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Sample records for superconducting point-contact quantum

  1. Sensing with Superconducting Point Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argo Nurbawono

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Superconducting point contacts have been used for measuring magnetic polarizations, identifying magnetic impurities, electronic structures, and even the vibrational modes of small molecules. Due to intrinsically small energy scale in the subgap structures of the supercurrent determined by the size of the superconducting energy gap, superconductors provide ultrahigh sensitivities for high resolution spectroscopies. The so-called Andreev reflection process between normal metal and superconductor carries complex and rich information which can be utilized as powerful sensor when fully exploited. In this review, we would discuss recent experimental and theoretical developments in the supercurrent transport through superconducting point contacts and their relevance to sensing applications, and we would highlight their current issues and potentials. A true utilization of the method based on Andreev reflection analysis opens up possibilities for a new class of ultrasensitive sensors.

  2. Spin-precession-assisted supercurrent in a superconducting quantum point contact coupled to a single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, C.; Belzig, W.; Fogelström, M.

    2012-08-01

    The supercurrent through a quantum point contact coupled to a nanomagnet strongly depends on the dynamics of the nanomagnet's spin. We employ a fully microscopic model to calculate the transport properties of a junction coupled to a spin whose dynamics is modeled as Larmor precession brought about by an external magnetic field and find that the dynamics affects the charge and spin currents by inducing transitions between the continuum states outside the superconducting gap region and the Andreev levels. This redistribution of the quasiparticles leads to a nonequilibrium population of the Andreev levels and an enhancement of the supercurrent which is visible as a modified current-phase relation as well as a nonmonotonous critical current as function of temperature. The nonmonotonous behavior is accompanied by a corresponding change in spin-transfer torques acting on the precessing spin and leads to the possibility of using temperature as a means to tune the back-action on the spin.

  3. Quantum point contacts in quantum wire systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternemann, E.; Buchholz, S.S.; Fischer, S.F.; Kunze, U. [Werkstoffe und Nanoelektronik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Reuter, D.; Wieck, A.D. [Angewandte Festkoerperphysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Quantum point contacts (QPCs) attract high interest for applications as magnetic focussing, beam splitting (quantum Hall edge states), spin filtering and electron thermometry. Here, we investigate QPCs in complex quantum wire (QWR) systems such as quantum rings. The QPCs were realized by lithographical definition of a short (150 nm) constriction (170 nm width) in (a) a 540 nm wide QWR and (b) 520 nm wide QWR leads of a QWR ring as in. Nanogates on top of the constrictions allow for the control of occupied modes in the QPCs. The devices are based on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure with a 2DEG 55 nm below the surface, patterned by electron beam lithography and wet-chemical etching. Two- and four-terminal conductance measurements at temperatures between 23 mK and 4.2 K were performed using lock-in technique. Our measurements reveal that QPCs in 1D nanostructures can be prepared to show subband separations of 6 meV, clear conductance quantization as well as the 0.7 anomaly. We further show that electron injection across a QPC into a QWR ring allows for electron interference (Aharonov-Bohm effect).

  4. Nonlinear peltier effect in quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachek, E. N.; Scherbakov, A. G.; Landman, Uzi

    1998-11-01

    A theoretical analysis of the Peltier effect in two-dimensional quantum point contacts, in field-free conditions and under the influence of applied magnetic fields, is presented. It is shown that in the nonlinear regime (finite applied voltage) new peaks in the Peltier coefficient appear leading to violation of Onsager's relation. Oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in a magnetic field are demonstrated.

  5. Quantum point contacts as heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgram, Sebastian; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency of macroscopic heat engines is restricted by the second law of thermodynamics. They can reach at most the efficiency of a Carnot engine. In contrast, heat currents in mesoscopic heat engines show fluctuations. Thus, there is a small probability that a mesoscopic heat engine exceeds Carnot's maximum value during a short measurement time. We illustrate this effect using a quantum point contact as a heat engine. When a temperature difference is applied to a quantum point contact, the system may be utilized as a source of electrical power under steady state conditions. We first discuss the optimal working point of such a heat engine that maximizes the generated electrical power and subsequently calculate the statistics for deviations of the efficiency from its most likely value. We find that deviations surpassing the Carnot limit are possible, but unlikely.

  6. Detection of Majorana Kramers pairs using a quantum point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Pan, Wei; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Lutchyn, Roman

    We propose a setup that integrates a quantum point contact (QPC) and a Josephson junction on a quantum spin Hall sample, experimentally realizable in InAs/GaSb quantum wells. The confinement due to both the QPC and the superconductor results in a Kramers pair of Majorana zero-energy bound states when the superconducting phases in the two arms differ by an odd multiple of π across the Josephson junction. We investigate the detection of these Majorana pairs with the integrated QPC, and find a robust switching from normal to Andreev scattering across the edges due to the presence of Majorana Kramers pairs. This transport signature is expected to be exhibited in measurements of differential conductance and/or current cross-correlation at low bias. This work was supported by ONR-N00014-14-1-0330.

  7. Hybrid Quantum Point Contact-Superconductor Devices Using InSb Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Stephen; Damasco, John Jeffrey; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Mason, Nadya

    Recent experiments using hybrid nanowire (NW)-superconductor (SC) devices have provided evidence for Majorana quasiparticles in tunneling experiments. However, these tunneling experiments are marked by a soft superconducting gap, which likely originates from disorder at the NW-SC interface. Hence, clean NW-SC interfaces are important for future Majorana studies. By carefully processing the NW-SC interface, we have realized quantized conductance steps in quantum point contacts fabricated from InSb NWs and superconducting contacts. We study the length dependence of ballistic behavior and the induced superconductivity in InSb NWs by quantum point contact spectroscopy. Additionally, we discuss how the transport in InSb NW-SC quantum point contacts evolves in magnetic field.

  8. Detection of Majorana Kramers Pairs Using a Quantum Point Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Pan, Wei; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a setup that integrates a quantum point contact (QPC) and a Josephson junction on a quantum spin Hall sample, experimentally realizable in InAs/GaSb quantum wells. The confinement due to both the QPC and the superconductor results in a Kramers pair of Majorana zero-energy bound states when the superconducting phases in the two arms differ by an odd multiple of π across the Josephson junction. We investigate the detection of these Majorana pairs with the integrated QPC, and find a robust switching from normal to Andreev scattering across the edges due to the presence of Majorana Kramers pairs. Such a switching of the current represents a qualitative signature where multiterminal differential conductances oscillate with alternating signs when the external magnetic field is tuned. We show that this qualitative signature is also present in current cross-correlations. Thus, the change of the backscattering current nature affects both conductance and shot noise, the measurement of which offers a significant advantage over quantitative signatures such as conductance quantization in realistic measurements.

  9. Reprint of : Quantum point contacts as heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgram, Sebastian; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of macroscopic heat engines is restricted by the second law of thermodynamics. They can reach at most the efficiency of a Carnot engine. In contrast, heat currents in mesoscopic heat engines show fluctuations. Thus, there is a small probability that a mesoscopic heat engine exceeds Carnot's maximum value during a short measurement time. We illustrate this effect using a quantum point contact as a heat engine. When a temperature difference is applied to a quantum point contact, the system may be utilized as a source of electrical power under steady state conditions. We first discuss the optimal working point of such a heat engine that maximizes the generated electrical power and subsequently calculate the statistics for deviations of the efficiency from its most likely value. We find that deviations surpassing the Carnot limit are possible, but unlikely.

  10. Nonlinear Seebeck and Peltier effects in quantum point contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipiloglu, M.A.; Turgut, S.; Tomak, M. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2004-09-01

    The charge and entropy currents across a quantum point contact are expanded as a series in powers of the applied bias voltage and the temperature difference. After that, the expansions of the Seebeck voltage in temperature difference and the Peltier heat in current are obtained. With a suitable choice of the average temperature and chemical potential, the lowest order nonlinear term in both cases appear to be of third order. The behavior of the third-order coefficients in both cases are then investigated for different contact parameters. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Nonlinear Seebeck and Peltier effects in quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çipilolu, M. A.; Turgut, S.; Tomak, M.

    2004-09-01

    The charge and entropy currents across a quantum point contact are expanded as a series in powers of the applied bias voltage and the temperature difference. After that, the expansions of the Seebeck voltage in temperature difference and the Peltier heat in current are obtained. With a suitable choice of the average temperature and chemical potential, the lowest order nonlinear term in both cases appear to be of third order. The behavior of the third-order coefficients in both cases are then investigated for different contact parameters.

  12. Current-voltage curves of gold quantum point contacts revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.; Nielsen, S K.; Brandbyge, Mads;

    2000-01-01

    We present measurements of current-voltage (I-V) curves on gold quantum point contacts (QPCs) with a conductance up to 4 G(0) (G(0) = 2e(2)/h is the conductance quantum) and voltages up to 2 V. The QPCs are formed between the gold tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a Au(110) surface under...... clean ultra-high-vacuum conditions at room temperature. The I - V curves are found to he almost linear in contrast to previous reports. Tight-binding calculations of I - V curves for one- and two-atom contacts are in excellent agreement with our measurements. On the other hand, clearly nonlinear I - V...

  13. Scanning gate imaging of a disordered quantum point contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, N; da Cunha, C R; Akis, R; Ferry, D K; Ochiai, Y

    2014-05-14

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is a novel technique that has been used to image characteristic features related to the coherent electron flow in mesoscopic structures. For instance, SGM has successfully been applied to study peculiar electron transport properties that arise due to small levels of disorder in a system. The particular case of an InGaAs quantum well layer in a heterostructure, which is dominated by a quasi-ballistic regime, was analyzed. A quantum point contact fabricated onto this material exhibits conduction fluctuations that are not expected in typical high-mobility heterostructures such as AlGaAs/GaAs. SGM revealed not only interference patterns corresponding to specific conductance fluctuations but also mode-dependent resistance peaks corresponding to the first and second quantum levels of conductance (2e(2)/h) at zero magnetic field. On the other hand, clear conductance plateaus originating from the integer quantum Hall effect were observed at high magnetic fields. The physical size of incompressible edge channels was estimated from cross-sectional analysis of these images.

  14. Giant acoustoelectric current in suspended quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreft, Dustin J.; Mourokh, Lev G.; Shin, Hyuncheol; Bichler, Max; Wegscheider, Werner; Blick, Robert H.

    2016-12-01

    We present results on the acoustoelectric current driven through a quantum point contact (QPC) placed on a suspended nanobridge, which is subject to surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The magnitude of this current is much larger than that of a two-dimensional gas, and the system has enhanced sensitivity to perturbations. In particular, the current oscillations as a function of magnetic field exhibit additional features associated with the spin splitting. Furthermore, the negative voltage applied to the QPC gates induces the oscillations revealing the subband structure not seen in transport measurements at the elevated temperatures of our experiment. Near the pinch off conditions, the acoustoelectric current becomes negative which we attribute to the enhanced backscattering caused by the SAW-phonons' absorption and emission.

  15. Microscopic Current Flow Patterns in Nanoscale Quantum Point Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Na; Bushong, Neil; Hatcher, Ryan; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2006-03-01

    Transport in nanoscale conductors has been studied extensively mainly using the stationary scattering approach. However, the dynamical nature of transport, and in particular, the flow patterns of the microscopic current through a nanoscale junction, have remained poorly understood. We apply a novel time-dependent transport approach [1], which combines closed and finite geometries with time-dependent density functional theory,to study current flow patterns in nanoscale quantum point contacts [2]. The results of both atomistic and jellium calculations show that surface charges form dynamically at the junction-electrode interfaces in both abrupt and adiabatic junctions. The curr ent exhibits some characteristics of a classical hydrodynamic liquid but also displays unique patterns arising from the interaction with the surface charges. We also investigate the effect of the flow velocity, charge density, and lattice structures on the electron dynamics. If time permits we also discuss the effects of the viscosity of the electron liquid [3]. Work supported by DOE (DE-FG02-05ER46204). [1] M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004). [2] N. Bushong, N. Sai and, M. Di Ventra, Nano Lett. (in press). [3] N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale, and M. Di Ventra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005 ).

  16. Subharmonic energy-gap structure and heating effects in superconducting niobium point contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensberg, K.; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    1989-01-01

    We present experimental data of the temperature-dependent subharmonic energy-gap structure (SGS) in the current-voltage (I-V) curves of superconducting niobium point contacts. The observed SGS is modified by heating effects. We construct a model of the quasiparticle conductance of metallic...

  17. Point-contact spectroscopy of superconducting URu sub 2 Si sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J.R. (IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)); Lejay, P. (Centre de Recherches sur les Tres Basses Temperatures, C.N.R.S., Boite Postal 166X, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX (France))

    1992-09-01

    We present point-contact measurements of the antiferromagnetic heavy-fermion superconductor URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. Our data in the superconducting state agree remarkably well with the theory of Blonder, Tinkham, and Klapwijk (BTK), and are consistent with a gap with {ital d}-wave symmetry. In the normal state a gap'' in the conductance develops as the temperature is lowered below the Neel temperature. The persistence of this gap into the superconducting state supports the view that magnetically correlated electrons participate in the superconductivity.

  18. Effect of Quantum Point Contact Measurement on Electron Spin State in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Fei-Yun; TU Tao; HAO Xiao-Jie; GUO Guang-Can; GUO Guo-Ping

    2009-01-01

    We study the time evolution of two electron spin states in a double quantum-dot system, which includes a nearby quantum point contact (QPC) as a measurement device. We find that the QPC measurement induced decoherence is in the microsecond timescale. We also find that the enhanced QPC measurement will trap the system in its initial spin states, which is consistent with the quantum Zeno effect.

  19. Point contact tunneling spectroscopy apparatus for large scale mapping of surface superconducting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groll, Nickolas; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zasadzinksi, John F. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We describe the design and testing of a point contact tunneling spectroscopy device that can measure material surface superconducting properties (i.e., the superconducting gap Δ and the critical temperature T{sub C}) and density of states over large surface areas with size up to mm{sup 2}. The tip lateral (X,Y) motion, mounted on a (X,Y,Z) piezo-stage, was calibrated on a patterned substrate consisting of Nb lines sputtered on a gold film using both normal (Al) and superconducting (PbSn) tips at 1.5 K. The tip vertical (Z) motion control enables some adjustment of the tip-sample junction resistance that can be measured over 7 orders of magnitudes from a quasi-ohmic regime (few hundred Ω) to the tunnel regime (from tens of kΩ up to few GΩ). The low noise electronic and LabVIEW program interface are also presented. The point contact regime and the large-scale motion capabilities are of particular interest for mapping and testing the superconducting properties of macroscopic scale superconductor-based devices.

  20. Critical analysis of soft point contact Andreev reflection spectra between superconducting films and pressed In

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Pradnya; Chauhan, Prashant; Muthurajan, H.; Bose, Sangita

    2017-04-01

    We present a critical analysis of an alternative technique of point contact Andreev reflection (PCAR) spectroscopy used to extract energy resolved information of superconductors which is based on making ‘soft-contacts’ between superconductors and indium. This technique is not sensitive to mechanical vibrations and hence can be used in a cryogen free platform increasing its accessibility to users having no access to cryogenic liquids. Through our experiments on large number of superconducting films we show that the PCAR spectra below the T c of In show sub-harmonic gap structures consistent with the theory of multiple Andreev reflection (MAR) and a zero bias conductance (ZBC) anomaly associated with the Josephson supercurrent. Furthermore, we demonstrate that large contact resistance with low transparency ballistic contacts in the PCAR regime are required to obtain reliable spectroscopic data. One limitation of the technique arises for low contact resistance junctions where the superconducting proximity effect (SPE) reduces the value of the superconducting energy gap.

  1. Quantum Fluctuation Theorem in an Interacting Setup: Point Contacts in Fractional Quantum Hall Edge State Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komnik, A.; Saleur, H.

    2011-09-01

    We verify the validity of the Cohen-Gallavotti fluctuation theorem for the strongly correlated problem of charge transfer through an impurity in a chiral Luttinger liquid, which is realizable experimentally as a quantum point contact in a fractional quantum Hall edge state device. This is accomplished via the development of an analytical method to calculate the full counting statistics of the problem in all the parameter regimes involving the temperature, the Hall voltage, and the gate voltage.

  2. Terahertz time domain interferometry of a SIS tunnel junction and a quantum point contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadi, Chandu [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-09-01

    The author has applied the Terahertz Time Domain Interferometric (THz-TDI) technique to probe the ultrafast dynamic response of a Superconducting-Insulating-Superconducting (SIS) tunnel junction and a Quantum Point Contact (QPC). The THz-TDI technique involves monitoring changes in the dc current induced by interfering two picosecond electrical pulses on the junction as a function of time delay between them. Measurements of the response of the Nb/AlOxNb SIS tunnel junction from 75--200 GHz are in full agreement with the linear theory for photon-assisted tunneling. Likewise, measurements of the induced current in a QPC as a function of source-drain voltage, gate voltage, frequency, and magnetic field also show strong evidence for photon-assisted transport. These experiments together demonstrate the general applicability of the THz-TDI technique to the characterization of the dynamic response of any micron or nanometer scale device that exhibits a non-linear I-V characteristic.

  3. Mesoscopic superconductivity and high spin polarization coexisting at metallic point contacts on Weyl semimetal TaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Leena; Gayen, Sirshendu; Das, Shekhar; Kumar, Ritesh; Süß, Vicky; Felser, Claudia; Shekhar, Chandra; Sheet, Goutam

    2017-01-01

    A Weyl semimetal is a topologically non-trivial phase of matter that hosts mass-less Weyl fermions, the particles that remained elusive for more than 80 years since their theoretical discovery. The Weyl semimetals exhibit unique transport properties and remarkably high surface spin polarization. Here we show that a mesoscopic superconducting phase with critical temperature Tc=7 K can be realized by forming metallic point contacts with silver (Ag) on single crystals of TaAs, while neither Ag nor TaAs are superconductors. Andreev reflection spectroscopy of such point contacts reveals a superconducting gap of 1.2 meV that coexists with a high transport spin polarization of 60% indicating a highly spin-polarized supercurrent flowing through the point contacts on TaAs. Therefore, apart from the discovery of a novel mesoscopic superconducting phase, our results also show that the point contacts on Weyl semimetals are potentially important for applications in spintronics.

  4. Gate-defined graphene quantum point contact in the quantum Hall regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaharai, S; Williams, J R; Marcus, C M

    2011-07-15

    We investigate transport in a gate-defined graphene quantum point contact in the quantum Hall regime. Edge states confined to the interface of p and n regions in the graphene sheet are controllably brought together from opposite sides of the sample and allowed to mix in this split-gate geometry. Among the expected quantum Hall features, an unexpected additional plateau at 0.5h/e2 is observed. We propose that chaotic mixing of edge channels gives rise to the extra plateau.

  5. The features of ballistic electron transport in a suspended quantum point contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevyrin, A. A., E-mail: shevandrey@isp.nsc.ru; Budantsev, M. V.; Bakarov, A. K.; Toropov, A. I. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Pogosov, A. G. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Ishutkin, S. V.; Shesterikov, E. V. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-19

    A suspended quantum point contact and the effects of the suspension are investigated by performing identical electrical measurements on the same experimental sample before and after the suspension. In both cases, the sample demonstrates conductance quantization. However, the suspended quantum point contact shows certain features not observed before the suspension, namely, plateaus at the conductance values being non-integer multiples of the conductance quantum, including the “0.7-anomaly.” These features can be attributed to the strengthening of electron-electron interaction because of the electric field confinement within the suspended membrane. Thus, the suspended quantum point contact represents a one-dimensional system with strong electron-electron interaction.

  6. Peltier Coefficient and Photon-Assisted Tunnelling in Quantum Point Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Aly, Arafa

    2008-12-01

    We present the Peltier coefficient and thermal transport in quantum point contact (QPC), under the influence of external fields and different temperatures. Also we obtain the oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in external fields. Numerical calculations of the Peltier coefficient are performed at different applied voltages, amplitudes and temperatures. The obtained results are consistent with the experimental data in the literature.

  7. Conductance enhancement in quantum-point-contact semiconductor-superconductor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Flensberg, Karsten;

    1999-01-01

    We present numerical calculations of the conductance of an interface between a phase-coherent two-dimensional electron gas and a superconductor with a quantum point contact in the normal region. Using a scattering matrix approach we reconsider the geometry of De Raedt, Michielsen, and Klapwijk [P...

  8. Engineering the quantum point contact response to single-electron charging in a few-electron quantum-dot circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.X.; Leburton, J.P.; Hanson, R.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2004-01-01

    We show that the design of a quantum point contact adjacent to a quantum dot can be optimized to produce maximum sensitivity to single-electron charging in the quantum dot. Our analysis is based on the self-consistent solution of coupled three-dimensional Kohn-Sham and Poisson equations for the

  9. Anomalous conductance of a strongly interacting Fermi gas through a quantum point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Zhai, Hui; Zhang, Shizhong

    2017-01-01

    In this work we study the particle conductance of a strongly interacting Fermi gas through a quantum point contact. With an atom-molecule two-channel model, we compute the contribution to particle conductance by both the fermionic atoms and the bosonic molecules using the Keldysh formalism. Focusing on the regime above the Fermi superfluid transition temperature, we find that the fermionic contribution to the conductance is reduced by interaction compared with the quantized value for the noninteracting case; while the bosonic contribution to the conductance exhibits a plateau with nonuniversal values that is larger than the quantized conductance. This feature is particularly profound at temperature close to the superfluid transition. We emphasize that the enhanced conductance arises because of the bosonic nature of closed channel molecules and the low dimensionality of the quantum point contact.

  10. Peltier Coefficient and Photon-Assisted Tunneling in Quantum Point Contact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arafa H. Aly

    2008-01-01

    @@ We present the Peltier coefficient and thermal transport in quantum point contact (QPC), under the influence of external fields and different temperatures.Also we obtain the oscillations of the Peltier coeffffcient in external fields.Numerical calculations of the Peltier coefficient are performed at different applied voltages, amplitudes and temperatures.The obtained results are cons/stent with the experimental data in the literature.

  11. Andreev reflection and bound state formation in a ballistic two-dimensional electron gas probed by a quantum point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Hiroshi; Todt, Clemens; Kumada, Norio; Harada, Yuichi; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Akazaki, Tatsushi; Muraki, Koji

    2016-10-01

    We study coherent transport and bound state formation of Bogoliubov quasiparticles in a high-mobility I n0.75G a0.25As two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) coupled to a superconducting Nb electrode by means of a quantum point contact (QPC) as a tunable single-mode probe. Below the superconducting critical temperature of Nb, the QPC shows a single-channel conductance greater than the conductance quantum 2 e2/h at zero bias, which indicates the presence of Andreev-reflected quasiparticles, time-reversed states of the injected electron, returning back through the QPC. The marked sensitivity of the conductance enhancement to voltage bias and perpendicular magnetic field suggests a mechanism analogous to reflectionless tunneling—a hallmark of phase-coherent transport, with the boundary of the 2DEG cavity playing the role of scatterers. When the QPC transmission is reduced to the tunneling regime, the differential conductance vs bias voltage probes the single-particle density of states in the proximity area. Measured conductance spectra show a double peak within the superconducting gap of Nb, demonstrating the formation of Andreev bound states in the 2DEG. Both of these results, obtained in the open and closed geometries, underpin the coherent nature of quasiparticles, i.e., phase-coherent Andreev reflection at the InGaAs/Nb interface and coherent propagation in the ballistic 2DEG.

  12. Fluctuation theorem for a double quantum dot coupled to a point-contact electrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, D. [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Utsumi, Y. [Department of Physics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mie University, Tsu, Mie, 514-8507 (Japan); Marthaler, M. [Institut für Theoretische Festkörperphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schön, G. [Institut für Theoretische Festkörperphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe, Germany and Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-12-04

    Motivated by recent experiments on the real-time single-electron counting through a semiconductor GaAs double quantum dot (DQD) by a nearby quantum point contact (QPC), we develop the full-counting statistics of coupled DQD and QPC system. By utilizing the time-scale separation between the dynamics of DQD and QPC, we derive the modified master equation with tunneling rates depending on the counting fields, which fulfill the detailed fluctuation theorem. Furthermore, we derive universal relations between the non-linear corrections to the current and noise, which can be verified in experiments.

  13. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo [Facultad de Física, Universidad de La Habana, C.P.10400, La Habana (Cuba); Mireles, Francisco [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.P. 22800 Ensenada, Baja California, México (Mexico)

    2013-11-21

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a function of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.

  14. Modeling A.C. Electronic Transport through a Two-Dimensional Quantum Point Contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronov, I.E.; Beletskii, N.N.; Berman, G.P.; Campbell, D.K.; Doolen, G.D.; Dudiy, S.V.

    1998-12-07

    We present the results on the a.c. transport of electrons moving through a two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor quantum point contact (QPC). We concentrate our attention on the characteristic properties of the high frequency admittance ({omega}{approximately}0 - 50 GHz), and on the oscillations of the admittance in the vicinity of the separatrix (when a channel opens or closes), in presence of the relaxation effects. The experimental verification of such oscillations in the admittance would be a strong confirmation of the semi-classical approach to the a.c. transport in a QPC, in the separatrix region.

  15. Tunable strength saddle-point contacts impact on quantum rings transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J. J.; Diago-Cisneros, L.

    2016-09-01

    A particular subject of investigation is the role of several sadle-point contact (QPC) parameters on the scattering properties of an Aharonov-Bohm-Aharonov-Casher quantum ring (QR) under Rashba-type spin orbit interaction. We discuss the interplay of the conductance with the confinement strengths and height of the QPC, which yields new and tunable harmonic and non-harmonics patterns, while one manipulates these constriction parameters. This phenomenology may be of utility to implement a novel way to modulate spin interference effects in semiconducting QRs, providing an appealing test-platform for spintronics applications.

  16. Measurement Back-Action in Quantum Point-Contact Charge Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Küng

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Charge sensing with quantum point-contacts (QPCs is a technique widely used in semiconductor quantum-dot research. Understanding the physics of this measurement process, as well as finding ways of suppressing unwanted measurement back-action, are therefore both desirable. In this article, we present experimental studies targeting these two goals. Firstly, we measure the effect of a QPC on electron tunneling between two InAs quantum dots, and show that a model based on the QPC’s shot-noise can account for it. Secondly, we discuss the possibility of lowering the measurement current (and thus the back-action used for charge sensing by correlating the signals of two independent measurement channels. The performance of this method is tested in a typical experimental setup.

  17. Microscopic origin of the '0.7-anomaly' in quantum point contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Florian; Heyder, Jan; Schubert, Enrico; Borowsky, David; Taubert, Daniela; Bruognolo, Benedikt; Schuh, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; von Delft, Jan; Ludwig, Stefan

    2013-09-05

    Quantum point contacts are narrow, one-dimensional constrictions usually patterned in a two-dimensional electron system, for example by applying voltages to local gates. The linear conductance of a point contact, when measured as function of its channel width, is quantized in units of GQ = 2e(2)/h, where e is the electron charge and h is Planck's constant. However, the conductance also has an unexpected shoulder at ∼0.7GQ, known as the '0.7-anomaly', whose origin is still subject to debate. Proposed theoretical explanations have invoked spontaneous spin polarization, ferromagnetic spin coupling, the formation of a quasi-bound state leading to the Kondo effect, Wigner crystallization and various treatments of inelastic scattering. However, explicit calculations that fully reproduce the various experimental observations in the regime of the 0.7-anomaly, including the zero-bias peak that typically accompanies it, are still lacking. Here we offer a detailed microscopic explanation for both the 0.7-anomaly and the zero-bias peak: their common origin is a smeared van Hove singularity in the local density of states at the bottom of the lowest one-dimensional subband of the point contact, which causes an anomalous enhancement in the Hartree potential barrier, the magnetic spin susceptibility and the inelastic scattering rate. We find good qualitative agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental results on the dependence of the conductance on gate voltage, magnetic field, temperature, source-drain voltage (including the zero-bias peak) and interaction strength. We also clarify how the low-energy scale governing the 0.7-anomaly depends on gate voltage and interactions. For low energies, we predict and observe Fermi-liquid behaviour similar to that associated with the Kondo effect in quantum dots. At high energies, however, the similarities between the 0.7-anomaly and the Kondo effect end.

  18. Mapping out spin and particle conductances in a quantum point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinner, Sebastian; Lebrat, Martin; Husmann, Dominik; Grenier, Charles; Brantut, Jean-Philippe; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-07-01

    We study particle and spin transport in a single-mode quantum point contact, using a charge neutral, quantum degenerate Fermi gas with tunable, attractive interactions. This yields the spin and particle conductance of the point contact as a function of chemical potential or confinement. The measurements cover a regime from weak attraction, where quantized conductance is observed, to the resonantly interacting superfluid. Spin conductance exhibits a broad maximum when varying the chemical potential at moderate interactions, which signals the emergence of Cooper pairing. In contrast, the particle conductance is unexpectedly enhanced even before the gas is expected to turn into a superfluid, continuously rising from the plateau at 1/h1/h for weak interactions to plateau-like features at nonuniversal values as high as 4/h4/h for intermediate interactions. For strong interactions, the particle conductance plateaus disappear and the spin conductance gets suppressed, confirming the spin-insulating character of a superfluid. Our observations document the breakdown of universal conductance quantization as many-body correlations appear. The observed anomalous quantization challenges a Fermi liquid description of the normal phase, shedding new light on the nature of the strongly attractive Fermi gas.

  19. Point contact characteristics of NbSe{sub 3} in the superconducting state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional, Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Briggs, A.; Monceau, P. [Centre de Recherches sur les Tres Basses Temperatures, CNRS, BP 166X, Grenoble (France)

    2001-07-23

    A study of the electronic properties of NbSe{sub 3} using NbSe{sub 3}-NbSe{sub 3} junctions has been made. Structures in the current against voltage curves and in the differential resistance against voltage curves were observed and studied as functions of temperature between 8 K and 0.4 K and magnetic field up to 1 T. Analysis of the data shows that the pressure applied at the contact is sufficient to make NbSe{sub 3} superconducting. (author)

  20. Quantum point contacts and resistive switching in Ni/NiO nanowire junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Sean M.; Fairfield, Jessamyn A.; Bellew, Allen T.; Lee, Sunghun; Champlain, James G.; Ruppalt, Laura B.; Boland, John J.; Vora, Patrick M.

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxide devices that exhibit resistive switching are leading candidates for non-volatile memory applications due to their potential for fast switching, low-power operation, and high device density. It is widely accepted in many systems that two-state resistive behavior arises from the formation and rupture of conductive filaments spanning the oxide layer. However, means for controlling the filament geometry, which critically influences conduction, have largely been unexamined. Here, we explore the connection between filament geometry and conductance in a model resistive switching system based on the junction of two nickel/nickel oxide core/shell nanowires. Variable temperature current-voltage measurements indicate that either wide metallic filaments or narrow semiconducting filaments can be preferentially formed by varying the current compliance during electroformation. Metallic filaments behave as a conventional metallic resistance in series with a small barrier, while semiconducting filaments behave as quantum point contacts. The ability to tune filament geometry and behavior through the electroforming process may open avenues for enhanced functionality in nanoscale memristive systems.

  1. Interference features in scanning gate conductance maps of quantum point contacts with disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasiński, K.; Szafran, B.; Brun, B.; Sellier, H.

    2016-08-01

    We consider quantum point contact (QPC) defined within a disordered two-dimensional electron gas as studied by scanning gate microscopy. We evaluate the conductance maps in the Landauer approach with a wave-function picture of electron transport for samples with both low and high electron mobility at finite temperatures. We discuss the spatial distribution of the impurities in the context of the branched electron flow. We reproduce the surprising temperature stability of the experimental interference fringes far from the QPC. Next, we discuss funnel-shaped features that accompany splitting of the branches visible in previous experiments. Finally, we study elliptical interference fringes formed by an interplay of scattering by the pointlike impurities and by the scanning probe. We discuss the details of the elliptical features as functions of the tip voltage and the temperature, showing that the first interference fringe is very robust against the thermal widening of the Fermi level. We present a simple analytical model that allows for extraction of the impurity positions and the electron-gas depletion radius induced by the negatively charged tip of the atomic force microscope, and apply this model on experimental scanning gate images showing such elliptical fringes.

  2. Spin splitting generated in a Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wójcik, P., E-mail: pawel.wojcik@fis.agh.edu.pl; Adamowski, J., E-mail: janusz.adamowski@fis.agh.edu.pl; Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, al. Mickiewicza 30, Kraków (Poland)

    2015-07-07

    We have studied the spin splitting of the current in the Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact (QPC) in a perpendicular magnetic field. Our calculations show that the appropriate tuning of the QPC potential and the external magnetic field leads to an almost perfect separation of the spin-polarized currents: electrons with opposite spins flow out through different output branches. The spin splitting results from the joint effect of the QPC, the spin Zeeman splitting, and the electron transport through the edge states formed in the nanowire at the sufficiently high magnetic field. The Y-shaped nanostructure can be used to split the unpolarized current into two spin currents with opposite spins as well as to detect the flow of the spin current. We have found that the separation of the spin currents is only slightly affected by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spin-splitter device is an analogue of the optical device—the birefractive crystal that splits the unpolarized light into two beams with perpendicular polarizations. In the magnetic-field range, in which the current is carried through the edges states, the spin splitting is robust against the spin-independent scattering. This feature opens up a possibility of the application of the Y-shaped nanostructure as a non-ballistic spin-splitter device in spintronics.

  3. Direct measurement on the geometric phase of a double quantum dot qubit via quantum point contact device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao; Zhang, Feng-Yang; Song, Jie; Song, He-Shan

    2015-01-01

    We propose a direct measurement scheme to read out the geometric phase of a coupled double quantum dot system via a quantum point contact(QPC) device. An effective expression of the geometric phase has been derived, which relates the geometric phase of the double quantum dot qubit to the current through QPC device. All the parameters in our expression are measurable or tunable in experiment. Moreover, since the measurement process affects the state of the qubit slightly, the geometric phase can be protected. The feasibility of the scheme has been analyzed. Further, as an example, we simulate the geometrical phase of a qubit when the QPC device is replaced by a single electron transistor(SET). PMID:26121538

  4. Nonequilibrium transport through a point contact in the nu = 5/2 non-Abelian quantum Hall state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiguin, Adrian; Fendley, Paul; Fisher, Matthew P A; Nayak, Chetan

    2008-12-05

    We analyze charge-e/4 quasiparticle tunneling between the edges of a point contact in a non-Abelian model of the nu = 5/2 quantum Hall state in the presence of a finite voltage difference using the time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group method. We confirm that, as the voltage decreases, the system is broken into two pieces. In the limits of small and large voltage, we recover the results expected from perturbation theory about the infrared and ultraviolet fixed points. We test our methods by finding the analogous nonequilibrium current through a point contact at nu = 1/3.

  5. All-electrical nonlinear fano resonance in coupled quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shiran

    This thesis is motivated by recent interest in the Fano resonance (FR). As a wave-interference phenomenon, this resonance is of increasing importance in optics, plasmon-ics, and metamaterials, where its ability to cause rapid signal modulations under variation of some suitable parameter makes it desirable for a variety of applications. In this thesis, I focus on a novel manifestation of this resonance in systems of coupled quantum point contacts (QPCs). The major finding of this work is that the FR in this system may be ma-nipulated by applying a nonlinear DC bias to the system. Under such conditions, we are able to induce significant distortions of resonance lineshape, providing a pathway to all-electrical manipulation of the FR. To interpret this behavior we apply a recently-developed model for a three-path FR, involving an additional "intruder" continuum. We have previously used this model to account for the magnetic-field induced distortions of the FR observed in coupled QPCs, and show here that this model also provides a frame-work for understanding the observed nonlinear behavior. Our work therefore reveals a new manifestation of the FR that can be sensitively tailored by external control, a finding that may eventually allow the application of this feature to nanoelectronics. Since the in-terference scheme involves in this thesis is a completely general one, it should be broadly applicable across a variety of different wave-based systems, including those in both pho-tonics and electronics and opening up the possibility of new applications in areas such as chemical and biological sensing and secure communications.

  6. Quantization and anomalous structures in the conductance of Si/SiGe quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Pock, J. F.; Salloch, D.; Qiao, G.; Wieser, U.; Hackbarth, T.; Kunze, U.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum point contacts (QPCs) are fabricated on modulation-doped Si/SiGe heterostructures and ballistic transport is studied at low temperatures. We observe quantized conductance with subband separations up to 4 meV and anomalies in the first conductance plateau at 4e2/h. At a temperature of T = 22 mK in the linear transport regime, a weak anomalous kink structure arises close to 0.5(4e2/h), which develops into a distinct plateau-like structure as temperature is raised up to T = 4 K. Under magnetic field parallel to the wire up to B = 14 T, the anomaly evolves into the Zeeman spin-split level at 0.5(4e2/h), resembling the "0.7 anomaly" in GaAs/AlGaAs QPCs. Additionally, a zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) is observed in nonlinear transport spectroscopy. At T = 22 mK, a parallel magnetic field splits the ZBA peak up into two peaks. At B = 0, elevated temperatures lead to similar splitting, which differs from the behavior of ZBAs in GaAs/AlGaAs QPCs. Under finite dc bias, the differential resistance exhibits additional plateaus approximately at 0.8(4e2/h) and 0.2(4e2/h) known as "0.85 anomaly" and "0.25 anomaly" in GaAs/AlGaAs QPCs. Unlike the first regular plateau at 4e2/h, the 0.2(4e2/h) plateau is insensitive to dc bias voltage up to at least VDS = 80 mV, in-plane magnetic fields up to B = 15 T, and to elevated temperatures up to T = 25 K. We interpret this effect as due to pinching off one of the reservoirs close to the QPC. We do not see any indication of lifting of the valley degeneracy in our samples.

  7. Probing chiral superconductivity in Sr2RuO4 underneath the surface by point contact measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Luo, Jiawei; Lou, Weijian; Ortmann, J. E.; Mao, Z. Q.; Liu, Y.; Wei, Jian

    2017-05-01

    Sr2RuO4 (SRO) is the prime candidate for a chiral p-wave superconductor with critical temperature {T}{{c}}({SRO})˜ 1.5 K. Chiral domains with opposite chiralities {p}x+/- {{{i}}{p}}y have been proposed, but are yet to be confirmed. We measure the field dependence of the point contact (PC) resistance between a tungsten tip and an SRO-Ru eutectic crystal, where micrometer-sized Ru inclusions are embedded in SRO with an atomically sharp interface. Ruthenium is an s-wave superconductor with {T}{{c}}({Ru})˜ 0.5 K; flux pinned near the Ru inclusions can suppress its superconductivity, as reflected in the PC resistance and spectra. This flux pinning effect originates from SRO underneath the surface and is very strong once flux is introduced. To fully remove flux pinning, one needs to thermally cycle the sample above T c(SRO) or apply alternating fields with decreasing amplitude. With alternating fields, the observed hysteresis in magnetoresistance can be explained by domain dynamics, providing support for the existence of chiral domains. The origin of the strong pinning could be the chiral domains themselves.

  8. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Field Dependence of Quantum Point Contacts in Si-Inversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.L.; Son, P.C. van; Wees, B.J. van; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The conductance of ballistic point contacts in high-mobility Si-inversion layers has been studied at several temperatures between 75 and 600 mK both without and in a magnetic field (up to 12T). When the width of constriction is varied in zero magnetic field, step-like features at multiples of 4e2/h

  9. Coherent electron focusing with quantum point contacts in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, H. van; Beenakker, C.W.J.; Williamson, J.G.; Broekaart, M.E.I.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Wees, B.J. van; Mooij, J.E.; Foxon, C.T.; Harris, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Transverse electron focusing in a two-dimensional electron gas is investigated experimentally and theoretically for the first time. A split Schottky gate on top of a GaAs-AlxGa1–xAs heterostructure defines two point contacts of variable width, which are used as injector and collector of ballistic el

  10. Hybrid superconductor-quantum point contact devices using InSb nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, S. T.; Damasco, J.; Car, D.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Mason, N.

    2016-12-01

    Proposals for studying topological superconductivity and Majorana bound states in a nanowire proximity coupled to superconductors require that transport in the nanowire is ballistic. Previous works on hybrid nanowire-superconductor systems have shown evidence for Majorana bound states, but these experiments were also marked by disorder, which disrupts ballistic transport. In this paper, we demonstrate ballistic transport in the InSb nanowires interfaced directly with superconducting Al by observing quantized conductance at zero-magnetic field. Additionally, we demonstrate that the nanowire is proximity coupled to the superconducting contacts by observing Andreev reflection. These results are important steps for robustly establishing topological superconductivity in the InSb nanowires.

  11. Charge noise analysis of metal oxide semiconductor dual-gate Si/SiGe quantum point contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamioka, J.; Oda, S. [Quantum Nanoelectronics Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S9-11, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8552 (Japan); Kodera, T., E-mail: kodera.t.ac@m.titech.ac.jp [Quantum Nanoelectronics Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S9-11, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8552 (Japan); Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-NE-25, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8552 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Takeda, K.; Obata, T. [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tarucha, S. [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN, Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-05-28

    The frequency dependence of conductance noise through a gate-defined quantum point contact fabricated on a Si/SiGe modulation doped wafer is characterized. The 1/f{sup 2} noise, which is characteristic of random telegraph noise, is reduced by application of a negative bias on the global top gate to reduce the local gate voltage. Direct leakage from the large global gate voltage also causes random telegraph noise, and therefore, there is a suitable point to operate quantum dot measurement.

  12. Observation of multiple superconducting gaps in Fe1+yTe1-xSex via a nano-scale approach to point-contact spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Haibing; De, Debtanu; Wu, Zheng; Diaz-Pinto, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    We report a distinct experimental approach to point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy with diagnostic capability via a unique design of nano-scale normal metal/superconductor devices with excellent thermo-mechanical stability, and have employed this method to unveil the existence of two superconducting energy gaps in iron chalcogenide Fe1+yTe1-xSex which is crucial for understanding its pairing mechanism. This work opens up new opportunities to study gap structures in superconductors an...

  13. Interedge backscattering in buried split-gate-defined graphene quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shaohua; Mreńca-Kolasińska, Alina; Miseikis, Vaidotas; Guiducci, Stefano; Kolasiński, Krzysztof; Coletti, Camilla; Szafran, Bartłomiej; Beltram, Fabio; Roddaro, Stefano; Heun, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Quantum Hall effects offer a formidable playground for the investigation of quantum transport phenomena. Edge modes can be deflected, branched, and mixed by designing a suitable potential landscape in a two-dimensional conducting system subject to a strong magnetic field. In the present work, we demonstrate a buried split-gate architecture and use it to control electron conduction in large-scale single-crystal monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The control of the edge trajectories is demonstrated by the observation of various fractional quantum resistances, as a result of a controllable interedge scattering. Experimental data are successfully modeled both numerically and analytically within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our architecture is particularly promising and unique in view of the investigation of quantum transport via scanning probe microscopy, since graphene constitutes the topmost layer of the device. For this reason, it can be approached and perturbed by a scanning probe down to the limit of mechanical contact.

  14. Information about the state of a charge qubit gained by a weakly coupled quantum point contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashhab, S; You, J Q; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: ashhab@riken.jp

    2009-12-15

    We analyze the information that one can learn about the state of a quantum two-level system, i.e. a qubit, when probed weakly by a nearby detector. We consider the general case where the qubit Hamiltonian and the qubit's operator probed by the detector do not commute. Because the qubit's state keeps evolving while being probed and the measurement data is mixed with a detector-related background noise, one might expect the detector to fail in this case. We show, however, that under suitable conditions and by proper analysis of the measurement data, useful information about the initial state of the qubit can be extracted. Our approach complements the usual master-equation and quantum-trajectory approaches, which describe the evolution of the qubit's quantum state during the measurement process but do not keep track of the acquired measurement information.

  15. Multi-channel conduction in redox-based resistive switch modelled using quantum point contact theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, E., E-mail: enrique.miranda@uab.cat; Suñé, J. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electrònica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallés, Barcelona (Spain); Mehonic, A.; Kenyon, A. J. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-25

    A simple analytic model for the electron transport through filamentary-type structures in Si-rich silica (SiO{sub x})-based resistive switches is proposed. The model is based on a mesoscopic description and is able to account for the linear and nonlinear components of conductance that arise from both fully and partially formed conductive channels spanning the dielectric film. Channels are represented by arrays of identical scatterers whose number and quantum transmission properties determine the current magnitude in the low and high resistance states. We show that the proposed model not only reproduces the experimental current-voltage (I-V) characteristics but also the normalized differential conductance (dln(I)/dln(V)-V) curves of devices under test.

  16. THz Magneto-photoresponse of an InAs-based Quantum Point Contact Structure in the Region of Cyclotron Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Whiteside, Vincent; Bhandari, Nikhil; Cahay, Marc; Newrock, Richard; McCombe, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the THz magneto-photoresponse of a 2DEG in an InAs quantum well with an embedded Quantum Point Contact in the frequency/field region where electron cyclotron resonance (CR) dominates the response suing several lines from an optically pumped THz laser. The photoresponse near CR is manifested as an envelope of the amplitude of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations of the 2DEG with a peak near the CR field. Clear spin-splitting of the quantum oscillations is observed for B > 4, while the SdH oscillations do not show resolved spin-splitting up to 10 T. Data were simulated by a model of resonant carrier heating (due to CR), and from the simulations the carrier density, the CR effective mass, scattering times and the g-factor were obtained. We find a significantly enhanced g-factor, apparently due to many-electron exchange interaction effects. The g-factor determined from fitting spin-split Landau level peaks increases with magnetic field. Work at UB was supported by NSF DMR 1008138 and the Office of the Provost; work at the University of Cincinnati was supported by NSF ECCE 1028483.

  17. Field Dependence of π-Band Superconducting Gap in MgB2 Thin Films from Point-Contact Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan; XI Xiao-Xing; WANG Yong-Lei; SHAN Lei; JIA Ying; YANG Huan; WEN Hai-Hu; ZHUANG Cheng-Gang; LI Qi; CUI Yi

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of point-contact spectroscopy measurements on high-quality epitaxial MgB2 thin films with injected current along the c-axis. The temperature and field dependences of л-band properties with the field parallel to (H‖) or perpendicular to (H┴ ) the c-axis are investigated in detail. When a magnetic field is applied, either parallel or perpendicular to the c-axis, the density of the quasiparticle state (DOS) of the л-band proliferates quickly with increasing field, while the gap amplitude of the л-band decreases slowly, which is different from the recent theoretical calculations, showing a field dependent competition between the interband scattering and the pair-breaking effects.

  18. Electron interaction and spin effects in quantum wires, quantum dots and quantum point contacts: a first-principles mean-field approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zozoulenko, I V; Ihnatsenka, S [Solid State Electronics, Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Linkoeping University, 60174 Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2008-04-23

    We have developed a mean-field first-principles approach for studying electronic and transport properties of low dimensional lateral structures in the integer quantum Hall regime. The electron interactions and spin effects are included within the spin density functional theory in the local density approximation where the conductance, the density, the effective potentials and the band structure are calculated on the basis of the Green's function technique. In this paper we present a systematic review of the major results obtained on the energetics, spin polarization, effective g factor, magnetosubband and edge state structure of split-gate and cleaved-edge overgrown quantum wires as well as on the conductance of quantum point contacts (QPCs) and open quantum dots. In particular, we discuss how the spin-resolved subband structure, the current densities, the confining potentials, as well as the spin polarization of the electron and current densities in quantum wires and antidots evolve when an applied magnetic field varies. We also discuss the role of the electron interaction and spin effects in the conductance of open systems focusing our attention on the 0.7 conductance anomaly in the QPCs. Special emphasis is given to the effect of the electron interaction on the conductance oscillations and their statistics in open quantum dots as well as to interpretation of the related experiments on the ultralow temperature saturation of the coherence time in open dots.

  19. Spin filtering effect generated by the inter-subband spin-orbit coupling in the bilayer nanowire with the quantum point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Paweł; Adamowski, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    The spin filtering effect in the bilayer nanowire with quantum point contact is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate the new mechanism of the spin filtering based on the lateral inter-subband spin-orbit coupling, which for the bilayer nanowires has been reported to be strong. The proposed spin filtering effect is explained as the joint effect of the Landau-Zener intersubband transitions caused by the hybridization of states with opposite spin (due to the lateral Rashba SO interaction) and the confinement of carriers in the quantum point contact region. PMID:28358141

  20. On the zero-bias anomaly and Kondo physics in quantum point contacts near pinch-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, S; Xiao, S; Fuji, K; Shibuya, K; Endo, T; Yumoto, N; Morimoto, T; Aoki, N; Bird, J P; Ochiai, Y

    2014-03-26

    We investigate the linear and non-linear conductance of quantum point contacts (QPCs), in the region near pinch-off where Kondo physics has previously been connected to the appearance of the 0.7 feature. In studies of seven different QPCs, fabricated in the same high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction, the linear conductance is widely found to show the presence of the 0.7 feature. The differential conductance, on the other hand, does not generally exhibit the zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) that has been proposed to indicate the Kondo effect. Indeed, even in the small subset of QPCs found to exhibit such an anomaly, the linear conductance does not always follow the universal temperature-dependent scaling behavior expected for the Kondo effect. Taken collectively, our observations demonstrate that, unlike the 0.7 feature, the ZBA is not a generic feature of low-temperature QPC conduction. We furthermore conclude that the mere observation of the ZBA alone is insufficient evidence for concluding that Kondo physics is active. While we do not rule out the possibility that the Kondo effect may occur in QPCs, our results appear to indicate that its observation requires a very strict set of conditions to be satisfied. This should be contrasted with the case of the 0.7 feature, which has been apparent since the earliest experimental investigations of QPC transport.

  1. Tunable All Electric Spin Polarizer Using A Quantum Point Contact With Two Pairs of In-Plane Side Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Nikhil; Charles, James; Dutta, Maitreya; Das, Partha; Cahay, Marc; Newrock, Richard; Herbert, Steven

    2013-03-01

    We report the first experimental investigation of a device consisting of a quantum point contact (QPC) with four gates - two in-plane side gates in series. The first set of gates (nearest the source contact) is asymmetrically biased to create spin polarization in the channel of the QPC. A symmetric bias is then applied on the second set of side gates (nearest the drain) and varied to tune the location of a conductance anomaly near 0.5 (x2e2/h). The experimental results compare well with simulations of the four-gate QPC devices using a Non-Equilibrium Green's Function formalism. The device is shown to be a tunable all-electric spin polarizer. The range of common-mode bias on the first set of gates over which maximum spin polarization can be achieved is much broader for the four-gate structure compared with the case of a QPC with a single pair of in-plane side gates. This work is supported by NSF under Award 1028483.

  2. Control of Nanofilament Structure and Observations of Quantum Point Contact Behavior in Ni/NiO Nanowire Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Sean; Fairfield, Jessamyn; Lee, Sunghun; Bellew, Allen; Stone, Iris; Ruppalt, Laura; Boland, John; Vora, Patrick

    Resistive switching is ideal for use in non-volatile memory where information is stored in a metallic or insulating state. Nanowire junctions formed at the intersection of two Ni/NiO core/shell nanowires have emerged as a leading candidate structure where resistive switching occurs due to the formation and destruction of conducting filaments. However, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the conduction mechanisms as measurements are typically only performed at room temperature. Here, we combine temperature-dependent current-voltage (IV) measurements from 15 - 300 K with magnetoresistance studies and achieve new insight into the nature of the conducting filaments. We identify a novel semiconducting state that behaves as a quantum point contact and find evidence for a possible electric-field driven phase transition. The insulating state exhibits unexpectedly complex IV characteristics that highlight the disordered nature of the ruptured filament while we find clear signs of anisotropic magnetoresistance in the metallic state. Our results expose previously unobserved behaviors in nanowire resistive switching devices and pave the way for future applications where both electrical and magnetic switching can be achieved in a single device. This work was supported by ONR Grant N-00014-15-1-2357.

  3. Microscopic origin of the 1.3 G(0) conductance observed in oxygen-doped silver quantum point contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Minglang; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2014-11-21

    Besides the peak at one conductance quantum, G0, two additional features at ∼0.4 G0 and ∼1.3 G0 have been observed in the conductance histograms of silver quantum point contacts at room temperature in ambient conditions. In order to understand such feature, here we investigate the electronic transport and mechanical properties of clean and oxygen-doped silver atomic contacts by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, unlike clean Ag single-atom contacts showing a conductance of 1 G0, the low-bias conductance of oxygen-doped Ag atomic contacts depends on the number of oxygen impurities and their binding configuration. When one oxygen atom binds to an Ag monatomic chain sandwiched between two Ag electrodes, the low-bias conductance of the junction always decreases. In contrast, when the number of oxygen impurities is two and the O-O axis is perpendicular to the Ag-Ag axis, the transmission coefficients at the Fermi level are, respectively, calculated to be 1.44 for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes and 1.24 for that with Ag(100) electrodes, both in good agreement with the measured value of ∼1.3 G0. The calculated rupture force (1.60 nN for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes) is also consistent with the experimental value (1.66 ± 0.09 nN), confirming that the measured ∼1.3 G0 conductance should originate from Ag single-atom contacts doped with two oxygen atoms in a perpendicular configuration.

  4. Microscopic origin of the 1.3 G0 conductance observed in oxygen-doped silver quantum point contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Xingchen

    2014-11-21

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Besides the peak at one conductance quantum, G0, two additional features at ∼0.4 G0 and ∼1.3 G0 have been observed in the conductance histograms of silver quantum point contacts at room temperature in ambient conditions. In order to understand such feature, here we investigate the electronic transport and mechanical properties of clean and oxygen-doped silver atomic contacts by employing the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, unlike clean Ag single-atom contacts showing a conductance of 1 G0, the low-bias conductance of oxygen-doped Ag atomic contacts depends on the number of oxygen impurities and their binding configuration. When one oxygen atom binds to an Ag monatomic chain sandwiched between two Ag electrodes, the low-bias conductance of the junction always decreases. In contrast, when the number of oxygen impurities is two and the O-O axis is perpendicular to the Ag-Ag axis, the transmission coefficients at the Fermi level are, respectively, calculated to be 1.44 for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes and 1.24 for that with Ag(100) electrodes, both in good agreement with the measured value of ∼1.3 G0. The calculated rupture force (1.60 nN for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes) is also consistent with the experimental value (1.66 ± 0.09 nN), confirming that the measured ∼1.3 G0 conductance should originate from Ag single-atom contacts doped with two oxygen atoms in a perpendicular configuration.

  5. The influence of device geometry on many-body effects in quantum point contacts : Signatures of the 0.7 anomaly, exchange and kondo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, E. J.; Lerescu, A. I.; Liu, J.; van Wees, B. J.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; van der Wal, C. H.

    2007-01-01

    The conductance of a quantum point contact (QPC) shows several features that result from many-body electron interactions. The spin degeneracy in zero magnetic field appears to be spontaneously lifted due to the so-called 0.7 anomaly. Further, the g-factor for electrons in the QPC is enhanced, and a

  6. Current-voltage characteristics of quantum-point contacts in the closed-channel regime: Transforming the bias voltage into an energy scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloos, K.; Utko, P.; Aagesen, M.;

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the I(V) characteristics (current versus bias voltage) of side-gated quantum-point contacts, defined in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures. These point contacts are operated in the closed-channel regime, that is, at fixed gate voltages below zero-bias pinch-off for conductance. Our...... analysis is based on a single scaling factor, extracted from the experimental I(V) characteristics. For both polarities, this scaling factor transforms the change of bias voltage into a change of electron energy. The latter is determined with respect to the top of the potential barrier of the contact....... Such a built-in energy-voltage calibration allows us to distinguish between the different contributions to the electron transport across the pinched-off contact due to thermal activation or quantum tunneling. The first involves the height of the barrier, and the latter also its length. In the model that we...

  7. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F., E-mail: francois.lefloch@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA - INAC - SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D. [Université Paris-sud, CNRS - IEF, F-91405 Orsay - France (France); Hasselbach, K. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS - Inst. Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Kirtley, J. R. [Center for probing at nanoscale, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305-4045 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  8. Quantum Transport with Three Time Dependent Quantum Point Contacts%含三个含时点接触的量子输运

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程芳

    2016-01-01

    拓扑绝缘体的材料可大大提高计算机芯片的运行速度和工作效率,甚至可能会成为以自旋电子学为基础的下一代全新计算机技术的基石。拓扑绝缘体的边缘态展现出奇特的性质,电子在表面自由流动,不损耗任何能量。使用玻色化,重整化群,格林函数的方法从理论上研究了三个含时点接触存在对拓扑边缘态输运性质的影响。得到电流随偏压和温度变化的解析表达式,以及依赖于电子间相互作用幂指数变化规律。该理论提供了一种调控纳米结构中输运性质的手段。%The novel topological insulator material has provided the physical foundation for the dissipationless spin transport, possibly constructed the brand-new spintronic devices. The edge state of the topological insulator shows unusual helical feature due to the electron spin-momentum locking. Using the Luttinger liquid theory and nonequilibium Green function, the quantum transport in a quantum spin Hall bar with three quantum point contacts ( QPCs) was studied. The currents display very different pump frequency dependence for weak and strong e-e inter-action. These unique properties were induced by the helical feature of the edge states, and therefore can be used to detect and control edge state transport.

  9. Superconducting Qubits and Quantum Resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forn-Díaz, P.

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting qubits are fabricated "loss-free" electrical circuits on a chip with size features of tens of nanometers. If cooled to cryogenic temperatures below -273 °C they behave as quantum elements, similar to atoms and molecules. Such a qubit can be manipulated by fast-oscillating magnetic fi

  10. Multigap superconductivity and strong electron-boson coupling in Fe-based superconductors: a point-contact Andreev-reflection study of Ba(Fe(1-x)Co(x))2As2 single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortello, M; Daghero, D; Ummarino, G A; Stepanov, V A; Jiang, J; Weiss, J D; Hellstrom, E E; Gonnelli, R S

    2010-12-03

    Directional point-contact Andreev-reflection measurements in Ba(Fe(1-x)Co(x))2As2 single crystals (T(c) = 24.5 K) indicate the presence of two superconducting gaps with no line nodes on the Fermi surface. The point-contact Andreev-reflection spectra also feature additional structures related to the electron-boson interaction, from which the characteristic boson energy Ω(b)(T) is obtained, very similar to the spin-resonance energy observed in neutron scattering experiments. Both the gaps and the additional structures can be reproduced within a three-band s ± Eliashberg model by using an electron-boson spectral function peaked at Ω(0) = 12 meV ≃ Ω(b)(0).

  11. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  12. Quantum Memristors with Superconducting Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmilehto, J.; Deppe, F.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2017-02-01

    Memristors are resistive elements retaining information of their past dynamics. They have garnered substantial interest due to their potential for representing a paradigm change in electronics, information processing and unconventional computing. Given the advent of quantum technologies, a design for a quantum memristor with superconducting circuits may be envisaged. Along these lines, we introduce such a quantum device whose memristive behavior arises from quasiparticle-induced tunneling when supercurrents are cancelled. For realistic parameters, we find that the relevant hysteretic behavior may be observed using current state-of-the-art measurements of the phase-driven tunneling current. Finally, we develop suitable methods to quantify memory retention in the system.

  13. Quantum Memristors with Superconducting Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmilehto, J.; Deppe, F.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2017-01-01

    Memristors are resistive elements retaining information of their past dynamics. They have garnered substantial interest due to their potential for representing a paradigm change in electronics, information processing and unconventional computing. Given the advent of quantum technologies, a design for a quantum memristor with superconducting circuits may be envisaged. Along these lines, we introduce such a quantum device whose memristive behavior arises from quasiparticle-induced tunneling when supercurrents are cancelled. For realistic parameters, we find that the relevant hysteretic behavior may be observed using current state-of-the-art measurements of the phase-driven tunneling current. Finally, we develop suitable methods to quantify memory retention in the system. PMID:28195193

  14. Directional point-contact spectroscopy of MgB$_{2}$ single crystals in magnetic fields two-band superconductivity and critical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gonnelli, R S; Ummarino, G A; Della Rocca, V; Calzolari, A; Stepanov, V A; Jun, J; Kazakov, S M; Karpinski, J; Dellarocca, Valeria

    2004-01-01

    The results of the first directional point-contact measurements in MgB2 single crystals, in the presence of magnetic fields up to 9 T either parallel or perpendicular to the ab planes, are presented. By applying suitable magnetic fields, we separated the partial contributions of the sigma and pi bands to the total Andreev-reflection conductance. Their fit with the BTK model allowed a very accurate determination of the temperature dependency of the gaps (Delta_sigma and Delta_pi), that resulted in close agreement with the predictions of the two-band models for MgB2. We also obtained, for the first time with point-contact spectroscopy, the temperature dependence of the (anisotropic) upper critical field of the sigma band and of the (isotropic) upper critical field of the pi band.

  15. Direct evidence for two-band superconductivity in MgB2 single crystals from directional point-contact spectroscopy in magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnelli, R S; Daghero, D; Ummarino, G A; Stepanov, V A; Jun, J; Kazakov, S M; Karpinski, J

    2002-12-01

    We present the results of the first directional point-contact spectroscopy experiments in high-quality MgB2 single crystals. Because of the directionality of the current injection into the samples, the application of a magnetic field allowed us to separate the contributions of the sigma and pi bands to the total conductance of our point contacts. By using this technique, we were able to obtain the temperature dependency of each gap independent of the other. The consequent, strong reduction of the error on the value of the gap amplitude as a function of temperature allows a stricter test of the predictions of the two-band model for MgB2.

  16. Superconductor-normal-superconductor with distributed Sharvin point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Matthew J.; Little, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A non-linear superconducting junction device comprising a layer of high transient temperature superconducting material which is superconducting at an operating temperature, a layer of metal in contact with the layer of high temperature superconducting material and which remains non-superconducting at the operating temperature, and a metal material which is superconducting at the operating temperature and which forms distributed Sharvin point contacts with the metal layer.

  17. Point contacts in encapsulated graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handschin, Clevin [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Swiss Nanoscience Institute, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Fülöp, Bálint; Csonka, Szabolcs [Department of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics and Condensed Matter Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budafoki ut 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Makk, Péter; Blanter, Sofya; Weiss, Markus; Schönenberger, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Schoenenberger@unibas.ch [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Material Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-11-02

    We present a method to establish inner point contacts with dimensions as small as 100 nm on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) encapsulated graphene heterostructures by pre-patterning the top-hBN in a separate step prior to dry-stacking. 2- and 4-terminal field effect measurements between different lead combinations are in qualitative agreement with an electrostatic model assuming point-like contacts. The measured contact resistances are 0.5–1.5 kΩ per contact, which is quite low for such small contacts. By applying a perpendicular magnetic field, an insulating behaviour in the quantum Hall regime was observed, as expected for inner contacts. The fabricated contacts are compatible with high mobility graphene structures and open up the field for the realization of several electron optical proposals.

  18. Superconducting quantum circuits theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiuhao

    Superconducting quantum circuit models are widely used to understand superconducting devices. This thesis consists of four studies wherein the superconducting quantum circuit is used to illustrate challenges related to quantum information encoding and processing, quantum simulation, quantum signal detection and amplification. The existence of scalar Aharanov-Bohm phase has been a controversial topic for decades. Scalar AB phase, defined as time integral of electric potential, gives rises to an extra phase factor in wavefunction. We proposed a superconducting quantum Faraday cage to detect temporal interference effect as a consequence of scalar AB phase. Using the superconducting quantum circuit model, the physical system is solved and resulting AB effect is predicted. Further discussion in this chapter shows that treating the experimental apparatus quantum mechanically, spatial scalar AB effect, proposed by Aharanov-Bohm, can't be observed. Either a decoherent interference apparatus is used to observe spatial scalar AB effect, or a quantum Faraday cage is used to observe temporal scalar AB effect. The second study involves protecting a quantum system from losing coherence, which is crucial to any practical quantum computation scheme. We present a theory to encode any qubit, especially superconducting qubits, into a universal quantum degeneracy point (UQDP) where low frequency noise is suppressed significantly. Numerical simulations for superconducting charge qubit using experimental parameters show that its coherence time is prolong by two orders of magnitude using our universal degeneracy point approach. With this improvement, a set of universal quantum gates can be performed at high fidelity without losing too much quantum coherence. Starting in 2004, the use of circuit QED has enabled the manipulation of superconducting qubits with photons. We applied quantum optical approach to model coupled resonators and obtained a four-wave mixing toolbox to operate photons

  19. Feedback control of superconducting quantum circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristè, D.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting circuits have recently risen to the forefront of the solid-state prototypes for quantum computing. Reaching the stage of robust quantum computing requires closing the loop between measurement and control of quantum bits (qubits). This thesis presents the realization of feedback contr

  20. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-03-04

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5.

  1. Quantum Magnetomechanics with Levitating Superconducting Microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Romero-Isart, O; Navau, C; Sanchez, A; Cirac, J I

    2011-01-01

    We show that by magnetically trapping a superconducting microsphere close to a quantum circuit, it is experimentally feasible to perform ground state cooling and to prepare quantum superpositions of the center-of-mass motion of the microsphere. Due to the absence of clamping losses and time dependent electromagnetic fields, the mechanical motion of micrometer-sized metallic spheres in the Meissner state is predicted to be extremely well isolated from the environment. Hence, we propose to combine the technology of magnetic mictrotraps and superconducting qubits to bring relatively large objects to the quantum regime.

  2. Experimental Quantum Randomness Processing Using Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao; Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Ma, Yuwei; Zhang, Fang; Yan, Zhaopeng; Vijay, R.; Sun, Luyan; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Coherently manipulating multipartite quantum correlations leads to remarkable advantages in quantum information processing. A fundamental question is whether such quantum advantages persist only by exploiting multipartite correlations, such as entanglement. Recently, Dale, Jennings, and Rudolph negated the question by showing that a randomness processing, quantum Bernoulli factory, using quantum coherence, is strictly more powerful than the one with classical mechanics. In this Letter, focusing on the same scenario, we propose a theoretical protocol that is classically impossible but can be implemented solely using quantum coherence without entanglement. We demonstrate the protocol by exploiting the high-fidelity quantum state preparation and measurement with a superconducting qubit in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture and a nearly quantum-limited parametric amplifier. Our experiment shows the advantage of using quantum coherence of a single qubit for information processing even when multipartite correlation is not present.

  3. Experimental Quantum Randomness Processing Using Superconducting Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao; Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Ma, Yuwei; Zhang, Fang; Yan, Zhaopeng; Vijay, R; Sun, Luyan; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Coherently manipulating multipartite quantum correlations leads to remarkable advantages in quantum information processing. A fundamental question is whether such quantum advantages persist only by exploiting multipartite correlations, such as entanglement. Recently, Dale, Jennings, and Rudolph negated the question by showing that a randomness processing, quantum Bernoulli factory, using quantum coherence, is strictly more powerful than the one with classical mechanics. In this Letter, focusing on the same scenario, we propose a theoretical protocol that is classically impossible but can be implemented solely using quantum coherence without entanglement. We demonstrate the protocol by exploiting the high-fidelity quantum state preparation and measurement with a superconducting qubit in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture and a nearly quantum-limited parametric amplifier. Our experiment shows the advantage of using quantum coherence of a single qubit for information processing even when multipartite correlation is not present.

  4. Toward a superconducting quantum computer. Harnessing macroscopic quantum coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers.

  5. Geneva University - Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 29 janvier 2007 COLLOQUE DE LA SECTION DE PHYSIQUE 17 heures - Auditoire Stueckelberg Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects Prof. Hans Mooij / Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology The quantum conjugate variables of a superconductor are the charge or number of Cooper pairs, and the phase of the order parameter. In circuits that contain small Josephson junctions, these quantum properties can be brought forward. In Delft we study so-called flux qubits, superconducting rings that contain three small Josephson junctions. When a magnetic flux of half a flux quantum is applied to the loop, there are two states with opposite circulating current. For suitable junction parameters, a quantum superposition of those macroscopic states is possible. Transitions can be driven with resonant microwaves. These quantum ...

  6. Superconducting Quantum Arrays for Broadband RF Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, V.; Sharafiev, A.; Soloviev, I.; Kolotinskiy, N.; Mukhanov, O.

    2014-05-01

    Superconducting Quantum Arrays (SQAs), homogenous arrays of Superconducting Quantum Cells, are developed for implementation of broadband radio frequency (RF) systems capable of providing highly linear magnetic signal to voltage transfer with high dynamic range, including active electrically small antennas (ESAs). Among the proposed quantum cells which are bi-SQUID and Differential Quantum Cell (DQC), the latter delivered better performance for SQAs. A prototype of the transformer-less active ESA based on a 2D SQA with nonsuperconducting electric connection of the DQCs was fabricated using HYPRES niobium process with critical current density 4.5 kA/cm2. The measured voltage response is characterized by a peak-to-peak swing of ~100 mV and steepness of ~6500 μV/μT.

  7. Superconducting Qubits as Mechanical Quantum Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtleben, Kewin; Mazon, Kahio T.; Rego, Luis G. C.

    2017-09-01

    We propose the equivalence of superconducting qubits with a pistonlike mechanical quantum engine. The work reports a study on the nature of the nonequilibrium work exchanged with the quantum-nonadiabatic working medium, which is modeled as a multilevel coupled quantum well system subject to an external control parameter. The quantum dynamics is solved for arbitrary control protocols. It is shown that the work output has two components: one that depends instantaneously on the level populations and another that is due to the quantum coherences built in the system. The nonadiabatic coherent dynamics of the quantum engine gives rise to a resistance (friction) force that decreases the work output. We consider the functional equivalence of such a device and a rf-SQUID flux qubit.

  8. Superconducting circuits for quantum information: an outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2013-03-08

    The performance of superconducting qubits has improved by several orders of magnitude in the past decade. These circuits benefit from the robustness of superconductivity and the Josephson effect, and at present they have not encountered any hard physical limits. However, building an error-corrected information processor with many such qubits will require solving specific architecture problems that constitute a new field of research. For the first time, physicists will have to master quantum error correction to design and operate complex active systems that are dissipative in nature, yet remain coherent indefinitely. We offer a view on some directions for the field and speculate on its future.

  9. rf superconducting quantum interference device metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-04-01

    A rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array in an alternating magnetic field is investigated with respect to its effective magnetic permeability, within the effective medium approximation. This system acts as an inherently nonlinear magnetic metamaterial, leading to negative magnetic response, and thus negative permeability above the resonance frequency of the individual SQUIDs. Moreover, the permeability exhibits oscillatory behavior at low field intensities, allowing its tuning by a slight change of the intensity of the applied field.

  10. Quantum Computing Using Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    highlighted in the " Molecular Motors" first feature article of the November, 2002, Physics Today, page 38. http://www.physicstoday.org/vol-5 5/iss-I I...12-2003. the article was in http://www.mosac.com/ fisica /news/leggi.php?codice= 191. News coverage in French include the following three newspapers... molecular vibra- Josephson junction devices have been proposed and experi- tional mode [12], motional quantum states of a trapped - - mentally

  11. Quantum device prospects of superconducting nanodiamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtsuko, D.; Churochkin, D.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured semiconducting carbon system, described by as a superlattice-like structure demonstrated its potential in switching device applications based on the quantum tunneling through the insulating carbon layer. This switching property can be enhanced further with the association of Josephson's tunneling between two superconducting carbon (diamond) grains separated by a very thin layer of carbon which holds the structure of the film firmly. The superconducting nanodiamond heterostructures form qubits which can lead to the development of quantum computers provided the effect of disorder present in these structure can be firmly understood. Presently we concentrate on electrical transport properties of heavily boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films around the superconducting transition temperature measured as a function of magnetic fields and the applied bias current. Microstructure of these films is described by a two dimensional superlattice system which can also contain paramagnetic impurities. We report observation of anomalous negative Hall resistance in these films close to the superconductor-insulator-normal phase transition in the resistance versus temperature plots at low bias currents at zero and low magnetic field. The negative Hall effect is found to be suppressed as the bias current increase. Magnetoresistance study shows a distinct peak at zero field when measured in the low current regimes which suggest a superconductor-insulator-superconductor structure of films. Current vs. voltage characteristics show signature of π-Josephson like behaviour which can give rise to a characteristic frequency of several hundred of gigahertz. Signature of spin flipping also shows novel spintronic device applications.

  12. Quantum memristor in a superconducting circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmilehto, Juha; Sanz, Mikel; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Solano, Enrique

    Memristors, resistive elements that retain information of their past, have garnered interest due to their paradigm-changing potential in information processing and electronics. The emergent hysteretic behaviour allows for novel architectural applications and has recently been classically demonstrated in a simplified superconducting setup using the phase-dependent conductance in the tunnel-junction-microscopic model. In this contribution, we present a truly quantum model for a memristor constructed using established elements and techniques in superconducting nanoelectronics, and explore the parameters for feasible operation as well as refine the methods for quantifying the memory retention. In particular, the memristive behaviour is shown to arise from quasiparticle-induced tunneling in the full dissipative model and can be observed in the phase-driven tunneling current. The relevant hysteretic behaviour should be observable using current state-of-the-art measurements for detecting quasiparticle excitations. Our theoretical findings constitute the first quantum memristor in a superconducting circuit and act as the starting point for designing further circuit elements that have non-Markovian characteristics The authors acknowledge support from the CCQED EU project and the Finnish Cultural Foundation.

  13. Electron tunneling and point contact Andreev reflection studies of superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenqing

    The energy gap is the most fundamental property of a superconductor. Electron tunneling spectroscopy and point contact spectroscopy (PCS) are powerful techniques for studying the density of states and energy gap features of superconductors. Two different superconducting systems, multiband superconductor MgB2 and proximity induced topological superconductor NbSe2/Bi 2Se3 heterostructures were studied using either quasiparticle tunneling in planar tunnel junctions or PCS in this work. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  14. Quantum synchronization in disordered superconducting metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fistul, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    I report a theoretical study of collective coherent quantum-mechanical oscillations in disordered superconducting quantum metamaterials (SQMs), i.e. artificial arrays of interacting qubits (two-levels system). An unavoidable disorder in qubits parameters results in a substantial spread of qubits frequencies, and in the absence of electromagnetic interaction between qubits these individual quantum-mechanical oscillations of single qubits manifest themselves by a large number of small resonant dips in the frequency dependent transmission of electromagnetic waves, |S21(ω)|2. We show that even a weak electromagnetic interaction between adjacent qubits can overcome the disorder and establish completely or partially synchronized quantum-mechanical dynamic state in the disordered SQM. In such a state a large amount of qubits displays the collective quantum mechanical oscillations, and this collective behavior manifests itself by a few giant resonant dips in the |S21(ω)|2 dependence. The size of a system r0 showing the collective (synchronized) quantum-mechanical behavior is determined in the one-dimensional SQMs as r0 ≃ a [K/δΔ]2, where K, δΔ, a are the effective energy of nearest-neighbor interaction, the spread of qubits energy splitting, and the distance between qubits, accordingly. We show that this phenomenon is mapped to the Anderson localization of spinon-type excitations arising in the SQM.

  15. Quantum synchronization in disordered superconducting metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fistul, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    I report a theoretical study of collective coherent quantum-mechanical oscillations in disordered superconducting quantum metamaterials (SQMs), i.e. artificial arrays of interacting qubits (two-levels system). An unavoidable disorder in qubits parameters results in a substantial spread of qubits frequencies, and in the absence of electromagnetic interaction between qubits these individual quantum-mechanical oscillations of single qubits manifest themselves by a large number of small resonant dips in the frequency dependent transmission of electromagnetic waves, |S21(ω)|2. We show that even a weak electromagnetic interaction between adjacent qubits can overcome the disorder and establish completely or partially synchronized quantum-mechanical dynamic state in the disordered SQM. In such a state a large amount of qubits displays the collective quantum mechanical oscillations, and this collective behavior manifests itself by a few giant resonant dips in the |S21(ω)|2 dependence. The size of a system r0 showing the collective (synchronized) quantum-mechanical behavior is determined in the one-dimensional SQMs as r0 ≃ a [K/δΔ]2, where K, δΔ, a are the effective energy of nearest-neighbor interaction, the spread of qubits energy splitting, and the distance between qubits, accordingly. We show that this phenomenon is mapped to the Anderson localization of spinon-type excitations arising in the SQM.

  16. Fraunhofer regime of operation for superconducting quantum interference filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadrin, A.V.; Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.;

    2008-01-01

    Series arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with incommensurate loop areas, so-called superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIFs), are investigated in the kilohertz and the gigahertz frequency range. In SQIFs made of high-T-c bicrystal junctions the flux-to-vol...

  17. Relativistic Quantum Teleportation with superconducting circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Friis, Nicolai; Truong, Kevin; Sabín, Carlos; Solano, Enrique; Johansson, Göran; Fuentes, Ivette

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of relativistic motion on quantum teleportation and propose a realizable experiment where our results can be tested. We compute bounds on the optimal fidelity of teleportation when one of the observers undergoes non-uniform motion for a finite time. The upper bound to the optimal fidelity is degraded due to the observer's motion however, we discuss how this degradation can be corrected. These effects are observable for experimental parameters that are within reach of cutting-edge superconducting technology.

  18. Optimal control and quantum simulations in superconducting quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel J.

    2014-10-31

    Quantum optimal control theory is the science of steering quantum systems. In this thesis we show how to overcome the obstacles in implementing optimal control for superconducting quantum bits, a promising candidate for the creation of a quantum computer. Building such a device will require the tools of optimal control. We develop pulse shapes to solve a frequency crowding problem and create controlled-Z gates. A methodology is developed for the optimisation towards a target non-unitary process. We show how to tune-up control pulses for a generic quantum system in an automated way using a combination of open- and closed-loop optimal control. This will help scaling of quantum technologies since algorithms can calibrate control pulses far more efficiently than humans. Additionally we show how circuit QED can be brought to the novel regime of multi-mode ultrastrong coupling using a left-handed transmission line coupled to a right-handed one. We then propose to use this system as an analogue quantum simulator for the Spin-Boson model to show how dissipation arises in quantum systems.

  19. Flux Exclusion Superconducting Quantum Metamaterial: Towards Quantum-level Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinov, V.; Tsiatmas, A.; Buckingham, A. R.; Fedotov, V. A.; de Groot, P. A. J.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear and switchable metamaterials achieved by artificial structuring on the subwavelength scale have become a central topic in photonics research. Switching with only a few quanta of excitation per metamolecule, metamaterial's elementary building block, is the ultimate goal, achieving which will open new opportunities for energy efficient signal handling and quantum information processing. Recently, arrays of Josephson junction devices have been proposed as a possible solution. However, they require extremely high levels of nanofabrication. Here we introduce a new quantum superconducting metamaterial which exploits the magnetic flux quantization for switching. It does not contain Josephson junctions, making it simple to fabricate and scale into large arrays. The metamaterial was manufactured from a high-temperature superconductor and characterized in the low intensity regime, providing the first observation of the quantum phenomenon of flux exclusion affecting the far-field electromagnetic properties of the metamaterial. PMID:22690319

  20. Odd-Parity Superconductivity and the Ferromagnetic Quantum Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, A. D.; Yates, S. J. C.; Lévy, F.; Sheikin, I.

    2007-05-01

    The study of the emergence of superconductivity close to quantum critical points affords a powerful means to identify the mechanism that drives the formation of unconventional superconductivity in heavy fermion materials. The recent discovery of superconducting states close to quantum critical points in ferromagnets UGe2 and URhGe is reviewed in this light. For URhGe we examine whether the predominant type of magnetic excitations involved are longitudinal excitations, hitherto considered theoretically to be the most promising candidate to mediate equal-spin-paired superconductivity.

  1. Controllable Quantum States Mesoscopic Superconductivity and Spintronics (MS+S2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku; Nakano, Hayato

    2008-10-01

    Josephson effect in diffusive d-wave junctions / T. Yokoyama. Quantum dissipation due to the zero energy bound states in high-T[symbol] superconductor junctions / Shiro Kawabata. Spin-polarized heat transport in ferromagnet/unconventional superconductor junctions / T. Yokoyama. Little-Parks oscillations in chiral p-wave superconducting rings / Mitsuaki Takigawa. Theoretical study of synergy effect between proximity effect and Andreev interface resonant states in triplet p-wave superconductors / Yasunari Tanuma. Theory of proximity effect in unconventional superconductor junctions / Y. Tanaka -- Quantum information. Analyzing the effectiveness of the quantum repeater / Kenichiro Furuta. Architecture-dependent execution time of Shor's algorithm / Rodney Van Meter -- Quantum dots and Kondo effects. Coulomb blockade properties of 4-gated quantum dot / Shinichi Amaha. Order-N electronic structure calculation of n-type GaAs quantum dots / Shintaro Nomura. Transport through double-dots coupled to normal and superconducting leads / Yoichi Tanaka. A study of the quantum dot in application to terahertz single photon counting / Vladimir Antonov. Electron transport through laterally coupled double quantum dots / T. Kubo. Dephasing in Kondo systems: comparison between theory and experiment / F. Mallet. Kondo effect in quantum dots coupled with noncollinear ferromagnetic leads / Daisuke Matsubayashi. Non-crossing approximation study of multi-orbital Kondo effect in quantum dot systems / Tomoko Kita. Theoretical study of electronic states and spin operation in coupled quantum dots / Mikio Eto. Spin correlation in a double quantum dot-quantum wire coupled system / S. Sasaki. Kondo-assisted transport through a multiorbital quantum dot / Rui Sakano. Spin decay in a quantum dot coupled to a quantum point contact / Massoud Borhani -- Quantum wires, low-dimensional electrons. Control of the electron density and electric field with front and back gates / Masumi Yamaguchi. Effect of the array

  2. Magneto-transport Spectroscopy of the First and Second Two-dimensional Subbands in Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN Quantum Point Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fangchao; Tang, Ning; Shang, Liangliang; Guan, Hongming; Xu, Fujun; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic transport spectroscopy is investigated in quantum point contacts (QPCs) fabricated in Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN heterostructures. The magnetic field perpendicular to the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is shown to depopulate the quasi-one-dimensional energy levels in the first two-dimensional (2D) subband faster than those in the second one. In GaN based heterostructures, the energy levels in the second 2D subband is generally concealed in the fast course of depletion and hence rarely detected. The perpendicular magnetic field facilitates the observation of the second 2D subband, and provides a method to study the properties of these energy levels. A careful analysis on the rate of the magnetic depletion with respect to the level index and confinement is carried out, from which the profile of the lateral confinement in GaN based QPCs is found to be triangular. The stability diagram at T shows the energy separation between the first and second 2D subband to be in the range of 32 to 42 meV. PMID:28225042

  3. Quantum information processing with superconducting circuits: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendin, G.

    2017-10-01

    During the last ten years, superconducting circuits have passed from being interesting physical devices to becoming contenders for near-future useful and scalable quantum information processing (QIP). Advanced quantum simulation experiments have been shown with up to nine qubits, while a demonstration of quantum supremacy with fifty qubits is anticipated in just a few years. Quantum supremacy means that the quantum system can no longer be simulated by the most powerful classical supercomputers. Integrated classical-quantum computing systems are already emerging that can be used for software development and experimentation, even via web interfaces. Therefore, the time is ripe for describing some of the recent development of superconducting devices, systems and applications. As such, the discussion of superconducting qubits and circuits is limited to devices that are proven useful for current or near future applications. Consequently, the centre of interest is the practical applications of QIP, such as computation and simulation in Physics and Chemistry.

  4. Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proslier, Th. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zasadzinski, J. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Elam, J. W. [ANL; Norem, J. [ANL; Pellin, M. J. [ANL

    2009-11-01

    We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  5. Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Quantum information science seeks to take advantage of the properties of quantum mechanics to manipulate information in ways that are not otherwise possible. Quantum computation, for example, promises to solve certain problems in days that would take a conventional supercomputer the age of the universe to decipher. This power does not come without a cost however, as quantum bits are inherently more susceptible to errors than their classical counterparts. Fortunately, it is possible to redundantly encode information in several entangled qubits, making it robust to decoherence and control imprecision with quantum error correction. I studied one possible physical implementation for quantum computing, employing the ground and first excited quantum states of a superconducting electrical circuit as a quantum bit. These ``transmon'' qubits are dispersively coupled to a superconducting resonator used for readout, control, and qubit-qubit coupling in the cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture. In this talk I will give an general introduction to quantum computation and the superconducting technology that seeks to achieve it before explaining some of the specific results reported in my thesis. One major component is that of the first realization of three-qubit quantum error correction in a solid state device, where we encode one logical quantum bit in three entangled physical qubits and detect and correct phase- or bit-flip errors using a three-qubit Toffoli gate. My thesis is available at arXiv:1311.6759.

  6. Simulating Zeno physics by a quantum quench with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing-Jun; An, Jun-Hong; Kwek, L. C.; Luo, Hong-Gang; Oh, C. H.

    2014-06-01

    Studying out-of-equilibrium physics in quantum systems under quantum quench is of vast experimental and theoretical interest. Using periodic quantum quenches, we present an experimentally accessible scheme to simulate the quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in an open quantum system of a single superconducting qubit interacting with an array of transmission line resonators. The scheme is based on the following two observations: First, compared with conventional systems, the short-time nonexponential decay in our superconducting circuit system is readily observed; and second, a quench-off process mimics an ideal projective measurement when its time duration is sufficiently long. Our results show the active role of quantum quench in quantum simulation and control.

  7. Recent progress of probing correlated electron states by point contact spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Cheng; Greene, Laura H.

    2016-09-01

    We review recent progress in point contact spectroscopy (PCS) to extract spectroscopic information out of correlated electron materials, with the emphasis on non-superconducting states. PCS has been used to detect bosonic excitations in normal metals, where signatures (e.g. phonons) are usually less than 1% of the measured conductance. In the superconducting state, point contact Andreev reflection (PCAR) has been widely used to study properties of the superconducting gap in various superconductors. It has been well-recognized that the corresponding conductance can be accurately fitted by the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) theory in which the AR occurring near the point contact junction is modeled by three parameters; the superconducting gap, the quasiparticle scattering rate, and a dimensionless parameter, Z, describing the strength of the potential barrier at the junction. AR can be as large as 100% of the background conductance, and only arises in the case of superconductors. In the last decade, there have been more and more experimental results suggesting that the point contact conductance could reveal new features associated with the unusual single electron dynamics in non-superconducting states, shedding a new light on exploring the nature of the competing phases in correlated materials. To correctly interpret these new features, it is crucial to re-examine the modeling of the point contact junctions, the formalism used to describe the single electron dynamics particularly in point contact spectroscopy, and the physical quantity that should be computed to understand the conductance. We will summarize the theories for point contact spectroscopy developed from different approaches and highlight these conceptual differences distinguishing point contact spectroscopy from tunneling-based probes. Moreover, we will show how the Schwinger-Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh (SKBK) formalism together with the appropriate modeling of the nano-scale point contacts randomly distributed

  8. Nanoscale thermometry using point contact thermocouples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Seid; Tan, Aaron; Chua, Yi Jie; Reddy, Pramod

    2010-07-14

    Probing temperature fields with nanometer resolution is critical to understanding nanoscale thermal transport as well as dissipation in nanoscale devices. Here, we demonstrate an atomic force microscope (AFM)-based technique capable of mapping temperature fields in metallic films with approximately 10 mK temperature resolution and thermocouples on a grid. The local temperature at each point contact is obtained by measuring the thermoelectric voltage of the platinum-gold point contact and relating it to the local temperature. These results demonstrate a direct measurement of the temperature field of a metallic surface without using specially fabricated scanning temperature-probes.

  9. Superconducting quantum node for entanglement and storage of microwave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurin, E; Roch, N; Pillet, J D; Mallet, F; Huard, B

    2015-03-06

    Superconducting circuits and microwave signals are good candidates to realize quantum networks, which are the backbone of quantum computers. We have realized a quantum node based on a 3D microwave superconducting cavity parametrically coupled to a transmission line by a Josephson ring modulator. We first demonstrate the time-controlled capture, storage, and retrieval of an optimally shaped propagating microwave field, with an efficiency as high as 80%. We then demonstrate a second essential ability, which is the time-controlled generation of an entangled state distributed between the node and a microwave channel.

  10. Superconducting Quantum Node for Entanglement and Storage of Microwave Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurin, E.; Roch, N.; Pillet, J. D.; Mallet, F.; Huard, B.

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting circuits and microwave signals are good candidates to realize quantum networks, which are the backbone of quantum computers. We have realized a quantum node based on a 3D microwave superconducting cavity parametrically coupled to a transmission line by a Josephson ring modulator. We first demonstrate the time-controlled capture, storage, and retrieval of an optimally shaped propagating microwave field, with an efficiency as high as 80%. We then demonstrate a second essential ability, which is the time-controlled generation of an entangled state distributed between the node and a microwave channel.

  11. Integrated superconducting detectors on semiconductors for quantum optics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniber, M.; Flassig, F.; Reithmaier, G.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum photonic circuits can be used to efficiently generate, manipulate, route and exploit nonclassical states of light for distributed photon-based quantum information technologies. In this article, we review our recent achievements on the growth, nanofabrication and integration of high-quality, superconducting niobium nitride thin films on optically active, semiconducting GaAs substrates and their patterning to realize highly efficient and ultra-fast superconducting detectors on semiconductor nanomaterials containing quantum dots. Our state-of-the-art detectors reach external detection quantum efficiencies up to 20 % for ~4 nm thin films and single-photon timing resolutions <72 ps. We discuss the integration of such detectors into quantum dot-loaded, semiconductor ridge waveguides, resulting in the on-chip, time-resolved detection of quantum dot luminescence. Furthermore, a prototype quantum optical circuit is demonstrated that enabled the on-chip generation of resonance fluorescence from an individual InGaAs quantum dot, with a linewidth <15 μeV displaced by 1 mm from the superconducting detector on the very same semiconductor chip. Thus, all key components required for prototype quantum photonic circuits with sources, optical components and detectors on the same chip are reported.

  12. Contextuality without nonlocality in a superconducting quantum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerger, Markus; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Oppliger, Markus; Potočnik, Anton; Mondal, Mintu; Wallraff, Andreas; Goodenough, Kenneth; Wehner, Stephanie; Juliusson, Kristinn; Langford, Nathan K.; Fedorov, Arkady

    2016-10-01

    Classical realism demands that system properties exist independently of whether they are measured, while noncontextuality demands that the results of measurements do not depend on what other measurements are performed in conjunction with them. The Bell-Kochen-Specker theorem states that noncontextual realism cannot reproduce the measurement statistics of a single three-level quantum system (qutrit). Noncontextual realistic models may thus be tested using a single qutrit without relying on the notion of quantum entanglement in contrast to Bell inequality tests. It is challenging to refute such models experimentally, since imperfections may introduce loopholes that enable a realist interpretation. Here we use a superconducting qutrit with deterministic, binary-outcome readouts to violate a noncontextuality inequality while addressing the detection, individual-existence and compatibility loopholes. This evidence of state-dependent contextuality also demonstrates the fitness of superconducting quantum circuits for fault-tolerant quantum computation in surface-code architectures, currently the most promising route to scalable quantum computing.

  13. Nano-patterned superconducting surface for high quantum efficiency cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Fay; Musumeci, Pietro

    2017-03-07

    A method for providing a superconducting surface on a laser-driven niobium cathode in order to increase the effective quantum efficiency. The enhanced surface increases the effective quantum efficiency by improving the laser absorption of the surface and enhancing the local electric field. The surface preparation method makes feasible the construction of superconducting radio frequency injectors with niobium as the photocathode. An array of nano-structures are provided on a flat surface of niobium. The nano-structures are dimensionally tailored to interact with a laser of specific wavelength to thereby increase the electron yield of the surface.

  14. Nano-patterned superconducting surface for high quantum efficiency cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannon, Fay; Musumeci, Pietro

    2017-03-07

    A method for providing a superconducting surface on a laser-driven niobium cathode in order to increase the effective quantum efficiency. The enhanced surface increases the effective quantum efficiency by improving the laser absorption of the surface and enhancing the local electric field. The surface preparation method makes feasible the construction of superconducting radio frequency injectors with niobium as the photocathode. An array of nano-structures are provided on a flat surface of niobium. The nano-structures are dimensionally tailored to interact with a laser of specific wavelength to thereby increase the electron yield of the surface.

  15. The origins of macroscopic quantum coherence in high temperature superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Philip, E-mail: ph.turner@napier.ac.uk [Edinburgh Napier University, 10 Colinton Road, Edinburgh EH10 5DT (United Kingdom); Nottale, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.nottale@obspm.fr [CNRS, LUTH, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 Place Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We propose a new theoretical approach to superconductivity in p-type cuprates. • Electron pairing mechanisms in the superconducting and pseudogap phases are proposed. • A scale free network of dopants is key to macroscopic quantum coherence. - Abstract: A new, theoretical approach to macroscopic quantum coherence and superconductivity in the p-type (hole doped) cuprates is proposed. The theory includes mechanisms to account for e-pair coupling in the superconducting and pseudogap phases and their inter relations observed in these materials. Electron pair coupling in the superconducting phase is facilitated by local quantum potentials created by static dopants in a mechanism which explains experimentally observed optimal doping levels and the associated peak in critical temperature. By contrast, evidence suggests that electrons contributing to the pseudogap are predominantly coupled by fractal spin waves (fractons) induced by the fractal arrangement of dopants. On another level, the theory offers new insights into the emergence of a macroscopic quantum potential generated by a fractal distribution of dopants. This, in turn, leads to the emergence of coherent, macroscopic spin waves and a second associated macroscopic quantum potential, possibly supported by charge order. These quantum potentials play two key roles. The first involves the transition of an expected diffusive process (normally associated with Anderson localization) in fractal networks, into e-pair coherence. The second involves the facilitation of tunnelling between localized e-pairs. These combined effects lead to the merger of the super conducting and pseudo gap phases into a single coherent condensate at optimal doping. The underlying theory relating to the diffusion to quantum transition is supported by Coherent Random Lasing, which can be explained using an analogous approach. As a final step, an experimental program is outlined to validate the theory and suggests a new

  16. The Quantum Socket: Wiring for Superconducting Qubits - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejanin, J. H.; McConkey, T. G.; Rinehart, J. R.; Bateman, J. D.; Earnest, C. T.; McRae, C. H.; Rohanizadegan, Y.; Shiri, D.; Mariantoni, M.; Penava, B.; Breul, P.; Royak, S.; Zapatka, M.; Fowler, A. G.

    Quantum computing research has reached a level of maturity where quantum error correction (QEC) codes can be executed on linear arrays of superconducting quantum bits (qubits). A truly scalable quantum computing architecture, however, based on practical QEC algorithms, requires nearest neighbor interaction between qubits on a two-dimensional array. Such an arrangement is not possible with techniques that rely on wire bonding. To address this issue, we have developed the quantum socket, a device based on three-dimensional wires that enables the control of superconducting qubits on a two-dimensional grid. In this talk, we present experimental results characterizing this type of wiring. We will show that the quantum socket performs exceptionally well for the transmission and reflection of microwave signals up to 10 GHz, while minimizing crosstalk between adjacent wires. Under realistic conditions, we measured an S21 of -5 dB at 6 GHz and an average crosstalk of -60 dB. We also describe time domain reflectometry results and arbitrary pulse transmission tests, showing that the quantum socket can be used to control superconducting qubits.

  17. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  18. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects. PMID:27324814

  19. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, L; Las Heras, U; Mezzacapo, A; Sanz, M; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2016-06-21

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  20. Engineering Dissipation to Generate Entanglement Between Remote Superconducting Quantum Bits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Mollie Elisheva

    Superconducting quantum circuits provide a promising avenue for scalable quantum computation and simulation. Their chief advantage is that, unlike physical atoms or electrons, these ''artificial atoms'' can be designed with nearly-arbitrarily large coupling to one another and to their electromagnetic environment. This strong coupling allows for fast quantum bit (qubit) operations, and for efficient readout. However, strong coupling comes at a price: a qubit that is strongly coupled to its environment is also strongly susceptible to losses and dissipation, as coherent information leaks from the quantum system under study into inaccessible ''bath'' modes. Extensive work in the field is dedicated to engineering away these losses to the extent possible, and to using error correction to undo the effects of losses that are unavoidable. This dissertation explores an alternate approach to dissipation: we study avenues by which dissipation itself can be used to generate, rather than destroy, quantum resources. We do so specifically in the context of quantum entanglement, one of the most important and most counter-intuitive aspects of quantum mechanics. Entanglement generation and stabilization is critical to most non-trivial implementations of quantum computing and quantum simulation, as it is the property that distinguishes a multi-qubit quantum system from a string of classical bits. The ability to harness dissipation to generate, purify, and stabilize entanglement is therefore highly desirable. We begin with an overview of quantum dissipation and measurement, followed by an introduction to entanglement and to the superconducting quantum information architecture. We then discuss three sets of experiments that highlight and explore the powerful uses of dissipation in quantum systems. First, we use an entangling measurement to probabilistically generate entanglement between two qubits separated by more than one meter of ordinary cable. This represents the first achievement

  1. Stimulating Uncertainty: Amplifying the Quantum Vacuum with Superconducting Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Nation, P D; Blencowe, M P; Nori, Franco

    2011-01-01

    The ability to generate particles from the quantum vacuum is one of the most pro- found consequences of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. Although the significance of vacuum fluctuations can be seen throughout physics, the experimental realization of vacuum amplification effects has until now been limited to a few cases. Superconducting circuit devices, driven by the goal to achieve a viable quantum computer, may soon be able to realize the elusive verification of the dynamical Casimir effect and analogue Hawking radiation. This article describes several mechanisms for generating photons from the quantum vacuum and emphasizes their connection to the well-known parametric amplifier from quantum optics. Discussed in detail is the possible realization of each mechanism, or its analogue, in superconducting circuit systems. The ability to selectively engineer these circuit devices highlights the relationship between the various amplification mechanisms.

  2. Colloquium: Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, P. D.; Johansson, J. R.; Blencowe, M. P.; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate particles from the quantum vacuum is one of the most profound consequences of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle. Although the significance of vacuum fluctuations can be seen throughout physics, the experimental realization of vacuum amplification effects has until now been limited to a few cases. Superconducting circuit devices, driven by the goal to achieve a viable quantum computer, have been used in the experimental demonstration of the dynamical Casimir effect, and may soon be able to realize the elusive verification of analog Hawking radiation. This Colloquium article describes several mechanisms for generating photons from the quantum vacuum and emphasizes their connection to the well-known parametric amplifier from quantum optics. Discussed in detail is the possible realization of each mechanism, or its analog, in superconducting circuit systems. The ability to selectively engineer these circuit devices highlights the relationship between the various amplification mechanisms.

  3. Emulation of complex open quantum systems using superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostame, Sarah; Huh, Joonsuk; Kreisbeck, Christoph; Kerman, Andrew J.; Fujita, Takatoshi; Eisfeld, Alexander; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2017-02-01

    With quantum computers being out of reach for now, quantum simulators are alternative devices for efficient and accurate simulation of problems that are challenging to tackle using conventional computers. Quantum simulators are classified into analog and digital, with the possibility of constructing "hybrid" simulators by combining both techniques. Here we focus on analog quantum simulators of open quantum systems and address the limit that they can beat classical computers. In particular, as an example, we discuss simulation of the chlorosome light-harvesting antenna from green sulfur bacteria with over 250 phonon modes coupled to each electronic state. Furthermore, we propose physical setups that can be used to reproduce the quantum dynamics of a standard and multiple-mode Holstein model. The proposed scheme is based on currently available technology of superconducting circuits consist of flux qubits and quantum oscillators.

  4. Observing single quantum trajectories of a superconducting qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Murch, K W; Macklin, C; Siddiqi, I

    2013-01-01

    The length of time that a quantum system can exist in a superposition state is determined by how strongly it interacts with its environment. This interaction entangles the quantum state with the inherent fluctuations of the environment. If these fluctuations are not measured, the environment can be viewed as a source of noise, causing random evolution of the quantum system from an initially pure state into a statistical mixture-a process known as decoherence. However, by accurately measuring the environment in real time, the quantum system can be maintained in a pure state and its time evolution described by a quantum trajectory conditioned on the measurement outcome. We employ weak measurements to monitor a microwave cavity embedding a superconducting qubit and track the individual quantum trajectories of the system. In this architecture, the environment is dominated by the fluctuations of a single electromagnetic mode of the cavity. Using a near-quantum-limited parametric amplifier, we selectively measure e...

  5. Nonequilibrium Transport through a Spinful Quantum Dot with Superconducting Leads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Brian Møller; Flensberg, Karsten; Koerting, Verena

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonlinear cotunneling current through a spinful quantum dot contacted by two superconducting leads. Applying a general nonequilibrium Green function formalism to an effective Kondo model, we study the rich variation in the IV characteristics with varying asymmetry in the tunnel...

  6. Two-dimensional lattice gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, D., E-mail: david.marcos@me.com [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Widmer, P. [Albert Einstein Center, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland); Rico, E. [IPCMS (UMR 7504) and ISIS (UMR 7006), University of Strasbourg and CNRS, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Hafezi, M. [Joint Quantum Institute, NIST/University of Maryland, College Park 20742 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Rabl, P. [Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria); Wiese, U.-J. [Albert Einstein Center, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland); Zoller, P. [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    A quantum simulator of U(1) lattice gauge theories can be implemented with superconducting circuits. This allows the investigation of confined and deconfined phases in quantum link models, and of valence bond solid and spin liquid phases in quantum dimer models. Fractionalized confining strings and the real-time dynamics of quantum phase transitions are accessible as well. Here we show how state-of-the-art superconducting technology allows us to simulate these phenomena in relatively small circuit lattices. By exploiting the strong non-linear couplings between quantized excitations emerging when superconducting qubits are coupled, we show how to engineer gauge invariant Hamiltonians, including ring-exchange and four-body Ising interactions. We demonstrate that, despite decoherence and disorder effects, minimal circuit instances allow us to investigate properties such as the dynamics of electric flux strings, signaling confinement in gauge invariant field theories. The experimental realization of these models in larger superconducting circuits could address open questions beyond current computational capability.

  7. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  8. Josephson directional amplifier for quantum measurement of superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, Baleegh; Sliwa, Katrina; Shankar, S; Hatridge, Michael; Frunzio, Luigi; Schoelkopf, Robert; Devoret, Michel

    2014-04-25

    We realize a microwave quantum-limited amplifier that is directional and can therefore function without the front circulator needed in many quantum measurements. The amplification takes place in only one direction between the input and output ports. Directionality is achieved by multipump parametric amplification combined with wave interference. We have verified the device noise performances by using it to read out a superconducting qubit and observed quantum jumps. With an improved version of this device, the qubit and preamplifer could be integrated on the same chip.

  9. Quantum magnonics: The magnon meets the superconducting qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Yutaka; Ishino, Seiichiro; Noguchi, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Toyofumi; Yamazaki, Rekishu; Usami, Koji; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2016-08-01

    The techniques of microwave quantum optics are applied to collective spin excitations in a macroscopic sphere of a ferromagnetic insulator. We demonstrate, in the single-magnon limit, strong coupling between a magnetostatic mode in the sphere and a microwave cavity mode. Moreover, we introduce a superconducting qubit in the cavity and couple the qubit with the magnon excitation via the virtual photon excitation. We observe the magnon-vacuum-induced Rabi splitting. The hybrid quantum system enables generation and characterization of non-classical quantum states of magnons. xml:lang="fr"

  10. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-03-17

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions.

  11. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions.

  12. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N

    2000-01-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz(1/2) in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz(1/2) at 10 Hz) was present. Compute...

  13. Probing quantum coherence in arrays of superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Alexandra; Rivas, Angel; Huelga, Susana; Plenio, Martin [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In the mid-80's the so-called phenomenon of dynamic localization was shown for a charged particle moving under the influence of a sinusoidally-varying time-dependent electric field, and more recently similar resonances in the conduction were found to be present also in ion channels. In this work we study the conditions under which this dynamic localization can be found in arrays of superconducting qubits. This phenomenon can serve as a signature of quantum coherence in such systems and moreover could be checked experimentally by various groups constructing arrays of superconducting flux qubits.

  14. Quantum acousto-optic transducer for superconducting qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Shumeiko, V S

    2015-01-01

    We propose theory for reversible quantum transducer connecting superconducting qubits and optical photons using acoustic waves in piezoelectrics. The proposed device consists of integrated acousto-optic resonator that utilizes stimulated Brillouin scattering for phonon-photon conversion, and piezoelectric e?ect for coupling of phonons to qubits. We evaluate the phonon-photon coupling rate, and show that the required power of optical pump as well as the other device parameters providing full and faithful quantum conversion are feasible for implementation with the state of the art integrated acousto-optics.

  15. Superconducting Quantum Arrays for Wideband Antennas and Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhanov, O.; Prokopemko, G.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Iinetference Filters (SQIF) consist of a two-dimensional array of niobium Josephson Junctions formed into N loops of incommensurate area. This structure forms a magnetic field (B) to voltage transducer with an impulse like response at B0. In principle, the signal-to-noise ratio scales as the square root of N and the noise can be made arbitrarily small (i.e. The SQIF chips are expected to exhibit quantum limited noise performance). A gain of about 20 dB was recently demonstrated at 10 GHz.

  16. Contextuality without nonlocality in a superconducting quantum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerger, Markus; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Oppliger, Markus; Potočnik, Anton; Mondal, Mintu; Wallraff, Andreas; Goodenough, Kenneth; Wehner, Stephanie; Juliusson, Kristinn; Langford, Nathan K.; Fedorov, Arkady

    2016-01-01

    Classical realism demands that system properties exist independently of whether they are measured, while noncontextuality demands that the results of measurements do not depend on what other measurements are performed in conjunction with them. The Bell–Kochen–Specker theorem states that noncontextual realism cannot reproduce the measurement statistics of a single three-level quantum system (qutrit). Noncontextual realistic models may thus be tested using a single qutrit without relying on the notion of quantum entanglement in contrast to Bell inequality tests. It is challenging to refute such models experimentally, since imperfections may introduce loopholes that enable a realist interpretation. Here we use a superconducting qutrit with deterministic, binary-outcome readouts to violate a noncontextuality inequality while addressing the detection, individual-existence and compatibility loopholes. This evidence of state-dependent contextuality also demonstrates the fitness of superconducting quantum circuits for fault-tolerant quantum computation in surface-code architectures, currently the most promising route to scalable quantum computing. PMID:27698351

  17. Emulating a mesoscopic system using superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Barends, R.; Bochmann, J.; Campbell, B.; Chiaro, B.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mariantoni, M.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P.; Ohya, S.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate an emulation of a mesoscopic system using superconducting quantum circuits. Taking advantage of our ReZQu-architectured quantum processor, we controllably splitted a microwave photon and manipulated the splitted photons before they recombined for detection. In this way, we were able to simulate the weak localization effect in mesoscopic systems - a coherent backscattering process due to quantum interference. The influence of the phase coherence was investigated by tuning the coherence time of the quantum circuit, which in turn mimics the temperature effect on the weak localization process. At the end, we demonstrated an effect resembling universal conductance fluctuations, which arises from the frequency beating between different coherent backscattering processes. The universality of the observed fluctuation was shown as the independence of the fluctuation amplitude on detailed experimental conditions.

  18. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  19. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  20. Spin analogs of superconductivity and integer quantum Hall effect in an array of spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by the successful idea of using weakly coupled quantum electronic wires to realize the quantum Hall effects and the quantum spin Hall effects, we theoretically study two systems composed of weakly coupled quantum spin chains within the mean-field approximations, which can exhibit spin analogs of superconductivity and the integer quantum Hall effect. First, a certain bilayer of two arrays of interacting spin chains is mapped, via the Jordan-Wigner transformation, to an attractive Hubbard model that exhibits fermionic superconductivity, which corresponds to spin superconductivity in the original spin Hamiltonian. Secondly, an array of spin-orbit-coupled spin chains in the presence of a suitable external magnetic field is transformed to an array of quantum wires that exhibits the integer quantum Hall effect, which translates into its spin analog in the spin Hamiltonian. The resultant spin superconductivity and spin integer quantum Hall effect can be characterized by their ability to transport spin without any resistance.

  1. HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement-Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement - based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0006 HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement - Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors Philip Walther UNIVERSITT...HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement - Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-11-1-3004 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  2. Induced Superconductivity in the Quantum Spin Hall Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hechen; Hart, Sean; Wagner, Timo; Leubner, Philipp; Muehlbauer, Mathias; Bruene, Christoph; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens; Yacoby, Amir

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional topological insulators have a gapped bulk and helical edge states, making it a quantum spin Hall insulator. Combining such edge states with superconductivity can be an excellent platform for observing and manipulating localized Majorana fermions. In the context of condensed matter, these are emergent electronic states that obey non-Abelian statistics and hence support fault-tolerant quantum computing. To realize such theoretical constructions, an essential step is to show these edge channels are capable of carrying coherent supercurrent. In our experiment, we fabricate Josephson junctions with HgTe/HgCdTe quantum wells, a two-dimensional material that becomes a quantum spin Hall insulator when the quantum well is thicker than 6.3 nm and the bulk density is depleted. In this regime, we observe supercurrents whose densities are confined to the edges of the junctions, with edge widths ranging from 180 nm to 408 nm. To verify the topological nature of these edges, we measure identical junctions with HgTe/HgCdTe quantum wells thinner than 6.3 nm and observe only uniform supercurrent density across the junctions. This research is supported by Microsoft Corporation Project Q, the NSF DMR-1206016, the DOE SCGF Program, the German Research Foundation, and EU ERC-AG program.

  3. Superconducting Analogue of the Parafermion Fractional Quantum Hall States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassan Vaezi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Read-Rezayi Z_{k} parafermion wave functions describe ν=2+(k/kM+2 fractional quantum Hall (FQH states. These states support non-Abelian excitations from which protected quantum gates can be designed. However, there is no experimental evidence for these non-Abelian anyons to date. In this paper, we study the ν=2/k FQH-superconductor heterostructure and find the superconducting analogue of the Z_{k} parafermion FQH state. Our main tool is the mapping of the FQH into coupled one-dimensional chains, each with a pair of counterpropagating modes. We show that by inducing intrachain pairing and charge preserving backscattering with identical couplings, the one-dimensional chains flow into gapless Z_{k} parafermions when k<4. By studying the effect of interchain coupling, we show that every parafermion mode becomes massive except for the two outermost ones. Thus, we achieve a fractional topological superconductor whose chiral edge state is described by a Z_{k} parafermion conformal field theory. For instance, we find that a ν=2/3 FQH in proximity to a superconductor produces a Z_{3} parafermion superconducting state. This state is topologically indistinguishable from the non-Abelian part of the ν=12/5 Read-Rezayi state. Both of these systems can host Fibonacci anyons capable of performing universal quantum computation through braiding operations.

  4. Dispersive Response of a Disordered Superconducting Quantum Metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy S. Shapiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider a disordered quantum metamaterial formed by an array of superconducting flux qubits coupled to microwave photons in a cavity. We map the system on the Tavis-Cummings model accounting for the disorder in frequencies of the qubits. The complex transmittance is calculated with the parameters taken from state-of-the-art experiments. We demonstrate that photon phase shift measurements allow to distinguish individual resonances in the metamaterial with up to 100 qubits, in spite of the decoherence spectral width being remarkably larger than the effective coupling constant. Our simulations are in agreement with the results of the recently reported experiment.

  5. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Michael G.; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  6. Simulating Quantum Chemical Dynamics with Improved Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megrant, Anthony E.

    A quantum computer will potentially solve far-reaching problems which are currently intractable on any classical computer. Many technological obstacles have prevented the realization of a quantum computer, the main obstacle being decoherence, which is the loss of quantum information. Decoherence arises from the undesired interaction between qubits and their environment. Isolated qubits have better coherence but are more difficult to control. Superconducting qubits are a promising platform since their macroscopic size allows for easy control and coupling to other qubits. While the coherence of superconducting qubits has substantially improved over the past two decades, further improvements in coherence are required. We have repeatedly and reliably increased the coherence times of superconducting qubits. Currently decoherence in these devices is dominated by coupling to material defects. These defects are present in the dielectrics used to fabricate these devices or introduced during fabrication. Using simpler resonators as a testbed, we individually isolate, characterize, and then improve each step of the more complicated fabrication of superconducting qubits. We increased the quality factor of resonators by a factor of four by first identifying the surfaces and interfaces as a major source of loss and then by optimizing the substrate preparation. Furthermore, we measure and subsequently mitigate additional defect loss, which is dependent on the position of ground plane holes used to limit the loss from magnetic vortices. Implementing these improvements led to an increase of our qubit coherence times by more than an order of magnitude. The progress made in coherence while maintaining a high degree of connectivity and controllability has been directly used in more complex circuits. One such device is a fully connected three qubit ring with both tunable qubit frequencies and adjustable qubit-qubit couplings. The considerable level of control allows us to generate the

  7. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, Michael G; Hadfield, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    We explore optimised control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) through bright illumination. We consider the behaviour of the SNSPD in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching) in long-running quantum key distribution experiments. We propose and demonstrate an effective bright-light attack on this realistic configuration, by applying transient blinding illumination lasting for a fraction of a microsecond and producing several deterministic fake clicks during this time. We show that this attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and is hence not introducing significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  8. Improved superconducting quantum interference devices by resistance asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, G.; Pagano, S.; Sarnelli, E.; Calidonna, C. R.; Furnari, M. Mango

    2001-10-01

    Direct current superconducting quantum interference devices made by Josephson junctions with asymmetric shunt resistances have been numerically investigated in the low temperature regime. When combined with a damping resistance, the asymmetry leads to a flux to voltage transfer coefficient several times larger than the one typical of symmetric devices, together with a lower magnetic flux noise. These results show that this type of asymmetric device may replace the standard ones in a large number of magnetometric applications, improving the sensitivity performance. The large transfer coefficient may also simplify the readout electronics allowing a direct coupling of asymmetric devices to an external preamplifier, without the need of an impedance matching flux transformer.

  9. Controlling group velocity in a superconductive quantum circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Tian-Hui; Yang Guo-Jian

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the controllable group velocity of a microwave probe field in a superconductive quantum circuit (SQC) pumped by microwave fields,and the use of such a SQC function as an artificial A-type three-level atom.The exchange between the subluminal and the superluminal states of the probe field can be realized simply by sweeping the pumping intensity,and the superluminal state is usually realized with a lower absorption.This work is one of the efforts to extend the study of electromagnetically induced transparency and its related properties from the lightwave band to the microwave band.

  10. Note on "Quantum superconducting criticality in graphene and topological insulators"

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Bitan; Herbut, Igor F

    2016-01-01

    We correct our previous conclusion regarding the fate of a charged quantum critical point across the superconducting transition for two dimensional massless Dirac fermion. Within the leading order $\\epsilon$ expansion, we now find that the requisite number of four-component Dirac fermion flavors ($N_f$) for the continuous phase transition through a charged critical point is $N_f>18.2699$. For $N_f\\geq1/2$, the critical number of bosonic flavors for this transition is significantly reduced as compared to the value determined in the absence of the Dirac fermions in the theory.

  11. Autonomously stabilized entanglement between two superconducting quantum bits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, S; Hatridge, M; Leghtas, Z; Sliwa, K M; Narla, A; Vool, U; Girvin, S M; Frunzio, L; Mirrahimi, M; Devoret, M H

    2013-12-19

    Quantum error correction codes are designed to protect an arbitrary state of a multi-qubit register from decoherence-induced errors, but their implementation is an outstanding challenge in the development of large-scale quantum computers. The first step is to stabilize a non-equilibrium state of a simple quantum system, such as a quantum bit (qubit) or a cavity mode, in the presence of decoherence. This has recently been accomplished using measurement-based feedback schemes. The next step is to prepare and stabilize a state of a composite system. Here we demonstrate the stabilization of an entangled Bell state of a quantum register of two superconducting qubits for an arbitrary time. Our result is achieved using an autonomous feedback scheme that combines continuous drives along with a specifically engineered coupling between the two-qubit register and a dissipative reservoir. Similar autonomous feedback techniques have been used for qubit reset, single-qubit state stabilization, and the creation and stabilization of states of multipartite quantum systems. Unlike conventional, measurement-based schemes, the autonomous approach uses engineered dissipation to counteract decoherence, obviating the need for a complicated external feedback loop to correct errors. Instead, the feedback loop is built into the Hamiltonian such that the steady state of the system in the presence of drives and dissipation is a Bell state, an essential building block for quantum information processing. Such autonomous schemes, which are broadly applicable to a variety of physical systems, as demonstrated by the accompanying paper on trapped ion qubits, will be an essential tool for the implementation of quantum error correction.

  12. Generation of Fock states in a superconducting quantum circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofheinz, Max; Weig, E M; Ansmann, M; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lucero, Erik; Neeley, M; O'Connell, A D; Wang, H; Martinis, John M; Cleland, A N

    2008-07-17

    Spin systems and harmonic oscillators comprise two archetypes in quantum mechanics. The spin-1/2 system, with two quantum energy levels, is essentially the most nonlinear system found in nature, whereas the harmonic oscillator represents the most linear, with an infinite number of evenly spaced quantum levels. A significant difference between these systems is that a two-level spin can be prepared in an arbitrary quantum state using classical excitations, whereas classical excitations applied to an oscillator generate a coherent state, nearly indistinguishable from a classical state. Quantum behaviour in an oscillator is most obvious in Fock states, which are states with specific numbers of energy quanta, but such states are hard to create. Here we demonstrate the controlled generation of multi-photon Fock states in a solid-state system. We use a superconducting phase qubit, which is a close approximation to a two-level spin system, coupled to a microwave resonator, which acts as a harmonic oscillator, to prepare and analyse pure Fock states with up to six photons. We contrast the Fock states with coherent states generated using classical pulses applied directly to the resonator.

  13. Rabi model as a quantum coherent heat engine: From quantum biology to superconducting circuits

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 91, 023816 (2015) Rabi model as a quantum coherent heat engine: From quantum biology to superconducting circuits Ferdi Altintas,1 Ali U¨ . C. Hardal,2 and O¨ zgu¨r E. Mu¨stecaplıog˘lu2,* 1Department of Physics, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, 14280, Turkey 2Department of Physics, Koc¸ University, Sarıyer, ˙Istanbul, 34450, Turkey (Received 10 November 2014; published 12 February 2015) We propose a multilevel quantum heat engine with a working medium de...

  14. Parameter scaling in the decoherent quantum-classical transition for chaotic rf superconducting quantum interference devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ting; Yu, Yang

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigated the quantum-classical transition in rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems coupled to a dissipative environment. It is found that chaos emerges and the degree of chaos, the maximal Lyapunov exponent lambda(m), exhibits nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the coupling strength D. By measuring the proximity of quantum and classical evolution with the uncertainty of dynamics, we show that the uncertainty is a monotonic function of lambda(m)/D. In addition, the scaling holds in SQUID systems to a relatively smaller variant Planck's over [symbol: see text], suggesting the universality for this scaling.

  15. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y.; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N.

    2000-11-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz1/2 in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz) was present. Computer simulation showed that the loss in this trilayer system was dominated by the high loss tangent of the dielectric film used for the separation of the upper and lower superconducting films. The rf coupling coefficient krf between the resonator and the flip-chip-coupled SQUID was also estimated. The values krf2≈14×10-3 obtained for the layout with two input coils, and krf2≈45×10-3 for the layout with the labyrinth resonator were considerably higher than the typical value of krf2≈7×10-3 for the single-layer coplanar resonator. These high coupling coefficients have compensated the somewhat degraded unloaded quality factor of the resonator, thus securing the optimum operation of the rf SQUID.

  16. Driven superconducting proximity effect in interacting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, Ali G.; Koenig, Juergen [Theoretische Physik, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); CeNIDE, Duisburg (Germany); Governale, Michele [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand)

    2012-07-01

    We show that strong superconducting correlations can be induced in an interacting quantum dot (QD) using fast oscillations in the effective coupling between the dot and superconducting leads which drive the dot out of equilibrium. This is in contrast with the well-known equilibrium state suppression of proximity effect in interacting QDs. In fact although interaction prohibits the superposition of empty (0) and doubly-occupied (d) states, fast coherent dynamics accompanied by the fast variations in the tunnel coupling can produce a nonequilibrium finite probability for such a superposition. Subsequently the superconducting correlations are established inside the QD when the energy difference between 0 and d states coincide with the frequency of driving oscillations. Simultaneously the nonequilibrium occupation probabilities of 0 and d states cause a pumping current flowing to the normal lead connected to the dot. Finally we demonstrate coherent oscillations in both dot charge and current by applying a pulsed oscillatory field to the coupling of dot and superconductor which show the possibility of coherent manipulation in the subspace of 0 and d states by changing the pulse duration.

  17. Conclusive quantum steering with superconducting transition edge sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Devin H; de Almeida, Marcelo; Branciard, Cyril; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Weinhold, Till J; Lita, Adriana; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo; White, Andrew G

    2011-01-01

    Quantum steering allows two parties to verify shared entanglement even if one measurement device is untrusted. A conclusive demonstration of steering through the violation of a steering inequality is of considerable fundamental interest and opens up applications in quantum communication. To date all experimental tests with single photon states have relied on post-selection, allowing untrusted devices to cheat by hiding unfavorable events in losses. Here we close this "detection loophole" by combining a highly efficient source of entangled photon pairs with superconducting transition edge sensors. We achieve an unprecedented $\\sim$62% conditional detection efficiency of entangled photons and violate a steering inequality with the minimal number of measurement settings by 48 standard deviations. Our results provide a clear path to practical applications of steering and to a photonic loophole-free Bell test.

  18. Quantum search via superconducting quantum interference devices in a cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yan; Dong Ping; Xue Zheng-Yuan; Cao Zhuo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for implementing the Grover search algorithm with two superconducing quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a cavity. Our scheme only requires single resonant interaction of the SQUID-cavity system and the required interaction time is very short. The simplicity of the process and the reduction of the interaction time are important for restraining decoherence.

  19. Towards realizing a quantum memory for a superconducting qubit: storage and retrieval of quantum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shiro; Zhu, Xiaobo; Amsüss, Robert; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Shimo-Oka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J; Semba, Kouichi

    2013-09-06

    We have built a hybrid system composed of a superconducting flux qubit (the processor) and an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond (the memory) that can be directly coupled to one another, and demonstrated how information can be transferred from the flux qubit to the memory, stored, and subsequently retrieved. We have established the coherence properties of the memory and succeeded in creating an entangled state between the processor and memory, demonstrating how the entangled state's coherence is preserved. Our results are a significant step towards using an electron spin ensemble as a quantum memory for superconducting qubits.

  20. Multilayer MgB2 superconducting quantum interference filter magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Elias; Melbourne, Thomas; Davidson, Bruce A.; Xi, X. X.; Chen, Ke

    2016-04-01

    We report two types of all-MgB2 superconductive quantum interference filter (SQIF) magnetometers that can measure absolute magnetic fields with high sensitivity. In one configuration, the SQIFs were made of 20 multilayer nonplanar all-MgB2 superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) connected in parallel with loop areas ranging in size from 0.4 to 3.6 μm2. These devices are sensitive to magnetic fields parallel to the substrate and show a single antipeak from 3 to 16 K with a maximum transfer function of ˜16 V/T at 3 K and a field noise of ˜110 pT/Hz1/2 above 100 Hz at 10 K. In a second configuration, the SQIFs were made with 16 planar SQUIDs connected in parallel with loop areas ranging in size from 4 μm2 to 25 μm2 and are sensitive to the magnetic fields perpendicular to the substrate. The planar SQIF shows a single antipeak from 10 to 22 K with a maximum transfer function of 7800 V/T at 10 K and a field noise of ˜70 pT/Hz1/2 above 100 Hz at 20 K.

  1. Superconducting transport in single and parallel double InAs quantum dot Josephson junctions with Nb-based superconducting electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shoji, E-mail: baba@meso.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Sailer, Juergen [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Deacon, Russell S. [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); RIKEN Advanced Science Laboratory, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Oiwa, Akira [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Shibata, Kenji [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Department of Electronics and Intelligent Systems, Tohoku Institute of Technology, Sendai 982-8577 (Japan); Hirakawa, Kazuhiko [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); JST CREST, 4-1-8 Hon-cho, Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Tarucha, Seigo [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); INQIE, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); QPEC, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-11-30

    We report conductance and supercurrent measurements for InAs single and parallel double quantum dot Josephson junctions contacted with Nb or NbTiN superconducting electrodes. Large superconducting gap energy, high critical field, and large switching current are observed, all reflecting the features of Nb-based electrodes. For the parallel double dots, we observe an enhanced supercurrent when both dots are on resonance, which may reflect split Cooper pair tunneling.

  2. Rabi model as a quantum coherent heat engine: From quantum biology to superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ferdi; Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2015-02-01

    We propose a multilevel quantum heat engine with a working medium described by a generalized Rabi model which consists of a two-level system coupled to a single-mode bosonic field. The model is constructed to be a continuum limit of a quantum biological description of light-harvesting complexes so that it can amplify quantum coherence by a mechanism which is a quantum analog of classical Huygens clocks. The engine operates in a quantum Otto cycle where the working medium is coupled to classical heat baths in the isochoric processes of the four-stroke cycle, while either the coupling strength or the resonance frequency is changed in the adiabatic stages. We found that such an engine can produce work with an efficiency close to the Carnot bound when it operates at low temperatures and in the ultrastrong-coupling regime. The interplay of the effects of quantum coherence and quantum correlations on the engine performance is discussed in terms of second-order coherence, quantum mutual information, and the logarithmic negativity of entanglement. We point out that the proposed quantum Otto engine can be implemented experimentally with modern circuit quantum electrodynamic systems where flux qubits can be coupled ultrastrongly to superconducting transmission-line resonators.

  3. A new type of HTc superconducting film comb-shape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Hai-yan; WANG Fu-ren; MENG Shu-chao; MAO Bo; LI Zhuang-zhi; NIE Rui-juan; LIU Xin-yuan; DAI Yuan-dong

    2006-01-01

    A new type of HTc superconducting film combshape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (RF SQUID) has been designed.This new type of superconducting film comb-shape resonator is formed by a foursquare microstrip line without a flux concentrator.The range of the center frequency of this type of resonator varies from 800 MHz to 1300 MHz by changing the length of the teeth.In this paper,we report on simulating the relationship of the value of the center frequency and the length of the teeth,and testing the noise of HTc RF SQUID coupling this comb-shape resonator.

  4. Nonlinearities in the quantum measurement process of superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serban, Ioana

    2008-05-15

    The work described in this thesis focuses on the investigation of decoherence and measurement backaction, on the theoretical description of measurement schemes and their improvement. The study presented here is centered around quantum computing implementations using superconducting devices and most important, the Josephson effect. The measured system is invariantly a qubit, i. e. a two-level system. The objective is to study detectors with increasing nonlinearity, e. g. coupling of the qubit to the frequency a driven oscillator, or to the bifurcation amplifier, to determine the performance and backaction of the detector on the measured system and to investigate the importance of a strong qubit-detector coupling for the achievement of a quantum non-demolition type of detection. The first part gives a very basic introduction to quantum information, briefly reviews some of the most promising physical implementations of a quantum computer before focusing on the superconducting devices. The second part presents a series of studies of different qubit measurements, describing the backaction of the measurement onto the measured system and the internal dynamics of the detector. Methodology adapted from quantum optics and chemical physics (master equations, phase-space analysis etc.) combined with the representation of a complex environment yielded a tool capable of describing a nonlinear, non-Markovian environment, which couples arbitrarily strongly to the measured system. This is described in chapter 3. Chapter 4 focuses on the backaction on the qubit and presents novel insights into the qubit dephasing in the strong coupling regime. Chapter 5 uses basically the same system and technical tools to explore the potential of a fast, strong, indirect measurement, and determine how close such a detection would ideally come to the quantum non-demolition regime. Chapter 6 focuses on the internal dynamics of a strongly driven Josephson junction. The analytical results are based on

  5. Proximity Induced Superconducting Properties in One and Two Dimensional Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten

    that a superconducting 1D nanowire can harbor Majorana bound states in the absence of spin–orbit coupling. We fabricate and measure micrometer–sized mesoscopic devices demonstrating the inheritance of superconducting properties in the 2D electron gas. By placing a quantum point contact proximal to the interface between...... the 2D electron gas and the aluminum, we are able to demonstrate quantization of conductance in units of 4e2/h indicative of perfect Andreev reflection at the interface. We show that the quantum point contact can be operated as a tunnel probe to locally measure the density of states in the electron gas...... with a superconducting pairing potential, Majorana bound states can exist in the absence of spin–orbit coupling. Our proposal dispenses with spin–orbit coupling at the expense of a locally varying magnetic field. The presence of the topological state is demonstrated analytically by mapping our model onto...

  6. Theoretical/Computational Studies of High-Temperature Superconductivity from Quantum Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0204 Theoretical/Computational Studies of High-Temperature Superconductivity from Quantum Magnetism Jose Rodriguez CALIFORNIA...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Theoretical/Computational Studies of High-Temperature Superconductivity from Quantum Magnetism 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT...SUBJECT TERMS quantum magnetism, HTS, superconductivity 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION OF       ABSTRACT UU 18.  NUMBER        OF

  7. Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors for quantum information and communications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhen; Fujiwara, Mikio

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPD or SSPD) are highly promising devices in the growing field of quantum information and communications technology. We have developed a practical SSPD system with our superconducting thin films and devices fabrication, optical coupling packaging, and cryogenic technology. The SSPD system consists of six-channel SSPD devices and a compact Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler, and can operate continuously on 100 V ac power without the need for any cryogens. The SSPD devices were fabricated from high-quality niobium nitride (NbN) ultra-thin films that were epitaxially grown on single-crystal MgO substrates. The packaged SSPD devices were temperature stabilized to 2.96 K +/- 10 mK. The system detection efficiency for an SSPD device with an area of 20x20 $\\mu m^2$ was found to be 2.6% and 4.5% at wavelengths of 1550 and 1310 nm, respectively, at a dark count rate of 100 c/s, and a jitter of 100 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM). We also performed ultra-fast BB84 q...

  8. Dynamical Lamb effect versus dissipation in superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Shapiro, D. S.; Pogosov, W. V.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting circuits provide a new platform for study of nonstationary cavity QED phenomena. An example of such a phenomenon is the dynamical Lamb effect, which is the parametric excitation of an atom due to nonadiabatic modulation of its Lamb shift. This effect was initially introduced for a natural atom in a varying cavity, while we suggest its realization in a superconducting qubit-cavity system with dynamically tunable coupling. In the present paper, we study the interplay between the dynamical Lamb effect and the energy dissipation, which is unavoidable in realistic systems. We find that despite naive expectations, this interplay can lead to unexpected dynamical regimes. One of the most striking results is that photon generation from vacuum can be strongly enhanced due to qubit relaxation, which opens another channel for such a process. We also show that dissipation in the cavity can increase the qubit excited-state population. Our results can be used for experimental observation and investigation of the dynamical Lamb effect and accompanying quantum effects.

  9. Phase-controlled superconducting heat-flux quantum modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giazotto, F.; Martínez-Pérez, M. J.

    2012-09-01

    We theoretically put forward the concept of a phase-controlled superconducting heat-flux quantum modulator. Its operation relies on phase-dependent heat current predicted to occur in temperature-biased Josephson tunnel junctions. The device behavior is investigated as a function of temperature bias across the junctions, bath temperature, and junctions asymmetry as well. In a realistic Al-based setup the structure could provide temperature modulation amplitudes up to ˜50 mK with flux-to-temperature transfer coefficients exceeding ˜125 mK/Φ0 below 1 K, and temperature modulation frequency of the order of a few MHz. The proposed structure appears as a promising building-block for the implementation of caloritronic devices operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. Micron size superconducting quantum interference devices of lead (Pb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sagar; Biswas, Sourav; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2017-02-01

    Micron size superconducting quantum interference devices (μ-SQUID) of lead (Pb), for probing nano-magnetism, were fabricated and characterized. In order to get continuous Pb films with small grain size, Pb was thermally evaporated on a liquid nitrogen cooled Si substrate. Pb was sandwiched between two thin Cr layers for improved adhesion and protection. The SQUID pattern was made by e-beam lithography with Pb lift-off after deposition. The current-voltage characteristics of these devices show a critical current, which exhibits the expected SQUID oscillations with magnetic field, and two re-trapping currents. As a result these devices have hysteresis at low temperatures, which disappears just below the critical temperature.

  11. Nano-superconducting quantum interference devices with suspended junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazra, D.; Hasselbach, K. [Institut Néel, CNRS and Université Joseph Fourier, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble (France); Kirtley, J. R. [Center for Probing the Nanoscale, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305-4045 (United States)

    2014-04-14

    Nano-Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (nano-SQUIDs) are usually fabricated from a single layer of either Nb or Al. We describe here a simple method for fabricating suspended nano-bridges in Nb/Al thin-film bilayers. We use these suspended bridges, which act as Josephson weak links, to fabricate nano-SQUIDs which show critical current oscillations at temperatures up to 1.5 K and magnetic flux densities up to over 20 mT. These nano-SQUIDs exhibit flux modulation depths intermediate between all-Al and all-Nb devices, with some of the desirable characteristics of both. The suspended geometry is attractive for magnetic single nanoparticle measurements.

  12. Experiments on two-resonator circuit quantum electrodynamics. A superconducting quantum switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Elisabeth Christiane Maria

    2013-05-29

    The field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) studies the interaction between light and matter on a fundamental level. In typical experiments individual natural atoms are interacting with individual photons trapped in three-dimensional cavities. Within the last decade the prospering new field of circuit QED has been developed. Here, the natural atoms are replaced by artificial solid state quantum circuits offering large dipole moments which are coupled to quasi-onedimensional cavities providing a small mode volume and hence a large vacuum field strength. In our experiments Josephson junction based superconducting quantum bits are coupled to superconducting microwave resonators. In circuit QED the number of parameters that can be varied is increased and regimes that are not accessible using natural atoms can be entered and investigated. Apart from design flexibility and tunability of system parameters a particular advantage of circuit QED is the scalability to larger system size enabled by well developed micro- and nanofabrication tools. When scaling up the resonator-qubit systems beyond a few coupled circuits, the rapidly increasing number of interacting subsystems requires an active control and directed transmission of quantum signals. This can, for example, be achieved by implementing switchable coupling between two microwave resonators. To this end, a superconducting flux qubit is used to realize a suitable coupling between two microwave resonators, all working in the Gigahertz regime. The resulting device is called quantum switch. The flux qubit mediates a second order tunable and switchable coupling between the resonators. Depending on the qubit state, this coupling can compensate for the direct geometric coupling of the two resonators. As the qubit may also be in a quantum superposition state, the switch itself can be ''quantum'': it can be a superposition of ''on'' and ''off''. This work

  13. Fiber-coupled NbN superconducting single-photon detectors for quantum correlation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slysz, W.; Wegrzecki, M.; Bar, J.; Grabiec, P.; Gorska, M.; Reiger, E.; Dorenbos, S.; Zwiller, V.; Milostnaya, I.; Minaeva, O.

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated fiber-coupled superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs), designed for quantum-correlationtype experiments. The SSPDs are nanostructured (~100-nm wide and 4-nm thick) NbN superconducting meandering stripes, operated in the 2 to 4.2 K temperature range, and known for ultrafast

  14. Bosonic Operator Realization of Hamiltonian for a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi

    2004-01-01

    Based on the appropriate bosonic phase operator diagonalized in the entangled state representation we construct the Hamiltonian operator model for a superconducting quantum interference device. The current operator and voltage operator equations are derived.

  15. Tunable Broadband Transparency of Macroscopic Quantum Superconducting Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daimeng Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Narrow-band invisibility in an otherwise opaque medium has been achieved by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT in atomic systems. The quantum EIT behavior can be classically mimicked by specially engineered metamaterials via carefully controlled interference with a “dark mode.” However, the narrow transparency window limits the potential applications that require a tunable wideband transparent performance. Here, we present a macroscopic quantum superconducting metamaterial with manipulative self-induced broadband transparency due to a qualitatively novel nonlinear mechanism that is different from conventional EIT or its classical analogs. A near-complete disappearance of resonant absorption under a range of applied rf flux is observed experimentally and explained theoretically. The transparency comes from the intrinsic bistability of the meta-atoms and can be tuned on and off easily by altering rf and dc magnetic fields, temperature, and history. Hysteretic in situ 100% tunability of transparency paves the way for autocloaking metamaterials, intensity-dependent filters, and fast-tunable power limiters.

  16. Phase-controlled coherent population trapping in superconducting quantum circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程广玲; 王一平; 陈爱喜

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influences of the-applied-field phases and amplitudes on the coherent population trapping behavior in superconducting quantum circuits. Based on the interactions of the microwave fields with a single∆-type three-level fluxonium qubit, the coherent population trapping could be obtainable and it is very sensitive to the relative phase and amplitudes of the applied fields. When the relative phase is tuned to 0 orπ, the maximal atomic coherence is present and coherent population trapping occurs. While for the choice ofπ/2, the atomic coherence becomes weak. Meanwhile, for the fixed relative phaseπ/2, the value of coherence would decrease with the increase of Rabi frequency of the external field coupled with two lower levels. The responsible physical mechanism is quantum interference induced by the control fields, which is indicated in the dressed-state representation. The microwave coherent phenomenon is present in our scheme, which will have potential applications in optical communication and nonlinear optics in solid-state devices.

  17. Superconducting resonators as beam splitters for linear-optics quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirolli, Luca; Burkard, Guido; Kumar, Shwetank; Divincenzo, David P

    2010-06-11

    We propose and analyze a technique for producing a beam-splitting quantum gate between two modes of a ring-resonator superconducting cavity. The cavity has two integrated superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that are modulated by applying an external magnetic field. The gate is accomplished by applying a radio frequency pulse to one of the SQUIDs at the difference of the two mode frequencies. Departures from perfect beam splitting only arise from corrections to the rotating wave approximation; an exact calculation gives a fidelity of >0.9992. Our construction completes the toolkit for linear-optics quantum computing in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  18. Cavity-assisted dynamical quantum phase transition in superconducting quantum simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin

    Coupling a quantum many-body system to a cavity can create bifurcation points in the phase diagram, where the many-body system switches between different phases. Here I will discuss the dynamical quantum phase transitions at the bifurcation points of a one-dimensional transverse field Ising model coupled to a cavity. The Ising model can be emulated with various types of superconducting qubits connected in a chain. With a time-dependent Bogoliubov method, we show that an infinitesimal quench of the driving field can cause gradual evolution of the transverse field on the Ising spins to pass through the quantum critical point. Our calculation shows that the cavity-induced nonlinearity plays an important role in the dynamics of this system. Quasiparticles can be excited in the Ising chain during this process, which results in the deviation of the system from its adiabatic ground state. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Award Number 0956064.

  19. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-02-24

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well.

  20. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-12-06

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa.

  1. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Deshui; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa.

  2. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K.

  3. Spectroscopy of phonons and spin torques in magnetic point contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanson, I K; Naidyuk, Yu G; Bashlakov, D L; Fisun, V V; Balkashin, O P; Korenivski, V; Konovalenko, A; Shekhter, R I

    2005-10-28

    Phonon spectroscopy is used to investigate the mechanism of current-induced spin torques in nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic (N/F) point contacts. Magnetization excitations observed in the magneto-conductance of the point contacts are pronounced for diffusive and thermal contacts, where the electrons experience significant scattering in the contact region. We find no magnetic excitations in highly ballistic contacts. Our results show that impurity scattering at the N/F interface is the origin of the new single-interface spin torque effect.

  4. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  5. Quantum Synchronization of Conjugated Variables in a Superconducting Device Leads to the Fundamental Resistance Quantization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hriscu, A.M.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a way to achieve quantum synchronization of two canonically conjugated variables. For this, we employ a superconducting device where the synchronization of Josephson and Bloch oscillations results in the quantization of transresistance similar to that in the (fractional) quantum Hall effe

  6. Towards Quantum Simulation of Chemical Dynamics with Prethreshold Superconducting Qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Stancil, P C; Cook, A; Sornborger, A T; Geller, M R

    2016-01-01

    The single excitation subspace (SES) method for universal quantum simulation is investigated for a number of diatomic molecular collision complexes. Assuming a system of $n$ tunably-coupled, and fully-connected superconducting qubits, computations are performed in the $n$-dimensional SES which maps directly to an $n$-channel collision problem within a diabatic molecular wave function representation. Here we outline the approach on a classical computer to solve the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation in an $n$-dimensional molecular basis - the so-called semiclassical molecular-orbital close-coupling (SCMOCC) method - and extend the treatment beyond the straight-line, constant-velocity approximation which is restricted to large kinetic energies ($\\gtrsim 0.1$ keV/u). We explore various multichannel potential averaging schemes and an Ehrenfest symmetrization approach to allow for the application of the SCMOCC method to much lower collision energies (approaching 1 eV/u). In addition, a computational efficiency ...

  7. Superconductivity and non-Fermi liquid behavior near a nematic quantum critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Samuel; Schattner, Yoni; Berg, Erez; Kivelson, Steven A.

    2017-05-01

    Using determinantal quantum Monte Carlo, we compute the properties of a lattice model with spin mn>1mn>mn>2mn>12 itinerant electrons tuned through a quantum phase transition to an Ising nematic phase. The nematic fluctuations induce superconductivity with a broad dome in the superconducting TcTc enclosing the nematic quantum critical point. For temperatures above TcTc, we see strikingly non-Fermi liquid behavior, including a “nodal-antinodal dichotomy” reminiscent of that seen in several transition metal oxides. In addition, the critical fluctuations have a strong effect on the low-frequency optical conductivity, resulting in behavior consistent with “bad metal” phenomenology.

  8. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  9. Distributed quantum computation with superconducting qubit via LC circuit using dressed states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Chao; Fang Mao-Fa; Xiao Xing; Li Yan-Ling; Cao Shuai

    2011-01-01

    A scheme is proposed where two superconducting qubits driven by a classical field interacting separately with two distant LC circuits connected by another LC circuit through mutual inductance, are used for implementing quantum gates. By using dressed states, quantum state transfer and quantum entangling gate can be implemented. With the help of the time-dependent electromagnetic field, any two dressed qubits can be selectively coupled to the data bus (the last LC circuit), then quantum state can be transferred from one dressed qubit to another and multi-mode entangled state can also be formed. As a result, the promising perspectives for quantum information processing of mesoscopic superconducting qubits are obtained and the distributed and scalable quantum computation can be implemented in this scheme.

  10. Fermion-fermion scattering in quantum field theory with superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, L; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; Egusquiza, I L; Lamata, L; Romero, G; Solano, E

    2015-02-20

    We propose an analog-digital quantum simulation of fermion-fermion scattering mediated by a continuum of bosonic modes within a circuit quantum electrodynamics scenario. This quantum technology naturally provides strong coupling of superconducting qubits with a continuum of electromagnetic modes in an open transmission line. In this way, we propose qubits to efficiently simulate fermionic modes via digital techniques, while we consider the continuum complexity of an open transmission line to simulate the continuum complexity of bosonic modes in quantum field theories. Therefore, we believe that the complexity-simulating-complexity concept should become a leading paradigm in any effort towards scalable quantum simulations.

  11. Search for E(2g) phonon modes in MgB2 single crystals by point-contact spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidyuk, Yu G; Yanson, I K; Kvitnitskaya, O E; Lee, S; Tajima, S

    2003-05-16

    The electron-phonon interaction in magnesium diboride MgB2 single crystals is investigated by point-contact (PC) spectroscopy. For the first time the electron coupling with E(2g) phonon modes is resolved in the PC spectra. The correlation between intensity of the extremely broad E(2g) modes in the PC spectra and value of the superconducting gap is established. Our observations favor current theoretical models for electron-phonon mediated superconductivity in MgB2, and they better match the harmonic phonon model.

  12. A novel protection layer of superconducting microwave circuits toward a hybrid quantum system

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jongmin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel multilayer structure based on Bragg layers that can protect a superconducting microwave resonator from photons and blackbody radiation and have little effect on its quality factor. We also discuss a hybrid quantum system exploiting a superconducting microwave circuit and a two-color evanescent field atom trap, where surface-scattered photons and absorption-induced broadband blackbody radiation might deteriorate the system.

  13. Design and construction of a point-contact spectroscopy rig with lateral scanning capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortello, M; Park, W K; Ascencio, C O; Saraf, P; Greene, L H

    2016-06-01

    The design and realization of a cryogenic rig for point-contact spectroscopy measurements in the needle-anvil configuration is presented. Thanks to the use of two piezoelectric nano-positioners, the tip can move along the vertical (z) and horizontal (x) direction and thus the rig is suitable to probe different regions of a sample in situ. Moreover, it can also form double point-contacts on different facets of a single crystal for achieving, e.g., an interferometer configuration for phase-sensitive measurements. For the later purpose, the sample holder can also host a Helmholtz coil for applying a small transverse magnetic field to the junction. A semi-rigid coaxial cable can be easily added for studying the behavior of Josephson junctions under microwave irradiation. The rig can be detached from the probe and thus used with different cryostats. The performance of this new probe has been tested in a Quantum Design PPMS system by conducting point-contact Andreev reflection measurements on Nb thin films over large areas as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  14. Towards noise engineering: Recent insights in low-frequency excess flux noise of superconducting quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Sebastian; Ferring, Anna; Enss, Christian

    2016-10-01

    The comprehensive analysis of low-frequency excess flux noise both in terms of magnetic flux noise S Φ , 1 / f and energy sensitivity ɛ1/f of 84 superconducting quantum devices studied at temperatures below 1 K reveals a universal behavior. When analyzing data in terms of ɛ1/f, we find that noise spectra of independent devices cross each other all at certain crossing frequencies fc. Besides this main result of our paper, we further show that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) arrays systematically feature higher noise exponents than single SQUIDs and give evidence for a material and device type dependence of low-frequency excess flux noise. The latter results facilitate to engineer the shape of magnetic flux noise spectra and thus to experimentally modify key properties such as coherence or measurement times of superconducting quantum devices.

  15. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    CERN Document Server

    Schuck, Carsten; Fan, Linran; Ma, Xiao-Song; Poot, Menno; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standa...

  16. Universal holonomic quantum gates in decoherence-free subspace on superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Z. D.

    2015-08-01

    To implement a set of universal quantum logic gates based on non-Abelian geometric phases, it is conventional wisdom that quantum systems beyond two levels are required, which is extremely difficult to fulfill for superconducting qubits and appears to be a main reason why only single-qubit gates were implemented in a recent experiment [A. A. Abdumalikov, Jr. et al., Nature (London) 496, 482 (2013), 10.1038/nature12010]. Here we propose to realize nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspace on circuit QED, where one can use only the two levels in transmon qubits, a usual interaction, and a minimal resource for the decoherence-free subspace encoding. In particular, our scheme not only overcomes the difficulties encountered in previous studies but also can still achieve considerably large effective coupling strength, such that high-fidelity quantum gates can be achieved. Therefore, the present scheme makes realizing robust holonomic quantum computation with superconducting circuits very promising.

  17. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  18. Effect of Multiphoton Processes on Geometric Quantum Computation in Superconducting Circuit QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-Yong

    2012-01-01

    We study the influence of multi-photon processes on the geometric quantum computation in the systems of superconducting qubits based on the displacement-like and the general squeezed operator methods. As an example, we focus on the question about how to implement a two-qubit geometric phase gate using superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics with both single- and two-photon interaction between the qubits and the cavity modes. We find that the multiphoton processes are not only controllable but also improve the gating speed. The comparison with other physical systems and experimental feasibility are discussed in detail.

  19. Quantum simulator of an open quantum system using superconducting qubits: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Mostame, Sarah; Tsomokos, Dimitris I; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-01-01

    In the initial stage of photosynthesis, light-harvested energy is transferred with remarkably high efficiency to a reaction center, with the vibrational environment assisting the transport mechanism. It is of great interest to mimic this process with present-day technologies. Here we propose an analog quantum simulator of open system dynamics, where noise engineering of the environment has a central role. In particular, we propose the use of superconducting qubits for the simulation of exciton transport in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson protein, a prototypical photosynthetic complex. Our method allows for a single-molecule implementation and the investigation of energy transfer pathways as well as non-Markovian and spatiotemporal noise-correlation effects.

  20. Quantum simulator of an open quantum system using superconducting qubits: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostame, Sarah; Rebentrost, Patrick; Eisfeld, Alexander; Kerman, Andrew J.; Tsomokos, Dimitris I.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2012-02-01

    In the initial stage of photosynthesis, light-harvested energy is transferred with remarkably high efficiency to a reaction center, with the vibrational environment assisting the transport mechanism. It is of great interest to mimic this process with present-day technologies. Here we propose an analog quantum simulator of open system dynamics, where noise engineering of the environment has a central role. In particular, we propose the use of superconducting qubits for the simulation of exciton transport in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson protein, a prototypical photosynthetic complex. Our method allows for a single-molecule implementation and the investigation of energy transfer pathways as well as non-Markovian and spatiotemporal noise-correlation effects.

  1. Superconducting quantum circuits at the surface code threshold for fault tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R; Kelly, J; Megrant, A; Veitia, A; Sank, D; Jeffrey, E; White, T C; Mutus, J; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Y; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Neill, C; O'Malley, P; Roushan, P; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; Korotkov, A N; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

    2014-04-24

    A quantum computer can solve hard problems, such as prime factoring, database searching and quantum simulation, at the cost of needing to protect fragile quantum states from error. Quantum error correction provides this protection by distributing a logical state among many physical quantum bits (qubits) by means of quantum entanglement. Superconductivity is a useful phenomenon in this regard, because it allows the construction of large quantum circuits and is compatible with microfabrication. For superconducting qubits, the surface code approach to quantum computing is a natural choice for error correction, because it uses only nearest-neighbour coupling and rapidly cycled entangling gates. The gate fidelity requirements are modest: the per-step fidelity threshold is only about 99 per cent. Here we demonstrate a universal set of logic gates in a superconducting multi-qubit processor, achieving an average single-qubit gate fidelity of 99.92 per cent and a two-qubit gate fidelity of up to 99.4 per cent. This places Josephson quantum computing at the fault-tolerance threshold for surface code error correction. Our quantum processor is a first step towards the surface code, using five qubits arranged in a linear array with nearest-neighbour coupling. As a further demonstration, we construct a five-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state using the complete circuit and full set of gates. The results demonstrate that Josephson quantum computing is a high-fidelity technology, with a clear path to scaling up to large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum circuits.

  2. Simulation of electronic structure Hamiltonians in a superconducting quantum computer architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaicher, Michael; Wilhelm, Frank K. [Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Love, Peter J. [Department of Physics, Haverford College, Haverford, Pennsylvania 19041 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Quantum chemistry has become one of the most promising applications within the field of quantum computation. Simulating the electronic structure Hamiltonian (ESH) in the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK)-Basis to compute the ground state energies of atoms/molecules reduces the number of qubit operations needed to simulate a single fermionic operation to O(log(n)) as compared to O(n) in the Jordan-Wigner-Transformation. In this work we will present the details of the BK-Transformation, show an example of implementation in a superconducting quantum computer architecture and compare it to the most recent quantum chemistry algorithms suggesting a constant overhead.

  3. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  4. Universal transport signatures of topological superconductivity in quantum spin Hall architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shu-Ping; Aasen, David; Karzig, Torsten; Alicea, Jason

    2015-03-01

    Interfacing s-wave superconductors with quantum spin Hall systems provides a promising route to ``engineered'' topological superconductivity. Given exciting recent progress on the fabrication side, identifying experiments that definitively expose the topological superconducting phase (and clearly distinguish it from a trivial state) raises an increasingly important problem. With this goal in mind we use renormalization group methods to extract universal transport characteristics of superconductor/quantum spin Hall heterostructures where the native edge states serve as a lead. Interestingly, arbitrarily weak interactions induce qualitative changes in the behavior relative to the free-fermion limit, leading to a sharp dichotomy in conductance for the trivial (narrow superconductor) and topological (wide superconductor) cases. Furthermore, we find that strong interactions can in principle induce power-law-localized ``parafermion'' excitations at a superconductor/quantum spin Hall junction. NSF Grant DMR-1341822. (2) Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, an NSF physics frontier center with support from the Moore Foundation.

  5. Realization of a Binary-Outcome Projection Measurement of a Three-Level Superconducting Quantum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerger, Markus; Macha, Pascal; Hamann, Andrés Rosario; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Juliusson, Kristinn; Fedorov, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    Binary-outcome measurements allow one to determine whether a multilevel quantum system is in a certain state while preserving quantum coherence between all orthogonal states. In this paper, we explore different regimes of the dispersive readout of a three-level superconducting quantum system coupled to a microwave cavity in order to implement binary-outcome measurements. By designing identical cavity-frequency shifts for the first and second excited states of the system, we realize strong projective binary-outcome measurements onto its ground state with a fidelity of 94.3%. Complemented with standard microwave control and low-noise parametric amplification, this scheme enables the quantum nondemolition detection of leakage errors and can be used to create sets of compatible measurements to reveal the contextual nature of superconducting circuits.

  6. Atlas of point contact spectra of electron-phonon interactions in metals

    CERN Document Server

    Khotkevich, A V

    1995-01-01

    The characteristics of electrical contacts have long attracted the attention of researchers since these contacts are used in every electrical and electronic device. Earlier studies generally considered electrical contacts of large dimensions, having regions of current concentration with diameters substantially larger than the characteristic dimensions of the material: the interatomic distance, the mean free path for electrons, the coherence length in the superconducting state, etc. [110]. The development of microelectronics presented to scientists and engineers the task of studying the characteristics of electrical contacts with ultra-small dimensions. Characteristics of point contacts such as mechanical stability under continuous current loads, the magnitudes of electrical fluctuations, inherent sensitivity in radio devices and nonlinear characteristics in connection with electromagnetic radiation can not be understood and altered in the required way without knowledge of the physical processes occurring in c...

  7. Operation of a superconducting nanowire quantum interference device with mesoscopic leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekker, David; Bezryadin, Alexey; Hopkins, David S.; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2005-09-01

    A theory describing the operation of a superconducting nanowire quantum interference device (NQUID) is presented. The device consists of a pair of thin-film superconducting leads connected by a pair of topologically parallel ultranarrow superconducting wires. It exhibits intrinsic electrical resistance, due to thermally activated dissipative fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter. Attention is given to the dependence of this resistance on the strength of an externally applied magnetic field aligned perpendicular to the leads, for lead dimensions such that there is essentially complete and uniform penetration of the leads by the magnetic field. This regime, in which at least one of the lead dimensions—length or width—lies between the superconducting coherence and penetration lengths, is referred to as the mesoscopic regime. The magnetic field causes a pronounced oscillation of the device resistance, with a period not dominated by the Aharonov-Bohm effect through the area enclosed by the wires and the film edges but, rather, in terms of the geometry of the leads, in contrast to the well-known Little-Parks resistance of thin-walled superconducting cylinders. A detailed theory, encompassing this phenomenology quantitatively, is developed through extensions, to the setting of parallel superconducting wires, of the Ivanchenko-Zil’berman-Ambegaokar-Halperin theory of intrinsic resistive fluctuations in a current-biased Josephson junction and the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin theory of intrinsic resistive fluctuations in a superconducting wire. In particular, it is demonstrated that via the resistance of the NQUID, the wires act as a probe of spatial variations in the superconducting order parameter along the perimeter of each lead: in essence, a superconducting phase gradiometer.

  8. Implementation of Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices via Raman Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical scheme is proposed to implement the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm with SQUIDs (superconducting quantum-interference devices) in cavity via Raman transition. The scheme only requires a quantized cavity field and classical microwave pulses. In this scheme, no transfer of quantum information between the SQUIDs and the cavity is required, the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed.

  9. Generation of an Entangled State of Two Three-Level Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating a maximally entangled state of two three-level superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classical microwave pluses in cavity. In this scheme, no quantum information will be transferred from the SQUIDs to the cavity since the cavity field is only virtually excited. Thus, the cavity decay is suppressed during the entanglement generation.

  10. Magnetic and superconducting quantum critical points of heavy-fermion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demuer, A.; Sheikin, I.; Braithwaite, D. E-mail: dbraithwaite@cea.fr; Faak, B.; Huxley, A.; Raymond, S.; Flouquet, J

    2001-05-01

    Two examples of heavy-fermion systems are presented : CePd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, an antiferromagnet with a quantum critical point at P{sub C}=28 kbar and UGe{sub 2} an itinerant ferromagnet which transits in a paramagnetic phase above P{sub C}=16 kbar. In CePd{sub 2}Si{sub 2} the superconductivity domain is centered on P{sub C}. Special attention was given to the superconducting and magnetic anomalies at their superconducting and Neel temperatures. In UGe{sub 2} superconductivity appears in 9 kbar at a temperature T{sub S}, more than two orders of magnitude lower than the Curie temperature; furthermore, it occurs only on the magnetic border (P

  11. Magnetic and superconducting quantum critical points of heavy-fermion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuer, A.; Sheikin, I.; Braithwaite, D.; Fåk, B.; Huxley, A.; Raymond, S.; Flouquet, J.

    2001-05-01

    Two examples of heavy-fermion systems are presented : CePd 2Si 2, an antiferromagnet with a quantum critical point at PC=28 kbar and UGe 2 an itinerant ferromagnet which transits in a paramagnetic phase above PC=16 kbar. In CePd 2Si 2 the superconductivity domain is centered on PC. Special attention was given to the superconducting and magnetic anomalies at their superconducting and Néel temperatures. In UGe 2 superconductivity appears in 9 kbar at a temperature TS, more than two orders of magnitude lower than the Curie temperature; furthermore, it occurs only on the magnetic border ( P< PC). Another characteristic temperature TX is detected by resistivity; the zigzag uranium chain of the lattice may favor a supplementary nesting in the majority spin band.

  12. Conference: Superconductivity, theory and practical challenges of a quantum phenonemon | 25 August | Uni Dufour

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    On Tuesday, 25 August, J. Georg Bednorz (Nobel prize in physics 1987, IBM Research Zurich) and Louis Taillefer (physicist and professor at the University of Sherbrooke, Canada, and at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) will give a conference on the fascinating theme of superconductivity. "Superconductivity: theory and practical challenges of a quantum phenonemon" Uni Dufour Tuesday, 25 August at 7 p.m. This conference is organized by the Faculty of science of the University of Geneva, as part of the International Congress Materials and Mechanisms of Superconductivity (M2S - 2015). Discovered more than 100 years ago, superconductivity remains one of the most fascinating manifestations of the laws of physics, observable only at low temperatures. This phenomenon, which allows the transport of electricity without any loss of energy, leads to various technological applications, for example in magnetically levitated vehicles, in MRI and in ...

  13. Investigation of Properties of Motion of Superconductive Electrons in Superconductors by Nonlinear Quantum Mechanical Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Pang

    2008-01-01

    The properties and rules of motion of superconductive electrons in steady and time-dependent non-equilibrium states of superconductors are studied by using the Ginzberg-Landau (GL) equations and nonlinear quantum theory. In the absence of external fields, the superconductive electrons move in the solitons with certain energy and velocity in a uniform system, The superconductive electron is still a soliton under action of an electromagnetic field, but its amplitude, phase and shape are changed. Thus we conclude that super- conductivity is a result of motion of soliton of superconductive electrons. Since soliton has the feature of motion for retaining its energy and form, thus a permanent current occurs in superconductor. From these solutions of GL equations under action of an electromagnetic field, we gain the structure of vortex lines-magnetic flux lines observed experimentally in type-II superconductors. In the time-dependent non- equilibrium states of superconductor, the motions of superconductive electrons exhibit still the soliton features, but the shape and amplitude have changed. In an invariant electric-field, it moves in a constant acceleration. In the medium with dissipation, the superconductive electron behaves still like a soliton, although its form, amplitude, and velocity are altered. Thus we have to convince that the superconductive electron is essentially a soliton in both non-equilibrium and equilibrium superconductors.

  14. Quantum criticality and nodal superconductivity in the FeAs-based superconductor KFe2As2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J K; Zhou, S Y; Guan, T Y; Zhang, H; Dai, Y F; Qiu, X; Wang, X F; He, Y; Chen, X H; Li, S Y

    2010-02-26

    The in-plane resistivity rho and thermal conductivity kappa of the FeAs-based superconductor KFe2As2 single crystal were measured down to 50 mK. We observe non-Fermi-liquid behavior rho(T) approximately T{1.5} at H{c{2}}=5 T, and the development of a Fermi liquid state with rho(T) approximately T{2} when further increasing the field. This suggests a field-induced quantum critical point, occurring at the superconducting upper critical field H{c{2}}. In zero field, there is a large residual linear term kappa{0}/T, and the field dependence of kappa_{0}/T mimics that in d-wave cuprate superconductors. This indicates that the superconducting gaps in KFe2As2 have nodes, likely d-wave symmetry. Such a nodal superconductivity is attributed to the antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations near the quantum critical point.

  15. Note: A hand-held high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device operating without shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, D F

    2011-02-01

    By improving the compensation circuit, a hand-held high-Tc rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) system was developed. It could operate well when moving in unshielded environment. To check the operation, it was used to do eddy-current testing by hand moving the SQUID, and the artificial defect under 6 mm aluminum plate could be successfully detected in shielded environment.

  16. Local anharmonic vibrations strong correlations and superconductivity : a quantum simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frick, M.; Linden, W. von der; Morgenstern, I.; Raedt, H. de

    1990-01-01

    We investigate the importance of local anharmonic vibrations of the bridging oxygen in the copper oxide high-Tc materials in the context of superconductivity. For the numerical simulation we employ the projector quantum Monte Carlo method to study the ground state properties of the coupled electron-

  17. Generation of Entangled States of Multiple Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating the maximally entangled states of many superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classicalmicrowave pulses in cavity. In the scheme,the maximally entangled states can be generated without requiring the measurement and individual addressing of the SQUIDs.

  18. Multiple quantum phase transitions and superconductivity in Ce-based heavy fermions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Z F; Smidman, M; Jiao, L; Lu, Xin; Yuan, H Q

    2016-09-01

    Heavy fermions have served as prototype examples of strongly-correlated electron systems. The occurrence of unconventional superconductivity in close proximity to the electronic instabilities associated with various degrees of freedom points to an intricate relationship between superconductivity and other electronic states, which is unique but also shares some common features with high temperature superconductivity. The magnetic order in heavy fermion compounds can be continuously suppressed by tuning external parameters to a quantum critical point, and the role of quantum criticality in determining the properties of heavy fermion systems is an important unresolved issue. Here we review the recent progress of studies on Ce based heavy fermion superconductors, with an emphasis on the superconductivity emerging on the edge of magnetic and charge instabilities as well as the quantum phase transitions which occur by tuning different parameters, such as pressure, magnetic field and doping. We discuss systems where multiple quantum critical points occur and whether they can be classified in a unified manner, in particular in terms of the evolution of the Fermi surface topology.

  19. Multiple quantum phase transitions and superconductivity in Ce-based heavy fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Z. F.; Smidman, M.; Jiao, L.; Lu, Xin; Yuan, H. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Heavy fermions have served as prototype examples of strongly-correlated electron systems. The occurrence of unconventional superconductivity in close proximity to the electronic instabilities associated with various degrees of freedom points to an intricate relationship between superconductivity and other electronic states, which is unique but also shares some common features with high temperature superconductivity. The magnetic order in heavy fermion compounds can be continuously suppressed by tuning external parameters to a quantum critical point, and the role of quantum criticality in determining the properties of heavy fermion systems is an important unresolved issue. Here we review the recent progress of studies on Ce based heavy fermion superconductors, with an emphasis on the superconductivity emerging on the edge of magnetic and charge instabilities as well as the quantum phase transitions which occur by tuning different parameters, such as pressure, magnetic field and doping. We discuss systems where multiple quantum critical points occur and whether they can be classified in a unified manner, in particular in terms of the evolution of the Fermi surface topology.

  20. Quantum phase transition in ultra small doubly connected superconducting cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternfeld, I.; Koret, R.; Shtrikman, H.; Tsukernik, A.; Karpovski, M.; Palevski, A.

    2008-02-01

    The kinetic energy of Cooper pairs, in doubly connected superconducting cylinders, is a function of the applied flux and the ratio between the diameter of the cylinder and the zero temperature coherence length d/ ξ(0). If d >ξ(0) the known Little-Parks oscillations are observed. On the other hand if d ξ(0), we observed the LP oscillations. In the Al cylinders we did not observe a transition to the superconducting state due to the proximity effect, resulted from an Au layer coating the Al. However, we did observe Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (h/2e) oscillations in these cylinders.

  1. Quantum phase transition in ultra small doubly connected superconducting cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternfeld, I. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)], E-mail: itayst@post.tau.ac.il; Koret, R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shtrikman, H. [Department of Condensed Matter, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Tsukernik, A. [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Karpovski, M.; Palevski, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2008-02-15

    The kinetic energy of Cooper pairs, in doubly connected superconducting cylinders, is a function of the applied flux and the ratio between the diameter of the cylinder and the zero temperature coherence length d/{xi}(0). If d >{xi}(0) the known Little-Parks oscillations are observed. On the other hand if d <{xi}(0), the superconducting state is energetically not favored around odd multiples of half flux quanta even at T{approx}0, resulting in the so called destructive regime [Y. Liu, et al., Science 294 (2001) 2332]. We developed a novel technique to fabricate superconducting doubly connected nanocylinders with both diameter and thickness less than 100 nm, and performed magnetoresistance measurements on such Nb and Al cylinders. In the Nb cylinders, where d >{xi}(0), we observed the LP oscillations. In the Al cylinders we did not observe a transition to the superconducting state due to the proximity effect, resulted from an Au layer coating the Al. However, we did observe Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (h/2e) oscillations in these cylinders.

  2. Superconducting detector dynamics studied by quantum pump-probe spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, R.W.; Zwiller, V.

    2012-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) on the picosecond time-scale using a correlated photon-pair source based on spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), corresponding to a pump-probe experiment at the single-photon level. We show that the detector can oper

  3. Hardware-Efficient and Fully Autonomous Quantum Error Correction in Superconducting Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapit, Eliot

    2016-04-01

    Superconducting qubits are among the most promising platforms for building a quantum computer. However, individual qubit coherence times are not far past the scalability threshold for quantum error correction, meaning that millions of physical devices would be required to construct a useful quantum computer. Consequently, further increases in coherence time are very desirable. In this Letter, we blueprint a simple circuit consisting of two transmon qubits and two additional lossy qubits or resonators, which is passively protected against all single-qubit quantum error channels through a combination of continuous driving and engineered dissipation. Photon losses are rapidly corrected through two-photon drive fields implemented with driven superconducting quantum interference device couplings, and dephasing from random potential fluctuations is heavily suppressed by the drive fields used to implement the multiqubit Hamiltonian. Comparing our theoretical model to published noise estimates from recent experiments on flux and transmon qubits, we find that logical state coherence could be improved by a factor of 40 or more compared to the individual qubit T1 and T2 using this technique. We thus demonstrate that there is substantial headroom for improving the coherence of modern superconducting qubits with a fairly modest increase in device complexity.

  4. Hardware-Efficient and Fully Autonomous Quantum Error Correction in Superconducting Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapit, Eliot

    2016-04-15

    Superconducting qubits are among the most promising platforms for building a quantum computer. However, individual qubit coherence times are not far past the scalability threshold for quantum error correction, meaning that millions of physical devices would be required to construct a useful quantum computer. Consequently, further increases in coherence time are very desirable. In this Letter, we blueprint a simple circuit consisting of two transmon qubits and two additional lossy qubits or resonators, which is passively protected against all single-qubit quantum error channels through a combination of continuous driving and engineered dissipation. Photon losses are rapidly corrected through two-photon drive fields implemented with driven superconducting quantum interference device couplings, and dephasing from random potential fluctuations is heavily suppressed by the drive fields used to implement the multiqubit Hamiltonian. Comparing our theoretical model to published noise estimates from recent experiments on flux and transmon qubits, we find that logical state coherence could be improved by a factor of 40 or more compared to the individual qubit T_{1} and T_{2} using this technique. We thus demonstrate that there is substantial headroom for improving the coherence of modern superconducting qubits with a fairly modest increase in device complexity.

  5. Demonstrating quantum speed-up in a superconducting two-qubit processor

    CERN Document Server

    Dewes, A; Ong, F R; Schmitt, V; Milman, P; Bertet, P; Vion, D; Esteve, D

    2011-01-01

    We operate a superconducting quantum processor consisting of two tunable transmon qubits coupled by a swapping interaction, and equipped with non destructive single-shot readout of the two qubits. With this processor, we run the Grover search algorithm among four objects and find that the correct answer is retrieved after a single run with a success probability between 0.52 and 0.67, significantly larger than the 0.25 achieved with a classical algorithm. This constitutes a proof-of-concept for the quantum speed-up of electrical quantum processors.

  6. Hybrid quantum circuit with a superconducting qubit coupled to an electron spin ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Yuimaru; Grezes, Cecile; Vion, Denis; Esteve, Daniel; Bertet, Patrice [Quantronics Group, SPEC (CNRS URA 2464), CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Diniz, Igor; Auffeves, Alexia [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Isoya, Jun-ichi [Research Center for Knowledge Communities, University of Tsukuba, 305-8550 Tsukuba (Japan); Jacques, Vincent; Dreau, Anais; Roch, Jean-Francois [LPQM (CNRS, UMR 8537), Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan, 94235 Cachan (France)

    2013-07-01

    We report the experimental realization of a hybrid quantum circuit combining a superconducting qubit and an ensemble of electronic spins. The qubit, of the transmon type, is coherently coupled to the spin ensemble consisting of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in a diamond crystal via a frequency-tunable superconducting resonator acting as a quantum bus. Using this circuit, we prepare arbitrary superpositions of the qubit states that we store into collective excitations of the spin ensemble and retrieve back into the qubit. We also report a new method for detecting the magnetic resonance of electronic spins at low temperature with a qubit using the hybrid quantum circuit, as well as our recent progress on spin echo experiments.

  7. Quantum tricritical fluctuations driving mass enhancement and reentrant superconductivity in URhGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Y.; Aoki, D.; Mayaffre, H.; Krämer, S.; Julien, M.-H.; Berthier, C.; Horvatić, M.; Sakai, H.; Kambe, S.; Hattori, T.; Araki, S.

    2016-02-01

    The field-induced reentrant superconductivity (RSC) discovered near a quantum critical point (QCP) in a ferromagnetic superconductor URhGe highlights the close interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. While the origin of the RSC is broadly thought to be associated with quantum critical fluctuations, their exact nature had not been well identified. Here we review our recent 59Co NMR study in a single crystal of URh0.9Co0.1Ge. Our measurements of the NMR spin-spin relaxation reveal a divergence of electronic spin fluctuations in the vicinity of the field-induced QCP at HR ≈ 13 T. The fluctuations observed are characteristic of a tricritical point, followed by a phase bifurcation toward quantum wing-critical points. We show that these tricritical fluctuations enhance the effective mass of the conduction electrons and, further, drive the RSC near the HR.

  8. Note: Increasing dynamic range of digital-to-analog converter using a superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Masakazu, E-mail: m.nakanishi@aist.go.jp [Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Central-3, 1-1, Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Responses of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) are periodically dependent on magnetic flux coupling to its superconducting ring and the period is a flux quantum (Φ{sub o} = h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). Using this periodicity, we had proposed a digital to analog converter using a SQUID (SQUID DAC) of first generation with linear current output, interval of which corresponded to Φ{sub o}. Modification for increasing dynamic range by interpolating within each interval is reported. Linearity of the interpolation was also based on the quantum periodicity. A SQUID DAC with dynamic range of about 1.4 × 10{sup 7} was created as a demonstration.

  9. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  10. Simulation of temperature distribution of point contacts in mixed lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Yuchuan(刘雨川); HU; Yuanzhong(胡元中); WANG; Wenzhong; (王文中); WANG; Hui(王慧)

    2002-01-01

    The numerical simulation of temperature distribution of point contacts in mixed lubrication is presented. The calculating includes two steps. First, temperature rises on two surfaces are obtained by a temperature integration method of transient point heat source. Second, the partition coefficients of heat flux are determined by matching the temperature of two surfaces. Similar to the calculation of elastic deformation, double linear interpolation function is used to get a better accuracy, and moving grid method is used to increase the efficiency of the computation. Due to the symmetry of influence coefficient matrix in the direction perpendicular to the velocity, storage and computational work are further reduced by 50%. Numerical samples validate the algorithm and program. The calculating results of the cases of smooth surface and isotropic sinusoidal surface are presented.

  11. From quantum matter to high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keimer, B; Kivelson, S A; Norman, M R; Uchida, S; Zaanen, J

    2015-02-12

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the copper oxides in 1986 triggered a huge amount of innovative scientific inquiry. In the almost three decades since, much has been learned about the novel forms of quantum matter that are exhibited in these strongly correlated electron systems. A qualitative understanding of the nature of the superconducting state itself has been achieved. However, unresolved issues include the astonishing complexity of the phase diagram, the unprecedented prominence of various forms of collective fluctuations, and the simplicity and insensitivity to material details of the 'normal' state at elevated temperatures.

  12. Characterization and reduction of microfabrication-induced decoherence in superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, C. M.; Megrant, A.; Chen, Z.; Dunsworth, A.; Chiaro, B.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mutus, J. Y.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2014-08-01

    Many superconducting qubits are highly sensitive to dielectric loss, making the fabrication of coherent quantum circuits challenging. To elucidate this issue, we characterize the interfaces and surfaces of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators and study the associated microwave loss. We show that contamination induced by traditional qubit lift-off processing is particularly detrimental to quality factors without proper substrate cleaning, while roughness plays at most a small role. Aggressive surface treatment is shown to damage the crystalline substrate and degrade resonator quality. We also introduce methods to characterize and remove ultra-thin resist residue, providing a way to quantify and minimize remnant sources of loss on device surfaces.

  13. Characterization and reduction of microfabrication-induced decoherence in superconducting quantum circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, C. M.; Megrant, A.; Chen, Z.; Dunsworth, A.; Chiaro, B.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mutus, J. Y.; O' Malley, P. J. J.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); and others

    2014-08-11

    Many superconducting qubits are highly sensitive to dielectric loss, making the fabrication of coherent quantum circuits challenging. To elucidate this issue, we characterize the interfaces and surfaces of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators and study the associated microwave loss. We show that contamination induced by traditional qubit lift-off processing is particularly detrimental to quality factors without proper substrate cleaning, while roughness plays at most a small role. Aggressive surface treatment is shown to damage the crystalline substrate and degrade resonator quality. We also introduce methods to characterize and remove ultra-thin resist residue, providing a way to quantify and minimize remnant sources of loss on device surfaces.

  14. Broadband calibrated scattering parameters characterization of a superconducting quantum interference device amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranzani, Leonardo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Spietz, Lafe; Aumentado, Jose [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2013-07-08

    In this work, we characterize the 2-port scattering parameters of a superconducting quantum interference device amplifier at {approx}20 mK over several gigahertz of bandwidth. The measurement reference plane is positioned on a 6.25 {Omega} microstrip line situated directly at the input and output of the device by means of a thru-reflect-line cryogenic calibration procedure. From the scattering parameters, we derive the device available power gain, isolation, and input impedance over the 2-8 GHz range. This measurement methodology provides a path towards designing wide-band matching circuits for low impedance superconducting amplifiers operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures.

  15. Quantum and wave dynamical chaos in superconducting microwave billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, B., E-mail: dietz@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de; Richter, A., E-mail: richter@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Experiments with superconducting microwave cavities have been performed in our laboratory for more than two decades. The purpose of the present article is to recapitulate some of the highlights achieved. We briefly review (i) results obtained with flat, cylindrical microwave resonators, so-called microwave billiards, concerning the universal fluctuation properties of the eigenvalues of classically chaotic systems with no, a threefold and a broken symmetry; (ii) summarize our findings concerning the wave-dynamical chaos in three-dimensional microwave cavities; (iii) present a new approach for the understanding of the phenomenon of dynamical tunneling which was developed on the basis of experiments that were performed recently with unprecedented precision, and finally, (iv) give an insight into an ongoing project, where we investigate universal properties of (artificial) graphene with superconducting microwave photonic crystals that are enclosed in a microwave resonator, i.e., so-called Dirac billiards.

  16. A ferroelectric quantum phase transition inside the superconducting dome of Sr1-xCaxTiO3-δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischau, Carl Willem; Lin, Xiao; Grams, Christoph P.; Finck, Dennis; Harms, Steffen; Engelmayer, Johannes; Lorenz, Thomas; Gallais, Yann; Fauqué, Benoît; Hemberger, Joachim; Behnia, Kamran

    2017-07-01

    SrTiO3, a quantum paraelectric, becomes a metal with a superconducting instability after removal of an extremely small number of oxygen atoms. It turns into a ferroelectric upon substitution of a tiny fraction of strontium atoms with calcium. The two orders may be accidental neighbours or intimately connected, as in the picture of quantum critical ferroelectricity. Here, we show that in Sr1-xCaxTiO3-δ (0.002 content, a quantum phase transition destroys the ferroelectric order. We detect an upturn in the normal-state scattering and a significant modification of the superconducting dome in the vicinity of this quantum phase transition. The enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature with calcium substitution documents the role played by ferroelectric vicinity in the precocious emergence of superconductivity in this system, restricting possible theoretical scenarios for pairing.

  17. Digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamata, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    We propose a digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits, including Fermi- Bose condensates, biased and pulsed Dicke models, for all regimes of light-matter coupling. We encode these classes of problems in a set of superconducting qubits coupled with a bosonic mode implemented by a transmission line resonator. Via digital-analog techniques, an efficient quantum simulation can be performed in state-of-the-art circuit quantum electrodynamics platforms, by suitable decomposition into analog qubit-bosonic blocks and collective single-qubit pulses through digital steps. Moreover, just a single global analog block would be needed during the whole protocol in most of the cases, superimposed with fast periodic pulses to rotate and detune the qubits. Therefore, a large number of digital steps may be attained with this approach, providing a reduced digital error. Additionally, the number of gates per digital step does not grow with the number of qubits, rendering the simulation efficient. This strategy paves the way for the scalable digital-analog quantum simulation of many-body dynamics involving bosonic modes and spin degrees of freedom with superconducting circuits. PMID:28256559

  18. Digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamata, Lucas

    2017-03-01

    We propose a digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits, including Fermi- Bose condensates, biased and pulsed Dicke models, for all regimes of light-matter coupling. We encode these classes of problems in a set of superconducting qubits coupled with a bosonic mode implemented by a transmission line resonator. Via digital-analog techniques, an efficient quantum simulation can be performed in state-of-the-art circuit quantum electrodynamics platforms, by suitable decomposition into analog qubit-bosonic blocks and collective single-qubit pulses through digital steps. Moreover, just a single global analog block would be needed during the whole protocol in most of the cases, superimposed with fast periodic pulses to rotate and detune the qubits. Therefore, a large number of digital steps may be attained with this approach, providing a reduced digital error. Additionally, the number of gates per digital step does not grow with the number of qubits, rendering the simulation efficient. This strategy paves the way for the scalable digital-analog quantum simulation of many-body dynamics involving bosonic modes and spin degrees of freedom with superconducting circuits.

  19. Superconductivity around quantum critical point in P-doped iron arsenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Guanghan, E-mail: ghcao@zju.edu.c [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Jiang Shuai; Wang Cao; Li Yuke; Ren Zhi; Tao Qian; Dai Jianhui; Xu Zhuan [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2010-12-15

    We demonstrate that, by the P/As substitution-without doping of charge carriers-in a FeAs-layer-based parent compound, superconductivity can be universally introduced. The maximum superconducting critical temperature (T{sub c}) of BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} achieves 30 K. The P doping in LnFeAsO system (Ln = La and Sm) produces superconductivity below 11 K. The normal-state resistivity obeys linear temperature dependence and the normal-state Hall coefficient shows strong temperature dependence. These non-Fermi liquid behaviors suggest magnetic quantum criticality. The maximum T{sub c} values in different systems correlates strongly with the diagonal bondangle of Fe-As-Fe, implying the important role of the next-nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange coupling in iron pnictide superconductors.

  20. Principle and experimental investigation of current-driven negative-inductance superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Jianshe; Zhang, Yingshan; Cai, Han; Li, Gang; Liu, Qichun; Han, Siyuan; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-01

    A negative-inductance superconducting quantum interference device (nSQUID) is an adiabatic superconducting logic device with high energy efficiency, and therefore a promising building block for large-scale low-power superconducting computing. However, the principle of the nSQUID is not that straightforward and an nSQUID driven by voltage is vulnerable to common mode noise. We investigate a single nSQUID driven by current instead of voltage, and clarify the principle of the adiabatic transition of the current-driven nSQUID between different states. The basic logic operations of the current-driven nSQUID with proper parameters are simulated by WRspice. The corresponding circuit is fabricated with a 100 A cm‑2 Nb-based lift-off process, and the experimental results at low temperature confirm the basic logic operations as a gated buffer.

  1. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob, E-mail: ihahn@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  2. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  3. Growth and characterization of epitaxial aluminum layers on gallium-arsenide substrates for superconducting quantum bits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournet, J.; Gosselink, D.; Miao, G.-X.; Jaikissoon, M.; Langenberg, D.; McConkey, T. G.; Mariantoni, M.; Wasilewski, Z. R.

    2016-06-01

    The quest for a universal quantum computer has renewed interest in the growth of superconducting materials on semiconductor substrates. High-quality superconducting thin films will make it possible to improve the coherence time of superconducting quantum bits (qubits), i.e., to extend the time a qubit can store the amplitude and phase of a quantum state. The electrical losses in superconducting qubits highly depend on the quality of the metal layers the qubits are made from. Here, we report on the epitaxy of single-crystal Al (011) layers on GaAs (001) substrates. Layers with 110 nm thickness were deposited by means of molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature and monitored by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction performed simultaneously at four azimuths. The single-crystal nature of the layers was confirmed by ex situ high-resolution x-ray diffraction. Differential interference contrast and atomic force microscopy analysis of the sample’s surface revealed a featureless surface with root mean square roughness of 0.55 nm. A detailed in situ study allowed us to gain insight into the nucleation mechanisms of Al layers on GaAs, highlighting the importance of GaAs surface reconstruction in determining the final Al layer crystallographic orientation and quality. A highly uniform and stable GaAs (001)-(2× 4) reconstruction reproducibly led to a pure Al (011) phase, while an arsenic-rich GaAs (001)-(4× 4) reconstruction yielded polycrystalline films with an Al (111) dominant orientation. The near-atomic smoothness and single-crystal character of Al films on GaAs, in combination with the ability to trench GaAs substrates, could set a new standard for the fabrication of superconducting qubits.

  4. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  5. Accurate periodicity measurement of superconducting quantum interference device magnetic flux response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Masakazu

    2010-09-01

    It is theoretically explained that a response of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is periodically dependent on total magnetic flux coupling to the SQUID ring (Φ) and its period is a flux quantum (Φ(o)=h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). For example, the voltage of an electromagnetically oscillated rf-SQUID or a current biased dc-SQUID is thought to be periodically dependent on Φ with a period of Φ(o). In this paper, we propose an accurate method to check the periodicity of a SQUID response by using a set of sensing coils covered with a superconducting sheath. As a demonstration, we measured periodicity of a commercially available thin-film type rf-SQUID response in magnetic flux ranging up to approximately 4300Φ(o). Its flux dependence was periodic below about 3400Φ(o).

  6. Quantum phase transition in a multiconnected superconducting Jaynes-Cummings lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kangjun; Tian, Lin

    2015-05-01

    The connectivity and tunability of superconducting qubits and resonators provide us with an appealing platform to study the many-body physics of microwave excitations. Here we present a multiconnected Jaynes-Cummings lattice model which is symmetric with respect to the nonlocal qubit-resonator couplings. Our calculation shows that this model exhibits a Mott insulator-superfluid-Mott insulator phase transition at commensurate fillings, featured by symmetric quantum critical points. Phase diagrams in the grand canonical ensemble are also derived, which confirm the incompressibility of the Mott insulator phase. Different from a general-purposed quantum computer, it only requires two operations to demonstrate this phase transition: the preparation and the detection of commensurate many-body ground state. We discuss the realization of these operations in a superconducting circuit.

  7. Testing Elementary Cycles Formulation of Quantum Mechanics in Carbon Nanotubes and Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Dolce, Donatello

    2016-01-01

    Elementary Cycles are intrinsic periodic phenomena, classical in the essence, whose classical relativistic dynamics reproduce the complete coherence (perfect recurrences) typically associated to the pure quantum behaviours of elementary particles. They can be regarded as effective representations of 't Hooft Cellular Automata. By means of Elementary Cycles physics we obtain a consistent, intuitive, novel derivation of the peculiar quantum dynamics of electrons in Carbon Nanotubes, as well as of Superconductivity fundamental phenomenology. In particular we derive, from classical arguments, the essential electronic properties of graphene systems, such as energy bands and density of states. Similarly, in the second part of the paper, we derive the Superconductivity fundamental phenomenology in terms of simple geometrical considerations, directly from the Elementary Cycles dynamics rather than from empirical aspects and effective quantities connected to the microscopical characteristics of materials as in the sta...

  8. Superconductivity near a Quantum-Critical Point: The Special Role of the First Matsubara Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Abanov, Artem; Altshuler, Boris L; Yuzbashyan, Emil A; Chubukov, Andrey V

    2016-10-07

    Near a quantum-critical point in a metal strong fermion-fermion interaction mediated by a soft collective boson gives rise to incoherent, non-Fermi liquid behavior. It also often gives rise to superconductivity which masks the non-Fermi liquid behavior. We analyze the interplay between the tendency to pairing and fermionic incoherence for a set of quantum-critical models with effective dynamical interaction between low-energy fermions. We argue that superconducting T_{c} is nonzero even for strong incoherence and/or weak interaction due to the fact that the self-energy from dynamic critical fluctuations vanishes for the two lowest fermionic Matsubara frequencies ω_{m}=±πT. We obtain the analytic formula for T_{c}, which reproduces well earlier numerical results for the electron-phonon model at vanishing Debye frequency.

  9. Solar LBIC scanning of high-efficiency point-contact silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorster, F.J.; Dyk, E.E. van [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    The induced current response from a High Efficiency Concentrator (HECO) monocrystaline Si solar cell was mapped as a function of surface position and cell bias by using a solar light beam induced current (S-LBIC) mapping system while at the same time dynamically biasing the whole cell with an external voltage. Recombination accounts for a major portion of the reduction in quantum efficiency in these cells. This paper examines the spatial distribution of defect mechanisms causing a reduction of collected photocurrent of the backside point-contact device structure while under spot illumination. By examining the bias dependence of the S-LBIC maps, the identification of current loss mechanisms of solar cells under concentrated solar irradiance may be improved. The techniques employed to interpret the spatially distributed I-V curves are discussed and results presented. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Analysis of high efficiency back point contact silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Antonio

    1988-01-01

    A model has been developed for the analysis of Back Point-Contact (BPC) cells under variable injection level. The analysis has been applied to an experimental cell from Stanford University to allow the extraction of the recombination parameters of this cell. While the bulk SRH recombination and the recombination in the surface and in the emitters are those expected, the Auger constant takes a higher value (2.1 × 10 -30 cm 6/s), than the one usually accepted, and in agreement with the measurements by the Stanford group, for the carrier density involved here. The analysis indicates that best efficiency results are obtained with cells with finely designed emitter dots and well passivated surfaces, made on high resistivity substrates, leading to an upper limit of efficiency obtained at 20 W/cm 2 of about 30.4%. If our technology prevents us from a fine dot delineation (below 5-10 μm) then the highest efficiency is to be expected from the more conventional Interdigitated Back Contact cells with a limit (with our fitted Auger constant) of about 30%. Finally, if the commonly accepted value of the Auger constant (3.8 × 10 -31 cm 6/s) is used this limit is obtained at 50 W/cm 2 and is of 33.1% with a strongly idealized cell. All the efficiencies are at 25°C.

  11. Quantum information transfer with superconducting flux qubits coupled to a resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chui-Ping

    2010-01-01

    We propose a way for implementing quantum information transfer with two superconducting flux qubits, by coupling them to a resonator. This proposal does not require adjustment of the level spacings or uniformity in the device parameters. Moreover, neither adiabatic passage nor a second-order detuning is needed by this proposal, thus the operation can be performed much faster when compared with the previous proposals.

  12. Quantum computing in decoherence-free subspaces with superconducting charge qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Zhibo [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Zhang Xinding [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)], E-mail: xdzhang2000@gmail.com

    2007-12-10

    Taking into account the main noises in superconducting charge qubits (SCQs), we propose a feasible scheme to realize quantum computing (QC) in a specially-designed decoherence-free subspace (DFS). In our scheme two physical qubits are connected with a common inductance to form a strong coupling subsystem, which acts as a logical qubit. Benefiting from the well-designed DFS, our scheme is helpful to suppress certain decoherence effects.

  13. Retrieval of original signals for superconducting quantum interference device operating in flux locked mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘当婷; 田野; 赵士平; 任育峰; 陈赓华

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a simple relation between the input and output signals of a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer operating in flux locked mode in a cosine curve approximation. According to this relation, an original fast input signal can be easily retrieved from its distorted output response. This technique can be used in some areas such as sensitive and fast detection of magnetic or metallic grains in medicine and food security checking.

  14. Acute enhancement of the upper critical field for superconductivity approaching a quantum critical point in URhGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, F.; Sheikin, I.; Huxley, A.

    2007-07-01

    When a pure material is tuned to the point where a continuous phase-transition line is crossed at zero temperature, known as a quantum critical point (QCP), completely new correlated quantum ordered states can form. These phases include exotic forms of superconductivity. However, as superconductivity is generally suppressed by a magnetic field, the formation of superconductivity ought not to be possible at extremely high field. Here, we report that as we tune the ferromagnet, URhGe, towards a QCP by applying a component of magnetic field in the material's easy magnetic plane, superconductivity survives in progressively higher fields applied simultaneously along the material's magnetic hard axis. Thus, although superconductivity never occurs above a temperature of 0.5K, we find that it can survive in extremely high magnetic fields, exceeding 28T.

  15. Acute enhancement of the upper critical field for superconductivity approaching a quantum critical point in URhGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, F.; Huxley, A. [CEA, SPSMS, DRFMC, F-38054 Grenoble, (France); Levy, F.; Sheikin, I. [CNRS, GHMFL, F-38042 Grenoble, (France); Huxley, A. [Univ Edinburgh, Scottish Univ Phys Alliance, Sch Phys, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Midlothian, (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    When a pure material is tuned to the point where a continuous phase-transition line is crossed at zero temperature, known as a quantum critical point (QCP), completely new correlated quantum ordered states can form. These phases include exotic forms of superconductivity. However, as superconductivity is generally suppressed by a magnetic field, the formation of superconductivity ought not to be possible at extremely high field. Here, we report that as we tune the ferromagnet, URhGe, towards a QCP by applying a component of magnetic field in the material's easy magnetic plane, superconductivity survives in progressively higher fields applied simultaneously along the material's magnetic hard axis. Thus, although superconductivity never occurs above a temperature of 0.5 K, we find that it can survive in extremely high magnetic fields, exceeding 28 T. (authors)

  16. Encoding quantum information in a stabilized manifold of a superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzard, S.; Leghtas, Z.; Mundhada, S. O.; Axline, C.; Reagor, M.; Chou, K.; Blumoff, J.; Sliwa, K. M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    In a superconducting Josephson circuit architecture, we activate a multi-photon process between two modes by applying microwave drives at specific frequencies. This creates a pairwise exchange of photons between a high-Q cavity and the environment. The resulting open dynamical system develops a two-dimensional quasi-energy ground state manifold. Can we encode, protect and manipulate quantum information in this manifold? We experimentally investigate the convergence and escape rates in and out of this confined subspace. Finally, using quantum Zeno dynamics, we aim to perform gates which maintain the state in the protected manifold at all times. Work supported by: ARO, ONR, AFOSR and YINQE.

  17. Coupling InSb quantum dots to a superconducting microwave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Maja; Kammhuber, Jakob; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sebastien; Bakkers, Erik; Dicarlo, Leo; Kouwenhoven, Leo

    2014-03-01

    We present measurements of a superconducting half-wave resonator coupled to two InSb nanowire quantum dots. Precise nanowire alignment at the electric field antinodes at opposite ends of the microwave cavity allows for a maximal electric field along the wire axis, without compromising the intrinsic quality factor of the cavity. This architecture may be useful for reaching the strong coupling limit between a single spin and a microwave photon, paving the way to on-chip coupling of single spins for quantum information processing.

  18. Heavy fermions, quantum criticality, and unconventional superconductivity in filled skutterudites and related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andraka, Bohdan [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-05-14

    The main goal of this program was to explore the possibility of novel states and behaviors in Pr-based system exhibiting quantum critical behavior, PrOs₄Sb₁₂. Upon small changes of external parameter, such as magnetic field, physical properties of PrOs₄Sb₁₂ are drastically altered from those corresponding to a superconductor, to heavy fermion, to field-induced ordered phase with primary quadrupolar order parameter. All these states are highly unconventional and not understood in terms of current theories thus offer an opportunity to expand our knowledge and understanding of condensed matter. At the same time, these novel states and behaviors are subjects to intense international controversies. In particular, two superconducting phases with different transition temperatures were observed in some samples and not observed in others leading to speculations that sample defects might be partially responsible for these exotic behaviors. This work clearly established that crystal disorder is important consideration, but contrary to current consensus this disorder suppresses exotic behavior. Superconducting properties imply unconventional inhomogeneous state that emerges from unconventional homogeneous normal state. Comprehensive structural investigations demonstrated that upper superconducting transition is intrinsic, bulk, and unconventional. The high quality of in-house synthesized single crystals was indirectly confirmed by de Haas-van Alphen quantum oscillation measurements. These measurements, for the first time ever reported, spanned several different phases, offering unprecedented possibility of studying quantum oscillations across phase boundaries.

  19. Superconducting Switch for Fast On-Chip Routing of Quantum Microwave Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechal, M.; Besse, J.-C.; Mondal, M.; Oppliger, M.; Gasparinetti, S.; Wallraff, A.

    2016-08-01

    A switch capable of routing microwave signals at cryogenic temperatures is a desirable component for state-of-the-art experiments in many fields of applied physics, including but not limited to quantum-information processing, communication, and basic research in engineered quantum systems. Conventional mechanical switches provide low insertion loss but disturb operation of dilution cryostats and the associated experiments by heat dissipation. Switches based on semiconductors or microelectromechanical systems have a lower thermal budget but are not readily integrated with current superconducting circuits. Here we design and test an on-chip switch built by combining tunable transmission-line resonators with microwave beam splitters. The device is superconducting and as such dissipates a negligible amount of heat. It is compatible with current superconducting circuit fabrication techniques, operates with a bandwidth exceeding 100 MHz, is capable of handling photon fluxes on the order of 1 05 μ s-1 , equivalent to powers exceeding -90 dBm , and can be switched within approximately 6-8 ns. We successfully demonstrate operation of the device in the quantum regime by integrating it on a chip with a single-photon source and using it to route nonclassical itinerant microwave fields at the single-photon level.

  20. Multiband nodeless superconductivity near the charge-density-wave quantum critical point in ZrTe3-x Sex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔珊; 何兰坡; 洪晓晨; 朱相德; Cedomir Petrovic; 李世燕

    2016-01-01

    It was found that selenium doping can suppress the charge-density-wave (CDW) order and induce bulk supercon-ductivity in ZrTe3. The observed superconducting dome suggests the existence of a CDW quantum critical point (QCP) in ZrTe3−x Sex near x≈0.04. To elucidate the superconducting state near the CDW QCP, we measure the thermal conductivity of two ZrTe3−x Sex single crystals (x=0.044 and 0.051) down to 80 mK. For both samples, the residual linear termκ0/T at zero field is negligible, which is a clear evidence for nodeless superconducting gap. Furthermore, the field dependence ofκ0/T manifests a multigap behavior. These results demonstrate multiple nodeless superconducting gaps in ZrTe3−x Sex , which indicates conventional superconductivity despite of the existence of a CDW QCP.

  1. Controllable coherent population transfers in superconducting qubits for quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L F; Johansson, J R; Cen, L X; Ashhab, S; Nori, Franco

    2008-03-21

    We propose an approach to coherently transfer populations between selected quantum states in one- and two-qubit systems by using controllable Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages. These evolution-time insensitive transfers, assisted by easily implementable single-qubit phase-shift operations, could serve as elementary logic gates for quantum computing. Specifically, this proposal could be conveniently demonstrated with existing Josephson phase qubits. Our proposal can find an immediate application in the readout of these qubits. Indeed, the broken parity symmetries of the bound states in these artificial atoms provide an efficient approach to design the required adiabatic pulses.

  2. High sensitivity double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelerhof, Derk Jan; Adelerhof, Derk Jan; Kawai, Jun; Uehara, Gen; Kado, Hisashi

    1994-01-01

    Double relaxation oscillationsuperconducting quantum interference devices(SQUIDs) (DROSs) have been fabricated with estimated relaxation frequencies up to 14 GHz. Both the intrinsic flux noise and the performance in a flux locked loop with direct voltage readout have been studied. In flux locked

  3. Self-designed conical point contact plate and clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To design a new kind of conical point contact plate (CPCP) in treatment of diaphyseal fracture to avoid further dam age to the blood supply of the cortex.   Methods: There were 4 pairs of conicles with a diameter of 1. 5-4 mm beneath the plate symmetrically. The nibs of the conicles were embedd ed about 1-1.5 mm in the cortex by the axial force of screws. The conicle provided a gap about 2 mm between the plate and the bone so as not to compress the periosteum and cortex. And the periostem didnt need to be stripped off dur ing operation and there was no need of postoperative external fixation.   Results: Forty-two cases with diaphyseal fracture were stabili zed by using CPCP. The patients could do joint exercise without loading after operation. Partial weight bearing could be performed in 4-6 weeks postoperati vely. There was no obvious external callus in these cases. The average time of b one healing was 3 months in the tibia and forearm fracture and 4 months in the f emur. Complications such as infection, non-union or malunion etc. were not foun d. The implant was removed 6-10 months after operation.   Conclusions:  CPCP has the advantages of drastic reduction of the implant-to-bone interface virtually, elimination of the impairment of the periosteal blood supply, increase of the rate of healing and good stability whi ch meets the need of early functional exercise.

  4. Superconducting single-photon detectors for integrated quantum optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahl, Oliver

    2016-01-29

    This thesis reports on the implementation and characterization of a fully integrated single-photon detector. Several detector circuits are realized and it is shown that the detectors exhibit supreme detection performance over a wide optical spectrum. The detectors' scalability is showcased by the parallel operation of multiple detectors within a single integrated circuit. These demonstrations are essential for future developments in integrated quantum optics.

  5. A twofold quantum delayed-choice experiment in a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Roy, Tanay; Kundu, Suman; Chand, Madhavi; Ranadive, Arpit; Vijay, Rajamani; Song, Yipu; Duan, Luming; Sun, Luyan

    2017-05-01

    Wave-particle complementarity lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. To illustrate this mysterious feature, Wheeler proposed the delayed-choice experiment, where a quantum system manifests the wave- or particle-like attribute, depending on the experimental arrangement, which is made after the system has entered the interferometer. In recent quantum delayed-choice experiments, these two complementary behaviors were simultaneously observed with a quantum interferometer in a superposition of being closed and open. We suggest and implement a conceptually different quantum delayed-choice experiment by introducing a which-path detector (WPD) that can simultaneously record and neglect the system's path information, but where the interferometer itself is classical. Our experiment is realized with a superconducting circuit, where a cavity acts as the WPD for an interfering qubit. Using this setup, we implement the first twofold delayed-choice experiment, which demonstrates that the system's behavior depends not only on the measuring device's configuration that can be chosen even after the system has been detected but also on whether we a posteriori erase or mark the which-path information, the latter of which cannot be revealed by previous quantum delayed-choice experiments. Our results represent the first demonstration of both counterintuitive features with the same experimental setup, significantly extending the concept of quantum delayed-choice experiment.

  6. Understanding and enhancing superconductivity in FeSe/SrTiO3 by quantum size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murta, Bruno; García-García, Antonio M.

    2016-11-01

    Superconductivity in one-atom-layer iron selenide (FeSe) on a strontium titanate (STO) substrate is enhanced by almost an order of magnitude with respect to bulk FeSe. There is recent experimental evidence suggesting that this enhancement persists in FeSe/STO nanoislands. More specifically, for sizes L ˜10 nm, the superconducting gap is a highly nonmonotonic function of L with peaks well above the bulk gap value. This is the expected behavior only for weakly-coupled metallic superconductors such as Al or Sn. Here we develop a theoretical formalism to describe these experiments based on three ingredients: Eliashberg theory of superconductivity in the weak coupling limit, pairing dominated by forward scattering, and periodic orbit theory to model spectral fluctuations. We obtain an explicit analytical expression for the size dependence of the gap that describes quantitatively the experimental results with no free parameters. This is a strong suggestion that superconductivity in FeSe/STO is mediated by STO phonons. We propose that, since FeSe/STO is still a weakly coupled superconductor, quantum size effects can be used to further enhance the bulk critical temperature in this interface.

  7. Integrating superconducting phase and topological crystalline quantum spin Hall effect in hafnium intercalated gallium film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jian, E-mail: jzhou2@vcu.edu, E-mail: pjena@vcu.edu; Jena, Puru, E-mail: jzhou2@vcu.edu, E-mail: pjena@vcu.edu [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Zhang, Shunhong [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Qian [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Motivated by the growth of superconducting atomic hexagonal Ga layers on GaN surface we have calculated the electronic properties of Hf intercalated honeycomb Ga layers using first-principles theory. In contrast to the hexagonal Ga layers where substrate is necessary for their stability, we find the above structure to be dynamically stable in its freestanding form with small formation energy. In particular, six Dirac cones composed of Hf-d{sub xy}/d{sub x2-y2} orbitals are observed in the first Brillouin zone, slightly below the Fermi energy. Spin-orbit coupling opens a large band gap of 177 meV on these Dirac cones. By calculating its mirror Chern number, we demonstrate that this band gap is topologically nontrivial and protected by mirror symmetry. Such mirror symmetry protected band gaps are rare in hexagonal lattice. A large topological crystalline quantum spin Hall conductance σ{sub SH} ∼ −4 e{sup 2}/h is also revealed. Moreover, electron-phonon coupling calculations reveal that this material is superconducting with a transition temperature T{sub c} = 2.4 K, mainly contributed by Ga out-of-plane vibrations. Our results provide a route toward manipulating quantum spin Hall and superconducting behaviors in a single material which helps to realize Majorana fermions and topological superconductors.

  8. Quantum computation with prethreshold superconducting qubits: Single-excitation subspace approach

    CERN Document Server

    Galiautdinov, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    We describe an alternative approach to quantum computation that is ideally suited for today's sub-threshold-fidelity qubits, and which can be applied to a family of hardware models that includes superconducting qubits with tunable coupling. In this approach, the computation on an n-qubit processor is carried out in the n-dimensional single-excitation subspace (SES) of the full 2^n-dimensional Hilbert space. Because any real Hamiltonian can be directly generated in the SES [E. J. Pritchett et al., arXiv:1008.0701], high-dimensional unitary operations can be carried out in a single step, bypassing the need to decompose into single- and two-qubit gates. Although technically nonscalable and unsuitable for applications (including Shor's) requiring enormous Hilbert spaces, this approach would make practical a first-generation quantum computer capable of achieving significant quantum speedup.

  9. Superconducting quantum criticality of topological surface states at three loops

    CERN Document Server

    Zerf, Nikolai; Maciejko, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The semimetal-superconductor quantum phase transition on the two-dimensional (2D) surface of a 3D topological insulator is conjectured to exhibit an emergent $\\mathcal{N}=2$ supersymmetry, based on a renormalization group (RG) analysis at one-loop order in the $\\epsilon$ expansion. We provide additional support for this conjecture by performing a three-loop RG analysis and showing that the supersymmetric fixed point found at this order survives the extrapolation to 2D. We compute critical exponents to order $\\epsilon^3$, obtaining the more accurate value $\

  10. Superconducting quantum criticality of topological surface states at three loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerf, Nikolai; Lin, Chien-Hung; Maciejko, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The semimetal-superconductor quantum phase transition on the two-dimensional (2D) surface of a 3D topological insulator is conjectured to exhibit an emergent N =2 supersymmetry, based on a one-loop renormalization group (RG) analysis in the ɛ expansion. We provide additional support for this conjecture by performing a three-loop RG analysis and showing that the supersymmetric fixed point found at this order survives the extrapolation to 2D. We compute critical exponents to order ɛ3, obtaining the more accurate value ν ≈0.985 for the correlation length exponent and confirming that the fermion and boson anomalous dimensions remain unchanged beyond one loop, as expected from non-renormalization theorems in supersymmetric theories. We further couple the system to a dynamical U(1) gauge field, and argue that the transition becomes fluctuation-induced first order in an appropriate type-I regime. We discuss implications of this result for quantum phase transitions between certain symmetry-preserving correlated surface states of 3D topological insulators.

  11. External driving synchronization in a superconducting quantum interference device based oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Zhao, Peng; Yu, Haifeng; Yu, Yang

    2016-11-01

    We propose an external driving, self-sustained oscillator based on superconducting resonators. The dynamics of the self-sustained oscillator can be described by a Duffing-van der Pol like equation. Under external driving, the self-sustained oscillator presents synchronization phenomena. We analytically and numerically investigate the synchronization regions, and the results show that the synchronization bandwidth can be quickly adjusted in situ by the external weak magnetic field in sub-nano seconds. Moreover, the system can re-stabilize in about 10 ns with a certain sudden change of driving frequency or the critical current of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). These advantages allow the potential applications of self-sustained oscillators in timing reference, microwave communication and electromagnetic sensing.

  12. Realization and Modeling of Metamaterials Made of rf Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trepanier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have prepared meta-atoms based on radio-frequency superconducting quantum-interference devices (rf SQUIDs and examined their tunability with dc magnetic field, rf current, and temperature. rf SQUIDs are superconducting split-ring resonators in which the usual capacitance is supplemented with a Josephson junction, which introduces strong nonlinearity in the rf properties. We find excellent agreement between the data and a model that regards the Josephson junction as the resistively and capacitively shunted junction. A magnetic field tunability of 80  THz/G at 12 GHz is observed, a total tunability of 56% is achieved, and a unique electromagnetically induced transparency feature at intermediate excitation powers is demonstrated for the first time. An rf SQUID metamaterial is shown to have qualitatively the same behavior as a single rf SQUID with regard to dc flux and temperature tuning.

  13. Quantum oscillations in antiferromagnetic CaFe(2)As(2) on the brink of superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, N; McDonald, R D; Mielke, C H; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Thompson, J D

    2009-08-12

    We report quantum oscillation measurements on CaFe(2)As(2) under strong magnetic fields-recently reported to become superconducting under pressures of as little as a kilobar. The largest observed carrier pocket occupies less than 0.05% of the paramagnetic Brillouin zone volume-consistent with Fermi surface reconstruction caused by antiferromagnetism. On comparing several alkaline earth AFe(2)As(2) antiferromagnets (with A = Ca, Sr and Ba), the dependences of the Fermi surface cross-sectional area F(α) and the effective mass m(α)(*) of the primary observed pocket on the antiferromagnetic/structural transition temperature T(s) are both found to be consistent with the case for quasiparticles in a conventional spin-density wave model. These findings suggest that the recently proposed strain-enhanced superconductivity in these materials occurs within a broadly conventional spin-density wave phase.

  14. Superconductive quantum interference magnetometer with high sensitivity achieved by an induced resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoliere, A; Granata, C

    2014-08-01

    A fully integrated low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in a magnetometer configuration is presented. An intrinsic high voltage responsivity as high as 500 μV/Φ0 has been obtained by introducing a resonance in the voltage - magnetic flux characteristic. This resonance is induced by an integrated superconducting coil surrounding the pick-up coil and connected to one end of the SQUID output. The SQUID magnetometer exhibits a spectral density of magnetic field noise as low as 3 fT/Hz(1/2). In order to verify the suitability of the magnetometer, measurements of bandwidth and slew rate have been performed and compared with those of the same device without the resonance and with additional positive feedback. Due to their good characteristics such devices can be employed in a large number of applications including biomagnetism.

  15. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-01

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  16. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan)

    2014-01-29

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  17. Quantum phase-slips in superconducting AlO{sub x} nanowire arrays at microwave frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skacel, Sebastian T.; Pfirrmann, Marco; Voss, Jan N.; Muenzberg, Julian; Radtke, Lucas; Probst, Sebastian; Rotzinger, Hannes [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weides, Martin [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Mooij, Hans E. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Ustinov, Alexey V. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Russian Quantum Center, 100 Novaya St., Skolkovo, Moscow region, 143025 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    Superconducting nanowires in the quantum phase slip (QPS) regime allow to study the flux and phase dynamics in duality to Josephson junction systems. However, due to the vanishing self-capacitance of the nanowires, the microwave response significantly differs. We experimentally study parallel arrays of nanowires which are embedded in a resonant circuit at GHz frequencies. The samples are probed at ultra-low microwave power and applied magnetic field at mK temperatures. The AlO{sub x} nanowires, with a sheet resistance in the kΩ range, are fabricated by sputter deposition of aluminium in a controlled oxygen atmosphere. The wires are defined with conventional electron beam lithography down to a width of approximately 15 nm. We present the fabrication of the nanowire arrays and measurement results for arrays coupled to superconducting microwave resonators.

  18. Demonstration of two-qubit algorithms with a superconducting quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, L; Chow, J M; Gambetta, J M; Bishop, Lev S; Johnson, B R; Schuster, D I; Majer, J; Blais, A; Frunzio, L; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2009-07-09

    Quantum computers, which harness the superposition and entanglement of physical states, could outperform their classical counterparts in solving problems with technological impact-such as factoring large numbers and searching databases. A quantum processor executes algorithms by applying a programmable sequence of gates to an initialized register of qubits, which coherently evolves into a final state containing the result of the computation. Building a quantum processor is challenging because of the need to meet simultaneously requirements that are in conflict: state preparation, long coherence times, universal gate operations and qubit readout. Processors based on a few qubits have been demonstrated using nuclear magnetic resonance, cold ion trap and optical systems, but a solid-state realization has remained an outstanding challenge. Here we demonstrate a two-qubit superconducting processor and the implementation of the Grover search and Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithms. We use a two-qubit interaction, tunable in strength by two orders of magnitude on nanosecond timescales, which is mediated by a cavity bus in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. This interaction allows the generation of highly entangled states with concurrence up to 94 per cent. Although this processor constitutes an important step in quantum computing with integrated circuits, continuing efforts to increase qubit coherence times, gate performance and register size will be required to fulfil the promise of a scalable technology.

  19. Edge state tunneling in a point contact at filling fraction ν=5/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Iuliana P.; Miller, J. B.; Dillard, C. R.; Marcus, C. M.; Kastner, M. A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2008-03-01

    We investigate low temperature transport properties of quantum point contacts (QPCs) fabricated in a GaAs/AlGaAs 2-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) with mobility 2000 m^2/Vs in a perpendicular magnetic field. The 2-DEG exhibits fractional quantum Hall effect, including a well-quantized plateau at ν=5/2. We study the temperature and DC current bias dependence of the transport through the QPC at ν=5/2 while preserving the same filling number in both the QPC and the bulk of the sample. We compare our results to theoretical predictions for quasi-particle tunneling in the weak coupling regime, and extract the quasi-particle charge and the strength of the Coulomb interaction, as reflected by the Luttinger liquid parameter g. This work was partially supported by ARO (W911NF-05-1-0062), by the NSEC program of NSF (PHY-0117795), by NSF (DMR-0353209) at MIT and by Project Q of Microsoft Corporation at Harvard University.

  20. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication for line and point contacts asymptotic and numerical approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Kudish, Ilya I

    2013-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication for Line and Point Contacts: Asymptotic and Numerical Approaches describes a coherent asymptotic approach to the analysis of lubrication problems for heavily loaded line and point contacts. This approach leads to unified asymptotic equations for line and point contacts as well as stable numerical algorithms for the solution of these elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) problems. A Unique Approach to Analyzing Lubrication Problems for Heavily Loaded Line and Point Contacts The book presents a robust combination of asymptotic and numerical techniques to solve EHL p

  1. Quantum Criticality Beneath the Superconducting Dome in β-YbAlB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, T.; Kuga, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Nakatsuji, S.

    2016-02-01

    Yb-based heavy fermion superconductor β-YbAlB4 at 0 K and 0 T at ambient pressure is located near the quantum critical point with strong mixed valiancy. In this type of Yb electron system, we expect that the magnetic order connected to the quantum critical point derives from the applied pressure. We built a pressure-temperature phase diagram for β-YbAlB4 by measuring the electrical resistivity of high quality single crystal at temperatures down to 40 mK under an applied pressure. A strange metal region appeared, showing non-Fermi liquid ρab α T1.5 behavior, which is stable with applied pressure up to 0.4 GPa, even when below the superconducting dome excluded by a magnetic field of 0.1 T. By increasing of pressure above 2.5 GPa, a magnetic order is first generated. Such ambient quantum criticality/superconductivity is unconventional and is detached from the magnetic order.

  2. Point contact spectroscopy on electron doped Pr{sub 1-x}LaCe{sub x}CuO{sub 4-y}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucolo, A.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, Via Allende, Baronissi (Italy); CNR-INFM Laboratorio Reg. SUPERMAT, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Piano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, Via Allende, Baronissi (Italy); School of Physics and Astr., University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Giubileo, F., E-mail: giubileo@sa.infn.i [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, Via Allende, Baronissi (Italy); CNR-INFM Laboratorio Reg. SUPERMAT, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Scarfato, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, Via Allende, Baronissi (Italy); Bobba, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, Via Allende, Baronissi (Italy); CNR-INFM Laboratorio Reg. SUPERMAT, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Di Bartolomeo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, Via Allende, Baronissi (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    Point contact spectroscopy has been used to address the question of the symmetry of the order parameter in the superconducting Pr{sub 1-x}LaCe{sub x}CuO{sub 4-y} compound. We recorded a huge variety of data that were consistently interpreted by considering a d-wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter. Despite the different features appearing in the tunneling conductance spectra, all data inferred a superconducting energy gap amplitude {Delta}{approx_equal}3.6{+-}0.2meV, with a conventional BCS temperature dependence and a ratio 2{Delta}/K{sub B}T{sub C{approx_equal}}3.5{+-}0.2. Also for the rare contacts showing a smaller gap value {Delta}{approx_equal}2.0meV we found the same BCS ratio confirming that we are probing a sample area with reduced superconductivity (T{sub C{approx_equal}}14K).

  3. A hybrid superconducting quantum dot acting as an efficient charge and spin Seebeck diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sun-Yong; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2016-09-01

    We propose a highly efficient thermoelectric diode device built from the coupling of a quantum dot with a normal or ferromagnetic electrode and a superconducting reservoir. The current shows a strongly nonlinear behavior in the forward direction (positive thermal gradients) while it almost vanishes in the backward direction (negative thermal gradients). Our discussion is supported by a gauge-invariant current-conserving transport theory accounting for electron-electron interactions inside the dot. We find that the diode behavior is greatly tuned with external gate potentials, Zeeman splittings or lead magnetizations. Our results are thus relevant for the search of novel thermoelectric devices with enhanced functionalities.

  4. Modulation Voltage of High T c DC Superconducting Quantum Interference Device with Damping Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enpuku, Keiji; Doi, Hideki; Tokita, Go; Maruo, Taku

    1994-05-01

    The effect of damping resistance on the voltage versus flux (V -Φ) relation of the high T c dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is studied experimentally. Dc SQUID using YBaCuO step-edge junction and damping resistance in parallel with SQUID inductance is fabricated. Measured values of modulation voltage in the V -Φ relation are compared with those of the conventional SQUID without damping resistance. It is shown that modulation voltage is much improved by using damping resistance. The obtained experimental results agree reasonably with theoretical predictions reported previously.

  5. Architectural considerations in the design of a superconducting quantum annealing processor

    OpenAIRE

    Bunyk, P. I.; Hoskinson, E.; Johnson, M. W.; Tolkacheva, E.; Altomare, F.; Berkley, A. J.; Harris, R; Hilton, J. P.; Lanting, T.; Whittaker, J

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a quantum annealing processor, based on an array of tunably coupled rf-SQUID flux qubits, fabricated in a superconducting integrated circuit process [1]. Implementing this type of processor at a scale of 512 qubits and 1472 programmable inter-qubit couplers and operating at ~ 20 mK has required attention to a number of considerations that one may ignore at the smaller scale of a few dozen or so devices. Here we discuss some of these considerations, and the delicate balance n...

  6. Transition between different quantum states in a mesoscopic system: The superconducting ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horane, E.M. [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Castro, J.I. [Departamento Fisico-Quimica, Facultad Filosofia Humanidades y Artes, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, San Juan (Argentina); Buscaglia, G.C.; Lopez, A. [Instituto Balseiro, and Centro Atomico Bariloche, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    1996-04-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a superconducting ring, both analytically and numerically, relying upon the Ginzburg-Landau theory. We find that modulated solutions for the order parameter play a role in describing the thermodynamic transitions between consecutive modes of uniform order parameter, associated with different quantum numbers. Exact expressions for these solutions are given in terms of elliptic functions. We identify the family of energy extrema which, being saddle points of the energy in the functional space of the distributions of the order parameter, represent the energy barrier to be overcome for transitions between different solutions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Quantum Gate Operations in Decoherence-Free Subspace with Superconducting Charge Qubits inside a Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi-Min; ZHOU Yan-Li; LIANG Lin-Mei; LI Cheng-Zu

    2009-01-01

    We propose a feasible scheme to achieve universal quantum gate operations in decoherence-free subspace with superconducting charge qubits placed in a microwave cavity.Single-logic-qubit gates can be realized with cavity assisted interaction, which possesses the advantages of unconventional geometric gate operation.The two-logic-qubit controlled-phase gate between subsystems can be constructed with the help of a variable electrostatic transformer, The collective decoherence can be successfully avoided in our well-designed system.Moreover, GHZ state for logical qubits can also be easily produced in this system.

  8. Quantum dynamics of a microwave driven superconducting phase qubit coupled to a two-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guozhu; Wen, Xueda; Mao, Bo; Zhou, Zhongyuan; Yu, Yang; Wu, Peiheng; Han, Siyuan

    2010-10-01

    We present an analytical and comprehensive description of the quantum dynamics of a microwave resonantly driven superconducting phase qubit coupled to a microscopic two-level system (TLS), covering a wide range of the external microwave field strength. Our model predicts several interesting phenomena in such an ac driven four-level bipartite system including anomalous Rabi oscillations, high-contrast beatings of Rabi oscillations, and extraordinary two-photon transitions. Our experimental results in a coupled qubit-TLS system agree quantitatively very well with the predictions of the theoretical model.

  9. InSb nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Deacon, R. S.; Car, D.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Ishibashi, K.

    2016-05-01

    By employing a micrometer precision mechanical transfer technique, we embed individual InSb nanowires into a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the characteristics of a double quantum dot formed in an InSb nanowire interacting with a single mode microwave field. The charge stability diagram can be obtained from the amplitude and phase response of the resonator independently from the dc transport measurement. As the charge transits between dot-dot, or dot-lead, the change of resonator transmission is compared and the charge-cavity coupling strength is extracted to be in the magnitude of several MHz.

  10. InSb nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Deacon, R. S., E-mail: russell@riken.jp; Ishibashi, K. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Car, D. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bakkers, E. P. A. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kavli Institute, Quantum Transport Group, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-05-16

    By employing a micrometer precision mechanical transfer technique, we embed individual InSb nanowires into a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the characteristics of a double quantum dot formed in an InSb nanowire interacting with a single mode microwave field. The charge stability diagram can be obtained from the amplitude and phase response of the resonator independently from the dc transport measurement. As the charge transits between dot-dot, or dot-lead, the change of resonator transmission is compared and the charge-cavity coupling strength is extracted to be in the magnitude of several MHz.

  11. Fabrication of Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions and superconducting quantum circuits by shadow evaporation and a dynamic oxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yu-Lin; Deng Hui; Yu Hai-Feng; Xue Guang-Ming; Tian Ye; Li Jie; Chen Ying-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Besides serving as promising candidates for realizing quantum computing,superconducting quantum circuits are one of a few macroscopic physical systems in which fundamental quantum phenomena can be directly demonstrated and tested,giving rise to a vast field of intensive research work both theoretically and experimentally.In this paper we report our work on the fabrication of superconducting quantum circuits,starting from its building blocks:Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions.By using electron beam lithography patterning and shadow evaporation,we have fabricated aluminum Josephson junctions with a controllable critical current density (jc) and wide range of junction sizes from 0.01 μm2 up to 1 μm2.We have carried out systematical studies on the oxidation process in fabricating Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions suitable for superconducting flux qubits.Furthermore,we have also fabricated superconducting quantum circuits such as superconducting flux qubits and charge-flux qubits.

  12. Superconducting single electron transistor for charge sensing in Si/SiGe-based quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen

    Si-based quantum devices, including Si/SiGe quantum dots (QD), are promising candidates for spin-based quantum bits (quits), which are a potential platform for quantum information processing. Meanwhile, qubit readout remains a challenging task related to semiconductor-based quantum computation. This thesis describes two readout devices for Si/SiGe QDs and the techniques for developing them from a traditional single electron transistor (SET). By embedding an SET in a tank circuit and operating it in the radio-frequency (RF) regime, a superconducting RF-SET has quick response as well as ultra high charge sensitivity and can be an excellent charge sensor for the QDs. We demonstrate such RF-SETs for QDs in a Si/SiGe heterostructure. Characterization of the SET in magnetic fields is studied for future exploration of advanced techniques such as spin detection and spin state manipulation. By replacing the tank circuit with a high-quality-factor microwave cavity, the embedded SET will be operated in the supercurrent regime as a single Cooper pair transistor (CPT) to further increase the charge sensitivity and reduce any dissipation. The operating principle and implementation of the cavity-embedded CPT (cCPT) will be introduced.

  13. Charge Kondo effect in negative-U quantum dots with superconducting electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tie-Feng; Guo, Ai-Min; Lu, Han-Tao; Luo, Hong-Gang; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2017-08-01

    Recent experimental realization of superconducting quantum dot devices with intradot attraction U [Nature (London) 521, 196 (2015), 10.1038/nature14398; Phys. Rev. X 6, 041042 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.041042] offers unique opportunities to study the charge Kondo effect in a superconducting environment. In such devices pseudospin flips are caused by two tunneling processes. One is the cotunneling of normal electrons which generates near-gap Kondo resonances in the single-electron spectral density. This negative-U charge Kondo effect is more robust than the conventional spin Kondo effect against the suppression by the superconductivity. The other tunneling is the mean-field Cooper-pair tunneling which produces a zero-energy bound state in the pair spectral density. Interesting crossover physics from the strongly-correlated Kondo screening to the mean-field polarization of local pseudospin is demonstrated. Due to the interplay of these two tunnelings, the supercurrent is suppressed for intermediate couplings, but it can increase to the unitary limits both in the strong and weak coupling regimes. We obtain the magnetic field-dependent supercurrent which is consistent with the key experimental findings.

  14. Development of a Cryostat to Characterize Nano-scale Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Mathew; Matheny, Matthew; Knudsen, Jasmine

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a low-noise vacuum cryostat to be used for the characterization of nano-scale superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Such devices are very sensitive to magnetic fields and can measure changes in flux on the order of a single electron magnetic moment. As a part of the design process, we calculated the separation required between the cryogenic preamplifier and superconducting magnet, including a high-permeability magnetic shield, using a finite-element model of the apparatus. The cryostat comprises a vacuum cross at room temperature for filtered DC and shielded RF electrical connections, a thin-wall stainless steel support tube, a taper-sealed cryogenic vacuum can, and internal mechanical support and wiring for the nanoSQUID. The Dewar is modified with a room-temperature flange with a sliding seal for the cryostat. The flange supports the superconducting 3 Tesla magnet and thermometry wiring. Upon completion of the cryostat fabrication and Dewar modifications, operation of the nanoSQUIDs as transported from our collaborator's laboratory in Israel will be confirmed, as the lead forming the SQUID is sensitive to oxidation and the SQUIDs must be shipped in a vacuum container. After operation of the nanoSQUIDs is confirmed, the primary work of characterizing their high-speed properties will begin. This will include looking at the measurement of relaxation oscillations at high bandwidth in comparison to the theoretical predictions of the current model.

  15. Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: II. Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blencowe, M P [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Armour, A D [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: miles.p.blencowe@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: andrew.armour@nottingham.ac.uk

    2008-09-15

    We describe a possible implementation of the nanomechanical quantum superposition generation and detection scheme described in the preceding, companion paper (Armour A D and Blencowe M P 2008 New. J. Phys. 10 095004). The implementation is based on the circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) set-up, with the addition of a mechanical degree of freedom formed out of a suspended, doubly-clamped segment of the superconducting loop of a dc SQUID located directly opposite the centre conductor of a coplanar waveguide (CPW). The relative merits of two SQUID based qubit realizations are addressed, in particular a capacitively coupled charge qubit and inductively coupled flux qubit. It is found that both realizations are equally promising, with comparable qubit-mechanical resonator mode as well as qubit-microwave resonator mode coupling strengths.

  16. Fast preparation of W states with superconducting quantum interference devices by using dressed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ye-Hong; Shi, Zhi-Cheng; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a protocol to prepare W states with superconducting quantum interference devices by using dressed states. Through choosing a set of dressed states suitably, the protocol can be used to accelerate the adiabatic passages while additional couplings are unnecessary. Moreover, we can optimize the evolution of the system with the restraint to the populations of the intermediate states by choosing suitable control parameters. Numerical simulations show that the protocol is robust against the parameter variations and decoherence mechanisms. Furthermore, the protocol is faster and more robust against the dephasing compared with that by the adiabatic passages. As for the Rabi frequencies of pulses designed by the method, they can be expressed by the linear superpositions of Gaussian functions, which does not increase difficulty in the experiments. In addition, the protocol could be controlled and manipulated easily in experiments with a circuit quantum electrodynamics system.

  17. Demonstration of Johnson noise thermometry with all-superconducting quantum voltage noise source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takahiro, E-mail: yamada-takahiro@aist.go.jp; Urano, Chiharu; Maezawa, Masaaki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2016-01-25

    We present a Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) system based on an integrated quantum voltage noise source (IQVNS) that has been fully implemented using superconducting circuit technology. To enable precise measurement of Boltzmann's constant, an IQVNS chip was designed to produce intrinsically calculable pseudo-white noise to calibrate the JNT system. On-chip real-time generation of pseudo-random codes via simple circuits produced pseudo-voltage noise with a harmonic tone interval of less than 1 Hz, which was one order of magnitude finer than the harmonic tone interval of conventional quantum voltage noise sources. We estimated a value for Boltzmann's constant experimentally by performing JNT measurements at the temperature of the triple point of water using the IQVNS chip.

  18. Hidden Correlations in Indivisible Qudits as a Resource for Quantum Technologies on Examples of Superconducting Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man'ko, M. A.; Man'ko, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    We show that the density-matrix states of noncomposite qudit systems satisfy entropic and information relations like the subadditivity condition, strong subadditivity condition, and Araki-Lieb inequality, which characterize hidden quantum correlations of observables associated with these indivisible systems. We derive these relations employing a specific map of the entropic inequalities known for density matrices of multiqudit systems to the inequalities for density matrices of single-qudit systems. We present the obtained relations in the form of mathematical inequalities for arbitrary Hermitian N × N-matrices. We consider examples of superconducting qubits and qudits. We discuss the hidden correlations in single- qudit states as a new resource for quantum technologies analogous to the known resource in correlations associated with the entanglement in multiqudit systems.

  19. Otto refrigerator based on a superconducting qubit: Classical and quantum performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, B.; Pekola, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze a quantum Otto refrigerator based on a superconducting qubit coupled to two L C resonators, each including a resistor acting as a reservoir. We find various operation regimes: nearly adiabatic (low driving frequency), ideal Otto cycle (intermediate frequency), and nonadiabatic coherent regime (high frequency). In the nearly adiabatic regime, the cooling power is quadratic in frequency, and we find a substantially enhanced coefficient of performance ɛ , as compared to that of an ideal Otto cycle. Quantum coherent effects lead invariably to a decrease in both cooling power and ɛ as compared to purely classical dynamics. In the nonadiabatic regime we observe strong coherent oscillations of the cooling power as a function of frequency. We investigate various driving wave forms: Compared to the standard sinusoidal drive, a truncated trapezoidal drive with optimized rise and dwell times yields higher cooling power and efficiency.

  20. Gain-assisted optical bistability and multistability in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini Sabegh, Z.; Maleki, M. A.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2017-02-01

    We study the absorption and optical bistability (OB) behavior of the superconducting phase quantum circuits in the four-level cascade and closed-loop configurations. It is shown that the OB is established in both configurations and it can be controlled by the intensity and frequency of applied fluxes. It is also demonstrated that the gain-assisted OB is generated in both configurations and can switch to the gain-assisted optical multistability (OM) only by changing the relative phase of applied fluxes in closed-loop quantum system. It is worth noting that the several significant output fluxes with negligible inputs can be seen in bistable behavior of the closed-loop configuration due to the nonlinear processing.

  1. Superconducting Pairing Correlations near a Kondo-destruction Quantum Critical Point in Cluster Impurity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ang; Pixley, Jedediah; Si, Qimiao

    Heavy fermion metals represent a canonical system to study superconductivity driven by quantum criticality. We are particularly motivated by the properties of CeRhIn5, which shows the characteristic features of a Kondo destruction quantum critical point (QCP) in its normal state, and has one of the highest Tc's among the heavy fermion superconductors. As a first step to study this problem within a cluster-EDMFT approach, we analyze a four-site Anderson impurity model with the antiferromagnetic spin component of the cluster coupled to a sub-Ohmic bosonic bath. We find a QCP that belongs to the same universality class as the single-site Bose-Fermi Anderson model. Together with previous work on a two-site model, our result suggests that the Kondo destruction QCP is robust as cluster size increases. More importantly, we are able to calculate the d-wave pairing susceptibility, which we find to be enhanced near the QCP. Using this model as the effective cluster model of the periodic Anderson model, we are also able to study the superconducting pairing near the Kondo-destruction QCP of the lattice model; preliminary results will be presented.

  2. A scheme to implement the Deutsch-Josza algorithm on a superconducting charge-qubit quantum computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Wenyi; LONG Guilu

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the implementation of the Deutsch-Josza quantum algorithm in a superconducting charge-qubit quantum computer. Different from previous studies, we have used the inductance coupled system of You et al. The detailed pulse sequences have been designed for the four possible functions in a 2-qubit system. The result is generalized to an arbitrary n-qubit system. This scheme will be useful for practical implementation of the algorithm.

  3. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Adiabatic Invariants for Time-Dependent Superconducting Qubit-Oscillators and Resonators in Quantum Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Ryeol Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic invariant, which is a conserved quantity, is useful for studying quantum and classical properties of dynamical systems. Adiabatic invariants for time-dependent superconducting qubit-oscillator systems and resonators are investigated using the Liouville-von Neumann equation. At first, we derive an invariant for a simple superconducting qubit-oscillator through the introduction of its reduced Hamiltonian. Afterwards, an adiabatic invariant for a nanomechanical resonator linearly interfaced with a superconducting circuit, via a coupling with a time-dependent strength, is evaluated using the technique of unitary transformation. The accuracy of conservation for such invariant quantities is represented in detail. Based on the results of our developments in this paper, perturbation theory is applicable to the research of quantum characteristics of more complicated qubit systems that are described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian involving nonlinear terms.

  4. Superconductivity versus quantum criticality: what can we learn from heavy fermions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steglich, F; Arndt, J; Friedemann, S; Krellner, C; Tokiwa, Y; Westerkamp, T; Brando, M; Gegenwart, P; Geibel, C; Wirth, S; Stockert, O

    2010-04-28

    Two quantum critical point (QCP) scenarios are being discussed for different classes of antiferromagnetic (AF) heavy-fermion (HF) systems. In the itinerant one, where AF order is of the spin-density wave (SDW) type, the heavy 'composite' charge carriers keep their integrity at the QCP. The second one implies a breakdown of the Kondo effect and a disintegration of the composite fermions at the AF QCP. We discuss two isostructural compounds as exemplary materials for these two different scenarios: CeCu(2)Si(2) exhibits a three-dimensional (3D) SDW QCP and superconductivity, presumably mediated by SDW fluctuations, as strongly suggested by recent inelastic neutron scattering experiments. In Y bRh(2)Si(2), the AF QCP is found to coincide with a Kondo-destroying one. However, in the latter compound these two QCPs can be detached by varying the average unit-cell volume, e.g. through the application of chemical pressure, as realized by partial substitution of either Ir or Co for Rh. A comparison of CeCu(2)Si(2) and Y bRh(2)Si(2) indicates that the apparent differences in quantum critical behaviour go along with disparate behaviour concerning the (non-) existence of superconductivity (SC). No sign of SC could be detected in Y bRh(2)Si(2) down to mK temperatures. A potential correlation between the specific nature of the QCP and the occurrence of SC, however, requires detailed studies on further quantum critical HF superconductors, e.g. on β-Y bAlB(4), UBe(13), CeCoIn(5) and CeRhIn(5).

  5. Inverted point-contact spectrum of electron-phonon interactions in arsenic homocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotkevich, A. V.; Krasnyi, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The point-contact (microcontact) spectra (second derivatives of the current-voltage characteristics) of As/As point homocontacts are measured at liquid helium temperatures. Inversion of the sign of the point-contact spectrum is observed as a result of the destruction of electron localization in the arsenic contacts owing to electron-phonon interactions. The point-contact spectrum contains two major peaks at energies of 10 and 25 meV. The boundary of the single-phonon part of the spectrum corresponds to 34 meV. This agrees with available data on the density of phonon states. Assuming that the inverted point-contact spectrum reflects features of the electro-phonon interaction spectral function, the mean-square frequency of the phonons is calculated and the Debye temperature is estimated.

  6. Current distribution effects in AC impedance spectroscopy of electroceramic point contact and thin film model electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Jacobsen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    The Finite-Element-Method (FEM) was used for the simulations of the effect of a changing current distribution during AC impedance spectrum recording on electroceramic point contact and thin film model electrodes. For pure electronic conducting point contact electrodes the transition from the prim......The Finite-Element-Method (FEM) was used for the simulations of the effect of a changing current distribution during AC impedance spectrum recording on electroceramic point contact and thin film model electrodes. For pure electronic conducting point contact electrodes the transition from...... regarding its significance is provided. The associated characteristic impedance spectrum shape change is simulated and its origin discussed. Furthermore, the characteristic shape of impedance spectra of thin electroceramic film electrodes with lateral ohmic resistance is studied as a function...

  7. An Efficient Scheme for Implementing an N-Qubit Toffoli Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG An-Shou; LIU Ji-Bing; XIANG Dong; LIU Cui-Lan; YUAN Hong

    2007-01-01

    An alternative approach is proposed to realize an n-qubit Toffoli gate with superconducting quantum-interference devices (SQUIDs) in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). In the proposal, we represent two logical gates of a qubit with the two lowest levels of a SQUID while a higher-energy intermediate level of each SQUID is utilized for the gate manipulation. During the operating process, because the cavity field is always in vacuum state, the requirement on the cavity is greatly loosened and there is no transfer of quantum information between the cavity and SQUIDs.

  8. Gain-assisted superluminal microwave pulse propagation via four-wave mixing in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sabegh, Z Amini; Maleki, M A; Mahmoudi, M

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation and amplification of a microwave field in a four-level cascade quantum system which is realized in a superconducting phase quantum circuit. It is shown that by increasing the microwave pump tones feeding the system, the normal dispersion switches to the anomalous and the gain-assisted superluminal microwave propagation is obtained in this system. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the stimulated microwave field is generated via four-wave mixing without any inversion population in the energy levels of the system (amplification without inversion) and the group velocity of the generated pulse can be controlled by the external oscillating magnetic fluxes. We also show that in some special set of parameters, the absorption-free superluminal generated microwave propagation is obtained in superconducting phase quantum circuit system.

  9. Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: I. Echo scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, A D [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Blencowe, M P [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)], E-mail: andrew.armour@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: miles.p.blencowe@dartmouth.edu

    2008-09-15

    We propose a scheme in which the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator can be probed using a superconducting qubit. We consider a mechanical resonator coupled capacitively to a Cooper pair box and assume that the superconducting qubit is tuned to the degeneracy point so that its coherence time is maximized and the electro-mechanical coupling can be approximated by a dispersive Hamiltonian. When the qubit is prepared in a superposition of states, this drives the mechanical resonator progressively into a superposition which in turn leads to apparent decoherence of the qubit. Applying a suitable control pulse to the qubit allows its population to be inverted resulting in a reversal of the resonator dynamics. However, the resonator's interactions with its environment mean that the dynamics is not completely reversible. We show that this irreversibility is largely due to the decoherence of the mechanical resonator and can be inferred from appropriate measurements on the qubit alone. Using estimates for the parameters involved based on a specific realization of the system, we show that it should be possible to carry out this scheme with existing device technology.

  10. An ultra-sensitive and wideband magnetometer based on a superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Hömmen, Peter; Drung, Dietmar; Körber, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic field noise in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) used for biomagnetic research such as magnetoencephalography or ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance is usually limited by instrumental dewar noise. We constructed a wideband, ultra-low noise system with a 45 mm diameter superconducting pick-up coil inductively coupled to a current sensor SQUID. Thermal noise in the liquid helium dewar is minimized by using aluminized polyester fabric as superinsulation and aluminum oxide strips as heat shields. With a magnetometer pick-up coil in the center of the Berlin magnetically shielded room 2 (BMSR2), a noise level of around 150 aT Hz-1/2 is achieved in the white noise regime between about 20 kHz and the system bandwidth of about 2.5 MHz. At lower frequencies, the resolution is limited by magnetic field noise arising from the walls of the shielded room. Modeling the BMSR2 as a closed cube with continuous μ-metal walls, we can quantitatively reproduce its measured field noise.

  11. Non-linear behaviour of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device coupled to a radio frequency oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Murrell, J K J

    2001-01-01

    previously unexplored regions of parameter space. We show that these calculations predict a range of previously unreported dynamical I-V characterises for SQUID rings in the strongly hysteretic regime. Finally, we present the successful realisation of a novel experimental technique that permits the weak link of a SQUID to be probed independently of the associated ring structure by mechanically opening and closing the ring. We demonstrate that this process can be completed during the same experimental run without the need for warming and re-cooling of the sample. This thesis is concerned with the investigation of the non-linear behaviour of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) coupled to a RF tank circuit. We consider two regimes, one where the underlying SQUID behaviour is non-hysteretic with respect to an externally applied magnetic flux, and the other where hysteretic (dissipative) behaviour is observed. We show that, by following non-linearities induced in the tank circuit response, the un...

  12. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu; Falferi, P. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  13. Experimental validation of superconducting quantum interference device sensors for electromagnetic scattering in geologic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.; Ruminer, P. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has supported the collaborative development with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) of two critical components for a hand-held low-field magnetic sensor based on superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensor technology. The two components are a digital signal processing (DSP) algorithm for background noise rejection and a small hand-held dewar cooled by a cryocooler. A hand-held sensor has been designed and fabricated for detection of extremely weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments. The sensor is capable of measuring weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments and has multiple applications. We have chosen to pursue battlefield medicine as the highest probability near-term application because of stated needs of several agencies.

  14. A unified theory of quantum Hall effect and high temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shigeji; Suzuki, Akira

    2014-03-01

    The quantum Hall effect (QHE) and high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) have remarkable common features. They occur only in two-dimensional (2D) solids. The critical temperature Tc of some HTSC exceeds 160K while the room temperature QHE is observed in graphene. The cause of both QHE and HTSC is the phonon exchange attraction. We develop a theoretical model for the QHE in terms of the composite bosons (fermions), each containing an electron and an odd (even) number of fluxons (magnetic flux quanta). The composite particles (boson, fermion) are bound by the phonon exchange attraction. If the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of the composite (c)- bosons occurs, then the system exhibits zero resistivity and the associated Hall conductivity plateau. The Hall conductivity is calculated rigorously without averaging. The mystery of the fractional charge carried by the c-bosons is resolved in our model.

  15. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Mok, E-mail: jmkim@kriss.re.kr; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong [Brain Cognition Measurement Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  16. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wan-Lu; Yang, Wan-Li; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Chen, Chang-Yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-09-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters.

  17. Analog approaches to quantum computation using highly-controllable superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neeley, M.; O'Malley, P.; Quintana, C.; Sank, D.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Martinis, J.

    The first generation of quantum hardware that outperforms classical computers will likely be analog in nature. In an effort to realize such a platform, we have built a one-dimensional chain of 9 superconducting gmon qubits. This device provides individual time-dependent control over all nearest-neighbor couplings and local fields (X, Y, Z) in the multi-qubit Hamiltonian. In this talk, I will focus on open problems in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics where dynamical properties become impossible to compute for only a few 10s of qubits. In particular, I will review device performance and the scaling of analog errors with system size. By studying how errors scale during practical applications, we aim to predict if otherwise-intractable computations could be carried out with 30 to 40 qubits.

  18. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2013-12-01

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  19. Tunable coupling in circuit quantum electrodynamics using a superconducting charge qubit with a V-shaped energy level diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, S J; Hoffman, A J; Gambetta, J M; Houck, A A

    2011-02-25

    We introduce a new type of superconducting charge qubit that has a V-shaped energy spectrum and uses quantum interference to provide independently tunable qubit energy and coherent coupling to a superconducting cavity. Dynamic access to the strong coupling regime is demonstrated by tuning the coupling strength from less than 200 kHz to greater than 40 MHz. This tunable coupling can be used to protect the qubit from cavity-induced relaxation and avoid unwanted qubit-qubit interactions in a multiqubit system.

  20. Finite-time full counting statistics and factorial cumulants for transport through a quantum dot with normal and superconducting leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droste, Stephanie; Governale, Michele

    2016-04-01

    We study the finite-time full counting statistics for subgap transport through a single-level quantum dot tunnel-coupled to one normal and one superconducting lead. In particular, we determine the factorial and the ordinary cumulants both for finite times and in the long-time limit. We find that the factorial cumulants violate the sign criterion, indicating a non-binomial distribution, even in absence of Coulomb repulsion due to the presence of superconducting correlations. At short times the cumulants exhibit oscillations which are a signature of the coherent transfer of Cooper pairs between the dot and the superconductor.

  1. CaFeAs2: A staggered intercalation of quantum spin Hall and high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianxin; Qin, Shengshan; Liang, Yi; Le, Congcong; Fan, Heng; Hu, Jiangping

    2015-02-01

    We predict that CaFeAs2, a newly discovered iron-based high-temperature (Tc) superconductor, is a staggered intercalation compound that integrates topological quantum spin Hall (QSH) and superconductivity (SC). CaFeAs2 has a structure with staggered CaAs and FeAs layers. While the FeAs layers are known to be responsible for high Tc superconductivity, we show that with spin orbital coupling each CaAs layer is a Z2 topologically nontrivial two-dimensional QSH insulator and the bulk is a three-dimensional weak topological insulator. In the superconducting state, the edge states in the CaAs layer are natural one-dimensional topological superconductors. The staggered intercalation of QSH and SC provides us a unique opportunity to realize and explore physics, such as Majorana modes and Majorana fermion chains.

  2. Competing effects of surface phonon softening and quantum size effects on the superconducting properties of nanostructured Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Sangita; Galande, Charudatta; Chockalingam, S P; Raychaudhuri, Pratap; Ayyub, Pushan [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Banerjee, Rajarshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5310 (United States)], E-mail: Sangita.Bose@fkf.mpg.de, E-mail: pratap@tifr.res.in, E-mail: pushan@tifr.res.in

    2009-05-20

    The superconducting transition temperature (T{sub C}) in nanostructured Pb decreases from 7.24 to 6.4 K as the particle size is reduced from 65 to 7 nm, below which superconductivity is lost rather abruptly. In contrast, there is a large enhancement in the upper critical field (H{sub C2}) in the same size regime. We explore the origin of the unusual robustness of T{sub C} over such a large particle size range in nanostructured Pb by measuring the temperature dependence of the superconducting energy gap in planar tunnel junctions of Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/nano-Pb. We show that below 22 nm, the electron-phonon coupling strength increases monotonically with decreasing particle size, and almost exactly compensates for the quantum size effect, which is expected to suppress T{sub C}.

  3. Pressure-induced unconventional superconductivity near a quantum critical point in CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, S; Tabuchi, T; Zheng Guoqing [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Wang, X F; Chen, X H [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2010-05-15

    {sup 75}As-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements are performed on CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} under pressure. At P = 4.7 and 10.8 kbar, the temperature dependencies of nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T{sub 1}) measured in the tetragonal phase show no coherence peak just below T{sub c}(P) and decrease with decreasing temperature. The superconductivity is gapless at P = 4.7 kbar but evolves to that with multiple gaps at P = 10.8 kbar. We find that the superconductivity appears near a quantum critical point under pressures in the range 4.7 kbar {<=} P {<=} 10.8 kbar. Both electron correlation and superconductivity disappear in the collapsed tetragonal phase. A systematic study under pressure indicates that electron correlations play a vital role in forming Cooper pairs in this compound.

  4. Characterization of a fabrication process for the integration of superconducting qubits and rapid-single-flux-quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Grönberg, Leif; Carelli, Pasquale; Chiarello, Fabio; Cosmelli, Carlo; Leoni, Roberto; Poletto, Stefano; Torrioli, Guido; Hassel, Juha; Helistö, Panu

    2006-08-01

    In order to integrate superconducting qubits with rapid-single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) control circuitry, it is necessary to develop a fabrication process that simultaneously fulfils the requirements of both elements: low critical current density, very low operating temperature (tens of millikelvin) and reduced dissipation on the qubit side; high operation frequency, large stability margins, low dissipated power on the RSFQ side. For this purpose, VTT has developed a fabrication process based on Nb trilayer technology, which allows the on-chip integration of superconducting qubits and RSFQ circuits even at very low temperature. Here we present the characterization (at 4.2 K) of the process from the point of view of the Josephson devices and show that they are suitable to build integrated superconducting qubits.

  5. Tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Taku J.; Okuyama, Daisuke; Kimura, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    A tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (T-ADR) has been developed for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer [Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS) from Quantum Design]. The whole T-ADR system is fit in a cylindrical space of diameter 8.5 mm and length 250 mm, and can be inserted into the narrow sample tube of MPMS. A sorption pump is self-contained in T-ADR, and hence no complex gas handling system is necessary. With the single crystalline Gd3Ga5O12 garnet (˜2 g) used as a magnetic refrigerant, the routinely achievable lowest temperature is ˜0.56 K. The lower detection limit for a magnetization anomaly is ˜1 × 10-7 emu, estimated from fluctuation of the measured magnetization. The background level is ˜5 × 10-5 emu below 2 K at H = 100 Oe, which is largely attributable to a contaminating paramagnetic signal from the magnetic refrigerant.

  6. Tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Taku J; Okuyama, Daisuke; Kimura, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    A tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (T-ADR) has been developed for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer [Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS) from Quantum Design]. The whole T-ADR system is fit in a cylindrical space of diameter 8.5 mm and length 250 mm, and can be inserted into the narrow sample tube of MPMS. A sorption pump is self-contained in T-ADR, and hence no complex gas handling system is necessary. With the single crystalline Gd3Ga5O12 garnet (∼2 g) used as a magnetic refrigerant, the routinely achievable lowest temperature is ∼0.56 K. The lower detection limit for a magnetization anomaly is ∼1 × 10(-7) emu, estimated from fluctuation of the measured magnetization. The background level is ∼5 × 10(-5) emu below 2 K at H = 100 Oe, which is largely attributable to a contaminating paramagnetic signal from the magnetic refrigerant.

  7. Readout of a superconducting qubit. A problem of quantum escape processes for driven systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verso, Alvise

    2010-10-27

    We started this work with a description of two devices that were recently developed in the context of quantum information processing. These devices are used as read-out for superconducting quantum bits based on Josephson junctions. The classical description has to be extended to the quantum regime. As the main result we calculate the leading order corrections in {Dirac_h} on the escape rate. We took into account a standard metastable potential with a static energy barrier and showed how to derive an extension of the classical diffusion equation. We did this within a systematic semiclassical formalism starting from a quantum mechanical master equation. This master equation contains an extra term for the loss of population due to tunneling through the barrier and, in contrast to previous approaches, finite barrier transmission which also affects the transition probabilities between the states. The escape rate is obtained from the stationary non-equilibrium solution of the diffusion equation. The quantum corrections on the escape rate are captured by two factors, the first one describes zero-point fluctuations in the well, while the second one describes the impact of finite barrier transmission close to the top. Interestingly, for weak friction there exists a temperature range, where the latter one can actually prevail and lead to a reduction of the escape compared to the classical situation due to finite reflection from the barrier even for energies above the barrier. Only for lower temperatures does the quantum result exceed the classical one. The approach can not strictly be used for the Duffing oscillator because of the time dependent term in its Hamiltonian. But it is possible to move in a frame rotating with a frequency equal to the response frequency of the Duffing oscillator in order to obtain a time-independent Hamiltonian. Therefore a system plus reservoir model was applied to consistently derive in the weak coupling limit the master equation for the reduced

  8. Proximity Induced Superconducting Properties in One and Two Dimensional Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten

    a voltage is passed through the Josephson junction, we observe multiple Andreev reflections and preliminary results point to a highly transmissive interface between the 2D electron gas and the superconductor. In the theoretical section we demonstrate analytically and numerically, that in a 1D nanowire......This report is concerned with the properties of one and two dimensional semiconducting materials when brought into contact with a superconductor. Experimentally we study the 2D electron gas in an InGaAs/InAs heterostructure with aluminum grown in situ on the surface, and theoretically we show...... that a superconducting 1D nanowire can harbor Majorana bound states in the absence of spin–orbit coupling. We fabricate and measure micrometer–sized mesoscopic devices demonstrating the inheritance of superconducting properties in the 2D electron gas. By placing a quantum point contact proximal to the interface between...

  9. Extending the lifetime of a quantum bit with error correction in superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Nissim; Petrenko, Andrei; Heeres, Reinier; Reinhold, Philip; Leghtas, Zaki; Vlastakis, Brian; Liu, Yehan; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, S. M.; Jiang, L.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum error correction (QEC) can overcome the errors experienced by qubits and is therefore an essential component of a future quantum computer. To implement QEC, a qubit is redundantly encoded in a higher-dimensional space using quantum states with carefully tailored symmetry properties. Projective measurements of these parity-type observables provide error syndrome information, with which errors can be corrected via simple operations. The ‘break-even’ point of QEC—at which the lifetime of a qubit exceeds the lifetime of the constituents of the system—has so far remained out of reach. Although previous works have demonstrated elements of QEC, they primarily illustrate the signatures or scaling properties of QEC codes rather than test the capacity of the system to preserve a qubit over time. Here we demonstrate a QEC system that reaches the break-even point by suppressing the natural errors due to energy loss for a qubit logically encoded in superpositions of Schrödinger-cat states of a superconducting resonator. We implement a full QEC protocol by using real-time feedback to encode, monitor naturally occurring errors, decode and correct. As measured by full process tomography, without any post-selection, the corrected qubit lifetime is 320 microseconds, which is longer than the lifetime of any of the parts of the system: 20 times longer than the lifetime of the transmon, about 2.2 times longer than the lifetime of an uncorrected logical encoding and about 1.1 longer than the lifetime of the best physical qubit (the |0>f and |1>f Fock states of the resonator). Our results illustrate the benefit of using hardware-efficient qubit encodings rather than traditional QEC schemes. Furthermore, they advance the field of experimental error correction from confirming basic concepts to exploring the metrics that drive system performance and the challenges in realizing a fault-tolerant system.

  10. Extending the lifetime of a quantum bit with error correction in superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Nissim; Petrenko, Andrei; Heeres, Reinier; Reinhold, Philip; Leghtas, Zaki; Vlastakis, Brian; Liu, Yehan; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, S M; Jiang, L; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2016-08-25

    Quantum error correction (QEC) can overcome the errors experienced by qubits and is therefore an essential component of a future quantum computer. To implement QEC, a qubit is redundantly encoded in a higher-dimensional space using quantum states with carefully tailored symmetry properties. Projective measurements of these parity-type observables provide error syndrome information, with which errors can be corrected via simple operations. The 'break-even' point of QEC--at which the lifetime of a qubit exceeds the lifetime of the constituents of the system--has so far remained out of reach. Although previous works have demonstrated elements of QEC, they primarily illustrate the signatures or scaling properties of QEC codes rather than test the capacity of the system to preserve a qubit over time. Here we demonstrate a QEC system that reaches the break-even point by suppressing the natural errors due to energy loss for a qubit logically encoded in superpositions of Schrödinger-cat states of a superconducting resonator. We implement a full QEC protocol by using real-time feedback to encode, monitor naturally occurring errors, decode and correct. As measured by full process tomography, without any post-selection, the corrected qubit lifetime is 320 microseconds, which is longer than the lifetime of any of the parts of the system: 20 times longer than the lifetime of the transmon, about 2.2 times longer than the lifetime of an uncorrected logical encoding and about 1.1 longer than the lifetime of the best physical qubit (the |0〉f and |1〉f Fock states of the resonator). Our results illustrate the benefit of using hardware-efficient qubit encodings rather than traditional QEC schemes. Furthermore, they advance the field of experimental error correction from confirming basic concepts to exploring the metrics that drive system performance and the challenges in realizing a fault-tolerant system.

  11. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, Carmine, E-mail: carmine.granata@cnr.it; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-19

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  12. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  13. Low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference device operating in Tesla magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Tobias; Nagel, Joachim; Wölbing, Roman; Kemmler, Matthias; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter

    2013-01-22

    Superconductivity in the cuprate YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) persists up to huge magnetic fields (B) up to several tens of Teslas, and sensitive direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be realized in epitaxially grown YBCO films by using grain boundary Josephson junctions (GBJs). Here we present the realization of high-quality YBCO nanoSQUIDs, patterned by focused ion beam milling. We demonstrate low-noise performance of such a SQUID up to B = 1 T applied parallel to the plane of the SQUID loop at the temperature T = 4.2 K. The GBJs are shunted by a thin Au layer to provide nonhysteretic current voltage characteristics, and the SQUID incorporates a 90 nm wide constriction which is used for on-chip modulation of the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop. The white flux noise of the device increases only slightly from 1.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz)(1/2) at B = 0 to 2.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. Assuming that a point-like magnetic particle with magnetization in the plane of the SQUID loop is placed directly on top of the constriction and taking into account the geometry of the SQUID, we calculate a spin sensitivity S(μ)(1/2) = 62 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at B = 0 and 110 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. The demonstration of low noise of such a SQUID in Tesla fields is a decisive step toward utilizing the full potential of ultrasensitive nanoSQUIDs for direct measurements of magnetic hysteresis curves of magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets.

  14. Note: simultaneous measurements of magnetization and electrical transport signal by a reconstructed superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H L; Yu, X Z; Wang, S L; Chen, L; Zhao, J H

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a sample rod which makes the conventional superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer capable of performing magnetization and electrical transport measurements simultaneously. The sample holder attached to the end of a 140 cm long sample rod is a nonmagnetic drinking straw or a 1.5 mm wide silicon strip with small magnetic background signal. Ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As films are used to test the new sample rod, and the results are in good agreement with previous report.

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TWO-POINT CONTACT BETWEEN WHEEL AND RAIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhang; Shouguang Sun; Xuesong Jin

    2009-01-01

    The elastic-plastic contact problem with rolling friction of wheel-rail is solved using the FE parametric quadratic programming method. Thus, the complex elastic-plastic contact problem can be calculated with high accuracy and efficiency, while the Hertz's hypothesis and the elastic semi-space assumption are avoided. Based on the 'one-point' contact calculation of wheel-rail, the computational model of 'two-point' contact are established and calculated when the wheel flange is close to the rail. In the case of 'two-point' contact, the changing laws of wheelrail contact are introduced and contact forces in various load cases are carefully analyzed. The main reason of wheel flange wear and rail side wear is found. Lubrication computational model of the wheel flange is constructed. Comparing with the result without lubrication, the contact force between wheel flange and rail decreases, which is beneficial for reducing the wear of wheel-rail.

  16. Automated fabrication technique of gold tips for use in point-contact spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Narasiwodeyar, S; Liu, M; Park, W K; Greene, L H

    2014-01-01

    For a successful point-contact spectroscopy (PCS) measurement, metallic tips of proper shape and smoothness are essential to ensure the ballistic nature of a point-contact junction. Until recently, the fabrication of Au tips suitable for use in point-contact spectroscopy has remained more of an art involving a trial and error method rather than an automated scientific process. To address these issues, we have developed a technique with which one can prepare high quality Au tips reproducibly and systematically. It involves an electronic control of the driving voltages used for an electrochemical etching of a gold wire in an HCl-glycerol mixture or an HCl solution. We find that a stopping current, below which the circuit is set to shut off, is a single very important parameter to produce an Au tip of desired shape. We present detailed descriptions for a two-step etching process for Au tips and also test results from PCS measurements using them.

  17. Two-step fabrication technique of gold tips for use in point-contact spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasiwodeyar, S.; Dwyer, M.; Liu, M.; Park, W. K., E-mail: wkpark@illinois.edu; Greene, L. H. [Department of Physics and Material Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    For a successful point-contact spectroscopy (PCS) measurement, metallic tips of proper shape and smoothness are essential to ensure the ballistic nature of a point-contact junction. Until recently, the fabrication of Au tips suitable for use in point-contact spectroscopy has remained more of an art involving a trial and error method rather than an automated scientific process. To address these issues, we have developed a technique with which one can prepare high quality Au tips reproducibly and systematically. It involves an electronic control of the driving voltages used for an electrochemical etching of a gold wire in a HCl-glycerol mixture or a HCl solution. We find that a stopping current, below which the circuit is set to shut off, is a single very important parameter to produce an Au tip of desired shape. We present detailed descriptions for a two-step etching process for Au tips and also test results from PCS measurements using them.

  18. Point-contact spectroscopy on LaS, GdS and TmSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankowski, I.; Wachter, P. (Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik)

    1981-12-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of point contacts with LaS, GdS and TmSe have been studied experimentally at liquid-helium temperatures. For LaS- and GdS-point contacts the observed structures in the spectra of d/sup 2/U/dI/sup 2/ measured as a function of the applied voltage are in agreement with the structures of the phonon density of states found by Raman scattering experiments. In point contacts with the intermediate valent compound TmSe a strong peak was observed in the first derivative dU/dI with a half width of 2 mV showing a logarithmic decrease with increasing voltage.

  19. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  20. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  1. Inductance mode characteristics of a ceramic YBa2Cu3O7-x radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device at 77 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Il'ichev, E. V.; Andreev, A. V.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results on some radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf-SQUID) signal properties are presented. The quantum interferometer was made of ceramic YBa2Cu3O7−x and was due to a low critical current operated in the inductance or nonhysteretic mode. With bias current...

  2. ASYMMETRIC DIFFERENTIAL RESISTANCE OF POINT CONTACTS ON NORMAL-METAL-SUPERCONDUCTOR BILAYERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEVERS, HFC; VANDERGRINTEN, MGD; JENNEN, PLH; VANKEMPEN, H; VANSON, PC

    1994-01-01

    Point-contact junctions on normal-metal-superconductor bilayers show asymmetries of different magnitudes and signs in the differential resistance versus voltage curves for opposite-bias voltages. In the absence of Andreev reflection (i.e. for energies outside the energy gap) no asymmetry is found.

  3. Point Contact Andreev Reflection Measurement of the Spin Polarization of Ferromagnetic Alloy NiFeSb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李壮志; 陶宏杰; 闻海虎; 张铭; 柳祝红; 崔玉亭; 吴光恒

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the temperature-dependent and barrier-strength-dependent Andreev reflection tunnelling spectroscopy with point contacts consisting of the newly synthesized half-metallic alloy NiFeSb and a Nb tip. By fitting the data to the generalized Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk theory, a spin polarization P = 0.52 has been obtained.

  4. CDEX-1 1 kg point-contact germanium detector for low mass dark matter searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ke-Jun; Yue, Qian; Wu, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Li, Yuan-Jing; Bai, Yang; Bi, Yong; Chang, Jian-Ping; Chen, Nan; Chen, Ning; Chen, Qing-Hao; Chen, Yun-Hua; Chuang, Yo-Chun; Deng, Zhi; Du, Qiang; Gong, Hui; Hao, Xi-Qing; He, Qing-Ju; Hu, Xin-Hui; Huang, Han-Xiong; Huang, Teng-Rui; Jiang, Hao; Li, Hau-Bin; Li, Jian-Min; Li, Jin; Li, Jun; Li, Xia; Li, Xin-Ying; Li, Xue-Qian; Li, Yu-Lan; Liao, Heng-Yi; Lin, Fong-Kay; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, Shu-Kui; Lü, Lan-Chun; Ma, Hao; Mao, Shao-Ji; Qin, Jian-Qiang; Ren, Jie; Ren, Jing; Ruan, Xi-Chao; Shen, Man-Bin; Lakhwinder, Singh; Manoj, Kumar Singh; Arun, Kumar Soma; Su, Jian; Tang, Chang-Jian; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Wang, Ji-Min; Wang, Li; Wang, Qing; Wong Tsz-King, Henry; Wu, Shi-Yong; Wu, Wei; Wu, Yu-Cheng; Xing, Hao-Yang; Xu, Yin; Xue, Tao; Yang, Li-Tao; Yang, Song-Wei; Yi, Nan; Yu, Chun-Xu; Yu, Hao; Yu, Xun-Zhen; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Yun-Hua; Zhao, Ming-Gang; Zhao, Wei; Zhong, Su-Ning; Zhou, Zu-Ying; Zhu, Jing-Jun; Zhu, Wei-Bin; Zhu, Xue-Zhou; Zhu, Zhong-Hua

    2013-12-01

    The CDEX collaboration has been established for direct detection of light dark matter particles, using ultra-low energy threshold point-contact p-type germanium detectors, in China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL). The first 1 kg point-contact germanium detector with a sub-keV energy threshold has been tested in a passive shielding system located in CJPL. The outputs from both the point-contact P+ electrode and the outside N+ electrode make it possible to scan the lower energy range of less than 1 keV and at the same time to detect the higher energy range up to 3 MeV. The outputs from both P+ and N+ electrode may also provide a more powerful method for signal discrimination for dark matter experiment. Some key parameters, including energy resolution, dead time, decay times of internal X-rays, and system stability, have been tested and measured. The results show that the 1 kg point-contact germanium detector, together with its shielding system and electronics, can run smoothly with good performances. This detector system will be deployed for dark matter search experiments.

  5. The CDEX-1 1 kg Point-Contact Germanium Detector for Low Mass Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Ke-Jun; Wu, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Li, Yuan-Jing; Bai, Yang; Bi, Yong; Chang, Jian-Ping; Chen, Nan; Chen, Ning; Chen, Qing-Hao; Chen, Yun-Hua; Chuang, You-Chun; Dend, Zhi; Du, Qiang; Gong, Hui; Hao, Xi-Qing; He, Qing-Ju; Hu, Xin-Hui; Huang, Han-Xiong; Huang, Teng-Rui; Jiang, Hao; Li, Hau-Bin; Li, Jian-Min; Li, Jin; Li, Jun; Li, Xia; Li, Xin-Ying; Li, Xue-Qian; Li, Yu-Lan; Liao, Heng-Ye; Lin, Fong-Kay; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, Shu-Kui; Lv, Lan-Chun; Ma, Hao; Mao, Shao-Ji; Qin, Jian-Qiang; Ren, Jie; Ren, Jing; Ruan, Xi-Chao; Shen, Man-Bin; Singh, Lakhwinder; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Soma, Arun Kumar; Su, Jian; Tang, Chang-Jian; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Wang, Ji-Min; Wang, Li; Wang, Qing; Wong, Tsz-King Henry; Wu, Shi-Yong; Wu, Wei; Xing, Hao-Yang; Xu, Yin; Xue, Tao; Yang, Li-Tao; Yang, Song-Wei; Yi, Nan; Yu, Chun-Xu; Yu, Hao; Yu, Xun-Zhen; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Yun-Hua; Zhao, Ming-Gang; Zhao, Wei; Zhong, Su-Ning; Zhou, Zu-Ying; Zhu, Jing-Jun; Zhu, Wei-Bin; Zhu, Xue-Zhou; Zhu, Zhong-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The CDEX Collaboration has been established for direct detection of light dark matter particles, using ultra-low energy threshold p-type point-contact germanium detectors, in China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL). The first 1 kg point-contact germanium detector with a sub-keV energy threshold has been tested in a passive shielding system located in CJPL. The outputs from both the point-contact p+ electrode and the outside n+ electrode make it possible to scan the lower energy range of less than 1 keV and at the same time to detect the higher energy range up to 3 MeV. The outputs from both p+ and n+ electrode may also provide a more powerful method for signal discrimination for dark matter experiment. Some key parameters, including energy resolution, dead time, decay times of internal X-rays, and system stability, have been tested and measured. The results show that the 1 kg point-contact germanium detector, together with its shielding system and electronics, can run smoothly with good performances. This...

  6. Conductance histogram evolution of an EC-MCBJ fabricated Au atomic point contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yang; Liu Junyang; Chen Zhaobin; Tian Jinghua; Jin Xi; Liu Bo; Yang Fangzu; Tian Zhongqun [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Li Xiulan; Tao Nongjian [Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Biodesign Institute, Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6206 (United States); Luo Zhongzi; Lu Miao, E-mail: zqtian@xmu.edu.cn [Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Pen-Tung Sah Micro-Nano Technology Institute, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2011-07-08

    This work presents a study of Au conductance quantization based on a combined electrochemical deposition and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) method. We describe the microfabrication process and discuss improved features of our microchip structure compared to the previous one. The improved structure prolongs the available life of the microchip and also increases the success rate of the MCBJ experiment. Stepwise changes in the current were observed at the last stage of atomic point contact breakdown and conductance histograms were constructed. The evolution of 1G{sub 0} peak height in conductance histograms was used to investigate the probability of formation of an atomic point contact. It has been shown that the success rate in forming an atomic point contact can be improved by decreasing the stretching speed and the degree that the two electrodes are brought into contact. The repeated breakdown and formation over thousands of cycles led to a distinctive increase of 1G{sub 0} peak height in the conductance histograms, and this increased probability of forming a single atomic point contact is discussed.

  7. Upper critical field and quantum oscillations in tetragonal superconducting FeS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Taichi; Kikugawa, Naoki; Lin, Hai; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu; Nomoto, Takuya; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Uji, Shinya

    2016-09-01

    The magnetoresistance and magnetic torque of FeS are measured in magnetic fields B of up to 18 T down to a temperature of 0.03 K. The superconducting transition temperature is found to be Tc=4.1 K , and the anisotropy ratio of the upper critical field Bc 2 at Tc is estimated from the initial slopes to be Γ (Tc)=6.9 . Bc 2(0 ) is estimated to be 2.2 and 0.36 T for B ∥a b and c , respectively. Quantum oscillations are observed in both the resistance and torque. Two frequencies F =0.15 and 0.20 kT are resolved and assigned to a quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surface cylinder. The carrier density and Sommerfeld coefficient associated with this cylinder are estimated to be 5.8 ×10-3 carriers/Fe and 0.48 mJ /(K2mol ) , respectively. Other Fermi surface pockets still remain to be found. Band-structure calculations are performed and compared to the experimental results.

  8. Tunable strong nonlinearity of a micromechanical beam embedded in a dc-superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ella, Lior, E-mail: lior.ella@weizmann.ac.il; Yuvaraj, D.; Suchoi, Oren; Shtempluk, Oleg; Buks, Eyal [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-01-07

    We present a study of the controllable nonlinear dynamics of a micromechanical beam coupled to a dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device). The coupling between these systems places the modes of the beam in a highly nonlinear potential, whose shape can be altered by varying the bias current and applied flux of the SQUID. We detect the position of the beam by placing it in an optical cavity, which sets free the SQUID to be used solely for actuation. This enables us to probe the previously unexplored full parameter space of this device. We measure the frequency response of the beam and find that it displays a Duffing oscillator behavior which is periodic in the applied magnetic flux. To account for this, we develop a model based on the standard theory for SQUID dynamics. In addition, with the aim of understanding if the device can reach nonlinearity at the single phonon level, we use this model to show that the responsivity of the current circulating in the SQUID to the position of the beam can become divergent, with its magnitude limited only by noise. This suggests a direction for the generation of macroscopically distinguishable superposition states of the beam.

  9. Parasitic effects in superconducting quantum interference device-based radiation comb generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosisio, R., E-mail: riccardo.bosisio@nano.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); NEST, Instituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Giazotto, F., E-mail: giazotto@sns.it [NEST, Instituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Solinas, P., E-mail: paolo.solinas@spin.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

    2015-12-07

    We study several parasitic effects on the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) driven by an external magnetic field. This system can be used as a radiation generator similarly to what is done in optics and metrology, and allows one to generate up to several hundreds of harmonics of the driving frequency. First we take into account how the assumption of a finite loop geometrical inductance and junction capacitance in each SQUID may alter the operation of the devices. Then, we estimate the effect of imperfections in the fabrication of an array of SQUIDs, which is an unavoidable source of errors in practical situations. We show that the role of the junction capacitance is, in general, negligible, whereas the geometrical inductance has a beneficial effect on the performance of the device. The errors on the areas and junction resistance asymmetries may deteriorate the performance, but their effect can be limited to a large extent by a suitable choice of fabrication parameters.

  10. Self-heterodyne detection of the in situ phase of an atomic superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, R.; Kumar, A.; Eckel, S.; Jendrzejewski, F.; Campbell, G. K.; Edwards, Mark; Tiesinga, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present theoretical and experimental analysis of an interferometric measurement of the in situ phase drop across and current flow through a rotating barrier in a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This experiment is the atomic analog of the rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The phase drop is extracted from a spiral-shaped density profile created by the spatial interference of the expanding toroidal BEC and a reference BEC after release from all trapping potentials. We characterize the interferometer when it contains a single particle, which is initially in a coherent superposition of a torus and reference state, as well as when it contains a many-body state in the mean-field approximation. The single-particle picture is sufficient to explain the origin of the spirals, to relate the phase-drop across the barrier to the geometry of a spiral, and to bound the expansion times for which the in situ phase can be accurately determined. Mean-field estimates and numerical simulations show that the interatomic interactions shorten the expansion time scales compared to the single-particle case. Finally, we compare the mean-field simulations with our experimental data and confirm that the interferometer indeed accurately measures the in situ phase drop.

  11. Operation of a Wideband Terahertz Superconducting Bolometer Responding to Quantum Cascade Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibella, S.; Beck, M.; Carelli, P.; Castellano, M. G.; Chiarello, F.; Faist, J.; Leoni, R.; Ortolani, M.; Sabbatini, L.; Scalari, G.; Torrioli, G.; Turcinkova, D.

    2012-06-01

    We make use of a niobium film to produce a micrometric vacuum-bridge superconducting bolometer responding to THz frequency. The bolometer works anywhere in the temperature range 2-7 K, which can be easily reached in helium bath cryostats or closed-cycle cryocoolers. In this work the bolometer is mounted on a pulse tube refrigerator and operated to measure the equivalent noise power (NEP) and the response to fast (μs) terahertz pulses. The NEP above 100 Hz equals that measured in a liquid helium cryostat showing that potential drawbacks related to the use of a pulse tube refrigerator (like mechanical and thermal oscillations, electromagnetic interference, noise) are irrelevant. At low frequency, instead, the pulse tube expansion-compression cycles originate lines at 1 Hz and harmonics in the noise spectrum. The bolometer was illuminated with THz single pulses coming either from a Quantum Cascade Laser operating at liquid nitrogen temperature or from a frequency-multiplied electronic oscillator. The response of the bolometer to the single pulses show that the device can track signals with a rise time as fast as about 450 ns.

  12. High temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device system for detection of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzell, Alf

    2012-07-01

    This doctoral thesis was aimed at establishing a set-up with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) radio-frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technology for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and in particular for testing applications of magnetic nanoparticle immunoassays. It was part of the EU-project ''Biodiagnostics'' running from 2005 to 2008. The method of magnetic binding assays was developed as an alternative to other methods of concentration determination like enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or fluorescent immunoassay. The ELISA has sensitivities down to analyte-concentrations of pg/ml. Multiple incubation and washing steps have to be performed for these techniques, the analyte has to diffuse to the site of binding. The magnetic assay uses magnetic nanoparticles as markers for the substance to be detected. It is being explored by current research and shows similar sensitivity compared to ELISA but in contrast - does not need any washing and can be read out directly after binding - can be applied in solution with opaque media, e.g. blood or muddy water - additionally allows magnetic separation or concentration - in combination with small magnetoresistive or Hall sensors, allows detection of only a few particles or even single beads. For medical or environmental samples, maybe opaque and containing a multitude of substances, it would be advantageous to devise an instrument, which allows to be read out quickly and with high sensitivity. Due to the mentioned items the magnetic assay might be a possibility here.

  13. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-06-09

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 6} L. monocytogenes for a 20 {micro}L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 {+-} 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria.

  14. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-06-09

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 6} L. monocytogenes for a 20 {micro}L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 {+-} 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria.

  15. Step edge Josephson junctions and high temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Millar, A J

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) gradiometers based on the high temperature superconductor YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (YBCO). A step-edge Josephson junction fabrication process was developed to produce sufficiently steep (>60 deg) step-edges such that junctions exhibited RSJ-like current-voltage characteristics. The mean I sub C R sub N product of a sample of twenty step-edge junctions was 130 mu V. Step-edge dc SQUIDs with inductances between 67pH and 114pH were fabricated. Generally the SQUIDs had an intrinsic white flux noise in the 10-30 mu PHI sub 0 /sq root Hz range, with the best device, a 70pH SQUID, exhibiting a white flux noise of 5 mu PHI sub 0 /sq root Hz. Different first-order SQUID gradiometer designs were fabricated from single layers of YBCO. Two single-layer gradiometer (SLG) designs were fabricated on 10x10mm sup 2 substrates. The best balance and lowest gradient sensitivity measured for these devices were 1/3...

  16. High temperature superconducting thin films and quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Graf zu Eulenburg, A

    1999-01-01

    the best balance and gradient sensitivity at 1kHz were 3x10 sup - sup 3 and 222fT/(cm sq root Hz))) respectively. The measured spatial response to a current carrying wire was in good agreement with a theoretical model. A significant performance improvement was obtained with the development of a single layer gradiometer with 13mm baseline, fabricated on 30x10mm sup 2 bicrystals. For such a device, the gradient sensitivity at 1kHz was 50fT/(cm sq root Hz)) and the gradiometer was used successfully for unshielded magnetocardiography. A parasitic effective area compensation scheme was employed with two neighbouring SQUIDs coupled in an opposite sense to the same gradiometer loop. This improved the balance from the intrinsic value of 10 sup - sup 3 to 3x10 sup - sup 5. This thesis describes several aspects of the development of gradiometers using high temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID). The pulsed laser deposition of thin films of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (YBCO) on Sr...

  17. Quantum critical point for stripe order: An organizing principle of cuprate superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doiron-Leyraud, Nicolas [Departement de Physique and RQMP, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto (Canada); Taillefer, Louis, E-mail: Louis.Taillefer@USherbrooke.ca [Departement de Physique and RQMP, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-11-01

    A spin density-wave quantum critical point (QCP) is the central organizing principle of organic, iron-pnictide, heavy-fermion and electron-doped cuprate superconductors. It accounts for the superconducting T{sub c} dome, the non-Fermi-liquid resistivity, and the Fermi-surface reconstruction. Outside the magnetically ordered phase above the QCP, scattering and pairing decrease in parallel as the system moves away from the QCP. Here we argue that a similar scenario, based on a stripe-order QCP, is a central organizing principle of hole-doped cuprate superconductors. Key properties of La{sub 1.8-x}Eu{sub 0.2}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}, La{sub 1.6-x}Nd{sub 0.4}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} are naturally unified, including stripe order itself, its QCP, Fermi-surface reconstruction, the linear-T resistivity, and the nematic character of the pseudogap phase.

  18. Aluminum and boron nuclear quadrupole resonance with a direct current superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C.; Chang, J.; Pines, A.

    1990-12-01

    We report the application of our dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) spectrometer [C. Connor, J. Chang, and A. Pines, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 1059(1990)] to nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies of aluminum-27, and boron-11 in crystalline and glassy solids. Our results give e2qQ/h=2.38 MHz and η=0.0 for α-Al2O3 at 4.2 K. For the natural mineral petalite (LiAlSi4O10), we obtain e2qQ/h=4.56 MHz and η=0.47. The quadrupole resonance frequency is 1467 kHz in boron nitride, and in the vicinity of 1300 kHz for various borates in the B2O3ṡxH2O system. The distribution of boron environments in a B2O3 glass gives rise to a linewidth of about 80 kHz in the SQUID detected resonance.

  19. Topological Quantum Phase Transition and Superconductivity Induced by Pressure in the Bismuth Tellurohalide BiTeI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yanpeng; Shi, Wujun; Naumov, Pavel G; Kumar, Nitesh; Sankar, Raman; Schnelle, Walter; Shekhar, Chandra; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Medvedev, Sergey A

    2017-03-06

    A pressure-induced topological quantum phase transition has been theoretically predicted for the semiconductor bismuth tellurohalide BiTeI with giant Rashba spin splitting. In this work, evolution of the electrical transport properties in BiTeI and BiTeBr is investigated under high pressure. The pressure-dependent resistivity in a wide temperature range passes through a minimum at around 3 GPa, indicating the predicted topological quantum phase transition in BiTeI. Superconductivity is observed in both BiTeI and BiTeBr, while resistivity at higher temperatures still exhibits semiconducting behavior. Theoretical calculations suggest that superconductivity may develop from the multivalley semiconductor phase. The superconducting transition temperature, Tc , increases with applied pressure and reaches a maximum value of 5.2 K at 23.5 GPa for BiTeI (4.8 K at 31.7 GPa for BiTeBr), followed by a slow decrease. The results demonstrate that BiTeX (X = I, Br) compounds with nontrivial topology of electronic states display new ground states upon compression.

  20. Coherence, Charging, and Spin Effects in Quantum Dots and Point Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    project and his rational ix method of thinking and working were a source of inspiration. Michael Janus and Linda Olofsson both spent a spring visiting our... Michael Janus helped significantly with the Kondo experiment and the never-explained “bunching” phenomenon. I am ever grateful to Michael for dinners...Boris Spivak , and Mike Stopa are among the many others with whom I’ve enjoyed good drinks and conversations. A number of people have helped keep our

  1. Analysis of Self-Terminated Pressure-Driven Quantum Point Contacts with Ultrafast Optical Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Fatemeh; Wlasenko, Alex; Steeves, Geoff

    2009-05-01

    A self-terminated electrochemical method was used to fabricate atomic-scale contacts between two Au electrodes in a microfluidic channel. The conductance of the contacts varies in a stepwise fashion. The mechanism works by a pressure-driven flow parallel with a pair of Au electrodes with a 100 μm gap in an electrolyte of HCl. Without applied flow, dendrite growth and dense branching morphology were typically observed at the cathode. The addition of applied pressure-driven flow resulted in a densely packed gold structure that filled the channel. The electrochemical fabrication approach introduces large variance in the formation and location of individual junctions. Understanding and controlling this process will enable the precise positioning of reproducible geometries into nano-electronic devices. To investigate the high speed behaviour of a QPC, it can be integrated with a transmission line structure patterned on a photoconductive GaAs substrate. The nonlinear conductance of the QPC (due to the finite density of states of the conductors) can be examined and compared with recent theoretical studies. Samples are fabricated in situ using an electrochemical procedure to produce QPCs along the transmission line structure. This method may provide insight into Terahertz Optoelectronic devices and ultrafast communication systems.

  2. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  3. Theory of Point Contact Restraint and Qualitative Analysis of Robot Grasping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊有伦

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a geometrical representation of robot grasping and a definition of "relative form closure" of point contact restraint based on the concepts of positive linear combination,affine combination,convex combination,etc.in the screw space.The dual equivalence theorem,topological equivalence theorem and algebraic equivalence theorem are derived from the defined restraint cone and freedom cone in the dual screw spaces.A J0-function method of computer-aided grasp planning is implemented more efficiently than other proposed methods.The states of restraint and instantaneous motion of a rigid body grasped by a set of point contacts are specified by the unisense degrees of freedom and unisense degrees of restraint.Finally,a quality measure of robot grasping is provided for the synthesis procedure of relatively form-closed grasp.

  4. Current driven tri-stable resistance states in magnetic point contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanson, I K; Fisun, V V; Naidyuk, Yu G; Balkashin, O P; Triputen, L Yu; Konovalenko, A; Korenivski, V

    2009-09-02

    Point contacts between normal and ferromagnetic metals are investigated using magnetoresistance and transport spectroscopy measurements combined with micromagnetic simulations. Pronounced hysteresis in the point contact resistance versus both bias current and external magnetic field are observed. It is found that such hysteretic resistance can exhibit, in addition to bi-stable resistance states found in ordinary spin valves, tri-stable resistance states with a middle resistance level. We interpret these observations in terms of surface spin valve and spin vortex states, originating from a substantially modified spin structure at the ferromagnetic interface in the contact core. We argue that these surface spin states, subject to a weakened exchange interaction, dominate the effects of spin transfer torques on the nanometer scale.

  5. Current driven tri-stable resistance states in magnetic point contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanson, I K; Fisun, V V; Naidyuk, Yu G; Balkashin, O P; Triputen, L Yu [B Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 47 Lenin Avenue, 61103, Kharkiv (Ukraine); Konovalenko, A; Korenivski, V [Nanostructure Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 10691, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-02

    Point contacts between normal and ferromagnetic metals are investigated using magnetoresistance and transport spectroscopy measurements combined with micromagnetic simulations. Pronounced hysteresis in the point contact resistance versus both bias current and external magnetic field are observed. It is found that such hysteretic resistance can exhibit, in addition to bi-stable resistance states found in ordinary spin valves, tri-stable resistance states with a middle resistance level. We interpret these observations in terms of surface spin valve and spin vortex states, originating from a substantially modified spin structure at the ferromagnetic interface in the contact core. We argue that these surface spin states, subject to a weakened exchange interaction, dominate the effects of spin transfer torques on the nanometer scale.

  6. Low-noise dc superconducting quantum interference devices for gravity wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Insik

    I have designed, built and tested a low noise dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) system which is intended primarily for use in a 50 mK omnidirectional gravity wave antenna. The SQUID system has three SQUIDs on a single chip: one SQUID is the sensor, another SQUID is the main readout, and the last is a spare readout. For good impedance matching between the sensor SQUID and the input circuit, I use a thin-film transformer. This thin-film transformer gives an input inductance of about 1 muH, which is good for many applications. A SQUID system in a gravity wave antenna must operate continuously for at least 6 months with high reliability. To meet these requirements, I fabricated dc SQUID chips from Nb-Al/AlOsbx-Nb trilayers. I tested the SQUID chips in a liquid helium bath and a dilution refrigerator in the temperature range of 4.2 K to 90 mK. I have designed and tested an eddy-current damping filter as a distributed microwave filter to damp out microwave resonances in strip-line input coils coupled to SQUIDs. The filter chip consists of a Au/Cu-dot array. The filter chip was coupled to the SQUID using a flip-chip arrangement on the SQUID chip. I found that the filter reduced noise bumps and removed distortion from the current-voltage curves. To flux-lock the SQUID system, I developed 2-stage SQUID feedback loops. I investigated two cascade SQUID systems in which I feed the feedback signal into the sensor SQUID and couple the ac modulation signal to the readout SQUID. I found that the noise spectrum with 2-SQUID feedback operation recovers the noise spectrum of the sensor SQUID with about 9% higher noise.

  7. Flexible superconducting Nb transmission lines on thin film polyimide for quantum computing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, David B.; Hamilton, Michael C.; Reilly, David J.; Bai, Rujun; Hernandez, George A.; Hornibrook, John M.; Sellers, John A.; Ellis, Charles D.

    2016-08-01

    We describe progress and initial results achieved towards the goal of developing integrated multi-conductor arrays of shielded controlled-impedance flexible superconducting transmission lines with ultra-miniature cross sections and wide bandwidths (dc to >10 GHz) over meter-scale lengths. Intended primarily for use in future scaled-up quantum computing systems, such flexible thin-film niobium/polyimide ribbon cables could provide a physically compact and ultra-low thermal conductance alternative to the rapidly increasing number of discrete coaxial cables that are currently used by quantum computing experimentalists to transmit signals between the several low-temperature stages (from ˜4 K down to ˜20 mK) of a dilution refrigerator. We have concluded that these structures are technically feasible to fabricate, and so far they have exhibited acceptable thermo-mechanical reliability. S-parameter results are presented for individual 2-metal layer Nb microstrip structures having 50 Ω characteristic impedance; lengths ranging from 50 to 550 mm were successfully fabricated. Solderable pads at the end terminations allowed testing using conventional rf connectors. Weakly coupled open-circuit microstrip resonators provided a sensitive measure of the overall transmission line loss as a function of frequency, temperature, and power. Two common microelectronic-grade polyimide dielectrics, one conventional and the other photo-definable (PI-2611 and HD-4100, respectively) were compared. Our most striking result, not previously reported to our knowledge, was that the dielectric loss tangents of both polyimides, over frequencies from 1 to 20 GHz, are remarkably low at deep cryogenic temperatures, typically 100× smaller than corresponding room temperature values. This enables fairly long-distance (meter-scale) transmission of microwave signals without excessive attenuation, and also permits usefully high rf power levels to be transmitted without creating excessive dielectric

  8. Metal-oxide-metal point contact junction detectors. [detection mechanism and mechanical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, J.; Havemann, R. H.; Fults, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    The detection mechanism(s) and design of a mechanically stable metal-oxide-metal point contact junction detector are considered. A prototype for a mechanically stable device has been constructed and tested. A technique has been developed which accurately predicts microwave video detector and heterodyne mixer SIM (semiconductor-insulator-metal) diode performance from low dc frequency volt-ampere curves. The difference in contact potential between the two metals and geometrically induced rectification constitute the detection mechanisms.

  9. Dynamic Carrying Capacity Analysis of Double-Row Four-Point Contact Ball Slewing Bearing

    OpenAIRE

    Yunfeng Li; Di Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Carrying capacity is the most important performance index for slewing bearings. Maximizing the carrying capacity of slewing bearing is one pursuing goal for the bearing designer; this is usually realized by optimizing the design parameters. A method of analyzing the carrying capacity of double-row four-point contact ball slewing bearing by using dynamic carrying capacity surfaces was proposed in this paper. Based on the dynamic load carrying capacity surface of the slewing bearing, the effect...

  10. Spin transfer torques and spin dynamics in point contacts and spin-flop tunnel junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Konovalenko, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The first part of this thesis is an experimental study of the spin-dependent transport in magnetic point contacts. Nano-contacts are produced micromechanically, by bringing a sharpened non-magnetic (N) tip into contact with a ferromagnetic (F) film. The magnetic and magneto-transport properties of such N/F nanocontacts are studied using transport spectroscopy, spanning the ballistic, diffusive, and thermal transport regimes. Single N/F interfaces can exhibit current driven magnetic excitation...

  11. Observation of quantum Griffiths singularity and ferromagnetism at the superconducting LaAl O3/SrTi O3(110 ) interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shengchun; Xing, Ying; Wang, Pengjie; Liu, Haiwen; Fu, Hailong; Zhang, Yangwei; He, Lin; Xie, X. C.; Lin, Xi; Nie, Jiacai; Wang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Diverse phenomena emerge at the interface between band insulators LaAl O3 and SrTi O3 , such as superconductivity and ferromagnetism, showing an opportunity for potential applications as well as contributing to fundamental research interests. Here, we report the superconductor-metal transition driven by a perpendicular magnetic field in superconducting two-dimensional electron gas formed at the LaAl O3/SrTi O3(110 ) interface, which offers an appealing platform for quantum phase transition from a superconductor to a weakly localized metal. Interestingly, when approaching the quantum critical point, the dynamic critical exponent is not a constant but a diverging value, which is direct evidence of a quantum Griffiths singularity arising from quenched disorder at ultralow temperatures. Furthermore, the hysteretic property of magnetoresistance is observed at the LaAl O3/SrTi O3(110 ) interface, which suggests the potential coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism.

  12. One-Step Realization of SWAP Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices and Atoms in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2008-01-01

    We put forward a simple scheme for one-step realization of a two-qubit SWAP gate with SQUIDs (super-conducting quantum-interference devices) in cavity QED via Raman transition. In this scheme, the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed. The SWAP gate is realized by using only two lower flux states of the SQUID system and the excited state would not be excited. Therefore, the effect of decoherence caused from the levels of the SQUID system is possibly minimized. The scheme can also be used to implement the SWAP gate with atoms.

  13. Topological quantum phase transition and superconductivity induced by pressure in the bismuth tellurohalide BiTeI

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Yanpeng; Shi, Wujun; Naumov, Pavel G.; Kumar, Nitesh; Sankar, Raman; Schnelle, Walter; Shekhar, Chandra; Chou, F. C.; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Medvedev, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    A pressure-induced topological quantum phase transition has been theoretically predicted for the semiconductor BiTeI with giant Rashba spin splitting. In this work, the evolution of the electrical transport properties in BiTeI and BiTeBr is investigated under high pressure. The pressure-dependent resistivity in a wide temperature range passes through a minimum at around 3 GPa, indicating the predicted transition in BiTeI. Superconductivity is observed in both BiTeI and BiTeBr while the resist...

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles for high-sensitivity detection on nucleic acids via superconducting-quantum-interference-device-based immunomagnetic reduction assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S. Y.; Chieh, J. J.; Wang, W. C.; Yu, C. Y.; Hing, N. S.; Horng, H. E.; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, H. C.; Chang, C. F.; Lin, H. Y.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we investigate the feasibility of detecting quantitatively DNA molecules utilizing the technology named after the immunomagnetic reduction (IMR) assay. Magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a phosphate buffer saline solution were bio-functionalized with probing single-strand DNA. A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) ac magnetosusceptometer was employed to detect IMR signals related to the concentration of the target DNA. The results reveal that use of IMR assay had merits such as a high convenience level, e.g. wash-free processes and high sensitivity, down to pM, for DNA detection.

  15. High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device recordings of spontaneous brain activity: Towards high-Tc magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öisjöen, F.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Figueras, G. A.; Chukharkin, M. L.; Kalabukhov, A.; Hedström, A.; Elam, M.; Winkler, D.

    2012-03-01

    We have performed single- and two-channel high transition temperature (high-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of spontaneous brain activity in two healthy human subjects. We demonstrate modulation of two well-known brain rhythms: the occipital alpha rhythm and the mu rhythm found in the motor cortex. We further show that despite higher noise-levels compared to their low-Tc counterparts, high-Tc SQUIDs can be used to detect and record physiologically relevant brain rhythms with comparable signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate the utility of high-Tc technology in MEG recordings of a broader range of brain activity.

  16. Unshielded use of thin-film Nb dc superconducting quantum interference devices and integrated asymmetric gradiometers for nondestructive evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M.E.; Nakane, H.; Cochran, A.; Weston, R.G.; Klein, U.; Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    Novel nondestructive evaluation measurements made using niobium dc superconducting quantum interference devices with integrated asymmetric first-order gradiometers are described. Comparative theoretical and experimental studies of their spatial response have been described, and it is shown that the gradiometric response makes operation possible in an unshielded and electromagnetically noisy environment. As a demonstration of their capabilities, subsurface defects in a multilayer aluminum structure have been located and mapped using induced eddy currents at 70 Hz, with no magnetic shielding around the specimen or cryostat. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 μs. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from 2D in a tunneling methyl group and 14N in NH4ClO4.

  18. Unconventional Geometric Phase-Shift Gates Based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Coupled to a Single-Mode Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ke-Hui; ZHOU Zheng-Wei; GUO Guang-Can

    2006-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize geometric phase-shift gate for two superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits coupled to a single-mode microwave field. The geometric phase-shift gate operation is performed transitions during the gate operation. Thus, the docoherence due to energy spontaneous emission based on the levels of SQUIDs are suppressed. The gate is insensitive to the cavity decay throughout the operation since the cavity mode is displaced along a circle in the phase space, acquiring a phase conditional upon the two lower flux states of the SQUID qubits, and the cavity mode is still in the original vacuum state. Based on the SQUID qubits interacting with the cavity mode, our proposed approach may open promising prospects for quantum logic in SQUID-system.

  19. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  20. Miniature ceramic-anvil high-pressure cell for magnetic measurements in a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateiwa, Naoyuki; Haga, Yoshinori; Fisk, Zachary; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2011-05-01

    A miniature opposed-anvil high-pressure cell has been developed for magnetic measurement in a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. Non-magnetic anvils made of composite ceramic material were used to generate high-pressure with a Cu-Be gasket. We have examined anvils with different culet sizes (1.8, 1.6, 1.4, 1.2, 1.0, 0.8, and 0.6 mm). The pressure generated at low temperature was determined by the pressure dependence of the superconducting transition of lead (Pb). The maximum pressure P(max) depends on the culet size of the anvil: the values of P(max) are 2.4 and 7.6 GPa for 1.8 and 0.6 mm culet anvils, respectively. We revealed that the composite ceramic anvil has potential to generate high-pressure above 5 GPa. The background magnetization of the Cu-Be gasket is generally two orders of magnitude smaller than the Ni-Cr-Al gasket for the indenter cell. The present cell can be used not only with ferromagnetic and superconducting materials with large magnetization but also with antiferromagnetic compounds with smaller magnetization. The production cost of the present pressure cell is about one tenth of that of a diamond anvil cell. The anvil alignment mechanism is not necessary in the present pressure cell because of the strong fracture toughness (6.5 MPa m(1∕2)) of the composite ceramic anvil. The simplified pressure cell is easy-to-use for researchers who are not familiar with high-pressure technology. Representative results on the magnetization of superconducting MgB(2) and antiferromagnet CePd(5)Al(2) are reported.

  1. Multiple gaps in SmFeAsO{sub 0.9}F{sub 0.1} revealed by point-contact spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yonglei; Shan Lei; Fang Lei; Cheng Peng; Ren Cong; Wen Haihu [National Laboratory for Superconductivity, Institute of Physics and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China)], E-mail: lshan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: hhwen@aphy.iphy.ac.cn

    2009-01-15

    We report the observation of two gaps in the superconductor SmFeAsO{sub 0.9}F{sub 0.1} (F-SmFeAsO) with T{sub c} = 51.5 K as measured by point-contact spectroscopy. Both gaps decrease with temperature and vanish at T{sub c}, and the temperature dependence of the gaps is described by the theoretical prediction of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory. A zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) was observed, indicating the presence of sign reversal of the gap function in F-SmFeAsO. Our results strongly suggest an unconventional superconductivity with multiple gaps in F-SmFeAsO.

  2. The energy gap of the compound FeSe0.5Te0.5 determined by specific heat and Point Contact Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Roberto; López-Romero, Rodolfo E.

    2015-10-01

    The superconductor FeSe0.5Te0.5 was studied with Point Contact spectroscopy and specific heat in polycrystalline samples. The transition temperature determined by magnetic measurement was TC=14.5 K. The size of the energy gap measured by junctions is Δ = 1.9 meV, whereas the gap determined by the specific heat measurements was Δ = 2.3 meV. The gap evolution with temperature follows BCS, the ratio 2Δ/KBTC has values between 2.88 ≤ 2 Δ /KBTC ≤ 3.04. The compound was grown by solid state synthesis in quartz ampoules under vacuum at 950 °C. Crystal structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction. The superconducting properties were characterized by magnetization, resistivity and specific heat. This superconductor shows an isotropic energy gap as observed with the fitting of the specific heat at low temperature.

  3. Time-Transient Characteristics of a Point-Contact-Type Peltier Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Toru; Yamaguchi, Shigeo

    We proposed a new type of Peltier device, and succeeded in the fabrication of the device, which we call a point-contact-type sandwich-structure (PCS). A micro-object can be cooled or heated using our fabricated device. The tip was cooled through the Peltier effect, and a tip temperature of -36.3°C was achieved at a current of 28 A. When current was reversed, the tip was heated and the maximum tip temperature was 251.5°C at a current of 20 A. The PCS Peltier device can be useful in medical treatment and bioelectronics.

  4. Reference layer exchange in spin transfer torque experiment using magnetic-coated nanometric point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, R. O.; Baptista, D. L.; Heinemann, M.; Kuhn, M. F.; Schmidt, J. E.; Pereira, L. G.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the importance of using nanotips on a point contact spin-transfer torque (STT) experiment. A systematic analysis comparing the STT in a magnetic thin film in current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) geometry sample for magnetic coated and uncoated tungsten nanotips is shown. The STT effect presents a reverse resistance to current behavior when using a magnetic coating layer on the nanotips. We demonstrate that the magnetic layer on the tip may assume the role of a polarizer layer. This effect opens up the possibility of exploiting simpler architectures in STT-based devices, such as STT-random access memory (STT-RAM).

  5. Observation of the optical analogue of the quantized conductance of a point contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montie, E.A.; Cosman, E.C.; Hooft, G.W. ' t; Mark, M.B. van der; Beenakker, C.W.J. (Philips Research Labs., Eindhoven (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    The light power transmitted by a diffusively illuminated slit of finite thickness is observed to depend stepwise on the slit width. The steps have equal height and a width of one half the wavelength of the monochromatic light used. This novel diffraction phenomenon is the analogue of the quantization of the conductance of a point contact in a two-dimensional electron gas. In contrast to the electronic case, absorption at the walls of the slit plays an important role in determining the shape of the steps, as we show from a model calculation. (orig.).

  6. Strong Coupling Superconductivity in the Vicinity of the Structural Quantum Critical Point in (Ca(x)Sr(1-x))₃Rh₄Sn₁₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wing Chi; Cheung, Yiu Wing; Saines, Paul J; Imai, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Michioka, Chishiro; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Goh, Swee K

    2015-11-13

    The family of the superconducting quasiskutterudites (Ca(x)Sr(1-x))(3)Rh(4)Sn(13) features a structural quantum critical point at x(c)=0.9, around which a dome-shaped variation of the superconducting transition temperature T(c) is found. Using specific heat, we probe the normal and the superconducting states of the entire series straddling the quantum critical point. Our analysis indicates a significant lowering of the effective Debye temperature on approaching x(c), which we interpret as a result of phonon softening accompanying the structural instability. Furthermore, a remarkably large enhancement of 2Δ/k(B)T(c) and ΔC/γT(c) beyond the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer values is found in the vicinity of the structural quantum critical point. The phase diagram of (Ca(x)Sr(1-x))(3)Rh(4)Sn(13) thus provides a model system to study the interplay between structural quantum criticality and strong electron-phonon coupling superconductivity.

  7. Reference layer exchange in spin transfer torque experiment using magnetic-coated nanometric point contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, R.O., E-mail: rafaelotoniel@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 91501-970 (Brazil); Baptista, D.L.; Heinemann, M.; Kuhn, M.F.; Schmidt, J.E.; Pereira, L.G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 91501-970 (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    We investigate the importance of using nanotips on a point contact spin-transfer torque (STT) experiment. A systematic analysis comparing the STT in a magnetic thin film in current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) geometry sample for magnetic coated and uncoated tungsten nanotips is shown. The STT effect presents a reverse resistance to current behavior when using a magnetic coating layer on the nanotips. We demonstrate that the magnetic layer on the tip may assume the role of a polarizer layer. This effect opens up the possibility of exploiting simpler architectures in STT-based devices, such as STT-random access memory (STT-RAM). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the spin-transfer torque (STT) effect using point contacts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tungsten nanotips were fabricated by electrochemical process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of the use of magnetic coating tips on STT effect was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed that the magnetic layer on the tip may assume the role of a polarizer layer.

  8. Point contacts at the copper-indium-gallium-selenide interface—A theoretical outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercegol, Adrien; Chacko, Binoy; Klenk, Reiner; Lauermann, Iver; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Liero, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that recombination in the space-charge region of copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) is dominant, at least in high efficiency solar cells with low band gap. The recent developments like potassium fluoride post deposition treatment and point-contact junction may call this into question. In this work, a theoretical outlook is made using three-dimensional simulations to investigate the effect of point-contact openings through a passivation layer on CIGS solar cell performance. A large set of solar cells is modeled under different scenarios for the charged defect levels and density, radius of the openings, interface quality, and conduction band offset. The positive surface charge created by the passivation layer induces band bending and this influences the contact (CdS) properties, making it beneficial for the open circuit voltage and efficiency, and the effect is even more pronounced when coverage area is more than 95%, and also makes a positive impact on the device performance, even in the presence of a spike at CIGS/CdS heterojunction.

  9. Quantum Bayesian rule for weak measurements of qubits in superconducting circuit QED

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Peiyue; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Compared with the quantum trajectory equation, the quantum Bayesian approach has the advantage of being more efficient to infer quantum state under monitoring, based on the integrated output of measurement. For weak measurement of qubits in circuit quantum electrodynamics(cQED), properly accounting for the measurement backaction effects within the Bayesian framework is an important problem of current interest.Elegant work towards this task was carried out by Korotkov in "bad-cavity" and weak-...

  10. Circuit design for multi-body interactions in superconducting quantum annealing systems with applications to a scalable architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancellor, N.; Zohren, S.; Warburton, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    Quantum annealing provides a way of solving optimization problems by encoding them as Ising spin models which are implemented using physical qubits. The solution of the optimization problem then corresponds to the ground state of the system. Quantum tunneling is harnessed to enable the system to move to the ground state in a potentially high non-convex energy landscape. A major difficulty in encoding optimization problems in physical quantum annealing devices is the fact that many real world optimization problems require interactions of higher connectivity, as well as multi-body terms beyond the limitations of the physical hardware. In this work we address the question of how to implement multi-body interactions using hardware which natively only provides two-body interactions. The main result is an efficient circuit design of such multi-body terms using superconducting flux qubits in which effective N-body interactions are implemented using N ancilla qubits and only two inductive couplers. It is then shown how this circuit can be used as the unit cell of a scalable architecture by applying it to a recently proposed embedding technique for constructing an architecture of logical qubits with arbitrary connectivity using physical qubits which have nearest-neighbor four-body interactions. It is further shown that this design is robust to non-linear effects in the coupling loops, as well as mismatches in some of the circuit parameters.

  11. Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) thin film dc SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference device)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racah, Daniel

    1991-03-01

    Direct current superconducting quantum interferometers (SQUIDs) based on HTSC thin films have been measured and characterized. The thin films used were of different quality: (1) Granular films on Sapphire substrates, prepared either by e-gun evaporation, by laser ablation or by MOCVD (metal oxide chemical vapor deposition), (2) Epitaxial films on MgO substrates. Modulations of the voltage on the SQUIDs as a function of the applied flux have been observed in a wide range of temperatures. The nature of the modulation was found to be strongly dependent on the morphology of the film and on its critical current. The SQUIDs based on granular films were relatively noisy, hysteretic and with a complicated V-phi shape. Those devices based on low quality (lowIc) granular films could be measured only at low temperatures (much lower than 77 K). While those of higher quality (granular films with high Ic) could be measured near to the superconductive transition. The SQUID based on high quality epitaxial film was measured near Tc and showed an anomalous, time dependent behavior.

  12. GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure point-contact concentrator cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, R. P.; Zavracky, P. M.; Mcclelland, R. W.; Fan, John C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Point-contact cells fabricated in silicon have recently achieved very high efficiencies. Applying this structure to GaAs is difficult as it requires both surface passivation of the GaAs and a film of GaAs with thickness less than 10 microns. The authors propose to overcome these difficulties by (1) using AlGaAs layers grown by OMCVD to act as front- and back-surface fields in order to confine the photogenerated minority carriers away from the surfaces, and (2) using the CLEFT technology to produce thin, separated films of this structure. It has been found that much of the necessary technologies have been developed and that the primary problem remaining to be solved is localized junction formation.

  13. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    show that this type of conduction is measurable using new types of experimental probes, such as the multi-tip scanning tunnelling microscope and the micro-four-point probe. The resulting electronic transport properties are intriguing, and suggest that semiconductor surfaces should be considered......The electrical properties of semiconductor surfaces have played a decisive role in one of the most important discoveries of the last century, transistors. In the 1940s, the concept of surface states-new electron energy levels characteristic of the surface atoms-was instrumental in the fabrication...... of the first point-contact transistors, and led to the successful fabrication of field-effect transistors. However, to this day, one property of semiconductor surface states remains poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. That is the conduction of electrons or holes directly through...

  14. Dynamic Carrying Capacity Analysis of Double-Row Four-Point Contact Ball Slewing Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrying capacity is the most important performance index for slewing bearings. Maximizing the carrying capacity of slewing bearing is one pursuing goal for the bearing designer; this is usually realized by optimizing the design parameters. A method of analyzing the carrying capacity of double-row four-point contact ball slewing bearing by using dynamic carrying capacity surfaces was proposed in this paper. Based on the dynamic load carrying capacity surface of the slewing bearing, the effect of changes of the bearing design parameters, such as axial clearance, raceway groove radius coefficient, and contact angle, on the dynamic carrying capacity of the slewing bearing was researched; the trend and the degree of the effect of the micro changes of the bearing design parameters on the dynamic load carrying capacity of the bearing were discussed, and the results provide the basis for optimizing the design parameter of this type of slewing bearing.

  15. High critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer with feedforward active noise control system for magnetocardiographic measurement in unshielded circumstances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizukami, A.; Nishiura, H.; Sakuta, K.; Kobayashi, T

    2003-10-15

    Magnetocardiographic (MCG) measurement in unshielded environment for practical use requires to suppress the environmental magnetic noise. We have designed the high critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device (High-T{sub c} SQUID) magnetometer with feedforward active noise control (ANC) system to suppress the environmental magnetic noise. The compensatory system consisted of two SQUID magnetometers, a digital signal processor (DSP) and the coil wound around the input magnetometer. The DSP calculated the output data to minimize the environmental noise from the input and reference date and then the coil generated the magnetic field to cancel the environmental noise. This method achieved the effective noise attenuation below 100 Hz about 40 dB. MCG measurement in unshielded environment was also performed.

  16. High-efficiency WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors for quantum state engineering in the near infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Jeannic, H Le; Cavaillès, A; Marsili, F; Shaw, M D; Huang, K; Morin, O; Nam, S W; Laurat, J

    2016-01-01

    We report on high-efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors based on amorphous WSi and optimized at 1064 nm. At an operating temperature of 1.8 K, we demonstrated a 93% system detection efficiency at this wavelength with a dark noise of a few counts per second. Combined with cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion, this fiber-coupled detector enabled us to generate narrowband single photons with a heralding efficiency greater than 90% and a high spectral brightness of $0.6\\times10^4$ photons/(s$\\cdot$mW$\\cdot$MHz). Beyond single-photon generation at large rate, such high-efficiency detectors open the path to efficient multiple-photon heralding and complex quantum state engineering.

  17. Scheme for realizing quantum computation and quantum information transfer with superconducting qubits coupling to a 1D transmission line resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Zhen-Gang; Chen Xiong-Wen; Zhu Xi-Xiang; Song Ke-Hui

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple scheme for realizing one-qubit and two-qubit quantum gates as well as multiqubit entanglement based on dc-SQUID charge qubits through the control of their coupling to a ID transmission line resonator (TLR). The TLR behaves effectively as a quantum data-bus mode of a harmonic oscillator, which has several practical advantages including strong coupling strength, reproducibility, immunity to 1// noise, and suppressed spontaneous emission. In this protocol, the data-bus does not need to stay adiabatically in its ground state, which results in not only fast quantum operation, but also high-fidelity quantum information processing. Also, it elaborates the transfer process with the 1D transmission line.

  18. Play building blocks on population distribution of multilevel superconducting flux qubit with quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Xueda; Yu, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments on Landau-Zener interference in multilevel superconducting flux qubits revealed various interesting characteristics, which have been studied theoretically in our recent work by simply using rate equation method [PRB 79, 094529, (2009)]. In this note we extend this method to the same system but with larger driving amplitude and higher driving frequency. The results show various anomalous characteristics, some of which have been observed in a recent work.

  19. Quantum transport in bilayer graphene. Fabry-Perot interferences and proximity-induced superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Renjun

    2015-10-30

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) p-n junctions made of hBN-BLG-hBN (hexagonal boron nitride) heterostructures enable ballistic transport over long distances. We investigate Fabry-Perot interferences, and detect that the bilayer-like anti-Klein tunneling transits into single-layer-like Klein tunneling when tuning the Fermi level towards the band edges. Furthermore, the proximity-induced superconductivity has been studied in these devices with Al leads.

  20. Adiabatic passage for one-step generation of n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of superconducting qubits via quantum Zeno dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Song, Chong; Xu, Jing; Yu, Lin; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2016-09-01

    An efficient scheme is proposed for generating n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of n superconducting qubits separated by (n-1) coplanar waveguide resonators capacitively via adiabatic passage with the help of quantum Zeno dynamics in one step. In the scheme, it is not necessary to precisely control the time of the whole operation and the Rabi frequencies of classical fields because of the introduction of adiabatic passage. The numerical simulations for three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state show that the scheme is insensitive to the dissipation of the resonators and the energy relaxation of the superconducting qubits. The three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state can be deterministically generated with comparatively high fidelity in the current experimental conditions, though the scheme is somewhat sensitive to the dephasing of superconducting qubits.

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  2. Holonomic quantum computation with superconducting charge-phase qubits in a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Zhibo [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China) and Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)], E-mail: zbfeng010@163.com; Zhang Xinding [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2008-03-03

    We theoretically propose a feasible scheme to realize holonomic quantum computation with charge-phase qubits placed in a microwave cavity. By appropriately adjusting the controllable parameters, each charge-phase qubit is set as an effective four-level subsystem, based on which a universal set of holonomic quantum gates can be realized. Further analysis shows that our system is robust to the first-order fluctuation of the gate charges, and the intrinsic leakages between energy levels can be ignored.

  3. Developments in nano-oscillators based upon spin-transfer point-contact devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T. J.; Rippard, W. H.

    We review the current status of research on microwave nano-oscillators that utilize spin transfer devices with point-contact geometry, with an emphasis on the open questions that still prevent our full understanding of device properties. In particular, we examine those aspects that might affect irreproducibility of device performance. While there is a clear picture of the general principles that underlie the properties of the spin torque nano-oscillator, there are a number of details complicating the picture. We suggest that these details are potentially responsible for adversely affecting uniformity of performance from device to device. These details include (1) nonlinearities, (2) the Oersted field, (3) thermal and deterministic noise sources, and (4) non-uniformity of the spin accumulation. We suggest what role that these details might have in determining spin torque dynamics, and suggest particular avenues of investigation that might clarify whether or not these details are indeed responsible for device variability. This article is one of a series devoted to the subject of spin torque in this issue of the Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials.

  4. Quantum Criticality and Superconductivity in SmFe1-xCoxAsO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, H.; Yun, Y.; Shumsun, N.; Savinkov, A.; Suzuki, H.; Li, Y. K.; Tao, Q.; Cao, G. H.; Xu, Z. A.

    2012-12-01

    One of the iron pnictide superconductors, SmFe1-xCoxAsO shows a domelike TC curve against Co concentration x. The parent compound SmFeAsO shows the crystal structure transition and antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) ordering. With increasing x, the structural transition temperature TD and SDW ordering temperature TN decrease and reach 0 K at the critical concentration xC. It is not so clear that the critical concentrations for TD and for TN coincident to each other or not. In our present report, we investigated the structural transition by the low temperature x-ray diffraction and the SDW ordering and the superconducting transition by measuring the magnetization using the SQUID magnetometer, MPMS We determined the phase diagram of TD, TN and the superconductive transition temperature TC against the Co concentration x near the xC precisely. We found that the maximum of TC in domelike shape locates near the xC, suggesting the QCP.

  5. Quantum Bayesian rule for weak measurements of qubits in superconducting circuit QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peiyue; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2014-12-01

    Compared with the quantum trajectory equation (QTE), the quantum Bayesian approach has the advantage of being more efficient to infer a quantum state under monitoring, based on the integrated output of measurements. For weak measurement of qubits in circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED), properly accounting for the measurement backaction effects within the Bayesian framework is an important problem of current interest. Elegant work towards this task was carried out by Korotkov in ‘bad-cavity’ and weak-response limits (Korotkov 2011 Quantum Bayesian approach to circuit QED measurement (arXiv:1111.4016)). In the present work, based on insights from the cavity-field states (dynamics) and the help of an effective QTE, we generalize the results of Korotkov to more general system parameters. The obtained Bayesian rule is in full agreement with Korotkov's result in limiting cases and as well holds satisfactory accuracy in non-limiting cases in comparison with the QTE simulations. We expect the proposed Bayesian rule to be useful for future cQED measurement and control experiments.

  6. Quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping of electron spins in superconducting hybrid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bubanja, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.bubanja@callaghaninnovation.govt.nz

    2015-06-15

    We present schemes for quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping of electronic spin states in hybrid superconductor–normal-metal systems. The proposed schemes employ subgap transport whereby the lowest order processes involve Cooper pair-electron and double Cooper-pair cotunneling in quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping protocols, respectively. The competition between elastic cotunneling and Cooper-pair splitting results in the success probability of 25% in both cases. Described implementations of these protocols are within reach of present-day experimental techniques.

  7. The biomechanics of point contact-dynamic compression plate and its effects on bone perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yu-feng; LI Qi-hong; GU Zu-chao; WANG Ai-min

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare the mechanical properties of point contact-dynamic compression plate (PC-DCP) and its effects on cortical bone perfusion with that of dynamic compression plates (DCP) in goat tibiae.Methods: Twenty pairs of matched fresh goat tibiae were used. A transverse fracture model was established.The fractures with a 3mm interspace between the fracture ends were subject to fixations with the DCPs and the PCDCPs respectively, then the four-points bending tests and the torsion tests were conducted to compare the mechanical properties of the PC-DCP with that of DCP. Another 13sexually mature goats underwent fixations with the DCPs and the PC-DCPs, respectively, at the mid-shafts of the intact bilateral tibiae. Ischemic zones were observed at four time points (1 day, 2, 6, and 12 weeks after operation)using disulphine blue staining technique.Results: There were no significant differences in mechanical properties, such as bend- and torsionresistance, between the DCPs and the PC-DCPs. One day,2, and 6 weeks after operation, on the side of DCP fixation, outer cortical bone iscbemia under the plate persisted, and this condition did not reverse until 12 weeks after operation. However, on the side of PC-DCP fixation,cortical bone ischemia occurred only in the periphery of the screw holes and at the contact sites of the PC NUTs 1 day after operation, and it disappeared at 2 weeks after operation.Conclusions: The PC-DCP has similar biomechanical properties of the DCP, but is less detrimental to local bone blood circulation than the conventional plates.

  8. Multi-photon dressing of an anharmonic superconducting many-level quantum circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braumueller, Jochen; Cramer, Joel; Schloer, Steffen; Rotzinger, Hannes; Radtke, Lucas; Lukashenko, Alexander; Yang, Ping; Skacel, Sebastian; Probst, Sebastian; Weides, Martin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Physikalisches Institut, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Marthaler, Michael; Guo, Lingzhen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ustinov, Alexey V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Physikalisches Institut, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    We report on the investigation of a superconducting anharmonic multi-level circuit that is coupled to a harmonic readout resonator. We observe multi-photon transitions via virtual energy levels of our system up to the fifth excited state. The back-action of these higher-order excitations on our readout device is analyzed quantitatively and demonstrated to be in accordance with theoretical expectation. By applying a strong microwave drive we achieve multi-photon dressing of our system which is dynamically coupled by a weak probe tone. The emerging higher-order Rabi sidebands and associated Autler-Townes splittings involving up to five levels of the investigated anharmonic circuit are observed. Experimental results are in good agreement with master equation simulations.

  9. Epitaxial Al2O3 capacitors for low microwave loss superconducting quantum circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Cho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized the microwave loss of high-Q parallel plate capacitors fabricated from thin-film Al/Al2O3/Re heterostructures on (0001 Al2O3 substrates. The superconductor-insulator-superconductor trilayers were grown in situ in a hybrid deposition system: the epitaxial Re base and polycrystalline Al counterelectrode layers were grown by sputtering, while the epitaxial Al2O3 layer was grown by pulsed laser deposition. Structural analysis indicates a highly crystalline epitaxial Al2O3 layer and sharp interfaces. The measured intrinsic (low-power, low-temperature quality factor of the resonators is as high as 3 × 104. These results indicate that low-loss grown Al2O3 is an attractive candidate dielectric for high-fidelity superconducting qubit circuits.

  10. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  11. Magnetic measurements at pressures above 10 GPa in a miniature ceramic anvil cell for a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateiwa, Naoyuki; Haga, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Tatsuma D; Fisk, Zachary

    2012-05-01

    A miniature ceramic anvil high pressure cell (mCAC) was earlier designed by us for magnetic measurements at pressures up to 7.6 GPa in a commercial superconducting quantum interference magnetometer [N. Tateiwa et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 053906 (2011)]. Here, we describe methods to generate pressures above 10 GPa in the mCAC. The efficiency of the pressure generation is sharply improved when the Cu-Be gasket is sufficiently preindented. The maximum pressure for the 0.6 mm culet anvils is 12.6 GPa when the Cu-Be gasket is preindented from the initial thickness of 300-60 μm. The 0.5 mm culet anvils were also tested with a rhenium gasket. The maximum pressure attainable in the mCAC is about 13 GPa. The present cell was used to study YbCu(2)Si(2) which shows a pressure induced transition from the non-magnetic to magnetic phases at 8 GPa. We confirm a ferromagnetic transition from the dc magnetization measurement at high pressure. The mCAC can detect the ferromagnetic ordered state whose spontaneous magnetic moment is smaller than 1 μ(B) per unit cell. The high sensitivity for magnetic measurements in the mCAC may result from the simplicity of cell structure. The present study shows the availability of the mCAC for precise magnetic measurements at pressures above 10 GPa.

  12. Full counting statistics of phonon-assisted Andreev tunneling through a quantum dot coupled to normal and superconducting leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bing; Ding, G. H.; Lei, X. L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation for the full counting statistics of the Andreev tunneling through a quantum dot (QD) embedded between superconducting (SC) and normal leads in the presence of a strong on-site electron-phonon interaction using nonequilibrium Green function method. For this purpose, we generalize the dressed tunneling approximation (DTA) recently developed in dealing with inelastic tunneling in a normal QD system to the Andreev transport issue. This method takes account of vibrational effect in evaluation of electronic tunneling self energy in comparison with other simple approaches and meanwhile allows us to derive an explicit analytical formula for the cumulant generating function at the subgap region. We then analyze the interplay of polaronic and SC proximity effects on the Andreev reflection spectrum, current-voltage characteristics, and current fluctuations of the hybrid system. Our main findings include: (1) no phonon side peaks in the linear Andreev conductance; (2) a negative differential conductance stemming from the suppressed Andreev reflection spectrum; (3) a novel inelastic resonant peak in the differential conductance due to phonon assisted Andreev reflection; (4) enhancement or suppression of shot noise for the symmetric or asymmetric tunnel-coupling system, respectively.

  13. A High-Performance Nb Nano-Superconducting Quantum Interference Device with a Three-Dimensional Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Long; Wang, Zhen

    2016-12-14

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) miniaturized into the nanoscale is promising in the inductive detection of a single electron spin. A nano-SQUID with a strong spin coupling coefficient, a low flux noise, and a wide working magnetic field range is highly desired in a single spin resonance measurement. Nano-SQUIDs with Dayem bridge junctions excel in a high working field range and in the direct coupling from spins to the bridge. However, the common planar structure of nano-SQUIDs is known for problems such as a shallow flux modulation depth and a troublesome hysteresis in current-voltage curves. Here, we developed a fabrication process for creating three-dimensional (3-D) niobium (Nb) nano-SQUIDs with nanobridge junctions that can be tuned independently. Characterization of the device shows up to 45.9% modulation depth with a reversible current-voltage curve. Owning to the large modulation depth, the measured flux noise is as low as 0.34 μΦ0/Hz(1/2). The working field range of the SQUID is greater than 0.5 T parallel to the SQUID plane. We believe that 3-D Nb nano-SQUIDs provide a promising step toward effective single-spin inductive detection.

  14. Advances in quantum control of three-level superconducting circuit architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falci, G.; Paladino, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); CNR-IMM UOS Universita (MATIS), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Di Stefano, P.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast(United Kingdom); Ridolfo, A.; D' Arrigo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); Paraoanu, G.S. [Low Temperature Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science (Finland)

    2017-06-15

    Advanced control in Lambda (Λ) scheme of a solid state architecture of artificial atoms and quantized modes would allow the translation to the solid-state realm of a whole class of phenomena from quantum optics, thus exploiting new physics emerging in larger integrated quantum networks and for stronger couplings. However control solid-state devices has constraints coming from selection rules, due to symmetries which on the other hand yield protection from decoherence, and from design issues, for instance that coupling to microwave cavities is not directly switchable. We present two new schemes for the Λ-STIRAP control problem with the constraint of one or two classical driving fields being always-on. We show how these protocols are converted to apply to circuit-QED architectures. We finally illustrate an application to coherent spectroscopy of the so called ultrastrong atom-cavity coupling regime. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Magnetoresistance oscillations and the half-flux-quantum state in doubly-connected superconducting cylinders of Sr2RuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xinxin

    Sr2RuO4, the only layered perovskite known to become superconducting without the presence of Cu, was predicted to be an odd-parity, spin-triplet superconductor shortly after its superconductivity was discovered in 1994. Sr2RuO4 was found to feature exotic vortex physics including half-flux quanta trapped in doubly connected samples and the formation of vortex lattices at low fields. In this dissertation, I present low-temperature magnetoresistance oscillation measurements on micronsized, doubly connected cylinders of Sr2RuO4 to explore the free energy modulation of the half-flux quantum state, inspired by the Little-Parks experiment, following a similar path taken in the original experiments for the establishment of fluoxid quantization. We fabricated transport devices of micron-sized superconducting cylinders of Sr2RuO4 on mechanically exfoliated single crystals. We carried out magnetoresistance oscillation measurements over a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields for various samples. Magnetoresistance oscillations with an unexpected large amplitude were observed, suggesting a vortex-crossing origin of the magnetoresistance oscillations rather than a conventional Little-Parks effect. In thin-wall cylinders of Sr2RuO4, a large number of pronounced quantum oscillations with a conventional period of the full-flux-quantum were found. For cylinders with a thick wall, two distinct periods of oscillations were found in high- and low-field regimes, respectively, providing insight into the unconventional vortex physics in Sr2RuO4. No evidence for half-flux-quantum resistance oscillations were identified in any sample measured without the presence of an in-plane field. We demonstrated the tunability of the free energy of the superconducting Sr2RuO4 cylinders using various parameters, including an in-plane magnetic field, the measurement current, and structural factors. Distinct dips on magnetoresistance peaks were found, which we argue to be related to the

  16. Development of a NbN Deposition Process for Superconducting Quantum Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Glowacka, D M; Withington, S; Muhammad, H; Yassin, G; Tan, B K

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed programme to explore the superconducting characteristics of reactive DC-magnetron sputtered NbN. The basic principle is to ignite a plasma using argon, and then to introduce a small additional nitrogen flow to achieve the nitridation of a Nb target. Subsequent sputtering leads to the deposition of NbN onto the host substrate. The characteristics of a sputtered film depend on a number of parameters: argon pressure, nitrogen flow rate and time-evolution profile, substrate material, etc. Crucially, the hysteresis in the target voltage as a function of the nitrogen flow can be used to provide a highly effective monitor of nitrogen consumption during the reactive process. By studying these dependencies we have been able to achieve highly reproducible film characteristics on sapphire, silicon dioxide on silicon, and silicon nitride on silicon. Intrinsic film stress was minimised by optimising the argon pressure, giving NbN films having Tc = 14.65 K. In the paper, we report characteris...

  17. Development of a NbN Deposition Process for Superconducting Quantum Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Glowacka, D M; Withington, S; Muhammad, H; Yassin, G

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed programme to explore the superconducting characteristics of reactive DC-magnetron sputtered NbN. The basic principle is to ignite a plasma using argon, and then to introduce a small additional nitrogen flow to achieve the nitridation of a Nb target. Subsequent sputtering leads to the deposition of NbN onto the host substrate. The characteristics of a sputtered film depend on a number of parameters: argon pressure, nitrogen flow rate and time-evolution profile, substrate material, etc. Crucially, the hysteresis in the target voltage as a function of the nitrogen flow can be used to provide a highly effective monitor of nitrogen consumption during the reactive process. By studying these dependencies we have been able to achieve highly reproducible film characteristics on sapphire, silicon dioxide on silicon, and silicon nitride on silicon. Intrinsic film stress was minimised by optimising the argon pressure, giving NbN films having Tc = 14.65 K. In the paper, we report characteris...

  18. Quantum-critical fluctuations in 2D metals: strange metals and superconductivity in antiferromagnets and in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Chandra M.

    2016-08-01

    The anomalous transport and thermodynamic properties in the quantum-critical region, in the cuprates, and in the quasi-two dimensional Fe-based superconductors and heavy-fermion compounds, have the same temperature dependences. This can occur only if, despite their vast microscopic differences, a common statistical mechanical model describes their phase transitions. The antiferromagnetic (AFM)-ic models for the latter two, just as the loop-current model for the cuprates, map to the dissipative XY model. The solution of this model in (2+1)D reveals that the critical fluctuations are determined by topological excitations, vortices and a variety of instantons, and not by renormalized spin-wave theories of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson type, adapted by Moriya, Hertz and others for quantum-criticality. The absorptive part of the fluctuations is a separable function of momentum \\mathbf{q} , measured from the ordering vector, and of the frequency ω and the temperature T which scale as \\tanh (ω /2T) at criticality. Direct measurements of the fluctuations by neutron scattering in the quasi-two-dimensional heavy fermion and Fe-based compounds, near their antiferromagnetic quantum critical point, are consistent with this form. Such fluctuations, together with the vertex coupling them to fermions, lead to a marginal fermi-liquid, with the imaginary part of the self-energy \\propto \\text{max}(ω,T) for all momenta, a resistivity \\propto T , a T\\ln T contribution to the specific heat, and other singular fermi-liquid properties common to these diverse compounds, as well as to d-wave superconductivity. This is explicitly verified, in the cuprates, by analysis of the pairing and the normal self-energy directly extracted from the recent high resolution angle resolved photoemission measurements. This reveals, in agreement with the theory, that the frequency dependence of the attractive irreducible particle-particle vertex in the d-wave channel is the same as the irreducible

  19. Reentrant Superconductivity Driven by Quantum Tricritical Fluctuations in URhGe: Evidence from Co 59 NMR in URh0.9Co0.1Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Y.; Aoki, D.; Mayaffre, H.; Krämer, S.; Julien, M.-H.; Berthier, C.; Horvatić, M.; Sakai, H.; Kambe, S.; Araki, S.

    2015-05-01

    Our measurements of the Co 59 NMR spin-spin relaxation in URh0.9Co0.1Ge reveal a divergence of electronic spin fluctuations in the vicinity of the field-induced quantum critical point at HR≈13 T , around which reentrant superconductivity (RSC) occurs in the ferromagnetic heavy fermion compound URhGe. We map out the strength of spin fluctuations in the (Hb,Hc ) plane of magnetic field components and show that critical fluctuations develop in the same limited region near the field HR as that where RSC is observed. This strongly suggests these quantum fluctuations as the pairing glue responsible for the RSC. The fluctuations observed are characteristic of a tricritical point, followed by a phase bifurcation toward quantum critical end points.

  20. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  1. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  2. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  3. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  4. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Clarke, John

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect 27Al NQR signals in ruby (Al2O3[Cr3+]) at 359 and 714 kHz.

  5. Inter-band phase fluctuations in macroscopic quantum tunneling of multi-gap superconducting Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Hidehiro, E-mail: hd-asai@aist.go.jp [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute (ESPRIT), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ota, Yukihiro [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8587 (Japan); Kawabata, Shiro [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute (ESPRIT), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nori, Franco [CEMS, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We study MQT in Josephson junctions composed of multi-gap superconductors. • We derive a formula of the MQT escape rate for multiple phase differences. • We investigate the effect of inter-band phase fluctuation on MQT. • The MQT escape rate is significantly enhanced by the inter-band phase fluctuation. - Abstract: We theoretically investigate macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in a hetero Josephson junction formed by a conventional single-gap superconductor and a multi-gap superconductor. In such Josephson junctions, phase differences for each tunneling channel are defined, and the fluctuation of the relative phase differences appear which is referred to as Josephson–Leggett’s mode. We take into account the effect of the fluctuation in the tunneling process and calculate the MQT escape rate for various junction parameters. We show that the fluctuation of relative phase differences drastically enhances the escape rate.

  6. Quantum criticality of D-wave quasiparticles and superconducting phase fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar; Tesanović, Zlatko

    2003-12-05

    We present finite temperature (T) extension of the (2+1)-dimensional QED (QED3) theory of under-doped cuprates. The theory describes nodal quasiparticles whose interactions with quantum proliferated hc/2e vortex-antivortex pairs are represented by an emergent U(1) gauge field. Finite T introduces a scale beyond which the spatial fluctuations of vorticity are suppressed. As a result, the spin susceptibility of the pseudogap state is bounded by T2 at low T and crosses over to approximately T at higher T, while the low-T specific heat scales as T2, reflecting the thermodynamics of QED3. The Wilson ratio vanishes as T-->0; the pseudogap state is a "thermal (semi)metal" but a "spin-charge dielectric." This non-Fermi liquid behavior originates from two general principles: spin correlations induced by "gauge" interactions of quasiparticles and fluctuating vortices and the "relativistic" scaling of the T=0 fixed point.

  7. Search for Pauli exclusion principle violating atomic transitions and electron decay with a p-type point contact germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P. -H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Dunagan, C.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Finnerty, P. S.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Massarczyk, R.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O’Shaughnessy, C.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2016-11-11

    A search for Pauli-exclusion-principle-violating K electron transitions was performed using 89.5 kg-d of data collected with a p-type point contact high-purity germanium detector operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. A lower limit on the transition lifetime of s at 90% C.L. was set by looking for a peak at 10.6 keV resulting from the X-ray and Auger electrons present following the transition. A similar analysis was done to look for the decay of atomic K-shell electrons into neutrinos, resulting in a lower limit of s at 90% C.L. It is estimated that the Majorana Demonstrator, a 44 kg array of p-type point contact detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of Ge, could improve upon these exclusion limits by an order of magnitude after three years of operation.

  8. Three-dimensional numerical analysis of hybrid heterojunction silicon wafer solar cells with heterojunction rear point contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Peng Ling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a three-dimensional numerical analysis of homojunction/heterojunction hybrid silicon wafer solar cells, featuring front-side full-area diffused homojunction contacts and rear-side heterojunction point contacts. Their device performance is compared with conventional full-area heterojunction solar cells as well as conventional diffused solar cells featuring locally diffused rear point contacts, for both front-emitter and rear-emitter configurations. A consistent set of simulation input parameters is obtained by calibrating the simulation program with intensity dependent lifetime measurements of the passivated regions and the contact regions of the various types of solar cells. We show that the best efficiency is obtained when a-Si:H is used for rear-side heterojunction point-contact formation. An optimization of the rear contact area fraction is required to balance between the gains in current and voltage and the loss in fill factor with shrinking rear contact area fraction. However, the corresponding optimal range for the rear-contact area fraction is found to be quite large (e.g. 20-60 % for hybrid front-emitter cells. Hybrid rear-emitter cells show a faster drop in the fill factor with decreasing rear contact area fraction compared to front-emitter cells, stemming from a higher series resistance contribution of the rear-side a-Si:H(p+ emitter compared to the rear-side a-Si:H(n+ back surface field layer. Overall, we show that hybrid silicon solar cells in a front-emitter configuration can outperform conventional heterojunction silicon solar cells as well as diffused solar cells with rear-side locally diffused point contacts.

  9. An engineering time-domain model for curve squeal: Tangential point-contact model and Green's functions approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenzerovic, I.; Kropp, W.; Pieringer, A.

    2016-08-01

    Curve squeal is a strong tonal sound that may arise when a railway vehicle negotiates a tight curve. In contrast to frequency-domain models, time-domain models are able to capture the nonlinear and transient nature of curve squeal. However, these models are computationally expensive due to requirements for fine spatial and time discretization. In this paper, a computationally efficient engineering model for curve squeal in the time-domain is proposed. It is based on a steady-state point-contact model for the tangential wheel/rail contact and a Green's functions approach for wheel and rail dynamics. The squeal model also includes a simple model of sound radiation from the railway wheel from the literature. A validation of the tangential point-contact model against Kalker's transient variational contact model reveals that the point-contact model performs well within the squeal model up to at least 5 kHz. The proposed squeal model is applied to investigate the influence of lateral creepage, friction and wheel/rail contact position on squeal occurrence and amplitude. The study indicates a significant influence of the wheel/rail contact position on squeal frequencies and amplitudes. Friction and lateral creepage show an influence on squeal occurrence and amplitudes, but this is only secondary to the influence of the contact position.

  10. Animal magnetocardiography using superconducting quantum interference device gradiometers assisted with magnetic nanoparticle injection: A sensitive method for early detecting electromagnetic changes induced by hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. C.; Hong, B. F.; Wu, B. H.; Yang, S. Y.; Horng, H. E.; Yang, H. C.; Tseng, W. Y. Isaac; Tseng, W. K.; Liu, Y. B.; Lin, L. C.; Lu, L. S.; Lee, Y. H.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the authors used a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetocardiography (MCG) system consisted of 64-channel low-transition-temperature SQUID gradiometers to detect the MCG signals of hepercholesterolemic rabbits. In addition, the MCG signals were recorded before and after the injection of magnetic nanoparticles into the rabbits' ear veins to investigate the effects of magnetic nanoparticles on the MCG signals. These MCG data were compared to those of normal rabbits to reveal the feasibility for early detection of the electromagnetic changes induced by hypercholesterolemia using MCG with the assistance of magnetic nanoparticle injection.

  11. Preparation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled states with multiple superconducting quantum-interference device qubits or atoms in cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chui-Ping; Han, Siyuan

    2004-12-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states of multiple superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) qubits by the use of a microwave cavity. The scheme operates essentially by creating a single photon through an auxiliary SQUID built in the cavity and performing a joint multiqubit phase shift with assistance of the cavity photon. It is shown that entanglement can be generated using this method, deterministic and independent of the number of SQUID qubits. In addition, we show that the present method can be applied to preparing many atoms in a GHZ entangled state, with tolerance to energy relaxation during the operation.

  12. Realization of the Greenberg-Horne (ghz) State and Swap Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices in a Cavity via Adiabatic Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, An-Shou; Cheng, Yong-Jin; Liu, Ji-Bing; Li, Tie-Ping

    We propose an alternative scheme to prepare the Greenberg-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state and realize a SWAP gate by using Superconducting Quantum-interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to a cavity. The present scheme, based on the adiabatic evolution of dark state, constitutes a decoherence-free method in the sense that spontaneous emission and cavity damping are avoided. Besides, the standard GHZ state can be directly obtained without measurement or any auxiliary SQUIDs and the construction of the SWAP gate does not require a composition of elementary gates from a universal set. Thus the procedure is simplified and decoherence is greatly suppressed.

  13. Solving a quantum chemistry equations and high-temperature superconductivity problems

    CERN Document Server

    Liverts, E Z

    2000-01-01

    The conventional technique for solving the equation of quantum chemistry (of solids) is unusually extended to the structures possessing certain symmetries. The extension proposed gives a chance to find unoccupied electronic states located lower than the Fermi level of the ground state of a specific system. Such states can be treated as 'spectral holes'. Application of this technique, in particular, when calculating the electronic structure of the HTSC-compound YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (0<= delta<=1) results in the following. For all versions of the examined charge distributions over a crystal lattice, spectral holes of high spatial localization are found. The 'spatial spectral holes' are mainly located at the p sub y -orbitals of the apex oxygens. These orbitals overlap and form linear chains which are parallel too but do not coincide with the known Cu(1)-O chains which disappear when delta is close tio 1. One can suppose that these linear chains of the overlapping hole states from a su...

  14. Nonstationary Superconductivity: Quantum Dissipation and Time-Dependent Ginzburg-Landau Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly A. Barybin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport equations of the macroscopic superfluid dynamics are revised on the basis of a combination of the conventional (stationary Ginzburg-Landau equation and Schrödinger's equation for the macroscopic wave function (often called the order parameter by using the well-known Madelung-Feynman approach to representation of the quantum-mechanical equations in hydrodynamic form. Such an approach has given (a three different contributions to the resulting chemical potential for the superfluid component, (b a general hydrodynamic equation of superfluid motion, (c the continuity equation for superfluid flow with a relaxation term involving the phenomenological parameters GL and GL, (d a new version of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation for the modulus of the order parameter which takes into account dissipation effects and reflects the charge conservation property for the superfluid component. The conventional Ginzburg-Landau equation also follows from our continuity equation as a particular case of stationarity. All the results obtained are mutually consistent within the scope of the chosen phenomenological description and, being model-neutral, applicable to both the low-c and high-c superconductors.

  15. Linear-scaling source-sink algorithm for simulating time-resolved quantum transport and superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Joseph; Waintal, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    We report on a "source-sink" algorithm which allows one to calculate time-resolved physical quantities from a general nanoelectronic quantum system (described by an arbitrary time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian) connected to infinite electrodes. Although mathematically equivalent to the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism, the approach is based on the scattering wave functions of the system. It amounts to solving a set of generalized Schrödinger equations that include an additional "source" term (coming from the time-dependent perturbation) and an absorbing "sink" term (the electrodes). The algorithm execution time scales linearly with both system size and simulation time, allowing one to simulate large systems (currently around 106 degrees of freedom) and/or large times (currently around 105 times the smallest time scale of the system). As an application we calculate the current-voltage characteristics of a Josephson junction for both short and long junctions, and recover the multiple Andreev reflection physics. We also discuss two intrinsically time-dependent situations: the relaxation time of a Josephson junction after a quench of the voltage bias, and the propagation of voltage pulses through a Josephson junction. In the case of a ballistic, long Josephson junction, we predict that a fast voltage pulse creates an oscillatory current whose frequency is controlled by the Thouless energy of the normal part. A similar effect is found for short junctions; a voltage pulse produces an oscillating current which, in the absence of electromagnetic environment, does not relax.

  16. Quantum charge pumping through resonant crossed Andreev reflection in a superconducting hybrid junction of silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ganesh C.; Saha, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the phenomena of adiabatic quantum charge pumping through a normal-insulator-superconductor-insulator-normal (NISIN) setup of silicene within the scattering matrix formalism. Assuming a thin barrier limit, we consider the strength of the two barriers (χ1 and χ2) as the two pumping parameters in the adiabatic regime. Within this geometry, we obtain crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) with probability unity in the χ1-χ2 plane without concomitant transmission or elastic co-tunneling. Tunability of the band gap at the Dirac point by applying an external electric field perpendicular to the silicene sheet and variation of the chemical potential at the normal silicene region, open up the possibility of achieving either a perfect CAR or transmission process through our setup. This resonant behavior is periodic with the barrier strengths. We analyze the behavior of the pumped charge through the NISIN structure as a function of the pumping strength and angles of the incident electrons. We show that large (Q ˜2 e ) pumped charge can be obtained through our geometry when the pumping contour encloses either the CAR or transmission resonance in the pumping parameter space. We discuss possible experimental feasibility of our theoretical predictions.

  17. On-chip microwave-to-optical quantum coherent converter based on a superconducting resonator coupled to an electro-optic microresonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javerzac-Galy, C.; Plekhanov, K.; Bernier, N. R.; Toth, L. D.; Feofanov, A. K.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a device architecture capable of direct quantum coherent electro-optical conversion of microwave-to-optical photons. The hybrid system consists of a planar superconducting microwave circuit coupled to an integrated whispering-gallery-mode microresonator made from an electro-optical material. We show that by exploiting the large vacuum electric field of the planar microwave resonator, electro-optical (vacuum) coupling strengths g0 as large as ˜2 π O (10 -100 ) kHz are achievable with currently available technology—a more than 3 orders of magnitude improvement over prior designs and realizations. Operating at millikelvin temperatures, such a converter would enable high-efficiency conversion of microwave-to-optical photons. We analyze the added noise and show that maximum quantum coherent conversion efficiency is achieved for a multiphoton cooperativity of unity which can be reached with optical power as low as O (1 ) mW.

  18. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  19. Quasiparticle spin relaxation with superconducting velocity-tunable state in GaAs(100) quantum wells in proximity to s -wave superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the quasiparticle spin relaxation with superconducting-velocity-tunable state in GaAs (100) quantum wells in proximity to an s -wave superconductor. We first present the influence of the supercurrent on the quasiparticle state in GaAs (100) quantum wells, which can be tuned by the superconducting velocity. Rich features such as the suppressed Cooper pairings, large quasiparticle density and nonmonotonically tunable momentum current can be realized by varying the superconducting velocity. In the degenerate regime, the quasiparticle Fermi surface is composed by two arcs, referred to as Fermi arcs, which are contributed by the electron- and holelike branches. The D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation is then explored, and intriguing physics is revealed when the Fermi arc emerges. Specifically, when the order parameter tends to zero, it is found that the branch-mixing scattering is forbidden in the quasielectron band. When the condensation process associated with the annihilation of the quasielectron and quasihole is slow, this indicates that the electron- and holelike Fermi arcs in the quasielectron band are independent. The open structure of the Fermi arc leads to the nonzero angular average of the effective magnetic field due to the spin-orbit coupling, which acts as an effective Zeeman field. This Zeeman field leads to spin oscillations even in the strong-scattering regime. Moreover, in the strong-scattering regime, we show that the open structure of the Fermi arc also leads to the insensitiveness of the spin relaxation to the momentum scattering, in contrast to the conventional motional narrowing situation. Nevertheless, with a finite order parameter, the branch-mixing scattering can be triggered, opening the interbranch spin relaxation channel, which is dominant in the strong-scattering regime. In contrast to the situation with an extremely small order parameter, due to the interbranch channel, the spin oscillations vanish and the spin relaxation

  20. A Search of Low-Mass WIMPs with p-type Point Contact Germanium Detector in the CDEX-1 Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, W; Kang, K J; Cheng, J P; Li, Y J; Wong, H T; Lin, S T; Chang, J P; Chen, J H; Chen, Q H; Chen, Y H; Deng, Z; Du, Q; Gong, H; Hao, X Q; He, H J; He, Q J; Huang, H X; Huang, T R; Jiang, H; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J M; Li, X; Li, X Y; Li, Y L; Lin, F K; Liu, S K; Lü, L C; Ma, H; Ma, J L; Mao, S J; Qin, J Q; Ren, J; Ruan, X C; Sharma, V; Shen, M B; Singh, L; Singh, M K; Soma, A K; Su, J; Tang, C J; Wang, J M; Wang, L; Wang, Q; Wu, S Y; Wu, Y C; Xianyu, Z Z; Xiao, R Q; Xing, H Y; Xu, F Z; Xu, Y; Xu, X J; Xue, T; Yang, L T; Yang, S W; Yi, N; Yu, C X; Yu, H; Yu, X Z; Zeng, M; Zeng, X H; Zeng, Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y H; Zhao, M G; Zhou, Z Y; Zhu, J J; Zhu, W B; Zhu, X Z; Zhu, Z H

    2016-01-01

    The CDEX-1 experiment conducted a search of low-mass (< 10 GeV/c2) Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) dark matter at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory using a p-type point-contact germanium detector with a fiducial mass of 915 g at a physics analysis threshold of 475 eVee. We report the hardware set-up, detector characterization, data acquisition and analysis procedures of this experiment. No excess of unidentified events are observed after subtraction of known background. Using 335.6 kg-days of data, exclusion constraints on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent and spin-dependent couplings are derived.

  1. An experimental evaluation of the Hamrock and Dowson minimum film thickness equation for fully flooded EHD point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koye, K. A.; Winer, W. O.

    1980-08-01

    Fifty-seven measurements of the minimum lubricant film separating the elastohydrodynamically lubricated point contact of a steel crowned roller and a flat sapphire disk were made by an optical interferometry technique. The data collected were used to evaluate the Hamrock and Dowson minimum EHD film thickness model over a practical range of contact ellipticity ratio where the major axis of the contact ellipse is aligned both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of motion. A statistical analysis of the measured film thickness data showed that on the average the experimental data averaged 30 percent greater film thickness than the Hamrock and Dowson model predicts.

  2. Differentiation of Bulk and Surface Events in p-type Point-Contact Germanium Detectors for Light WIMP Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Li, H B

    2013-01-01

    The p-type point-contact germanium detectors are novel techniques offering kg-scale radiation sensors with sub-keV sensitivities. They have been used for light Dark Matter WIMPs searches and may have potential applications in neutrino physics. There are, however, anomalous surface behaviour which needs to be characterized and understood. We describe the methods and results of a research program whose goals are to identify the bulk and surface events via software pulse shape analysis techniques, and to devise calibration schemes to evaluate the selection efficiency factors. Efficiencies-corrected background spectra from the low-background facility at Kuo-Sheng Neutrino Laboratory are derived.

  3. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  4. Designing quantum-information-processing superconducting qubit circuits that exhibit lasing and other atomic-physics-like phenomena on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting (SC) circuits can behave like atoms making transitions between a few energy levels. Such circuits can test quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales and be used to conduct atomic-physics experiments on a silicon chip. This talk overviews a few of our theoretical studies on SC circuits and quantum information processing (QIP) including: SC qubits for single photon generation and for lasing; controllable couplings among qubits; how to increase the coherence time of qubits using a capacitor in parallel to one of the qubit junctions; hybrid circuits involving both charge and flux qubits; testing Bell's inequality in SC circuits; generation of GHZ states; quantum tomography in SC circuits; preparation of macroscopic quantum superposition states of a cavity field via coupling to a SC qubit; generation of nonclassical photon states using a SC qubit in a microcavity; scalable quantum computing with SC qubits; and information processing with SC qubits in a microwave field. Controllable couplings between qubits can be achieved either directly or indirectly. This can be done with and without coupler circuits, and with and without data-buses like EM fields in cavities (e.g., we will describe both the variable-frequency magnetic flux approach and also a generalized double-resonance approach that we introduced). It is also possible to ``turn a quantum bug into a feature'' by using microscopic defects as qubits, and the macroscopic junction as a controller of it. We have also studied ways to implement radically different approaches to QIP by using ``cluster states'' in SC circuits. For a general overview of this field, see, J.Q. You and F. Nori, Phys. Today 58 (11), 42 (2005)

  5. 基于SQUIDs和腔场相互作用传送量子信息的方案%Quantum information transfer with superconducting quantum interference device qubits in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴韬; 何娟; 倪致祥

    2009-01-01

    本文提出了一个基于SQUIDs和腔场的大失谐相互作用传送量子信息的方案,此方案可以直接地、百分之百地实现量子信息的传送.该方案中腔场和SQUIDs系统之间没有量子信息的传递,腔场只是虚激发,这样对腔的品质因子的要求大大的降低了.同时也可以在SQUIDs之间建立传送量子信息的量子网络.%We propose a scheme for transferring Quantum information via superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits and cavity field interaction with a large detuning.In the scheme,no quantum information is transferred between the SQUIDs and the cavities,the cavity-fields are only virtually excited,thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavities is greatly relaxed.In addition,in the scheme the quantum information can be directly transferred with a successful probability of 100% in a simple manner.And meanwhile we can establish a network for transferring quantum information between SQUID qubits.

  6. Search for Pauli Exclusion Principle Violating Atomic Transitions and Electron Decay with a P-type Point Contact Germanium Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Bradley, A W; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Buuck, M; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Chu, P -H; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Dunagan, C; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Finnerty, P S; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilliss, T; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Jasinski, B R; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Massarczyk, R; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Shanks, B; Shirchenko, M; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhitnikov, I

    2016-01-01

    A search for Pauli-exclusion-principle-violating K-alpha electron transitions was performed using 89.5 kg-d of data collected with a p-type point contact high-purity germanium detector operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. A lower limit on the transition lifetime of 5.8x10^30 seconds at 90% C.L. was set by looking for a peak at 10.6 keV resulting from the x-ray and Auger electrons present following the transition. A similar analysis was done to look for the decay of atomic K-shell electrons into neutrinos, resulting in a lower limit of 6.8x10^30 seconds at 90 C.L. It is estimated that the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 44 kg array of p-type point contact detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76-Ge, could improve upon these exclusion limits by an order of magnitude after three years of operation.

  7. Search for Pauli exclusion principle violating atomic transitions and electron decay with a p-type point contact germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Bradley, A.W.; Chan, Y.D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A.W.P. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Arnquist, I.J.; Hoppe, E.W.; Kouzes, R.T.; LaFerriere, B.D.; Orrell, J.L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Barabash, A.S.; Konovalov, S.I.; Yumatov, V. [National Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertrand, F.E.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Radford, D.C.; Varner, R.L.; White, B.R.; Yu, C.H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brudanin, V.; Shirchenko, M.; Vasilyev, S.; Yakushev, E.; Zhitnikov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Busch, M. [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Buuck, M.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J.A.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I.S.; Leon, J.; Robertson, R.G.H. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Caldwell, A.S.; Christofferson, C.D.; Dunagan, C.; Howard, S.; Suriano, A.M. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Chu, P.H.; Elliott, S.R.; Goett, J.; Massarczyk, R.; Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Efremenko, Yu. [University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ejiri, H. [Osaka University, Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan); Finnerty, P.S.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G.K.; Henning, R.; Howe, M.A.; MacMullin, J.; Meijer, S.J.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Rager, J.; Shanks, B.; Trimble, J.E.; Vorren, K.; Xu, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Green, M.P. [North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Guiseppe, V.E.; Tedeschi, D.; Wiseman, C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Jasinski, B.R. [University of South Dakota, Department of Physics, Vermillion, SD (United States); Keeter, K.J. [Black Hills State University, Department of Physics, Spearfish, SD (United States); Kidd, M.F. [Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville, TN (United States); Martin, R.D. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Romero-Romero, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Vetter, K. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wilkerson, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A search for Pauli-exclusion-principle-violating K{sub α} electron transitions was performed using 89.5 kg-d of data collected with a p-type point contact high-purity germanium detector operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. A lower limit on the transition lifetime of 5.8 x 10{sup 30} s at 90% C.L. was set by looking for a peak at 10.6 keV resulting from the X-ray and Auger electrons present following the transition. A similar analysis was done to look for the decay of atomic K-shell electrons into neutrinos, resulting in a lower limit of 6.8 x 10{sup 30} s at 90% C.L. It is estimated that the Majorana Demonstrator, a 44 kg array of p-type point contact detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge, could improve upon these exclusion limits by an order of magnitude after three years of operation. (orig.)

  8. Order, disorder, and tunable gaps in the spectrum of Andreev bound states in a multiterminal superconducting device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tomohiro; Reutlinger, Johannes; Belzig, Wolfgang; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the spectrum of Andreev bound states (ABSs) in an exemplary four-terminal superconducting structure where four chaotic cavities are connected by quantum point contacts to the terminals and to each other forming a ring. We nickname the resulting device 4T-ring. Such a tunable device can be realized in a 2D electron gas-superconductor or a graphene-based hybrid structure. We concentrate on the limit of a short structure and large conductance of the point contacts where there are many ABS in the device forming a quasicontinuous spectrum. The energies of the ABS can be tuned by changing the superconducting phases of the terminals. We observe the opening and closing of gaps in the spectrum upon changing the phases. This concerns the usual proximity gap that separates the levels from zero energy as well as less usual "smile" gaps that split the levels of the quasicontinuous spectrum. We demonstrate a remarkable crossover in the overall spectrum that occurs upon changing the ratio of conductances of the inner and outer point contacts. At big values of the ratio (closed limit), the levels exhibit a generic behavior expected for the spectrum of a disordered system manifesting level repulsion and Brownian "motion" upon changing the phases. At small values of the ratio (open limit), the levels are squeezed into narrow bunches separated by wide smile gaps. Each bunch consists of almost degenerate ABS formed by Andreev reflection between two adjacent terminals. We study in detail the properties of the spectrum in the limit of a small ratio, paying special attention to the crossings of bunches. We distinguish two types of crossings: (i) with a regular phase dependence of the levels and (ii) crossings where the Brownian motion of the levels leads to an apparently irregular phase dependence. We work out a perturbation theory that explains the observations both at a detailed level of random scattering in the device and at a phenomenological level of positively defined

  9. Quantum and superconducting fluctuations effects in disordered Nb 1- xTa x thin films above Tc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannouri, M.; Papastaikoudis, C.

    1999-05-01

    Disordered Nb 1- xTa x thin films are prepared with e-gun coevaporation. The influence of the β-phase of tantalum in the critical temperature Tc is observed as a function of the substrate temperature. The measurements of transverse magnetoresistance at various isothermals are interpreted in terms of weak-localization and superconducting fluctuations. From the fitting procedure, the phase breaking rate τφ-1 and the Larkin parameter βL are estimated as a function of temperature. Conclusions about the dominant inelastic scattering mechanisms at various temperature regions as well as for the dominant mechanism of superconducting fluctuations near the transition temperature are extracted.

  10. Multispectral Superconducting Quantum Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Molybdenum 894 SS316 2770 Iron Fe 1890 SS304 2790 Beryllium 1300 Titanium 1700 Aluminum 3910 Poly-Alumina 791 Table 3.6. Total thermal contraction...is the electron two spin density of states and p is the density of the material. This constant describes coupling of electrons with thermal phonons...antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations . Due to the presence of node lines, the low temperature behavior of a superconductor is quite sensitive to the

  11. Quantum key distribution over 120 km using ultrahigh purity single-photon source and superconducting single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kazuya; Nambu, Yoshihiro; Miyazawa, Toshiyuki; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yorozu, Shinichi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-01

    Advances in single-photon sources (SPSs) and single-photon detectors (SPDs) promise unique applications in the field of quantum information technology. In this paper, we report long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) by using state-of-the-art devices: a quantum-dot SPS (QD SPS) emitting a photon in the telecom band of 1.5 μm and a superconducting nanowire SPD (SNSPD). At the distance of 100 km, we obtained the maximal secure key rate of 27.6 bps without using decoy states, which is at least threefold larger than the rate obtained in the previously reported 50-km-long QKD experiment. We also succeeded in transmitting secure keys at the rate of 0.307 bps over 120 km. This is the longest QKD distance yet reported by using known true SPSs. The ultralow multiphoton emissions of our SPS and ultralow dark count of the SNSPD contributed to this result. The experimental results demonstrate the potential applicability of QD SPSs to practical telecom QKD networks.

  12. Unexpected superconductivity at nanoscale junctions made on the topological crystalline insulator Pb0.6Sn0.4Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shekhar; Aggarwal, Leena; Roychowdhury, Subhajit; Aslam, Mohammad; Gayen, Sirshendu; Biswas, Kanishka; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-09-01

    Discovery of exotic phases of matter from the topologically non-trivial systems not only makes the research on topological materials more interesting but also enriches our understanding of the fascinating physics of such materials. Pb0.6Sn0.4Te was recently shown to be a topological crystalline insulator. Here, we show that by forming a mesoscopic point-contact using a normal non-superconducting elemental metal on the surface of Pb0.6Sn0.4Te, a superconducting phase is created locally in a confined region under the point-contact. This happens when the bulk of the sample remains to be non-superconducting, and the superconducting phase emerges as a nano-droplet under the point-contact. The superconducting phase shows a high transition temperature Tc that varies for different point-contacts and falls in a range between 3.7 K and 6.5 K. Therefore, this Letter presents the discovery of a superconducting phase on the surface of a topological crystalline insulator, and the discovery is expected to shed light on the mechanism of induced superconductivity in topologically non-trivial systems in general.

  13. CoGeNT: A Search for Low-Mass Dark Matter using p-type Point Contact Germanium Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aalseth, C E; Colaresi, J; Collar, J I; Leon, J Diaz; Fast, J E; Fields, N E; Hossbach, T W; Knecht, A; Kos, M S; Marino, M G; Miley, H S; Miller, M L; Orrell, J L; Yocum, K M

    2013-01-01

    CoGeNT employs p-type point-contact (PPC) germanium detectors to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). By virtue of its low energy threshold and ability to reject surface backgrounds, this type of device allows an emphasis on low-mass dark matter candidates (WIMP mass around 10 GeV/c2). We report on the characteristics of the PPC detector presently taking data at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, elaborating on aspects of shielding, data acquisition, instrumental stability, data analysis, and background estimation. A detailed background model is used to investigate the low energy excess of events previously reported, and to assess the possibility of temporal modulations in the low-energy event rate. We conclude that the technique is ideally suited to search for the annual modulation signature expected from dark matter particle interactions in the region of WIMP mass and coupling favored by the DAMA/LIBRA claim.

  14. Point-contacting by localised dielectric breakdown: Characterisation of a metallisation technique for the rear surface of a solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Western, Ned J., E-mail: n.western@unsw.edu.au; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan; Wenham, Stuart R.; Bremner, Stephen P. [Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, UNSW, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2015-07-28

    Characterisation results are presented for ohmic contacts to passivated crystalline silicon, formed using the point-contacting by localised dielectric breakdown technique. Self aligned contact is made between the metal and heavily doped surface regions through an intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layer. Local doping is provided by a laser using a standard technique identical to that for selective emitter formation. Our results for gate metals of Au, Al, and Ti show that the technique does not rely on reactivity between the dielectric and the metal, excluding metal induced crystallisation from the contacting process. Diffusion of the gate metal into the dielectric is observed in transmission electron microscope images suggesting high temperatures are present locally during the breakdown process. The technique is equally applicable to contacting of n and p-type silicon, making it a potential alternative for ohmic contacting to silicon to passivated rear surfaces.

  15. Development of cryogenic CMOS Readout ASICs for the Point-Contact HPGe Detectors for Dark Matter Search and Neutrino Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi; He, Li; Liu, Feng; Liu, Yinong; Xue, Tao; Li, Yulan; Yue, Qian

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents the developments of two cryogenic readout ASICs for the point-contact HPGe detectors for dark matter search and neutrino experiments. Extremely low noise readout electronics were demanded and the capability of working at cryogenic temperatures may bring great advantages. The first ASIC was a monolithic CMOS charge sensitive preamplifier with its noise optimized for ∼1 pF input capacitance. The second ASIC was a waveform recorder based on switched capacitor array. These two ASICs were fabricated in CMOS 350 nm and 180 nm processes respectively. The prototype chips were tested and showed promising results. Both ASICs worked well at low temperature. The preamplifier had achieved ENC of 10.3 electrons with 0.7 pF input capacitance and the SCA chip could run at 9 bit effective resolution and 25 MSPS sampling rate.

  16. Al-Si alloy point contact formation and rear surface passivation for silicon solar cells using double layer porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumni, Besma; Ben Jaballah, Abdelkader; Bessais, Brahim

    2012-10-01

    Lowering the rear surface recombination velocities by a dielectric layer has fascinating advantages compared with the standard fully covered Al back-contact silicon solar cells. In this work the passivation effect by double layer porous silicon (PS) (wide band gap) and the formation of Al-Si alloy in narrow p-type Si point contact areas for rear passivated solar cells are analysed. As revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we found that a thin passivating aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer is formed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis performed in cross sections shows that with bilayer PS, liquid Al penetrates into the openings, alloying with the Si substrate at depth and decreasing the contact resistivity. At the solar cell level, the reduction in the contact area and resistivity leads to a minimization of the fill factor losses.

  17. On-chip microwave-to-optical quantum coherent converter based on a superconducting resonator coupled to an electro-optic microresonator

    CERN Document Server

    Javerzac-Galy, Clément; Bernier, Nathan; Toth, Laszlo D; Feofanov, Alexey K; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2015-01-01

    We propose a device architecture capable of direct quantum electro-optical conversion of microwave to optical photons. The hybrid system consists of a planar superconducting microwave circuit coupled to an integrated whispering-gallery-mode microresonator made from an electro-optical material. We show that electro-optical (vacuum) coupling rates $g_0$ as large as$\\sim 2\\pi \\, \\mathcal{O}(10-100)$ kHz are achievable with currently available technology, due to the small mode volume of the planar microwave resonator. Operating at millikelvin temperatures, such a converter would enable high-efficiency conversion of microwave to optical photons. We analyze the added noise, and show that maximum conversion efficiency is achieved for a multi-photon cooperativity of unity which can be reached with optical power as low as $ \\mathcal{O}(1)\\,\\mathrm{mW} $.

  18. Magnetic characteristics measurements of ethanol-water mixtures using a hybrid-type high-temperature superconducting quantum-interference device magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Keiji; Matsunaga, Yasuaki; Isshiki, Ryota; Nakamura, Yuta; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic characteristics of ethanol-water mixtures were investigated using our newly developed hybrid-type magnetometer based on a high-temperature superconducting quantum-interference device. The magnetization (M-H) curves of ethanol-water mixtures show good diamagnetic characteristics. The magnetic moments of the mixture show ethanol concentration dependence. However, the variation in magnetic moment differs from the characteristics expected by considering the magnetic moment ratio between water and ethanol, and volume-reduction rate. It showed two decrement regions separated at approximately 50-60% concentration values. It is also observed that the concentration dependence of the magnetic moment measured using the sample vibration method under a uniform magnetic field and that by the sample rotation method showed slightly different characteristics. These anomalies are attributed to the formation of clustered structures in the mixture.

  19. Exotic Magnetic Orders and Their Interplay with Superconductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Holm

    Superconductivity represents one of the most important scientific discoveries of the 20th century. The practical applications are numerous ranging from clean energy storage and MRI machines to quantum computers. However, the low temperatures required for superconductivity prohibits many practical...

  20. Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices for the Detection of Magnetic Flux and Application to Airborne High Frequency Direction Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    initial value problem L-C inductor -capacitor MATLAB Matrix Laboratory MHz megahertz MRI magnetic resonance imaging NDE non-destructive examination ODE...theory of operation ( Type I and Type II superconductors), by critical temperature (high and low temperature superconductors), or by the material itself...superconducting research is focused on critical temperatures below 77 K. There are several material types that are used for this temperature range with Niobium as

  1. Statistical mechanics of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kita, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical, step-by-step comprehensive explanation of superconductivity for undergraduate and graduate students who have completed elementary courses on thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. To this end, it adopts the unique approach of starting with the statistical mechanics of quantum ideal gases and successively adding and clarifying elements and techniques indispensible for understanding it. They include the spin-statistics theorem, second quantization, density matrices, the Bloch–De Dominicis theorem, the variational principle in statistical mechanics, attractive interaction, and bound states. Ample examples of their usage are also provided in terms of topics from advanced statistical mechanics such as two-particle correlations of quantum ideal gases, derivation of the Hartree–Fock equations, and Landau’s Fermi-liquid theory, among others. With these preliminaries, the fundamental mean-field equations of superconductivity are derived with maximum mathematical clarity based on ...

  2. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  3. Fingerprints of Mott Superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强华

    2003-01-01

    We improve a previous theory of doped Mott insulators with duality between pairing and magnetism by a further duality transform. As the result we obtained a quantum Ginzburg-Landau theory describing the Cooper pair condensate and the dual of spin condensate. We address the superconductivity by doping a Mott insulator,which we call the Mott superconductivity. Some fingerprints of such novelty in cuprates are the scaling between neutron resonance energy and superfluid density, and the induced quantized spin moment by vortices or Zn impurity (together with circulating charge super-current to be checked by experiments).

  4. Quantum statistical field theory an introduction to Schwinger's variational method with Green's function nanoapplications, graphene and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern Horing, Norman J

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the methods of coupled quantum statistical field theory and Green's functions. The methods of coupled quantum field theory have played a major role in the extensive development of nonrelativistic quantum many-particle theory and condensed matter physics. This introduction to the subject is intended to facilitate delivery of the material in an easily digestible form to advanced undergraduate physics majors at a relatively early stage of their scientific development. The main mechanism to accomplish this is the early introduction of variational calculus and the Schwinger Action Principle, accompanied by Green's functions. Important achievements of the theory in condensed matter and quantum statistical physics are reviewed in detail to help develop research capability. These include the derivation of coupled field Green's function equations-of-motion for a model electron-hole-phonon system, extensive discussions of retarded, thermodynamic and nonequilibrium Green's functions...

  5. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  6. An MCMC-based waveform analysis with p-type point contact detectors in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Benjamin; MAJORANA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Statistical signal processing can be a powerful tool for extracting as much information as possible from raw data. By fitting data to a physical model of signal generation on an event-by-event basis, it can be used to perform precise event reconstruction and enable efficient background rejection. Searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay must achieve extremely low backgrounds to reach sensitivities required for discovery, and so can benefit greatly from this analysis technique. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR has implemented a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) signal processing algorithm to fit waveforms from p-type point contact (PPC) germanium detectors. After a machine learning step to tune detector fields and electronics response parameters, the MCMC algorithm is able to reconstruct the time, energy and position of interactions within the PPC detector. The parameters estimated with this method will find many applications within the DEMONSTRATOR physics program, including background identification and rejection. This will prove important as the DEMONSTRATOR aims to reach its background goal of < 3 counts/tonne/yr in the region of interest. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  7. Exploring Interacting Quantum Many-Body Systems by Experimentally Creating Continuous Matrix Product States in Superconducting Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, C.; Mlynek, J.; Butscher, J.; Kurpiers, P.; Hammerer, K.; Osborne, T. J.; Wallraff, A.

    2015-10-01

    Improving the understanding of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems such as gases of interacting atoms or electrons is one of the most important challenges in modern condensed matter physics, materials research, and chemistry. Enormous progress has been made in the past decades in developing both classical and quantum approaches to calculate, simulate, and experimentally probe the properties of such systems. In this work, we use a combination of classical and quantum methods to experimentally explore the properties of an interacting quantum gas by creating experimental realizations of continuous matrix product states—a class of states that has proven extremely powerful as a variational ansatz for numerical simulations. By systematically preparing and probing these states using a circuit quantum electrodynamics system, we experimentally determine a good approximation to the ground-state wave function of the Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian, which describes an interacting Bose gas in one dimension. Since the simulated Hamiltonian is encoded in the measurement observable rather than the controlled quantum system, this approach has the potential to apply to a variety of models including those involving multicomponent interacting fields. Our findings also hint at the possibility of experimentally exploring general properties of matrix product states and entanglement theory. The scheme presented here is applicable to a broad range of systems exploiting strong and tunable light-matter interactions.

  8. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  9. Superconductivity up to 30 K in the vicinity of the quantum critical point in BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Shuai; Xing Hui; Xuan Guofang; Wang Cao; Ren Zhi; Dai Jianhui; Xu Zhu' an; Cao Guanghan [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Feng, Chunmu, E-mail: ghcao@zju.edu.c [Test and Analysis Center, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2009-09-23

    We report bulk superconductivity induced by an isovalent doping of phosphorus in BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}. The P-for-As substitution results in shrinkage of the lattice, especially for the FeAs block layers. The resistivity anomaly associated with the spin-density-wave (SDW) transition in the undoped compound is gradually suppressed by the P doping. Superconductivity with a maximum T{sub c} of 30 K emerges at x = 0.32, coinciding with a magnetic quantum critical point (QCP) which is shown by the disappearance of SDW order and the linear temperature-dependent resistivity in the normal state. The T{sub c} values were found to decrease with further P doping and no superconductivity was observed down to 2 K for x>=0.77. The appearance of superconductivity in the vicinity of QCP hints at the superconductivity mechanism in iron-based arsenides. (fast track communication)

  10. 石墨烯带正常-超导结的量子输运%Quantum transport through normal-superconducting graphene nanoribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 李健伟; 卫亚东; 王健

    2014-01-01

    The first principles calculation has been carried out to investigate the quantum transport properties of normal-superconducting graphene nanoribbons ( GNRs) within the combination of non-equilibrium Green’s function ( NEGF) and density functional theory ( DFT) . The Andreev reflection coefficient TA and quasi-particle transmission probability T1 of normal-superconducting system of a series of defective configurations were investigated in detail. As a comparison, the electric transmission coefficient TN of normal system was also calculated. In the pristine graphene nanoribbons, The Andreev reflection coefficient TA is a constant and exactly equals to electric transmission coefficient TN of the normal system in the superconducting energy gap, which indicates that the Andreev conductance is twice of the normal electric conductance. In the defective configurations of graphene nanoribbons, TA shows two sharp peaks at E =± Δ, and the peak values are larger than the electric conductance of normal system. Outside the superconducting energy gap, Andreev conductance decays to zero, and quasi-particle transmission probability increases to the normal electric transmission coefficient gradually. Different defective configurations give different influence to the Andreev reflection of the normal-superconducting graphene nanoribbons.%基于非平衡格林函数( non-equilibrium Green’s function, NEGF )和密度泛函理论( density functional theory, DFT),从第一性原理出发研究Armchair型和Zigzag型的石墨烯带正常-超导结的电子输运性质,计算了缺陷对这两种正常-超导结输运性质的影响。计算表明,对无缺陷正常-超导石墨烯带,在超导能隙内, Andreev反射系数TA恰好等于正常石墨烯带的电子透射系数TN 。当石墨烯带存在缺陷时, Andreev反射系数TA不再是一个常数,而在超导能隙边缘出现两个尖锐的峰,其峰值大于正常系统的电子透射系数。在超导能隙之外, Andreev

  11. Synthesis and characterization of YBa2Cu3O7(Y123) via sol-gel method for development of superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Noorhana; Zakariah, Muhammad Hanis

    2012-10-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) waves transmitted by Horizontal Electric Dipole (HED) source to detect contrasts in subsurface resistivity termed Seabed Logging (SBL) is now an established method for hydrocarbon exploration. However, currently used EM wave detectors for SBL have several challenges including the sensitivity and its bulk size. This work exploits the benefit of superconductor technology in developing a magnetometer termed Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) which can potentially be used for SBL. A SQUID magnetometer was fabricated using hexagon shape-niobium wire with YBa2Cu37O, (YBCO) as a barrier. The YBa2Cu37O, samples were synthesized by sol-gel method and were sintered using a furnace and conventional microwave oven. The YBCO gel was dried at 120 degrees C in air for 72 hours. It was then ground and divided into 12 parts. Four samples were sintered at 750 degrees C, 850 degrees C, 900 degrees C, and 950 degrees C for 12 hours in a furnace to find the optimum temperature. The other eight samples were sintered in a microwave with 1100 Watt (W) with a different sintering time, 5, 15, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1 hour 15 minutes, 1 hour 30 minutes, 1 hour 45 minutes and 2 hours. A DEWAR container was designed and fabricated using fiberglass material. It was filled with liquid nitrogen (LN2) to ensure the superconducting state of the magnetometer. XRD results showed that the optimum sintering temperature for the formation of orthorhombic Y-123 phase was at 950 degrees C with the crystallite size of 67 nm. The morphology results from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) showed that the grains had formed a rod shape with an average diameter of 60 nm. The fabricated SQUID magnetometer was able to show an increment of approximately 249% in the intensity of the EM waves when the source receiver offset was one meter apart.

  12. Theory of Nonequilibrium Spin Transport and Spin Transfer Torque in Superconducting-Ferromagnetic Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Erhai; Sauls, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Spin transport currents and the spin-transfer torques in voltage-biased superconducting-ferromagnetic nanopillars (SFNFS point contacts) are computed. We develop and implement an algorithm based on the Ricatti formulation of the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity to solve the time-dependent boundary conditions for the nonequilibrium Green's functions for spin transport through the ferromagnetic interfaces. A signature of the nonequilibrium torque is a component perpendicular to the pl...

  13. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  14. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  15. Point contact Andreev reflection and the measurement of spin polarization: high fields and novel materials (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenov, Plamen; Borisov, Kiril

    2016-10-01

    Point Contact Andreev Reflection (PCAR) is one of the few available methods for the determination of the Fermi level spin polarisation in metals and degenerate semiconductors. It has traditionally been applied at fixed (liquid He) temperatures, using pure niobium as the superconductor, and at essentially zero applied magnetic fields, all of which limit the amount of information that it can provide - i.e. do not allow for the extraction of the sign of the spin polarisation and make the assignment of the transport regime to ballistic or diffusive almost impossible. Here a series of experiments is described, aimed at the expansion of this parameter space to higher magnetic fields and to higher temperatures. These require redesigned experimental setups and the use of higher performance superconductors. Demonstrations are described of the determination of the sign of the spin polarisation, at fields of more than 5 Tesla using a low-Z superconductor, as well as operations beyond 9.2 K. Doubts about the practical reliability of the PCAR technique are dispersed using systematic series of samples - the heavy rare-earths and comparisons with alternatives, such as spin-polarised field emission, photo-emission and Tedrow-Meservey tunnelling. The specific material examples presented include 3d-metals, order-disorder transition alloys and zero-moment half-metals - Fe, FeAl and MnRuGa, alternative low-Z and high-Z superconductors - MgB2 and NbTi, and magnetic topological insulators, such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3.

  16. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  17. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  18. Nonlinear current-voltage characteristics due to quantum tunneling of phase slips in superconducting Nb nanowire networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trezza, M.; Cirillo, C.; Sabatino, P.; Carapella, G.; Attanasio, C. [CNR-SPIN Salerno and Dipartimento di Fisica “E. R. Caianiello”, Università degli Studi di Salerno, Fisciano I-84084 (Italy); Prischepa, S. L. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, P. Browka 6, Minsk 220013 (Belarus)

    2013-12-16

    We report on the transport properties of an array of N∼30 interconnected Nb nanowires, grown by sputtering on robust porous Si substrates. The analyzed system exhibits a broad resistive transition in zero magnetic field, H, and highly nonlinear V(I) characteristics as a function of H, which can be both consistently described by quantum tunneling of phase slips.

  19. Superconducting doped topological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Satoshi, E-mail: sasaki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mizushima, Takeshi, E-mail: mizushima@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Studies on both normal- and SC-state properties of doped topological materials. • Odd-parity pairing systems with the time-reversal-invariance. • Robust superconductivity in the presence of nonmagnetic impurity scattering. • We propose experiments to identify the existence of Majorana fermions in these SCs. - Abstract: Recently, the search for Majorana fermions (MFs) has become one of the most important and exciting issues in condensed matter physics since such an exotic quasiparticle is expected to potentially give rise to unprecedented quantum phenomena whose functional properties will be used to develop future quantum technology. Theoretically, the MFs may reside in various types of topological superconductor materials that is characterized by the topologically protected gapless surface state which are essentially an Andreev bound state. Superconducting doped topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators are promising candidates to harbor the MFs. In this review, we discuss recent progress and understanding on the research of MFs based on time-reversal-invariant superconducting topological materials to deepen our understanding and have a better outlook on both the search for and realization of MFs in these systems. We also discuss some advantages of these bulk systems to realize MFs including remarkable superconducting robustness against nonmagnetic impurities.

  20. Infrared Superconducting Single-Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    group realized small microstrip devices, the next iteration of which may narrow the line width to below 100 nm, entering the single-photon detection...and will explore superconducting detectors with integrated waveguide circuits and novel deposition techniques. 15. SUBJECT...world record quantum cryptography demonstrations [9] and operation of quantum waveguide circuits at telecom wavelengths [10]. Beyond the quantum

  1. Quantum Piston - Quantum Preservation, Simulation and Transfer In Oxide Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    of the host material that is performing the simulation. A lot of the research that was conducted involves basic characterization (quantum transport ... semiconductor with long-lived defect complexes (nitrogen-vacanc 15. SUBJECT TERMS oxide nanoelectronics, superconductivity, quantum information 16...to develop the unique properties of superconducting semiconductors to achieve Quantum Preservation, Simulation and Transfer in Oxide Nanostructures

  2. Superconducting Coset Topological Fluids in Josephson Junction Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Diamantini, M C; Trugenberger, C A; Sodano, Pasquale; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2006-01-01

    We show that the superconducting ground state of planar Josephson junction arrays is a P- and T-invariant coset topological quantum fluid whose topological order is characterized by the degeneracy 2 on the torus. This new mechanism for planar superconductivity is the P- and T-invariant analogue of Laughlin's quantum Hall fluids. The T=0 insulator-superconductor quantum transition is a quantum critical point characterized by gauge fields and deconfined degrees of freedom. Experiments on toroidal Josephson junction arrays could provide the first direct evidence for topological order and superconducting quantum fluids.

  3. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  4. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  5. ``Hybrid'' multi-gap/single-gap Josephson junctions: Evidence of macroscopic quantum tunneling in superconducting-to-normal switching experiments on MgB2/I/Pb and MgB2/I/Sn junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabello, Steve; Lambert, Joseph; Dai, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Chen, Ke; Cunnane, Daniel; Xi, X. X.; Ramos, Roberto

    We report results of superconducting-to-normal switching experiments on MgB2/I/Pb and MgB2/I/Sn junctions, with and without microwaves. These results suggest that the switching behavior is dominated by quantum tunneling through the washboard potential barrier, rather than thermal excitations or electronic noise. Evidence includes a leveling in the standard deviation of the switching current distribution below a crossover temperature, a Lorentzian shape of the escape rate enhancement peak upon excitation by microwaves, and a narrowing in the histogram of escape counts in the presence of resonant microwave excitation relative to that in the absence of microwaves. These are the first such results reported in ``hybrid'' Josephson tunnel junctions, consisting of multi-gap and single-gap superconducting electrodes.

  6. Point-contact spectroscopy on SmB/sub 6/, TmSe, LaB/sub 6/ and LaSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankowski, I.; Wachter, P. (Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik)

    1982-02-01

    The dynamic resistance DU/dI (U) and its derivative d/sup 2/U/dI/sup 2/ (U) of point contacts with intermediate valent SmB/sub 6/ and TmSe and their integer valent reference compounds LaB/sub 6/ and LaSe at liquid helium temperatures has been measured. While dU/dI (U) for point contacts with LaB/sub 6/ and LaSe did not show anomalous structures, for SmB/sub 6/ and TmSe a strong resistance peak at zero voltage was observed with a characteristic width of approximately 5 mV for SmB/sub 6/ and approximately 2.5 mV for TmSe.

  7. Transport spectroscopy on trapped superconducting nano-islands of Pb: signature of unconventional pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Saha, Preetha; Gayen, Sirshendu; Singh, Avtar; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-07-01

    Elemental bulk lead (Pb) is a conventional type I, spin-singlet (s-wave) superconductor with a critical temperature T c = 7.2 K and a critical magnetic field H c = 800 Oe. However, it is known that at mesoscopic length scales, like in point-contact geometries, Pb shows significantly higher critical field, sometimes up to several Tesla. We have used this property to trap a small superconducting nano-droplet of Pb by forming a metallic point contact on Pb and then applying a magnetic field larger than 800 Oe that drives the bulk of the material non-superconducting. From systematic magnetic field dependent behaviour of the point-contact spectra measured across such a trapped island of Pb we show that the superconducting order parameter of mesoscopic Pb mixes non-trivially with magnetic field possibly due to the emergence of a local spin-triplet component at such length scales. From comparative studies with Nb-based point contacts we surmise that the strong spin-orbit coupling in Pb leads to the emergence of the unconventional component in the order parameter of mesoscopic Pb.

  8. Exotic Magnetic Orders and Their Interplay with Superconductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Holm

    applications. The more recent discovery of high-temperature superconductors, with superconducting transition temperatures above 100~K, has led to the hope that superconductivity at room-temperature might be achievable, although a complete theoretical understanding of the high-temperature superconductors......Superconductivity represents one of the most important scientific discoveries of the 20th century. The practical applications are numerous ranging from clean energy storage and MRI machines to quantum computers. However, the low temperatures required for superconductivity prohibits many practical...

  9. Superconductivity in One-atomic-layer Metal Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tong; CHEN Xi; WANG Yayu; LIU Ying; LIN Haiqing; JIA Jinfeng; XUE Qikun; CHENG Peng; LI Wenjuan; SUN Yujie; WANG Guang; ZHU Xicgang; HE Ke; WANG Lili; MA Xucun

    2011-01-01

    @@ Superconductivity is a peculiar quantum phenomenon which originates from the pairing of conduction electrons, followed by phase coherent condensation.Since the discovery by K.Onnes in 1911, superconductivity has been one of the hottest topics in physics for an entire century, and still attracts people's great interest.One of the intriguing issues is how superconductivity appears in low dimensional system where quantum size effect and surface/interface effect that large bulk material doesn't have may become crucial.

  10. Superconductivity in One-atomic-layer Metal Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tong; CHENG Peng; LI Wenjuan; SUN Yujie; WANG Guang; ZHU Xiegang; HE Ke; WANG Lili; MA Xucun; CHEN Xi; WANG Yayu; LIU Ying; LIN Haiqing; JIA Jinfeng; XUE Qikun

    2011-01-01

    Superconductivity is a peculiar quantum phenomenon which originates from the pairing of conduction electrons, tbllowed by phase coherent condensation, Since the discovery by K. Onnes in 1911, superconductivity has been one of the hottest topics in physics for an entire century, and still attracts people's great interest. One of the intriguing issues is how superconductivity appears in low dimensional system where quantum size effect and surface/interface effect that large bulk material doesn't have may become crucial.

  11. Superconductivity in all its states

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    Temporary exhibition at the Saint-Genis-Pouilly Tourist Office. For the 100th anniversary of its discovery, take a plunge into the amazing world of superconductivity. Some materials, when cooled down to extreme temperatures, acquire a remarkable property -  they become superconducting. Superconductivity is a rare example of a quantum effect that can be witnessed on the macroscopic scale and is today at the heart of much research. In laboratories, researchers try to gain a better understanding of its origins, study new superconducting materials, explore the phenomenon at the nanometric scale and pursue their indefatigable search for new applications. Monday to Friday: 09:00 a.m. to 12:00 and 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday: 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon » Open to all – Admission free For further information: +33 (0)4 50 42 29 37

  12. On the magnetization relaxation of ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films as determined by superconducting quantum interference device measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hai-hu; Ziemann, Paul; Radovan, Henri A.; Herzog, Thomas

    1998-09-01

    By using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the temporal relaxation of the magnetization was determined for ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films at various temperatures between 10 K and 80 K in magnetic fields ranging from 2 mT to 0.3 T. Based on these data, a detailed analysis has been performed related to the following methods or models: (1) Fitting the data to the thermally activated flux motion and collective pinning model; (2) Applying the Generalized Inversion Scheme to extract the temperature dependence of the unrelaxed critical current density jc( T) and pinning potential Uc( T); (3) Testing a modified Maley's method to obtain the current dependent activation energy for flux motion; (4) 2D vortex glass scaling. It is found that, for low fields (2 mT, 10 mT, 40 mT) the experimental data can be described by an elastic flux motion, most probably due to 3D single vortex creep. At higher fields (0.1 T, 0.2 T, 0.3 T), the observed behavior can be interpreted in terms of plastic flux motion which is probably governed by dislocation mediated flux creep. These high field data can also be consistently described by the 2D vortex glass scaling with scaling parameters ν2D, T0 and p being consistent with those derived from corresponding transport measurement. Also, results are presented demonstrating the importance of optimizing the scan length of the sample in a moving sample SQUID magnetometer to avoid artifacts.

  13. Energizer keep going: 100 years of superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengcheng Dai; Xing-jiang Zhou; Dao-xin Yao

    2011-01-01

    It has been 100 years since Heike Kamerlingh Onnes discovered superconductivity on April 8,1911.Amazingly,this field is still very active and keeps booming,like a magic.A lot of new phenomena and materials have been found,and superconductors have been used in many different fields to improve our lives.Onnes won the Nobel Prize for this incredible discovery in 1913 and used the word superconductivity for the first time.Onnes believed that quantum mechanics would explain the effect,but he could not produce a theory at that time.Now we know superconductivity is a macroscopic quantum phenomenon.

  14. Meissner effect in superconducting microtraps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, Daniel

    2009-04-30

    This thesis investigates the impact of the Meissner effect on magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms near superconducting microstructures. This task has been accomplished both theoretically and experimentally. The Meissner effect distorts the magnetic fields near superconducting surfaces, thus altering the parameters of magnetic microtraps. Both computer simulations and experimental measurements demonstrate that the Meissner effect shortens the distance between the magnetic microtrap and the superconducting surface, reduces the magnetic-field gradients and dramatically lowers the trap depth. A novel numerical method for calculating magnetic fields in atom chips with superconducting microstructures has been developed. This numerical method overcomes the geometrical limitations of other calculation techniques and can solve superconducting microstructures of arbitrary geometry. The numerical method has been used to calculate the parameters of magnetic microtraps in computer-simulated chips containing thin-film wires. Simulations were carried out for both the superconducting and the normal-conducting state, and the differences between the two cases were analyzed. Computer simulations have been contrasted with experimental measurements. The experimental apparatus generates a magnetic microtrap for ultracold Rubidium atoms near a superconducting Niobium wire of circular cross section. The design and construction of the apparatus has met the challenge of integrating the techniques for producing atomic quantum gases with the techniques for cooling solid bodies to cryogenic temperatures. By monitoring the position of the atom cloud, one can observe how the Meissner effect influences the magnetic microtrap. (orig.)

  15. Quantum memristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  16. Crosstalk-free operation of multielement superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array integrated with single-flux-quantum circuit in a 0.1 W Gifford-McMahon cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Taro; Miki, Shigehito; Terai, Hirotaka; Makise, Kazumasa; Wang, Zhen

    2012-07-15

    We demonstrate the successful operation of a multielement superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SSPD) array integrated with a single-flux-quantum (SFQ) readout circuit in a compact 0.1 W Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. A time-resolved readout technique, where output signals from each element enter the SFQ readout circuit with finite time intervals, revealed crosstalk-free operation of the four-element SSPD array connected with the SFQ readout circuit. The timing jitter and the system detection efficiency were measured to be 50 ps and 11.4%, respectively, which were comparable to the performance of practical single-pixel SSPD systems.

  17. Competing collinear magnetic structures in superconducting FeSe by first-principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemeyer, Brian; Dagrada, Mario; Sorella, Sandro; Casula, Michele; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2016-07-01

    Resolving the interplay between magnetic interactions and structural properties in strongly correlated materials through a quantitatively accurate approach has been a major challenge in condensed-matter physics. Here we apply highly accurate first-principles quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques to obtain structural and magnetic properties of the iron selenide (FeSe) superconductor under pressure. Where comparable, the computed properties are very close to the experimental values. Of potential ordered magnetic configurations, collinear spin configurations are the most energetically favorable over the explored pressure range. They become nearly degenerate in energy with bicollinear spin orderings at around 7 GPa, when the experimental critical temperature Tc is the highest. On the other hand, ferromagnetic, checkerboard, and staggered dimer configurations become relatively higher in energy as the pressure increases. The behavior under pressure is explained by an analysis of the local charge compressibility and the orbital occupation as described by the QMC many-body wave function, which reveals how spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom are strongly coupled in this compound. This remarkable pressure evolution suggests that stripelike magnetic fluctuations may be responsible for the enhanced Tc in FeSe and that higher Tc is associated with nearness to a crossover between collinear and bicollinear ordering.

  18. Superconductivity an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiner, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this proven text has been developed further in both scope and scale to reflect the potential for superconductivity in power engineering to increase efficiency in electricity transmission or engines. The landmark reference remains a comprehensive introduction to the field, covering every aspect from fundamentals to applications, and presenting the latest developments in organic superconductors, superconducting interfaces, quantum coherence, and applications in medicine and industry. Due to its precise language and numerous explanatory illustrations, it is suitable as an introductory textbook, with the level rising smoothly from chapter to chapter, such that readers can build on their newly acquired knowledge. The authors cover basic properties of superconductors and discuss stability and different material groups with reference to the latest and most promising applications, devoting the last third of the book to applications in power engineering, medicine, and low temperature physics. An e...

  19. Fermionic models with superconducting circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Las Heras, Urtzi; Garcia-Alvarez, Laura; Mezzacapo, Antonio; Lamata, Lucas [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Physical Chemistry, Bilbao (Spain); Solano, Enrique [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Physical Chemistry, Bilbao (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method for the efficient quantum simulation of fermionic systems with superconducting circuits. It consists in the suitable use of Jordan-Wigner mapping, Trotter decomposition, and multiqubit gates, be with the use of a quantum bus or direct capacitive couplings. We apply our method to the paradigmatic cases of 1D and 2D Fermi-Hubbard models, involving couplings with nearest and next-nearest neighbours. Furthermore, we propose an optimal architecture for this model and discuss the benchmarking of the simulations in realistic circuit quantum electrodynamics setups. (orig.)

  20. Suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are unique candidates to study quantum mechanical properties of a nanomechanical resonator. However to access this quantum regime, present detectors are not yet sensitive enough. In this thesis we couple a carbon nanotube CNT mechanical resonator to a superconducting circuit which i