increased by a factor of 5 over the SLC, but the luminosity needs to be increased by 5 orders of magnitude. The superconducting (SRF) approach offers multiple relief from the many pressing challenges of achieving high luminosity. The major challenges for the SRF approach are to raise the gradients well above 5 MV/m possible today and at the same time to lower the costs. Progress in SRF technology is presented. A collaborative venture on a TESLA TEST FACILITY is now taking shape, these activities are summarized. (R.P.) 19 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  5. Fabrication and Final Field Tuning of Copper Cavity Models for a High-Current SRF ERL at 703.75 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Michael; Burger, Al; Falletta, Michael; Holmes, Douglas; Peterson, Ed; Wong, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Energy Systems is currently under contract to BNL to fabricate a five cell superconducting cavity and cryomodule for the RHIC eCooler SRF Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) program.* The cavity is designed and optimized for ampere class SRF ERL service. As part of this program, we have fabricated two low power copper models of the RF cavities. During the fabrication process a series of frequency measurements were made and compared to the frequency expected at that point in the fabrication process. Where possible, the cavity was modified either before or during, the next fabrication step to tune the cavity frequency toward the target frequency. Following completion of the cavities they were tuned for field flatness and frequency. This paper will review the measurements made, frequency tuning performed, and discuss discrepancies between the expected and measured results. We will also review the as fabricated field profiles and the results of the tuning steps. Further, the cost and benefits of extensive in pro...

  6. Heat load of a P-doped GaAs photocathode in SRF electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Jain, A.; Gupta, R.; Holmes, D.

    2010-01-01

    Many efforts were made over the last decades to develop a better polarized electron source for the high energy physics. Several laboratories operate DC guns with the Gallium-Arsenide photo-cathode, which yield a highly polarized electron beam. However, the beam's emittance might well be improved using a Superconducting RF electron gun, which delivers beams of higher brightness than DC guns does, because the field gradient at the cathode is higher. SRF guns with metal cathodes and CsTe cathodes have been tested successfully. To produce polarized electrons, a Gallium-Arsenide photo-cathode must be used: an experiment to do so in a superconducting RF gun is under way at BNL. Since the cathode will be normal conducting, the problem about the heat load stemming from the cathode arises. We present our measurements of the electrical resistance of GaAs at cryogenic temperatures, a prediction of the heat load and the verification by measuring the quality factor of the gun with and without cathode.

  7. Tuner Design for PEFP Superconducting RF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yazhe; An, Sun; Zhang, Liping; Cho, Yong Sub

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity will be used to accelerate a proton beam after 100 MeV at 700 MHz in a linac of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) and its extended project. In order to control the SRF cavity's operating frequency at a low temperature, a new tuner has been developed for the PEFP SRF cavities. Each PEFP superconducting RF cavity has one tuner to match the cavity resonance frequency with the desired accelerator operating frequency; or to detune a cavity frequency a few bandwidths away from a resonance, so that the beam will not excite the fundamental mode, when the cavity is not being used for an acceleration. The PEFP cavity tuning is achieved by varying the total length of the cavity. The length of the cavity is controlled differentially by tuner acting with respect to the cavity body. The PEFP tuner is attached to the helium vessel and drives the cavity Field Probe (FP) side to change the frequency of the cavity

  8. Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rašković

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7  μm/min⁡ using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

  9. Pengaruh variasi rasio HAF/SRF terhadap sifat vulkanisat NBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihda Novia Indrajati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research were to study the effect of HAF/SRF black ratio and the loading of sulfur on vulcanization characteristic, swelling behaviour and compression set of NBR vulcanizates. The ratio of HAF/SRF were 0/70; 10/60; 20/50; 30/40; 35/35; 40/30; 50/20 and 70/0 phr, respectively. The observation of this research consist of curing characteristic, morphology property and swelling equilibrium. Curing characteristic was determined from cure rate index (CRI, vulcanizates morphology was studied by SEM and swelling equilibrium was conducted by immersion test using benzene. The data were analyzed qualitatively to see the respond of the variable on physical properties. The curing characteristic of double filler vulcanizates was higher than those with single filler. Solvent uptake for double filler present in between to those with HAF or SRF. All of vulcanizates indicate the anomalous mass tranfer, with n>0,5 and constant k showed the same trend. The intrinsic diffusivity (D*, sorption and permeation coefficient showed similar trend and the maximum was obtained by the ratio HAF/SRF 0/70.

  10. On active disturbance rejection based control design for superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, John; Morris, Dan; Usher, Nathan [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Gao, Zhiqiang, E-mail: z.gao@csuohio.edu [Center for Advanced Control Technologies, Fenn College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115-2214 (United States); Zhao Shen; Nicoletti, Achille; Zheng Qinling [Center for Advanced Control Technologies, Fenn College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115-2214 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are key components of modern linear particle accelerators. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is building a 3 MeV/u re-accelerator (ReA3) using SRF cavities. Lightly loaded SRF cavities have very small bandwidths (high Q) making them very sensitive to mechanical perturbations whether external or self-induced. Additionally, some cavity types exhibit mechanical responses to perturbations that lead to high-order non-stationary transfer functions resulting in very complex control problems. A control system that can adapt to the changing perturbing conditions and transfer functions of these systems would be ideal. This paper describes the application of a control technique known as 'Active Disturbance Rejection Control' (ARDC) to this problem.

  11. Multi-cell superconducting structures for high energy e+ e- colliders and free electron laser linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J

    2008-01-01

    This volume, which is the first in the EuCARD Editorial Series on “Accelerator Science and Technology”, is closely combined with the most advanced particle accelerators – based on Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) technology. In general, SRF research includes following areas: high gradient cavities, cavity prototyping, thin film technologies, large grain and mono-crystalline niobium and niobium alloys, quenching effects in superconducting cavities, SRF injectors, photo-cathodes, beam dynamics, quality of electron beams, cryogenics, high power RF sources, low level RF controls, tuners, RF power coupling to cavities, RF test infrastructures, etc. The monograph focuses on TESLA structures used in FLASH machine and planned for XFEL and ILC experiments.

  12. Development of a superconducting radio frequency photoelectron injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, A.; Buettig, H.; Janssen, D.; Kamps, T.; Klemz, G.; Lehmann, W.D.; Lehnert, U.; Lipka, D.; Marhauser, F.; Michel, P.; Moeller, K.; Murcek, P.; Schneider, Ch.; Schurig, R.; Staufenbiel, F.; Stephan, J.; Teichert, J.; Volkov, V.; Will, I.; Xiang, R.

    2007-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (RF) photoelectron injector (SRF gun) is under development at the Research Center Dresden-Rossendorf. This project aims mainly at replacing the present thermionic gun of the superconducting electron linac ELBE. Thereby the beam quality is greatly improved. Especially, the normalized transverse emittance can be reduced by up to one order of magnitude depending on the operating conditions. The length of the electron bunches will be shortened by about two orders of magnitude making the present bunchers in the injection beam line dispensable. The maximum obtainable bunch charge of the present thermionic gun amounts to 80pC. The SRF gun is designed to deliver also higher bunch charge values up to 2.5nC. Therefore, this gun can be used also for advanced facilities such as energy recovery linacs (ERLs) and soft X-ray FELs. The SRF gun is designed as a 312 cell cavity structure with three cells basically TESLA cells supplemented by a newly developed gun cell and a choke filter. The exit energy is projected to be 9.5MeV. In this paper, we present a description of the design of the SRF gun with special emphasis on the physical and technical problems arising from the necessity of integrating a photocathode into the superconducting cavity structure. Preparation, transfer, cooling and alignment of the photocathode are discussed. In designing the SRF gun cryostat for most components wherever possible the technical solutions were adapted from the ELBE cryostat in some cases with major modifications. As concerns the status of the project the design is finished, most parts are manufactured and the gun is being assembled. Some of the key components are tested in special test arrangements such as cavity warm tuning, cathode cooling, the mechanical behavior of the tuners and the effectiveness of the magnetic screening of the cavity

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) / Microwave Ablation (MWA) of Lung Tumors ... and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? What are Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, ...

  14. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  15. Quantum efficiency temporal response and lifetime of a GaAs cathode in SRF electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2010-05-23

    RF electron guns with a strained super lattice GaAs cathode can generate polarized electron beam of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface. In a normal conducting RF gun, the extremely high vaccum required by these cathodes can not be met. We report on an experiment with a superconducting SRF gun, which can maintain a vacuum of nearly 10-12 torr because of cryo-pumping at the temperature of 4.2K. With conventional activation, we obtained a QE of 3% at 532 nm, with lifetime of nearly 3 days in the preparation chamber. We plan to use this cathode in a 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun to study its performance. In addition, we studied the multipacting at the location of cathode. A new model based on the Forkker-Planck equation which can estimate the bunch length of the electron beam is discussed in this paper. Future particle accelerators such as eRHIC and ILC require high brightness, high current polarized electrons Recently, using a superlattice crystal, the maximum polarization of 95% was reached. Activation with Cs,O lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons excited in to the conduction band and reach the surface to escape into the vacuum. Presently the polarized electron sources are based on DC gun, such as that at the CEBAF at Jlab. In these devices, the life time of the cathode is extended due to the reduced back bombardment in their UHV conditions. However, the low accelerating gradient of the DC guns lead to poor longitudinal emittance. The higher accelerating gradient of the RF gun generates low emittance beams. Superconducting RF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of the DC guns with the higher accelerating gradients of the RF guns and provide potentially a long lived cathode with very low transverse and longitudinal emittance. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the GaAs. The quantum efficient is 3% at 532 nm and is

  16. Quantum efficiency temporal response and lifetime of a GaAs cathode in SRF electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2010-01-01

    RF electron guns with a strained super lattice GaAs cathode can generate polarized electron beam of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface. In a normal conducting RF gun, the extremely high vaccum required by these cathodes can not be met. We report on an experiment with a superconducting SRF gun, which can maintain a vacuum of nearly 10-12 torr because of cryo-pumping at the temperature of 4.2K. With conventional activation, we obtained a QE of 3% at 532 nm, with lifetime of nearly 3 days in the preparation chamber. We plan to use this cathode in a 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun to study its performance. In addition, we studied the multipacting at the location of cathode. A new model based on the Forkker-Planck equation which can estimate the bunch length of the electron beam is discussed in this paper. Future particle accelerators such as eRHIC and ILC require high brightness, high current polarized electrons Recently, using a superlattice crystal, the maximum polarization of 95% was reached. Activation with Cs,O lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons excited in to the conduction band and reach the surface to escape into the vacuum. Presently the polarized electron sources are based on DC gun, such as that at the CEBAF at Jlab. In these devices, the life time of the cathode is extended due to the reduced back bombardment in their UHV conditions. However, the low accelerating gradient of the DC guns lead to poor longitudinal emittance. The higher accelerating gradient of the RF gun generates low emittance beams. Superconducting RF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of the DC guns with the higher accelerating gradients of the RF guns and provide potentially a long lived cathode with very low transverse and longitudinal emittance. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the GaAs. The quantum efficient is 3% at 532 nm and is expected

  17. DARMSTADT: Superconducting electron accelerator in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    In December, the S-DALINAC superconducting radiofrequency electron accelerator at the Nuclear Physics Institute of Darmstadt's Technische Hochschule was completed. This pioneer continuous-wave (c.w.) machine passed a major milestone several years ago when it accelerated its first low energy electron beam

  18. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, J.; Palczewski, A.; Popović, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Im, Do; Phillips, H. L.; Vušković, L.

    2017-12-01

    An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity's inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  19. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Upadhyay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity’s inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  20. Development of high gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities for international linear collider and energy recovery linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji; Furuta, Fumio; Saeki, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities were used for storage rings like TRISTAN at KEK, HERA at DESY and LEP-II at CERN in 1990-2000. This technology has been accepted as a common accelerator technology. In August 2004, ITPR recommended an electron/positron linear collider based on SRF technology for the future high energy physics. ICFA accepted the recommendation and named it ILC (International Linear Collider). SRF cavities have a very unique feature due to its very small surface resistance. Energy recovery is another very exciting application. Many laboratories are proposing ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) as a next bright photon source. In these accelerators, production of SRF cavities with reliably high performance is the most important issue. In this paper the activities of ILC high gradient cavities will be introduced. ERL activity will be briefly presented. (author)

  1. Development of High Gradient Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities for International Linear Collider and Energy Recovery Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kenji; Furuta, Fumio; Saeki, Takayuki

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities were used for storage rings like TRISTAN at KEK, HERA at DESY and LEP-II at CERN in 1990-2000. This technology has been accepted as a common accelerator technology. In August 2004, ITPR recommended an electron/positron linear collider based on SRF technology for the future high energy physics. ICFA accepted the recommendation and named it ILC (International Linear Collider). SRF cavities have a very unique feature due to its very small surface resistance. Energy recovery is another very exciting application. Many laboratories are proposing ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) as a next bright photon source. In these accelerators, production of SRF cavities with reliably high performance is the most important issue. In this paper the activities of ILC high gradient cavities will be introduced. ERL activity will be briefly presented.

  2. Contamination issues in superconducting cavity technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The application of radio-frequency superconductivity technology in particle accelerator projects has become increasingly evident in recent years. Several large scale projects around the world are either completed or close to completion, such as CEBAF, HERA, TRISTAN and LEP. And superconducting cavity technology is seriously being considered for future applications in linear colliders (TESLA), high current proton accelerators (APT, spallation neutron sources), muon colliders and free electron lasers for industrial application. The reason for this multitude of activities are matured technology based on a better understanding of the phenomena encountered in superconducting cavities and the influence of improved material properties and contamination and quality control measures

  3. Application of superconducting magnesium diboride (MGB2) in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teng

    The superconductivity in magnesium diboride (MgB2) was discovered in 2001. As a BCS superconductor, MgB2 has a record-high Tc of 39 K, high Jc of > 107 A/cm2 and no weak link behavior across the grain boundary. All these superior properties endorsed that MgB2 would have great potential in both power applications and electronic devices. In the past 15 years, MgB2 based power cables, microwave devices, and commercial MRI machines emerged and the next frontier are superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. SRF cavities are one of the leading accelerator technologies. In SRF cavities, applied microwave power generates electrical fields that accelerate particle beams. Compared with other accelerator techniques, SRF cavity accelerators feature low loss, high acceleration gradients and the ability to accelerate continuous particle beams. However, current SRF cavities are made from high-purity bulk niobium and work at 2 K in superfluid helium. The construction and operational cost of SRF cavity accelerators are very expensive. The demand for SRF cavity accelerators has been growing rapidly in the past decade. Therefore, a lot of effort has been devoted to the enhancement of the performance and the reduction of cost of SRF cavities. In 2010, an acceleration gradient of over 50 MV/m has been reported for a Nb-based SRF cavity. The magnetic field at the inner surface of such a cavity is ~ 1700 Oe, which is close to the thermodynamic critical field of Nb. Therefore, new materials and technologies are required to raise the acceleration gradient of future SRF cavity accelerators. Among all the proposed approaches, using MgB2 thin films to coat the inner surface of SRF cavities is one of the promising tactics with the potential to raise both the acceleration gradient and the operation temperature of SRF cavity accelerators. In this work, I present my study on MgB2 thin films for their application in SRF cavities. C-epitaxial MgB2 thin films grown on SiC(0001) substrates

  4. Improvement of the operational performance of SRF cavities via in situ helium processing and waveguide vacuum processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, C.E.; Drury, M.; Rao, M.G.; Nguyen-Tuong, V.

    1997-01-01

    The useful performance range of the superconducting rf (SRF) cavities in the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab is frequently limited by electron field emission and derived phenomena. Improvements are required to support future operation of the accelerator at higher than 5 GeV. Twelve operational cryomodules have been successfully processed to higher useful operating gradients via rf-helium processing. Progress against field emission was evidenced by improved high-field Q, reduced x-ray production and greatly reduced incidence of arcing at the cold ceramic window. There was no difficulty reestablishing beamline vacuum following the processing. Cavities previously limited to 4-6 MV/m are now operating stably at 6-9 MV/m. By applying a pulsed-rf processing technique, we have also improved the pressure stability of the thermal transition region of the input waveguide for several cavities

  5. Development of Vertical Buffered Electropolishing for Its Post-Treatment Technology on 1.5 GHz Niobium SRF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Song; Lu Xiang-Yang; Lin Lin; Zhao Kui; Wu, A. T.; Rimmer, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the latest research development of vertical buffered electropolishing on its post-treatment procedure as well as the effects of several major post-treatment techniques for buffered electropolishing (BEP) processed 1.5 GHz niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. With the established post-treatment procedure, an accelerating gradient of 28.4 MV/m is obtained on a single cell cavity of the cebaf shape. This is the best result in the history of BEP development. The cavity is limited by quench with a high quality factor over 1.2 × 10 10 at the quench point. Analyses from optical inspection and temperature-mapping show that the quench should be originated from the pits that were already present on the cavity before this BEP treatment. All of these factors indicate that this procedure will have a great potential to produce better results if cavities without intrinsic performance limiting imperfections are used. (nuclear physics)

  6. Recent Developments in SRF Cavity Science and Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ciovati

    2006-08-10

    The performances of SRF cavities made of high purity bulk niobium have been improving in the last few years and surface magnetic fields (Bp) close to the thermodynamic critical field of niobium have been achieved in a few cases. The recommendation made in 2004 in favor of SRF as the technology of choice for the International Linear Collider (ILC), requires improving the reliability of multi-cell cavities operating at accelerating gradients (Eacc) of the order of 35 MV/m. Additionally, a better understanding of the present limitations to cavity performance, such as the high-field Q-drop is needed. This contribution presents some recent developments in SRF cavity science and performance. Among the most significant advances of the last few years, new cavity shapes with lower ratio Bp/Eacc were designed and tested. Cavities made of large-grain niobium became available, promising lower cost at comparable performance to standard fine-grain ones and several tests on single-cell cavities were done to gain a better understanding of high-field losses. In addition, studies to improve the reliability of electropolishing are being carried out by several research groups.

  7. Improving the work function of the niobium surface of SRF cavities by plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, P.V.; Doleans, M.; Hannah, B.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C.; Stewart, S.; Mammosser, J.; Howell, M.; Saunders, J.; Degraff, B.; Kim, S.-H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An in situ plasma processing for SNS SRF cavities has been developed to remove hydrocarbons from cavity surface. • Reactive oxygen plasma is very effective to remove hydrocarbons from niobium top surface. • Reactive oxygen plasma processing increases the work function of niobium surface in the range of 0.5–1.0 eV. • It was observed that hydrocarbons can migrate at plasma cleaned top surface from near surface regions when waiting in vacuum at room temperature. • Multiple cycles of plasma processing with waiting periods in between was found beneficial to mitigate such hydrocarbons migration at plasma cleaned surface. - Abstract: An in situ plasma processing technique using chemically reactive oxygen plasma to remove hydrocarbons from superconducting radio frequency cavity surfaces at room temperature has been developed at the spallation neutron source, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To understand better the interaction between the plasma and niobium surface, surface studies on small samples were performed. In this article, we report the results from those surface studies. The results show that plasma processing removes hydrocarbons from top surface and improves the surface work function by 0.5–1.0 eV. Improving the work function of RF surface of cavities can help to improve their operational performance.

  8. SRF cavity alignment detection method using beam-induced HOM with curved beam orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Ayaka; Hayano, Hitoshi

    2017-09-01

    We have developed a method to obtain mechanical centers of nine cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities from localized dipole modes, that is one of the higher order modes (HOM) induced by low-energy beams. It is to be noted that low-energy beams, which are used as alignment probes, are easy to bend in fringe fields of accelerator cavities. The estimation of the beam passing orbit is important because only information about the beam positions measured by beam position monitors outside the cavities is available. In this case, the alignment information about the cavities can be obtained by optimizing the parameters of the acceleration components over the beam orbit simulation to consistently represent the position of the beam position monitors measured at every beam sweep. We discuss details of the orbit estimation method, and estimate the mechanical center of the localized modes through experiments performed at the STF accelerator. The mechanical center is determined as (x , y) =(0 . 44 ± 0 . 56 mm , - 1 . 95 ± 0 . 40 mm) . We also discuss the error and the applicable range of this method.

  9. Investigations of Residual Stresses and Mechanical Properties of Single Crystal Niobium for SRF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnaeupel-Herold, Thomas; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Ricker, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    This work investigates properties of large grained, high purity niobium with respect to the forming of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities from such large grained sheets. The yield stresses were examined using tensile specimens that were essentially single crystals in orientations evenly distributed in the standard projection triangle. No distinct yield anisotropy was found, however, vacuum annealing increased the yield strength by a factor 2...3. The deep drawing forming operation of the half cells raises the issues of elastic shape changes after the release of the forming tool (springback) and residual stresses, both of which are indicated to be negligible. This is a consequence of the low yield stress (< 100 MPa) and the large thickness (compared to typical thicknesses in sheet metal forming). However, the significant anisotropy of the transversal plastic strains after uniaxial deformation points to potentially critical thickness variations for large grained / single crystal half cells, thus raising the issue of controlling grain orientation or using single crystal sheet material

  10. Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2011-01-01

    RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10 -12 Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to ∼10 -9 Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and the high accelerating

  11. Elemental balance of SRF production process: solid recovered fuel produced from municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Oinas, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    In the production of solid recovered fuel (SRF), certain waste components have excessive influence on the quality of product. The proportion of rubber, plastic (hard) and certain textiles was found to be critical as to the elemental quality of SRF. The mass flow of rubber, plastic (hard) and textiles (to certain extent, especially synthetic textile) components from input waste stream into the output streams of SRF production was found to play the decisive role in defining the elemental quality of SRF. This paper presents the mass flow of polluting and potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in SRF production. The SRF was produced from municipal solid waste (MSW) through mechanical treatment (MT). The results showed that of the total input chlorine content to process, 55% was found in the SRF and 30% in reject material. Of the total input arsenic content, 30% was found in the SRF and 45% in fine fraction. In case of cadmium, lead and mercury, of their total input content to the process, 62%, 38% and 30%, respectively, was found in the SRF. Among the components of MSW, rubber material was identified as potential source of chlorine, containing 8.0 wt.% of chlorine. Plastic (hard) and textile components contained 1.6 and 1.1. wt.% of chlorine, respectively. Plastic (hard) contained higher lead and cadmium content compared with other waste components, i.e. 500 mg kg(-1) and 9.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. EFFECTIVENESS OF FERTILIZER SRF-N D AND H ON RICE GROWTH AND RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasruddin Razak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Study aims are to know effectiveness level of SRF-N (D & H on growth and yield of lowland rice, and gets fertilizer dosage that gave highest yield of lowland rice. Twelve 12 treatments added with recommendation dosage and farmer treatment. Experiment arranged in RCBD three replications. Result: SRF-N significantly effect growth and yield of lowland rice. Applied SRF-N type H with dosage 350 kg per ha which combined SP-36 and KCl gave higher dry grind grain compared to other treatments of SRF. Proposes SRF-H 280 kg and SRF-D 500 kg per ha. Treatment of farmer way with dosage Urea 300 kg, SP-36 100 kg, and KCl 50 kg per ha, gave higher dry grind grain (8.14 t DGG per ha compared to other treatments including recommendation dosage (7.65 t DGG per ha. Effectiveness of SRF-N type H with dosage 350 kg (two times applications on produce of grain, is 0.97 times compared to recommendation. Need to study more of SRF-H 350 kg and 280 kg per ha, and SRF-H 500 kg per ha (two times application which combined with P and K recommendation on different location and planting season to obtain accurate data in order to obtain locationspecific fertilizer recommendation

  13. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  14. Intermediate quality control tests in the development of a superconducting RF cryomodule for CW operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattalwar, Shrikant; Jones, Thomas; Strachan, John; Bate, Robert; Davies, Phil; McIntosh, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Through an international cryomodule collaboration, ASTeC at Daresbury Laboratory has taken the primary responsibility in leading the development of an optimised Superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule, operating in CW mode for energy recovery facilities and other high duty cycle accelerators. For high beam current operation, Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers are critical components of the SRF Cryomodule, ensuring excessive heating of the accelerating structures and beam instabilities are effectively managed. This paper describes some of the cold tests conducted on the HOM absorbers and other critical components during the construction phase, to ensure that the quality and reliable cryomodule performance is maintained.

  15. Near-field microwave magnetic nanoscopy of superconducting radio frequency cavity materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Tamin; Ghamsari, Behnood G.; Bieler, Thomas R.; Tan, Teng; Xi, X. X.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2014-06-01

    A localized measurement of the RF critical field on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity materials is a key step to identify specific defects that produce quenches of SRF cavities. Two measurements are performed to demonstrate these capabilities with a near-field scanning probe microwave microscope. The first is a third harmonic nonlinear measurement on a high Residual-Resistance-Ratio bulk Nb sample showing strong localized nonlinear response, with surface RF magnetic field Bsurface˜102 mT. The second is a raster scanned harmonic response image on a MgB2 thin film demonstrating a uniform nonlinear response over large areas.

  16. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  17. Study of Nb-Cu 1.3 GHz SRF cavity resonators for future particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Amelin, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Niobium-coated superconducting radio-frequency cavities have a number of advantages over cavities made from bulk niobium. Cavities coated with high-power impulse magnetron sputtering are tested at CERN in order to optimize the coating and study the Q-slope that limits the performance. To accurately measure the quality factor as a function of accelerating field, it is important to have good matching between an input antenna and a cavity impedance. To improve the matching, a variable coupler that changes the length of the antenna can be used. We have shown that the Q-factor of the input antenna can be changed between $10^7-10^{11}$ by moving the antenna, which should allow to achieve critical coupling with a cavity. This technology could be used in future measurements, so that reflections are always minimized.

  18. Superconductivity - applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the following subjects: 1) Electronics and high-frequency technology, 2) Superconductors for energy technology, 3) Superconducting magnets and their applications, 4) Electric machinery, 5) Superconducting cables. (WBU) [de

  19. Large grain CBMM Nb ingot slices: An ideal test bed for exploring the microstructure-electromagnetic property relationships relevant to SRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Zu-Hawn; Lee, Peter J.; Polyanskii, Anatolii; Balachandran, Shreyas; Chetri, Santosh; Larbalestier, David C.; Wang, Mingmin; Compton, Christopher; Bieler, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    High purity (RRR > 200), large grain (> 5-10 cm) niobium ingot slices have been successfully used to fabricate radio frequency (RF) cavities for particle accelerators. They offer significantly reduced fabrication cost by eliminating processing steps and furthermore they provide the opportunity to study the influence of individual grain boundaries in SRF Nb. Here we summarize our measurements of grain boundary (GB) effects on the superconducting properties of large grain high purity niobium sheet manufactured by CBMM. We show by magneto-optical (MO) imaging that GBs allow premature flux penetration, but only when they are oriented close to the direction of the magnetic field. However, even low angle GBs produced by minor deformations commensurate with half-cell forming produce localized flux penetration. The transport properties of grain boundaries were investigated by direct transport across them and evidence for preferential vortex flow along the GBs of SRF Nb was observed for the first time. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and micro crystallographic analysis with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), we were able to quantitatively characterize surface substructures that can lead to localized thermal breakdown of superconductivity. Important to these studies was the development of sample preparation techniques that made the cutout single, bi-crystal and tri-crystal Nb coupons as representative as possible of the surface properties of cavities manufactured by standard techniques

  20. Electron Source based on Superconducting RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianmu

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a Continuous Wave (CW) mode can provide high peak current as well as the high average current which are required for many advanced applications of accelerators facilities, for example, electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs). Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) has many advantages over other electron-injector technologies, especially when it is working in CW mode as it offers higher repetition rate. An 112 MHz SRF electron photo-injector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for electron cooling experiments. The gun utilizes a Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR) geometry for a compact structure and improved electron beam dynamics. The detailed RF design of the cavity, fundamental coupler and cathode stalk are presented in this work. A GPU accelerated code was written to improve the speed of simulation of multipacting, an important hurdle the SRF structure has to overcome in various locations. The injector utilizes high Quantum Efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes (K2CsSb) for generating electrons. The cathode fabrication system and procedure are also included in the thesis. Beam dynamic simulation of the injector was done with the code ASTRA. To find the optimized parameters of the cavities and beam optics, the author wrote a genetic algorithm Python script to search for the best solution in this high-dimensional parameter space. The gun was successfully commissioned and produced world record bunch charge and average current in an SRF photo-injector.

  1. Deep drawing experiences of niobium disk for PEFP SRF cavity prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; An, Sun; Zhang, Liping; Tang, Yazhe; Li, Ying Min; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a geometrical beta of 0.42 has been designed to accelerate a proton beam after 100 MeV for an extension of Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP). The designed cavity shape is an elliptical and the resonant frequency is 700 MHz. In order to confirm the RF and mechanical properties of the cavity, two prototypes of copper cavities have been fabricated and tested. Based on the experiences gained with the copper prototypes, two niobium prototypes have been designed. One is two-cell cavity and the other is five cell cavity. The two-cell cavity is for finalizing the niobium cavity production procedure and testing the cavity RF properties at a low temperature and moderate power level. The five-cell cavity is for checking the production quality and testing vertical test system in the future. Both of them are under fabrication. Through the fabrication of the niobium prototype, several issues such as deep drawing, electron beam welding and surface treatment will be addressed. The drawing of the PEPF SRF low beta cavity is shown in Fig. 1. Major parameters for the cavity are like following. - Frequency: 700 MHz - Operating mode: TM010 pi mode - Cavity type: Elliptical - Geometrical beta: 0.42 - Number of cells: 5 per cavity - Accelerating gradient: 8 MV/m - Epeak/Eacc: 3.71 - Bpeak/Eacc: 7.47 mT/(MV/m) - R/Q: 102.3 ohm - Epeak: 29.68 MV/m - Field flatness: 1.56 % - Cell to cell coupling: 1.41 % - Geometrical factor: 121.68 ohm - Cavity wall thickness: 4.3 mm - Lorentz force detuning: 0.4 Hz/(MV/m)2 - Stiffening structure: Double ring - Effective length: 0.45 m - External Q of FPC: 8.0E5 ±20 % - HOM load: less than 2 W - HOM Qext requirement: less than 3.0E5 At present, all the niobium disk and plates for cavity and NbTi flanges for beam pipe flange are prepared

  2. Design of RF structures for a superconducting proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, Rajni; Roy, Shweta; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main components of the Accelerator Driven System (ADS) programme in India is a 1 GeV, high intensity CW proton accelerator that will be superconducting after the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), i.e. after 3 MeV. The superconducting linac will consist of various superconducting structures like Half Wave Resonators, Spoke Resonators and elliptical cavities, operating at RF frequencies of 162.5 MHz, 325 MHz and 650 MHz. The paper will discuss the optimization of the electromagnetic design of the various superconducting structures. (author)

  3. RF control studies for moderate beamtime coupling between SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, L.R.; Wang, D.X.

    1998-01-01

    When an SRF accelerator is designed, there is motivation to move the cavities close together on the beamline. Assuming the beamline apertures are not shrunk as well, this compaction (which will increase the overall accelerating gradient and/or lower the dynamic cryogenic heat load) increases the inter-cavity coupling. Within certain limits, the control system can compensate for this coupling by retuning each of the cavities. This paper describes constraints on the RF system, tuners, couplers, and control systems that are required to provide stable operation of cavities in the presence of inter-cavity coupling that exceeds the loaded bandwidth of an individual cavity

  4. Comparison of Deformation in High-Purity Single/Large Grain and Polycrystalline Niobium Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; Peter Kneisel

    2005-01-01

    The current approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Recently, a new technique was developed at Jefferson Laboratory that enables the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. To better understand the differences between SRF cavities fabricated out of fine-grained polycrystalline sheet in the standard manner and single crystal cavities fabricated by the new technique, two half-cells were produced according to the two different procedures and compared using a variety of analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning laser confocal microscopy, profilometry, and X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic orientations, texture, and residual stresses were determined in the samples before and after forming and this poster presents the results of this ongoing study

  5. Superconducting rf and beam-cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Beam-cavity interactions can limit the beam quality and current handling capability of linear and circular accelerators. These collective effects include cumulative and regenerative transverse beam breakup (BBU) in linacs, transverse multipass beam breakup in recirculating linacs and microtrons, longitudinal and transverse coupled-bunch instabilities in storage rings, and a variety of transverse and longitudinal single-bunch phenomena (instabilities, beam breakup, and energy deposition). The superconducting radio frequency (SRF) environment has a number of features which distinguish it from room temperature configuration with regard to these beam-cavity interactions. Typically the unloaded Qs of the lower higher order modes (HOM) are at the 10 9 level and require significant damping through couplers. High gradient CW operation, which is a principal advantage of SRF, allows for better control of beam quality, which for its preservation requires added care which respect to collective phenomena. Gradients are significantly higher than those attainable with copper in CW operation but remain significantly lower than those obtainable with pulsed copper cavities. Finally, energy deposition by the beam into the cavity can occur in a cryogenic environment. In this note those characteristics of beam-cavity interactions which are of particular importance for superconducting RF cavities are highlighted. 6 refs., 4 figs

  6. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert Rimmer; Jay Benesch; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece

    2005-01-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maintenance shutdown. We report on the overall SRF performance of the machine after these major disturbances and on efforts to characterize and optimize the new behavior for high-energy running

  7. Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderschueren, Geert Maria Joris Michael

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of spinal and non-spinal osteoid osteomas. Furthermore, the technical requirements needed for safe radiofrequency ablation and the clinical outcome after radiofrequency

  8. Superconducting RF for Low-Velocity and Intermediate-Velocity Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Grimm, Terry L

    2005-01-01

    Existing superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linacs are used to accelerate ions (protons through uranium) with velocities less than about 15% the speed of light, or electrons with velocities approximately equal to the speed of light. In the last ten years, prototype SRF cavities have completely covered the remaining range of velocities. They have demonstrated that SRF linacs will be capable of accelerating electrons from rest up to the speed of light, and ions from less than 1% up to the speed of light. When the Spallation Neutron Source is operational, SRF ion linacs will have covered the full range of velocities except for v/c ~ 0.15 to v/c ~ 0.5. A number of proposed projects (RIA, EURISOL) would span the latter range of velocities. Future SRF developments will have to address the trade-offs associated with a number of issues, including high gradient operation, longitudinal and transverse acceptance, microphonics, Lorentz detuning, operating temperature, cryogenic load, number of gaps or cells per cavity...

  9. Adaptive Feedforward Cancellation of Sinusoidal Disturbances in Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kandil, T H; Hartung, W; Khalil, H; Popielarski, J; Vincent, J; York, R C

    2004-01-01

    A control method, known as adaptive feedforward cancellation (AFC) is applied to damp sinusoidal disturbances due to microphonics in superconducting RF (SRF) cavities. AFC provides a method for damping internal, and external sinusoidal disturbances with known frequencies. It is preferred over other schemes because it uses rudimentary information about the frequency response at the disturbance frequencies, without the necessity of knowing an analytic model (transfer function) of the system. It estimates the magnitude and phase of the sinusoidal disturbance inputs and generates a control signal to cancel their effect. AFC, along with a frequency estimation process, is shown to be very successful in the cancellation of sinusoidal signals from different sources. The results of this research may significantly reduce the power requirements and increase the stability for lightly loaded continuous-wave SRF systems.

  10. Superconductivity revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    While the macroscopic phenomenon of superconductivity is well known and in practical use worldwide in many industries, including MRIs in medical diagnostics, the current theoretical paradigm for superconductivity (BCS theory) suffers from a number of limitations, not the least of which is an adequate explanation of high temperature superconductivity. This book reviews the current theory and its limitations and suggests new ideas and approaches in addressing these issues. The central objective of the book is to develop a new, coherent, understandable theory of superconductivity directly based on molecular quantum mechanics.

  11. A superconducting RFQ for an ECR injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1988-01-01

    The beam dynamics and resonator properties of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) for heavy ions are discussed. The motivation is its use as a very low velocity section following an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source for injection into a superconducting heavy-ion linac. The constraints on the design and performance of this accelerating structure are presented. Expressions for a limiting stable phase angle and longitudinal and transverse acceptance are derived. A numerical example is given, using the SUNYLAC linac at Sony Stony Brook. Beam-dynamics calculations with PARMTEQ are reported, verifying the theoretical beam-dynamics calculations. (author) 12 refs., 1 tab

  12. Superconducting rf activities at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.; Hakimi, M.; Kirchgessner, J.

    1988-01-01

    Development of rf superconductivity for high energy accelerators has been a robust activity at the Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies (LNS) for many years. In order to realize the potential of rf superconductivity, a two-pronged approach has been followed. On the one hand accelerator applications were selected where the existing state-of-the art of superconducting rf is competitive with alternate technologies, then LNS engaged in a program to design, construct and test suitable superconducting cavities, culminating in a full system test in an operating accelerator. On the second front the discovery and invention of ideas, techniques and materials required to make superconducting rf devices approach the ideal in performance has been aggressively pursued. Starting with the development of superconducting cavities for high energy electron synchrotrons, the technology was extended to high energy e + e - storage rings. The LE5 cavity design has now been adopted for use in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). When completed, this project will be one of the largest applications of SRF technology, using 440 LE5 modules[4]. In the last two years, the cavity design and the technology have been transferred to industry and CEBAF. Cornell has tested the early industrial prototypes and cavity pairs. LNS has developed, in collaboration with CEBAF, designs and procedures for cavity pair and cryomodule assembly and testing. Advanced research for future electron accelerators is badly needed if particle physicists hope to expand the energy frontier. Superconducting cavity technology continues to offer attractive opportunities for further advances in achievable voltage at reasonable cost for future accelerators. For Nb, the full potential implies an order of magnitude increase over current capabilities. 20 references, 11 figures

  13. NB Coating Developments with HIPIMS for SRF Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Terenziani, G; Junginger, T; Santillana, I A; Ehiasarian, A P

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology [1]. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species [2,3] can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. A study is under way at CERN to apply this technology for the Nb coating of SRF 1.3-1.5 GHz Cu cavities, and in parallel at SHU the plasma physics and its correlation with film morphology are being investigated [2]. Recent results achieved with this technique are presented in the paper.

  14. Operational optimization of large-scale SRF accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. R. Delayen; L. R. Doolittle; C. E. Reece

    1999-01-01

    Unlike other types of accelerator subsystems, because of the flexibility in setting the gradient in each cavity, an SRF linac has many operational degrees of freedom. The overall linac has an operational envelope (beam voltage and current) that depends on acceptable reliability, cryogenic capacity, and RF power budget. For economic and end-user physics reasons, one typically wants to run as close to the edge of the operational envelope as possible. With about 160 cavities in each of the CEBAF linacs. The authors have been forced to treat this problem in a very general way, and satisfy other non-fundamental needs as energy lock and rapid recovery from failures. They present a description of the relevant diverse constraints and the solution developed for CEBAF

  15. SRF Cavity Surface Topography Characterization Using Replica Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Xu, M.J. Kelley, C.E. Reece

    2012-07-01

    To better understand the roll of topography on SRF cavity performance, we seek to obtain detailed topographic information from the curved practical cavity surfaces. Replicas taken from a cavity interior surface provide internal surface molds for fine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and stylus profilometry. In this study, we confirm the replica resolution both on surface local defects such as grain boundary and etching pits and compare the surface uniform roughness with the aid of Power Spectral Density (PSD) where we can statistically obtain roughness parameters at different scales. A series of sampling locations are at the same magnetic field chosen at the same latitude on a single cell cavity to confirm the uniformity. Another series of sampling locations at different magnetic field amplitudes are chosen for this replica on the same cavity for later power loss calculation. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

  16. Turn-key SRF accelerators to drive subcritical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2011-01-01

    Large particle accelerator projects, both accomplished and proposed, have been used to engage US industry through contracts and grants to develop efficient capabilities to design, develop, produce, and deliver entire accelerator systems or any needed subsystems. Staffed in many cases by experienced scientists and engineers from National Laboratories and Universities, existing companies could extend their portfolios to offer turn-key accelerators with parameters to match the needs of ADS. If the reactors were based on molten salt fuel such that trip rate requirements were relaxed, the developments needed for a multi-MW proton accelerator for ADS would be minimal. Turn-key SRF proton linacs for ADS operation can be ordered now to enable GW-level power generation from natural thorium, natural uranium, or nuclear waste from conventional reactors. (author)

  17. Activities on cryostats and SRF cavities at the I.P.N. Orsay laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelher, S.; Caruette, A.; Fouaidy, M.; Junquera, T.

    1993-01-01

    The main effort of the SRF community at Orsay during the last five years was concentrated on the MACSE project (study, construction, assembly and test of 3 cryostats), participation to the TESLA project and R and D activities in close collaboration with the Saclay SRF group. 3 major topics are outlined and briefly discussed: cryogenics, scanning surface thermometers for diagnostics on SRF cavities and thermal behaviour analysis of HOM couplers. The main results obtained in this frame since the 5th SC workshop at Hamburg in 1991 are presented. (authors) 12 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Impact of nitrogen doping of niobium superconducting cavities on the sensitivity of surface resistance to trapped magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, Dan; Kaufman, John; Liepe, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac require hundreds of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium cavities operating in continuous wave mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0) to keep cryogenic losses within feasible limits. To reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping of niobium cavities has been selected as the cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1 × 1010, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here, we show that the sensitivity to RF losses from trapped magnetic field in a cavity's walls is strongly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120 °C baked cavities show a sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜0.6 and ˜0.8 nΩ/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a higher sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜1 to 5 nΩ/mG trapped. We show that this difference in sensitivities is directly related to the mean free path of the RF surface layer of the niobium: shorter mean free paths lead to less sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the dirty limit (ℓ ≪ ξ0), while longer mean free paths lead to lower sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the clean limit (ℓ ≫ ξ0). These experimental results are also shown to have good agreement with recent theoretical predictions for pinned vortex lines oscillating in RF fields.

  19. Superconducting cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, A.; Funkenbusch, P.D.; Chang, G.C.S.; Burns, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Two distant classes of superconducting cermets can be distinguished, depending on whether or not a fully superconducting skeleton is established. Both types of cermets have been successfully fabricated using non-noble metals, with as high as 60wt% of the metal phase. The electrical, magnetic and mechanical behavior of these composites is discussed

  20. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  1. Dependence of trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain Nb superconducting radio-frequency cavity on spatial temperature gradient during cooldown through T_{c}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichun Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies by Romanenko et al. revealed that cooling down a superconducting cavity under a large spatial temperature gradient decreases the amount of trapped flux and leads to reduction of the residual surface resistance. In the present paper, the flux expulsion ratio and the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain cavity cooled down under a spatial temperature gradient up to 80  K/m are studied under various applied magnetic fields from 5 to 20  μT. We show the flux expulsion ratio improves as the spatial temperature gradient increases, independent of the applied magnetic field: our results support and enforce the previous studies. We then analyze all rf measurement results obtained under different applied magnetic fields together by plotting the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance normalized by the applied magnetic field as a function of the spatial temperature gradient. All the data can be fitted by a single curve, which defines an empirical formula for the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance as a function of the spatial temperature gradient and applied magnetic field. The formula can fit not only the present results but also those obtained by Romanenko et al. previously. The sensitivity r_{fl} of surface resistance from trapped magnetic flux of fine-grain and large-grain niobium cavities and the origin of dT/ds dependence of R_{fl}/B_{a} are also discussed.

  2. Superconducting technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Superconductivity has a long history of about 100 years. Over the past 50 years, progress in superconducting materials has been mainly in metallic superconductors, such as Nb, Nb-Ti and Nb 3 Sn, resulting in the creation of various application fields based on the superconducting technologies. High-T c superconductors, the first of which was discovered in 1986, have been changing the future vision of superconducting technology through the development of new application fields such as power cables. On basis of these trends, future prospects of superconductor technology up to 2040 are discussed. In this article from the viewpoints of material development and the applications of superconducting wires and electronic devices. (author)

  3. Interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gariglio, S., E-mail: stefano.gariglio@unige.ch [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Gabay, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bat 510, Université Paris-Sud 11, Centre d’Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Triscone, J.-M. [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We discuss interfacial superconductivity, a field boosted by the discovery of the superconducting interface between LaAlO. • This system allows the electric field control and the on/off switching of the superconducting state. • We compare superconductivity at the interface and in bulk doped SrTiO. • We discuss the role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. • We briefly discuss superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments. • Recent observations of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} are presented. - Abstract: Low dimensional superconducting systems have been the subject of numerous studies for many years. In this article, we focus our attention on interfacial superconductivity, a field that has been boosted by the discovery of superconductivity at the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}. We explore the properties of this amazing system that allows the electric field control and on/off switching of superconductivity. We discuss the similarities and differences between bulk doped SrTiO{sub 3} and the interface system and the possible role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. We also, more briefly, discuss interface superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments, and the recent observation of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3}.

  4. The New 2nd-Generation SRF RandD Facility at Jefferson Lab: TEDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, Charles E.; Reilly, Anthony V.

    2012-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has funded a near-complete renovation of the SRF-based accelerator research and development facilities at Jefferson Lab. The project to accomplish this, the Technical and Engineering Development Facility (TEDF) Project has completed the first of two phases. An entirely new 3,100 m 2 purpose-built SRF technical work facility has been constructed and was occupied in summer of 2012. All SRF work processes with the exception of cryogenic testing have been relocated into the new building. All cavity fabrication, processing, thermal treatment, chemistry, cleaning, and assembly work is collected conveniently into a new LEED-certified building. An innovatively designed 800 m2 cleanroom/chemroom suite provides long-term flexibility for support of multiple RandD and construction projects as well as continued process evolution. The characteristics of this first 2nd-generation SRF facility are described

  5. Radiofrequency spark chambers and delay line resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayag, Jacques

    1971-01-01

    According to a suggestion of A. Kastler, a spark chamber was excited by an undamped radiofrequency pulse and tracks about 1 mm wide obtained; the result was interpreted by computation of the coefficients of electronic amplification and partial ambipolar diffusion. This work led us to the construction of a new fast triggering undamped wave-train generator of very high tension (patent taken out by the C.E.A. under the no.: EN 7 134 650 the 27.9.1971). Since this apparatus uses a resonant storage line, its design implied a precise knowledge of high impedance delay lines. The experimental radiofrequency spectra of the input impedance of opened or short-circuited lines were plotted completely and analysed by the circuits theory, new measuring methods were established, dispersion relations accurately checked and the equivalence of the formulas, within the third order, with theses of Debye's Dipolar Absorption demonstrated. General properties of Hilbert's transform were also investigated. From the experimental point of view, the electromagnetic energy storage process was extended to the case of a liquid nitrogen-immersed resonant delay line. The good behavior of the cryogenic experiment, where the main difficulty of icing was overcame by the construction of special electrodes, offers great promise for extrapolation to superconductivity. (author) [fr

  6. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by TEM and EELS

    OpenAIRE

    Trenikhina, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Kwon, J.; Zuo, J. -M.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ~100nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride for...

  7. Fast beam radiofrequency spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipkin, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    The combination of a fast atom or ion beam derived from a small accelerator with radiofrequency spectroscopy methods provides a powerful method for measuring the fine structure of atomic and molecular systems. The fast beam makes possible measurements in which two separated oscillatory fields are used to obtain resonance lines whose widths are less than the natural line width due to the lifetimes of the states. The separated oscillatory field lines have, in addition, a number of features which make possible measurements with greater precision and less sensitivity to systematic errors. The fast beam also makes accessible multiple photon radiofrequency transitions whose line width is intrinsically narrower than that of the single photon transitions and which offer great potential for high precision measurements. This report focuses on the techniques and their promise. Recent measurements of the fine structure of H and He + are used as illustrations

  8. Organic superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, D.

    1980-01-01

    We present the experimental evidences for the existence of a superconducting state in the Quasi One Dimensional organic conductor (TMTSF) 2 PF 6 . Superconductivity occuring at 1 K under 12 kbar is characterized by a zero resistance diamagnetic state. The anistropy of the upper critical field of this type II superconductor is consistent with the band structure anistropy. We present evidences for the existence of large superconducting precursor effects giving rise to a dominant paraconductive contribution below 40 K. We also discuss the anomalously large pressure dependence of T sb(s), which drops to 0.19 K under 24 kbar in terms of the current theories. (author)

  9. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin - 12088

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, R.L.; Rinehart, D.E.; Brown, G.N.; Peterson, R.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing Cs-137. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50 deg. C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow at elevated temperature (45 deg., 50 deg., 55 deg., 60 deg., 65 deg., 75 deg. C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45 deg. C. Above 60 deg. C the resin appears to not load at all. It was observed that the resin disintegrated at 75 deg. C until not much was left and partially disintegrated at 65 deg. C, which caused the column to plug in both tests after ∼336 hours. The results indicate that WTP will lose resin loading capacity if the ion exchange process is performed above 25 deg. C, and the resin will disintegrate above 65 deg. C. Therefore, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures to perform the ion exchange process with this resin. PNNL and WTP are currently evaluating the operating limits of the resin in further detail. Aging in 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} also caused the resin to lose capacity above 25 deg. C and to completely dissolve at 55 deg. C. Again, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures when eluting the resin with nitric acid in order to maintain resin loading capacity and avoid disintegration of the resin

  10. Superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Shepard, K.W.; Wangler, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    This project has two goals: to design, build, and test a small superconducting linac to serve as an energy booster for heavy ions from an FN tandem electrostatic accelerator, and to investigate various aspects of superconducting rf technology. The main design features of the booster are described, a status report on various components (resonators, rf control system, linac control system, cryostats, buncher) is given, and plans for the near future are outlined. Investigations of superconducting-linac technology concern studies on materials and fabrication techniques, resonator diagnostic techniques, rf-phase control, beam dynamics computer programs, asymmetry in accelerating field, and surface-treatment techniques. The overall layout of the to-be-proposed ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System, is shown; the ATLAS would use superconducting technology to produce beams of 5 to 25 MeV/A. 6 figures

  11. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormann, R.; Loiseau, R.; Marcilhac, B.

    1989-01-01

    The invention concerns superconducting ceramics containing essentially barium, calcium and copper fluorinated oxides with close offset and onset temperatures around 97 K and 100 K and containing neither Y nor rare earth [fr

  12. Hole superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.; Marsiglio, F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors review recent work on a mechanism proposed to explain high T c superconductivity in oxides as well as superconductivity of conventional materials. It is based on pairing of hole carriers through their direct Coulomb interaction, and gives rise to superconductivity because of the momentum dependence of the repulsive interaction in the solid state environment. In the regime of parameters appropriate for high T c oxides this mechanism leads to characteristic signatures that should be experimentally verifiable. In the regime of conventional superconductors most of these signatures become unobservable, but the characteristic dependence of T c on band filling survives. New features discussed her include the demonstration that superconductivity can result from repulsive interactions even if the gap function does not change sign and the inclusion of a self-energy correction to the hole propagator that reduces the range of band filling where T c is not zero

  13. Status of the Chalk River superconducting heavy-ion cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormrod, J.H.; Bigham, C.B.; Heighway, E.A.; Hoffmann, C.R.; Hulbert, J.A.; Schneider, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Chalk River four-sector K=520 superconducting cyclotron is designed to accelerate all ions from lithium (to 50 MeV/u) to uranium (to 10 MeV/u) using a 13 MV tandem Van de Graaff as injector. After an extended shutdown the magnet has been reassembled and field measurements resumed. During the shutdown a ground fault between the superconducting coil and its container was removed, the flutter poles were shimmed and the remaining trim rod holes were bored in them, the 104 trim rods with their holders were installed and the cryostat inner wall was modified to accept the radiofrequency accelerating structure. Experiments on the radiofrequency accelerating system, cryopumps, electrostatic deflector and superconducting windings for the magnetic channel are done in separate test chambers. Recent results and the status of all subsystems are given

  14. Superconducted tour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-09-15

    Superconductivity - the dramatic drop in electrical resistance in certain materials at very low temperatures - has grown rapidly in importance over the past two or three decades to become a key technology for high energy particle accelerators. It was in this setting that a hundred students and 15 lecturers met in Hamburg in June for a week's course on superconductivity in particle accelerators, organized by the CERN Accelerator School and the nearby DESY Laboratory.

  15. Superconductivity: Phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falicov, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    This document discusses first the following topics: (a) The superconducting transition temperature; (b) Zero resistivity; (c) The Meissner effect; (d) The isotope effect; (e) Microwave and optical properties; and (f) The superconducting energy gap. Part II of this document investigates the Ginzburg-Landau equations by discussing: (a) The coherence length; (b) The penetration depth; (c) Flux quantization; (d) Magnetic-field dependence of the energy gap; (e) Quantum interference phenomena; and (f) The Josephson effect

  16. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Robert; Preble, Joseph P; Reece, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maint...

  17. Modified 3½-Cell SC Cavity Made of Large Grain Niobium for the FZD SRF Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Murcek, P; Michel, P; Moeller, K; Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Freitag, M; Kneisel, P

    2010-01-01

    An SRF photoinjector has been successfully tested in FZD under the collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. In order to improve the gun cavity quality and thus reach a higher gradient, a new 3+1/2 superconducting cavity is being fabricated in cooperation with JLab. The modified cavity is made of large grain niobium, composed of one filter choke, one special designed half-cell (gun-cell) and three TESLA cavities. In this paper, the main updates of the new cavity design will be explained in detail. The deformation of the filter choke and the gun-cell, which is caused by pressure fluctuation in the He-line and also by the effect of the Lorentz force, will be minimized by stiffening between the filter choke and the gun-cell. Meanwhile, the cathode hole in the choke and gun-cell is enlarged for better rinsing. To simplify assembly, the NbTi pick-up will be welded directly on the wall of filter choke.

  18. Radiofrequency in cosmetic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Karen L; Weiss, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for noninvasive methods of facial and body rejuvenation has experienced exponential growth over the last decade. There is a particular interest in safe and effective ways to decrease skin laxity and smooth irregular body contours and texture without downtime. These noninvasive treatments are being sought after because less time for recovery means less time lost from work and social endeavors. Radiofrequency (RF) treatments are traditionally titrated to be nonablative and are optimal for those wishing to avoid recovery time. Not only is there minimal recovery but also a high level of safety with aesthetic RF treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. International radiofrequency standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lincoln, J.

    2001-01-01

    Of the various radiofrequency standards in use around the world, many are based on or similar to the Guidelines published by ICNIRP (The International Commission on Non-ionising Radiation Protection). This organisation is a working group operating in co-operation with the Environmental Health division of the World Health Organisation (WHO). This paper presents a very brief overview of current international standards, beginning with a summary of the salient points of the ICNIRP Guidelines. It should be remembered that these are guidelines only and do not exist as a separate standard. Copyright (2001) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  20. Superconducting cavity development at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore pursuing a program on 'R and D Activities for High Energy Proton Linac based Spallation Neutron Source'. Spallation neutron source (SNS) facility will provide high flux pulse neutrons for research in the areas of condensed matter physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and engineering. This will complement the existing synchrotron light source facility, INDUS-2 at RRCAT and reactor based neutron facilities at BARC. RRCAT is also participating in approved mega project on 'Physics and Advanced Technology for High Intensity Proton Accelerator' to support activities of Indian Institutions - Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC). The SNS facility will have a 1 GeV superconducting proton injector linac and 1 GeV accumulator ring. The linac will comprise of large number of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at different RF frequencies housed in suitable cryomodules. Thus, an extensive SCRF cavity infrastructure setup is being established. In addition, a scientific and technical expertise are also being developed for fabrication, processing and testing of the SCRF cavities for series production. The paper presents the status of superconducting cavity development at RRCAT

  1. SRF Cavity and Materials R&D at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Khabiboulline, N; Bellantoni, L; Berenc, T; Boffo, C; Carcagno, R; Chapman, C; Edwards, H; Elementi, L; Foley, M; Hahn, E; Hicks, D; Mitchell, D; Rowe, A; Solyak, N; Terechkine, Yu

    2004-01-01

    Two 3.9 GHz superconducting RF cavities are under development at FNAL for use in the upgraded Photoinjector Facility. A TM110 mode cavity will provide streak capability for bunch slice diagnostics, and a TM010 mode cavity will provide linearization of the accelerating gradient before compression for better emittance. The status of these two efforts and a review of the FNAL infrastructure development will be given.

  2. Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Coatings for Large Scale Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namhoon; Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Wolak, Matthaeus; Xi, Xiaoxing

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered to be a great candidate for next generation superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities due to its higher critical temperature Tc (40 K) and increased thermodynamic critical field Hc compared to other conventional superconductors. These properties significantly reduce the BCS surface resistance (RsBCS)and residual resistance (Rres) according to theoretical studies and suggest the possibility of an enhanced accelerating field (Eacc) . We have investigated the possibility of coating the inner surface of a 3 GHz SRF cavity with MgB2 by using a hybrid physical-vapor deposition (HPCVD) system which was modified for this purpose. To simulate a real 3 GHz SRF cavity, a stainless steel mock cavity has been employed for the study. The film quality was characterized on small substrates that were placed at selected locations within the cavity. MgB2 films on stainless steel foils, niobium pieces and SiC substrates showed transition temperatures of above 36 K. Dielectric resonance measurements resulted in promising Q values as obtained for the MgB2 films grown on the various substrates. By employing the HPCVD technique, a uniform film was achieved across the cavity interior, demonstrating the feasibility of HPCVD for MgB2 coatings for SRF cavities.

  3. Role of thermal resistance on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2017-03-01

    Thermal stability is an important parameter for the operation of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in particle accelerators. The rf power dissipated on the inner surface of the cavities is conducted to the helium bath cooling the outer cavity surface and the equilibrium temperature of the inner surface depends on the thermal resistance. In this manuscript, we present the results of direct measurements of thermal resistance on 1.3 GHz single cell SRF cavities made from high purity large-grain and fine-grain niobium as well as their rf performance for different treatments applied to outer cavity surface in order to investigate the role of the Kapitza resistance to the overall thermal resistance and to the SRF cavity performance. The results show no significant impact of the thermal resistance to the SRF cavity performance after chemical polishing, mechanical polishing or anodization of the outer cavity surface. Temperature maps taken during the rf test show nonuniform heating of the surface at medium rf fields. Calculations of Q0(Bp) curves using the thermal feedback model show good agreement with experimental data at 2 and 1.8 K when a pair-braking term is included in the calculation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance. These results indicate local intrinsic nonlinearities of the surface resistance, rather than purely thermal effects, to be the main cause for the observed field dependence of Q0(Bp) .

  4. Role of thermal resistance on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashupati Dhakal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stability is an important parameter for the operation of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities used in particle accelerators. The rf power dissipated on the inner surface of the cavities is conducted to the helium bath cooling the outer cavity surface and the equilibrium temperature of the inner surface depends on the thermal resistance. In this manuscript, we present the results of direct measurements of thermal resistance on 1.3 GHz single cell SRF cavities made from high purity large-grain and fine-grain niobium as well as their rf performance for different treatments applied to outer cavity surface in order to investigate the role of the Kapitza resistance to the overall thermal resistance and to the SRF cavity performance. The results show no significant impact of the thermal resistance to the SRF cavity performance after chemical polishing, mechanical polishing or anodization of the outer cavity surface. Temperature maps taken during the rf test show nonuniform heating of the surface at medium rf fields. Calculations of Q_{0}(B_{p} curves using the thermal feedback model show good agreement with experimental data at 2 and 1.8 K when a pair-braking term is included in the calculation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance. These results indicate local intrinsic nonlinearities of the surface resistance, rather than purely thermal effects, to be the main cause for the observed field dependence of Q_{0}(B_{p}.

  5. Superconducting cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blosser, H.G.; Johnson, D.A.; Burleigh, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Superconducting cyclotrons are particularly appropriate for acceleration of heavy ions. A review is given of design features of a superconducting cyclotron with energy 440 (Q 2 /A) MeV. A strong magnetic field (4.6 tesla average) leads to small physical size (extraction radius 65 cm) and low construction costs. Operating costs are also low. The design is based on established technology (from present cyclotrons and from large bubble chambers). Two laboratories (in Chalk River, Canada and in East Lansing, Michigan) are proceeding with construction of full-scale prototype components for such cyclotrons

  6. The design of a five-cell high-current superconducting cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongming; Zhu Feng; Quan Shengwen; Liu Kexin; Nassiri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Energy recovery linacs are promising for achieving high average current with superior beam quality. The key component for accelerating such high-current beams is the superconducting radio-frequency cavity. The design of a 1.3 GHz five-cell high-current superconducting cavity has been carried out under cooperation between Peking University and the Argonne National Laboratory. The radio-frequency properties, damping of the higher order modes, multipacting and mechanical features of this cavity have been discussed and the final design is presented. (authors)

  7. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001) surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    OpenAIRE

    D. B. Beringer; W. M. Roach; C. Clavero; C. E. Reece; R. A. Lukaszew

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ∼50  MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2162...

  8. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruvalds, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermi liquid nesting in high temperature superconductors; optical properties of high temperature superconductors; Hall effect in superconducting La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 ; source of high transition temperatures; and prospects for new superconductors

  9. Superconducting transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting transformer having a winding arrangement that provides for current limitation when subjected to a current transient as well as more efficient utilization of radial spacing and winding insulation. Structural innovations disclosed include compressed conical shaped winding layers and a resistive matrix to promote rapid switching of current between parallel windings

  10. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-T c superconductor at low temperature

  11. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.

    1996-01-01

    Superconducting dipole magnets for high energy colliders are discussed. As an example, the magnets recently built for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are reviewed. Their technical performance and the cost for the industry-built production dipoles are given. The cost data is generalized in order to extrapolate the cost of magnets for a new machine

  12. Bipolar superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankratov, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    A model of bipolaron superconductivity suggested by Soviet scientist Alexandrov A.S. and French scientist Ranninger is presentes in a popular way. It is noted that the bipolaron theory gives a good explanation of certain properties of new superconductors, high critical temperature, in particular

  13. Superconducting transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    A three film superconducting tunneling device, analogous to a semiconductor transistor, is presented, including a theoretical description and experimental results showing a current gain of four. Much larger current gains are shown to be feasible. Such a development is particularly interesting because of its novelty and the striking analogies with the semiconductor junction transistor

  14. Root Causes of Field Emitters in SRF Cavities Placed in CEBAF Tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli

    2016-05-01

    It has been suspected that appearance of new field emitters can occur in SRF cavities after their placement in accelerator tunnel for long term beam operation. This apparently has been the case for CEBAF. However, no physical evidence has been shown in the past. In this contribution, we will report on the recent results concerning the root cause of field emitters in SRF cavities placed in CEBAF tunnel. We will discuss these results in the context of high-reliability and low-cryogenic-loss operation of CEBAF.

  15. Analysis of mechanical fabrication experience with CEBAF's production SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammosser, J.; Kneisel, P.; Benesch, J.

    1993-06-01

    CEBAF has received a total of 360 five-cell niobium cavities, the largest group of industrially fabricated superconducting cavities so far. An extensive data base exists on the fabrication, surface treatment, assembly and cavity performance parameters. Analysis of the mechanical features of the cavities includes the following: the spread in fabrication tolerances of the cells derived from field profiles of the ''as fabricated'' cavities and the ''as fabricated'' external Q-values of the fundamental power coupler compared to dimensional deviations. A comparison is made of the pressure sensitivity of cavities made of materials from different manufacturers between 760 torr (4.2 K) and 23 torr (2 K)

  16. SRF cavity testing using a FPGA Self Excited Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2018-01-01

    This document provides a detailed description of procedures for very-high precision calibration and testing of superconducting RF cavities using digital Low-Level RF (LLRF) electronics based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). The use of a Self-Excited Loop with an innovative procedure for fast turn-on allows the measurement of the forward, reflected and transmitted power from a single port of the directional coupler in front of the cavity, thus eliminating certain measurement errors. Various procedures for measuring the quality factor as a function of cavity fields are described, including a single RF pulse technique. Errors are estimated for the measurements.

  17. Theory of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisan, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up to the 1987 results on high temperature superconductivity. Contents: Phenomenological Theory of Superconductivity; Microscopic Theory of Superconductivity; Theory of Superconducting Alloys; Superconductors in a Magnetic Field; Superconductivity and Magnetic Order; Superconductivity in Quasi-One-Dimensional Systems; and Non-Conventional Superconductivity

  18. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM; Burrell, Anthony K [Los Alamos, NM; Agrawal, Anoop [Tucson, AZ; Hall, Simon B [Palmerston North, NZ

    2009-01-20

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  19. Phase and Frequency Locked Magnetrons for SRF Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, Michael [Muons, Inc.; Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-12

    There is great potential for a magnetron power source that can be controlled both in phase and frequency. Such a power source could revolutionize many particle accelerator systems that require lower capital cost and/or higher power efficiency. Beyond the accelerator community, phase and frequency locked magnetons could improve radar systems around the world and make affordable phased arrays for wireless power transmission for solar powered satellites. This joint project of Muons, Inc., Fermilab, and L-3 CTL was supported by an STTR grant monitored by the Nuclear Physics Office of the DOE Office of Science. The object of the program was to incorporate ferrite materials into the anode of a magnetron and, with appropriate biasing of the ferrites, to maintain frequency lock and to allow for frequency adjustment of the magnetron without mechanical tuners. If successful, this device would have a dual use both as a source for SRF linacs and for military applications where fast tuning of the frequency is a requirement. In order to place the materials in the proper location, several attributes needed to be modeled. First the impact of the magnetron’s magnetic field needed to be shielded from the ferrites so that they were not saturated. And second, the magnetic field required to change the frequency of the magnetron at the ferrites needed to be shielded from the region containing the circulating electrons. ANSYS calculations of the magnetic field were used to optimize both of these parameters. Once the design for these elements was concluded, parts were fabricated and a complete test assembly built to confirm the predictions of the computer models. The ferrite material was also tested to determine its compatibility with magnetron tube processing temperatures. This required a vacuum bake out of the chosen material to determine the cleanliness of the material in terms of outgassing characteristics, and a subsequent room temperature test to verify that the characteristics of

  20. Electromagnetic field sources in radiofrequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.; Sebastiao, D.; Ladeira, D.; Antunes, M.; Correia, L.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the scope of the monIT Project, several measurements were made of electromagnetic fields in Portugal. This paper presents an analysis of the sources operating in the radiofrequency range, resulting from 2429 measurements in 466 locations.

  1. Influence of SrF_2-doping in AlN ceramics on scintillation and dosimeter properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Kaori; Okada, Go; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized undoped AlN and SrF_2-doped AlN (AlN-SrF_2) ceramics by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), and we characterized their optical, scintillation and dosimeter properties. The prepared undoped AlN ceramic had gray color and visually non-transparent whereas, with an addition of SrF_2, the transparency improved and became translucent. The measured in-line transmittance was approximately 0.2% at wavelengths longer than 500 nm. While the addition of SrF_2 decreased the scintillation intensity, the decay time was significantly fastened, which is a great advantage for fast photon counting-based measurements. Both the thermally-stimulated luminescence (TSL) and optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) showed good linear response from the milli-gray range to over 10 Gy. The sensitivity seems to decrease by an addition of SrF_2 as it suppresses structural defect centers which are responsible for dosimeter properties. However, the main TSL glow peak position shifts to higher temperature with the addition of SrF_2, which indicates that inclusion of SrF_2 improves the TSL signal stability. - Highlights: • We synthesized undoped and SrF_2-doped AlN ceramics by Spark Plasma Sintering. • We evaluated scintillator and dosimeter properties of undoped and SrF_2-doped AlN. • By doping with SrF_2, the decay time is shortened. • By doping with SrF_2, the stability of TSL and OSL is improved.

  2. Automated Surface Classification of SRF Cavities for the Investigation of the Influence of Surface Properties onto the Operational Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Superconducting niobium radio-frequency cavities are fundamental for the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider. To use the operational advantages of superconducting cavities, the inner surface has to fulfill quite demanding requirements. The surface roughness and cleanliness improved over the last decades and with them, the achieved maximal accelerating field. Still, limitations of the maximal achieved accelerating field are observed, which are not explained by localized geometrical defects or impurities. The scope of this thesis is a better understanding of these limitations in defect free cavities based on global, rather than local, surface properties. For this goal, more than 30 cavities underwent subsequent surface treatments, cold RF tests and optical inspections within the ILC-HiGrade research program and the XFEL cavity production. An algorithm was developed which allows an automated surface characterization based on an optical inspection robot. This algorithm delivers a set of optical surface properties, which describes the inner cavity surface. These optical surface properties deliver a framework for a quality assurance of the fabrication procedures. Furthermore, they shows promising results for a better understanding of the observed limitations in defect free cavities.

  3. Automated Surface Classification of SRF Cavities for the Investigation of the Influence of Surface Properties onto the Operational Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2015-07-15

    Superconducting niobium radio-frequency cavities are fundamental for the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider. To use the operational advantages of superconducting cavities, the inner surface has to fulfill quite demanding requirements. The surface roughness and cleanliness improved over the last decades and with them, the achieved maximal accelerating field. Still, limitations of the maximal achieved accelerating field are observed, which are not explained by localized geometrical defects or impurities. The scope of this thesis is a better understanding of these limitations in defect free cavities based on global, rather than local, surface properties. For this goal, more than 30 cavities underwent subsequent surface treatments, cold RF tests and optical inspections within the ILC-HiGrade research program and the XFEL cavity production. An algorithm was developed which allows an automated surface characterization based on an optical inspection robot. This algorithm delivers a set of optical surface properties, which describes the inner cavity surface. These optical surface properties deliver a framework for a quality assurance of the fabrication procedures. Furthermore, they shows promising results for a better understanding of the observed limitations in defect free cavities.

  4. SRF LINAC for future extension of the PEFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Seol, Kyoung Tae; Jang, Ji Ho; Cho, Yong Sub [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    A study on the superconducting RF linac is underway in order to increase the beam energy up to 1 GeV by extending the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) 100-MeV linac. The operating frequency of the PEFP superconducting linac (SCL) is 700 MHz, which is determined by the fact that the frequency of the existing normal conducting linac is 350 MHz. A preliminary study on the beam dynamics showed that two types of cavities with geometrical betas of 0.50 and 0.74 could cover the entire energy range from 100 MeV to 1 GeV. An inductive output tube (IOT) based RF system is under consideration as a high-power RF source for the SCL due to its low operating voltage and high efficiency. As a prototyping activity for a reduced beta cavity, a five-cell cavity with a geometrical beta of 0.42 was designed and fabricated. A vertical test of the prototype cavity at low temperatures was performed to check the performance of the cavity. The design study and the prototyping activity for the PEFP SCL will be presented in this paper.

  5. SRF LINAC for future extension of the PEFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Seol, Kyoung Tae; Jang, Ji Ho; Cho, Yong Sub

    2014-01-01

    A study on the superconducting RF linac is underway in order to increase the beam energy up to 1 GeV by extending the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) 100-MeV linac. The operating frequency of the PEFP superconducting linac (SCL) is 700 MHz, which is determined by the fact that the frequency of the existing normal conducting linac is 350 MHz. A preliminary study on the beam dynamics showed that two types of cavities with geometrical betas of 0.50 and 0.74 could cover the entire energy range from 100 MeV to 1 GeV. An inductive output tube (IOT) based RF system is under consideration as a high-power RF source for the SCL due to its low operating voltage and high efficiency. As a prototyping activity for a reduced beta cavity, a five-cell cavity with a geometrical beta of 0.42 was designed and fabricated. A vertical test of the prototype cavity at low temperatures was performed to check the performance of the cavity. The design study and the prototyping activity for the PEFP SCL will be presented in this paper.

  6. Impact of high temperature superconductors on the possibility of radio-frequency confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, S.O.

    1989-01-01

    Recent discoveries of superconducting materials that operate at high temperatures may have both technical and economic consequences for magnetic confinement fusion. In addition, they could also open up the possibility of plasma confinement by radio-frequency fields. The new, high temperature superconductors may impact the feasibility of rf confinement in two important ways: (1) higher temperature superconductors should have higher critical B fields and consequently may allow higher critical electric fields to be sustained in the cavity, thus allowing the necessary confining pressure to be achieved; and (2) the higher temperature superconductors lower the refrigeration power necessary to maintain the superconducting cavity, thus allowing a favorable energy balance

  7. Error analysis for intrinsic quality factor measurement in superconducting radio frequency resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnychuk, O; Grassellino, A; Romanenko, A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss error analysis for intrinsic quality factor (Q0) and accelerating gradient (Eacc) measurements in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) resonators. The analysis is applicable for cavity performance tests that are routinely performed at SRF facilities worldwide. We review the sources of uncertainties along with the assumptions on their correlations and present uncertainty calculations with a more complete procedure for treatment of correlations than in previous publications [T. Powers, in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27]. Applying this approach to cavity data collected at Vertical Test Stand facility at Fermilab, we estimated total uncertainty for both Q0 and Eacc to be at the level of approximately 4% for input coupler coupling parameter β1 in the [0.5, 2.5] range. Above 2.5 (below 0.5) Q0 uncertainty increases (decreases) with β1 whereas Eacc uncertainty, in contrast with results in Powers [in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27], is independent of β1. Overall, our estimated Q0 uncertainty is approximately half as large as that in Powers [in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27].

  8. Performance Characterization of LCLS-II Superconducting Radiofrequency Cryomodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, RuthAnn [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-11-10

    This paper will describe the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source)-II, Fermilab’s role in the development of LCLS-II, and my contributions as a Lee Teng intern. LCLS-II is a second generation x-ray free electron laser being constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Fermilab is responsible for the design, construction, and testing of several 1.3 GHz cryomodules to be used in LCLS-II. These cryomodules are currently being tested at Fermilab. Some software was written to analyze the data from the cryomodule tests. This software assesses the performance of the cryomodules by looking at data on the cavity voltage, cavity gradient, dark current, and radiation.

  9. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-01-01

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications

  10. Color superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-01-01

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken

  11. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  12. Fabrication and test of a superconducting RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.; Wang, H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Paul, P.; Noe, J.W.; Lombardi, A.

    1992-01-01

    The fabrication and first performance tests of a prototype superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole resonator (SRFQ) are described. The SRFQ operates at 57 MHz and is optimized for a particle velocity of β = 0.033. It is constructed of copper electroplated with a lead-tin alloy. An accelerating field gradient of 1.25 MV/m was achieved with about 7 watts of helium dissipation. This corresponds to an energy gain of 700 keV per unit charge over the 56 cm overall diameter of the resonator

  13. Continuous wave superconducting radio frequency electron linac for nuclear physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, has been actively serving the nuclear physics research community as a unique forefront international resource since 1995. This cw electron linear accelerator (linac) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has continued to evolve as a precision tool for discerning the structure and dynamics within nuclei. Superconducting rf (SRF) technology has been the essential foundation for CEBAF, first as a 4 GeV machine, then 6 GeV, and currently capable of 12 GeV. Lastly, we review the development, implementation, and performance of SRF systems for CEBAF from its early beginnings to the commissioning of the 12 GeV era.

  14. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical niobium samples used for superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhavale, Asavari S.; Dhakal, Pashupati; Polyanskii, Anatolii A.; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2012-06-01

    We present the results from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low-temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data are analyzed using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples, favorable to lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  15. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  16. Material options for the superconducting rf system of the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aull, Sarah; Butterworth, Andy; Schwerg, Nikolai

    2018-01-01

    The design of the superconducting RF (SRF) systems of the Future Circular Collider (FCC) machine variants requires a thorough comparison of the different options for cavity material, oper- ating temperature and frequency. We collected representative SRF performance data at different frequencies and temperatures of bulk niobium as the standard technology and of niobium thin films as a potential alternative and develop a perspective for future performance for all material- frequency-temperature combinations as function of accelerating gradient. Based on this perspective, we estimate the corresponding cryogenic grid power for the different FCC machines showing the most favourable accelerating gradients for the different materials and operating temperatures. Further- more, we discuss advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the different technology options to be taken into consideration.

  17. Continuous wave superconducting radio frequency electron linac for nuclear physics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles E. Reece

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, has been actively serving the nuclear physics research community as a unique forefront international resource since 1995. This cw electron linear accelerator (linac at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab has continued to evolve as a precision tool for discerning the structure and dynamics within nuclei. Superconducting rf (SRF technology has been the essential foundation for CEBAF, first as a 4 GeV machine, then 6 GeV, and currently capable of 12 GeV. We review the development, implementation, and performance of SRF systems for CEBAF from its early beginnings to the commissioning of the 12 GeV era.

  18. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical niobium samples used for superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhavale, Asavari S; Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Polyanskii, Anatolii A

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low-temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data are analyzed using a modified critical state model. The critical current density J c and pinning force F p are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples, favorable to lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities. (paper)

  19. Understanding Quality Factor Degradation in Superconducting Niobium Cavities at Low Microwave Field Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, A.; Schuster, D. I.

    2017-12-01

    In niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for particle acceleration, a decrease of the quality factor at lower fields—a so-called low field Q slope or LFQS—has been a long-standing unexplained effect. By extending the high Q measurement techniques to ultralow fields, we discover two previously unknown features of the effect: (i) saturation at rf fields lower than Eacc˜0.1 MV /m ; (ii) strong degradation enhancement by growing thicker niobium pentoxide. Our findings suggest that the LFQS may be caused by the two level systems in the natural niobium oxide on the inner cavity surface, thereby identifying a new source of residual resistance and providing guidance for potential nonaccelerator low-field applications of SRF cavities.

  20. Superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  1. Melt formed superconducting joint between superconducting tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.G.; Knudsen, B.A.; Rumaner, L.E.; Zaabala, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a superconducting joint between contiguous superconducting tapes having an inner laminate comprised of a parent-metal layer selected from the group niobium, tantalum, technetium, and vanadium, a superconductive intermetallic compound layer on the parent-metal layer, a reactive-metal layer that is capable of combining with the parent-metal and forming the superconductive intermetallic compound, the joint comprising: a continuous precipitate of the superconductive intermetallic compound fused to the tapes forming a continuous superconducting path between the tapes

  2. CEBAF SRF Performance during Initial 12 GeV Commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Allison, Trent; Daly, Edward; Drury, Michael; Hovater, J; Lahti, George; Mounts, Clyde; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of eleven new 100 MV cryomodules (88 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a Q L of 3x10 7 . Not all the cavities were operated at the minimum gradient of 19.3 MV/m with the beam. Though the initial 12 GeV milestones were achieved during the initial commissioning of CEBAF, there are still some issues to be addressed for long term reliable operation of these modules. This paper reports the operational experiences during the initial commissioning and the path forward to improve the performance of C100 (100 MV) modules.

  3. Design of 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell SRF cavity and development of single cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, Sudeshna; Som, Sumit; Bhattacharyya, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    In India, DAE laboratories and other institutes are now actively involved in research and development activities on SRF cavities and associated technologies for the proposed high current, high energy proton linear accelerators like ISNS/IADS and also for the FERMILAB PIP-II program under Indian institutions-Fermilab collaboration (IIFC). As part of the above activities, VECC, Kolkata, has been involved in the design, analysis and development of a 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell elliptical shape Superconducting RF linac cavity. RF design involves optimization of the geometry to get acceptable values of field enhancement factors (magnetic and electric), R/Q , Geometric factor, coupling factor and field flatness. This paper describes the RF design using 2-D superfish and 3-D CST Microwave studio and multipacting analysis using 2-D Multipac2.1 and 3-D CST Particle Studio. A prototype 1-cell aluminum cavity and a prototype 5-cell copper cavity have been fabricated using die-punch assembly designed for fabrication of elliptical half-cells to check the procedures for forming and to make sure the desired frequency and field flatness could be obtained. RF characterization has been carried out for both the prototypes using Vector Network Analyzer and Bead pull measurement set up.The fabrication of a single-cell niobium cavity has been carried out indigenously and with the help of Electron Beam Welding (EBW) facility at IUAC, New Delhi. CMM measurement and RF characterization of the niobium half cells and full cell cavities have been carried out. This paper describes the development and measurement of prototype cavities and single cell niobium cavity. (author)

  4. Radiofrequency generation by coherently moving fluxons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Sachser, R.; Huth, M.; Shklovskij, V. A.; Vovk, R. V.; Bevz, V. M.; Tsindlekht, M. I.

    2018-04-01

    A lattice of Abrikosov vortices in type II superconductors is characterized by a periodic modulation of the magnetic induction perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. For a coherent vortex motion under the action of a transport current, the magnetic induction at a given point of the sample varies in time with a washboard frequency fWB = v/d, where v is the vortex velocity and d is the distance between the vortices in the direction of motion. Here, by using a spectrum analyzer connected to a 50 nm-wide Au nanowire meander near the surface of a superconducting Nb film, we detect an ac voltage induced by coherently moving fluxons. The voltage is peaked at the washboard frequency, fWB, and its subharmonics, fTOF = fWB/5, determined by the antenna width. By sweeping the dc current value, we reveal that fWB can be tuned from 100 MHz to 1.5 GHz, thereby demonstrating that patterned normal metal/superconductor nanostructures can be used as dc-tunable generators operating in the radiofrequency range.

  5. 78 FR 25916 - Authorization of Radiofrequency Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ...] Authorization of Radiofrequency Equipment AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule... bodies, and measurement procedures used to determine RF equipment compliance. The Commission believes... Commission is responsible for an equipment authorization program for radiofrequency (RF) devices under part 2...

  6. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonowich, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation and field below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields. 23 refs

  7. Methods of Phase and Power Control in Magnetron Transmitters for Superconducting Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazadevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Lebedev, V. [Fermilab; Schappert, W. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Various methods of phase and power control in magnetron RF sources of superconducting accelerators intended for ADS-class projects were recently developed and studied with conventional 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons operating in pulsed and CW regimes. Magnetron transmitters excited by a resonant (injection-locking) phasemodulated signal can provide phase and power control with the rates required for precise stabilization of phase and amplitude of the accelerating field in Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of the intensity-frontier accelerators. An innovative technique that can significantly increase the magnetron transmitter efficiency at the widerange power control required for superconducting accelerators was developed and verified with the 2.45 GHz magnetrons operating in CW and pulsed regimes. High efficiency magnetron transmitters of this type can significantly reduce the capital and operation costs of the ADSclass accelerator projects.

  8. Superconducting plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro; Ohno, J.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) plasmas are proposed and investigated. The SC plasmas are not yet familiar and have not yet been studied. However, the existence and the importance of SC plasmas are stressed in this report. The existence of SC plasmas are found as follows. There is a fundamental property of Meissner effect in superconductors, which shows a repulsive effect of magnetic fields. Even in that case, in a microscopic view, there is a region of magnetic penetration. The penetration length λ is well-known as London's penetration depth, which is expressed as δ = (m s /μ 0 n s q s 2 ) 1/2 where m s , n s , q s and μ o show the mass, the density, the charge of SC electron and the permeability in free space, respectively. Because this expression is very simple, no one had tried it into more simple and meaningful form. Recently, one of the authors (T.O.) has found that the length can be expressed into more simple and understandable fundamental form as λ = c/ω ps where c = (ε 0 μ 0 ) -1/2 and ω ps = (n s q s 2 /m s ε 0 ) 1/2 are the light velocity and the superconducting plasma frequency. From this simple expression, the penetration depth of the magnetic field to SC is found as a SC plasma skin depth, that is, the fundamental property of SC can be expressed by the SC plasmas. This discovery indicates an importance of the studies of superconducting plasmas. From these points, several properties (propagating modes et al) of SC plasmas, which consist of SC electrons, normal electrons and lattice ions, are investigated in this report. Observations of SC plasma frequency is also reported with a use of Terahertz electromagnet-optical waves

  9. Development of low angle grain boundaries in lightly deformed superconducting niobium and their influence on hydride distribution and flux perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Z.-H.; Wang, M.; Polyanskii, A. A.; Santosh, C.; Balachandran, S.; Compton, C.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Bieler, T. R.; Lee, P. J.

    2017-05-01

    This study shows that low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) can be created by small 5% strains in high purity (residual resistivity ratio ≥ 200) superconducting radio frequency (SRF)-grade single crystalline niobium (Nb) and that these boundaries act as hydrogen traps as indicated by the distribution of niobium hydrides (Nb1-xHx). Nb1-xHx is detrimental to SRF Nb cavities due to its normal conducting properties at cavity operating temperatures. By designing a single crystal tensile sample extracted from a large grain (>5 cm) Nb ingot slice for preferred slip on one slip plane, LAGBs and dense dislocation boundaries developed. With chemical surface treatments following standard SRF cavity fabrication practice, Nb1-xHx phases were densely precipitated at the LAGBs upon cryogenic cooling (8-10 K/min). Micro-crystallographic analysis confirmed heterogeneous hydride precipitation, which included significant hydrogen atom accumulation in LAGBs. Magneto-optical imaging analysis showed that these sites can then act as sites for both premature flux penetration and eventually flux trapping. However, this hydrogen related degradation at LAGBs did not completely disappear even after an 800 °C/2 h anneal typically used for hydrogen removal in SRF Nb cavities. These findings suggest that hydride precipitation at an LAGB is facilitated by a non-equilibrium concentration of vacancy-hydrogen (H) complexes aided by mechanical deformation and the hydride phase interferes with the recovery process under 800 °C annealing.

  10. Microscopic examination and elemental analysis of surface defects in LEP superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, C.; Cosso, R.; Hauer, M.; Hellgren, N.; Lacarrere, D.

    1996-01-01

    A diagnostic tool, based on a computer controlled surface analysis instrument, incorporating secondary electron imaging, static auger electron spectroscopy and scanning auger mapping has been designed and built at CERN to characterize the inner surface of LEP superconducting cavities with provide unsatisfactory radio-frequency performance. The experimental results obtained to date are reported and discussed. (author)

  11. New-generation radiofrequency technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Nils; Sadick, Neil S

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) technology has become a standard treatment in aesthetic medicine with many indications due to its versatility, efficacy, and safety. It is used worldwide for cellulite reduction; acne scar revision; and treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids, rosacea, and inflammatory acne in all skin types. However, the most common indication for RF technology is the nonablative tightening of tissue to improve skin laxity and reduce wrinkles. Radiofrequency devices are classified as unipolar, bipolar, or multipolar depending on the number of electrodes used. Additional modalities include fractional RF; sublative RF; phase-controlled RF; and combination RF therapies that apply light, massage, or pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs). This article reviews studies and case series on these devices. Radiofrequency technology for aesthetic medicine has seen rapid advancements since it was used for skin tightening in 2003. Future developments will continue to keep RF technology at the forefront of the dermatologist's armamentarium for skin tightening and rejuvenation.

  12. The state of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.D.

    1981-01-01

    The present status of applications based on the phenomena of superconductivity are reviewed. Superconducting materials, large scale applications, the Josephson effect and its applications, and superconductivity in instrumentation, are considered. The influence that superconductivity has had on modern theories of elementary particles, such as gauge symmetry breaking, is discussed. (U.K.)

  13. Non-surgical radiofrequency facelift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narins, David J; Narins, Rhoda S

    2003-10-01

    There has been considerable interest in using non-ablative methods to rejuvenate the skin. The ThermaCool TC (Thermage Inc.) is a radiofrequency (RF) device that has been introduced to induce tightening of the address the problem of skin via a uniform volumetric heating into the deep dermis tightening, resulting in a 'non-surgical facelift'. Radiofrequency produces a uniform volumetric heating into the deep dermis. Twenty treatment areas in 17 patients were treated to evaluate the efficacy and safety of RF treatment to the brow and jowls. The technique was found to produce gradual tightening in most patients, and there were no adverse effects.

  14. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  15. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1987-07-01

    After a short account of the history of experimental studies on superconductivity, the microscopic theory of superconductivity, the calculation of the control temperature and its possible maximum value are presented. An explanation of the mechanism of superconductivity in recently discovered superconducting metal oxide ceramics and the perspectives for the realization of new high-temperature superconducting materials are discussed. 56 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Superconducting accelerator technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Hartline, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Modern and future accelerators for high energy and nuclear physics rely increasingly on superconducting components to achieve the required magnetic fields and accelerating fields. This paper presents a practical overview of the phenomenon of superconductivity, and describes the design issues and solutions associated with superconducting magnets and superconducting rf acceleration structures. Further development and application of superconducting components promises increased accelerator performance at reduced electric power cost

  17. Sample preparation and biomass determination of SRF model mixture using cryogenic milling and the adapted balance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnöller, Johannes, E-mail: johannes.schnoeller@chello.at; Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Hahn, Manuel; Fellner, Johann; Rechberger, Helmut

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • An alternative sample comminution procedure for SRF is tested. • Proof of principle is shown on a SRF model mixture. • The biogenic content of the SRF is analyzed with the adapted balance method. • The novel method combines combustion analysis and a data reconciliation algorithm. • Factors for the variance of the analysis results are statistically quantified. - Abstract: The biogenic fraction of a simple solid recovered fuel (SRF) mixture (80 wt% printer paper/20 wt% high density polyethylene) is analyzed with the in-house developed adapted balance method (aBM). This fairly new approach is a combination of combustion elemental analysis (CHNS) and a data reconciliation algorithm based on successive linearisation for evaluation of the analysis results. This method shows a great potential as an alternative way to determine the biomass content in SRF. However, the employed analytical technique (CHNS elemental analysis) restricts the probed sample mass to low amounts in the range of a few hundred milligrams. This requires sample comminution to small grain sizes (<200 μm) to generate representative SRF specimen. This is not easily accomplished for certain material mixtures (e.g. SRF with rubber content) by conventional means of sample size reduction. This paper presents a proof of principle investigation of the sample preparation and analysis of an SRF model mixture with the use of cryogenic impact milling (final sample comminution) and the adapted balance method (determination of biomass content). The so derived sample preparation methodology (cutting mills and cryogenic impact milling) shows a better performance in accuracy and precision for the determination of the biomass content than one solely based on cutting mills. The results for the determination of the biogenic fraction are within 1–5% of the data obtained by the reference methods, selective dissolution method (SDM) and {sup 14}C-method ({sup 14}C-M)

  18. Evidence for preferential flux flow at the grain boundaries of superconducting RF-quality niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Z.-H.; Lee, P. J.; Gurevich, A.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2018-04-01

    The question of whether grain boundaries (GBs) in niobium can be responsible for lowered operating field (B RF) or quality factor (Q 0) in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is still controversial. Here, we show by direct DC transport across planar GBs isolated from a slice of very large-grain SRF-quality Nb that vortices can preferentially flow along the grain boundary when the external magnetic field lies in the GB plane. However, increasing the misalignment between the GB plane and the external magnetic field vector markedly reduces preferential flux flow along the GB. Importantly, we find that preferential GB flux flow is more prominent for a buffered chemical polished than for an electropolished bi-crystal. The voltage-current characteristics of GBs are similar to those seen in low angle grain boundaries of high temperature superconductors where there is clear evidence of suppression of the superconducting order parameter at the GB. While local weakening of superconductivity at GBs in cuprates and pnictides is intrinsic, deterioration of current transparency of GBs in Nb appears to be extrinsic, since the polishing method clearly affect the local GB degradation. The dependence of preferential GB flux flow on important cavity preparation and experimental variables, particularly the final chemical treatment and the angle between the magnetic field and the GB plane, suggests two more reasons why real cavity performance can be so variable.

  19. Progress in the Development of SRF Cavity Tuners Based on Magnetic Smart Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Joshi; A. Pappo; D. Upham; J. Preble

    2001-01-01

    Energen, Inc. has developed and demonstrated an SRF cavity tuning mechanism based on magnetic smart materials. Magnetic ''smart'' materials change their shape in a reversible and repeatable manner when exposed to a small magnetic field. A fine-tuning mechanism with a 2 kHz tuning range on a nominal resonant frequency of 1.497 GHz. was successfully demonstrated in 1999 [1]. Since then, Energen has been developing a tuning mechanism based on its linear stepper motors. These stepper motors are designed to deliver high-force precision linear motion of tens of millimeters at cryogenic temperatures. A locking mechanism built into the stepper motor enables the tuner to be locked into position when the power is turned off. This new tuning technology will eliminate the mechanical feeds through the vacuum jacket and reduce the complexity of the cryostat design and assembly. Performance and capabilities of a prototype SRF cavity tuner will be reported

  20. Evidence for tension-based regulation of Drosophila MAL and SRF during invasive cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Kálmán; Rørth, Pernille

    2004-07-01

    Cells migrating through a tissue exert force via their cytoskeleton and are themselves subject to tension, but the effects of physical forces on cell behavior in vivo are poorly understood. Border cell migration during Drosophila oogenesis is a useful model for invasive cell movement. We report that this migration requires the activity of the transcriptional factor serum response factor (SRF) and its cofactor MAL-D and present evidence that nuclear accumulation of MAL-D is induced by cell stretching. Border cells that cannot migrate lack nuclear MAL-D but can accumulate it if they are pulled by other migrating cells. Like mammalian MAL, MAL-D also responds to activated Diaphanous, which affects actin dynamics. MAL-D/SRF activity is required to build a robust actin cytoskeleton in the migrating cells; mutant cells break apart when initiating migration. Thus, tension-induced MAL-D activity may provide a feedback mechanism for enhancing cytoskeletal strength during invasive migration.

  1. Radiofrequency fields in our surroundings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the National Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) with the Post and Telecommunications Authority carried out a project where it is measured radiofrequency fields from various telecom systems in homes, kindergartens, schools, offices, and urban environments. Close to 99 percent of the measurement points were found values of less than one thousandth of the maximum. No values were near the limits. (AG)

  2. Compensating microphonics in SRF cavities to ensure beam stability for future free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Axel

    2008-07-21

    In seeded High-Gain-Harmonic-Generation free electron lasers or energy recovery linear accelerators the requirements for the bunch-to-bunch timing and energy jitter of the beam are in the femtosecond and per mill regime. This implies the ability to control the cavity radiofrequency (RF) field to an accuracy of 0.02 in phase and up to 1.10{sup -4} in amplitude. For the planned BESSY-FEL it is envisaged to operate 144 superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities of the 2.3 GeV driver linac in continuous wave mode and at a low beam current. The cavity resonance comprises a very narrow bandwidth of the order of tens of Hertz. Such cavities have been characterized under accelerator like conditions in the HoBiCaT test facility. It was possible to measure the error sources affecting the field stability in continuous wave (CW) operation. Microphonics, the main error source for a mechanical detuning of the cavities, lead to an average fluctuation of the cavity resonance of 1-5 Hz rms. Furthermore, the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning and the helium pressure dependance of the cavity resonance have been measured. Single cavity RF control and linac bunch-to-bunch longitudinal phase space modeling containing the measured properties showed, that it is advisable to find means to minimize the microphonics detuning by mechanical tuning. Thus, several fast tuning systems have been tested for CW operation. These tuners consist of a motor driven lever for slow and coarse tuning and a piezo that is integrated into the tuner support for fast and fine tuning. Regarding the analysis of the detuning spectrum an adaptive feedforward method based on the least-mean-square filter algorithm has been developed for fast cavity tuning. A detuning compensation between a factor of two and up to a factor of seven has been achieved. Modeling the complete system including the fast tuning scheme, showed that the requirements of the BESSY-FEL are attainable. (orig.)

  3. Compensating microphonics in SRF cavities to ensure beam stability for future free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, Axel

    2008-01-01

    In seeded High-Gain-Harmonic-Generation free electron lasers or energy recovery linear accelerators the requirements for the bunch-to-bunch timing and energy jitter of the beam are in the femtosecond and per mill regime. This implies the ability to control the cavity radiofrequency (RF) field to an accuracy of 0.02 in phase and up to 1.10 -4 in amplitude. For the planned BESSY-FEL it is envisaged to operate 144 superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities of the 2.3 GeV driver linac in continuous wave mode and at a low beam current. The cavity resonance comprises a very narrow bandwidth of the order of tens of Hertz. Such cavities have been characterized under accelerator like conditions in the HoBiCaT test facility. It was possible to measure the error sources affecting the field stability in continuous wave (CW) operation. Microphonics, the main error source for a mechanical detuning of the cavities, lead to an average fluctuation of the cavity resonance of 1-5 Hz rms. Furthermore, the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning and the helium pressure dependance of the cavity resonance have been measured. Single cavity RF control and linac bunch-to-bunch longitudinal phase space modeling containing the measured properties showed, that it is advisable to find means to minimize the microphonics detuning by mechanical tuning. Thus, several fast tuning systems have been tested for CW operation. These tuners consist of a motor driven lever for slow and coarse tuning and a piezo that is integrated into the tuner support for fast and fine tuning. Regarding the analysis of the detuning spectrum an adaptive feedforward method based on the least-mean-square filter algorithm has been developed for fast cavity tuning. A detuning compensation between a factor of two and up to a factor of seven has been achieved. Modeling the complete system including the fast tuning scheme, showed that the requirements of the BESSY-FEL are attainable. (orig.)

  4. WAVEGUIDE COUPLER KICK TO BEAM BUNCH AND CURRENT DEPENDENCY ON SRF CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genfa Wu; Haipeng Wang; Charles Reece; Robert Rimmer

    2008-01-01

    JLAB SRF cavities employ waveguide type fundamental power couplers (FPC). The FPC design for the 7-cell upgrade cavities was optimized to minimize the dipole field kick. For continuous wave (CW) operation, the forwarding RF power will be at different magnitude to drive the different beam current and cavity gradient. This introduces some deviation from optimized FPC field for varying beam loading. This article analyzes the beam behavior both in centroid kick and head-tail kick under different beam loading conditions

  5. How to Achieve the Best SRF Performance: (Practical) Limitations and Possible Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, Claire Z

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents in the first part the requirement for the surface preparation of RF Niobium cavities and its justification in term s of physical origin of limitation (e.g. cleanliness and field emission, influence of the surface treatments, morphology and surface damage, etc.). In the second part we discuss the different models describing the ultimate limits of SRF cavities, and we present one of the possible ways to overcome Niobium monopoly toward higher performances

  6. How to Achieve the Best SRF Performance: (Practical) Limitations and Possible Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine, Claire Z [IRFU, Saclay (France)

    2014-07-01

    This chapter presents in the first part the requirement for the surface preparation of RF Niobium cavities and its justification in term s of physical origin of limitation (e.g. cleanliness and field emission, influence of the surface treatments, morphology and surface damage, etc.). In the second part we discuss the different models describing the ultimate limits of SRF cavities, and we present one of the possible ways to overcome Niobium monopoly toward higher performances.

  7. Quench dynamics in SRF cavities: can we locate the quench origin with 2nd sound?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximenko, Yulia; Segatskov, Dmitri A.

    2011-01-01

    A newly developed method of locating quenches in SRF cavities by detecting second-sound waves has been gaining popularity in SRF laboratories. The technique is based on measurements of time delays between the quench as determined by the RF system and arrival of the second-sound wave to the multiple detectors placed around the cavity in superfluid helium. Unlike multi-channel temperature mapping, this approach requires only a few sensors and simple readout electronics; it can be used with SRF cavities of almost arbitrary shape. One of its drawbacks is that being an indirect method it requires one to solve an inverse problem to find the location of a quench. We tried to solve this inverse problem by using a parametric forward model. By analyzing the data we found that the approximation where the second-sound emitter is a near-singular source does not describe the physical system well enough. A time-dependent analysis of the quench process can help us to put forward a more adequate model. We present here our current algorithm to solve the inverse problem and discuss the experimental results.

  8. Dealing with a large installation of SRF cavities: Characterizing limitations and exploiting operational flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Reece; B. Madre; L. Doolittle; J. Delayen

    1999-01-01

    Linacs using a large number of SRF cavities can have an awkwardly large number of degrees of freedom for operational setup. The cost and robustness of operation as a function of operating gradient is a particular characteristic of each cavity system and the intended beamloading. A systematic characterization of these limitations has been developed which yields a valuable guide for development resource allocation. In addition, a software tool has been developed which enables the CEBAF machine operator to conveniently exploit the flexibility that results from the many degrees of freedom in response to changing programmatic needs. The two CEBAF SRF linacs each have about 160 independently-controlled SRF cavities. The software utility (LEM++) establishes the operationally optimum gradient in each cavity in response to the operator providing only three of the following four parameters: linac voltage, anticipated beam current, rf cryoheat load, and net rf trip rate. The utility is now fully operational at CEBAF. The methods employed and particular features useful for operations will be presented. The interactive process that has brought the software to its current form will also be discussed. The analysis scheme used to characterize the limitations of the ensemble of cavities will be presented as well

  9. Gas Generation Testing of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colburn, Heather A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bryan, Samuel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Camaioni, Donald M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, Lenna A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Adami, Susan R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    This report describes gas generation testing of the spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin that was conducted to support the technology maturation of the LAWPS facility. The current safety basis for the LAWPS facility is based primarily on two studies that had limited or inconclusive data sets. The two studies indicated a 40% increase in hydrogen generation rate of water (as predicted by the Hu model) with sRF resin over water alone. However, the previous studies did not test the range of conditions (process fluids and temperatures) that are expected in the LAWPS facility. Additionally, the previous studies did not obtain replicate test results or comparable liquid-only control samples. All of the testing described in this report, conducted with water, 0.45M nitric acid, and waste simulants with and without sRF resin, returned hydrogen generation rates that are within the current safety basis for the facility of 1.4 times the Hu model output for water.

  10. Analysis of the Qualification-Tests Performance of the Superconducting Cavities for the SNS Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Delayen, J R; Ozelis, O

    2004-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerating Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cryomodules for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cold linac. This consists of 11 medium-beta (β=0.61) cyomodules of 3 cavities each, and 12 high-beta (β=0.81) cryomodules of 4 cavities each. Before assembly into cavity strings the cavities undergo individual qualification tests in a vertical cryostat (VTA). In this paper we analyze the performance of the cavities during these qualification tests, and attempt to correlate this performance with cleaning, assembly, and testing procedures. We also compare VTA performance with performance in completed cryomodules.

  11. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  12. Understanding and application of superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Byeong Mu; Lee, Chun Heung

    1997-02-01

    This book deals with superconducting materials, which contains from basic theory to application of superconducting materials. The contents of this book are mystery of superconducting materials, properties of superconducting materials, thermodynamics of superconducting materials, theoretical background of superconducting materials, tunnelling and quantum interference, classification and properties of superconducting materials, high temperature superconducting materials, production and analysis of superconducting materials and application of superconducting materials.

  13. Cryogenic system for VECC K500 superconducting cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, G; Bhattacharyya, T K; Bhandari, R K

    2009-01-01

    VEC Centre, Kolkata in India is at an advanced stage of commissioning a K500 superconducting cyclotron. The superconducting coil of the magnet for cyclotron is cooled by liquid helium. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the Dees of the radiofrequency system, maintain the vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The cryogenic system for magnet for cyclotron has been tested by cooling the coil and energizing the magnet. The cryogenic system for cryopanels has also been tested. Heater and temperature sensor were placed on the liquid helium cold head for cryopanel. The temperature of the cold head was observed to be below 20 K upto a heat load of 11.7 watt.

  14. Operating experience with superconducting cavities at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    The CEBAF recirculating superconducting electron linac at Jefferson Lab is now in full operation supporting nuclear physics experiments in three target halls at up to 4.4 GeV. The 330 SRF cavities, operating at 2.0 K, continue to perform well above design specifications, and have accumulated over 8,000,000 operating cavity hours. The authors have to date no evidence of degradation of cavity performance. The SRF cavities have demonstrated excellent reliability. The one klystron per cavity design provides CEBAF with flexibility and redundancy for normal operations. Several techniques have been developed for establishing optimum operating conditions for the 330 independent systems. Operation of the cavities and control systems at the full design current of 1 mA has recently been achieved. The principal constraints on usable gradient for low current operations are (1) discharge at the cold ceramic rf window induced by electron field emission in cavities, (2) tuner controls, and (3) stability of the waveguide vacuum in the region between the warm and cold windows. Several cryomodules have been improved by application of rf helium processing while installed on the beamline

  15. Transport Characteristics of Mesoscopic Radio-Frequency Single Electron Transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A. H.; Kirah, K.; Aly, N. A. I.; El-Sayes, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    The transport property of a quantum dot under the influence of external time-dependent field is investigated. The mesoscopic device is modelled as semiconductor quantum dot coupled weakly to superconducting leads via asymmetric double tunnel barriers of different heights. An expression for the current is deduced by using the Landauer–Buttiker formula, taking into consideration of both the Coulomb blockade effect and the magnetic field. It is found that the periodic oscillation of the current with the magnetic field is controlled by the ratio of the frequency of the applied ac-field to the electron cyclotron frequency. Our results show that the present device operates as a radio-frequency single electron transistor

  16. Plasma Etching of superconducting radio frequency cavity by Ar/Cl2 capacitively coupled Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Popovic, Svetozar; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie; Phillips, Larry; Vuskovic, Lepsha

    2016-09-01

    We are developing plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the asymmetry was studied by changing the contour of the inner electrode. The optimized contour of the electrode based on these measurements was chosen for SRF cavity processing. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity is used, which previously mechanically polished, buffer chemically etched afterwards and rf tested at cryogenic temperatures for a baseline test. Plasma processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish segmented plasma processing. The cavity is rf tested afterwards at cryogenic temperatures. The rf test and surface condition results are presented.

  17. Thermal design studies in superconducting rf cavities: Phonon peak and Kapitza conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aizaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design studies of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities involve two thermal parameters, namely the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Nb at low temperatures and the heat transfer coefficient at the Nb-He II interface, commonly known as the Kapitza conductance. During the fabrication process of the SRF cavities, Nb sheet is plastically deformed through a deep drawing process to obtain the desired shape. The effect of plastic deformation on low temperature thermal conductivity as well as Kapitza conductance has been studied experimentally. Strain induced during the plastic deformation process reduces the thermal conductivity in its phonon transmission regime (disappearance of phonon peak by 80%, which may explain the performance limitations of the defect-free SRF cavities during their high field operations. Low temperature annealing of the deformed Nb sample could not recover the phonon peak. However, moderate temperature annealing during the titanification process recovered the phonon peak in the thermal conductivity curve. Kapitza conductance measurements for the Nb-He II interface for various surface topologies have also been carried out before and after the annealing. These measurements reveal consistently increased Kapitza conductance after the annealing process was carried out in the two temperature regimes.

  18. ac superconducting articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    A noval ac superconducting cable is described. It consists of a composite structure having a superconducting surface along with a high thermally conductive material wherein the superconducting surface has the desired physical properties, geometrical shape and surface finish produced by the steps of depositing a superconducting layer upon a substrate having a predetermined surface finish and shape which conforms to that of the desired superconducting article, depositing a supporting layer of material on the superconducting layer and removing the substrate, the surface of the superconductor being a replica of the substrate surface

  19. Analytical and semi-analytical formalism for the voltage and the current sources of a superconducting cavity under dynamic detuning

    CERN Document Server

    Doleans, M

    2003-01-01

    Elliptical superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are sensitive to frequency detuning because they have a high Q value in comparison with normal conducting cavities and weak mechanical properties. Radiation pressure on the cavity walls, microphonics, and tuning system are possible sources of dynamic detuning during SRF cavity-pulsed operation. A general analytic relation between the cavity voltage, the dynamic detuning function, and the RF control function is developed. This expression for the voltage envelope in a cavity under dynamic detuning and dynamic RF controls is analytically expressed through an integral formulation. A semi-analytical scheme is derived to calculate the voltage behavior in any practical case. Examples of voltage envelope behavior for different cases of dynamic detuning and RF control functions are shown. The RF control function for a cavity under dynamic detuning is also investigated and as an application various filling schemes are presented.

  20. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation of Hepatic Cysts : Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ye Ri; Kim, Pyo Nyun

    2005-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation has been frequently performed on intra-hepatic solid tumor, namely, hepatocellular carcinoma, metastatic tumor and cholangio carcinoma, for take the cure. But, the reports of radiofrequency ablation for intrahepatic simple cysts are few. In vitro experiment of animal and in vivo treatment for intrahepatic cysts of human had been reported in rare cases. We report 4 cases of radiofrequency ablation for symptomatic intrahepatic cysts

  2. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieter, Chet

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  3. Superconducting current in a bisoliton superconductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, V.N.; Kruchinin, S.P.; Ponezha, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the transition into a superconducting state with the current which is described by a bisoliton superconductivity model is accompanied by the deformation of the spectrum of one-particle states of the current carriers. The deformation value is proportional to the conducting current force. The residuaby resistance in such state is absent

  4. Comparison of coal/solid recovered fuel (SRF) with coal/refuse derived fuel (RDF) in a fluidised bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagland, S.T.; Kilgallon, P.; Coveney, R.; Garg, A.; Smith, R.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T.; Simms, N.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to compare the differences between municipal solid waste (MSW) derived solid recovered fuel (SRF) (complying with CEN standards) and refuse derived fuel (RDF). Both fuels were co-combusted with coal in a 50 kW fluidised bed combustor and the metal emissions were compared. Synthetic SRF was prepared in the laboratory by grinding major constituents of MSW such as paper, plastic, textile and wood. RDF was obtained from a local mechanical treatment plant. Heavy metal emissions in flue gas and ash samples from the (coal + 10% SRF) fuel mixture were found to be within the acceptable range and were generally lower than that obtained for coal + 10% RDF fuel mixture. The relative distribution of heavy metals in ash components and the flue gas stream shows the presence of a large fraction (up to 98%) of most of the metals in the ash (except Hg and As). Thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis of SRF constituents was performed to understand the behaviour of fuel mixtures in the absence and presence of air. The results obtained from the experimental study will enhance the confidence of fuel users towards using MSW-derived SRF as an alternative fuel.

  5. Spectroscopic properties of Er3+ and Yb3+ co-doped glass ceramics containing SrF2 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Xvsheng; Fan Xianping; Wang Minquan; Zhang Xianghua

    2009-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of Er 3+ /Yb 3+ co-doped 50SiO 2 -10Al 2 O 3 -20ZnF 2 -20SrF 2 glass and glass ceramic containing SrF 2 nanocrystals were investigated. The formation of SrF 2 nanocrystals in the glass ceramic was confirmed by XRD. The oscillator strengths for several transitions of the Er 3+ ions in the glass ceramic have been obtained and the Judd-Ofelt parameters were then determined. The XRD result and Judd-Ofelt parameters suggested that Er 3+ and Yb 3+ ions had efficiently enriched in the SrF 2 nanocrystals in the glass ceramic. The lifetime of excited states has been used to reveal the surroundings of luminescent Er 3+ and Yb 3+ and energy transfer (ET) mechanism between Er 3+ and Yb 3+ . Much stronger upconversion luminescence and longer lifetime of the Er 3+ /Yb 3+ co-doped glass ceramic were observed in comparison with the Er 3+ /Yb 3+ co-doped glass, which could be ascribed to more efficient ET from Yb 3+ to Er 3+ due to the enrichment of Yb 3+ and Er 3+ and the shortening of the distance between lanthanide ions in the precipitated SrF 2 nanocrystals.

  6. Estimation of the electrical power needed for LHC magnets and radiofrequency at 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Thiesen, H; Burnet, J P

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the electrical power needed from the grid for the power converters feeding the magnets (superconducting, warm and experiments) and the radiofrequency of the LHC. At 4 TeV, the active power required for the magnets is 17.6MW and the estimation is 25.5MW at 7 TeV. The active power needed for the radiofrequency depends on the beam intensity and on the bunch spacing. It will grow from 7MW to 10MW with 25ns bunch spacing operation. This does not include the power needed for the cryogenic and magnet auxiliary systems. This paper gives also the instantaneous profile of the power needed from the grid during the ramp and the reactive power which needs to be compensated by the static VAR compensators.

  7. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  8. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  9. Buffer Chemical Polishing and RF Testing of the 56 MHz SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill,A.

    2009-01-01

    The 56 MHz cavity presents a unique challenge in preparing it for RF testing prior to construction of the cryomodule. This challenge arises due to the physical dimensions and subsequent weight of the cavity, and is further complicated by the coaxial geometry, and the need to properly chemically etch and high pressure rinse the entire inner surface prior to RF testing. To the best of my knowledge, this is the largest all niobium SRF cavity to be chemically etched and subsequently tested in a vertical dewar at 4K, and these processes will be the topic of this technical note.

  10. Design and commissioning of Fermilab's vertical test stand for ILC SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Carcagno, Ruben; Ginsburg, Camille M.; Huang, Yuenian; Norris, Barry; Peterson, Thomas; Poloubotko, Valeri; Rabehl, roger; Rakhno, Igor; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    As part of its ILC program, Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities. It operates at a nominal temperature of 2K, using a cryoplant that can supply LHe in excess of 20g/sec and provide bath pumping capacity of 125W at 2K. The below-grade cryostat consists of a vacuum vessel and LHe vessel, equipped with magnetic shielding to reduce the ambient magnetic field to <10mG. Internal fixed and external movable radiation shielding ensures that exposure to personnel is minimized. The facility features an integrated personnel safety system consisting of RF switches, interlocks, and area radiation monitors.

  11. Design and commissioning of Fermilab's vertical test stand for ILC SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Carcagno, Ruben; Ginsburg, Camille M.; Huang, Yuenian; Norris, Barry; Peterson, Thomas; Poloubotko, Valeri; Rabehl, roger; Rakhno, Igor; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-01-01

    As part of its ILC program, Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities. It operates at a nominal temperature of 2K, using a cryoplant that can supply LHe in excess of 20g/sec and provide bath pumping capacity of 125W at 2K. The below-grade cryostat consists of a vacuum vessel and LHe vessel, equipped with magnetic shielding to reduce the ambient magnetic field to <10mG. Internal fixed and external movable radiation shielding ensures that exposure to personnel is minimized. The facility features an integrated personnel safety system consisting of RF switches, interlocks, and area radiation monitors

  12. Laser excited fluorescence spectrum of Ho3+:SrF2 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Bansi; Ramachandra Rao, D.

    1980-01-01

    The fluorescence spectrum of Ho 3+ : SrF 2 single crystal excited by the various lines of an Ar + laser, is reported. The three fluorescence groups recorded in the region 5300-7700 A, correspond to the transitions from ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 8 , 5 F 5 to 5 I 8 , 5 F 3 to 5 I 7 and ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 7 . Marked changes in the total integrated intensity of the various fluorescence groups with the change in the exciting wavelength are observed. (author)

  13. Improved Magnetron Stability and Reduced Noise in Efficient Transmitters for Superconducting Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Lebedev, V. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2018-04-01

    State of the art high-current superconducting accelerators require efficient RF sources with a fast dynamic phase and power control. This allows for compensation of the phase and amplitude deviations of the accelerating voltage in the Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities caused by microphonics, etc. Efficient magnetron transmitters with fast phase and power control are attractive RF sources for this application. They are more cost effective than traditional RF sources such as klystrons, IOTs and solid-state amplifiers used with large scale accelerator projects. However, unlike traditional RF sources, controlled magnetrons operate as forced oscillators. Study of the impact of the controlling signal on magnetron stability, noise and efficiency is therefore important. This paper discusses experiments with 2.45 GHz, 1 kW tubes and verifies our analytical model which is based on the charge drift approximation.

  14. Latest Development in Superconducting RF Structures for beta=1 Particle Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter Kneisel

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting RF technology is since nearly a decade routinely applied to different kinds of accelerating devices: linear accelerators, storage rings, synchrotron light sources and FEL's. With the technology recommendation for the International Linear Collider (ILC) a year ago, new emphasis has been placed on improving the performance of accelerating cavities both in Q-value and in accelerating gradients with the goal to achieve performance levels close to the fundamental limits given by the material parameters of the choice material, niobium. This paper will summarize the challenges to SRF technology and will review the latest developments in superconducting structure design. Additionally, it will give an overview of the newest results and will report on the developments in alternative materials and technologies

  15. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Hyperkalaemia after radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoevena, BH; Haagsma, EB; Appeltans, BMG; Slooff, MJH; de Jong, KP

    Radiofrequency ablation of liver tumours is a useful therapy for otherwise unresectable tumours. The complication rate is said to be low. In this case report we describe hyperkalaemia after radiofrequency ablation of a hepatocellular carcinoma in a patient with end-stage renal insufficiency. (C)

  17. Predicting nurses' acceptance of radiofrequency identification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norten, Adam

    2012-10-01

    The technology of radiofrequency identification allows for the scanning of radiofrequency identification-tagged objects and individuals without line-of-sight requirements. Healthcare organizations use radiofrequency identification to ensure the health and safety of patients and medical personnel and to uncover inefficiencies. Although the successful implementation of a system incorporating radiofrequency identification technologies requires acceptance and use of the technology, some nurses using radiofrequency identification in hospitals feel like "Big Brother" is watching them. This predictive study used a theoretical model assessing the effect of five independent variables: privacy concerns, attitudes, subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy, on a dependent variable, nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification. A Web-based questionnaire containing previously validated questions was answered by 106 US RNs. Multiple linear regression showed that all constructs together accounted for 60% of the variance in nurses' intention to use radiofrequency identification. Of the predictors in the model, attitudes provided the largest unique contribution when the other predictors in the model were held constant; subjective norms also provided a unique contribution. Privacy concerns, controllability, and self-efficacy did not provide a significant contribution to nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification.

  18. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vostrikov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS-II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 · 10 10 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS-II.

  19. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, Alexander [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS–II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 ∙ 1010 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS–II.

  20. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Leibfritz, J.R.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Nobrega, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  1. The Influence of Grain Boundaries on the Properties of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Zu Hawn

    Grain boundaries (GBs) in niobium are multiply connected defects that may be responsible for significant performance degradation in superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. Magneto optical (MO) studies show that early flux penetration often occurs at GBs. One possible mechanism is that a locally reduced superconducting gap (Delta) at the GB reduces the depairing current density (Jb) and thus leads to a local reduction of the critical field. Alternatively vortices may penetrate the GB preferentially because of field enhancement at a GB groove, or for other reasons. In all these cases, the effect of high RF fields is to produce additional power dissipation, which in turn produces a reduction in quality factor (Q 0) and leads to a premature quench of the cavity. To further our understanding of the superconducting properties of SRF-quality Nb, we made extensive superconducting characterizations by magneto-optical imaging, which allowed assessment of the uniformity of properties on scales down to about 5 microm and by direct transport voltage-current methods in single and bi-crystals treated by standard cavity optimization treatments of BCP (buffered chemical treatment) and EP (electropolishing). We correlated these superconducting characterizations to microstructural properties using scanning laser and scanning electron microscopy and then thinned some samples to examine them at the nanometer scale using analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also developed special metallographic sample preparation techniques that allowed us to apply these experimental approaches to very soft superconducting RF niobium in the polished conditions characteristics of a real inner cavity surface. Using MO imaging, we found that GBs can preferentially admit flux penetration when the plane of a GB is aligned parallel to the vector of the external magnetic field. In DC transport in the superconducting state, we found preferential flux flow at the GB and could detect the

  2. The LEP2 superconducting RF system

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, A; Brunner, O; Ciapala, Edmond; Frischholz, Hans; Geschonke, Günther; Peschardt, E; Sladen, J

    2008-01-01

    The upgrade of LEP2 energy to beyond the W boson production threshold required the progressive installation of a completely new radio-frequency (RF) accelerating system. The new system used superconducting (SC) cavities, which complemented and partially replaced the original LEP1 RF system based on conventional copper cavity technology. The final system consisted of 56 copper and 288 SC cavities and provided a peak acceleration of more than 3600 MV/turn. This paper describes the main elements of the SC system and reviews the 5 years of LEP2 operation at gradients well beyond the design specification. Also presented are some of the main performance limitations and problems encountered together with the various solutions and procedures found to eliminate them or reduce their effects.

  3. The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.M.

    1990-09-01

    The preliminary design of the 600 MeV H - linac for the Superconducting Super Collider injector is described. The linac must provide a 25 mA beam during 7--35 μs macropulses at Hz within injection bursts. Normalized transverse emittances of less than 0.5 π mm-mrad (rms) are required for injection into the Low Energy Booster synchrotron. Cost, ease of commissioning, and operational reliability are important considerations. The linac will consists of an H - source with electrostatic LEBT, 2.5 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator, a 70 MeV drift-tube linac, and 530 MeV and the side-coupled linac operates at 1284 MHz. A modest total length of 150 m results from the tradeoff between cost optimization and reliability. The expected performance from beam dynamics simulations and the status of the project are described. 11 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  4. Development efforts on helium vessel for 5 cell - 650 MHz SRF cavity at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Abhay; Kumar, Pankaj; Sandha, R.S.; Dutta, Subhajit; Soni, Rakesh; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Thakurta, A.C.; Bhatnagar, V.K.; Mundra, G.

    2011-01-01

    The work focuses on the development of helium vessel which houses a 5 cell - 650 MHz SRF niobium cavity and serves as a helium bath to maintain the cavity at 2 K. The vessel has provision for changing the axial length of the cavity for tuning purpose by using a tuning mechanism and a large bellow. Titanium has been chosen as a material of construction of the vessel due to its coefficient of thermal expansion being close to that of niobium. Efforts have been initiated to understand the functional requirements, design requirements, acceptance criteria for design and analysis, non-destructive examination requirements, inspection and testing requirements, manufacturing technology of the titanium vessel and its integration with the SRF cavity. The welding assumes a special significance as titanium is highly reactive and ductility of the weld joint is lost in the presence of air and other impurities. A trial vessel has been conceptualised having typical sizes and geometries. The manufacturing features of vessel are based on ASME B and PV Code, Section VIII Division-1 and manufacturing of this vessel has been started at an Indian industry. Quality assurance plan for this work is developed. The paper describes the work done at RRCAT on the functional and integration requirements, overall design requirements, design methodology to achieve code conformance, manufacturing technology and QAP being used in the development of helium vessel. (author)

  5. Oncogenic N-Ras Stimulates SRF-Mediated Transactivation via H3 Acetylation at Lysine 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ju Yi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction pathways regulate the gene expression by altering chromatin dynamics in response to mitogens. Ras proteins are key regulators linking extracellular stimuli to a diverse range of biological responses associated with gene regulation. In mammals, the three ras genes encode four Ras protein isoforms: H-Ras, K-Ras4A, K-Ras4B, and N-Ras. Although emerging evidence suggests that Ras isoforms differentially regulate gene expressions and are functionally nonredundant, the mechanisms underlying Ras specificity and Ras signaling effects on gene expression remain unclear. Here, we show that oncogenic N-Ras acts as the most potent regulator of SRF-, NF-κB-, and AP-1-dependent transcription. N-Ras-RGL2 axis is a distinct signaling pathway for SRF target gene expression such as Egr1 and JunB, as RGL2 Ras binding domain (RBD significantly impaired oncogenic N-Ras-induced SRE activation. By monitoring the effect of Ras isoforms upon the change of global histone modifications in oncogenic Ras-overexpressed cells, we discovered that oncogenic N-Ras elevates H3K9ac/H3K23ac levels globally in the chromatin context. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed that H3K9ac is significantly enriched at the promoter and coding regions of Egr1 and JunB. Collectively, our findings define an undocumented role of N-Ras in modulating of H3 acetylation and in gene regulation.

  6. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2... MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency device defined. As used in this part, a radiofrequency device is any device which in its operation is capable of...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion probe. 882.4725 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4725 Radiofrequency lesion probe. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF...

  8. Laser activated superconducting switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    A superconducting switch or bistable device is described consisting of a superconductor in a cryogen maintaining a temperature just below the transition temperature, having a window of the proper optical frequency band for passing a laser beam which may impinge on the superconductor when desired. The frequency of the laser is equal to or greater than the optical absorption frequency of the superconducting material and is consistent with the ratio of the gap energy of the switch material to Planck's constant, to cause depairing of electrons, and thereby normalize the superconductor. Some embodiments comprise first and second superconducting metals. Other embodiments feature the two superconducting metals separated by a thin film insulator through which the superconducting electrons tunnel during superconductivity

  9. Free-electron lasers considered for CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Spinoff development of industrial free-electron lasers is in prospect for an industry-universitylaboratory consortium centred at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, site of the CEBAF 4 GeV superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator, now being commissioned (see page 42). Together with several US corporations and universities, the Laboratory is now also addressing the potential of smaller SRF electron accelerators for ''driving'' free-electron lasers (FELs)

  10. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  11. A large superconducting accelerator project. International linear collider (ILC). Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The international linear collider (ILC) is proposed as the next-energy-frontier particle accelerator anticipated to be realized through global cooperation. The ILC accelerator is composed of a pair of electron and positron linear accelerators to realize head-on collision with a center-of-mass energy of 500 (250+250) GeV. It is based on superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) technology, and the R and D and technical design have progressed in the technical design phase since 2007, and the technical design report (TDR) reached completion in 2012. This report reviews the ILC general design and technology. (author)

  12. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  13. Superconductivity and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Roque, António; Sousa, Duarte M.; Fernão Pires, Vítor; Margato, Elmano

    2017-01-01

    Trabalho apresentado em International Conference on Renewable Energies and Power Quality (ICREPQ’17), 4 a 6 de Abril de 2017, Málaga, Espanha The research in the field of superconductivity has led to the synthesis of superconducting materials with features that allow you to expand the applicability of this kind of materials. Among the superconducting materials characteristics, the critical temperature of the superconductor is framing the range and type of industrial applications that can b...

  14. Superconducting machines. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    A brief account is given of the principles of superconductivity and superconductors. The properties of Nb-Ti superconductors and the method of flux stabilization are described. The basic features of superconducting d.c. machines are illustrated by the use of these machines for ship propulsion, steel-mill drives, industrial drives, aluminium production, and other d.c. power supplies. Superconducting a.c. generators and their design parameters are discussed. (U.K.)

  15. Superconductivity in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Lawson, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The trends in the occurrence of superconductivity in actinide materials are discussed. Most of them seem to show simple transition metal behavior. However, the superconductivity of americium proves that the f electrons are localized in that element and that ''actinides'' is the correct name for this row of elements. Recently the superconductivity of UBe 13 and UPt 3 has been shown to be extremely unusual, and these compounds fall in the new class of compounds now known as heavy fermion materials

  16. Cryogenic testing of the 2.1 GHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terrence L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results from cryogenic tests of the multi-cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving high average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery-linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam break-up instability, caused by parasitic higher order modes (HOMs) interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The multi-cell cavity was designed and fabricated of niobium. Two cryogenic (vertical) tests were conducted. The high unloaded Q-factor was demonstrated at a temperature of 4.2 K at accelerating gradients up to 3 MV/m. The measured value of the unloaded Q-factor was 1.55 × 108, in agreement with prediction.

  17. Superconductivity in power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings volume presents 24 conference papers and 15 posters dealing with the following aspects: 1) Principles and elementary aspects of high-temperature superconductivity (3 plenary lectures); 2) Preparation, properties and materials requirements of metallic or oxide superconductors (critical current behaviour, soldered joints, structural studies); 3) Magnet technology (large magnets for thermonuclear fusion devices; magnets for particle accelerators and medical devices); 4) Magnetic levitation and superconductivity; 5) Cryogenics; 6) Energy storage systems using superconducting coils (SMES); 7) Superconducting power transmission cables, switches, transformers, and generator systems for power plant; 8) Supporting activities, industrial aspects, patents. There are thirty-eight records in the ENERGY database relating to individual conference papers. (MM) [de

  18. Superconductivity and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadoni, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper, after a short introduction to superconductivity and to multifilamentary superconducting composites is aiming to review the state of the art and the future perspective of some of the applications of the superconducting materials. The main interest is focussed to large scale applications like, for istance, magnets for accelerators or fusion reactors, superconducting system for NMR thomography, etc. A short paragraph is dedicated to applications for high sensitivity instrumentation. The paper is then concluded by some considerations about the potentialities of the newly discovered high critical temperature materials

  19. Superconducting quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, V.

    1989-01-01

    This book reviews recent accomplishments, presents new results and discusses possible future developments of superconducting quantum electronics and high T c superconductivity. The three main parts of the book deal with fundamentals, sensitive detectors, and precision metrology. New results reported include: correct equivalent circuits modelling superconducting electronic devices; exact solution of the Mattis-Bardeen equations describing various experiments for thin films; complete theoretical description and experimental results for a new broad band spectrum analyzer; a new Josephson junction potentiometer allowing tracing of unknown voltage ratios back to well-known frequency ratios; and fast superconducting SQUID shift registers enabling the production of calculable noise power spectra in the microwave region

  20. Superconducting linear accelerator cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Elkonin, B.V.; Sokolowski, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A large vertical cryostat for a superconducting linear accelerator using quarter wave resonators has been developed. The essential technical details, operational experience and performance are described. (author)

  1. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  2. The Role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in Activity-Dependent Neuronal Plasticity in the Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulimood, Nisha S; Rodrigues, Wandilson Dos Santos; Atkinson, Devon A; Mooney, Sandra M; Medina, Alexandre E

    2017-07-12

    The transcription factors CREB (cAMP response element binding factor), SRF (serum response factor), and MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2) play critical roles in the mechanisms underlying neuronal plasticity. However, the role of the activation of these transcription factors in the different components of plasticity in vivo is not well known. In this study, we tested the role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in ocular dominance plasticity (ODP), a paradigm of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity in the visual cortex. These three proteins bind to the synaptic activity response element (SARE), an enhancer sequence found upstream of many plasticity-related genes (Kawashima et al., 2009; Rodríguez-Tornos et al., 2013), and can act cooperatively to express Arc , a gene required for ODP (McCurry et al., 2010). We used viral-mediated gene transfer to block the transcription function of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in the visual cortex, and measured visually evoked potentials in awake male and female mice before and after a 7 d monocular deprivation, which allowed us to examine both the depression component (Dc-ODP) and potentiation component (Pc-ODP) of plasticity independently. We found that CREB, SRF, and MEF2 are all required for ODP, but have differential effects on Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP. CREB is necessary for both Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP, whereas SRF and MEF2 are only needed for Dc-ODP. This finding supports previous reports implicating SRF and MEF2 in long-term depression (required for Dc-ODP), and CREB in long-term potentiation (required for Pc-ODP). SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is the cellular basis for learning and memory, and it is crucial for the refinement of neuronal circuits during development. Identifying the mechanisms of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is crucial to finding therapeutic interventions in the myriad of disorders where it is disrupted, such as Fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, epilepsy, major depressive disorder, and autism

  3. CAS CERN Accelerator School superconductivity in particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of the CERN Accelerator School is to run courses on specialised topics in the particle accelerator field. The present volume contains the proceedings of one such course, this time organized in conjunction with the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) on the subject of superconductivity in particle accelerators. This course reflects the very considerable progress made over the last few years in the use of the technology for the magnet and radio-frequency systems of many large and small accelerators already in use or nearing completion, while also taking account of the development work now going on for future machines. The lectures cover the theory of superconductivity, cryogenics and accelerator magnets and cavities, while the seminars include superfluidity, superconductors, special magnets and the prospects for high-temperature superconductors. (orig.)

  4. Characterization of Superconducting Cavities for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, Martina

    2013-01-01

    In this report the radiofrequency measurements done for the superconducting cavities developed at CERN for the HIE-ISOLDE project are analyzed. The purpose of this project is improve the energy of the REX-ISOLDE facility by means of a superconducting LINAC. In this way it will be possible to reach higher accelerating gradients, and so higher particle energies (up to 10MeV/u). At this purpose the Niobium thin film technology was preferred to the Niobium bulk technology because of the technical advantages like the higher thermal conductivity of Copper and the higher stiffness of the cavities which are less sentitive to mechanical vibrations. The Niobium coating is being optimized on test prototypes which are qualified by RF measurements at cold.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging: project planning and management of a superconductive M.R.I. installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condon, P.M.; Robertson, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    The planning and installation of a Superconductive Magnetic Resonance Imaging installation at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia is described. Tender specification, assessment of offers via criteria weighted analysis of technical and economic factors and the final recommendation for a 1.0 Tesla unit are discussed. Building and installation considerations are noted including fringe field effects, magnetic shielding, radiofrequency shielding, cryogens, metallic screening and specific considerations in the Magnet room. 9 refs., 7 figs

  6. [Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter; Bale, Reto

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is well established in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Due to its curative potential, it is the method of choice for non resectable BCLC (Barcelona Liver Clinic) 0 and A. RFA challenges surgical resection for small HCC and is the method of choice in bridging for transplantation and recurrence after resection or transplantation. The technical feasibility of RFA depends on the size and location of the HCC and the availability of ablation techniques (one needle techniques, multi-needle techniques). More recently, stereotactic multi-needle techniques with 3D trajectory planning and guided needle placement substantially improve the spectrum of treatable lesions including large volume tumors. Treatment success depends on the realization of ablations with large intentional margins of tumor free tissue (A0 ablation in analogy to R0 resection), which has to be documented by fusion of post- with pre-ablation images, and confirmed during follow-up imaging.

  7. Radiation effects on superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of radiation on the superconducting transition temperature (T/sub c/), upper critical field (H/sub c2/), and volume-pinning-force density (F/sub p/) were discussed for the three kinds of superconducting material (elements, alloys, and compounds). 11 figures, 3 tables, 86 references

  8. Superconducting elliptical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J K

    2011-01-01

    We give a brief overview of the history, state of the art, and future for elliptical superconducting cavities. Principles of the cell shape optimization, criteria for multi-cell structures design, HOM damping schemes and other features are discussed along with examples of superconducting structures for various applications.

  9. Superconductivity in technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, P.

    1976-01-01

    Physics, especially high energy physics and solid state physics was the first area in which superconducting magnets were used but in the long run, the most extensive application of superconductivity will probably be in energy technology. Superconducting power transmission cables, magnets for energy conversion in superconducting electrical machines, MHD-generators and fusion reactors and magnets for energy storage are being investigated. Magnets for fusion reactors will have particularly large physical dimensions, which means that much development effort is still needed, for there is no economic alternative. Superconducting surfaces in radio frequency cavities can give Q-values up to a factor of 10 6 higher than those of conventional resonators. Particle accelerators are the important application. And for telecommunication, simple coaxial superconducting radio frequency cables seem promising. The tunnel effect in superconducting junctions is now being developed commercially for sensitive magnetometers and may soon possibly feature in the memory cells of computer devices. Hence superconductivity can play an important role in the technological world, solving physical and technological problems and showing economic advantages as compared with possible conventional techniques, bearing also in mind the importance of reliability and safety. (author)

  10. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  11. Superconducting rotating machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L. Jr.; Kirtley, J.L. Jr.; Thullen, P.

    1975-01-01

    The opportunities and limitations of the applications of superconductors in rotating electric machines are given. The relevant properties of superconductors and the fundamental requirements for rotating electric machines are discussed. The current state-of-the-art of superconducting machines is reviewed. Key problems, future developments and the long range potential of superconducting machines are assessed

  12. Superconductivity in bad metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ''bad metals'' with such a poor conductivity that the usual mean-field theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Some consequences for high temperature superconductors are described

  13. Submicron superconducting structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovashkin, A.I.; Lykov, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of works concerning superconducting structures of submicron dimensions and a system of such structures is given. It is noted that usage of the above structures in superconducting microelectronics permits, first, to increase the element packing density, to decrease the signal transmission time, capacity, power dissipated in high-frequency applications. Secondly, negligible coherence length in transition metals, their alloys and high-temperature compounds also restrict the dimensions of superconducting weak couplings when the 'classical' Josephson effect is displayed. The most effective methods for production of submicron superconducting structures are the following: lithography, double scribering. Recently the systems of superconducting submicron elements are extensively studied. It is shown that such systems can be phased by magnetic field

  14. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    , the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10......We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However...

  15. Superconducting Wind Turbine Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunying Pan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is well known as a renewable energy because its clean and less polluted characteristic, which is the foundation of development modern wind electricity. To find more efficient wind turbine is the focus of scientists around the world. Compared from conventional wind turbines, superconducting wind turbine generators have advantages at zero resistance, smaller size and lighter weight. Superconducting wind turbine will inevitably become the main trends in this area. This paper intends to introduce the basic concept and principle of superconductivity, and compare form traditional wind turbine to obtain superiority, then to summary three proposed machine concept.While superconductivity have difficulty  in modern technology and we also have proposed some challenges in achieving superconducting wind turbine finally.

  16. X-ray imaging of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Susan Elizabeth

    The goal of this research was to develop an improved diagnostic technique to identify the location of defects that limit superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity performance during cavity testing or in existing accelerators. SRF cavities are primarily constructed of niobium. Electrons within the metal of a cavity under high electric field gradient have a probability of tunneling through the potential barrier. i e. leave the surface or are field emitted in regions where defects are encountered. Field emitted electrons are accelerated in the electric fields within the cavity. The electrons can have complicated trajectories and strike the cavity walls thus producing x-rays via Coulomb interactions and/or bremsstrahlung radiation. The endpoint energy of an x-ray spectrum predicts the electron maximum final kinetic energy within the cavity. Field emission simulations can then predict the source of the field-emitted electrons and the defect(s). In a multicell cavity the cells are coupled together and act as a set of coupled oscillators. There are multiple passbands of excitation for a multicell structure operating in a particular mode. For different passbands of operation the direction and amplitude of the fields within a cavity change from that of the normal accelerating mode. Field emitted electrons have different trajectories depending on the mode and thus produce x-rays in different locations. Using a collimated sodium iodide detector and subjecting a cavity to multiple passband modes at high electric field gradient the source of a cavity's x-rays can be determined. Knowing the location of the x-rays and the maximum electron kinetic energy; field emission simulations for different passband modes can be used to determine and verify the source of the field emitted electrons from mode to mode. Once identified, the defect(s) can be repaired or modifications made to the manufacturing process.

  17. Superconductivity and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, P.W.; Valdre, U.

    1977-01-01

    In this review article, two aspects of the role of superconductivity in electron microscopy are examined: (i) the development of superconducting devices (mainly lenses) and their incorporation in electron microscopes; (ii) the development of electron microscope techniques for studying fundamental and technological problems associated with superconductivity. The first part opens with a brief account of the relevant properties of conventional lenses, after which the various types of superconducting lenses are described and their properties compared. The relative merits and inconveniences of superconducting and conventional lenses are examined, particular attention being paid to the spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients at accelerating voltages above a megavolt. This part closes with a survey of the various microscope designs that have been built or proposed, incorporating superconducting components. In the second part, some methods that have been or might be used in the study of superconductivity in the electron microscope are described. A brief account of the types of application for which they are suitable is given. (author)

  18. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001) surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, D. B.; Roach, W. M.; Clavero, C.; Reece, C. E.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ˜50MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2162264] was proposed to overcome this limit that involves coating superconducting layers separated by insulating ones onto the inner walls of the cavities. Thus, we have undertaken a systematic effort to understand the dynamic evolution of the Nb surface under specific deposition thin film conditions onto an insulating surface in order to explore the feasibility of the proposed model. We examine and compare the morphology from two distinct Nb/MgO series, each with its own epitaxial registry, at very low growth rates and closely examine the dynamical scaling of the surface features during growth. Further, we apply analysis techniques such as power spectral density to the specific problem of thin film growth and roughness evolution to qualify the set of deposition conditions that lead to successful SRF coatings.

  19. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001 surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Beringer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ∼50  MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2162264] was proposed to overcome this limit that involves coating superconducting layers separated by insulating ones onto the inner walls of the cavities. Thus, we have undertaken a systematic effort to understand the dynamic evolution of the Nb surface under specific deposition thin film conditions onto an insulating surface in order to explore the feasibility of the proposed model. We examine and compare the morphology from two distinct Nb/MgO series, each with its own epitaxial registry, at very low growth rates and closely examine the dynamical scaling of the surface features during growth. Further, we apply analysis techniques such as power spectral density to the specific problem of thin film growth and roughness evolution to qualify the set of deposition conditions that lead to successful SRF coatings.

  20. Roughness analysis applied to niobium thin films grown on MgO(001) surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beringer, D. B. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Roach, W. M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Clavero, C. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Reece, C. E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Lukaszew, R. A. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    2013-02-05

    This paper describes surface studies to address roughness issues inherent to thin film coatings deposited onto superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. This is particularly relevant for multilayered thin film coatings that are being considered as a possible scheme to overcome technical issues and to surpass the fundamental limit of ~500 MV/m accelerating gradient achievable with bulk niobium. In 2006, a model by Gurevich [ Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 012511 (2006)] was proposed to overcome this limit that involves coating superconducting layers separated by insulating ones onto the inner walls of the cavities. Thus, we have undertaken a systematic effort to understand the dynamic evolution of the Nb surface under specific deposition thin film conditions onto an insulating surface in order to explore the feasibility of the proposed model. We examine and compare the morphology from two distinct Nb/MgO series, each with its own epitaxial registry, at very low growth rates and closely examine the dynamical scaling of the surface features during growth. Further, we apply analysis techniques such as power spectral density to the specific problem of thin film growth and roughness evolution to qualify the set of deposition conditions that lead to successful SRF coatings.

  1. Superconducting materials and magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Superconducting Materials and Magnets was convened by the IAEA and held by invitation of the Japanese government on September 4-6, 1989 in Tokyo. The meeting was hosted by the National Research Institute for Metals. Topics of the conference related to superconducting magnets and technology with particular application to fusion and the superconducting supercollider. Technology using both high and low-temperature superconductors was discussed. This document is a compendium of the papers presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. 'Speedy' superconducting circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holst, T.

    1994-01-01

    The most promising concept for realizing ultra-fast superconducting digital circuits is the Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) logic. The basic physical principle behind RSFQ logic, which include the storage and transfer of individual magnetic flux quanta in Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), is explained. A Set-Reset flip-flop is used as an example of the implementation of an RSFQ based circuit. Finally, the outlook for high-temperature superconducting materials in connection with RSFQ circuits is discussed in some details. (au)

  3. ESCAR superconducting magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, W.S.; Meuser, R.B.; Pope, W.L.; Green, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-four superconducting dipoles, each about 1 meter long, provide the guide field for the Experimental Superconducting Accelerator Ring proton accelerator--storage ring. Injection of 50 MeV protons corresponds to a 3 kG central dipole field, and a peak proton energy of 4.2 GeV corresponds to a 46 kG central field. Thirty-two quadrupoles provide focusing. The 56 superconducting magnets are contained in 40 cryostats that are cryogenically connected in a novel series ''weir'' arrangement. A single 1500 W refrigeration plant is required. Design and testing of the magnet and cryostat system are described. (U.S.)

  4. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  5. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ''bad metals'', with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described

  6. Superconducting active impedance converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures

  7. Introduction to superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Darriulat, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The lecture series will address physicists, such as particle and nuclear physicists, familiar with non-relativistic quantum mechanics but not with solid state physics. The aim of this introduction to low temperature superconductivity is to give sufficient bases to the student for him/her to be able to access the scientific literature on this field. The five lectures will cover the following topics : 1. Normal metals, free electron gas, chambers equation. 2. Cooper pairs, the BCS ground state, quasi particle excitations. 3. DC superconductivity, Meissner state, dirty superconductors.4. Self consistent approach, Ginsburg Landau equations, Abrikosov fluxon lattice. 5. Josephson effects, high temperature superconductivity.

  8. New resonant circuits for the ISOLTRAP radiofrequency quadrupole trap

    CERN Document Server

    SENECAL, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This report describes my work during my Summer Student Program. My main project was building and testing a resonance-circuit box for a radio-frequency power supply used with the radio-frequency cooler and buncher.

  9. Radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: l.crocetti@med.unipi.i [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy); Lencioni, Riccardo [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumor ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of solid tumors. Among these methods, radiofrequency (RF) ablation is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RF ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options and is considered as a viable alternate to surgery for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer. Recently, RF ablation has been demonstrated to be a safe and valuable treatment option for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable lung malignancies. Resection should remain the standard therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but RF ablation may be better than conventional external-beam radiation for the treatment of the high-risk individual with NSCLC. Initial favourable outcomes encourage combining radiotherapy and RF ablation, especially for treating larger tumors. In the setting of colorectal cancer lung metastases, survival rates provided by RF ablation in selected patients, are substantially higher than those obtained with any chemotherapy regimens and provide indirect evidence that RF ablation therapy improves survival in patients with limited lung metastatic disease.

  10. Dielectric-filled radiofrequency linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faehl, R J; Keinigs, R K; Pogue, E W [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    High current, high brightness electron beam accelerators promise to open up dramatic new applications. Linear induction accelerators are currently viewed as the appropriate technology for these applications. A concept by Humphries and Hwang may permit radiofrequency accelerators to fulfill the same functions with greater simplicity and enhanced flexibility. This concept involves the replacement of vacuum rf cavities with dielectric filled ones. Simple analysis indicates that the resonant frequencies are reduced by a factor of ({epsilon}{sub 0}/{epsilon}){sup 1/2} while the stored energy is increased by {epsilon}/{epsilon}{sub 0}. For a high dielectric constant like water, this factor can approach 80. A series of numerical calculations of simple pill-box cavities was performed. Eigenfunctions and resonant frequencies for a full system configuration, including dielectric material, vacuum beamline, and a ceramic window separating the two have been computed. These calculations are compared with the results of a small experimental cavity which have been constructed and operated. Low power tests show excellent agreement. (author). 4 figs., 8 refs.

  11. The radiofrequency magnetic dipole discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martines, E., E-mail: emilio.martines@igi.cnr.it; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Fassina, A.; Spolaore, M. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Marcante, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); TIFPA, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications INFN, 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    This paper describes a novel and simple concept of plasma source, which is able to produce a radiofrequency magnetized discharge with minimal power requirements. The source is based on the magnetron concept and uses a permanent magnet as an active electrode. The dipolar field produced by the magnet confines the electrons, which cause further ionization, thus producing a toroidally shaped plasma in the equatorial region around the electrode. A plasma can be ignited with such scheme with power levels as low as 5 W. Paschen curves have been built for four different working gases, showing that in Helium or Neon, plasma breakdown is easily obtained also at atmospheric pressure. The plasma properties have been measured using a balanced Langmuir probe, showing that the electron temperature is around 3–4 eV and higher in the cathode proximity. Plasma densities of the order of 10{sup 16 }m{sup −3} have been obtained, with a good positive scaling with applied power. Overall, the electron pressure appears to be strongly correlated with the magnetic field magnitude in the measurement point.

  12. The radiofrequency magnetic dipole discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Marcante, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Fassina, A.; Spolaore, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a novel and simple concept of plasma source, which is able to produce a radiofrequency magnetized discharge with minimal power requirements. The source is based on the magnetron concept and uses a permanent magnet as an active electrode. The dipolar field produced by the magnet confines the electrons, which cause further ionization, thus producing a toroidally shaped plasma in the equatorial region around the electrode. A plasma can be ignited with such scheme with power levels as low as 5 W. Paschen curves have been built for four different working gases, showing that in Helium or Neon, plasma breakdown is easily obtained also at atmospheric pressure. The plasma properties have been measured using a balanced Langmuir probe, showing that the electron temperature is around 3-4 eV and higher in the cathode proximity. Plasma densities of the order of 1016 m-3 have been obtained, with a good positive scaling with applied power. Overall, the electron pressure appears to be strongly correlated with the magnetic field magnitude in the measurement point.

  13. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  14. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.; Chaud, X.; Gautier-Picard, P.

    1996-01-01

    Superconductors, especially high T c ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO

  15. Superconducting Technology Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    This Superconducting Technology Assessment (STA) has been conducted by the National Security Agency to address the fundamental question of a potential replacement for silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS...

  16. Superconductivity: materials and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Kircher, F.; Leveque, J.; Tixador, P.

    2008-01-01

    This digest paper presents the different types of superconducting materials: 1 - the low-TC superconductors: the multi-filament composite as elementary constituent, the world production of NbTi, the superconducting cables of the LHC collider and of the ITER tokamak; 2 - the high-TC superconductors: BiSrCaCuO (PIT 1G) ribbons and wires, deposited coatings; 3 - application to particle physics: the the LHC collider of the CERN, the LHC detectors; 4 - applications to thermonuclear fusion: Tore Supra and ITER tokamaks; 5 - NMR imaging: properties of superconducting magnets; 6 - applications in electrotechnics: cables, motors and alternators, current limiters, transformers, superconducting energy storage systems (SMES). (J.S.)

  17. Superconductivity and its devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Among the more important developments that are discussed are cryotrons, superconducting motors and generators, and high-field magnets. Cryotrons will create faster and more economical computer systems. Superconducting motors and generators will cost much less to build than conventional electric generators and cut fuel consumption. Moreover, high-field magnets are being used to confine plasma in connection with nuclear fusion. Superconductors have a vital role to play in all of these developments. Most importantly, though, are the magnetic properties of superconductivity. Superconducting magnets are an integral part of nuclear fusion. In addition, high-field magnets are necessary in the use of accelerators, which are needed to study the interactions between elementary particles

  18. Superconductivity: Heike's heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Marel, D.; Golden, M.

    2011-01-01

    A century ago, Heike Kamerlingh Onnes discovered superconductivity. And yet, despite the conventional superconductors being understood, the list of unconventional superconductors is growing — for which unconventional theories may be required.

  19. Fundamental Study of Micro-Defects in Electropolished EB-Welded and Hydroformed SRF Accelerating Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumption, Mike

    2014-08-29

    In the area of niobium elecropolishing fundamentals, we focused on understanding the influence of the surface topology, and geometry (with effects from gravity included. The formation of a viscous film is essential for the electropolishing process to take place. The exact nature and composition of the film formed on niobium is still unknown because of its solubility in the electrolyte. Extensive pitting may take place at surface where a stable film cannot form. This has to be taken into consideration while determining the speed with which the SRF cavities are rotated while EP. Hydrodynamic aspects must be taken into consideration while optimizing the polishing parameters. There is improvement in surface finish with polishing time. There is a huge change in surface quality when the EP time is increased from 2 hours to 4 hours but not much change takes place when the time is further increased to 6 hours. So keeping the economic points in view, about 100 um defect layer removal may be sufficient to get the desired performance. In the area of Electropolishing of untreated and treated niobium with Weld Joints we studied untreated and treated Nb, especially for the heat affected areas next to welded bumps, electropolished for different durations. The electropolishing of the untreated Nb caused the formation of pits on the surface at about 15 min but they disappeared when the electropolishing duration was more than 15 min. Electropolishing for 120 min smoothened the surface of untreated Nb by levelling the surface, but the severe formation of pits on the whole surface was found after 240 min. The treatment of Nb significantly changed the Nb surface morphology which was covered by grains of different size that looked light or dark in the optical microscope. The treated Nb was susceptible to pitting during the entire electropolishing starting from 15 min and the dark grains had more susceptibility to pitting than the light grains. In addition, electropolishing for 240 min

  20. Ablation of liver metastases by radiofrequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baere, T. de

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency is a thermal ablative technique that is most often used percuteanously under image guidance. Thermal damage is obtained through frictional heating of a high frequency current. The maximal volume of destruction obtained in one radiofrequency delivery is around 4 cm and consequently, best indication for treatment are tumours below 3 cm. When compared, radiofrequency and surgical removal for tumours below 25 mm in diameter demonstrated a rate of incomplete resection/ablation of 6% and 7.3% respectively. Median survival after the first radiofrequency of a liver metastasis of CRC is reported to be 24 to 52 months with a 5 years overall survival of 18 to 44%. The median overall survival increases from 22 to 48 months depending on the use of radiofrequency ablation as rescue treatment after failure of others, or as a first line treatment. For patients with a single tumour, less than 4 cm, the survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years are respectively 97%, 84% and 40%, with a median survival of 50 months. Follow-up imaging requires to use contrast-enhanced CT or MRI, looking for local recurrences evidenced by local foci of enhancement at the periphery of the ablation zone. (author)

  1. A survey on monopolar radiofrequency treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong Hye; Hong, Eun Sun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Hei Sung

    2017-09-01

    This questionnaire-based study was aimed to measure the level of appreciation, awareness of the special tips, and practice patterns of monopolar radiofrequency among Korean dermatologists practicing a specific monopolar radiofrequency device (Thermage® Inc., Hayward, CA). A total of 82 surveys were analyzed to show that the majority of participants (78.8%) were highly satisfied with the outcomes of monopolar radiofrequency treatment. All respondents were aware of the Eye Tip 0.25 cm 2 , and the majority knew the difference between the Face tip (blue) and the Total tip (orange). Most (86.3%) agreed to the statement that 900 shots were appropriate for facial tightening in those between the ages of 35 and 65 years. 66.2% of participants reported to have perform monopolar radiofrequency to extra-facial sites within the past year. As for the tips, the Total tip was most popular for all body sties and the Big tip was favored for the abdomen, thighs and buttock. We hope our data allow dermatologists to better utilize monopolar radiofrequency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The effects of Eu-concentrations on the luminescent properties of SrF2:Eu nanophosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagoub, M.Y.A.; Swart, H.C.; Noto, L.L.; O’Connel, J.H.; Lee, M.E.; Coetsee, E.

    2014-01-01

    SrF 2 :Eu nanophosphors were successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The structure of the nanophosphors was investigated with x-ray diffraction. The average crystallite size calculated using the Scherrer equation was in the range of 7.0 nm. The photoluminescence of Eu doped as-prepared SrF 2 nanophosphors were studied using different excitation sources. The samples showed emission from both the Eu oxidation states, Eu 2+ and Eu 3+ . At low Eu concentrations the emission from Eu 2+ centered at 416 nm was more dominant. While the narrow band of Eu 3+ emission intensity increased with an increase in the Eu concentration. High resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that the Eu was indeed in both Eu 2+ and Eu 3+ valance states. The presence of Eu 2+ and Eu 3+ in the system largely enhanced the response of the Eu 3+ under ultraviolet excitation. The time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry results suggested that the energy transfer between two ions was likely to occur. The relative photoluminescence intensity of the Eu 2+ rapidly decreased with an increasing laser beam irradiating time. This result would make the current Eu 2+ doped SrF 2 samples unsuitable candidates for several applications, such as white light-emitting diodes and wavelength conversion films for silicon photovoltaic cells. - Highlights: • SrF 2 : Eu nanophosphors were successfully synthesised (hydrothermal technique). • PL and XPS results showed enhanced absorption response of Eu 3+ UV excitation. • Eu concentrations more than 5 mol% improved fluorescence emission. • TOF-SIMS results suggested that the energy transfer from Eu 2+ to Eu 3+ is dominant

  3. Stacked magnet superconducting bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, T.K. II; Saville, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting bearing is described, comprising: a plurality of permanent magnets magnetized end-to-end and stacked side-by-side in alternating polarity, such that flux lines flow between ends of adjacent magnets; isolating means, disposed between said adjacent magnets, for reducing flux leakage between opposing sides of said adjacent magnets; and a member made of superconducting material having at least one surface in communication with said flux lines

  4. Superconductivity at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, N B; Ginzburg, N I

    1969-07-01

    Work published during the last 3 or 4 yrs concerning the effect of pressure on superconductivity is reviewed. Superconducting modifications of Si, Ge, Sb, Te, Se, P and Ce. Change of Fermi surface under pressure for nontransition metals. First experiments on the influence of pressure on the tunneling effect in superconductors provide new information on the nature of the change in phonon and electron energy spectra of metals under hydrostatic compression. 78 references.

  5. Superconductivity: A critical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacchetti, Nicola

    1997-01-01

    It is some forty years now that superconductivity has entered into the field of applied Physics. Countless applications have been proposed some of which have been successfully tested in the form of prototypes and relatively few have become widely used products. This article offers an objective examination of what applied superconductivity represents in the area of modern technology highlighting its exclusive advantages and its inevitable limitations

  6. Generalized Superconductivity. Generalized Levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, B.; Agop, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the recent papers, the gravitational superconductivity is described. We introduce the concept of generalized superconductivity observing that any nongeodesic motion and, in particular, the motion in an electromagnetic field, can be transformed in a geodesic motion by a suitable choice of the connection. In the present paper, the gravitoelectromagnetic London equations have been obtained from the generalized Helmholtz vortex theorem using the generalized local equivalence principle. In this context, the gravitoelectromagnetic Meissner effect and, implicitly, the gravitoelectromagnetic levitation are given. (authors)

  7. Superconducting magnets for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, Yu.N.

    1979-01-01

    Expediency of usage and possibilities arising in application of superconducting devices in magnetic systems of accelerators and experimental nuclear-physical devices are studied. Parameters of specific devices are given. It is emphasized that at the existing level of technological possibilities, construction and usage of superconducting magnetic systems in experimental nuclear physics should be thought of as possible, from the engineering, and expedient, from the economical viewpoints [ru

  8. Fundamental damper power calculation of the 56 MHz SRF cavity for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.; Bellavia, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Grau, M.; Miglionico, G.; Pai, C.

    2011-01-01

    At each injection period during RHIC's operation, the beam's frequency sweeps across a wide range, and some of its harmonics will cross the frequency of the 56MHz SRF cavity. To avoid excitation of the cavity at these times, we designed a fundamental damper for the quarter-wave resonator to damp the cavity heavily. The power extracted by the fundamental damper should correspond to the power handling ability of the system at all stages. In this paper, we discuss the power output from the fundamental damper when it is fully extracted, inserted, and any intermediate point. A Fundamental Damper (FD) will greatly reduce the cavity's Q factor to ∼300 during the acceleration phase of the beam. However, when the beam is at store and the FD is removed, the cavity is excited by both the yellow and the blue beams at 2 x 0.3A to attain the required 2MV voltage across its gap. The cavity then is operated to increase the luminosity of the RHIC experiments. Table 1 lists the parameters of the FD. Figure 1 shows the configuration of the FD fully inserted into the 56MHz SRF cavity; this complete insertion is defined as the start location (0cm) of FD simulation, an assumption we make throughout this paper. The power consumed by the cavity while maintaining the beam's energy and its orbit is compensated by the 28MHz accelerating cavities in the storage ring. The power dissipation of the external load is dynamic with respect to the position of the FD during its extraction. As a function of the external Q and the EM field in the cavity, the power should peak with the FD at a certain vertical location. Our calculation of the power extracted is detailed in the following sections. Figure 2 plots the frequency change in the cavity, and the external Q against the changes in position of the FD. The location of the FD is selected carefully such that the frequency will approach the designed working point from the lower side only. The loaded Q of the cavity is 223 when the FD is fully

  9. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  10. Superconducting Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized superconducting fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs by potassium (K intercalation. They showed large superconducting volume fractions, as high as 80%. The superconducting transition temperature at 17 K was independent of the K content (x in the range between 1.6 and 6.0 in K-doped C60 nanowhiskers (KxC60NWs, while the superconducting volume fractions changed with x. The highest shielding fraction of a full shielding volume was observed in the material of K3.3C60NW by heating at 200 °C. On the other hand, that of a K-doped fullerene (K-C60 crystal was less than 1%. We report the superconducting behaviors of our newly synthesized KxC60NWs in comparison to those of KxC60 crystals, which show superconductivity at 19 K in K3C60. The lattice structures are also discussed, based on the x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses.

  11. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... Procedures Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 § 1.1310 Radiofrequency radiation... exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b), except in the case of portable...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4400 Radiofrequency lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to produce...

  13. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4100 Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus is an AC...

  14. R&D progress in SRF surface preparation with centrifugal barrel polishing (cbp) for both Nb and Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari [JLAB

    2013-09-01

    Centrifugal Barrel polishing (CBP) is becoming a common R&D tool for SRF cavity preparation around the world. During the CBP process a cylindrically symmetric SRF cavity is filled with relatively cheap and environmentally friendly abrasive and sealed. The cavity is then spun around a cylindrically symmetric axis at high speeds uniformly conditioning the inner surface. This uniformity is especially relevant for SRF application because many times a single manufacturing defects limits cavity?s performance well below it?s theoretical limit. In addition CBP has created surfaces with roughness?s on the order of 10?s of nm which create a unique surface for wet chemistry or thin film deposition. CBP is now being utilized at Jefferson Laboratory, Fermi Laboratory and Cornell University in the US, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Germany, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro in Italy, and Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology in India. In this talk we will present current CBP research from each lab including equipment, baseline recipes, cavity removal rates and subsequent cryogenic cavity tests on niobium as well as copper cavities where available.

  15. Maximum Potential Hydrogen Gas Retention in the sRF Resin Ion Exchange Column for the LAWPS Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wells, Beric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bottenus, Courtney LH [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schonewill, Philip P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) is being developed to provide treated supernatant liquid from the Hanford tank farms directly to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The design and development of the LAWPS is being conducted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC. A key process in LAWPS is the removal of radioactive Cs in ion exchange (IX) columns filled with spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. One accident scenario being evaluated is the loss of liquid flow through the sRF resin bed after it has been loaded with radioactive Cs and hydrogen gas is being generated by radiolysis. In normal operations, the generated hydrogen is expected to remain dissolved in the liquid and be continuously removed by liquid flow. For an accident scenario with a loss of flow, hydrogen gas can be retained within the IX column both in the sRF resin and below the bottom screen that supports the resin within the column. The purpose of this report is to summarize calculations that estimate the upper-bound volume of hydrogen gas that can be retained in the column and potentially be released to the headspace of the IX column or to process equipment connected to the IX column and, thus, pose a flammability hazard.

  16. Superconducting linac beam dynamics with high-order maps for RF resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, A A; Pardo, R C; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.11.177

    2004-01-01

    The arbitrary-order map beam optics code COSY Infinity has recently been adapted to calculate accurate high-order ion-optical maps for electrostatic and radio-frequency accelerating structures. The beam dynamics of the superconducting low-velocity positive-ion injector linac for the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab is used to demonstrate some advantages of the new simulation capability. The injector linac involves four different types of superconducting accelerating structures and has a total of 18 resonators. The detailed geometry for each of the accelerating cavities is included, allowing an accurate representation of the on- and off-axis electric fields. The fields are obtained within the code from a Poisson-solver for cylindrically symmetric electrodes of arbitrary geometry. The transverse focusing is done with superconducting solenoids. A detailed comparison of the transverse and longitudinal phase space is made with the conventional ray-tracing code LINRAY. The two codes are evaluated for ease ...

  17. High-current applications of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, P.

    1995-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: superconducting materials, design principles of superconducting magnets, magnets for research and engineering, superconductivity for power engineering, superconductivity in nuclear fusion technology, economical considerations

  18. Development of a multi-scale simulation model of tube hydroforming for superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sumption, M.D., E-mail: sumption.3@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Bong, H.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Lim, H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Collings, E.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-01-02

    This work focuses on finite element modeling of the hydroforming process for niobium tubes intended for use in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The hydroforming of tubular samples into SRF-relevant shapes involves the complex geometries and loading conditions which develop during the deformation, as well as anisotropic materials properties. Numerical description of the process entails relatively complex numerical simulations. A crystal plasticity (CP) model was constructed that included the evolution of crystallographic orientation during deformation as well as the anisotropy of tubes in all directions and loading conditions. In this work we demonstrate a multi-scale simulation approach which uses both microscopic CP and macroscopic continuum models. In this approach a CP model (developed and implemented into ABAQUS using UMAT) was used for determining the flow stress curve only under bi-axial loading in order to reduce the computing time. The texture of the materials obtained using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and tensile test data were inputs for this model. Continuum FE analysis of tube hydroforming using the obtained constitutive equation from the CP modeling was then performed and compared to the results of hydraulic bulge testing. The results show that high quality predictions of the deformation under hydroforming of Nb tubes can be obtained using CP-FEM based on their known texture and the results of tensile tests. The importance of the CP-FEM based approach is that it reduces the need for hydraulic bulge testing, using a relatively simple computational approach.

  19. Evaluations of MgB2 Coatings on 2'' Copper Discs for Superconducting Radio Frequency Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Lee, Namhoon; Banjade, Huta; Eremeev, Grigory; Welander, Paul; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie; Kustom, Robert; Wolak, Matthäus; Nassiri, Alireza; Xi, Xiaoxing

    We propose that coating the inner walls of copper RF cavities with superconducting MgB2 (Tc = 39 K) can result in a viable alternative to the already established niobium-based SRF technology. This approach improves the thermal conductivity, allows for operation at higher temperatures, and reduces the need for large helium refrigeration, thereby resulting in lower operational costs. For our studies, we grew MgB2 films via hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) on 2'' Cu substrates. Since Mg and Cu readily form an alloy at higher temperatures, the HPCVD setup was modified in order to achieve lower deposition temperatures, minimize alloy formation, and provide high quality MgB2 films. This method yielded MgB2 coatings on 2'' Cu discs with transition temperatures around 38 K. The samples were characterized with regards to their RF attributes and showed similar performance in comparison to Nb reference samples. The presented results show that MgB2 coated copper can be a suitable alternative for use in SRF cavities.

  20. An evolutionary yield function based on Barlat 2000 yield function for the superconducting niobium sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, Payam; Pourboghrat, Farhang

    2011-08-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities are widely used in high-energy physics to accelerate particle beams in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities is affected by the microstructure and purity of the niobium sheet, surface quality, geometry, etc. Following optimum strain paths in the forming of these cavities can significantly control these parameters. To select these strain paths, however, information about the mechanical behavior, microstructure, and formability of the niobium sheet is required. In this study the Barlat 2000 yield function has been used as a yield function for high purity niobium. Results from this study showed that, due to intrinsic behavior, it is necessary to evolve the anisotropic coefficients of Barlat's yield function in order to properly model the plastic behavior of the niobium sheet. The accuracy of the newly developed evolutionary yield function was verified by applying it to the modeling of the hydrostatic bulging of the niobium sheet. Also, in a separate attempt crystal plasticity finite element method was use to model the behavior of the polycrystalline niobium sheet with a particular initial texture.