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Sample records for superconducting interference device

  1. Medical applications of superconducting quantum interference devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Gen

    2011-01-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) are applied to clinical areas and basic medical science fields because of their potential for measuring a minute magnetic signal from the human body. Magnetoencephalography, one of their applications, is used for the functional mapping of the brain cortex before surgery and the localization of focus of epilepsy. Recently, their applications to the early-stage detection of dementia and the localization of brain ischemia are suggested. Another application of SQUIDs is magnetospinography, which detects the conduction block in spinal cord signal propagation. (author)

  2. Method of making an improved superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.T.; Falco, C.M.; Kampwirth, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    An improved superconducting quantum interference device is made by sputtering a thin film of an alloy of three parts niobium to one part tin in a pattern comprising a closed loop with a narrow region, depositing a thin film of a radiation shield such as copper over the niobium-tin, scribing a narrow line in the copper over the narrow region, exposing the structure at the scribed line to radiation and removing the deposited copper

  3. Computational and Mathematical Modeling of Coupled Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Susan Anne Elizabeth

    This research focuses on conducting an extensive computational investigation and mathematical analysis into the average voltage response of arrays of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). These arrays will serve as the basis for the development of a sensitive, low noise, significantly lower Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) antenna integrated with Low-Noise Amplifier (LNA) using the SQUID technology. The goal for this antenna is to be capable of meeting all requirements for Guided Missile Destroyers (DDG) 1000 class ships for Information Operations/Signals Intelligence (IO/SIGINT) applications in Very High Frequency/Ultra High Frequency (V/UHF) bands. The device will increase the listening capability of receivers by moving technology into a new regime of energy detection allowing wider band, smaller size, more sensitive, stealthier systems. The smaller size and greater sensitivity will allow for ships to be “de-cluttered” of their current large dishes and devices, replacing everything with fewer and smaller SQUID antenna devices. The fewer devices present on the deck of a ship, the more invisible the ship will be to enemy forces. We invent new arrays of SQUIDs, optimized for signal detection with very high dynamic range and excellent spur-free dynamic range, while maintaining extreme small size (and low radar cross section), wide bandwidth, and environmentally noise limited sensitivity, effectively shifting the bottle neck of receiver systems forever away from the antenna itself deeper into the receiver chain. To accomplish these goals we develop and validate mathematical models for different designs of SQUID arrays and use them to invent a new device and systems design. This design is capable of significantly exceeding, per size weight and power, state-of-the-art receiver system measures of performance, such as bandwidth, sensitivity, dynamic range, and spurious-free dynamic range.

  4. A voltage biased superconducting quantum interference device bootstrap circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Xiaoming; Wang Huiwu; Wang Yongliang; Dong Hui; Jiang Mianheng; Zhang Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I; Offenhaeusser, Andreas; Mueck, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We present a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) readout circuit operating in the voltage bias mode and called a SQUID bootstrap circuit (SBC). The SBC is an alternative implementation of two existing methods for suppression of room-temperature amplifier noise: additional voltage feedback and current feedback. Two circuit branches are connected in parallel. In the dc SQUID branch, an inductively coupled coil connected in series provides the bias current feedback for enhancing the flux-to-current coefficient. The circuit branch parallel to the dc SQUID branch contains an inductively coupled voltage feedback coil with a shunt resistor in series for suppressing the preamplifier noise current by increasing the dynamic resistance. We show that the SBC effectively reduces the preamplifier noise to below the SQUID intrinsic noise. For a helium-cooled planar SQUID magnetometer with a SQUID inductance of 350 pH, a flux noise of about 3 μΦ 0 Hz -1/2 and a magnetic field resolution of less than 3 fT Hz -1/2 were obtained. The SBC leads to a convenient direct readout electronics for a dc SQUID with a wider adjustment tolerance than other feedback schemes.

  5. Multiqubit quantum phase gate using four-level superconducting quantum interference devices coupled to superconducting resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waseem, Muhammad; Irfan, Muhammad [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Qamar, Shahid, E-mail: shahid_qamar@pieas.edu.pk [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, we propose a scheme to realize three-qubit quantum phase gate of one qubit simultaneously controlling two target qubits using four-level superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to a superconducting resonator. The two lowest levels Divides 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket and Divides 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket of each SQUID are used to represent logical states while the higher energy levels Divides 2 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket and Divides 3 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket are utilized for gate realization. Our scheme does not require adiabatic passage, second order detuning, and the adjustment of the level spacing during gate operation which reduce the gate time significantly. The scheme is generalized for an arbitrary n-qubit quantum phase gate. We also apply the scheme to implement three-qubit quantum Fourier transform.

  6. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a DC superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinis, J.M.; Hilbert, C.; Clarke, J.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of amplifying a radiofrequency signal consisting of: disposing a single symmetrically biased dc SQUID and an input coil within a superconducting shield, the dc SQUID having a superconducting ring interrupted by two shunted Josephson junctions, and the input coil being inductively coupled solely to the ring of the single SQUID, establishing a constant magnetic flux threading the SQUID ring, applying the radiofrequency signal to the input coil from outside of the superconducting shield, obtaining an amplified radiofrequency signal solely from across the ring of the single SQUID, transmitting the amplified radiofrequency signal from across the SQUID ring to the outside of the superconducting shield

  7. Automatic adjustment of bias current for direct current superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makie-Fukuda, K.; Hotta, M.; Okajima, K.; Kado, H.

    1993-01-01

    A new method of adjusting the bias current of dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is described. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratio of a SQUID magnetometer connected in a flux-locked loop configuration is proportional to the second harmonic of the output signal from the SQUID. A circuit configuration that can automatically optimize a SQUID's bias current by measuring this second harmonic and adjusting the bias current accordingly is proposed

  8. A method for quantitative nondestructive evaluation using high critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Fumio; Nagashima, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Daisuke; Kasai, Naoko

    1998-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a computational method for detecting and characterizing defect shapes in conducting materials using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The mathematical model is described by electrical potential problems with mixed boundary condition. The model output is then represented by Biot-Savart's law. The estimation scheme is proposed for reconstructing defect shapes in sample materials with defect. Successful numerical results are reported in order to show the feasibility of the proposed algorithms. (author)

  9. A method for quantitative nondestructive evaluation using high critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Fumio; Nagashima, Yoshinori [Osaka Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Suzuki, Daisuke; Kasai, Naoko

    1998-06-01

    This paper is concerned with a computational method for detecting and characterizing defect shapes in conducting materials using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The mathematical model is described by electrical potential problems with mixed boundary condition. The model output is then represented by Biot-Savart`s law. The estimation scheme is proposed for reconstructing defect shapes in sample materials with defect. Successful numerical results are reported in order to show the feasibility of the proposed algorithms. (author)

  10. Symposium on applications of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The abstracts are given of thirteen papers presented at a ''SQUID Symposium'' organized by the Division of Materials Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy and held March 23--25, 1978, at the University of Virginia. Since SQUID systems have already been utilized in feasibility demonstration in geothermal reservoir exploration, it was recognized that these devices also hold great potential for many other important scientific measurements. Many of these are energy-related, and others include forefront investigations in a diverse group of scientific areas, from biomedical to earthquake monitoring. Research in SQUIDs has advanced so rapidly in recent years that it was felt that a symposium to review the current status and future prospects of the devices would be timely. The abstracts given present an overview of work in this area and hopefully provide an opportunity to increase awareness among basic and applied scientists of the inherent implications of the extreme measurement sensitivity in advanced SQUID systems

  11. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  12. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems

  13. Evaluation of the magnetic properties of cosmetic contact lenses with a superconducting quantum interference device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kagayaki; Shirakawa, Naoki; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Tawara, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Akihiro; Nakai, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the magnetization of 21 cosmetic contact lens samples that included various coloring materials with a superconducting quantum interference device with regard to magnetic resonance (MR) safety. We found 7 samples were ferromagnetic; two had both ferromagnetic and diamagnetic properties; and the rest were diamagnetic. The saturated magnetization of the most ferromagnetic sample was 15.0 µJ/T, which yielded a magnetically induced displacement force of 90.0 µN when the spatial gradient of the static magnetic field was 6.0 T/m. The force was less than one-third of the gravitational force.

  14. Proximity effect bilayer nano superconducting quantum interference devices for millikelvin magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blois, A., E-mail: a.blois@ucl.ac.uk; Rozhko, S.; Romans, E. J. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London (UCL), 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Hao, L.; Gallop, J. C. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-21

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) incorporating thin film nanobridges as weak links have sensitivities approaching that required for single spin detection at 4.2 K. However, due to thermal hysteresis they are difficult to operate at much lower temperatures which hinder their application to many quantum measurements. To overcome this, we have developed nanoscale SQUIDs made from titanium-gold proximity bilayers. We show that their electrical properties are consistent with a theoretical model developed for heat flow in bilayers and demonstrate that they enable magnetic measurements to be made on a sample at system temperatures down to 60 mK.

  15. Rotation gate for a three-level superconducting quantum interference device qubit with resonant interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.-P.; Han Siyuan

    2006-01-01

    We show a way to realize an arbitrary rotation gate in a three-level superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubit using resonant interaction. In this approach, the two logical states of the qubit are represented by the two lowest levels of the SQUID and a higher-energy intermediate level is utilized for the gate manipulation. By considering spontaneous decay from the intermediate level during the gate operation, we present a formula for calculating average fidelity over all possible initial states. Finally, based on realistic system parameters, we show that an arbitrary rotation gate can be achieved with a high fidelity in a SQUID

  16. Superconducting analogs of quantum optical phenomena: Macroscopic quantum superpositions and squeezing in a superconducting quantum-interference device ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everitt, M.J.; Clark, T.D.; Stiffell, P.B.; Prance, R.J.; Prance, H.; Vourdas, A.; Ralph, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we explore the quantum behavior of a superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) ring which has a significant Josephson coupling energy. We show that the eigenfunctions of the Hamiltonian for the ring can be used to create macroscopic quantum superposition states of the ring. We also show that the ring potential may be utilized to squeeze coherent states. With the SQUID ring as a strong contender as a device for manipulating quantum information, such properties may be of great utility in the future. However, as with all candidate systems for quantum technologies, decoherence is a fundamental problem. In this paper we apply an open systems approach to model the effect of coupling a quantum-mechanical SQUID ring to a thermal bath. We use this model to demonstrate the manner in which decoherence affects the quantum states of the ring

  17. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Mok, E-mail: jmkim@kriss.re.kr; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong [Brain Cognition Measurement Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  18. Implementation of quantum partial search with superconducting quantum interference device qudits in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong-Yi; Wu Chun-Wang; Chen Yu-Bo; Lin Yuan-Gen; Chen Ping-Xing; Li Cheng-Zu

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to implement the quantum partial search of the database separated into any number of blocks with qudits, D-level quantum systems. Compared with the partial search using qubits, our method needs fewer iteration steps and uses the carriers of the information more economically. To illustrate how to realize the idea with concrete physical systems, we propose a scheme to carry out a twelve-dimensional partial search of the database partitioned into three blocks with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in cavity QED. Through the appropriate modulation of the amplitudes of the microwave pulses, the scheme can overcome the non-identity of the cavity—SQUID coupling strengths due to the parameter variations resulting from the fabrication processes. Numerical simulation under the influence of the cavity and SQUID decays shows that the scheme could be achieved efficiently within current state-of-the-art technology

  19. Superconducting Nonlinear Kinetic Inductance Devices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Superconducting quantum interference devices, or SQUIDs, are by far the most sensitive magnetometers available, but two issues limit their commercial potential:...

  20. An ultra-sensitive and wideband magnetometer based on a superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Hömmen, Peter; Drung, Dietmar; Körber, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic field noise in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) used for biomagnetic research such as magnetoencephalography or ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance is usually limited by instrumental dewar noise. We constructed a wideband, ultra-low noise system with a 45 mm diameter superconducting pick-up coil inductively coupled to a current sensor SQUID. Thermal noise in the liquid helium dewar is minimized by using aluminized polyester fabric as superinsulation and aluminum oxide strips as heat shields. With a magnetometer pick-up coil in the center of the Berlin magnetically shielded room 2 (BMSR2), a noise level of around 150 aT Hz-1/2 is achieved in the white noise regime between about 20 kHz and the system bandwidth of about 2.5 MHz. At lower frequencies, the resolution is limited by magnetic field noise arising from the walls of the shielded room. Modeling the BMSR2 as a closed cube with continuous μ-metal walls, we can quantitatively reproduce its measured field noise.

  1. Superconducting quantum interference device microscopy of fluxoids in superconducting rings and artificially layered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirtley, J R; Tsuei, C C; Tafuri, F; Medaglia, P G; Orgiani, P; Balestrino, G

    2004-01-01

    The SQUID microscope has the advantages of excellent field sensitivity, small interaction between the sensor and the sample, and a linear, easily calibrated response. It has the disadvantages of modest spatial resolution and the requirement of a cooled sensor. In this paper we will present results from two applications of the SQUID microscope, chosen with these advantages and disadvantages in mind. First, we have found that the distribution of final fluxoid states of quenched superconducting rings can be accounted for by using a mechanism of the freeze-out of thermally activated fluxoids. This mechanism is complementary to one proposed by Kibble and Zurek in connection with tests of models of the generation of topological singularities in the early development of the universe, and which relies only on causality to produce a freeze-out of the order of parameter fluctuations. Second, we have studied Pearl vortices in [BaCuO x ] n /[CaCuO 2 ] m (CBCO) artificial superlattice structures, with as few as three superconducting CuO 2 layers. The Pearl penetration depths of vortices trapped in these films, which should be inversely proportional to the areal superfluid density, are very long (up to ∼1 mm), as expected. In both cases it would be difficult to image fluxoids that generate such weak magnetic fields using any other technique

  2. Parasitic effects in superconducting quantum interference device-based radiation comb generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosisio, R., E-mail: riccardo.bosisio@nano.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); NEST, Instituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Giazotto, F., E-mail: giazotto@sns.it [NEST, Instituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Solinas, P., E-mail: paolo.solinas@spin.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

    2015-12-07

    We study several parasitic effects on the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) driven by an external magnetic field. This system can be used as a radiation generator similarly to what is done in optics and metrology, and allows one to generate up to several hundreds of harmonics of the driving frequency. First we take into account how the assumption of a finite loop geometrical inductance and junction capacitance in each SQUID may alter the operation of the devices. Then, we estimate the effect of imperfections in the fabrication of an array of SQUIDs, which is an unavoidable source of errors in practical situations. We show that the role of the junction capacitance is, in general, negligible, whereas the geometrical inductance has a beneficial effect on the performance of the device. The errors on the areas and junction resistance asymmetries may deteriorate the performance, but their effect can be limited to a large extent by a suitable choice of fabrication parameters.

  3. Rotational population patterns and searches for the nuclear SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.J.; Farhan, A.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Ring, P.; Stoyer, M.A.

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents new theoretical results for rotational population patterns in the nuclear SQUID effect. (The term nuclear SQUID is in analogy to the solid-state Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices.) The SQUID effect is an interesting new twist to an old quest to understand Coriolis anti-pairing (CAP) effects in nuclear rotational bands. Two-neutron transfer reaction cross sections among high-spin states have long been touted as more specific CAP probes than other nuclear properties. Heavy projectiles like Sn or Pb generally are recommended to pump the deformed nucleus to as high spin as possible for transfer. The interference and sign reversal of 2n transfer amplitudes at high spin, as predicted in the early SQUID work imposes the difficult requirement of Coulomb pumping to near back-bending spins at closest approach. For Pb on rare earths we find a dramatic departure from sudden-approximation, so that the population depression occurs as low as final spin 10h. 14 refs., 8 figs

  4. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, Carmine, E-mail: carmine.granata@cnr.it; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-19

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  5. Inductance analysis of superconducting quantum interference devices with 3D nano-bridge junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ruoting; Li, Guanqun; Wu, Long; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Lei; Ren, Jie; Wang, Zhen

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with 3D nano-bridge junctions can be miniaturized into nano-SQUIDs that are able to sense a few spins in a large magnetic field. Among all device parameters, the inductance is key to the performance of SQUIDs with 3D nano-bridge junctions. Here, we measured the critical-current magnetic flux modulation curves of 12 devices with three design types using a current strip-line directly coupled to the SQUID loop. A best flux modulation depth of 71% was achieved for our 3D Nb SQUID. From the modulation curves, we extracted the inductance values of the current stripe-line in each design and compared them with the corresponding simulation results of InductEX. In this way, London penetration depths of 110 and 420 nm were determined for our Nb (niobium) and NbN (niobium nitride) films, respectively. Furthermore, we showed that inductances of 11 and 119 pH for Nb and NbN 3D nano-bridge junctions, respectively, dominated the total inductance of our SQUID loops which are 23 pH for Nb and 255 pH for NbN. A screening parameter being equal to one suggests optimal critical currents of 89.6 and 8.1 μA for Nb and NbN SQUIDs, respectively. Additionally, intrinsic flux noise of 110 ± 40 nΦ0/(Hz)1/2 is calculated for the Nb SQUIDs with 3D nano-bridge junctions by Langevin simulation.

  6. Advances in biomagnetic research using high- T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hong-Chang [Department of Physics/Institute of Applied Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, S Y [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Liao, Shu-Hsien, E-mail: hcyang@phys.ntu.edu.t [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2009-09-15

    This review reports the advances of biomagnetic research using high- T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). It especially focuses on SQUID-detected magnetocardiography (MCG), magnetically labeled immunoassays (MLIs) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance and imaging (NMR/MRI). The progress in MCG that scientists have made and the encountered challenges are discussed here. This study includes the early detection of the electromagnetic change in cardiac activity in animal studies of hypercholesterolemic rabbits, which suggests the possibility of early diagnosis of cardiac disease in clinical applications. The progress on MLIs using measurements of remanence, magnetic relaxation and magnetic susceptibility reduction is presented. The wash-free immunomagnetic reduction shows both high sensitivity and high specificity. NMR/MRI of high spectral resolution and of high signal-to-noise ratio are addressed and discussed. The proton-phosphate J-coupling of trimethyl phosphate ((CH{sub 3}){sub 3}PO{sub 4}) in one shot in microtesla fields is demonstrated. The prospects of biomagnetic applications are addressed. (topical review)

  7. Nanohertz frequency determination for the gravity probe B high frequency superconducting quantum interference device signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, M; Conklin, J W; Kozaczuk, J; Berberian, J E; Keiser, G M; Silbergleit, A S; Worden, P; Santiago, D I

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we present a method to measure the frequency and the frequency change rate of a digital signal. This method consists of three consecutive algorithms: frequency interpolation, phase differencing, and a third algorithm specifically designed and tested by the authors. The succession of these three algorithms allowed a 5 parts in 10(10) resolution in frequency determination. The algorithm developed by the authors can be applied to a sampled scalar signal such that a model linking the harmonics of its main frequency to the underlying physical phenomenon is available. This method was developed in the framework of the gravity probe B (GP-B) mission. It was applied to the high frequency (HF) component of GP-B's superconducting quantum interference device signal, whose main frequency f(z) is close to the spin frequency of the gyroscopes used in the experiment. A 30 nHz resolution in signal frequency and a 0.1 pHz/s resolution in its decay rate were achieved out of a succession of 1.86 s-long stretches of signal sampled at 2200 Hz. This paper describes the underlying theory of the frequency measurement method as well as its application to GP-B's HF science signal.

  8. Metallic Contaminant Detection using a High-Temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Akai, Tomohiro; Takemoto, Makoto; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Takeyoshi; Ikeda, Yoshio; Suzuki, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    We develop magnetic metallic contaminant detectors using high-temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (HTS-SQUIDs) for industrial products. Finding ultra-small metallic contaminants is an important issue for manufacturers producing commercial products such as lithium ion batteries. If such contaminants cause damages, the manufacturer of the product suffers a big financial loss due to having to recall the faulty products. Previously, we described a system for finding such ultra-small particles in food. In this study, we describe further developments of the system, for the reduction of the effect of the remnant field of the products, and we test the parallel magnetization of the products to generate the remnant field only at both ends of the products. In addition, we use an SQUID gradiometer in place of the magnetometer to reduce the edge effect by measuring the magnetic field gradient. We test the performances of the system and find that tiny iron particles as small as 50 × 50 μm 2 on the electrode of a lithium ion battery could be clearly detected. This detection level is difficult to achieve when using other methods. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  9. Frequency multiplexed superconducting quantum interference device readout of large bolometer arrays for cosmic microwave background measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, M A; Lueker, M; Aird, K A; Bender, A N; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H-M; Clarke, J; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Flanigan, D I; de Haan, T; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Johnson, B R; Joseph, J; Keisler, R; Kennedy, J; Kermish, Z; Lanting, T M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Luong-Van, D; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Montroy, T E; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Richards, P L; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Schwan, D; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vu, C; Westbrook, B; Williamson, R

    2012-07-01

    A technological milestone for experiments employing transition edge sensor bolometers operating at sub-Kelvin temperature is the deployment of detector arrays with 100s-1000s of bolometers. One key technology for such arrays is readout multiplexing: the ability to read out many sensors simultaneously on the same set of wires. This paper describes a frequency-domain multiplexed readout system which has been developed for and deployed on the APEX-SZ and South Pole Telescope millimeter wavelength receivers. In this system, the detector array is divided into modules of seven detectors, and each bolometer within the module is biased with a unique ∼MHz sinusoidal carrier such that the individual bolometer signals are well separated in frequency space. The currents from all bolometers in a module are summed together and pre-amplified with superconducting quantum interference devices operating at 4 K. Room temperature electronics demodulate the carriers to recover the bolometer signals, which are digitized separately and stored to disk. This readout system contributes little noise relative to the detectors themselves, is remarkably insensitive to unwanted microphonic excitations, and provides a technology pathway to multiplexing larger numbers of sensors.

  10. High temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device system for detection of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzell, Alf

    2012-01-01

    This doctoral thesis was aimed at establishing a set-up with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) radio-frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technology for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and in particular for testing applications of magnetic nanoparticle immunoassays. It was part of the EU-project ''Biodiagnostics'' running from 2005 to 2008. The method of magnetic binding assays was developed as an alternative to other methods of concentration determination like enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or fluorescent immunoassay. The ELISA has sensitivities down to analyte-concentrations of pg/ml. Multiple incubation and washing steps have to be performed for these techniques, the analyte has to diffuse to the site of binding. The magnetic assay uses magnetic nanoparticles as markers for the substance to be detected. It is being explored by current research and shows similar sensitivity compared to ELISA but in contrast - does not need any washing and can be read out directly after binding - can be applied in solution with opaque media, e.g. blood or muddy water - additionally allows magnetic separation or concentration - in combination with small magnetoresistive or Hall sensors, allows detection of only a few particles or even single beads. For medical or environmental samples, maybe opaque and containing a multitude of substances, it would be advantageous to devise an instrument, which allows to be read out quickly and with high sensitivity. Due to the mentioned items the magnetic assay might be a possibility here.

  11. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-06-09

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 6} L. monocytogenes for a 20 {micro}L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 {+-} 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria.

  12. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 ± 1.1) x 10 6 L. monocytogenes for a 20 (micro)L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 ± 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria

  13. Investigation and reduction of excess low-frequency noise in rf superconducting quantum interference devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueck, M.; Heiden, C.; Clarke, J.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed study has been made of the low-frequency excess noise of rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), fabricated from thin niobium films and operated at 4.2 K, with rf bias frequencies of 0.15, 1.7, and 3 GHz. When the SQUIDs were operated in an open-loop configuration in the absence of low-frequency flux modulation, the demodulated rf voltage exhibited a substantial level 1/f noise, which was essentially independent of the rf bias frequency. As the rf bias frequency was increased, the crossover frequency at which the 1/f noise power was equal to the white noise power moved to higher frequencies, because of the reduction in white noise. On the other hand, when the SQUID was flux modulated at 50 kHz and operated in a flux locked loop, no 1/f noise was observed at frequencies above 0.5 Hz. A detailed description of how the combination of rf bias and flux modulation removes 1/f noise due to critical current fluctuations is given. Thus, the results demonstrate that the 1/f noise observed in these SQUIDs is generated by critical current fluctuations, rather than by the hopping of flux vortices in the niobium films

  14. Step edge Josephson junctions and high temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, Alasdair J.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) gradiometers based on the high temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO). A step-edge Josephson junction fabrication process was developed to produce sufficiently steep (>60 deg) step-edges such that junctions exhibited RSJ-like current-voltage characteristics. The mean I C R N product of a sample of twenty step-edge junctions was 130μV. Step-edge dc SQUIDs with inductances between 67pH and 114pH were fabricated. Generally the SQUIDs had an intrinsic white flux noise in the 10-30μΦ 0 /√Hz range, with the best device, a 70pH SQUID, exhibiting a white flux noise of 5μΦ 0 /√Hz. Different first-order SQUID gradiometer designs were fabricated from single layers of YBCO. Two single-layer gradiometer (SLG) designs were fabricated on 10x10mm 2 substrates. The best balance and lowest gradient sensitivity measured for these devices were 1/300 and 308fT/cm√Hz (at 1 kHz) respectively. The larger baseline and larger flux capture area of the pick-up loops in a large area SLG design, fabricated on 30x10mm 2 substrates, resulted in significant improvements in the balance and gradient field sensitivity with 1/1000 and 50fT/cm√Hz (at 1kHz) measured respectively. To reduce the uniform field effective area of SLOs and therefore reduce the direct pick-up of environmental field noise when operated unshielded, a novel gradiometric SQUID (G-SQUID) device was developed. Fabricated from a single layer of YBCO, the G-SQUIDs with inductances of 67pH, had small uniform field effective areas of approximately 2μm 2 - more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the uniform field effective areas of conventional narrow linewidth SQUIDs of similar inductance. Two designs of G-SQUID were fabricated on 10x10mm 2 substrates. Due to their small effective areas, when cooled unshielded these devices showed no increase in their white flux noise. The best balance achieved for a G

  15. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 (micro)T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz -1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm 3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm 3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm 3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T 1 ) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T 1 of ex vivo normal and cancerous

  16. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  17. High-resolution imaging of magnetic fields using scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong de Los Santos, Luis E.

    Development of a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope system with interchangeable sensor configurations for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature (RT) samples with sub-millimeter resolution. The low-critical-temperature (Tc) niobium-based monolithic SQUID sensor is mounted in the tip of a sapphire rod and thermally anchored to the cryostat helium reservoir. A 25 mum sapphire window separates the vacuum space from the RT sample. A positioning mechanism allows adjusting the sample-to-sensor spacing from the top of the Dewar. I have achieved a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100 mum, which could be maintained for periods of up to 4 weeks. Different SQUID sensor configurations are necessary to achieve the best combination of spatial resolution and field sensitivity for a given magnetic source. For imaging thin sections of geological samples, I used a custom-designed monolithic low-Tc niobium bare SQUID sensor, with an effective diameter of 80 mum, and achieved a field sensitivity of 1.5 pT/Hz1/2 and a magnetic moment sensitivity of 5.4 x 10-18 Am2/Hz1/2 at a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100 mum in the white noise region for frequencies above 100 Hz. Imaging action currents in cardiac tissue requires higher field sensitivity, which can only be achieved by compromising spatial resolution. I developed a monolithic low-Tc niobium multiloop SQUID sensor, with sensor sizes ranging from 250 mum to 1 mm, and achieved sensitivities of 480 - 180 fT/Hz1/2 in the white noise region for frequencies above 100 Hz, respectively. For all sensor configurations, the spatial resolution was comparable to the effective diameter and limited by the sensor-to-sample spacing. Spatial registration allowed us to compare high-resolution images of magnetic fields associated with action currents and optical recordings of transmembrane potentials to study the bidomain nature of cardiac tissue or to match petrography to magnetic field maps in thin sections of

  18. A superconducting quantum interference device based read-out of a subattonewton force sensor operating at millikelvin temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usenko, O.; Vinante, A.; Wijts, G.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to measure the displacement of a nanomechanical resonator at cryogenic temperature. The technique is based on the use of a superconducting quantum interference device to detect the magnetic flux change induced by a magnetized particle attached on the end of the resonator. Unlike conventional interferometric techniques, our detection scheme does not involve direct power dissipation in the resonator, and therefore, is particularly suitable for ultralow temperature applications. We demonstrate its potential by cooling an ultrasoft silicon cantilever to a noise temperature of 25 mK, corresponding to a subattonewton thermal force noise of 0.5 aN/√(Hz).

  19. Quantum phase slip interference device based on a shaped superconducting nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorin, Alexander; Hongisto, Terhi [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    As was predicted by Mooij and Nazarov, the superconducting nanowires may exhibit, depending on the impedance of external electromagnetic environment, not only quantum slips of phase, but also the quantum-mechanically dual effect of coherent transfer of single Cooper pairs. We propose and realize a transistor-like superconducting circuit including two serially connected segments of a narrow (10 nm by 18 nm) nanowire joint by a wider segment with a capacitively coupled gate in between. This circuit is made of amorphous NbSi film and embedded in a network of on-chip Cr microresistors ensuring a high external impedance (>>h/e{sup 2}∼25.8 kΩ) and, eventually, a charge bias regime. Virtual quantum phase slips in two narrow segments of the wire lead in this case to quantum interference of voltages on these segments making this circuit dual to the dc SQUID. Our samples demonstrated appreciable Coulomb blockade voltage (analog of critical current of the SQUID) and remarkable periodic modulation of this blockade by an electrostatic gate (analog of flux modulation in the SQUID). The obtained experimental results and the model of this QPS transistor will be presented.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance with dc SQUID [Super-conducting QUantum Interference Device] preamplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, N.Q.; Heaney, M.B.; Clark, J.; Newitt, D.; Wald, L.; Hahn, E.L.; Bierlecki, A.; Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    Sensitive radio-frequency (rf) amplifiers based on dc Superconducting QUantum Interface Devices (SQUIDS) are available for frequencies up to 200 MHz. At 4.2 K, the gain and noise temperature of a typical tuned amplifier are 18.6 +- 0.5 dB and 1.7 +- 0.5 K at 93 MHz. These amplifiers are being applied to a series of novel experiments on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The high sensitivity of these amplifiers was demonstrated in the observation of ''nuclear spin noise'', the emission of photons by 35 Cl nuclei in a state of zero polarization. In the more conventional experiments in which one applies a large rf pulse to the spins, a Q-spoiler, consisting of a series array of Josephson junctions, is used to reduce the Q of the input circuit to a very low value during the pulse. The Q-spoiler enables the circuit to recover quickly after the pulse, and has been used in an NQR experiment to achieve a sensitivity of about 2 /times/ 10 16 nuclear Bohr magnetons in a single free precession signal with a bandwidth of 10 kHz. In a third experiment, a sample containing 35 Cl nuclei was placed in a capacitor and the signal detected electrically using a tuned SQUID amplifier and Q-spoiler. In this way, the electrical polarization induced by the precessing Cl nuclear quadrupole moments was detected: this is the inverse of the Stark effect in NQR. Two experiments involving NMR have been carried out. In the first, the 30 MHz resonance in 119 Sn nuclei is detected with a tuned amplifier and Q-spoiler, and a single pulse resolution of 10 18 nuclear Bohr magnetons in a bandwidth of 25 kHz has been achieved. For the second, a low frequency NMR system has been developed that uses an untuned input circuit coupled to the SQUID. The resonance in 195 Pt nuclei has been observed at 55 kHz in a field of 60 gauss. 23 refs., 11 figs

  1. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs

  2. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Yong-Ho; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs.

  3. Linearity of high-Tc dc superconducting quantum interference device operated in a flux-locked loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, D.G.; Dantsker, E.; Kleiner, R.; Mueck, M.; Clarke, J.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the linearity of a high transition temperature dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) operated at 77 K with 130 kHz flux modulation in a flux-locked loop. The degree of nonlinearity was determined from harmonic generation. A sinusoidal magnetic flux with harmonic content less than -130 dB was applied to the SQUID, which was cooled in a magnetic field below 10 -7 T, and the harmonics at the output of the flux-locked loop were measured with a spectrum analyzer. For input signals at frequencies up to 248 Hz and amplitudes up to 20Φ 0 rms (Φ 0 is the flux quantum), the second, third, and fourth harmonics were each at least 115 dB below the fundamental. At higher frequencies the harmonic content began to increase because of the reduction in the open-loop gain of the flux-locked loop. The magnitude of the harmonics was not measurably changed when the SQUID was cooled in a field of 100 μT. The amplitudes of the even harmonics depended critically on the amplitude of the 130 kHz flux modulation, and became zero when its peak-to-peak value was precisely Φ 0 /2. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  4. Localization of firearm projectiles in the human body using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Barbosa, C.

    2004-06-01

    A technique had been previously developed, based on magnetic field measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device sensor, to localize in three dimensions steel needles lost in the human body. In all six cases that were treated until now, the technique allowed easy surgical localization of the needles with high accuracy. The technique decreases, by a large factor, the surgery time for foreign body extraction, and also reduces the generally high odds of failure. The method is accurate, noninvasive, and innocuous, and with clear clinical importance. Despite the importance of needle localization, the most prevalent foreign body in the modern society is the firearm projectile (bullet), generally composed of lead, a paramagnetic material, thus not presenting a remanent magnetic field as steel needles do. On the other hand, since lead is a good conductor, eddy current detection techniques can be employed, by applying an alternating magnetic field with the aid of excitation coils. The primary field induces eddy currents on the lead, which in turn generate a secondary magnetic field that can be detected by a magnetometer, and give information about position and volume of the conducting foreign body. In this article we present a theoretical study for the development of a localization technique for lead bullets inside the human body. Initially, we present a model for the secondary magnetic field generated by the bullet, given a known applied field. After that, we study possible excitation systems, and propose a localization algorithm based on the detected magnetic field.

  5. High temperature superconductor micro-superconducting-quantum-interference-device magnetometer for magnetization measurement of a microscale magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Keiji; Mori, Hatsumi; Yamaguchi, Akira; Ishimoto, Hidehiko; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Kuriki, Shinya; Hozumi, Toshiya; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a high temperature superconductor (HTS) micrometer-sized dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer for high field and high temperature operation. It was fabricated from YBa2Cu3O7-delta of 92 nm in thickness with photolithography techniques to have a hole of 4x9 microm2 and 2 microm wide grain boundary Josephson junctions. Combined with a three dimensional magnetic field coil system, the modulation patterns of critical current Ic were observed for three different field directions. They were successfully used to measure the magnetic properties of a molecular ferrimagnetic microcrystal (23x17x13 microm3), [Mn2(H2O)2(CH3COO)][W(CN)8]2H2O. The magnetization curve was obtained in magnetic field up to 0.12 T between 30 and 70 K. This is the first to measure the anisotropy of hysteresis curve in the field above 0.1 T with an accuracy of 10(-12) J T(-1) (10(-9) emu) with a HTS micro-SQUID magnetometer.

  6. Effect of capacitive feedback on the characteristics of direct current superconducting quantum interference device coupled to a multiturn input coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minotani, T.; Enpuku, K.; Kuroki, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Distortion of voltage versus flux (V endash Φ) relation of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) coupled to a multiturn input coil is studied. First, resonant behavior of the coupled SQUID due to the so-called input coil resonance is clarified. It is shown that large rf noise flux is produced by the input coil resonance. This rf flux is added to the SQUID, and results in large rf voltage across the SQUID. In the case where parasitic capacitance exists between the input coil and the ground of the SQUID, this rf voltage produces the rf flux again, i.e., a feedback loop for the rf flux is formed. Taking into account this capacitive feedback, we study the V endash Φ relation of the coupled SQUID. Numerical simulation shows that the V endash Φ relation is distorted considerably by the feedback mechanism. The simulation result explains well the experimental V endash Φ relation of the coupled SQUID. The combination of the input coil resonance with the capacitive feedback is the most likely mechanism for the distorted V endash Φ curve of the coupled SQUID. The condition for occurrence of the distorted V endash Φ curve due to the capacitive feedback is also obtained, and methods to prevent degradation are discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Enhancements to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) Multiplexer Readout and Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgione, J.; Benford, D. J.; Buchanan, E. D.; Moseley, S. H.; Rebar, J.; Shafer, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Far-infrared detector arrays such as the 16x32 superconducting bolometer array for the SAFIRE instrument (flying on the SOFIA airborne observatory) require systems of readout and control electronics to provide translation between a user-driven, digital PC and the cold, analog world of the cryogenic detector. In 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed their Mark III electronics for purposes of control and readout of their 1x32 SQUID Multiplexer chips. We at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center acquired a Mark 111 system and subsequently designed upgrades to suit our and our collaborators purposes. We developed an arbitrary, programmable multiplexing system that allows the user to cycle through rows in a SQUID array in an infinite number of combinations. We provided hooks in the Mark III system to allow readout of signals from outside the Mark 111 system, such as telescope status information. Finally, we augmented the heart of the system with a new feedback algorithm implementation, flexible diagnostic tools, and informative telemetry.

  8. High-resolution room-temperature sample scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscope configurable for geological and biomagnetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, L. E.; Holzer, J. R.; McBride, K. K.; Lima, E. A.; Baudenbacher, F.; Radparvar, M.

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope system with interchangeable sensor configurations for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature (RT) samples with submillimeter resolution. The low-critical-temperature (Tc) niobium-based monolithic SQUID sensors are mounted on the tip of a sapphire and thermally anchored to the helium reservoir. A 25μm sapphire window separates the vacuum space from the RT sample. A positioning mechanism allows us to adjust the sample-to-sensor spacing from the top of the Dewar. We achieved a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100μm, which could be maintained for periods of up to four weeks. Different SQUID sensor designs are necessary to achieve the best combination of spatial resolution and field sensitivity for a given source configuration. For imaging thin sections of geological samples, we used a custom-designed monolithic low-Tc niobium bare SQUID sensor, with an effective diameter of 80μm, and achieved a field sensitivity of 1.5pT/Hz1/2 and a magnetic moment sensitivity of 5.4×10-18Am2/Hz1/2 at a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100μm in the white noise region for frequencies above 100Hz. Imaging action currents in cardiac tissue requires a higher field sensitivity, which can only be achieved by compromising spatial resolution. We developed a monolithic low-Tc niobium multiloop SQUID sensor, with sensor sizes ranging from 250μm to 1mm, and achieved sensitivities of 480-180fT /Hz1/2 in the white noise region for frequencies above 100Hz, respectively. For all sensor configurations, the spatial resolution was comparable to the effective diameter and limited by the sensor-to-sample spacing. Spatial registration allowed us to compare high-resolution images of magnetic fields associated with action currents and optical recordings of transmembrane potentials to study the bidomain nature of cardiac tissue or to match petrography to magnetic field maps in thin sections of geological samples.

  9. Animal magnetocardiography using superconducting quantum interference device gradiometers assisted with magnetic nanoparticle injection: A sensitive method for early detecting electromagnetic changes induced by hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. C.; Hong, B. F.; Wu, B. H.; Yang, S. Y.; Horng, H. E.; Yang, H. C.; Tseng, W. Y. Isaac; Tseng, W. K.; Liu, Y. B.; Lin, L. C.; Lu, L. S.; Lee, Y. H.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the authors used a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetocardiography (MCG) system consisted of 64-channel low-transition-temperature SQUID gradiometers to detect the MCG signals of hepercholesterolemic rabbits. In addition, the MCG signals were recorded before and after the injection of magnetic nanoparticles into the rabbits' ear veins to investigate the effects of magnetic nanoparticles on the MCG signals. These MCG data were compared to those of normal rabbits to reveal the feasibility for early detection of the electromagnetic changes induced by hypercholesterolemia using MCG with the assistance of magnetic nanoparticle injection.

  10. Preparation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled states with multiple superconducting quantum-interference device qubits or atoms in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chuiping; Han Siyuan

    2004-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states of multiple superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) qubits by the use of a microwave cavity. The scheme operates essentially by creating a single photon through an auxiliary SQUID built in the cavity and performing a joint multiqubit phase shift with assistance of the cavity photon. It is shown that entanglement can be generated using this method, deterministic and independent of the number of SQUID qubits. In addition, we show that the present method can be applied to preparing many atoms in a GHZ entangled state, with tolerance to energy relaxation during the operation

  11. Rf superconducting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, W.H.; Passow, C.

    1975-01-01

    Topics discussed include (1) the theory of superconductors in high-frequency fields (London surface impedance, anomalous normal surface resistance, pippard nonlocal theory, quantum mechanical model, superconductor parameters, quantum mechanical calculation techniques for the surface, impedance, and experimental verification of surface impedance theories); (2) residual resistance (separation of losses, magnetic field effects, surface resistance of imperfect and impure conductors, residual loss due to acoustic coupling, losses from nonideal surfaces, high magnetic field losses, field emission, and nonlinear effects); (3) design and performance of superconducting devices (design considerations, materials and fabrication techniques, measurement of performance, and frequency stability); (4) devices for particle acceleration and deflection (advantages and problems of using superconductors, accelerators for fast particles, accelerators for particles with slow velocities, beam optical devices separators, and applications and projects under way); (5) applications of low-power superconducting resonators (superconducting filters and tuners, oscillators and detectors, mixers and amplifiers, antennas and output tanks, superconducting resonators for materials research, and radiation detection with loaded superconducting resonators); and (6) transmission and delay lines

  12. Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) thin film dc SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference device)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racah, Daniel

    1991-03-01

    Direct current superconducting quantum interferometers (SQUIDs) based on HTSC thin films have been measured and characterized. The thin films used were of different quality: (1) Granular films on Sapphire substrates, prepared either by e-gun evaporation, by laser ablation or by MOCVD (metal oxide chemical vapor deposition), (2) Epitaxial films on MgO substrates. Modulations of the voltage on the SQUIDs as a function of the applied flux have been observed in a wide range of temperatures. The nature of the modulation was found to be strongly dependent on the morphology of the film and on its critical current. The SQUIDs based on granular films were relatively noisy, hysteretic and with a complicated V-phi shape. Those devices based on low quality (lowIc) granular films could be measured only at low temperatures (much lower than 77 K). While those of higher quality (granular films with high Ic) could be measured near to the superconductive transition. The SQUID based on high quality epitaxial film was measured near Tc and showed an anomalous, time dependent behavior.

  13. Direct observation of interlayer Josephson vortices in heavily Pb-doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy by scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Junpei; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Okazaki, Noriaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Nakayama, Yuri; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi; Kishio, Kohji; Motohashi, Teruki; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    Josephson vortices trapped in cross-sectional edge surfaces of Pb 0.6 Bi 1.4 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O y has been directly observed by using a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope. The magnetic field distribution B z around each vortex is substantially anisotropic, compared with the usual vortex in the ab-plane, and is extended over 100 μm toward the in-plane direction. By fitting a theoretical B z function to experimental ones, c-axis penetration depth λ c was estimated to be 11.2 ±0.7 μm, which is in good agreement with the literature value, 12.6 μm, obtained from the Josephson plasma edge frequency. (author)

  14. Non-invasive and high-sensitivity scanning detection of magnetic nanoparticles in animals using high-Tc scanning superconducting-quantum-interference-device biosusceptometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieh, J J; Hong, C Y

    2011-08-01

    Although magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been widely applied to animals in biomedicine, MNPs within animals should be examined in real time, in vivo, and without bio-damaged possibility to evaluate whether the bio-function of MNPs is valid or to further controls the biomedicinal process because of accompanying complex problems such as MNPs distribution and MNPs biodegradation. The non-invasive and high-sensitivity scanning detection of MNPs in animals using ac susceptometry based on a high-T(c) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is presented. The non-invasive results and biopsy results show good agreement, and two gold-standard biomedicine methods, Prussian blue stain and inductively coupled plasma, prove the magnetic results. This confirms that the future clinical diagnosis of bio-functional MNPs could be operated by using scanning SQUID biosusceptometry as conveniently as an ultrasonic probe.

  15. Inductance mode characteristics of a ceramic YBa2Cu3O7-x radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device at 77 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Il'ichev, E. V.; Andreev, A. V.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results on some radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf-SQUID) signal properties are presented. The quantum interferometer was made of ceramic YBa2Cu3O7−x and was due to a low critical current operated in the inductance or nonhysteretic mode. With bias current...... as reference, amplitude variation, and phase shift of the voltage over the tank circuit coupled to the SQUID were measured simultaneously. It is shown that there is qualitative agreement between calculations based on the resistivity shunted junction model and the data. Moreover, using phase detection, signal...... instabilities predicted for the rf-SQUID inductance mode were observed. These signal instabilities may be exploited to enhance the transfer coefficient for measured flux-to-output signal. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  16. Inducing Strong Non-Linearities in a Phonon Trapping Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator Coupled to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Goryachev

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is designed to coherently trap phonons in such a way that they are well confined and immune to suspension losses so they exhibit extremely high acoustic Q-factors at low temperature, with Q × f products of order 10 18 Hz. In this work we couple such a resonator to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID amplifier and investigate effects in the strong signal regime. Both parallel and series connection topologies of the system are investigated. The study reveals significant non-Duffing response that is associated with the nonlinear characteristics of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity provides quasi-periodic structure of the spectrum in both incident power and frequency. The result gives an insight into the open loop behaviour of a future Cryogenic Quartz Oscillator in the strong signal regime.

  17. Fraunhofer regime of operation for superconducting quantum interference filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadrin, A.V.; Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Series arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with incommensurate loop areas, so-called superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIFs), are investigated in the kilohertz and the gigahertz frequency range. In SQIFs made of high-T-c bicrystal junctions the flux...... range of more than 60 dB in the kilohertz range. In the 1-2 GHz range the estimated power gain is 20 dB and the magnetic flux noise level is as low as 10(-4)Phi(0)....

  18. Frequency-domain cascading microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers; beyond limitations originating from room-temperature electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori

    2018-07-01

    A novel approach, frequency-domain cascading microwave multiplexers (MW-Mux), has been proposed and its basic operation has been demonstrated to increase the number of pixels multiplexed in a readout line U of MW-Mux for superconducting detector arrays. This method is an alternative to the challenging development of wideband, large power, and spurious-free room-temperature (300 K) electronics. The readout system for U pixels consists of four main parts: (1) multiplexer chips connected in series those contain U superconducting resonators in total. (2) A cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor amplifier (HEMT). (3) A 300 K microwave frequency comb generator based on N(≡U/M) parallel units of digital-to-analog converters (DAC). (4) N parallel units of 300 K analog-to-digital converters (ADC). Here, M is the number of tones each DAC produces and each ADC handles. The output signal of U detectors multiplexed at the cryogenic stage is transmitted through a cable to the room temperature and divided into N processors where each handles M pixels. Due to the reduction factor of 1/N, U is not anymore dominated by the 300 K electronics but can be increased up to the potential value determined by either the bandwidth or the spurious-free power of the HEMT. Based on experimental results on the prototype system with N = 2 and M = 3, neither excess inter-pixel crosstalk nor excess noise has been observed in comparison with conventional MW-Mux. This indicates that the frequency-domain cascading MW-Mux provides the full (100%) usage of the HEMT band by assigning N 300 K bands on the frequency axis without inter-band gaps.

  19. Three-terminal superconducting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The transistor has a number of properties that make it so useful. The authors discuss these and the additional properties a transistor would need to have for high performance applications at temperatures where superconductivity could contribute advantages to system-level performance. These properties then serve as criteria by which to evaluate three-terminal devices that have been proposed for applications at superconducting temperatures. FETs can retain their transistor properties at low temperatures, but their power consumption is too large for high-speed, high-density cryogenic applications. They discuss in detail why demonstrated superconducting devices with three terminals -Josephson effect based devices, injection controlled weak links, and stacked tunnel junction devices such as the superconducting transistor proposed by K. Gray and the quiteron -- each fail to have true transistor-like properties. They conclude that the potentially very rewarding search for a transistor compatible with superconductivity in high performance applications must be in new directions

  20. Superconductivity and its devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Among the more important developments that are discussed are cryotrons, superconducting motors and generators, and high-field magnets. Cryotrons will create faster and more economical computer systems. Superconducting motors and generators will cost much less to build than conventional electric generators and cut fuel consumption. Moreover, high-field magnets are being used to confine plasma in connection with nuclear fusion. Superconductors have a vital role to play in all of these developments. Most importantly, though, are the magnetic properties of superconductivity. Superconducting magnets are an integral part of nuclear fusion. In addition, high-field magnets are necessary in the use of accelerators, which are needed to study the interactions between elementary particles

  1. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-01

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 104 ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 104 and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √SI = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S21 enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers PMR make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √SI is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of PMR) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of PMR). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the microwave RF-SQUID multiplexer can exhibit √SI ≤ 5 pA/√Hz, i.e., close to √SI of

  2. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-01-01

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 10 4  ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 10 4 and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √S I  = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S 21 enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers P MR make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √S I is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of P MR ) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of P MR ). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the microwave RF-SQUID multiplexer can exhibit

  3. Cooling device of superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthil, R.; Lottin, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    This device is rotating around an horizontal axis. The superconducting coils are contained in a cryogenic enclosure feeded in liquid helium forced circulation. They are related to an electric generator by electric mains each of them comprising a gas exchanger, and an exchanger-evaporator set between the cryogenic device and those exchangers. The exchanger-evaporator is aimed at dissipating the heat arriving by conductors connected to the superconducting coils. According to the invention, the invention includes an annular canalization with horizontal axis in which the connection conductors bathe in liquid helium [fr

  4. Applied superconductivity. Handbook on devices and applications. Vol. 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Paul (ed.) [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik, AG Tieftemperaturphysik

    2015-07-01

    The both volumes contain the following 12 chapters: 1. Fundamentals; 2. Superconducting Materials; 3. Technology, Preparation, and Characterization (bulk materials, thin films, multilayers, wires, tapes; cooling); 4, Superconducting Magnets; 5. Power Applications (superconducting cables, superconducting current leads, fault current limiters, transformers, SMES and flywheels; rotating machines; SmartGrids); 6. Superconductive Passive Devices (superconducting microwave components; cavities for accelerators; superconducting pickup coils; magnetic shields); 7. Applications in Quantum Metrology (superconducting hot electron bolometers; transition edge sensors; SIS Mixers; superconducting photon detectors; applications at Terahertz frequency; detector readout); 8. Superconducting Radiation and Particle Detectors; 9. Superconducting Quantum Interference (SQUIDs); 10. Superconductor Digital Electronics; 11. Other Applications (Josephson arrays as radiation sources. Tunable microwave devices) and 12. Summary and Outlook (of the superconducting devices).

  5. Applied superconductivity. Handbook on devices and applications. Vol. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The both volumes contain the following 12 chapters: 1. Fundamentals; 2. Superconducting Materials; 3. Technology, Preparation, and Characterization (bulk materials, thin films, multilayers, wires, tapes; cooling); 4, Superconducting Magnets; 5. Power Applications (superconducting cables, superconducting current leads, fault current limiters, transformers, SMES and flywheels; rotating machines; SmartGrids); 6. Superconductive Passive Devices (superconducting microwave components; cavities for accelerators; superconducting pickup coils; magnetic shields); 7. Applications in Quantum Metrology (superconducting hot electron bolometers; transition edge sensors; SIS Mixers; superconducting photon detectors; applications at Terahertz frequency; detector readout); 8. Superconducting Radiation and Particle Detectors; 9. Superconducting Quantum Interference (SQUIDs); 10. Superconductor Digital Electronics; 11. Other Applications (Josephson arrays as radiation sources. Tunable microwave devices) and 12. Summary and Outlook (of the superconducting devices).

  6. Readout of the atomtronic quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Tobias; Tan, Joel; Theng, Mark; Dumke, Rainer; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Amico, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    A Bose-Einstein condensate confined in ring shaped lattices interrupted by a weak link and pierced by an effective magnetic flux defines the atomic counterpart of the superconducting quantum interference device: the atomtronic quantum interference device (AQUID). In this paper, we report on the detection of current states in the system through a self-heterodyne protocol. Following the original proposal of the NIST and Paris groups, the ring-condensate many-body wave function interferes with a reference condensate expanding from the center of the ring. We focus on the rf AQUID which realizes effective qubit dynamics. Both the Bose-Hubbard and Gross-Pitaevskii dynamics are studied. For the Bose-Hubbard dynamics, we demonstrate that the self-heterodyne protocol can be applied, but higher-order correlations in the evolution of the interfering condensates are measured to readout of the current states of the system. We study how states with macroscopic quantum coherence can be told apart analyzing the noise in the time of flight of the ring condensate.

  7. Superconducting devices at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.F.

    1978-04-01

    The various ongoing programs in applied superconductivity supported by BNL are summarized, including the development of high field ac and dc superconducting magnets for accelerators and other applications, of microwave deflecting cavities for high energy particle beam separators, and of cables for underground power transmission, and materials research on methods of fabricating new superconductors and on metallurgical properties affecting the performance of superconducting devices

  8. Development of superconducting equipment for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Masayuki; Ueda, Toshio; Hiue, Hisaaki; Ohgushi, Kouzou

    1993-01-01

    At Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., the development of superconductivity was started from 1960, and superconducting equipment for fusion device has been developed for ten years. The superconducting equipment, which is developed for fusion by Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., are able to be grouped in three categories which are current lead, superconducting coil and superconducting bus-line. The current lead is an electrical feeder between a superconducting coil and an electrical power supply. The rated current of developed current lead is 30kA at continuous use and 100kA at short time use respectively. The advanced disk type coil is developed for the toroidal field coil and some coils are developed for critical current measurement. Superconductor is applied to the superconducting bus-line between the superconducting coils and the current leads, and the bus-line is being developed for the Large Helical Device. This report describes an abstract of these equipment. (author)

  9. Quantum transport in bilayer graphene. Fabry-Perot interferences and proximity-induced superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Renjun

    2015-01-01

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) p-n junctions made of hBN-BLG-hBN (hexagonal boron nitride) heterostructures enable ballistic transport over long distances. We investigate Fabry-Perot interferences, and detect that the bilayer-like anti-Klein tunneling transits into single-layer-like Klein tunneling when tuning the Fermi level towards the band edges. Furthermore, the proximity-induced superconductivity has been studied in these devices with Al leads.

  10. Superconducting Quantum Interference based Electromechanical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etaki, S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical sensors are essential tools for the detection of small forces. This thesis presents the dc SQUID as a detector for the displacement of embedded micromechanical resonators. The device geometry and basic operating principle are described. The SQUID displacement detector reaches an excellent

  11. Vacuum Technology for Superconducting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiggiato, P [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    The basic notions of vacuum technology for superconducting applications are presented, with an emphasis on mass and heat transport in free molecular regimes. The working principles and practical details of turbomolecular pumps and cryopumps are introduced. The specific case of the Large Hadron Collider’s cryogenic vacuum system is briefly reviewed.

  12. Development of superconducting power devices in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tixador, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Europe celebrated last year (2008) the 100-year anniversary of the first liquefaction of helium by H. Kammerling Onnes in Leiden. It led to the discovery of superconductivity in 1911. Europe is still active in the development of superconducting (SC) devices. The discovery of high critical temperature materials in 1986, again in Europe, has opened a lot of opportunities for SC devices by broking the 4 K cryogenic bottleneck. Electric networks experience deep changes due to the emergence of dispersed generation (renewable among other) and to the advances in ICT (Information Communication Technologies). The networks of the future will be 'smart grids'. Superconductivity will offer 'smart' devices for these grids like FCL (Fault Current Limiter) or VLI (Very Low Inductance) cable and would certainly play an important part. Superconductivity also will participate to the required sustainable development by lowering the losses and enhancing the mass specific powers. Different SC projects in Europe will be presented (Cable, FCL, SMES, Flywheel and Electrical Machine) but the description is not exhaustive. Nexans has commercialized the first two FCLs without public funds in the European grid (UK and Germany). The Amsterdam HTS cable is an exciting challenge in term of losses for long SC cables. European companies (Nexans, Air Liquide, Siemens, Converteam, ...) are also very active for projects outside Europe (LIPA, DOE FCL, ...).

  13. Applied superconductivity handbook on devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This wide-ranging presentation of applied superconductivity, from fundamentals and materials right up to the latest applications, is an essential reference for physicists and engineers in academic research as well as in the field. Readers looking for a systematic overview on superconducting materials will expand their knowledge and understanding of both low and high Tc superconductors, including organic and magnetic materials. Technology, preparation and characterization are covered for several geometries, but the main benefit of this work lies in its broad coverage of significant applications in power engineering or passive devices, such as filter and antenna or magnetic shields. The reader will also find information on superconducting magnets for diverse applications in mechanical engineering, particle physics, fusion research, medicine and biomagnetism, as well as materials processing. SQUIDS and their usage in medicine or geophysics are thoroughly covered as are applications in quantum metrology, and, las...

  14. Interference lithography for optical devices and coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, Abigail Therese

    Interference lithography can create large-area, defect-free nanostructures with unique optical properties. In this thesis, interference lithography will be utilized to create photonic crystals for functional devices or coatings. For instance, typical lithographic processing techniques were used to create 1, 2 and 3 dimensional photonic crystals in SU8 photoresist. These structures were in-filled with birefringent liquid crystal to make active devices, and the orientation of the liquid crystal directors within the SU8 matrix was studied. Most of this thesis will be focused on utilizing polymerization induced phase separation as a single-step method for fabrication by interference lithography. For example, layered polymer/nanoparticle composites have been created through the one-step two-beam interference lithographic exposure of a dispersion of 25 and 50 nm silica particles within a photopolymerizable mixture at a wavelength of 532 nm. In the areas of constructive interference, the monomer begins to polymerize via a free-radical process and concurrently the nanoparticles move into the regions of destructive interference. The holographic exposure of the particles within the monomer resin offers a single-step method to anisotropically structure the nanoconstituents within a composite. A one-step holographic exposure was also used to fabricate self-healing coatings that use water from the environment to catalyze polymerization. Polymerization induced phase separation was used to sequester an isocyanate monomer within an acrylate matrix. Due to the periodic modulation of the index of refraction between the monomer and polymer, the coating can reflect a desired wavelength, allowing for tunable coloration. When the coating is scratched, polymerization of the liquid isocyanate is catalyzed by moisture in air; if the indices of the two polymers are matched, the coatings turn transparent after healing. Interference lithography offers a method of creating multifunctional self

  15. Superconducting quantum interference monitor of charged particle beam current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertsev, K.F.; Mikheev, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Description and test results of the monitor of charged particle beam current on the base of the high-frequency superconducting quantum interference detector with lead slotted shield are presented. The toroidal superconducting coil, which covers the measured beam has 16 turns wound by the lead belt of 7 mm width with 0.5 mm gaps between the turns. A superconducting low-coupling monitor having two holes and point oxidated niobium contact has been used in the mode of quanta counting of magnetic flux. The lead point shield was 2 mm thick and it had 30 mm aperture. The coefficient of background shielding within 0-200 Hz frequency range constituted more than 10 8 . The threshold current resolution of the monitor had the value less than 01 μA √Hz. The suggested monitor requires helium cooling. The proposed design of the monitor is applicable for mounting on the vacuum chamber when it is surrounded by helium conductor. In other cases mounting of low-powerful autonomic system or cryostat of helium storage up to several weeks is possible [ru

  16. Character of quantum interference on superconducting circuits made of V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovashkin, A.I.; Lykov, A.N.; Prishchepa, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of circuits formed by two parallel superconducting bridge-type contacts made of V 3 Si are studied. The bridges made of V 3 Si films having the 1-30 μm width and 1-2 μm length and the circuits of different areas have been located in a magnetic field perpendicular to the film plane. Current oscillations through the circuit during magnetic field variations have shown themselves through periodic changes in output voltage of the circuit. The attained value of the voltage oscillation amplitude on the parallel bridge-type contacts is 60 μV. For the first time the periodic voltage oscillations are obtained using such circuits during variations of the external magnetic field. The oscillation period is defined by the quantum of magnetic flux. Perspectiveness of V 3 Si for construction of superconducting quantum interference devices is shown [ru

  17. Atomic-phase interference devices based on ring-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates: Two-ring case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.P.; Dholakia, K.; Wright, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the ground-state properties and quantum dynamics of a pair of adjacent ring-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates that are coupled via tunneling. This device, which is the analog of a symmetric superconducting quantum interference device, is the simplest version of what we term an atomic-phase interference device (APHID). The two-ring APHID is shown to be sensitive to rotation

  18. Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2013-08-20

    A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

  19. Device to measure elastic modulus of superconducting windings

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    This device was made to measure elastic modulus of the Po dipole superconducting coils. More elaborated devices, but based on the same concept, were later used to measure the apparent elastic moduli of the LHC superconducting magnet coils. See also 7903547X, 7901386.

  20. High-Tc superconductor quantum interference devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a superconductive quantum interferometric device for sensing a characteristic of a magnetic field. It comprises a substrate having a surface, the substrate being selected from the group which consists of strontium titanate, aluminum oxide, sapphire, ZrO 2 and mixtures thereof; a coating of MgO on the surface of the substrate; two identical thin-strip films of a high-critical temperature superconductor on the coating, each of the films having a pair of mutually parallel arms in the form of superconductor strips extending toward and aligned with super conductor strips forming corresponding arms of the other thin-strip film, and a crossbar strip connecting the arms of each thin-strip film at right angles to the arms, the high-critical-temperature superconductor being selected from the group which consists of yttrium-barium-calcium-copper-oxides, bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper-oxides, thallium-barium-copper-oxides, thallium-barium-calcium-copper-oxides, barium oxide: potassium oxide: bismuth oxides, and calcium oxide: zinc oxide: iron oxides; and insulating films on the coating between corresponding free ends of the arms thin-strip films, the insulating films being composed of a material selected from the group which consists of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, magnesium oxide and mixture thereof

  1. Superconductivity in LiFeAs probed with quasiparticle interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhixiang; Nag, Pranab Kumar; Baumann, Danny; Kappenberger, Rhea [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Wurmehl, Sabine [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Institute for Solid State Physics, TU Dresden (Germany); Buechner, Bernd [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Institute for Solid State Physics, TU Dresden (Germany); Center for Transport and Devices, TU Dresden (Germany); Hess, Christian [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Center for Transport and Devices, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In spite of many theoretical and experimental efforts on studying the superconductivity of iron-based high temperature superconductors, the puzzle about LiFeAs's superconducting mechanism and pairing symmetry are still not clear. Here we want to present our low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy results on probing the superconductivity of LiFeAs. By taking conductance spectroscopic maps for both the superconducting state and normal state, we identify the scatterings due to the electron and hole bands close to the Fermi level. We observe a strong indication that the superconducting behavior in the hole bands are important for the formation of superconductivity in LiFeAs. Our results may also shine light on understanding the superconductivity in other iron pnictide superconductors.

  2. Operating modes of superconducting tunnel junction device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maehata, Keisuke [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-07-01

    In the Electrotechnical Laboratory, an Nb type superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) device with 200 x 200 sq. micron in area and super high quality was manufactured. By using 55-fe source, response of this large area STJ to X-ray was measured. In this measurement, two action modes with different output wave height from front amplifier were observed. Then, in this study, current-voltage feature of the element in each action mode was analyzed to elucidate a mechanism to form such two action modes. The feature was analyzed by using first order approximate solution on cavity resonance mode of Sine-Gordon equation. From the analytical results, it could be supposed that direction and magnitude of effective magnetic field penetrating into jointed area changed by an induction current effect owing to impressing speed of the magnetic field, which brings two different current-voltage features to make possible to observe two action modes with different pulse wave height. (G.K.)

  3. Hybrid superconducting-magnetic memory device using competing order parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Burm; Rippard, William H; Benz, Samuel P; Russek, Stephen E; Dresselhaus, Paul D

    2014-05-28

    In a hybrid superconducting-magnetic device, two order parameters compete, with one type of order suppressing the other. Recent interest in ultra-low-power, high-density cryogenic memories has spurred new efforts to simultaneously exploit superconducting and magnetic properties so as to create novel switching elements having these two competing orders. Here we describe a reconfigurable two-layer magnetic spin valve integrated within a Josephson junction. Our measurements separate the suppression in the superconducting coupling due to the exchange field in the magnetic layers, which causes depairing of the supercurrent, from the suppression due to the stray magnetic field. The exchange field suppression of the superconducting order parameter is a tunable and switchable behaviour that is also scalable to nanometer device dimensions. These devices demonstrate non-volatile, size-independent switching of Josephson coupling, in magnitude as well as phase, and they may enable practical nanoscale superconducting memory devices.

  4. Use of high current density superconducting coils in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1979-11-01

    Superconducting magnets will play an important role in fusion research in years to come. The magnets which are currently proposed for fusion research use the concept of cryostability to insure stable operation of the superconducting coils. This paper proposes the use of adiabatically stable high current density superconducting coils in some types of fusion devices. The advantages of this approach are much lower system cold mass, enhanced cryogenic safety, increased access to the plasma and lower cost

  5. Detection device for control rod interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Noboru.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to detect the mechanical interference or friction between a control rod and a channel box automatically, simply and rapidly. Constitution: A signal from a gate circuit and a signal from a comparison mechanism are inputted into an AND circuit if a control rod has not been displaced by a predetermined distance within a prescribed time Δt after the output of an insertion or withdrawal signal for the control rod, by which a control-rod-interference signal is outputted from the AND circuit. Accordingly, the interference between the control rod and the channel box can be detected automatically, easily and rapidly. Furthermore, by properly adjusting the prescribed time Δt set by the gate circuit, the degree of the interference can also be detected, whereby the safety and the reliability of the reactor can be improved significantly. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. An update on mobile phones interference with medical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashazadeh, A. M.; Aghajani, M.; Nabipour, I.; Assadi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phones' electromagnetic interference with medical devices is an important issue for the medical safety of patients who are using life-supporting medical devices. This review mainly focuses on mobile phones' interference with implanted medical devices and with medical equipment located in critical areas of hospitals. A close look at the findings reveals that mobile phones may adversely affect the functioning of medical devices, and the specific effect and the degree of interference depend on the applied technology and the separation distance. According to the studies' findings and the authors' recommendations, besides mitigating interference, using mobile phones at a reasonable distance from medical devices and developing technology standards can lead to their effective use in hospital communication systems. (authors)

  7. An update on mobile phones interference with medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud Pashazadeh, Ali; Aghajani, Mahdi; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2013-10-01

    Mobile phones' electromagnetic interference with medical devices is an important issue for the medical safety of patients who are using life-supporting medical devices. This review mainly focuses on mobile phones' interference with implanted medical devices and with medical equipment located in critical areas of hospitals. A close look at the findings reveals that mobile phones may adversely affect the functioning of medical devices, and the specific effect and the degree of interference depend on the applied technology and the separation distance. According to the studies' findings and the authors' recommendations, besides mitigating interference, using mobile phones at a reasonable distance from medical devices and developing technology standards can lead to their effective use in hospital communication systems.

  8. Mobile communication devices causing interference in invasive and noninvasive ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bao P; Nel, Pierre R; Gjevre, John A

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if common mobile communication systems would cause significant interference on mechanical ventilation devices and at what distances would such interference occur. We tested all the invasive and noninvasive ventilatory devices used within our region. This consisted of 2 adult mechanical ventilators, 1 portable ventilator, 2 pediatric ventilators, and 2 noninvasive positive pressure ventilatory devices. We operated the mobile devices from the 2 cellular communication systems (digital) and 1 2-way radio system used in our province at varying distances from the ventilators and looked at any interference they created. We tested the 2-way radio system, which had a fixed operation power output of 3.0 watts, the Global Systems for Mobile Communication cellular system, which had a maximum power output of 2.0 watts and the Time Division Multiple Access cellular system, which had a maximum power output of 0.2 watts on our ventilators. The ventilators were ventilating a plastic lung at fixed settings. The mobile communication devices were tested at varying distances starting at zero meter from the ventilator and in all operation modes. The 2-way radio caused the most interference on some of the ventilators, but the maximum distance of interference was 1.0 m. The Global Systems for Mobile Communication system caused significant interference only at 0 m and minor interference at 0.5 m on only 1 ventilator. The Time Division Multiple Access system caused no interference at all. Significant interference consisted of a dramatic rise and fluctuation of the respiratory rate, pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure of the ventilators with no normalization when the mobile device was removed. From our experiment on our ventilators with the communication systems used in our province, we conclude that mobile communication devices such as cellular phones and 2-way radios are safe and cause no interference unless operated at very close distances of

  9. Quantum Devices Bonded Beneath a Superconducting Shield: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Corey Rae; Abdallah, Adel; Bejanin, Jeremy; Earnest, Carolyn; McConkey, Thomas; Pagel, Zachary; Mariantoni, Matteo

    The next-generation quantum computer will rely on physical quantum bits (qubits) organized into arrays to form error-robust logical qubits. In the superconducting quantum circuit implementation, this architecture will require the use of larger and larger chip sizes. In order for on-chip superconducting quantum computers to be scalable, various issues found in large chips must be addressed, including the suppression of box modes (due to the sample holder) and the suppression of slot modes (due to fractured ground planes). By bonding a metallized shield layer over a superconducting circuit using thin-film indium as a bonding agent, we have demonstrated proof of concept of an extensible circuit architecture that holds the key to the suppression of spurious modes. Microwave characterization of shielded transmission lines and measurement of superconducting resonators were compared to identical unshielded devices. The elimination of box modes was investigated, as well as bond characteristics including bond homogeneity and the presence of a superconducting connection.

  10. Examination of a microwave sensing system using superconducting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiya, N.; Mukaida, M.; Saito, A.; Hirano, S.; Oshima, S.

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated a microwave sensing system integrated with superconducting devices which can detect motion for crime prevention and security purposes. The system consists of a transmitting antenna, a receiving antenna, a power divider as a directional coupler, and a mixer. The antennas and the directional coupler were fabricated using 50-nm thick YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) thin films. A superconducting antenna with a resonant frequency of 10.525 GHz and a superconducting directional coupler were designed and fabricated for the system. A Schottky barrier diode was used as a mixer. These devices were integrated and their operation as a sensor was examined. Comparisons of the output voltage of the IF signal amplifier showed that the superconducting integrated sensor system was superior to the normal conductor sensor

  11. Directly coupled direct current superconducting quantum interference device magnetometers based on ramp-edge Ag:YBa2Cu3O7-x/PrBa2Cu3O7-x/Ag:YBa2Cu3O7-x junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Q.X.; Yan, F.; Mombourquette, C.; Reagor, D.

    1998-01-01

    Directly coupled dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers on LaAlO 3 substrates were fabricated using ramp-edge superconductor/normal-metal/superconductor junctions, where Ag-doped YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x was used for the electrode and PrBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x for the normal-metal barrier. A flux noise of 8x10 -6 Φ 0 Hz -1/2 at 10 kHz measured with a dc bias current was achieved at 75 K, which corresponded to a field sensitivity of 400fTHz -1/2 for a magnetometer with a pick-up loop area of 8.5mmx7.5mm. Most significantly, the noise floor increased at lower frequencies with a frequency dependence slightly less than 1/f. The field noise of the SQUID magnetometers increased by only 25% after cycling the devices from zero field to 500 mG. In a static earth close-quote s magnetic field background, the field noise of the SQUID magnetometers increased by less than a factor of 2. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  12. On-chip quantum interference of a superconducting microsphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, H.; Prat-Camps, J.; Sinha, K.; Prasanna Venkatesh, B.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2018-04-01

    We propose and analyze an all-magnetic scheme to perform a Young’s double slit experiment with a micron-sized superconducting sphere of mass ≳ {10}13 amu. We show that its center of mass could be prepared in a spatial quantum superposition state with an extent of the order of half a micrometer. The scheme is based on magnetically levitating the sphere above a superconducting chip and letting it skate through a static magnetic potential landscape where it interacts for short intervals with quantum circuits. In this way, a protocol for fast quantum interferometry using quantum magnetomechanics is passively implemented. Such a table-top earth-based quantum experiment would operate in a parameter regime where gravitational energy scales become relevant. In particular, we show that the faint parameter-free gravitationally-induced decoherence collapse model, proposed by Diósi and Penrose, could be unambiguously falsified.

  13. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on superconductivity the absence of electrical resistance has always fascinated the mind of researchers with a promise of applications unachievable by conventional technologies. Since its discovery superconductivity has been posing many questions and challenges to solid state physics, quantum mechanics, chemistry and material science. Simulations arrived to superconductivity from particle physics, astrophysic, electronics, electrical engineering and so on. In seventy-five years the original promises of superconductivity were going to become reality: a microscopical theory gave to superconductivity the cloth of the science and the level of technological advances was getting higher and higher. High field superconducting magnets became commercially available, superconducting electronic devices were invented, high field accelerating gradients were obtained in superconductive cavities and superconducting particle detectors were under study. Other improvements came in a quiet progression when a tornado brought a revolution in the field: new materials had been discovered and superconductivity, from being a phenomenon relegated to the liquid Helium temperatures, became achievable over the liquid Nitrogen temperature. All the physics and the technological implications under superconductivity have to be considered ab initio

  14. Superconducting InSb nanowire devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szombati, D.B.

    2017-01-01

    Josephson junctions form a two-level system which is used as a building block for many types of superconducting qubits. Junctions fabricated from semiconducting nanowires are gate-tunable and offer electrostatically adjustable Josephson energy, highly desirable in qubit architecture. Studying

  15. High-performance magnetic field sensor based on superconducting quantum interference filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, P.; Oppenländer, J.; Häussler, Ch.; Tomes, J.; Friesch, A.; Träuble, T.; Schopohl, N.

    2004-08-01

    We have developed an absolute magnetic field sensor using a superconducting quantum interference filter (SQIF) made of high-Tc grain-boundary Josephson junctions. The device shows the typical magnetic-field-dependent voltage response V(B ), which is a sharp deltalike dip in the vicinity of zero-magnetic field. When the SQIF is cooled with magnetic shield, and then the shield is removed, the presence of the ambient magnetic field induces a shift of the dip position from B0≈0 to a value B ≈B1, which is about the average value of the Earth's magnetic field, at our latitude. When the SQIF is cooled in the ambient field without shielding, the dip is first found at B ≈B1, and the further shielding of the SQIF results in a shift of the dip towards B0≈0. The low hysteresis observed in the sequence of experiments (less than 5% of B1) makes SQIFs suitable for high precision measurements of the absolute magnetic field. The experimental results are discussed in view of potential applications of high-Tc SQIFs in magnetometry.

  16. Electromagnetically induced interference in a superconducting flux qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du lingjie; Yu Yang; Lan Dong

    2013-01-01

    Interaction between quantum two-level systems (qubits) and electromagnetic fields can provide additional coupling channels to qubit states. In particular, the interwell relaxation or Rabi oscillations, resulting, respectively, from the multi- or single-mode interaction, can produce effective crossovers, leading to electromagnetically induced interference in microwave driven qubits. The environment is modeled by a multimode thermal bath, generating the interwell relaxation. Relaxation induced interference, independent of the tunnel coupling, provides deeper understanding to the interaction between the qubits and their environment. It also supplies a useful tool to characterize the relaxation strength as well as the characteristic frequency of the bath. In addition, we demonstrate the relaxation can generate population inversion in a strongly driving two-level system. On the other hand, different from Rabi oscillations, Rabi-oscillation-induced interference involves more complicated and modulated photon exchange thus offers an alternative means to manipulate the qubit, with more controllable parameters including the strength and position of the tunnel coupling. It also provides a testing ground for exploring nonlinear quantum phenomena and quantum state manipulation in qubits either with or without crossover structure.

  17. Superconductive magnetic-field-trapping device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    An apparatus which enables the establishment of a magnetic field in air that has the same intensity as the ones in ferromagnetic materials is described. The apparatus is comprised of a core of ferromagnetic material and is surrounded by a cylinder made of a material that has superconducting properties when cooled below a critical temperature. A method is provided for producing a magnetic field through the ferromagnetic core. The core can also be split and pulled apart when it is required that the center of the cavity be left empty.

  18. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, C; Guo, X; Fan, L; Ma, X; Poot, M; Tang, H X

    2016-01-21

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips.

  19. Electromagnetic Interference in Implantable Rhythm Devices - The Indian Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Implantable rhythm device (IRD is the generic name for the group of implantable devices used for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Devices in this category include cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and implantable loop recorders. Since these devices have complex microelectronic circuitry and use electromagnetic waves for communication, they are susceptible to interference from extraneous sources of electromagnetic radiation and magnetic energy. Electromagnetic interference (EMI is generally not a major problem outside of the hospital environment. The most important interactions occur when a patient is subjected to medical procedures such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, electrocautery and radiation therapy. Two articles in this issue of the journal discusses various aspects of EMI on IRD1,2 . Together these articles provide a good review of the various sources of EMI and their interaction with IRD for the treating physician.

  20. Probing the unconventional superconducting state of LiFeAs by quasiparticle interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänke, Torben; Sykora, Steffen; Schlegel, Ronny; Baumann, Danny; Harnagea, Luminita; Wurmehl, Sabine; Daghofer, Maria; Büchner, Bernd; van den Brink, Jeroen; Hess, Christian

    2012-03-23

    A crucial step in revealing the nature of unconventional superconductivity is to investigate the symmetry of the superconducting order parameter. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy has proven a powerful technique to probe this symmetry by measuring the quasiparticle interference (QPI) which sensitively depends on the superconducting pairing mechanism. A particularly well-suited material to apply this technique is the stoichiometric superconductor LiFeAs as it features clean, charge neutral cleaved surfaces without surface states and a relatively high T(c)∼18  K. Our data reveal that in LiFeAs the quasiparticle scattering is governed by a van Hove singularity at the center of the Brillouin zone which is in stark contrast to other pnictide superconductors where nesting is crucial for both scattering and s(±) superconductivity. Indeed, within a minimal model and using the most elementary order parameters, calculations of the QPI suggest a dominating role of the holelike bands for the quasiparticle scattering. Our theoretical findings do not support the elementary singlet pairing symmetries s(++), s(±), and d wave. This brings to mind that the superconducting pairing mechanism in LiFeAs is based on an unusual pairing symmetry such as an elementary p wave (which provides optimal agreement between the experimental data and QPI simulations) or a more complex order parameter (e.g., s+id wave symmetry).

  1. High-temperature superconducting passive microwave devices, filters and antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, S.

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) passive microwave devices, such as filters and antennas, are promising devices. In particular, HTS filters may be successfully marketed in the near future. Cross-coupled filters, ring filters, and coplanar waveguide filters are good options to reduce filter size. On the other hand, HTS patch antennas which can be cooled by a cryo-cooler are also promising devices as well, since they show higher efficiency than normal antennas. This paper examines the design process and filter properties of HTS filters as well as the gains, directivity, and cooling system of HTS patch antennas. (author)

  2. Low-frequency excess flux noise in superconducting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempf, Sebastian; Ferring, Anna; Fleischmann, Andreas; Enss, Christian [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Low-frequency noise is a rather universal phenomenon and appears in physical, chemical, biological or even economical systems. However, there is often very little known about the underlying processes leading to its occurrence. In particular, the origin of low-frequency excess flux noise in superconducting devices has been an unresolved puzzle for many decades. Its existence limits, for example, the coherence time of superconducting quantum bits or makes high-precision measurements of low-frequency signals using SQUIDs rather challenging. Recent experiments suggest that low-frequency excess flux noise in Josephson junction based devices might be caused by the random reversal of interacting spins in surface layer oxides and in the superconductor-substrate interface. Even if it turns out to be generally correct, the underlying physical processes, i.e. the origin of these spins, their physical nature as well as the interaction mechanisms, have not been resolved so far. In this contribution we discuss recent measurements of low-frequency SQUID noise which we performed to investigate the origin of low-frequency excess flux noise in superconducting devices. Within this context we give an overview of our measurement techniques and link our data with present theoretical models and literature data.

  3. Advances in superconductivity: new materials, critical currents and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, R.; Malik, S.K.; Grover, A.K.; Ayyub, P.

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in the cuprates produced an explosive growth in research, driven by the quest for higher and higher superconducting transition temperatures. In the initial stages, the excitement was tremendous both in the physical sciences and in engineering. However, the complexity of the new materials on the one hand, and the absence of a viable theory on the other, have made further developments much more difficult. It is to be expected therefore, that the early excitement and the subsequent rapid advances have paved the way for more systematic and detailed studies of all aspects of superconductivity. The International Symposium was intended to provide a forum to review the progress in selected areas in superconductivity. The emphasis was on experimental and theoretical studies of the new superconductors, advances in the theoretical understanding, progress in studies of flux pinning and vortex dynamics which affect critical currents, and developments of novel material synthesis methods. Recent developments in the twin areas of thin films and devices were extensively discussed during the symposium. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  4. Robust determination of the superconducting gap sign structure via quasiparticle interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenfeld, Dustin [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Hirschfeld, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Eremin, Ilya [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Kazan Federal University, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Mazin, Igor [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 6393, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Using an electronic theory, we present a qualitative description to identify sign changes of the superconducting order parameter via quasiparticle interference (QPI) measurement in Fe-based superconductors (FeSc). In particular, we point out that the temperature dependence of the momentum-integrated QPI data can be used to differentiate between s{sub +-} and s{sub ++} states in a system with typical iron pnictide Fermi surface. We show that the signed symmetrized and antisymmetrized QPI maps are useful to obtain a characteristic signature of a gap sign change or lack thereof, starting from two-band model up to ab initio based band structure calculation. We further suggest this method as a robust way of the determination of the superconducting gap sign structure in experiment and discuss its application to the LiFeAs compounds.

  5. Superconductivity Devices: Commercial Use of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertling, Gene (Principal Investigator); Furman, Eugene; Li, Guang

    1996-01-01

    The work described in this report covers various aspects of the Rainbow solid-state actuator and sensor technologies. It is presented in five parts dealing with sensor applications, nonlinear properties, stress-optic and electrooptic properties, stacks and arrays, and publications. The Rainbow actuator technology is a relatively new materials development which had its inception in 1992. It involves a new processing technique for preparing pre-stressed, high lead containing piezoelectric and electrostrictive ceramic materials. Ceramics fabricated by this method produce bending-mode actuator devices which possess several times more displacement and load bearing capacity than present-day benders. Since they can also be used in sensor applications, Rainbows are part of the family of materials known as smart ceramics. During this period, PLZT Rainbow ceramics were characterized with respect to their piezoelectric properties for potential use in stress sensor applications. Studies of the nonlinear and stress-optic/electrooptic birefringent properties were also initiated during this period. Various means for increasing the utility of stress-enhanced Rainbow actuators are presently under investigation.

  6. Entanglement of distant superconducting quantum interference device rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukarnain, Z Ahmad; Konstadopoulou, A; Vourdas, A; Migliore, R; Messina, A

    2005-01-01

    We consider two distant mesoscopic SQUID rings, approximated with two-level systems, interacting with two-mode microwaves. The Hamiltonian of the system is used to calculate its time evolution. The cases with microwaves which at t = 0 are in separable states (classically correlated) or entangled states (quantum mechanically correlated) are studied. It is shown that the Josephson currents in the two SQUID rings are also correlated

  7. Principles and applications of superconducting quantum interference devices

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    Principles and applications of SQUIDs serves as a textbook and a multi-author collection of critical reviews. Providing both basic aspects and recent progress in SQUIDs technology, it offers a realistic and stimulating picture of the state of the art. It can also contribute to a further development of the field for commercial applications.

  8. Current contact device for a superconducting magnet coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hieronymus, H.

    1987-01-01

    The invention concerns a current supply device for a superconducting magnet coil to be shortcircuited, with a separating device per coil end, which contains a fixed cooled contact and a moving contact connected to a power supply device and a mechanical actuating device for closing and opening the contacts. When closing the heated contact on to the cooled contact, relatively large quantities of heat can be transferred to the cooled contact and therefore to the connected superconducting coil end and can cause normal conduction there. The invention therefore provides that the mass ratio of the cooled contact to the moving contact is at least 5:1, preferably at least 10:1, and that the cooled contact part is provided, at the end away from the contact area, with means for increasing the area, for example cooling fins and is connected to the coil end has a thermal resistance between the contact area and the coil end of at least 0.2 k/W, preferably at least 0.5 k/W per 1000 A of current to be transmitted. (orig.) [de

  9. Selective interference with pacemaker activity by electrical dental devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C S; Leonelli, F M; Latham, E

    1998-01-01

    We sought to determine whether electromagnetic interference with cardiac pacemakers occurs during the operation of contemporary electrical dental equipment. Fourteen electrical dental devices were tested in vitro for their ability to interfere with the function of two Medtronics cardiac pacemakers (one a dual-chamber, bipolar Thera 7942 pacemaker, the other a single-chamber, unipolar Minix 8340 pacemaker). Atrial and ventricular pacemaker output and electrocardiographic activity were monitored by means of telemetry with the use of a Medtronics 9760/90 programmer. Atrial and ventricular pacing were inhibited by electromagnetic interference produced by the electrosurgical unit up to a distance of 10 cm, by the ultrasonic bath cleaner up to 30 cm, and by the magnetorestrictive ultrasonic scalers up to 37.5 cm. In contrast, operation of the amalgamator, electric pulp tester, composite curing light, dental handpieces, electric toothbrush, microwave oven, dental chair and light, ENAC ultrasonic instrument, radiography unit, and sonic scaler did not alter pacing rate or rhythm. These results suggest that certain electrosurgical and ultrasonic instruments may produce deleterious effects in medically fragile patients with cardiac pacemakers.

  10. Superconducting (radiation hardened) magnets for mirror fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Miller, J.R.; Perkins, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for mirror fusion have evolved considerably since the Baseball II magnet in 1970. Recently, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) yin-yang has been tested to a full field of 7.7 T with radial dimensions representative of a full scale reactor. Now the emphasis has turned to the manufacture of very high field solenoids (choke coils) that are placed between the tandem mirror central cell and the yin-yang anchor-plug set. For MFTF-B the choke coil field reaches 12 T, while in future devices like the MFTF-Upgrade, Fusion Power Demonstration and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) reactor the fields are doubled. Besides developing high fields, the magnets must be radiation hardened. Otherwise, thick neutron shields increase the magnet size to an unacceptable weight and cost. Neutron fluences in superconducting magnets must be increased by an order of magnitude or more. Insulators must withstand 10 10 to 10 11 rads, while magnet stability must be retained after the copper has been exposed to fluence above 10 19 neutrons/cm 2

  11. Reliable, Practical Kilowatt-class Cryogenics for Superconducting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoor, Philip [Clever Fellows Innovation Consortium, Inc., Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Following the successful development of a Flexibly-Attached Remote cryocooler for ~200W at 80K under a Phase II DOE grant, Clever Fellows Innovation Consortium, Inc. (dba CFIC-Qdrive; acquired by Chart Industries in 2012) was invited by the DOE to scale up this technology to ~1000W/80K in a Phase III program. This target is responsive to the “Cryogenics Roadmap” developed by the DOE to accelerate the development of cryogenic cooling necessary to support the emerging superconducting power applications. Mirroring the Roadmap, our proposal included a capacity target (1000W at 80K) and a cost target (<$40/watt, at 80K), but unlike the Roadmap, we did not formally propose to meet a specific efficiency target. We achieved 75% of the capacity target, with a record-size coaxial “pulse-tube” coldfinger, but only by working on the project well beyond the original “period of performance” on unfunded extension. We believe 100% of the capacity target was within reach, but our own budget and time constraints forbade additional effort. We were less successful in meeting the cost targets. Ultimately, the specific configuration that was the subject of Phase III was not commercialized, largely because the market for superconducting devices has not been nearly as robust as was expected at the advent of the Roadmap.

  12. Low-frequency Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interference in dissipative superconducting qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du-lingjie; Lan- Dong; Yu-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg (LZS) interference of continuously driven superconducting qubits is studied. Going beyond the second order perturbation expansion, we find a time dependent stationary population evolution as well as unsymmetrical microwave driven Landau-Zener transitions, resulting from the nonresonant terms which are neglected in rotating-wave approximation. For the low-frequency driving, the qubit population at equilibrium is a periodical function of time, owing to the contribution of the nonresonant terms. In order to obtain the average population, it is found that the average approximation based on the perturbation approach can be applied to the low-frequency region. For the extremely low frequency which is much smaller than the decoherence rate, we develop noncoherence approximation by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps during which the coherence is lost totally. These approximations present comprehensive analytical descriptions of LZS interference in most of parameter space of frequency and decoherence rate, agreeing well with those of the numerical simulations and providing a simple but integrated understanding to system dynamics. The application of our models to microwave cooling can obtain the minimal frequency to realize effective microwave cooling.

  13. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.W.B.; Noakes, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    This book is an elementray introduction into superconductivity. The topics are the superconducting state, the magnetic properties of superconductors, type I superconductors, type II superconductors and a chapter on the superconductivity theory. (WL)

  14. Enhancement of superconducting critical current by injection of quasiparticles in superconductor semiconductor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutchinsky, Jonatan; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef; Sørensen, C. B.

    2000-01-01

    We report new measurements on 3-terminal superconductor semiconductor injection devices, demonstrating enhancement of the supercurrent by injection from a superconducting injector electrode. Two other electrodes were used as detectors. Applying a small voltage to the injector, reduced the maximum...

  15. Superconducting devices and materials. A literature survey issued quarterly, January-March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olien, N.A.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive bibliography, i.e., over 200 pages of articles from 18 US and foreign journals, on superconducting devices and materials is presented. An author index is included. Upcoming conferences related to cryogenic research are listed

  16. Theory of superconducting spintronic SIsFS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakurskiy, S.V.; Klenov, N.V.; Soloviev, I.I.; Kupriyanov, M.Yu.; Bol'ginov, V.V.; Ryazanov, V.V.; Vernik, I.V.; Mukhanov, O.A.; Golubov, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Motivated by recent progress in developments of cryogenic memory compatible with single flux quantum (SFQ) circuits we have performed a theoretical study of magnetic SIsFS Josephson junctions, where 'S' is a bulk superconductor, 's' is a thin superconducting film, 'F' is a metallic ferromagnet and 'I' is an insulator. We calculate the Josephson current as a function of s and F layers thickness, temperature and exchange energy of F film. We outline several modes of operation of these junctions and demonstrate their unique ability to have high I C R N product in the π-state, comparable to that in SIS tunnel junctions commonly used in SFQ circuits. We develop a model describing switching of the Josephson critical current in these devices by external magnetic field. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data for Nb-Al/AlOx-Nb-Pd0:99Fe0:01-Nb junctions. This work is supported by RFBR No. 12-02-90010-Bel a .

  17. Optimal control and quantum simulations in superconducting quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel J.

    2014-10-31

    Quantum optimal control theory is the science of steering quantum systems. In this thesis we show how to overcome the obstacles in implementing optimal control for superconducting quantum bits, a promising candidate for the creation of a quantum computer. Building such a device will require the tools of optimal control. We develop pulse shapes to solve a frequency crowding problem and create controlled-Z gates. A methodology is developed for the optimisation towards a target non-unitary process. We show how to tune-up control pulses for a generic quantum system in an automated way using a combination of open- and closed-loop optimal control. This will help scaling of quantum technologies since algorithms can calibrate control pulses far more efficiently than humans. Additionally we show how circuit QED can be brought to the novel regime of multi-mode ultrastrong coupling using a left-handed transmission line coupled to a right-handed one. We then propose to use this system as an analogue quantum simulator for the Spin-Boson model to show how dissipation arises in quantum systems.

  18. Possible superconductivity in Sr2IrO4 probed by quasiparticle interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Huaixiang; Wang, Qiang-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Based on the possible superconducting (SC) pairing symmetries recently proposed, the quasiparticle interference (QPI) patterns in electron- and hole-doped Sr2IrO4 are theoretically investigated. In the electron-doped case, the QPI spectra can be explained based on a model similar to the octet model of the cuprates while in the hole-doped case, both the Fermi surface topology and the sign of the SC order parameter resemble those of the iron pnictides and there exists a QPI vector resulting from the interpocket scattering between the electron and hole pockets. In both cases, the evolution of the QPI vectors with energy and their behaviors in the nonmagnetic and magnetic impurity scattering cases can well be explained based on the evolution of the constant-energy contours and the sign structure of the SC order parameter. The QPI spectra presented in this paper can be compared with future scanning tunneling microscopy experiments to test whether there are SC phases in electron- and hole-doped Sr2IrO4 and what the pairing symmetry is. PMID:25783417

  19. Possible superconductivity in Sr₂IrO₄ probed by quasiparticle interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Huaixiang; Wang, Qiang-Hua

    2015-03-18

    Based on the possible superconducting (SC) pairing symmetries recently proposed, the quasiparticle interference (QPI) patterns in electron- and hole-doped Sr₂IrO₄ are theoretically investigated. In the electron-doped case, the QPI spectra can be explained based on a model similar to the octet model of the cuprates while in the hole-doped case, both the Fermi surface topology and the sign of the SC order parameter resemble those of the iron pnictides and there exists a QPI vector resulting from the interpocket scattering between the electron and hole pockets. In both cases, the evolution of the QPI vectors with energy and their behaviors in the nonmagnetic and magnetic impurity scattering cases can well be explained based on the evolution of the constant-energy contours and the sign structure of the SC order parameter. The QPI spectra presented in this paper can be compared with future scanning tunneling microscopy experiments to test whether there are SC phases in electron- and hole-doped Sr₂IrO₄ and what the pairing symmetry is.

  20. Hidden order symmetry and superconductivity in heavy Fermions investigated by quasiparticle interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Alireza [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); MPI for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Thalmeier, Peter [MPI for the Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The hidden order (HO) in URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} has been determined as a high rank multipole formed by itinerant 5f-electrons with distinct orbital structure imposed by the crystalline electric field. Because this can lead to a considerable number of different multipoles it is of great importance to use microscopic techniques that are sensitive to their subtle physical differences. Here we investigate whether quasiparticle interference (QPI) method can distinguish between the two most frequently proposed HO parameter models: the even rank-4 hexadecapole and the odd-rank-5 dotriacontapole model. We obtain the quasiparticle dispersion and reconstructed Fermi surface in each HO phase adapting an effective two-orbital model of 5f bands that reproduces the main Fermi surface sheets of the para phase. We show that the resulting QPI spectrum reflects directly the effect of fourfold symmetry breaking in the rank-5 model which is absent in the rank-4 model. Therefore we suggest that QPI method should give a possibility of direct discrimination between the two most investigated models of HO in URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. Furthermore the signature of proposed chiral d-wave superconducting (SC) order parameter in QPI of the coexisting HO+SC phase is investigated.

  1. Micropatterned superconducting film circuitry for operation in hybrid quantum devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bothner, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This thesis discusses three aspects of the arduous way towards hybrid quantum systems consisting of superconducting circuits and ensembles of ultracold paramagnetic atoms. In the first part of the thesis, superconducting coplanar microwave resonators as used for quantum information processing with superconducting qubits are investigated in magnetic fields. In the second part of the thesis integrated atom chips are designed and fabricated, which offer the possibility to trap an ensemble of ultracold atoms close to a superconducting coplanar resonator on that chip. In the third and last part of the thesis, unconventional disordered and quasiperiodic arrangements of microfabricated holes (antidots) in superconducting films are patterned and investigated with respect to the impact of the arrangement on the superconductor transport properties in magnetic fields.

  2. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  3. Stability of the superconductive operating mode in high current-density devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wipf, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    The superconductive operating mode represents a thermal equilibrium that can tolerate a certain amount of disturbance before it is lost. The basin of attraction (BOA), in many ways equivalent to a potential well, is a measure of the size of disturbance needed to lift the device from the superconductive into a resistive operating mode. The BOA for a simple geometry is calculated and discussed. Experimental results are reported, showing how the concept is used to gain information on the disturbances occurring in a superconducting device

  4. Conceptual radiation shielding design of superconducting tokamak fusion device by PHITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukegawa, Atsuhiko M.; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Okuno, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    A complete 3D neutron and photon transport analysis by Monte Carlo transport code system PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System) have been performed for superconducting tokamak fusion device such as JT-60 Super Advanced (JT-60SA). It is possible to make use of PHITS in the port streaming analysis around the devices for the tokamak fusion device, the duct streaming analysis in the building where the device is installed, and the sky shine analysis for the site boundary. The neutron transport analysis by PHITS makes it clear that the shielding performance of the superconducting tokamak fusion device with the cryostat is improved by the graphical results. From the standpoint of the port streaming and the duct streaming, it is necessary to calculate by 3D Monte Carlo code such as PHITS for the neutronics analysis of superconducting tokamak fusion device. (author)

  5. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries

  6. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onnes, H.K.

    1988-01-01

    The author traces the development of superconductivity from 1911 to 1986. Some of the areas he explores are the Meissner Effect, theoretical developments, experimental developments, engineering achievements, research in superconducting magnets, and research in superconducting electronics. The article also mentions applications shown to be technically feasible, but not yet commercialized. High-temperature superconductivity may provide enough leverage to bring these applications to the marketplace

  7. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Mortensen, K.

    1988-12-01

    This report contains lecture notes of the basic lectures presented at the 1st Topsoee Summer School on Superconductivity held at Risoe National Laboratory, June 20-24, 1988. The following lecture notes are included: L.M. Falicov: 'Superconductivity: Phenomenology', A. Bohr and O. Ulfbeck: 'Quantal structure of superconductivity. Gauge angle', G. Aeppli: 'Muons, neutrons and superconductivity', N.F. Pedersen: 'The Josephson junction', C. Michel: 'Physicochemistry of high-T c superconductors', C. Laverick and J.K. Hulm: 'Manufacturing and application of superconducting wires', J. Clarke: 'SQUID concepts and systems'. (orig.) With 10 tabs., 128 figs., 219 refs

  8. A device for regulating the field generated by a superconducting winding or the gradient of same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duret, Denis; Dunand, J.-J.

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a stabilizing device which does not require the use of a specific solvent. Changes occurring in the field generated by the main winding and the correcting winding are transmitted by a superconducting unit to a quantum superconducting interferometer. An impedance measurement provides an error-signal, the latter being integrated for feeding the correcting winding. A form of embodiment relates to the regulation of a modulated field. This can be applied to nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers [fr

  9. Electronic Systems for the Protection of Superconducting Devices in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Denz, R; Mess, K H

    2008-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider LHC [1] incorporates an unprecedented amount of superconducting components: magnets, bus-bars, and current leads. Most of them require active protection in case of a transition from the superconducting to the resistive state, the so-called quench. The electronic systems ensuring the reliable quench detection and further protection of these devices have been developed and produced over the last years and are currently being put into operation

  10. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  11. Buffer layers for REBCO films for use in superconducting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A superconducting article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface. A biaxially textured buffer layer, which can be a cap layer, is supported by the substrate. The buffer layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different transition metal cations. A biaxially textured superconductor layer is deposited so as to be supported by the buffer layer. A method of making a superconducting article is also disclosed.

  12. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  13. Device for delivering cryogen to rotary super-conducting winding of cryogen-cooled electrical machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, I.F.; Gorbunov, G.S.; Khutoretsky, G.M.; Popov, J.S.; Skachkov, J.V.; Vinokurov, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A device is disclosed for delivering cryogen to a superconducting winding of a cryogen-cooled electrical machine comprising a pipe articulated along the axis of the electrical machine and intended to deliver cryogen. One end of said pipe is located in a rotary chamber which communicates through channels with the space of the electrical machine, and said space accommodating its superconducting winding. The said chamber accommodates a needle installed along the chamber axis, and the length of said needle is of sufficient length such that in the advanced position of said cryogen delivering pipe said needle reaches the end of the pipe. The layout of the electrical machine increases the reliability and effectiveness of the device for delivering cryogen to the superconducting winding, simplifies the design of the device and raises the efficiency of the electrical machine

  14. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakani, S.L.; Kakani, Shubhra

    2007-01-01

    The monograph provides readable introduction to the basics of superconductivity for beginners and experimentalists. For theorists, the monograph provides nice and brief description of the broad spectrum of experimental properties, theoretical concepts with all details, which theorists should learn, and provides a sound basis for students interested in studying superconducting theory at the microscopic level. Special chapter on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates is devoted

  15. Cooling device of superconducting coils. Dispositif de refroidissement de bobinages supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duthil, R; Lottin, J C

    1985-08-30

    This device is rotating around an horizontal axis. The superconducting coils are contained in a cryogenic enclosure feeded in liquid helium forced circulation. They are related to an electric generator by electric mains each of them comprising a gas exchanger, and an exchanger-evaporator set between the cryogenic device and those exchangers. The exchanger-evaporator is aimed at dissipating the heat arriving by conductors connected to the superconducting coils. According to the invention, the invention includes an annular canalization with horizontal axis in which the connection conductors bathe in liquid helium.

  16. Origin and Reduction of 1 /f Magnetic Flux Noise in Superconducting Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Sendelbach, S.; Beck, M. A.; Freeland, J. W.; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Hui; Yu, Clare C.; Wu, R. Q.; Pappas, D. P.; McDermott, R.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic flux noise is a dominant source of dephasing and energy relaxation in superconducting qubits. The noise power spectral density varies with frequency as 1 /fα, with α ≲1 , and spans 13 orders of magnitude. Recent work indicates that the noise is from unpaired magnetic defects on the surfaces of the superconducting devices. Here, we demonstrate that adsorbed molecular O2 is the dominant contributor to magnetism in superconducting thin films. We show that this magnetism can be reduced by appropriate surface treatment or improvement in the sample vacuum environment. We observe a suppression of static spin susceptibility by more than an order of magnitude and a suppression of 1 /f magnetic flux noise power spectral density of up to a factor of 5. These advances open the door to the realization of superconducting qubits with improved quantum coherence.

  17. 'Speedy' superconducting circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holst, T.

    1994-01-01

    The most promising concept for realizing ultra-fast superconducting digital circuits is the Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) logic. The basic physical principle behind RSFQ logic, which include the storage and transfer of individual magnetic flux quanta in Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), is explained. A Set-Reset flip-flop is used as an example of the implementation of an RSFQ based circuit. Finally, the outlook for high-temperature superconducting materials in connection with RSFQ circuits is discussed in some details. (au)

  18. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruana, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Despite reports of new, high-temperature superconductive materials almost every day, participants at the First Congress on Superconductivity do not anticipate commercial applications with these materials soon. What many do envision is the discovery of superconducting materials that can function at much warmer, perhaps even room temperatures. Others hope superconductivity will usher in a new age of technology as semiconductors and transistors did. This article reviews what the speakers had to say at the four-day congress held in Houston last February. Several speakers voiced concern that the Reagan administration's apparent lack of interest in funding superconductivity research while other countries, notably Japan, continue to pour money into research and development could hamper America's international competitiveness

  19. Understanding and application of superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Byeong Mu; Lee, Chun Heung

    1997-02-01

    This book deals with superconducting materials, which contains from basic theory to application of superconducting materials. The contents of this book are mystery of superconducting materials, properties of superconducting materials, thermodynamics of superconducting materials, theoretical background of superconducting materials, tunnelling and quantum interference, classification and properties of superconducting materials, high temperature superconducting materials, production and analysis of superconducting materials and application of superconducting materials.

  20. AANA Journal Course: update for nurse anesthetists. Arrhythmia management devices and electromagnetic interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Emily

    2005-04-01

    The technological complexity of implantable arrhythmia management devices, specifically pacemakers and defibrillators, has increased dramatically since their introduction only a few decades ago. Patients with such devices are encountered much more frequently in hospitals and surgery centers, yet anesthesia provider knowledge of safe and proper management is often incomplete. Anesthesia textbooks and references may provide only short paragraphs on arrhythmia management devices that do not address important perioperative management strategies for this ever-growing patient population. It is no longer satisfactory to simply place a magnet over an implanted device during surgery and assume that this action protects the patient from harm due to electromagnetic interference from inappropriate device function. This AANA Journal course serves as a concise review of basic device function, the sources and effects of electromagnetic interference in the operative setting, and patient management recommendations from current literature.

  1. Detail of photo 7903109 stack of superconducting cables in the modulus measuring device

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The picture shows an assembly of insulated superconducting cables of the type used in the Po dipole magnet inserted in the elastic modulus measuring device (photos 7903547X and 7903169) in order to measures its mechanical properties under azimuthal compression. See also 7903547X, 7903169, 8307552X.

  2. Network-Assisted Distributed Fairness-Aware Interference Coordination for Device-to-Device Communication Underlaid Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Boabang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Device-to-device (D2D communication underlaid cellular network is considered a key integration feature in future cellular network. However, without properly designed interference management, the interference from D2D transmission tends to degrade the performance of cellular users and D2D pairs. In this work, we proposed a network-assisted distributed interference mitigation scheme to address this issue. Specifically, the base station (BS acts as a control agent that coordinates the cross-tier interference from D2D transmission through a taxation scheme. The cotier interference is controlled by noncooperative game amongst D2D pairs. In general, the outcome of noncooperative game is inefficient due to the selfishness of each player. In our game formulation, reference user who is the victim of cotier interference is factored into the payoff function of each player to obtain fair and efficient outcome. The existence, uniqueness of the Nash Equilibrium (NE, and the convergence of the proposed algorithm are characterized using Variational Inequality theory. Finally, we provide simulation results to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  4. Ion implantation in superconducting niobium and Nb3 Sn thin films: adjustment of Josephson microbridges and SQUID devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robic, J.Y.; Piaguet, J.; Duret, D.; Veler, J.C.; Veran, J.L.; Zenatti, D.

    1978-01-01

    The principles of operation of Josephson junctions and SQUIDS are resumed. An ion implantation technique for the adjustment of the critical current is presented. High quality superconducting thin films were obtained by electron gun evaporation of niobium on heated substrates. Polycrystalline Nb 3 Sn was made by annealing (1000 K, 10 -6 Torr) a multilayer structure of successively evaporated niobium and thin films. Selected ions (helium, neon, argon) were implanted at doses ranging from 10 13 to 10 17 cm -2 . After implantation the critical temperature, the critical current and the normal resistivity were measured on special photoetched geometries. The variations of these electrical properties depend on the nuclear energy loss. The critical temperature of Nb 3 Sn is decreased by ion implantation and can be increased again by a new annealing. The parameters of the ion implantation were defined in order to obtain a critical temperature slightly higher than the operating temperature. The geometries of the microbridges and the implanted areas where then chosen to obtain appropriate criticals currents (approximately 10 μA) at the operating temperature. The obtained microbridges were used as junction elements in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID)

  5. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertling, Gene; Randolph, Henry; Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Verbelyi, Darren

    1991-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The first dealing with work involved with Clemson University and the second with the results from Westinghouse/Savannah River. Both areas of work involved low noise, low thermal conductivity superconducting grounding links used in the NASA-sponsored Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) Project. Clemson prepared the links from YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor tape that was mounted on a printed circuit board and encapsulated with epoxy resin. The Clemson program includes temperature vs. resistance, liquid nitrogen immersion, water immersion, thermal cycling, humidity, and radiation testing. The evaluation of the links under a long term environmental test program is described. The Savannah River program includes gamma irradiation, vibration, and long-term evaluation. The progress made in these evaluations is discussed.

  6. High Tc superconducting three-terminal device under quasi-particle injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Kabasawa, U.; Tonouchi, M.; Kobayashi, T.

    1988-01-01

    A new type of the current injection type three terminal device was fabricated using the high Tc YBaCuO thin epitaxial films, wherein the hot quasi-particle injection effect on the superconducting current was closely examined. The zero bias drain current was efficiently suppressed by the injection of the hot quasi-particles through the gate electrode. Though it is speculative, a comparison of the experimental results and analyses based on the familiar BCS theory intimates that the main mechanism of the current modulation is the non-equilibrium superconductivity due to accumulation of the excess quasi-particles

  7. Superconductivity applications for infrared and microwave devices; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 19, 20, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Heinen, Vernon O.

    1990-10-01

    Various papers on superconductivity applications for IR and microwave devices are presented. The individual topics addressed include: pulsed laser deposition of Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O films, patterning of high-Tc superconducting thin films on Si substrates, IR spectra and the energy gap in thin film YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), high-temperature superconducting thin film microwave circuits, novel filter implementation utilizing HTS materials, high-temperature superconductor antenna investigations, high-Tc superconducting IR detectors, high-Tc superconducting IR detectors from Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films, Y-Ba-Cu0-O thin films as high-speed IR detectors, fabrication of a high-Tc superconducting bolometer, transition-edge microbolometer, photoresponse of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) granular and epitaxial superconducting thin films, fast IR response of YBCO thin films, kinetic inductance effects in high-Tc microstrip circuits at microwave frequencies.

  8. Superconducting analogue electronics for research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, D

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives a brief review of superconducting electronics in research and industry. Examples will show how science benefits from the development and how superconducting devices have found their way into industry and to some commercial products. Impact in terms of enabling new research in other fields (e.g. radio astronomy, medicine), in industry (certification, safety, metrology, etc) and in terms of market will be addressed. From the examples, two fields will be emphasized: superconducting detectors for astronomy and the superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) employed for different applications

  9. An Interference Mitigation Scheme of Device-to-Device Communications for Sensor Networks Underlying LTE-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehyeong; Karim, Nzabanita Abdoul; Cho, Sunghyun

    2017-05-10

    Device-to-Device (D2D) communication technology has become a key factor in wireless sensor networks to form autonomous communication links among sensor nodes. Many research results for D2D have been presented to resolve different technical issues of D2D. Nevertheless, the previous works have not resolved the shortage of data rate and limited coverage of wireless sensor networks. Due to bandwidth shortages and limited communication coverage, 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) has introduced a new Device-to-Device (D2D) communication technique underlying cellular networks, which can improve spectral efficiencies by enabling the direct communication of devices in proximity without passing through enhanced-NodeB (eNB). However, to enable D2D communication in a cellular network presents a challenge with regard to radio resource management since D2D links reuse the uplink radio resources of cellular users and it can cause interference to the receiving channels of D2D user equipment (DUE). In this paper, a hybrid mechanism is proposed that uses Fractional Frequency Reuse (FFR) and Almost Blank Sub-frame (ABS) schemes to handle inter-cell interference caused by cellular user equipments (CUEs) to D2D receivers (DUE-Rxs), reusing the same resources at the cell edge area. In our case, DUE-Rxs are considered as victim nodes and CUEs as aggressor nodes, since our primary target is to minimize inter-cell interference in order to increase the signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR) of the target DUE-Rx at the cell edge area. The numerical results show that the interference level of the target D2D receiver (DUE-Rx) decreases significantly compared to the conventional FFR at the cell edge. In addition, the system throughput of the proposed scheme can be increased up to 60% compared to the conventional FFR.

  10. Anisotropic energy-gaps of iron-based superconductivity from intra-band quasiparticle interference in LiFeAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rost, A.W. [LASSP, Department of Physics, Cornell, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Allan, M.P. [LASSP, Department of Physics, Cornell, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); CMPMS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Mackenzie, A.P. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Xie, Y. [CMPMS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Davis, J.C. [LASSP, Department of Physics, Cornell, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); CMPMS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kihou, K.; Lee, C.H.; Iyo, A.; Eisaki, H. [AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Chuang, T.M. [LASSP, Department of Physics, Cornell, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); CMPMS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Inst. of Physics, Academica Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-01

    Cooper pairing in the Fe-based superconductors is thought to occur due to the projection of the antiferromagnetic interactions between iron atoms onto the complex momentum-space electronic structure. A key consequence is that distinct anisotropic energy gaps {Delta}{sub i}(k) with specific relative orientations should occur on the different electronic bands i. To determine this previously unresolved gap structure high-precision spectroscopy is required. Here we introduce the STM technique of intra-band Bogolyubov quasiparticle scattering interference (QPI) to iron-based superconductor studies, focusing on LiFeAs. We identify the QPI signatures of three hole-like dispersions and, by introducing a new QPI technique, determine the magnitude and relative orientations of corresponding anisotropic {Delta}{sub i}(k). Intra-band Bogolyubov QPI therefore yields the spectroscopic information required to identify the mechanism of superconductivity in Fe-based superconductors.

  11. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  12. Design study of superconducting sextupole magnet using HTS coated conductor for neutron-focusing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaka, T.; Koyanagi, K.; Ono, M.; Kuriyama, T.; Watanabe, I.; Tsuchiya, K.; Suzuki, J.; Adachi, T.; Shimizu, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    We performed a design study of sextupole magnet using high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires. The sextupole magnet is used as a focusing lens for neutron-focusing devices. A neutron-focusing device is desired to have a large aperture and a high magnetic field gradient of G, where G = 2B/r 2 , B is the magnetic field and r is a distance from the sextupole magnet axis. Superconducting magnets offer promising prospects to meet the demands of a neutron-focusing device. Recently NbTi coils of low temperature superconducting (LTS) have been developed for a sextupole magnet with a 46.8 mm aperture. The maximum magnetic field gradient G of this magnet is 9480 T/m 2 at 4.2 K and 12,800 T/m 2 at 1.8 K. On the other hand, rapid progress on second generation HTS wire has been made in increasing the performance of critical current and in demonstrating a long length. The second generation HTS wire is referred to as coated conductor. It consists of tape-shaped base upon which a thin coating of superconductor, usually YBCO, is deposited or grown. This paper describes a design study of sextupole magnet using coated conductors

  13. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlikar, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Amongst the numerous scientific discoveries that the 20th century has to its credit, superconductivity stands out as an exceptional example of having retained its original dynamism and excitement even for more than 80 years after its discovery. It has proved itself to be a rich field by continually offering frontal challenges in both research and applications. Indeed, one finds that a majority of internationally renowned condensed matter theorists, at some point of their career, have found excitement in working in this important area. Superconductivity presents a unique example of having fetched Nobel awards as many as four times to date, and yet, interestingly enough, the field still remains open for new insights and discoveries which could undeniably be of immense technological value. 1 fig

  14. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book profiles the research activity of 42 companies in the superconductivity field, worldwide. It forms a unique and comprehensive directory to this emerging technology. For each research site, it details the various projects in progress, analyzes the level of activity, pinpoints applications and R and D areas, reviews strategies and provides complete contact information. It lists key individuals, offers international comparisons of government funding, reviews market forecasts and development timetables and features a bibliography of selected articles on the subject

  15. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buller, L.; Carrillo, F.; Dietert, R.; Kotziapashis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Superconductors are materials which combine the property of zero electric resistance with the capability to exclude any adjacent magnetic field. This leads to many large scale applications such as the much publicized levitating train, generation of magnetic fields in MHD electric generators, and special medical diagnostic equipment. On a smaller-scale, superconductive materials could replace existing resistive connectors and decrease signal delays by reducing the RLC time constants. Thus, a computer could operate at much higher speeds, and consequently at lower power levels which would reduce the need for heat removal and allow closer spacing of circuitry. Although technical advances and proposed applications are constantly being published, it should be recognized that superconductivity is a slowly developing technology. It has taken scientists almost eighty years to learn what they now know about this material and its function. The present paper provides an overview of the historical development of superconductivity and describes some of the potential applications for this new technology as it pertains to the electronics industry

  16. High performance superconducting devices enabled by three dimensionally ordered nanodots and/or nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit

    2013-09-17

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate same with self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods of a single or multicomponent material within another single or multicomponent material for use in electrical, electronic, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices is disclosed. Self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods are ordered arrays wherein ordering occurs due to strain minimization during growth of the materials. A simple method to accomplish this when depositing in-situ films is also disclosed. Device applications of resulting materials are in areas of superconductivity, photovoltaics, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistance, high density storage, solid state lighting, non-volatile memory, photoluminescence, thermoelectrics and in quantum dot lasers.

  17. Superconducting inductive displacement detection of a microcantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinante, A.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a superconducting inductive technique to measure the displacement of a micromechanical resonator. In our scheme, a type I superconducting microsphere is attached to the free end of a microcantilever and approached to the loop of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometer. A local magnetic field as low as 100 μT, generated by a field coil concentric to the SQUID, enables detection of the cantilever thermomechanical noise at 4.2 K. The magnetomechanical coupling and the magnetic spring are in good agreement with image method calculations assuming pure Meissner effect. These measurements are relevant to recent proposals of quantum magnetomechanics experiments based on levitating superconducting microparticles.

  18. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    During 2007, a large amount of the work was centred on the ITER project and related tasks. The activities based on low-temperature superconducting (LTS) materials included the manufacture and qualification of ITER full-size conductors under relevant operating conditions, the design of conductors and magnets for the JT-60SA tokamak and the manufacture of the conductors for the European dipole facility. A preliminary study was also performed to develop a new test facility at ENEA in order to test long-length ITER or DEMO full-size conductors. Several studies on different superconducting materials were also started to create a more complete database of superconductor properties, and also for use in magnet design. In this context, an extensive measurement campaign on transport and magnetic properties was carried out on commercially available NbTi strands. Work was started on characterising MgB 2 wire and bulk samples to optimise their performance. In addition, an intense experimental study was started to clarify the effect of mechanical loads on the transport properties of multi-filamentary Nb 3 Sn strands with twisted or untwisted superconducting filaments. The experimental activity on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials was mainly focussed on the development and characterisation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-X (YBCO) based coated conductors. Several characteristics regarding YBCO deposition, current transport performance and tape manufacture were investigated. In the framework of chemical approaches for YBCO film growth, a new method, developed in collaboration with the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca (TUCN), Romania, was studied to obtain YBCO film via chemical solution deposition, which modifies the well-assessed metallic organic deposition trifluoroacetate (MOD-TFA) approach. The results are promising in terms of critical current and film thickness values. YBCO properties in films with artificially added pinning sites were characterised in collaboration with

  19. Design study of an indirect cooling superconducting magnet for a fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, Toshiyuki; Hemmi, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    The design study of superconducting magnets adapting a new coil winding scheme of an indirect cooling method is reported. The superconducting magnet system for the spherical tokamak (ST), which is proposed to study the steady state plasma experiment with Q - equiv-1, requires high performances with a high current density compared to the ordinal magnet design because of its tight spatial restriction. The superconducting magnet system for the fusion device has been used in the condition of high magnetic field, high electromagnetic force, and high heat load. The pool boiling liquid helium cooling outside of the conductor or the forced flow of supercritical helium cooling inside of the conductor, such as cable-in-conduit conductors, were used so far for the cooling method of the superconducting magnet for a fusion application. The pool cooling magnet has the disadvantages of low mechanical rigidities and low withstand voltages of the coil windings. The forced flow cooling magnet with cable-in-conduit conductors has the disadvantages of the restriction of the coil design because of the path of the electric current must be the same as that of the cooling channel for refrigerant. The path of the electric current and that of the cooling channel for refrigerant can be independently designed by adopting the indirect cooling method that inserts the independent cooling panel in the coil windings and cools the conductor from the outside. Therefore the optimization of the coil windings structure can be attempted. It was shown that the superconducting magnet design of the high current density became possible by the indirect cooling method compared with those of the conventional cooling scheme. (author)

  20. Integrated-optic current sensors with a multimode interference waveguide device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Moon; Chu, Woo-Sung; Kim, Sang-Guk; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2016-04-04

    Optical current sensors based on polarization-rotated reflection interferometry are demonstrated using polymeric integrated optics and various functional optical waveguide devices. Interferometric sensors normally require bias feedback control for maintaining the operating point, which increases the cost. In order to resolve this constraint of feedback control, a multimode interference (MMI) waveguide device is integrated onto the current-sensor optical chip in this work. From the multiple outputs of the MMI, a 90° phase-shifted transfer function is obtained. Using passive quadrature demodulation, we demonstrate that the sensor could maintain the output signal regardless of the drift in the operating bias-point.

  1. Superconducting instabilities and quasipartical interference in the LiFeAs and Co-doped NaFeAs iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenfeld, Dustin; Ahn, Felix; Eremin, Ilya [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Borisenko, Sergey [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State Research, IFW-Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We analyze and compare the structure of the pairing interaction and superconducting gaps in LiFeAs and Co-doped NaFeAs by using the ten-orbital tight-binding model, derived from ab initio LDA calculations with hopping parameters extracted from the fit to ARPES experiments. We discuss the phase diagram and experimental probes to determine the structure of the superconducting gap in these systems with special emphasis on the quasiparticle interference, computed using the T-matrix approximation. In particular, we analyze how the superconducting state with opposite sign of the gaps on the two inner hole pockets in LiFeAs evolve upon changing the parameters towards NaFeAs compound.

  2. A new cryogenic test facility for large superconducting devices at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Serio, L; Stewart, L; Benda, V; Bremer, J; Pirotte, O

    2015-01-01

    To expand CERN testing capability to superconducting devices that cannot be installed in existing test facilities because of their size and/or mass, CERN is building a new cryogenic test facility for large and heavy devices. The first devices to be tested in the facility will be the S-FRS superconducting magnets for the FAIR project that is currently under construction at the GSI Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany. The facility will include a renovated cold box with 1.2 kW at 4.5 K equivalent power with its compression system, two independent 15 kW liquid nitrogen precooling and warm-up units, as well as a dedicated cryogenic distribution system providing cooling power to three independent test benches. The article presents the main input parameters and constraints used to define the cryogenic system and its infrastructure. The chosen layout and configuration of the facility is presented and the characteristics of the main components are described.

  3. Conceptual design and development of a superconducting bus-line for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, T.; Takahata, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamamoto, J.; Uede, T.; Ikeda, M.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting bus-line is proposed and preliminarily tested as an electrical feeder between the superconducting coils of the Large Helical Device (LHD) and their electrical power supply. The bus-line consists of a superconductor and its cryogenic transfer-line. The superconductor is a specially developed aluminum stabilized NbTi wire, which is installed in the innermost channel of the transfer-line. The vacuum insulated transfer-line consists of four corrugated tubes assembled coaxially. Liquid helium flows through the innermost channel and shield gas flows through another annular channel in the line. We are completing the conceptual design of the bus-line and the installation plan for the LHD experimental hall and are carrying out development of wires, including an investigation of their mechanical properties and electrical insulation. This report describes the conceptual design of the superconducting bus-line for the LHD, and the results we obtained recently during the design and development of a full-scale demonstration facility. (orig.)

  4. Radio frequency siliconization: An approach to the coating for the future large superconducting fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Zhao, Y.P.; Wan, B.N.; Gong, X.Z.; Zhen, M.; Gu, X.M.; Zhang, X.D.; Luo, J.R.; Wan, Y.X.; Xie, J.K.; Li, C.F.; Chen, J.L.; Toi, K.; Noda, N.; Watari, T.

    2001-01-01

    Radio frequency (rf) siliconization has been carried out on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak in the presence of a high magnetic field, which is a try on superconducting tokamaks. Three different procedures of rf siliconization have been tested and a very promising method to produce high quality silicon films was found after comparing the film properties and plasma performance produced by these three different procedures. The Si/C films are amorphous, semitransparent, and homogeneous throughout the layer and adhere firmly to all the substrates. The advantages of silicon atoms as a powerful radiator and a good oxygen getter have been proved. An outstanding merit of rf siliconization to superconducting devices is its fast recovery after a serious degradation of the condition due to the leakage of air to good wall conditions. A wider stable operation region has been obtained and plasma performance is improved immediately after each siliconization due to significant reduction of impurities. Energy confinement time increases more than 50% and particle confinement time increases by a factor of 2. The lifetime of the silicon film is more than 400 standard ohmic heated plasma discharges. Simulation shows that the confinement improvement is due to the reduction of the electron thermal diffusivity in the outer region of the plasma

  5. Optimization of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Device via a CPU-Efficient Semi-Analytical Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrov, I K; Zhang, X; Solovyov, V F; Chubar, O; Li, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in second generation (YBCO) high temperature superconducting wire could potentially enable the design of super high performance energy storage devices that combine the high energy density of chemical storage with the high power of superconducting magnetic storage. However, the high aspect ratio and considerable filament size of these wires requires the concomitant development of dedicated optimization methods that account for both the critical current density and ac losses in ...

  6. Design and fabrication of forced-flow superconducting poloidal coils for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Mizumaki, S.; Yamakoshi, T.; Kanai, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Wachi, Y.; Ushijima, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kai, T.; Takahata, K.; Yamamoto, J.; Satow, T.; Motojima, O.

    1995-01-01

    Three pairs of superconducting poloidal coils for the LHD (Large Helical Device) have been designed and fabricated using NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductors cooled with forced-flow supercritical helium (SHE). In the LHD poloidal coils, high field accuracy as well as high reliability are required. To meet these requirements, detailed field and structural analyses have been performed and key parameters including winding pattern and size and locations of conductor joints have been determined. Compact conductor joint, where NbTi filaments are directly bonded, has also been developed using the solid state bonding technique. (orig.)

  7. Semiconductor Quantum Electron Wave Transport, Diffraction, and Interference: Analysis, Device, and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Gregory Newell

    Semiconductor device dimensions are rapidly approaching a fundamental limit where drift-diffusion equations and the depletion approximation are no longer valid. In this regime, quantum effects can dominate device response. To increase further device density and speed, new devices must be designed that use these phenomena to positive advantage. In addition, quantum effects provide opportunities for a new class of devices which can perform functions previously unattainable with "conventional" semiconductor devices. This thesis has described research in the analysis of electron wave effects in semiconductors and the development of methods for the design, fabrication, and characterization of quantum devices based on these effects. First, an exact set of quantitative analogies are presented which allow the use of well understood optical design and analysis tools for the development of electron wave semiconductor devices. Motivated by these analogies, methods are presented for modeling electron wave grating diffraction using both an exact rigorous coupled-wave analysis and approximate analyses which are useful for grating design. Example electron wave grating switch and multiplexer designs are presented. In analogy to thin-film optics, the design and analysis of electron wave Fabry-Perot interference filters are also discussed. An innovative technique has been developed for testing these (and other) electron wave structures using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). This technique uses a liquid-helium temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to perform spectroscopy of the electron transmittance as a function of electron energy. Experimental results show that BEEM can resolve even weak quantum effects, such as the reflectivity of a single interface between materials. Finally, methods are discussed for incorporating asymmetric electron wave Fabry-Perot filters into optoelectronic devices. Theoretical and experimental results show that such structures could

  8. Design and construction of a resistive energy dump device for bipolar superconducting magnet systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, M. J.

    1977-05-01

    When superconducting magnets quench, the resistance of the conductor material rises rapidly to its normal value. This increase in resistance can result in catastrophic heating in the magnet unless stored field energy is quickly removed from the system. Phase inversion is the normal mode of energy removal. SCR's in the power supply are phased back, the output of the supply is inverted, and magnetic field energy is directed back into the utility grid. Under certain conditions, however, the power supply may fail to invert properly, and an alternate energy removal scheme must protect the superconducting magnet system. Composed of an isolation switch, a semiconductor switching module, and a dump resistor, the resistive dump device provides a viable protection scheme. Operationally, several conditions are capable of activating the isolation switch and triggering the bipolar SCR switching module. Manual dump commands, for instance, permit the operator to dump field energy in the event of observed abnormalities. A special voltage tap quench detector senses the aforementioned abnormal power supply output inversion and also fires the dump circuit. Regardless of the nature of the trigger input, however, activation of the energy dump device diverts coil current through the dump resistor. I/sup 2/R losses over time then safely dissipate stored magnetic field energy.

  9. Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo [ed.

    2005-07-01

    Research on superconductivity at ENEA is mainly devoted to projects related to the ITER magnet system. In this framework, ENEA has been strongly involved in the design, manufacturing and test campaigns of the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), which reached a world record in operating current (up to 80 kA). Further to this result, the activities in 2004 were devoted to optimising the ITER conductor performance. ENEA participated in the tasks launched by EFDA to define and produce industrial-scale advanced Nb3Sn strand to be used in manufacturing the ITER high-field central solenoid (CS) and toroidal field (TF) magnets. As well as contributing to the design of the new strand and the final conductor layout, ENEA will also perform characterisation tests, addressing in particular the influence of mechanical stress on the Nb3Sn performance. As a member of the international ITER-magnet testing group, ENEA plays a central role in the measurement campaigns and data analyses for each ITER-related conductor and coil. The next phase in the R and D of the ITER magnets will be their mechanical characterisation in order to define the fabrication route of the coils and structures. During 2004 the cryogenic measurement campaign on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by-pass diode stacks was completed. As the diode-test activity was the only LHC contract to be finished on schedule, the 'Centre Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire' (CERN) asked ENEA to participate in an international tender for the cold check of the current leads for the LHC magnets. The contract was obtained, and during 2004, the experimental setup was designed and realised and the data acquisition system was developed. The measurement campaign was successfully started at the end of 2004 and will be completed in 2006.

  10. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  11. Optical and tribomechanical stability of optically variable interference security devices prepared by dual ion beam sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetinörgü-Goldenberg, Eda; Baloukas, Bill; Zabeida, Oleg; Klemberg-Sapieha, Jolanta; Martinu, Ludvik

    2011-07-01

    Optical security devices applied to banknotes and other documents are exposed to different types of harsh environments involving the cycling of temperature, humidity, chemical agents, and tribomechanical intrusion. In the present work, we study the stability of optically variable devices, namely metameric interference filters, prepared by dual ion beam sputtering onto polycarbonate and glass substrates. Specifically, we assess the color difference as well as the changes in the mechanical properties and integrity of all-dielectric and metal-dielectric systems due to exposure to bleach, detergent and acetone agents, and heat and humidity. The results underline a significant role of the substrate material, of the interfaces, and of the nature and microstructure of the deposited films in long term stability under everyday application conditions.

  12. Electromagnetic interference of implantable cardiac devices from a shoulder massage machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saeko; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Kohira, Satoshi; Hirose, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    Shoulder massage machines have two pads that are driven by solenoid coils to perform a per cussive massage on the shoulders. There have been concerns that such machines might create electromagnetic interference (EMI) in implantable cardiac devices because of the time-varying magnetic fields produced by the alternating current in the solenoid coils. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential EMI from one such shoulder massage machine on implantable cardiac devices. We measured the distribution profile of the magnetic field intensity around the massage machine. Furthermore, we performed an inhibition test and an asynchronous test on an implantable cardiac pacemaker using the standardized Irnich human body model. We examined the events on an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) using a pacemaker programmer while the massage machine was in operation. The magnetic field distribution profile exhibited a peak intensity of 212 (A/m) in one of the solenoid coils. The maximal interference distance between the massage machine and the implantable cardiac pacemaker was 28 cm. Ventricular fibrillation was induced when the massage machine was brought near the electrode of the ICD and touched the Irnich human body model. It is necessary to provide a "don't use" warning on the box or the exterior of the massage machines or in the user manuals and to caution patients with implanted pacemakers about the dangers and appropriate usage of massage machines.

  13. Non-equilibrium properties of Josephson critical current in Nb-based three terminal superconducting tunnel devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, G.; Parlato, L.; Peluso, G.; Pepe, G.

    1998-01-01

    Tunnel quasi-particle injection into a superconducting film provides useful information on the non-equilibrium state inside the perturbed superconductor as well as on the potential application to electronic devices. Three terminal injector-detector superconducting devices have a long history in non-equilibrium superconductivity. In the recent past non-equilibrium phenomena have attracted again considerable attention because of many superconducting based detectors involve processes substantially non-equilibrium in nature. The possibility of using a stacked double tunnel junction to study the influence of non-equilibrium superconductivity on the Josephson critical current is now considered. An experimental study of the effect of quasi-particle injection on the Josephson current both in steady-state and pulsed experiments down to T=1.2 K is presented using 3 terminal Nb-based stacked double tunnel devices. The feasibility of a new class of particle detectors based on the direct measurement of the change in the Josephson current following the absorption of a X-ray quantum is also discussed in terms of non-equilibrium theories. (orig.)

  14. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  15. SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) arrays for simultaneous magnetic measurements: Calibration and source localization performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Lloyd; Williamson, Samuel J.; Costaribeiro, P.

    1988-02-01

    Recently developed small arrays of SQUID-based magnetic sensors can, if appropriately placed, locate the position of a confined biomagnetic source without moving the array. The authors present a technique with a relative accuracy of about 2 percent for calibrating such sensors having detection coils with the geometry of a second-order gradiometer. The effects of calibration error and magnetic noise on the accuracy of locating an equivalent current dipole source in the human brain are investigated for 5- and 7-sensor probes and for a pair of 7-sensor probes. With a noise level of 5 percent of peak signal, uncertainties of about 20 percent in source strength and depth for a 5-sensor probe are reduced to 8 percent for a pair of 7-sensor probes, and uncertainties of about 15 mm in lateral position are reduced to 1 mm, for the configuration considered.

  16. Superconductivity applications for infrared and microwave devices II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 4, 5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Vernon O.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    Topics discussed include thin-film technology, microwave transmission lines and resonators, microwave devices and circuits, infrared detectors and bolometers, and superconducting junctions. Papers are presented on possible enhancement in bolometric response using free-standing film of YBa2Cu3O(x), aging and surface instability in high-Tc superconductors, epitaxial Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 thin films on LaAlO3 and their microwave device properties, the performance of stripline resonators using sputtered YBCO films, and a coplanar waveguide microwave filter of YBa2Cu3O7. Attention is also given to the performance characteristics of Y-Ba-Cu-O microwave superconducting detectors, high-Tc bolometer developments for planetary missions, infrared detectors from YBaCuO thin films, high-temperature superconductor junction technology, and submillimeter receiver components using superconducting tunnel junctions. (For individual items see A93-27244 to A93-27248)

  17. Cryogenic refrigeration requirements for superconducting insertion devices in a light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses cryogenic cooling superconducting insertion devices for modern light sources. The introductory part of the report discusses the difference between wiggler and undulators and how the bore temperature may affect the performance of the magnets. The steps one would take to reduce the gap between the cold magnet pole are discussed. One section of the report is devoted to showing how one would calculate the heat that enters the device. Source of heat include, heat entering through the vacuum chamber, heating due to stray electrons and synchrotron radiation, heating due to image current on the bore, heat flow by conduction and radiation, and heat transfer into the cryostat through the magnet leads. A section of the report is devoted to cooling options such as small cryo-cooler and larger conventional helium refrigerators. This section contains a discussion as to when it is appropriate to use small coolers that do not have J-T circuits. Candidate small cryo-coolers are discussed in this section of the report. Cooling circuits for cooling with a conventional refrigerator are also discussed. A section of the report is devoted to vibration isolation and how this may affect how the cooling is attached to the device. Vibration isolation using straps is compared to vibration isolation using helium heat pipes. The vibration isolation of a conventional refrigeration system is also discussed. Finally, the cool down of an insertion device is discussed. The device can either be cooled down using liquid cryogenic nitrogen and liquid helium or by using the cooler used to keep the devices cold over the long haul

  18. [Electromagnetic interference in the current era of cardiac implantable electronic devices designed for magnetic resonance environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Valentina; Santini, Luca; Forleo, Giovanni B; Della Rocca, Domenico; Panattoni, Germana; Scali, Marta; Schirripa, Valentina; Danisi, Nicola; Ammirati, Fabrizio; Santini, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades we are observing a continuous increase in the number of patients wearing cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). At the same time, we face daily with a domestic and public environment featured more and more by the presence and the utilization of new emitters and finally, more medical procedures are based on electromagnetic fields as well. Therefore, the topic of the interaction of devices with electromagnetic interference (EMI) is increasingly a real and actual problem.In the medical environment most attention is paid to magnetic resonance, nevertheless the risk of interaction is present also with ionizing radiation, electrical nerve stimulation and electrosurgery. In the non-medical environment, most studies reported in the literature focused on mobile phones, metal detectors, as well as on headphones or digital players as potential EMI sources, but many other instruments and tools may be intentional or non-intentional sources of electromagnetic fields.CIED manufacturers are more and more focusing on new technological features in order to make implantable devices less susceptible to EMI. However, patients and emitter manufacturers should be aware that limitations exist and that there is not complete immunity to EMI.

  19. Achieved capability of the superconducting magnet system for the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satow, T.; Imagawa, S.; Yanagi, N.

    2001-01-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) is a plasma physics experimental device with a magnetic stored energy of 960 MJ, consisting of two sc (superconducting) helical coils and six sc poloidal coils. The trial operation and the first plasma discharge of the eight-year Phase I project for LHD were finished on 31 March 1998 as initially planned. The second experimental campaign was conducted by additional heating using two NBI devices. The third campaign started in June 1999 and was finished in January 2000. Many plasma heating tests up to a plasma field of 2.90 T were carried out. Major test results on the sc magnet system for LHD are as follows: (1) The LHD cryogenic system succeeded in 13,400-hour operation and proved its high reliability. (2) A central field of 2.91 T at a radius of 3.60 m was achieved at an H-I current of 11.08 kA, H-M current of 11.83 kA and an H-O current of 12.02 kA. (3) All six poloidal coils were excited stably. (4) Nine flexible sc bus-lines with a total length of 497 m were operated stably and safe. (author)

  20. Personal medical electronic devices and walk-through metal detector security systems: assessing electromagnetic interference effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guag, Joshua; Addissie, Bisrat; Witters, Donald

    2017-03-20

    There have been concerns that Electromagnetic security systems such as walk-through metal detectors (WTMDs) can potentially cause electromagnetic interference (EMI) in certain active medical devices including implantable cardiac pacemakers and implantable neurostimulators. Incidents of EMI between WTMDs and active medical devices also known as personal medical electronic devices (PMED) continue to be reported. This paper reports on emission measurements of sample WTMDs and testing of 20 PMEDs in a WTMD simulation system. Magnetic fields from sample WTMD systems were characterized for emissions and exposure of certain PMEDs. A WTMD simulator system designed and evaluated by FDA in previous studies was used to mimic the PMED exposures to the waveform from sample WTMDs. The simulation system allows for controlled PMED exposure enabling careful study with adjustable magnetic field strengths and exposure duration, and provides flexibility for PMED exposure at elevated levels in order to study EMI effects on the PMED. The PMED samples consisted of six implantable cardiac pacemakers, six implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), five implantable neurostimulators, and three insulin pumps. Each PMED was exposed in the simulator to the sample WTMD waveforms using methods based on appropriate consensus test standards for each of the device type. Testing the sample PMEDs using the WTMD simulator revealed EMI effects on two implantable pacemakers and one implantable neurostimulator for exposure field strength comparable to actual WTMD field strength. The observed effects were transient and the PMEDs returned to pre-exposure operation within a few seconds after removal from the simulated WTMD exposure fields. No EMI was observed for the sample ICDs or insulin pumps. The findings are consistent with earlier studies where certain sample PMEDs exhibited EMI effects. Clinical implications were not addressed in this study. Additional studies are needed to evaluate potential PMED

  1. Intrathecal Pump Exposure to Electromagnetic Interference: A Report of Device Interrogation following Multiple ECT Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicket, Mark C; Hanna, George M

    2016-02-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery systems represent an increasingly common treatment modality for patients with a variety of conditions, including chronic pain and spasticity. Pumps rely on electronic programming to properly control and administer highly concentrated medications. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is a known exposure that may cause a potential patient safety issue stemming from direct patient injury, pump damage, or changes to pump operation or flow rate. The objective of our case report was to describe an approach to evaluating a patient with a pump prior to and following exposure to EMI from electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), as well as to document findings from device interrogations associated with this event. Case report. Academic university-based pain management center. We present the case of a patient with an intrathecal pump who underwent multiple exposures to EMI in the form of 42 ECT sessions. Interrogation of the intrathecal drug delivery system revealed no safety issues following ECT sessions. At no time were error messages, unintentional changes in event logs, unintentional changes in pump settings, or evidence of pump stall or over-infusion noted. Communication with multiple entities (patient, family, consulting physicians, and device manufacturer) and maintaining vigilance through device interrogation both before and after EMI exposure are appropriate safeguards to mitigate the risk and detect potential adverse events of EMI with intrathecal drug delivery systems. Given the infrequent reports of device exposure to ECT, best practices may be derived from experience with EMI exposure from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although routine EMI exposure to intrathecal drug delivery systems should be avoided, we describe one patient with repeated exposure to ECT without apparent complication.

  2. Ballistic transport and quantum interference in InSb nanowire devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sen; Huang Guang-Yao; Guo Jing-Kun; Kang Ning; Xu Hong-Qi; Caroff, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    An experimental realization of a ballistic superconductor proximitized semiconductor nanowire device is a necessary step towards engineering topological quantum electronics. Here, we report on ballistic transport in InSb nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy contacted by superconductor electrodes. At an elevated temperature, clear conductance plateaus are observed at zero magnetic field and in agreement with calculations based on the Landauer formula. At lower temperature, we have observed characteristic Fabry–Pérot patterns which confirm the ballistic nature of charge transport. Furthermore, the magnetoconductance measurements in the ballistic regime reveal a periodic variation related to the Fabry–Pérot oscillations. The result can be reasonably explained by taking into account the impact of magnetic field on the phase of ballistic electron’s wave function, which is further verified by our simulation. Our results pave the way for better understanding of the quantum interference effects on the transport properties of InSb nanowires in the ballistic regime as well as developing of novel device for topological quantum computations. (paper)

  3. Realizing a Circuit Analog of an Optomechanical System with Longitudinally Coupled Superconducting Resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Eichler, C.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    We realize a superconducting circuit analog of the generic cavity-optomechanical Hamiltonian by longitudinally coupling two superconducting resonators, which are an order of magnitude different in frequency. We achieve longitudinal coupling by embedding a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) into a high frequency resonator, making its resonance frequency depend on the zero point current fluctuations of a nearby low frequency LC-resonator. By employing sideband drive fields we e...

  4. Application of high-temperature superconducting coil for internal ring devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Yuichi [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)]. E-mail: ogawa@ppl.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Morikawa, Junji [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Mito, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yanagi, Nagato [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Iwakuma, Masataka [Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    A high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil is applied for plasma confinement devices, where plasma is confined with a magnetic field of a floating HTS coil. The internal coil device mini-RT with a BSCCO tape has been constructed, in which the coil major radius and magnetomotive force are 0.15 m and 50 kA, respectively. The coil is cooled to 20 K with a helium gas by using a demountable transfer tube and check valve system. The coil current is directly excited by the external power supply with demountable electrodes. To reduce the heat load, the electrodes were cooled with liquid nitrogen. The levitation experiment of the HTS coil has been carried out. The position of the HTS coil is measured by laser sensors, and is feedback-controlled with the levitation coil current. We have succeeded in levitating the HTS coil during 1 h with accuracy of less than 20 {mu}m. The magnetic field strength near the internal coil is around 0.1 T, and a radio-frequency wave of 2.45 GHz is applied for the plasma production. At the floating condition of the HTS coil, a high-density plasma with more than 10{sup 17} m{sup -3}, which is higher than the cut-off density of a 2.45 GHz microwave, has been produced. A new device RT-1 with a major radius of 0.25 m and a magnetomotive force of 250 kA is under construction, and a persistent current has been demonstrated. The feasibility on YBCO tape is briefly discussed.

  5. Superconductivity: Phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falicov, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    This document discusses first the following topics: (a) The superconducting transition temperature; (b) Zero resistivity; (c) The Meissner effect; (d) The isotope effect; (e) Microwave and optical properties; and (f) The superconducting energy gap. Part II of this document investigates the Ginzburg-Landau equations by discussing: (a) The coherence length; (b) The penetration depth; (c) Flux quantization; (d) Magnetic-field dependence of the energy gap; (e) Quantum interference phenomena; and (f) The Josephson effect

  6. The first operation of the superconducting optimized stellarator fusion device Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The confinement of a high-temperature plasma by a suitable magnetic field is the most promising path to master nuclear fusion of Deuterium and Tritium on the scale of a reasonable power station. The two leading confinement concepts are the tokamak and the stellarator. Different from a tokamak, the stellarator does not require a strong current in the plasma but generates the magnetic field by external coils only. This has significant advantages, e.g. better stability properties and inherent steady-state capability. But stellarators need optimization, since ad hoc chosen magnetic field geometries lead to insufficient confinement properties, unfavourable plasma equilibria, and loss of fast particles. Wendelstein 7-X is a large (plasma volume 30 m{sup 3}) stellarator device with shaped superconducting coils that were determined via pure physics optimization criteria. After 19 years of construction, Wendelstein 7-X has now started operation. This talk introduces into the stellarator concept as a candidate for a future fusion power plant, summarizes the optimization principles, and presents the first experimental results with Helium and Hydrogen high temperature plasmas. An outlook on the physics program and the main goals of the project is given, too.

  7. Structural analysis and manufacture for the vacuum vessel of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuntao; Yao Damao; Wu Songata; Weng Peide

    2006-01-01

    The experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) is an advanced steady-state plasma physics experimental device, which has been approved by the Chinese government and is being constructed as the Chinese national nuclear fusion research project. The vacuum vessel, that is one of the key components, will have to withstand not only the electromagnetic force due to the plasma disruption and the Halo current, but also the pressure of boride water and the thermal stress due to the 250 deg. C baking out by the hot pressure nitrogen gas, or the 100 deg. C hot wall during plasma operation. This paper is a report of the mechanical analyses of the vacuum vessel. According to the allowable stress criteria of American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee (ASME), the maximum integrated stress intensity on the vacuum vessel is 396 MPa, less than the allowable design stress intensity 3S m (441 MPa). At the same time, some key R and D issues are presented, which include supporting system, bellows and the assembly of the whole vacuum vessel

  8. A method for building low loss multi-layer wiring for superconducting microwave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsworth, A.; Barends, R.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Zijun; Chiaro, B.; Fowler, A.; Foxen, B.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Klimov, P. V.; Lucero, E.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.; Megrant, A.

    2018-02-01

    Complex integrated circuits require multiple wiring layers. In complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor processing, these layers are robustly separated by amorphous dielectrics. These dielectrics would dominate energy loss in superconducting integrated circuits. Here, we describe a procedure that capitalizes on the structural benefits of inter-layer dielectrics during fabrication and mitigates the added loss. We use a deposited inter-layer dielectric throughout fabrication and then etch it away post-fabrication. This technique is compatible with foundry level processing and can be generalized to make many different forms of low-loss wiring. We use this technique to create freestanding aluminum vacuum gap crossovers (airbridges). We characterize the added capacitive loss of these airbridges by connecting ground planes over microwave frequency λ/4 coplanar waveguide resonators and measuring resonator loss. We measure a low power resonator loss of ˜3.9 × 10-8 per bridge, which is 100 times lower than that of dielectric supported bridges. We further characterize these airbridges as crossovers, control line jumpers, and as part of a coupling network in gmon and fluxmon qubits. We measure qubit characteristic lifetimes (T1s) in excess of 30 μs in gmon devices.

  9. Introduction to superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rose-Innes, A C

    1978-01-01

    Introduction to Superconductivity differs from the first edition chiefly in Chapter 11, which has been almost completely rewritten to give a more physically-based picture of the effects arising from the long-range coherence of the electron-waves in superconductors and the operation of quantum interference devices. In this revised second edition, some further modifications have been made to the text and an extra chapter dealing with """"high-temperature"""" superconductors has been added. A vast amount of research has been carried out on these since their discovery in 1986 but the results, both

  10. Variable temperature superconducting microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Yeh, W. J.

    2000-03-01

    We have developed and tested a promising type of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope, which can be used to detect vortex motion and can operate in magnetic fields over a large temperature range. The system utilizes a single-loop coupling transformer, consisting of a patterned high Tc superconducting thin film. At one end of the transformer, a 20 μm diam detecting loop is placed close to the sample. At the other end, a large loop is coupled to a NbTi coil, which is connected to a low Tc SQUID sensor. Transformers in a variety of sizes have been tested and calibrated. The results show that the system is capable of detecting the motion of a single vortex. We have used the microscope to study the behavior of moving vortices at various positions in a YBa2Cu3O7 thin film bridge.

  11. Maskless X-Ray Writing of Electrical Devices on a Superconducting Oxide with Nanometer Resolution and Online Process Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, Lorenzo; Bonino, Valentina; Agostino, Angelo; Prestipino, Carmelo; Borfecchia, Elisa; Lamberti, Carlo; Operti, Lorenza; Fretto, Matteo; De Leo, Natascia; Truccato, Marco

    2017-08-22

    X-ray nanofabrication has so far been usually limited to mask methods involving photoresist impression and subsequent etching. Herein we show that an innovative maskless X-ray nanopatterning approach allows writing electrical devices with nanometer feature size. In particular we fabricated a Josephson device on a Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ (Bi-2212) superconducting oxide micro-crystal by drawing two single lines of only 50 nm in width using a 17.4 keV synchrotron nano-beam. A precise control of the fabrication process was achieved by monitoring in situ the variations of the device electrical resistance during X-ray irradiation, thus finely tuning the irradiation time to drive the material into a non-superconducting state only in the irradiated regions, without significantly perturbing the crystal structure. Time-dependent finite element model simulations show that a possible microscopic origin of this effect can be related to the instantaneous temperature increase induced by the intense synchrotron picosecond X-ray pulses. These results prove that a conceptually new patterning method for oxide electrical devices, based on the local change of electrical properties, is actually possible with potential advantages in terms of heat dissipation, chemical contamination, miniaturization and high aspect ratio of the devices.

  12. Superconducting pipes and levitating magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Yan; Rizzato, Felipe B

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by a beautiful demonstration of the Faraday and the Lenz laws in which a small neodymium magnet falls slowly through a conducting nonferromagnetic tube, we consider the dynamics of a magnet falling coaxially through a superconducting pipe. Unlike the case of normal conducting pipes, in which the magnet quickly reaches the terminal velocity, inside a superconducting tube the magnet falls freely. On the other hand, to enter the pipe the magnet must overcome a large electromagnetic energy barrier. For sufficiently strong magnets, the barrier is so large that the magnet will not be able to penetrate it and will be levitated over the mouth of the pipe. We calculate the work that must done to force the magnet to enter a superconducting tube. The calculations show that superconducting pipes are very efficient at screening magnetic fields. For example, the magnetic field of a dipole at the center of a short pipe of radius a and length L approximately > a decays, in the axial direction, with a characteristic length xi approximately 0.26a. The efficient screening of the magnetic field might be useful for shielding highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices. Finally, the motion of the magnet through a superconducting pipe is compared and contrasted to the flow of ions through a trans-membrane channel.

  13. Thermooptic two-mode interference device for reconfigurable quantum optic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Partha Pratim

    2018-06-01

    Reconfigurable large-scale integrated quantum optic circuits require compact component having capability of accurate manipulation of quantum entanglement for quantum communication and information processing applications. Here, a thermooptic two-mode interference coupler has been introduced as a compact component for generation of reconfigurable complex multi-photons quantum interference. Both theoretical and experimental approaches are used for the demonstration of two-photon and four-photon quantum entanglement manipulated with thermooptic phase change in TMI region. Our results demonstrate complex multi-photon quantum interference with high fabrication tolerance and quantum fidelity in smaller dimension than previous thermooptic Mach-Zehnder implementations.

  14. High temperature superconducting devices for SQUIDs, HF- and FIR-applications. Subproject: Thin-film heterostructures for devices and loss mechanisms in HTS. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, O.

    1994-06-01

    The successful use of electronic devices fabricated from the High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) in SQUID systems as well as HF- and FIR-applications requires the development of a suitable thin-film and device technology. Within the present research project we successfully established the technological base for the deposition and patterning of epitaxial HTS thin-films (YBaCuO, NdCeCuO) and heterostructures of HTS and insulating materials (e.g. NdGaO 3 ). YBaCuO/NdCeCuO superlattices could be successfully fabricated such that both components of the hterostructure were in a superconducting state. This allows for the fabrication and study of superconducting p-n structures. With respect to the fabrication of single grain boundary Josephson junctions based on the bicrystal technique we could establish an international leadership. The small spread of the junction parameters (∝20%) allowed the controllable fabrication of simple devices such as SQUIDs or flux-flow transistors. By the development of a new measuring technique the homogeneity of the critical current density distribution in grain-boundary junctions could be investigated on a sub-μm-scale. Within this project we also could establish a good understanding of the physical background of the transport phenomena in the mixed state of HTS in the presence of a temperature gradient. (orig./MM) [de

  15. Superconducting technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Superconductivity has a long history of about 100 years. Over the past 50 years, progress in superconducting materials has been mainly in metallic superconductors, such as Nb, Nb-Ti and Nb 3 Sn, resulting in the creation of various application fields based on the superconducting technologies. High-T c superconductors, the first of which was discovered in 1986, have been changing the future vision of superconducting technology through the development of new application fields such as power cables. On basis of these trends, future prospects of superconductor technology up to 2040 are discussed. In this article from the viewpoints of material development and the applications of superconducting wires and electronic devices. (author)

  16. Process and devices of detection of hard electromagnetic or particle radiations using a superconducting element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukier, A.K.; Valette, Claude; Waysand, Georges.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to processes and systems for the detection of hard electromagnetic or particle radiations and the sensors fitted to these systems. 'Hard radiations' means those whose energy is greater than a variable threshold, depending on the applications, but always more than 5 keV. The use of these sensors and the associated systems can therefore be envisaged in radiography and also in emission gammagraphy in the biological, anatomic and medical fields. In these processes, in order to detect a photon or a radiation particle, use is made of the transition phenomenon of a homogeneous grain of superconducting material of the first kind, from the metastable superconducting state to the normal state, under the effect of a photoelectron ejected by the impact of the photon or of the particle on the grain of superconducting material [fr

  17. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  18. QUANTUM ELECTRONIC DEVICES: Superconducting Nb3Sn point contact in the submillimeter range of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenov, É. M.; Danileĭko, M. V.; Derkach, V. E.; Romanenko, V. I.; Uskov, A. V.

    1988-05-01

    An investigation was made of the influence of submillimeter radiation emitted by an HCN laser operating at a frequency νl = 891 GHz on a superconducting point contact made of Nb3Sn. Three steps of the electric current were recorded. The experimental results indicated that such a contact could be used for frequency multiplication up to 3 THz.

  19. Advanced modern superconductive materials for the machines and devices working on the principles of levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prikhna, T.A.; Novikov, N.V.; Savchuk, Ya.M.; Sverdun, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    By the high-pressure (2 GPa) high-temperature (800-900 degree C) synthesis from Mg and B taken in the MgB 2 stoichiometric ratio and with 10 wt.% of Ti, the MgB 2 -based nanostructural superconductive material with the record values of critical current density, J c , and the irreversible fields has been obtained

  20. Superconducting six-axis accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A new superconducting accelerometer, capable of measuring both linear and angular accelerations, is under development at the University of Maryland. A single superconducting proof mass is magnetically levitated against gravity or any other proof force. Its relative positions and orientations with respect to the platform are monitored by six superconducting inductance bridges sharing a single amplifier, called the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The six degrees of freedom, the three linear acceleration components and the three angular acceleration components, of the platform are measured simultaneously. In order to improve the linearity and the dynamic range of the instrument, the demodulated outputs of the SQUID are fed back to appropriate levitation coils so that the proof mass remains at the null position for all six inductance bridges. The expected intrinsic noise of the instrument is 4 x 10(exp -12)m s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for linear acceleration and 3 x 10(exp -11) rad s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for angular acceleration in 1-g environment. In 0-g, the linear acceleration sensitivity of the superconducting accelerometer could be improved by two orders of magnitude. The design and the operating principle of a laboratory prototype of the new instrument is discussed.

  1. Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. X.; Wei, L. F.; Johansson, J. R.; Tsai, J. S.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the intrinsic nonlinearity of superconducting Josephson junctions, we propose a scalable circuit with superconducting qubits (SCQs) which is very similar to the successful one now being used for trapped ions. The SCQs are coupled to the ``vibrational'' mode provided by a superconducting LC circuit or its equivalent (e.g., a superconducting quantum interference device). Both single-qubit rotations and qubit-LC-circuit couplings and/or decouplings can be controlled by the frequencies of the time-dependent magnetic fluxes. The circuit is scalable since the qubit-qubit interactions, mediated by the LC circuit, can be selectively performed, and the information transfer can be realized in a controllable way. [4pt] Y.X. Liu, L.F. Wei, J.R. Johansson, J.S. Tsai, F. Nori, Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions, Phys. Rev. B 76, 144518 (2007). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v76/e144518

  2. Design and Fabrication of Slotted Multimode Interference Devices for Chemical and Biological Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mayeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present optical sensors based on slotted multimode interference waveguides. The sensor can be tuned to highest sensitivity in the refractive index ranges necessary to detect protein-based molecules or other water-soluble chemical or biological materials. The material of choice is low-loss silicon oxynitride (SiON which is highly stable to the reactivity with biological agents and processing chemicals. Sensors made with this technology are suited to high volume manufacturing.

  3. The pressure effect on the superconducting transition temperature of black phosphorus

    CERN Document Server

    Karuzawa, M; Endo, S

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the pressure effect on the superconducting transition temperature T sub c of black phosphorus up to 160 GPa using a superconducting quantum interference device vibrating coil magnetometer. It was found that T sub c had a maximum value of about 9.5 K at about 32 GPa, began decreasing with pressure and reached about 4.3 K at about 100 GPa.

  4. Numerical simulation and analysis for the baking out system of the HT-7U super-conducting tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuntao

    2004-01-01

    It can provide an ultrahigh vacuum location for the plasma operation. In order to improve its vacuum degree and attain a high quality operation environment for plasma, it is very important to proceed 250 degree C baking out to clear the wall before the plasma operation. The paper firstly gives two kinds of structures for the baking of the vacuum vessel, in which one is the baking by electricity and another is baking by the nitrogen gas. Secondly based on the numerical simulation and analysis, some results have been attained such as the baking power, temperature field distribution and thermal stress for the vacuum vessel, which can provide some valuable theory basis for the engineering design and optimization of the baking system of the HT-7U vacuum vessel or other similar super-conducting tokamak devices

  5. Hydride generation – in-atomizer collection of Pb in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device for atomic absorption spectrometry – an interference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotný, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); High School in Hořice, Husova 1414, 508 01 Hořice (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Interferences of selected hydride forming elements (As, Sb, Bi, Se and Sn) on lead determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were extensively studied in both on-line atomization and preconcentration (collection) modes. The commonly used on-line atomization mode was found free of significant interferences, whereas strong interference from Bi was observed when employing the preconcentration mode with plumbane collection in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device. Interference of Bi seems to take place in the preconcentration step. Interference of Bi in the collection mode cannot be reduced by increased hydrogen radical amount in the trap and/or the atomizer. - Highlights: ► Interference study on Pb determination by in-atomizer trapping was performed for the first time. ► Bi was found as a severe interferent in the preconcentration mode (Pb:Bi ratio 1:100). ► No interference was found in the on-line atomization (no preconcentration). ► Bi interference occurs during preconcentration.

  6. Requirements for accuracy of superconducting coils in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K; Yanagi, N; Ji, H; Kaneko, H; Ohyabu, N; Satow, T; Morimoto, S; Yamamoto, J; Motojima, O [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Chikusa, Nagoya (Japan); LHD Design Group

    1993-01-01

    Irregular magnetic fields resonate with the rational surface of the magnetic confinement systems, form magnetic islands and ergodic layers, and destruct the plasma confinement. To avoid this confinement destruction the requirement of an accuracy of 10[sup -4] in the magnetic field is adopted as the magnetic-accuracy design criterion for the LHD machine. Following this criterion the width of the undesirable magnetic island is kept less than one tenth of the plasma radius. The irregular magnetic field from the superconducting (SC) helical and poloidal coils is produced by winding irregularity, installing irregularity, cooling-down deformations and electromagnetic deformations. The local irregularities such as feeders, layer connections, adjacent-conductor connections of the coils also produce an error field. The eddy currents on the supporting shell structure of SC coils, the cryostat, etc. are also evaluated. All irregular effects are analyzed using Fourier decomposition and field mapping methods for the LHD design, and it is confirmed that the present design of the superconducting coil system satisfies the design criterion for these field irregularities. (orig.).

  7. Superconducting transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    A three film superconducting tunneling device, analogous to a semiconductor transistor, is presented, including a theoretical description and experimental results showing a current gain of four. Much larger current gains are shown to be feasible. Such a development is particularly interesting because of its novelty and the striking analogies with the semiconductor junction transistor

  8. Nanolayers with advanced properties for superconducting nanoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prepelita, A.; Zdravkov, V.; Morari, R.; Socrovisciuc, A.; Antropov, E.; Sidorenko, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Elaborated advanced technology for superconducting spintronics - technological process, based on magnetron sputtering of the metallic films with non-metallic protective layers, yields significant improvement in superconducting properties of thin Nb films and Nb/CuNi nanostructures in comparison with common methods of films deposition. The developed advanced technological process is patented (Patent RM number 175 from 31.03.2010). First experimental observation of the double re-entrant superconductivity in superconductor/ ferromagnetic nanostructures (Nb/Cu 41 Ni 59 bilayers) in dependence on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer (Published in : A.S. Sidorenko, V.I. Zdravkov, J. Kehrle, R.Morari, E.Antropov, G. Obermeier, S. Gsell, M. Schreck, C. Muller, V.V. Ryazanov, S. Horn, R. Tidecks, L.R. Tagirov. Extinction and recovery of superconductivity by interference in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers. In: Nanoscale Phenomena . Fundamentals and Applications,Ed. by H.Hahn, A.Sidorenko, I.Tiginyanu, Springer, 2009 p.1-10. Perspectives of applications: design of a new generation of superconducting spintronic devices - high frequency operating superconducting spin-switch for telecommunication and computers. (author)

  9. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices. Mid-Term Report, May 1990 - Jun. 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haertling, G.; Randolph, H.; Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Verbelyi, D.

    1991-07-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The first dealing with work involved with Clemson University and the second with the results from Westinghouse/Savannah River. Both areas of work involved low noise, low thermal conductivity superconducting grounding links used in the NASA-sponsored Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) Project. Clemson prepared the links from YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor tape that was mounted on a printed circuit board and encapsulated with epoxy resin. The Clemson program includes temperature vs. resistance, liquid nitrogen immersion, water immersion, thermal cycling, humidity, and radiation testing. The evaluation of the links under a long term environmental test program is described. The Savannah River program includes gamma irradiation, vibration, and long-term evaluation. The progress made in these evaluations is discussed

  10. Evaluating Electromagnetic Interference of Communication Devices with Root ZX Mini Apex Locator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Shafieibavani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The correct determination of working length is a critical factor in the success of endodontic treatment. Nowadays, the electronic apex locators (EALs is more used because of their ease of use, high accuracy, and the uncertainty of other methods. Because EALs use the electronic method, it is likely that electromagnetic waves (EMWs affect their performance. This study aims to investigate the possibility of this interference. Materials and Methods: The visual canal length (CL of 12 maxillary incisors (Vertucci’s type I was measured with a K-file and magnifying glass. Root ZX mini apex locator is used to measure CL in the absence/presence of EMWs in both the second (2G and third generations (3G of mobile communication network at the mode of ringing and conversation at direct contact and the distances of 25 and 50 cm. Results: The mean CL at presence of EMWs in all conditions and distances (by removing the conversation with 2G at direct contact group were not significantly difference with CL and EAL and absence of investigated EMWs group (Repeated-Measures Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, P = 0.083. The indicator of EAL were unstable on apex sign at least 5 seconds for 5 teeth (41.7% of samples in conversation with 2G at the direct contact group. Conclusion: EMWs of 2G and 3G not causes malfunctions of the Root ZX mini apex locator except conversation with 2G at the direct contact.

  11. Stationary levitation and vibration transmission characteristic in a superconducting seismic isolation device with a permanent magnet system and a copper plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, S., E-mail: s.sasaki@ecei.tohoku.ac.j [Electrical Engineering Department, Graduate School, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Shimada, K.; Yagai, T.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T. [Electrical Engineering Department, Graduate School, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Kawai, N.; Yasui, K. [Okumura Corporation, 5-6-1 Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo 180-8381 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    We have devised a magnetic levitation type superconducting seismic isolation device taking advantage of the specific characteristic of HTS bulk that the HTS bulk returns to its original position by restoring force against a horizontal displacement. The superconducting seismic isolation device is composed of HTS bulks and permanent magnets (PM rails). The PMs are fixed on an iron plate to realize the same polarities in the longitudinal direction and the different polarities in the transverse direction. The superconducting seismic isolation device can theoretically remove any horizontal vibrations completely. Therefore, the vibration transmissibility in the longitudinal direction of the PM rail becomes zero in theory. The zero vibration transmissibility and the stationary levitation, however, cannot be achieved in the real device because a uniform magnetic field distribution in the longitudinal direction of PM rail cannot be realized due to the individual difference of the PMs. Therefore, to achieve stationary levitation in the real device we adopted a PM-PM system that the different polarities are faced each other. The stationary levitation could be achieved by the magnetic interaction between the PMs in the PM-PM system, while the vibration transmitted to the seismic isolation object due to the magnetic interaction. We adopted a copper plate between the PMs to reduce the vibration transmissibility. The PM-PM system with the copper plate is very useful for realizing the stationary levitation and reducing the vibration transmissibility.

  12. Stationary levitation and vibration transmission characteristic in a superconducting seismic isolation device with a permanent magnet system and a copper plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, S.; Shimada, K.; Yagai, T.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T.; Kawai, N.; Yasui, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have devised a magnetic levitation type superconducting seismic isolation device taking advantage of the specific characteristic of HTS bulk that the HTS bulk returns to its original position by restoring force against a horizontal displacement. The superconducting seismic isolation device is composed of HTS bulks and permanent magnets (PM rails). The PMs are fixed on an iron plate to realize the same polarities in the longitudinal direction and the different polarities in the transverse direction. The superconducting seismic isolation device can theoretically remove any horizontal vibrations completely. Therefore, the vibration transmissibility in the longitudinal direction of the PM rail becomes zero in theory. The zero vibration transmissibility and the stationary levitation, however, cannot be achieved in the real device because a uniform magnetic field distribution in the longitudinal direction of PM rail cannot be realized due to the individual difference of the PMs. Therefore, to achieve stationary levitation in the real device we adopted a PM-PM system that the different polarities are faced each other. The stationary levitation could be achieved by the magnetic interaction between the PMs in the PM-PM system, while the vibration transmitted to the seismic isolation object due to the magnetic interaction. We adopted a copper plate between the PMs to reduce the vibration transmissibility. The PM-PM system with the copper plate is very useful for realizing the stationary levitation and reducing the vibration transmissibility.

  13. A Novel Device for the Measurement of the Mechanical and Magnetic Axes of Superconducting Magnet Assemblies for Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Aznar, S; Fischer, F; Galbraith, Peter; García-Pérez, J; Goy, S; Mermillod, N; Peiro, G; Patti, G; Rathjen, C

    2002-01-01

    In the context of the LHC superconducting magnet production, especially for dipoles and quadrupoles due to their complexity, it is foreseen to perform acceptance tests, at an early production stage, to detect possible significant deviations from the design values. The knowledge of the magnetic field geometry is very important, especially for the main magnets. In order to get this information a new device has been conceived that measures the magnets at room temperature during different stages of construction. This device incorporates a sensitive measuring probe and an efficient data acquisition system because the coils are only powered at about 10-5 of the nominal D.C. current. It is dedicated to Quadrupole and Dipole (by using Quadrupole-Configured Dipole (QCD) transformation) magnets, but is also easily adaptable to higher order magnets (n = 3, 4 and 5) by specific orientation of the search coils. It is equipped with magnetic sensors (4 fixed tangential coils and AC excitation current for the magnet) and p...

  14. Coupled Cryogenic Thermal and Electrical Models for Transient Analysis of Superconducting Power Devices with Integrated Cryogenic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, S.; Indrakanti, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, C.; Pamidi, S.

    2017-12-01

    Benefits of an integrated high temperature superconducting (HTS) power system and the associated cryogenic systems on board an electric ship or aircraft are discussed. A versatile modelling methodology developed to assess the cryogenic thermal behavior of the integrated system with multiple HTS devices and the various potential configurations are introduced. The utility and effectiveness of the developed modelling methodology is demonstrated using a case study involving a hypothetical system including an HTS propulsion motor, an HTS generator and an HTS power cable cooled by an integrated cryogenic helium circulation system. Using the methodology, multiple configurations are studied. The required total cooling power and the ability to maintain each HTS device at the required operating temperatures are considered for each configuration and the trade-offs are discussed for each configuration. Transient analysis of temperature evolution in the cryogenic helium circulation loop in case of a system failure is carried out to arrive at the required critical response time. The analysis was also performed for a similar liquid nitrogen circulation for an isobaric condition and the cooling capacity ratio is used to compare the relative merits of the two cryogens.

  15. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Wang

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ∼140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ∼140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ∼140 MV

  16. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  17. The long way to steady state fusion plasmas - the superconducting stellarator device Wendelstein 7-X

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The stable generation of high temperature Hydrogen plasmas (ion and electron temperature in the range 10-20 keV) is the basis for the use of nuclear fusion to generate heat and thereby electric power. The most promising path is to use strong, toroidal, twisted magnetic fields to confine the electrically charged plasma particles in order to avoid heat losses to the cold, solid wall elements. Two magnetic confinement concepts have been proven to be most suitable: (a) the tokamak and (b) the stellarator. The stellarator creates the magnetic field by external coils only, the tokamak by combining the externally created field with the magnetic field generated by a strong current in the plasma. “Wendelstein 7-X” is the name of a large superconducting stellarator that went successfully into operation after 15 years of construction. With 30 m3 plasma volume, 3 T magnetic field on axis, and 10 MW micro wave heating power, Hydrogen plasmas are generated that allow one to establish a scientific basis for the extrapol...

  18. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  19. Characterization of a dc SQUID based accelerometer circuit for a superconducting gravity gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharnweber, R.; Lumley, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A demonstrator set-up to test superconducting components has been designed and fabricated in order to characterize their functionality for use in a superconducting gravity gradiometer. The displacement of a freely oscillating levitated niobium proof mass in this acceleration transducer is measured inductively and read out by a direct current superconducting quantum interference device. It has been confirmed experimentally that the oscillation frequency depends on the current of the levitation magnet that is operated in persistent-current mode. The results allow us to establish testing and operational procedures that can be used in a more complex multichannel system to confirm functionality and to adjust the levitated proof mass. (author)

  20. Characterization of a dc SQUID based accelerometer circuit for a superconducting gravity gradiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharnweber, R.; Lumley, J.M. [Oxford Instruments, Scientific Research Division, Research Instruments (Cambridge), Newton House, Cambridge Business Park, Cowley Road, Cambridge CB4 4WZ (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    A demonstrator set-up to test superconducting components has been designed and fabricated in order to characterize their functionality for use in a superconducting gravity gradiometer. The displacement of a freely oscillating levitated niobium proof mass in this acceleration transducer is measured inductively and read out by a direct current superconducting quantum interference device. It has been confirmed experimentally that the oscillation frequency depends on the current of the levitation magnet that is operated in persistent-current mode. The results allow us to establish testing and operational procedures that can be used in a more complex multichannel system to confirm functionality and to adjust the levitated proof mass. (author)

  1. Experimental formation of a fractional vortex in a superconducting bi-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y.; Yamamori, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Nishio, T.; Arisawa, S.

    2018-05-01

    We report the experimental formation of a fractional vortex generated by using a thin superconducting bi-layer in the form of a niobium bi-layer, observed as a magnetic flux distribution image taken by a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope. Thus, we demonstrated that multi-component superconductivity can be realized by an s-wave conventional superconductor, because, in these superconductors, the magnetic flux is no longer quantized as it is destroyed by the existence of an inter-component phase soliton (i-soliton).

  2. Non-superconducting magnet structures for near-term, large fusion experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    File, J.; Knutson, D.S.; Marino, R.E.; Rappe, G.H.

    1980-10-01

    This paper describes the magnet and structural design in the following American tokamak devices: the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Joint European Torus (JET), also presented herein, has a magnet structure evolved from several European programs and, like TFTR, represents state of the art magnet and structure design

  3. Study of ions - molecules reactions in the gas phase with collision reaction cell devices: Applications to the direct resolution of spectroscopic interferences in ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, G.

    2008-12-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry emerged as the most widespread mass spectrometry technique in inorganic analytical chemistry for determining the concentration of a given isotope or an isotope ratio. The problem of spectroscopic interferences, inherent to this technique, finds a solution through the use of reaction cell devices. An in situ interference removal is feasible with the addition of a well selected gas in the cell. The understanding of the chemistry of ions-molecules interactions in the gas phase is however fundamental to optimize the efficiency of such devices. An accurate knowledge of experimental conditions in the reaction zone according to instrumental parameters appears crucial in order to interpret observed reactivities. This preliminary study is then used for the resolution of two nuclear field characteristic interferences. (author)

  4. Imaging orbitals and defects in superconducting FeSe/SrTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Jennifer [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Huang, Dennis; Webb, Tatiana; Feng, Shiang; Kaxiras, Efthimios [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Song, Can-Li [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Chang, Cui-Zu; Moodera, Jagadeesh [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Single-layer FeSe grown epitaxially on SrTiO{sub 3} has been shown to superconduct with T{sub c} as high as 100 K, more than a factor of 10 higher than bulk FeSe. This dramatic enhancement motivates intense efforts to understand the superconducting mechanism and to design and fabricate devices. Nematic order, breaking the 4-fold rotational symmetry of the crystal, has been proposed as an important factor in the superconducting phase diagram. Meanwhile, atomic defects, which may pin nematic fluctuations or otherwise perturb superconductivity, can provide important clues into the superconducting mechanism as well as practical routes to superconducting devices. Here we use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to search for orbital nematicity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO{sub 3}, and to investigate atomic-scale defects which locally influence superconductivity. From quasiparticle interference (QPI) images, we disentangle scattering intensities from the orthogonal Fe 3d{sub xz} and 3d{sub yz} bands, and quantitatively exclude pinned nematic orbital order with domain size larger than δ r ∝ 20 nm. Furthermore, we identify a prevalent ''dumbbell''-shaped atomic-scale defect whose placement could be harnessed to define two-dimensional superconducting devices.

  5. Superconductivity in power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings volume presents 24 conference papers and 15 posters dealing with the following aspects: 1) Principles and elementary aspects of high-temperature superconductivity (3 plenary lectures); 2) Preparation, properties and materials requirements of metallic or oxide superconductors (critical current behaviour, soldered joints, structural studies); 3) Magnet technology (large magnets for thermonuclear fusion devices; magnets for particle accelerators and medical devices); 4) Magnetic levitation and superconductivity; 5) Cryogenics; 6) Energy storage systems using superconducting coils (SMES); 7) Superconducting power transmission cables, switches, transformers, and generator systems for power plant; 8) Supporting activities, industrial aspects, patents. There are thirty-eight records in the ENERGY database relating to individual conference papers. (MM) [de

  6. Charge qubit coupled to an intense microwave electromagnetic field in a superconducting Nb device: evidence for photon-assisted quasiparticle tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, S E; Leppäkangas, J; Adamyan, A; Danilov, A V; Lindström, T; Fogelström, M; Bauch, T; Johansson, G; Kubatkin, S E

    2013-09-27

    We study a superconducting charge qubit coupled to an intensive electromagnetic field and probe changes in the resonance frequency of the formed dressed states. At large driving strengths, exceeding the qubit energy-level splitting, this reveals the well known Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference structure of a longitudinally driven two-level system. For even stronger drives, we observe a significant change in the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg pattern and contrast. We attribute this to photon-assisted quasiparticle tunneling in the qubit. This results in the recovery of the qubit parity, eliminating effects of quasiparticle poisoning, and leads to an enhanced interferometric response. The interference pattern becomes robust to quasiparticle poisoning and has a good potential for accurate charge sensing.

  7. High Tc superconducting nonlinear inductance and quick response magnetic sensor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, T.; Mohri, K.; Ozeki, A.; Shibata, T.

    1990-01-01

    A flux penetration model considering the demagnetizing effect is presented in order to analyze the nonlinear inductance characteristics for HTcSC. Various quick response magnetic devices such as modulators, magnetic switches and magnetic sensors were constructed. The magnetizing frequency can be set up more than 10 MHz which is difficult to achieve with the conventional ferromagnetic bulk cores. The cut-off frequency of 1.6 MHz was obtained for the sensors using the HTcSC cores at a magnetizing frequency of 11.5 MHz

  8. Superconducting quantum circuits theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiuhao

    Superconducting quantum circuit models are widely used to understand superconducting devices. This thesis consists of four studies wherein the superconducting quantum circuit is used to illustrate challenges related to quantum information encoding and processing, quantum simulation, quantum signal detection and amplification. The existence of scalar Aharanov-Bohm phase has been a controversial topic for decades. Scalar AB phase, defined as time integral of electric potential, gives rises to an extra phase factor in wavefunction. We proposed a superconducting quantum Faraday cage to detect temporal interference effect as a consequence of scalar AB phase. Using the superconducting quantum circuit model, the physical system is solved and resulting AB effect is predicted. Further discussion in this chapter shows that treating the experimental apparatus quantum mechanically, spatial scalar AB effect, proposed by Aharanov-Bohm, can't be observed. Either a decoherent interference apparatus is used to observe spatial scalar AB effect, or a quantum Faraday cage is used to observe temporal scalar AB effect. The second study involves protecting a quantum system from losing coherence, which is crucial to any practical quantum computation scheme. We present a theory to encode any qubit, especially superconducting qubits, into a universal quantum degeneracy point (UQDP) where low frequency noise is suppressed significantly. Numerical simulations for superconducting charge qubit using experimental parameters show that its coherence time is prolong by two orders of magnitude using our universal degeneracy point approach. With this improvement, a set of universal quantum gates can be performed at high fidelity without losing too much quantum coherence. Starting in 2004, the use of circuit QED has enabled the manipulation of superconducting qubits with photons. We applied quantum optical approach to model coupled resonators and obtained a four-wave mixing toolbox to operate photons

  9. Application of High-Temperature Superconducting Thin-Film Devices to Electro-Optical and Electronic Warfare Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    superconducting dispersive (chirp) delay line. Bt currents (IB 1 and 1B 2) control states of write junctions (gates 1 and 2). (Counter) clockwise currents...Gavaler, and "S. A. Reihle, "Superconductive Convolver with June- A. I. Braginski, "Optical Response of Epitaxial Films tion Ring Nlixers," IELT Trans

  10. Nanoscale superconducting memory based on the kinetic inductance of asymmetric nanowire loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Andrew; Averin, Dmitri V.; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2017-06-01

    The demand for low-dissipation nanoscale memory devices is as strong as ever. As Moore’s law is staggering, and the demand for a low-power-consuming supercomputer is high, the goal of making information processing circuits out of superconductors is one of the central goals of modern technology and physics. So far, digital superconducting circuits could not demonstrate their immense potential. One important reason for this is that a dense superconducting memory technology is not yet available. Miniaturization of traditional superconducting quantum interference devices is difficult below a few micrometers because their operation relies on the geometric inductance of the superconducting loop. Magnetic memories do allow nanometer-scale miniaturization, but they are not purely superconducting (Baek et al 2014 Nat. Commun. 5 3888). Our approach is to make nanometer scale memory cells based on the kinetic inductance (and not geometric inductance) of superconducting nanowire loops, which have already shown many fascinating properties (Aprili 2006 Nat. Nanotechnol. 1 15; Hopkins et al 2005 Science 308 1762). This allows much smaller devices and naturally eliminates magnetic-field cross-talk. We demonstrate that the vorticity, i.e., the winding number of the order parameter, of a closed superconducting loop can be used for realizing a nanoscale nonvolatile memory device. We demonstrate how to alter the vorticity in a controlled fashion by applying calibrated current pulses. A reliable read-out of the memory is also demonstrated. We present arguments that such memory can be developed to operate without energy dissipation.

  11. Nanoscale superconducting memory based on the kinetic inductance of asymmetric nanowire loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Andrew; Bezryadin, Alexey; Averin, Dmitri V

    2017-01-01

    The demand for low-dissipation nanoscale memory devices is as strong as ever. As Moore’s law is staggering, and the demand for a low-power-consuming supercomputer is high, the goal of making information processing circuits out of superconductors is one of the central goals of modern technology and physics. So far, digital superconducting circuits could not demonstrate their immense potential. One important reason for this is that a dense superconducting memory technology is not yet available. Miniaturization of traditional superconducting quantum interference devices is difficult below a few micrometers because their operation relies on the geometric inductance of the superconducting loop. Magnetic memories do allow nanometer-scale miniaturization, but they are not purely superconducting (Baek et al 2014 Nat. Commun. 5 3888). Our approach is to make nanometer scale memory cells based on the kinetic inductance (and not geometric inductance) of superconducting nanowire loops, which have already shown many fascinating properties (Aprili 2006 Nat. Nanotechnol. 1 15; Hopkins et al 2005 Science 308 1762). This allows much smaller devices and naturally eliminates magnetic-field cross-talk. We demonstrate that the vorticity, i.e., the winding number of the order parameter, of a closed superconducting loop can be used for realizing a nanoscale nonvolatile memory device. We demonstrate how to alter the vorticity in a controlled fashion by applying calibrated current pulses. A reliable read-out of the memory is also demonstrated. We present arguments that such memory can be developed to operate without energy dissipation. (paper)

  12. Superconducting magnets for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, Yu.N.

    1979-01-01

    Expediency of usage and possibilities arising in application of superconducting devices in magnetic systems of accelerators and experimental nuclear-physical devices are studied. Parameters of specific devices are given. It is emphasized that at the existing level of technological possibilities, construction and usage of superconducting magnetic systems in experimental nuclear physics should be thought of as possible, from the engineering, and expedient, from the economical viewpoints [ru

  13. Modeling and Error Analysis of a Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    quantum (bij magnetic flux linking elements i and u b N noise flux of SQUID W natural angular frequency W f angular frequency of forcing function Wi...SQUID superconducting quantum interference device TBAN tolerable background acceleration noise VIC voltage to current converter -xxiii- .4 Chapter I...to detect the minute vibrations induced in a 1 ton, cryogenically cooled and magnetically levitated gravitational wave antenna. The antenna concept

  14. First-Order 0-π Quantum Phase Transition in the Kondo Regime of a Superconducting Carbon-Nanotube Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Maurand

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study a carbon-nanotube quantum dot embedded in a superconducting-quantum-interference-device loop in order to investigate the competition of strong electron correlations with a proximity effect. Depending on whether local pairing or local magnetism prevails, a superconducting quantum dot will exhibit a positive or a negative supercurrent, referred to as a 0 or π Josephson junction, respectively. In the regime of a strong Coulomb blockade, the 0-to-π transition is typically controlled by a change in the discrete charge state of the dot, from even to odd. In contrast, at a larger tunneling amplitude, the Kondo effect develops for an odd-charge (magnetic dot in the normal state, and quenches magnetism. In this situation, we find that a first-order 0-to-π quantum phase transition can be triggered at a fixed valence when superconductivity is brought in, due to the competition of the superconducting gap and the Kondo temperature. The superconducting-quantum-interference-device geometry together with the tunability of our device allows the exploration of the associated phase diagram predicted by recent theories. We also report on the observation of anharmonic behavior of the current-phase relation in the transition regime, which we associate with the two accessible superconducting states. Our results finally demonstrate that the spin-singlet nature of the Kondo state helps to enhance the stability of the 0 phase far from the mixed-valence regime in odd-charge superconducting quantum dots.

  15. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa. PMID:27922087

  16. Development of integrated superconducting devices for signal preprocessing. Final report; Entwicklung supraleitender Bausteine der Signalvorverarbeitung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biehl, M.; Koch, R.; Neuhaus, M.; Scherer, T.; Jutzi, W.

    1998-02-01

    SPICE and CADENCE based tools for designing, simulating and optimizing SFQ and RSFQ circuits have been developed as well as a standard cell library corresponding to the fabrication technology established at the IEGI. A 12 bit flux shuttle shift register using Nb/Al Josephson junctions with a new write and readout gate has been fabricated and tested successfully; the power dissipation is 9 nW/bit/GHz. A pseudo random pulse generator was developed correspondingly. Simulations of RSFQ toggle flipflops during a large number of clock cycles demonstrated that the digital performance of counters is limited to clock frequencies below 100 GHz by dynamic effects, especially of parasitic inductances. Therefore dc measurements based on the voltage-frequency Josephson relationship must be followed by real time measurements of single SFQ word pulses. A four stage Nb based RSFQ counter in a coplanar waveguide test jig was tested up to a frequency of 2 GHz, limited by the available 32 bit pattern generator and the bandwith of the sampling oscilloscope, yielding bit error rates of about 10{sup -12}. Using YBCO technology, a 4 bit SFQ shift register (T=40 K) as well as miniaturized coplanar microwave devices for satellite and communication applications at 10 GHz (T=77 K) have been designed and fabricated. A 4 bit instantaneous real time frequency meter (IFM) and a microwave filter with a 3-dB bandwidth of only 1.8% have been mounted on the cold head of a split-cycle Stirling cooler (AEG, 1.5 W rate at 80 K) and tested successfully. Hybrid devices, e.g. amplifiers and oscillators, combining active semiconductor components and low loss coplanar YBCO transmission lines operated at 77 K seem very promising. (orig.) [Deutsch] Werkzeuge der Auslegung, Simulation und Optimierung von SFQ- und RSFQ-Schaltungen auf der Basis von SPICE und CADENCE wurden am IEGI entwickelt und eingesetzt. Eine auf die Technologien des Instituts zugeschnittene Bibliothek von Zellen ist vorhanden. Mit der

  17. Local switching of two-dimensional superconductivity using the ferroelectric field effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K. S.; Gabay, M.; Jaccard, D.; Shibuya, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Lippmaa, M.; Triscone, J.-M.

    2006-05-01

    Correlated oxides display a variety of extraordinary physical properties including high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance. In these materials, strong electronic correlations often lead to competing ground states that are sensitive to many parameters-in particular the doping level-so that complex phase diagrams are observed. A flexible way to explore the role of doping is to tune the electron or hole concentration with electric fields, as is done in standard semiconductor field effect transistors. Here we demonstrate a model oxide system based on high-quality heterostructures in which the ferroelectric field effect approach can be studied. We use a single-crystal film of the perovskite superconductor Nb-doped SrTiO3 as the superconducting channel and ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 as the gate oxide. Atomic force microscopy is used to locally reverse the ferroelectric polarization, thus inducing large resistivity and carrier modulations, resulting in a clear shift in the superconducting critical temperature. Field-induced switching from the normal state to the (zero resistance) superconducting state was achieved at a well-defined temperature. This unique system could lead to a field of research in which devices are realized by locally defining in the same material superconducting and normal regions with `perfect' interfaces, the interface being purely electronic. Using this approach, one could potentially design one-dimensional superconducting wires, superconducting rings and junctions, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) or arrays of pinning centres.

  18. Integrated high-transition temperature magnetometer with only two superconducting layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, R.; Kingston, J.J.; Miklich, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of an integrated YBa2Cu3O7-x thin-film magnetometer consisting of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), with biepitaxial grain boundary junctions, integrated with a flux transformer on a single substrate. Only two superconducting layers...... are required, the SQUID body serving as the crossunder that completes the multiturn flux transformer. The highest temperature at which any of the magnetometers functioned was 76 K. At 60 K the magnetic field gain of this device was 63, and the magnetic field noise was 160 fT Hz-1/2 at 2 kHz, increasing to 3...

  19. Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. II. Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, H.A.; Moody, M.V.; Paik, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive superconducting gravity gradiometer has been constructed and tested. Coupling to gravity signals is obtained by having two superconducting proof masses modulate magnetic fields produced by persistent currents. The induced electrical currents are differenced by a passive superconducting circuit coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device. The experimental behavior of this device has been shown to follow the theoretical model closely in both signal transfer and noise characteristics. While its intrinsic noise level is shown to be 0.07 E Hz/sup -1/2/ (1 Eequivalent10/sup -9/ sec/sup -2/), the actual performance of the gravity gradiometer on a passive platform has been limited to 0.3--0.7 E Hz/sup -1/2/ due to its coupling to the environmental noise. The detailed structure of this excess noise is understood in terms of an analytical error model of the instrument. The calibration of the gradiometer has been obtained by two independent methods: by applying a linear acceleration and a gravity signal in two different operational modes of the instrument. This device has been successfully operated as a detector in a new null experiment for the gravitational inverse-square law. In this paper we report the design, fabrication, and detailed test results of the superconducting gravity gradiometer. We also present additional theoretical analyses which predict the specific dynamic behavior of the gradiometer and of the test

  20. Interference of GSM mobile phones with communication between Cardiac Rhythm Management devices and programmers: A combined in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong; Dong, Zhi-Feng; Chen, Yan; Wang, Fa-Bin; Wei, Zhi; Zhao, Wen-Bin; Li, Shuai; Liu, Ming-Ya; Zhu, Wei; Wei, Meng; Li, Jing-Bo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate interference, and how to avoid it, by high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) mobile phone with communication between cardiac rhythm management devices (CRMs) and programmers, a combined in vivo and in vitro testing was conducted. During in vivo testing, GSM mobile phones interfered with CRM-programmer communication in 33 of 65 subjects tested (50.8%). Losing ventricle sensing was representative in this study. In terms of clinical symptoms, only 4 subjects (0.6%) felt dizzy during testing. CRM-programmer communication recovered upon termination of mobile phone communication. During in vitro testing, electromagnetic interference by high-frequency (700-950 MHz) EMFs reproducibly occurred in duplicate testing in 18 of 20 CRMs (90%). During each interference, the pacing pulse signal on the programmer would suddenly disappear while the synchronous signal was normal on the amplifier-oscilloscope. Simulation analysis showed that interference by radiofrequency emitting devices with CRM-programmer communication may be attributed to factors including materials, excitation source distance, and implant depth. Results suggested that patients implanted with CRMs should not be restricted from using GSM mobile phones; however, CRMs should be kept away from high-frequency EMFs of GSM mobile phone during programming. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Superconducting quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, V.

    1989-01-01

    This book reviews recent accomplishments, presents new results and discusses possible future developments of superconducting quantum electronics and high T c superconductivity. The three main parts of the book deal with fundamentals, sensitive detectors, and precision metrology. New results reported include: correct equivalent circuits modelling superconducting electronic devices; exact solution of the Mattis-Bardeen equations describing various experiments for thin films; complete theoretical description and experimental results for a new broad band spectrum analyzer; a new Josephson junction potentiometer allowing tracing of unknown voltage ratios back to well-known frequency ratios; and fast superconducting SQUID shift registers enabling the production of calculable noise power spectra in the microwave region

  2. Laser activated superconducting switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    A superconducting switch or bistable device is described consisting of a superconductor in a cryogen maintaining a temperature just below the transition temperature, having a window of the proper optical frequency band for passing a laser beam which may impinge on the superconductor when desired. The frequency of the laser is equal to or greater than the optical absorption frequency of the superconducting material and is consistent with the ratio of the gap energy of the switch material to Planck's constant, to cause depairing of electrons, and thereby normalize the superconductor. Some embodiments comprise first and second superconducting metals. Other embodiments feature the two superconducting metals separated by a thin film insulator through which the superconducting electrons tunnel during superconductivity

  3. The integration of cryogenic cooling systems with superconducting electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been critical issue that has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the market place. Even though the performance of the superconducting circuit is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement for cryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a disadvantage. This report will talk about the various methods for refrigerating superconducting devices. Cryocooler types will be compared for vibration, efficiency, and cost. Some solutions to specific problems of integrating cryocoolers to superconducting devices are presented.

  4. Ex-situ manufacturing of SiC-doped MgB2 used for superconducting wire in medical device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbirowo, Satrio; Imaduddin, Agung; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Yuwono, Akhmad Herman

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is a superconductor material with a relatively high critical temperature. Due to its relatively high critical temperature, this material is promising and has the potential to replace Nb3Sn for wire superconducting used in many medical devices. In this work, nanoparticle SiC-doped MgB2 superconducting material has been fabricated through an ex-situ method. The doping of nanoparticle SiC by 10 and 15 wt% was conducted to analyze its effect on specific resistivity of MgB2. The experiment was started by weighing a stoichiometric amount of MgB2 and nanoparticles SiC. Both materials were mixed and grounded for 30 minutes by using an agate mortar. The specimens were then pressed into a 6 mm diameter stainless steel tube, which was then reduced until 3 mm through a wire drawing method. X-ray diffraction analysis was conducted to confirm the phase, whereas the superconductivity of the specimens was analyzed by using resistivity measurement under cryogenic magnetic system. The results indicated that the commercial MgB2 showed a critical temperature of 37.5 K whereas the SiC doped MgB2 has critical temperature of 38.3 K.

  5. Coherence properties in superconducting flux qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilla, Samuele

    2015-02-16

    The research work discussed in this thesis deals with the study of superconducting Josephson qubits. Superconducting qubits are solid-state artificial atoms which are based on lithographically defined Josephson tunnel junctions properties. When sufficiently cooled, these superconducting devices exhibit quantized states of charge, flux or junction phase depending on their design parameters. This allows to observe coherent evolutions of their states. The results presented can be divided into two parts. In a first part we investigate operations of superconducting qubits based on the quantum coherence in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID). We explain experimental data which has been observed in a SQUID subjected to fast, large-amplitude modifications of its effective potential shape. The motivations for this work come from the fact that in the past few years there have been attempts to interpret the supposed quantum behavior of physical systems, such as Josephson devices, within a classical framework. Moreover, we analyze the possibility of generating GHZ states, namely maximally entangled states, in a quantum system made out of three Josephson qubits. In particular, we investigate the possible limitations of the GHZ state generation due to coupling to bosonic baths. In the second part of the thesis we address a particular cause of decoherence of flux qubits which has been disregarded until now: thermal gradients, which can arise due to accidental non equilibrium quasiparticle distributions. The reason for these detrimental effects is that heat currents flowing through Josephson tunnel junctions in response to a temperature gradient are periodic functions of the phase difference between the electrodes. The phase dependence of the heat current comes from Andreev reflection, namely an interplay between the quasiparticles which carry heat and the superconducting condensate which is sensitive to the superconducting phase difference. Generally speaking

  6. FY 2000 research and development of fundamental technologies for AC superconducting power devices. R and D of fundamental technologies for superconducting power cables and faults current limiters, R and D of superconducting magnets for power applications, and study on the total systems and related subjects; 2000 nendo koryu chodendo denryoku kiki kiban gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Chodendo soden cable kiban gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu, chodendo genryuki kiban gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu, denryokuyo chodendo magnet no kenkyu kaihatsu, total system nado no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The project for research and development of fundamental technologies for AC superconducting power devices has been started, and the FY 2000 results are reported. The R and D of fundamental technologies for superconducting power cables include grasping the mechanical characteristics associated with integration necessary for fabrication of large current capacity and long cables; development of barrier cable materials by various methods; and development of short insulated tubes as cooling technology for long superconducting cables, and grasping its thermal/mechanical characteristics. The R and D of faults current limiters include introduction of the unit for superconducting film fabrication, determination of the structures and layouts for large currents, and improvement of performance of each device for high voltages. R and D of superconducting magnets for power applications include grasping the fundamental characteristics of insulation at cryogenic temperature, completion of the insulation designs for high voltage/current lead bushing, and development of prototype sub-cooled nitrogen cooling unit for cooling each AC power device. Study on the total systems and related subjects include analysis for stabilization of the group model systems, to confirm improved voltage stability when the superconducting cable is in service. (NEDO)

  7. Joint interference management and resource allocation for device-to-device (D2D) communications underlying downlink/uplink decoupled (DUDe) heterogeneous networks

    KAUST Repository

    Celik, Abdulkadir

    2017-07-31

    In this paper, resource allocation and co-tier/cross-tier interference management are investigated for D2D-enabled heterogeneous networks (HetNets) where tiers 1, 2, and 3 consist of macrocells, smallcells, and D2D pairs, respectively. We first propose a D2D-enabled fractional frequency reuse scheme for uplink (UL) HetNets where macrocell subregions are preassigned to different subbands (SBs) in order to mitigate the tier-1↔tier-1 interference. Nevertheless, cell-edge macrocell user equipments (MUEs) with high transmission powers still form dead-zones for nearby smallcell UEs (SUEs) and D2D UEs (DUEs). One of the simple but yet novel means of the dead-zone alleviation is associating the cell-edge MUEs with nearby smallcells, which is also known as downlink (DL)/UL decoupling (DUDe). Subject to quality of service (QoS) requirements and power constraints, we formulate a joint SB assignment and resource block (RB) allocation optimization as a mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP) problem to maximize the D2D sum rate and minimize the co-tier/cross-tier interference. Based on tolerable interference limit, we propose a fast yet high-performance suboptimal solution to jointly assign available SBs and RBs to smallcells. A D2D mode selection and resource allocation framework is then developed for DUEs. As traditional DL/UL Coupled (DUCo) scheme generates significant interference proportional to cellular user density and user association bias factor, results obtained from the combination of proposed methods and developed algorithms reveal the potential of DUDe for co-tier/cross-tier interference mitigation which opens more room for spectrum reuse of DUEs.

  8. Full-switching FSF-type superconducting spin-triplet magnetic random access memory element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, D.; Morari, R.; Zdravkov, V. I.; Ullrich, A.; Khaydukov, Yu.; Obermeier, G.; Müller, C.; Sidorenko, A. S.; von Nidda, H.-A. Krug; Horn, S.; Tagirov, L. R.; Tidecks, R.

    2017-11-01

    In the present work a superconducting Co/CoOx/Cu41Ni59 /Nb/Cu41Ni59 nanoscale thin film heterostructure is investigated, which exhibits a superconducting transition temperature, Tc, depending on the history of magnetic field applied parallel to the film plane. In more detail, around zero applied field, Tc is lower when the field is changed from negative to positive polarity (with respect to the cooling field), compared to the opposite case. We interpret this finding as the result of the generation of the odd-in-frequency triplet component of superconductivity arising at noncollinear orientation of the magnetizations in the Cu41Ni59 layer adjacent to the CoOx layer. This interpretation is supported by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, which revealed a correlation between details of the magnetic structure and the observed superconducting spin-valve effects. Readout of information is possible at zero applied field and, thus, no permanent field is required to stabilize both states. Consequently, this system represents a superconducting magnetic random access memory element for superconducting electronics. By applying increased transport currents, the system can be driven to the full switching mode between the completely superconducting and the normal state.

  9. Research briefing on high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    The research briefing was prepared in response to the exciting developments in superconductivity in ceramic oxide materials announced earlier in 1987. The panel's specific charge was to examine not only the scientific opportunities in high-temperature superconductivity but also the barriers to commercial exploitation. While the base of experimental knowledge on the superconductors is growing rapidly, there is as yet no generally accepted theoretical explanation of their behavior. The fabrication and processing challenges presented by the materials suggest that the period or precommercial exploration for applications will probably extend for a decade or more. Near term prospects for applications include magnetic shielding, the voltage standard, superconducting quantum interference devices, infrared sensors, microwave devices, and analog signal processing. The panel also identified a number of longer-term prospects in high-field and large-scale applications, and in electronics. The United States' competitive position in the field is discussed, major scientific and technological objectives for research and development identified, and concludes with a series of recommendations.

  10. Superconducting materials for large scale applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dew-Hughes, D.

    1975-01-01

    Applications of superconductors capable of carrying large current densities in large-scale electrical devices are examined. Discussions are included on critical current density, superconducting materials available, and future prospects for improved superconducting materials. (JRD)

  11. Origin and Reduction of 1/f Magnetic Flux Noise in Superconducting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P.; Sendelbach, S.; Beck, M. A.; Freeland, J. W.; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Hui; Yu, Clare C.; Wu, R. Q.; Pappas, D. P.; McDermott, R.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic flux noise is a dominant source of dephasing and energy relaxation in superconducting qubits. The noise power spectral density varies with frequency as 1=fα, with α ≲ 1, and spans 13 orders of magnitude. Recent work indicates that the noise is from unpaired magnetic defects on the surfaces of the superconducting devices. Here, we demonstrate that adsorbed molecular O2 is the dominant contributor to magnetism in superconducting thin films. We show that this magnetism can be reduced by appropriate surface treatment or improvement in the sample vacuum environment. We observe a suppression of static spin susceptibility by more than an order of magnitude and a suppression of 1=f magnetic flux noise power spectral density of up to a factor of 5. These advances open the door to the realization of superconducting qubits with improved quantum coherence.

  12. Evaluation of an Acoustic Charge Transport (ACT) device for adaptive interference suppression in spread spectrum communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Michael S.

    1993-12-01

    Analytical results have shown that adaptive filtering can be a powerful tool for the rejection of narrowband interference in a direct sequence spread spectrum receiver. However, the complexity of adaptive filtering hardware has hindered the experimental validation of these results. This thesis describes a unique adaptive filter architecture for implementing the Widrow-Hoff least mean square (LMS) algorithm using two state of the art acoustic charge transport (ACT) programmable transversal filters (PTF's). Signal to noise ratio improvement measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of the adaptive filter for suppressing single- and dual-tone jammers at jammer to signal ratios (JSR's) of up to 30 dB. It is shown that the ACT adaptive interference rejection system can consistently produce 55 dB notch depths with 3-dB bandwidths as low as 300 kHz with minimal degradation to the spread spectrum signal. It is also shown that the adaptive system can eliminate single tone jammers at any frequency within the spread spectrum bandwidth at any of 10, 20, or 30 dB JSRs within 10 to 15 iterations of the adaptive algorithm. The only drawback with the adaptive system as tested is the amount of time taken to perform an iteration because of the requirement to update the PTF tap weights sequentially. Suggestions are given as to how this particular parameter of the adaptive interference system could be optimized.

  13. Bolometric Device Based on Fluxoid Quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Joseph A.; Kenyon, Matthew E.; Leduc, Henry G.; Day, Peter K.

    2010-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fluxoid quantization in a superconducting loop. The sensitivity of the device is expected to surpass that of other superconducting- based bolometric devices, such as superconducting transition-edge sensors and superconducting nanowire devices. Just as important, the proposed device has advantages in sample fabrication.

  14. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toyokazu; Murata, Toru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To shield superconducting coils for use in the generation of magnetic field against neutron irradiation thereby preventing tritium contamination. Constitution: The thermonuclear device comprises, in its inside, a vacuum container for containing plasmas, superconducting coils disposed to the outside of the vacuum container and neutron absorbers disposed between the super-conducting coils and the vacuum container. since neutrons issued from the plasma are absorbed by neutron absorbers and not irradiated to the superconducting coils, generation of tritium due to the reaction between 3 He in the liquid helium as the coolants for the super-conducting coils and the neutrons is prevented. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. Superconducting resonators as beam splitters for linear-optics quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirolli, Luca; Burkard, Guido; Kumar, Shwetank; Divincenzo, David P

    2010-06-11

    We propose and analyze a technique for producing a beam-splitting quantum gate between two modes of a ring-resonator superconducting cavity. The cavity has two integrated superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that are modulated by applying an external magnetic field. The gate is accomplished by applying a radio frequency pulse to one of the SQUIDs at the difference of the two mode frequencies. Departures from perfect beam splitting only arise from corrections to the rotating wave approximation; an exact calculation gives a fidelity of >0.9992. Our construction completes the toolkit for linear-optics quantum computing in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  16. Superconductivity in technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, P.

    1976-01-01

    Physics, especially high energy physics and solid state physics was the first area in which superconducting magnets were used but in the long run, the most extensive application of superconductivity will probably be in energy technology. Superconducting power transmission cables, magnets for energy conversion in superconducting electrical machines, MHD-generators and fusion reactors and magnets for energy storage are being investigated. Magnets for fusion reactors will have particularly large physical dimensions, which means that much development effort is still needed, for there is no economic alternative. Superconducting surfaces in radio frequency cavities can give Q-values up to a factor of 10 6 higher than those of conventional resonators. Particle accelerators are the important application. And for telecommunication, simple coaxial superconducting radio frequency cables seem promising. The tunnel effect in superconducting junctions is now being developed commercially for sensitive magnetometers and may soon possibly feature in the memory cells of computer devices. Hence superconductivity can play an important role in the technological world, solving physical and technological problems and showing economic advantages as compared with possible conventional techniques, bearing also in mind the importance of reliability and safety. (author)

  17. Radio frequency interference noise reduction using a field programmable gate array for SQUID applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuta, K; Narita, Y; Itozaki, H

    2007-01-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurement without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is one of the effective methods to reduce environmental noise. Recently, SQUIDs have been used in various applications at high frequencies, such as nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The NQR frequency from explosives is in the range 0.5-5 MHz. In this case, an NQR sensor is exposed to AM radio frequency interference (RFI). The feasibility of the ANC system for RFI that used digital signal processing was studied. Our investigation showed that this digital ANC system can be applied to SQUID measurements for RFI suppression

  18. Does One Need a 4.5 K Screen in Cryostats of Superconducting Accelerator Devices Operating in Superfluid Helium? Lessons from the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph; Tavian, L

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large proj...

  19. Opto-electronic device for frequency standard generation and terahertz-range optical demodulation based on quantum interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Nikos P.; Polzik, Eugene S.; Kimble, H. Jeff

    1999-02-02

    An opto-electronic system and technique for comparing laser frequencies with large frequency separations, establishing new frequency standards, and achieving phase-sensitive detection at ultra high frequencies. Light responsive materials with multiple energy levels suitable for multi-photon excitation are preferably used for nonlinear mixing via quantum interference of different excitation paths affecting a common energy level. Demodulation of a carrier with a demodulation frequency up to 100's THZ can be achieved for frequency comparison and phase-sensitive detection. A large number of materials can be used to cover a wide spectral range including the ultra violet, visible and near infrared regions. In particular, absolute frequency measurement in a spectrum from 1.25 .mu.m to 1.66 .mu.m for fiber optics can be accomplished with a nearly continuous frequency coverage.

  20. Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. I. Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, H.A.; Paik, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Because of the equivalence principle, a global measurement is necessary to distinguish gravity from acceleration of the reference frame. A gravity gradiometer is therefore an essential instrument needed for precision tests of gravity laws and for applications in gravity survey and inertial navigation. Superconductivity and SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) technology can be used to obtain a gravity gradiometer with very high sensitivity and stability. A superconducting gravity gradiometer has been developed for a null test of the gravitational inverse-square law and space-borne geodesy. Here we present a complete theoretical model of this instrument. Starting from dynamical equations for the device, we derive transfer functions, a common mode rejection characteristic, and an error model of the superconducting instrument. Since a gradiometer must detect a very weak differential gravity signal in the midst of large platform accelerations and other environmental disturbances, the scale factor and common mode rejection stability of the instrument are extremely important in addition to its immunity to temperature and electromagnetic fluctuations. We show how flux quantization, the Meissner effect, and properties of liquid helium can be utilized to meet these challenges

  1. High transition temperature superconducting integrated circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiIorio, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and fabrication of the first superconducting integrated circuit capable of operating at over 10K. The primary component of the circuit is a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) which is extremely sensitive to magnetic fields. The dc SQUID consists of two superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson microbridges that are fabricated using a novel step-edge process which permits the use of high transition temperature superconductors. By utilizing electron-beam lithography in conjunction with ion-beam etching, very small microbridges can be produced. Such microbridges lead to high performance dc SQUIDs with products of the critical current and normal resistance reaching 1 mV at 4.2 K. These SQUIDs have been extensively characterized, and exhibit excellent electrical characteristics over a wide temperature range. In order to couple electrical signals into the SQUID in a practical fashion, a planar input coil was integrated for efficient coupling. A process was developed to incorporate the technologically important high transition temperature superconducting materials, Nb-Sn and Nb-Ge, using integrated circuit techniques. The primary obstacles were presented by the metallurgical idiosyncrasies of the various materials, such as the need to deposit the superconductors at elevated temperatures, 800-900 0 C, in order to achieve a high transition temperature

  2. Superconductivity and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, P.W.; Valdre, U.

    1977-01-01

    In this review article, two aspects of the role of superconductivity in electron microscopy are examined: (i) the development of superconducting devices (mainly lenses) and their incorporation in electron microscopes; (ii) the development of electron microscope techniques for studying fundamental and technological problems associated with superconductivity. The first part opens with a brief account of the relevant properties of conventional lenses, after which the various types of superconducting lenses are described and their properties compared. The relative merits and inconveniences of superconducting and conventional lenses are examined, particular attention being paid to the spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients at accelerating voltages above a megavolt. This part closes with a survey of the various microscope designs that have been built or proposed, incorporating superconducting components. In the second part, some methods that have been or might be used in the study of superconductivity in the electron microscope are described. A brief account of the types of application for which they are suitable is given. (author)

  3. Introduction of fuzzy logic theorem for quench detection in the superconducting coil system of a Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Yamato; Ninomiya, Akira; Uriu, Yoshihisa; Ishigohka, Takeshi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Imagawa, Shinsaku; Yanagi, Nagato; Sekiguchi, Haruo; Yamada, Shuichi

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed the state of the superconducting coil system in a LHD at NIFS (National Institute of Fusion Science) using a fuzzy logic theorem to detect quenching at an early stage. In this method, the 'warning coefficient' of the coil system is calculated. As for the fuzzy variables, 'effective stored heat' in the coil is introduced in addition to the voltage signal in order to improve quench detection and state estimation. The 'effective stored heat' is an integrated value of the heat generated in the coil on the assumption that instantaneous heat in the conductor is continuously cooled by liquid helium. Experiments conducted using the LHD coils confirmed that quench alarm signals can be issued with sufficient lead time before quenching. On the other hand, in the case of small local disturbances, the system shows only a small increase in the caution level. (author)

  4. Impact of High Power Interference Sources in Planning and Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks and Devices in the 2.4 GHz Frequency Band in Heterogeneous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Falcone

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven’s power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology.

  5. Superconductivity - applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the following subjects: 1) Electronics and high-frequency technology, 2) Superconductors for energy technology, 3) Superconducting magnets and their applications, 4) Electric machinery, 5) Superconducting cables. (WBU) [de

  6. Development of a custom monolithic device for data acquisition from a scintillating calorimeter at the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenberg, T.; Dawson, J.W.; Talaga, R.L.; Stevens, A.E.; Haberichter, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    A clock-driven continuous sequential write/random read data acquisition architecture for a scintillating calorimeter at the SSC is presented. Simplicity of design and operation as well as potentially dead time-less operation are the motivations of this effort. The architecture minimizes the number of fast control signals, thereby reducing pickup from digital control lines by sensitive analog circuits in the front-end device. This architecture also reduces the logic necessary on the front-end device improving reliability and easing design and operation. Operation and design of the front-end device are discussed. 3 refs., 7 figs

  7. The development of superconducting equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Ueda, T; Hiue, H

    2003-01-01

    Fuji Electric has been developing various types of superconducting equipment for over a quarter of a century. This paper describes the development results achieved for superconducting equipment and especially focuses on large-capacity current leads and superconducting transmission systems, the development of which is being promoted for application to the field of nuclear fusion. High temperature superconductor (HTS) is becoming the mainstream in the field of superconductivity, and the HTS floating coil and conduction-cooled HTS transformed are also introduced as recent developments for devices that utilize this technology. (author)

  8. Quantum transport in nanowire-based hybrid devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenel, Haci Yusuf

    2013-05-08

    the Andreev reflection of quasiparticles at single interface, by suppressing the superconductivity of Al with small magnetic fields, as well as at double interface for zero magnetic field. The junction geometry was further changed by replacing the InAs nanowire with the InAs tube. In this case the GaAs/InAs core/shell tubular nanowires were contacted by two superconducting Nb electrodes. For this junction geometry we have demonstrated the interference of phase conjugated electron-hole pairs in the presence of coaxial magnetic. The effect of temperature, constant dc bias current and gate voltage on the magnetoresistance oscillations were examined. In the last part of this thesis, we have fabricated and characterized the single crystal Au nanowire-based proximity superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID).

  9. A quantitative investigation of the effect of a close-fitting superconducting shield on the coil factor of a solenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Morten; Monaco, R.; Koshelet, V.

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting shields are commonly used to suppress external magnetic interference. We show, that an error of almost an order of magnitude can occur in the coil factor in realistic configurations of the solenoid and the shield. The reason is that the coil factor is determined by not only...... the geometry of the solenoid, but also the nearby magnetic environment. This has important consequences for many cryogenic experiments involving magnetic fields such as the determination of the parameters of Josephson junctions, as well as other superconducting devices. It is proposed to solve the problem...

  10. Diamagnetic composite material structure for reducing undesired electromagnetic interference and eddy currents in dielectric wall accelerators and other devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J.; Poole, Brian R.; Hawkins, Steven A.

    2015-06-30

    The devices, systems and techniques disclosed here can be used to reduce undesired effects by magnetic field induced eddy currents based on a diamagnetic composite material structure including diamagnetic composite sheets that are separated from one another to provide a high impedance composite material structure. In some implementations, each diamagnetic composite sheet includes patterned conductor layers are separated by a dielectric material and each patterned conductor layer includes voids and conductor areas. The voids in the patterned conductor layers of each diamagnetic composite sheet are arranged to be displaced in position from one patterned conductor layer to an adjacent patterned conductor layer while conductor areas of the patterned conductor layers collectively form a contiguous conductor structure in each diamagnetic composite sheet to prevent penetration by a magnetic field.

  11. Sensitive Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer Constructed with Levitated Test Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, C. E.; Moody, M. V.; Norton, R. S.; Paik, H. J.; Venkateswara, K.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate basic operations of a two-component superconducting gravity gradiometer (SGG) that is constructed with a pair of magnetically levitated test masses coupled to superconducting quantum-interference devices. A design that gives a potential sensitivity of 1.4 ×10-4 E Hz-1 /2 (1 E ≡10-9 s-2 ) in the frequency band of 1 to 50 mHz and better than 2 ×10-5 E Hz-1 /2 between 0.1 and 1 mHz for a compact tensor SGG that fits within a 22-cm-diameter sphere. The SGG has the capability of rejecting the platform acceleration and jitter in all 6 degrees of freedom to one part in 109 . Such an instrument has applications in precision tests of fundamental laws of physics, earthquake early warning, and gravity mapping of Earth and the planets.

  12. Advances in Fiber Optic Sensors Technology Development for temperature and strain measurements in Superconducting magnets and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A.; Bajko, M.; Bottura, L.; Consales, M.; Cusano, A.; Giordano, M.; Perez, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) requires the development of a new generation of superconducting magnets based on Nb$_{3}$Sn technology. In order to monitor the magnet thermo-mechanical behaviour during its service life, from the coil fabrication to the magnet operation, reliable sensing systems need to be implemented. In the framework of the FP7 European project EUCARD, Nb$_{3}$Sn racetrack coils are developed as test beds for the fabrication validation, the cable characterization and the instrumentation development. Fiber optic sensors (FOS) based on Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) technology have been embedded in the coils of the Short Model Coil (SMC) magnet. The FBG sensitivity to both temperature and strain required the development of a solution able to separate the mechanical and temperature effects. This work presents the feasibility study of the implementation of embedded FBG sensors for the temperature and strain monitoring of the 11 T type conductor. We aim to monitor and regi...

  13. Probing the superconducting state of CeCoIn{sub 5} by quantum interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foyevtsov, Oleksandr; Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Josephson junction based structures provide a pathway to investigation of the superconducting state of unconventional superconductors. A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) structure was fabricated on micro-crystals of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn{sub 5}. Photo-lithography and ion beam milling/induced deposition were used to prepare the structure on a thin film of CeCoIn{sub 5} grown via molecular beam epitaxy. The interferometer was characterized with regard to the SQUID properties. The unconventional nature of superconducting state in CeCoIn{sub 5}, the implications of the normal-state electronic properties, as well as the weak-link characteristics of the SQUID structure itself lead to a wealth of different features in the I(V) and dI/dV(V) characteristics.

  14. European roadmap on superconductive electronics - status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, S.; Blamire, M. G.; Buchholz, F.-Im.; Crété, D.-G.; Cristiano, R.; Febvre, P.; Fritzsch, L.; Herr, A.; Il'ichev, E.; Kohlmann, J.; Kunert, J.; Meyer, H.-G.; Niemeyer, J.; Ortlepp, T.; Rogalla, H.; Schurig, T.; Siegel, M.; Stolz, R.; Tarte, E.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Toepfer, H.; Villegier, J.-C.; Zagoskin, A. M.; Zorin, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    Executive SummaryFor four decades semiconductor electronics has followed Moore’s law: with each generation of integration the circuit features became smaller, more complex and faster. This development is now reaching a wall so that smaller is no longer any faster. The clock rate has saturated at about 3-5 GHz and the parallel processor approach will soon reach its limit. The prime reason for the limitation the semiconductor electronics experiences is not the switching speed of the individual transistor, but its power dissipation and thus heat. Digital superconductive electronics is a circuit- and device-technology that is inherently faster at much less power dissipation than semiconductor electronics. It makes use of superconductors and Josephson junctions as circuit elements, which can provide extremely fast digital devices in a frequency range - dependent on the material - of hundreds of GHz: for example a flip-flop has been demonstrated that operated at 750 GHz. This digital technique is scalable and follows similar design rules as semiconductor devices. Its very low power dissipation of only 0.1 μW per gate at 100 GHz opens the possibility of three-dimensional integration. Circuits like microprocessors and analogue-to-digital converters for commercial and military applications have been demonstrated. In contrast to semiconductor circuits, the operation of superconducting circuits is based on naturally standardized digital pulses the area of which is exactly the flux quantum Φ0. The flux quantum is also the natural quantization unit for digital-to-analogue and analogue-to-digital converters. The latter application is so precise, that it is being used as voltage standard and that the physical unit ‘Volt’ is defined by means of this standard. Apart from its outstanding features for digital electronics, superconductive electronics provides also the most sensitive sensor for magnetic fields: the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). Amongst

  15. European roadmap on superconductive electronics - status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, S.; Blamire, M.G.; Buchholz, F.-Im.; Crete, D.-G.; Cristiano, R.; Febvre, P.; Fritzsch, L.; Herr, A.; Il'ichev, E.; Kohlmann, J.; Kunert, J.; Meyer, H.-G.; Niemeyer, J.; Ortlepp, T.; Rogalla, H.; Schurig, T.

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary: For four decades semiconductor electronics has followed Moore's law: with each generation of integration the circuit features became smaller, more complex and faster. This development is now reaching a wall so that smaller is no longer any faster. The clock rate has saturated at about 3-5 GHz and the parallel processor approach will soon reach its limit. The prime reason for the limitation the semiconductor electronics experiences is not the switching speed of the individual transistor, but its power dissipation and thus heat. Digital superconductive electronics is a circuit- and device-technology that is inherently faster at much less power dissipation than semiconductor electronics. It makes use of superconductors and Josephson junctions as circuit elements, which can provide extremely fast digital devices in a frequency range - dependent on the material - of hundreds of GHz: for example a flip-flop has been demonstrated that operated at 750 GHz. This digital technique is scalable and follows similar design rules as semiconductor devices. Its very low power dissipation of only 0.1 μW per gate at 100 GHz opens the possibility of three-dimensional integration. Circuits like microprocessors and analogue-to-digital converters for commercial and military applications have been demonstrated. In contrast to semiconductor circuits, the operation of superconducting circuits is based on naturally standardized digital pulses the area of which is exactly the flux quantum Φ 0 . The flux quantum is also the natural quantization unit for digital-to-analogue and analogue-to-digital converters. The latter application is so precise, that it is being used as voltage standard and that the physical unit 'Volt' is defined by means of this standard. Apart from its outstanding features for digital electronics, superconductive electronics provides also the most sensitive sensor for magnetic fields: the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). Amongst many

  16. Does one need a 4.5 K screen in cryostats of superconducting accelerator devices operating in superfluid helium? lessons from the LHL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Philippe; Parma, Vittorio; Tavian, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large projects confronted with this issue, i.e. CEBAF, SPL, ESS, LHC, TESLA, European X-FEL, ILC.

  17. Spin, Vibrations and Radiation in Superconducting Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padurariu, C.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents the theoretical study of superconducting transport in several devices based on superconducting junctions. The important feature of these devices is that the transport properties of the junction are modified by the interaction with another physical system integrated in the

  18. A current controlled variable delay superconducting transmission line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anlage, S.M.; Snortland, H.J.; Beasley, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a device concept for a current-controlled variable delay for superconducting transmission line. The device makes use of the change in kinetic inductance of a superconducting transmission line under the application of a DC bias current. The relevant materials parameters and several promising superconducting materials have been identified

  19. Superconductivity in doped semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustarret, E., E-mail: Etienne.bustarret@neel.cnrs.fr

    2015-07-15

    A historical survey of the main normal and superconducting state properties of several semiconductors doped into superconductivity is proposed. This class of materials includes selenides, tellurides, oxides and column-IV semiconductors. Most of the experimental data point to a weak coupling pairing mechanism, probably phonon-mediated in the case of diamond, but probably not in the case of strontium titanate, these being the most intensively studied materials over the last decade. Despite promising theoretical predictions based on a conventional mechanism, the occurrence of critical temperatures significantly higher than 10 K has not been yet verified. However, the class provides an enticing playground for testing theories and devices alike.

  20. Development and Evaluation of an Airborne Superconducting Quantum Interference Device-Based Magnetic Gradiometer Tensor System for Detection, Characterization and Mapping of Unexploded Ordnance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Figure 17: USGS Helmholtz coils with SQUID and fluxgate magnetometers installed. 22 Figure 18: Plot of SQUID and fluxgate data from a rotating... fluxgate magnetometer , each sensor measures flux in only one direction. Combinations of SQUID sensor elements are arranged in various configurations...than the absolute field value the way that a fluxgate magnetometer would do. If the SQUID is shut down or loses lock, it has no way to relate the new

  1. International Conference on Superconducting Interference Devices (2nd) and Workshop on Biomagnetism (3rd) Held 6-9 May 1980, West Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-06

    cryogenics. L. Holborn and W. Wien performed thermometric measurements there at the turn of the century, and in 1913, W. Nernst installed a hydrogen...Heinonen, M. Tuomola and J. Lekkala W 22 "AN ALUMINIUM SHIELDED ROOM FOR BIOMAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS" G. Stroink, B. Brown, B. Blackford and M. Horacek

  2. Superconductivity revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    While the macroscopic phenomenon of superconductivity is well known and in practical use worldwide in many industries, including MRIs in medical diagnostics, the current theoretical paradigm for superconductivity (BCS theory) suffers from a number of limitations, not the least of which is an adequate explanation of high temperature superconductivity. This book reviews the current theory and its limitations and suggests new ideas and approaches in addressing these issues. The central objective of the book is to develop a new, coherent, understandable theory of superconductivity directly based on molecular quantum mechanics.

  3. Modern high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching Wu Chu

    1988-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, its unusual scientific challenge and great technological potential have been recognized. For the past three-quarters of a century, superconductivity has done well on the science front. This is because sueprconductivity is interesting not only just in its own right but also in its ability to act as a probe to many exciting nonsuperconducting phenomena. For instance, it has continued to provide bases for vigorous activities in condensed matter science. Among the more recent examples are heavy-fermion systems and organic superconductors. During this same period of time, superconductivity has also performed admirably in the applied area. Many ideas have been conceived and tested, making use of the unique characteristics of superconductivity - zero resistivity, quantum interference phenomena, and the Meissner effect. In fact, it was not until late January 1987 that it became possible to achieve superconductivity with the mere use of liquid nitrogen - which is plentiful, cheap, efficient, and easy to handle - following the discovery of supercondictivity above 90 K in Y-Ba-Cu-O, the first genuine quaternary superconductor. Superconductivity above 90 K poses scientific and technological challenges not previously encountered: no existing theories can adequately describe superconductivity above 40 K and no known techniques can economically process the materials for full-scale applications. In this paper, therefore, the author recalls a few events leading to the discovery of the new class of quaternary compounds with a superconducting transition temperature T c in the 90 K range, describes the current experimental status of high-temperature superconductivity and, finally, discusses the prospect of very-high-temperature superconductivity, i.e., with a T c substantially higher than 100 K. 97 refs., 7 figs

  4. Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckler, Tobias; Jagielski, Kai; Stunder, Dominik

    2015-05-27

    Electromagnetic interference is a concern for people wearing cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so the voltage induced in CIEDs by Qi A13 design magnetic fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out a measuring circuit was developed which can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution. The phantom was exposed by using Helmholtz coils from 5 µT to 27 µT with 111 kHz sine‑bursts or by using a Qi A13 design wireless charging board (Qi‑A13‑Board) in two operating modes "power transfer" and "pinging". With the Helmholtz coils the lowest magnetic flux density at which the performance limit was exceeded is 11 µT. With the Qi‑A13‑Board in power transfer mode 10.8% and in pinging mode 45.7% (2.2% at 10 cm distance) of the performance limit were reached at maximum. In neither of the scrutinized cases, did the voltage induced by the Qi‑A13‑Board exceed the performance limits.

  5. Bipolar programmable current supply for superconducting nuclear magnetic resonance magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuniemi, Jaakko; Luusalo, Reeta; Hakonen, Pertti

    1998-09-01

    In high resolution continuous-wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) work well-reproducible, linear sweeps of current are needed. We have developed a microcontroller based programmable current supply, tested with superconducting magnets with inductance of 10 mH and 10 H. We achieved a resolution and noise of 4 ppm. The supply has an internal sweep with programmable ramping rate and a possibility for remote operation from a computer with either GPIB or RS232 interface. It is based on an 18-bit D/A converter. The maximum output current is ±10 A, the sweep rate can be set between 1 μA/s-140 mA/s, and the maximum output voltage is ±2.5 V. In work at ultralow temperatures, especially in superconducting quantum interference device NMR, all rf interference to the experiment should be avoided. One of the sources of this kind of unwanted input is the digital switching noise of fast logic devices. We discuss this problem in the context of our design.

  6. Fiscal 1997 R and D project on industrial science and technology under a consignment from NEDO. R and D of the superconducting material and device (technical development of the Josephson device hybrid system); 1997 nendo sangyo kagaku gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo Shin energy Sangyo Gijutsu Sogo Kaihatsu Kiko itaku. Chodendo zairyo chodendo soshi no kenkyu kaihatsu (Josephson soshi hybrid system no gijutsu kaihatsu) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In order to establish basic technology for hybrid systems of superconducting and semiconducting devices, study was made on ultrahigh speed and low energy consumption properties of Josephson devices. As Josephson IC technology, a logical circuit, ring network, memory circuit, and oxide superconductor logical circuit were studied. As superconducting hybrid system technology, a Josephson device- semiconductor device interface, formation technology of signal transmission lines, and Josephson-MOS IC technology were developed. In fiscal 1997, as Josephson IC technology, switch motion of 4GHz in clock frequency was achieved by new high-density wiring process. Integration of some semiconducting processor elements, junction of surface- stabilized superconducting thin films, and motion of combination structure of some SQUIDs were also confirmed. On the hybrid system, voltage conversion operation of all interfaces was confirmed. Proper logical operation of the Josephson device hybrid circuit was also confirmed. 95 refs., 90 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Japan. Superconductivity for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, K.

    2012-11-15

    Currently, many smart grid projects are running or planned worldwide. These aim at controlling the electricity supply more efficiently and more stably in a new power network system. In Japan, especially superconductivity technology development projects are carried out to contribute to the future smart grid. Japanese cable makers such as Sumitomo Electric and Furukawa Electric are leading in the production of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables. The world's largest electric current and highest voltage superconductivity proving tests have been started this year. Big cities such as Tokyo will be expected to introduce the HTS power cables to reduce transport losses and to meet the increased electricity demand in the near future. Superconducting devices, HTS power cables, Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and flywheels are the focus of new developments in cooperations between companies, universities and research institutes, funded by the Japanese research and development funding organization New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)

  8. Civilian applications for superconducting magnet technology developed for defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.A.; Klein, S.W.; Gurol, H.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy years after its discovery, superconducting technology is beginning to play an important role in the civilian sector. Strategic defense initiative (SDI)-related research in space- and ground-based strategic defense weapons, particularly research efforts utilizing superconducting magnet energy storage, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), and superconducting pulsed-power devices, have direct applications in the civilian sector as well and are discussed in the paper. Other applications of superconducting magnets, which will be indirectly enhanced by the overall advancement in superconducting technology, include high-energy physics accelerators, magnetic resonance imaging, materials purifying, water purifying, superconducting generators, electric power transmission, magnetically levitated trains, magnetic-fusion power plants, and superconducting computers

  9. Superconducting cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, A.; Funkenbusch, P.D.; Chang, G.C.S.; Burns, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Two distant classes of superconducting cermets can be distinguished, depending on whether or not a fully superconducting skeleton is established. Both types of cermets have been successfully fabricated using non-noble metals, with as high as 60wt% of the metal phase. The electrical, magnetic and mechanical behavior of these composites is discussed

  10. ASC 84: applied superconductivity conference. Final program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations covering: superconducting device fabrication; applications of rf superconductivity; conductor stability and losses; detectors and signal processing; fusion magnets; A15 and Nb-Ti conductors; stability, losses, and various conductors; SQUID applications; new applications of superconductivity; advanced conductor materials; high energy physics applications of superconductivity; electronic materials and characterization; general superconducting electronics; ac machinery and new applications; digital devices; fusion and other large scale applications; in-situ and powder process conductors; ac applications; synthesis, properties, and characterization of conductors; superconducting microelectronics

  11. ASC 84: applied superconductivity conference. Final program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations covering: superconducting device fabrication; applications of rf superconductivity; conductor stability and losses; detectors and signal processing; fusion magnets; A15 and Nb-Ti conductors; stability, losses, and various conductors; SQUID applications; new applications of superconductivity; advanced conductor materials; high energy physics applications of superconductivity; electronic materials and characterization; general superconducting electronics; ac machinery and new applications; digital devices; fusion and other large scale applications; in-situ and powder process conductors; ac applications; synthesis, properties, and characterization of conductors; superconducting microelectronics. (LEW)

  12. Interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gariglio, S., E-mail: stefano.gariglio@unige.ch [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Gabay, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bat 510, Université Paris-Sud 11, Centre d’Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Triscone, J.-M. [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We discuss interfacial superconductivity, a field boosted by the discovery of the superconducting interface between LaAlO. • This system allows the electric field control and the on/off switching of the superconducting state. • We compare superconductivity at the interface and in bulk doped SrTiO. • We discuss the role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. • We briefly discuss superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments. • Recent observations of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} are presented. - Abstract: Low dimensional superconducting systems have been the subject of numerous studies for many years. In this article, we focus our attention on interfacial superconductivity, a field that has been boosted by the discovery of superconductivity at the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}. We explore the properties of this amazing system that allows the electric field control and on/off switching of superconductivity. We discuss the similarities and differences between bulk doped SrTiO{sub 3} and the interface system and the possible role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. We also, more briefly, discuss interface superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments, and the recent observation of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3}.

  13. Storage and on-demand release of microwaves using superconducting resonators with tunable coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, Mathieu; Svensson, Ida-Maria; Raman Sathyamoorthy, Sankar; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2014-01-01

    We present a system which allows to tune the coupling between a superconducting resonator and a transmission line. This storage resonator is addressed through a second, coupling resonator, which is frequency-tunable and controlled by a magnetic flux applied to a superconducting quantum interference device. We experimentally demonstrate that the lifetime of the storage resonator can be tuned by more than three orders of magnitude. A field can be stored for 18 μs when the coupling resonator is tuned off resonance and it can be released in 14 ns when the coupling resonator is tuned on resonance. The device allows capture, storage, and on-demand release of microwaves at a tunable rate.

  14. Organic superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, D.

    1980-01-01

    We present the experimental evidences for the existence of a superconducting state in the Quasi One Dimensional organic conductor (TMTSF) 2 PF 6 . Superconductivity occuring at 1 K under 12 kbar is characterized by a zero resistance diamagnetic state. The anistropy of the upper critical field of this type II superconductor is consistent with the band structure anistropy. We present evidences for the existence of large superconducting precursor effects giving rise to a dominant paraconductive contribution below 40 K. We also discuss the anomalously large pressure dependence of T sb(s), which drops to 0.19 K under 24 kbar in terms of the current theories. (author)

  15. Superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Shepard, K.W.; Wangler, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    This project has two goals: to design, build, and test a small superconducting linac to serve as an energy booster for heavy ions from an FN tandem electrostatic accelerator, and to investigate various aspects of superconducting rf technology. The main design features of the booster are described, a status report on various components (resonators, rf control system, linac control system, cryostats, buncher) is given, and plans for the near future are outlined. Investigations of superconducting-linac technology concern studies on materials and fabrication techniques, resonator diagnostic techniques, rf-phase control, beam dynamics computer programs, asymmetry in accelerating field, and surface-treatment techniques. The overall layout of the to-be-proposed ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System, is shown; the ATLAS would use superconducting technology to produce beams of 5 to 25 MeV/A. 6 figures

  16. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormann, R.; Loiseau, R.; Marcilhac, B.

    1989-01-01

    The invention concerns superconducting ceramics containing essentially barium, calcium and copper fluorinated oxides with close offset and onset temperatures around 97 K and 100 K and containing neither Y nor rare earth [fr

  17. Hole superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.; Marsiglio, F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors review recent work on a mechanism proposed to explain high T c superconductivity in oxides as well as superconductivity of conventional materials. It is based on pairing of hole carriers through their direct Coulomb interaction, and gives rise to superconductivity because of the momentum dependence of the repulsive interaction in the solid state environment. In the regime of parameters appropriate for high T c oxides this mechanism leads to characteristic signatures that should be experimentally verifiable. In the regime of conventional superconductors most of these signatures become unobservable, but the characteristic dependence of T c on band filling survives. New features discussed her include the demonstration that superconductivity can result from repulsive interactions even if the gap function does not change sign and the inclusion of a self-energy correction to the hole propagator that reduces the range of band filling where T c is not zero

  18. Fundamental of cryogenics (for superconducting RF technology)

    CERN Document Server

    Pierini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This review briefly illustrates a few fundamental concepts of cryogenic engineering, the technological practice that allows reaching and maintaining the low-temperature operating conditions of the superconducting devices needed in particle accelerators. To limit the scope of the task, and not to duplicate coverage of cryogenic engineering concepts particularly relevant to superconducting magnets that can be found in previous CAS editions, the overview presented in this course focuses on superconducting radio-frequency cavities.

  19. Superconducting quantum circuits theory and application

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Xiuhao

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting quantum circuit models are widely used to understand superconducting devices. This thesis consists of four studies wherein the superconducting quantum circuit is used to illustrate challenges related to quantum information encoding and processing, quantum simulation, quantum signal detection and amplification.The existence of scalar Aharanov-Bohm phase has been a controversial topic for decades. Scalar AB phase, defined as time integral of electric potential, gives rises to a...

  20. Superconducted tour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-09-15

    Superconductivity - the dramatic drop in electrical resistance in certain materials at very low temperatures - has grown rapidly in importance over the past two or three decades to become a key technology for high energy particle accelerators. It was in this setting that a hundred students and 15 lecturers met in Hamburg in June for a week's course on superconductivity in particle accelerators, organized by the CERN Accelerator School and the nearby DESY Laboratory.

  1. Molybdenum-rhenium superconducting suspended nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Mohsin; Christopher Hudson, David; Russo, Saverio [Centre for Graphene Science, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-09

    Suspended superconducting nanostructures of MoRe 50%/50% by weight are fabricated employing commonly used fabrication steps in micro- and nano-meter scale devices followed by wet-etching with Hydro-fluoric acid of a SiO{sub 2} sacrificial layer. Suspended superconducting channels as narrow as 50 nm and length 3 μm have a critical temperature of ≈6.5 K, which can increase by 0.5 K upon annealing at 400 °C. A detailed study of the dependence of the superconducting critical current and critical temperature upon annealing and in devices with different channel widths reveals that desorption of contaminants is responsible for the improved superconducting properties. These findings pave the way for the development of superconducting electromechanical devices using standard fabrication techniques.

  2. Superconducting spin switch based on superconductor-ferromagnet nanostructures for spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehrle, Jan; Mueller, Claus; Obermeier, Guenter; Schreck, Matthias; Gsell, Stefan; Horn, Siegfried; Tidecks, Reinhard; Zdravkov, Vladimir; Morari, Roman; Sidorencko, Anatoli; Prepelitsa, Andrei; Antropov, Evgenii; Socrovisciiuc, Alexei; Nold, Eberhard; Tagirov, Lenar

    2011-01-01

    Very rapid developing area, spintronics, needs new devices, based on new physical principles. One of such devices - a superconducting spin-switch, consists of ferromagnetic and superconducting layers, and is based on a new phenomenon - reentrant superconductivity. The tuning of the superconducting and ferromagnetic layers thickness is investigated to optimize superconducting spin-switch effect for Nb/Cu 41 Ni 59 based nanoscale layered systems.

  3. Recent advances in fullerene superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Margadonna, S

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting transition temperatures in bulk chemically intercalated fulleride salts reach 33 K at ambient pressure and in hole-doped C sub 6 sub 0 derivatives in field-effect-transistor (FET) configurations, they reach 117 K. These advances pose important challenges for our understanding of high-temperature superconductivity in these highly correlated organic metals. Here we review the structures and properties of intercalated fullerides, paying particular attention to the correlation between superconductivity and interfullerene separation, orientational order/disorder, valence state, orbital degeneracy, low-symmetry distortions, and metal-C sub 6 sub 0 interactions. The metal-insulator transition at large interfullerene separations is discussed in detail. An overview is also given of the exploding field of gate-induced superconductivity of fullerenes in FET electronic devices.

  4. Superconducting cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blosser, H.G.; Johnson, D.A.; Burleigh, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Superconducting cyclotrons are particularly appropriate for acceleration of heavy ions. A review is given of design features of a superconducting cyclotron with energy 440 (Q 2 /A) MeV. A strong magnetic field (4.6 tesla average) leads to small physical size (extraction radius 65 cm) and low construction costs. Operating costs are also low. The design is based on established technology (from present cyclotrons and from large bubble chambers). Two laboratories (in Chalk River, Canada and in East Lansing, Michigan) are proceeding with construction of full-scale prototype components for such cyclotrons

  5. Electrical insulation for large multiaxis superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, A.R.; Rinde, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The selection of interturn and interlayer insulation for superconducting magnets is discussed. The magnet problems of the Baseball II device are described. Manufacture of the insulation and radiation damage are mentioned. A planned experimental program is outlined

  6. Superconducting energy store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsel, W.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages obtained by the energy store device according to the invention with a superconducting solenoid system consist of the fact that only relatively short superconducting forward and return leads are required, which are collected into cables as far as possible. This limits the coolant losses of the cables. Only one relatively expensive connecting part with a transition of its conductors from room temperature to a low temperature is required, which, like the normal conducting current switch, is easily accessible. As the continuation has to be cooled independently of the upper part solenoid, cooling of this continuation part can prevent the introduction of large quantities of heat into the connected part solenoid. Due to the cooling of the forward and return conductors of the connecting cable with the coolant of the lower part solenoid, there are relatively few separations between the coolant spaces of the part solenoids. (orig./MM) [de

  7. Local tuning of the order parameter in superconducting weak links: A zero-inductance nanodevice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winik, Roni; Holzman, Itamar; Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.; Buks, Eyal; Ivry, Yachin

    2018-03-01

    Controlling both the amplitude and the phase of the superconducting quantum order parameter (" separators="|ψ ) in nanostructures is important for next-generation information and communication technologies. The lack of electric resistance in superconductors, which may be advantageous for some technologies, hinders convenient voltage-bias tuning and hence limits the tunability of ψ at the microscopic scale. Here, we demonstrate the local tunability of the phase and amplitude of ψ, obtained by patterning with a single lithography step a Nb nano-superconducting quantum interference device (nano-SQUID) that is biased at its nanobridges. We accompany our experimental results by a semi-classical linearized model that is valid for generic nano-SQUIDs with multiple ports and helps simplify the modelling of non-linear couplings among the Josephson junctions. Our design helped us reveal unusual electric characteristics with effective zero inductance, which is promising for nanoscale magnetic sensing and quantum technologies.

  8. Superconductive microstrip exhibiting negative differential resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, R.P.; Gallus, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    A device capable of exhibiting negative differential electrical resistivity over a range of values of current and voltage is formed by vapor-depositing a thin layer of a material capable of exhibiting superconductivity on an insulating substrate, establishing electrical connections at opposite ends of the deposited strip, and cooling the alloy into its superconducting range. The device will exhibit negative differential resistivity when biased in the current-induced resistive state

  9. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruvalds, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermi liquid nesting in high temperature superconductors; optical properties of high temperature superconductors; Hall effect in superconducting La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 ; source of high transition temperatures; and prospects for new superconductors

  10. Superconducting transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting transformer having a winding arrangement that provides for current limitation when subjected to a current transient as well as more efficient utilization of radial spacing and winding insulation. Structural innovations disclosed include compressed conical shaped winding layers and a resistive matrix to promote rapid switching of current between parallel windings

  11. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-T c superconductor at low temperature

  12. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.

    1996-01-01

    Superconducting dipole magnets for high energy colliders are discussed. As an example, the magnets recently built for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are reviewed. Their technical performance and the cost for the industry-built production dipoles are given. The cost data is generalized in order to extrapolate the cost of magnets for a new machine

  13. Bipolar superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankratov, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    A model of bipolaron superconductivity suggested by Soviet scientist Alexandrov A.S. and French scientist Ranninger is presentes in a popular way. It is noted that the bipolaron theory gives a good explanation of certain properties of new superconductors, high critical temperature, in particular

  14. he First Superconductivity Experiment in Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polturak, E.; Koren, G.

    1999-01-01

    One of the most promising applications of high Tc superconductors is in the field of satellite communications. In view of the rapidly increasing demand for satellite communication channels due to the formation of global networks of cellular phones, internet, etc., one needs to (develop more efficient ways of dividing the finite frequency band into more and more channels without paying for it with excessive interference or an increasingly large weight of conventional filters. Superconductive components can save an order of magnitude on the weight and volume of such filters, a very important factor in satellite design. Yet, up to now superconductors were never tested in space. We present the design and performance of the first such experiment to reach space. The experiment consists of a thin film HTSC device integrated with a miniature cryo cooler. It was launched into space in July 1998 aboard the Thatch's-II micro satellite. We will present data obtained from this experiment until the present time. Long term survivability of HTSC devices in space would be discussed

  15. Measurements, characteristics, and origin of new electromagnetic interference on magnetocardiographic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Hong-Fang; Cai Wen-Yan; Wei Yu-Ke; Liu Zheng-Hao; Wang Qian; Wang Yue; Dai Yuan-Dong; Ma Ping

    2012-01-01

    In order to eliminate the influence of the large-amplitude magnetic field noise that has complicated magnetocardiographic studies since October 2009, we have performed high-accuracy measurement of the environmental magnetic field noise in the vicinity of Beijing Subway Line 4 using a three-component height T c radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). By analysing the spatial form and other characteristics of the time and the frequency domains and by calculating the circumferential magnetic field distribution based on a duel-end feeding system model, we reach the following conclusions: (i) the main source of magnetic field noise is the magnetic field generated by the subway trains, and (ii) the magnetic field interference results mainly from the imbalance between traction current and return rail current that is caused by the leakage current. (general)

  16. Theory of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisan, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up to the 1987 results on high temperature superconductivity. Contents: Phenomenological Theory of Superconductivity; Microscopic Theory of Superconductivity; Theory of Superconducting Alloys; Superconductors in a Magnetic Field; Superconductivity and Magnetic Order; Superconductivity in Quasi-One-Dimensional Systems; and Non-Conventional Superconductivity

  17. Coherent suppression of quasiparticle dissipation in a superconducting artificial atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop, Ioan [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate immunity to quasiparticle dissipation in a Josephson junction. At the foundation of this protection rests a prediction by Brian Josephson from fifty years ago: the particle-hole interference of superconducting quasiparticles when tunneling across a Josephson junction. The junction under study is the central element of a fluxonium artificial atom, which we place in an extremely low loss environment and measure using radio-frequency dispersive techniques. Furthermore, by using a quantum limited amplifier (a Josephson Parametric Converter) we can observe quantum jumps between the 0 and 1 states of the qubit in thermal equilibrium with the environment. The distribution of the times in-between the quantum jumps reveals quantitative information about the population and dynamics of quasiparticles. The data is entirely consistent with the hypothesis that our system is sensitive to single quasiparticle excitations, which opens new perspectives for quasiparticle monitoring in low temperature devices.

  18. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  19. Color superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-01-01

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken

  20. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  1. Superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  2. Melt formed superconducting joint between superconducting tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.G.; Knudsen, B.A.; Rumaner, L.E.; Zaabala, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a superconducting joint between contiguous superconducting tapes having an inner laminate comprised of a parent-metal layer selected from the group niobium, tantalum, technetium, and vanadium, a superconductive intermetallic compound layer on the parent-metal layer, a reactive-metal layer that is capable of combining with the parent-metal and forming the superconductive intermetallic compound, the joint comprising: a continuous precipitate of the superconductive intermetallic compound fused to the tapes forming a continuous superconducting path between the tapes

  3. Superconductivity Engineering and Its Application for Fusion 3.Superconducting Technology as a Gateway to Future Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Katsuhiko

    Hopes for achieving a new source of energy through nuclear fusion rest on the development of superconducting technology that is needed to make future equipments more energy efficient as well as increase their performance. Superconducting technology has made progress in a wide variety of fields, such as energy, life science, electronics, industrial use and environmental improvement. It enables the actualization of equipment that was unachievable with conventional technology, and will sustain future “IT-Based Quality Life Style”, “Sustainable Environmental” and “Advanced Healthcare” society. Besides coil technology with high magnetic field performance, superconducting electoronics or device technology, such as SQUID and SFQ-circuit, high temperature superconducting material and advanced cryogenics technology might be great significance in the history of nuclear fusion which requires so many wide, high and ultra technology. Superconducting technology seems to be the catalyst for a changing future society with nuclear fusion. As society changes, so will superconducting technology.

  4. Engineering Synthesis of Nonlinear Spatial Selection with Artificial Intelligence Elements to Suppress Critical Interference of Background in Aviation and Space-Based Opto-Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Levshin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous authors’ works have shown that the system of quasi-optimal linear spatial filtering, due to the restriction of this class of filters, related to the superposition principle, has very limited capacity to suppress the most critical interference spatially inhomogeneous background. Such partial suppression does not meet extreme approach requirements for providing high probability characteristics to detect small targets in the most difficult background conditions.In this regard, there is a conclusion that it is necessary to find a different approach, in which the result of the system operation in complex background does not depend on the level of the background noise at the input. This article performs an engineering synthesis of the system with the artificial visual intelligence elements, which recognizes a class of the small-sized radiating objects with the suppression of the most critical interference through nonlinear topological selection.Consideration of this problem begins with the formation of the filter-discriminator aperture, which is a basis for this theory, «echoing» with the theory of optimal nonlinear filtering spatial Poisson processes. Thus, formation of the optimized nonlinear filter structure is based on the optimal linear filter (Wiener filter structure. As a result, there are three versions of filter apertures (4-, 8- and 16-connected ones, with one of which later providing operations of the object shape discrimination. The focus of the article is, mainly, on the 8-connected aperture, as the average in balance of efficiency and complexity option.The article pays considerable attention to development of signs and algorithms to select the objects by size and shape. It shows that selection on a uniform background is possible by the maximum value of the first derivative and to separate the most critical form of Markov’s field inhomogeneities and background brightness, as the fragments of component boundaries of

  5. A cryogenic current-measuring device with nano-ampere resolution at the storage ring TARN II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Chida, K.; Shinada, K.

    1999-01-01

    In cooler-ring experiments, an accurate and non-destructive current measurement is essential for determining the reaction cross sections. The lowest current which can be measured by the DC current transformer commonly used so far is some μA. In order to measure a low-beam current from nA to μA, we made a cryogenic current-measuring device using a superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID), and measured the circulating ion current at the cooler ring TARN II. This paper gives the design and performance of the device

  6. Superconducting three element synchronous ac machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, L.; Chabrerie, J.P.; Mailfert, A.; Renard, M.

    1975-01-01

    There is a growing interest in ac superconducting machines. Of several new concepts proposed for these machines in the last years one of the most promising seems to be the ''three elements'' concept which allows the cancellation of the torque acting on the superconducting field winding, thus overcoming some of the major contraints. This concept leads to a device of induction-type generator. A synchronous, three element superconducting ac machine is described, in which a room temperature, dc fed rotating winding is inserted between the superconducting field winding and the ac armature. The steady-state machine theory is developed, the flux linkages are established, and the torque expressions are derived. The condition for zero torque on the field winding, as well as the resulting electrical equations of the machine, are given. The theoretical behavior of the machine is studied, using phasor diagrams and assuming for the superconducting field winding either a constant current or a constant flux condition

  7. Foreword: Focus on Superconductivity in Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2008-01-01

    -TC superconductors (Tamegai et al, and the mechanism of superconductivity is discussed. Last but not least, a novel highest-density phase of boron is produced and characterized (Zarechnaya et al.We hope that this focus issue will help readers to understand the frontiers of superconductivity in semiconductors and assist in the application of new devices using a combination of superconductivity and semiconductivity.

  8. Superconducting plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro; Ohno, J.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) plasmas are proposed and investigated. The SC plasmas are not yet familiar and have not yet been studied. However, the existence and the importance of SC plasmas are stressed in this report. The existence of SC plasmas are found as follows. There is a fundamental property of Meissner effect in superconductors, which shows a repulsive effect of magnetic fields. Even in that case, in a microscopic view, there is a region of magnetic penetration. The penetration length λ is well-known as London's penetration depth, which is expressed as δ = (m s /μ 0 n s q s 2 ) 1/2 where m s , n s , q s and μ o show the mass, the density, the charge of SC electron and the permeability in free space, respectively. Because this expression is very simple, no one had tried it into more simple and meaningful form. Recently, one of the authors (T.O.) has found that the length can be expressed into more simple and understandable fundamental form as λ = c/ω ps where c = (ε 0 μ 0 ) -1/2 and ω ps = (n s q s 2 /m s ε 0 ) 1/2 are the light velocity and the superconducting plasma frequency. From this simple expression, the penetration depth of the magnetic field to SC is found as a SC plasma skin depth, that is, the fundamental property of SC can be expressed by the SC plasmas. This discovery indicates an importance of the studies of superconducting plasmas. From these points, several properties (propagating modes et al) of SC plasmas, which consist of SC electrons, normal electrons and lattice ions, are investigated in this report. Observations of SC plasma frequency is also reported with a use of Terahertz electromagnet-optical waves

  9. The present role of superconductivity in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, S.

    1986-01-01

    After completion of large fusion devices in the world, such as JT-60, JET and TFTR, high temperature plasma is proceeding to critical condition for fusion. The devices up to now use mainly conventional magnet. However, for the next generation machine which demonstrates fusion reaction, deuterium-tritium burning, superconducting magnet system is indispensable from view point of both net energy extraction and capacity limitation of power supply. In order to realize such a large and complicated system, a lot of development works is being carried out. This paper describes required parameters of superconducting magnet and helium refrigerator, the state of plasma condition and superconducting magnet. It is shown that the present technology of superconducting magnet is not so far from realization of fusion experimental reactor

  10. Superconducting Quantum Interferometers for Nondestructive Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Faley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We review stationary and mobile systems that are used for the nondestructive evaluation of room temperature objects and are based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs. The systems are optimized for samples whose dimensions are between 10 micrometers and several meters. Stray magnetic fields from small samples (10 µm–10 cm are studied using a SQUID microscope equipped with a magnetic flux antenna, which is fed through the walls of liquid nitrogen cryostat and a hole in the SQUID’s pick-up loop and returned sidewards from the SQUID back to the sample. The SQUID microscope does not disturb the magnetization of the sample during image recording due to the decoupling of the magnetic flux antenna from the modulation and feedback coil. For larger samples, we use a hand-held mobile liquid nitrogen minicryostat with a first order planar gradiometric SQUID sensor. Low-Tc DC SQUID systems that are designed for NDE measurements of bio-objects are able to operate with sufficient resolution in a magnetically unshielded environment. High-Tc DC SQUID magnetometers that are operated in a magnetic shield demonstrate a magnetic field resolution of ~4 fT/√Hz at 77 K. This sensitivity is improved to ~2 fT/√Hz at 77 K by using a soft magnetic flux antenna.

  11. The state of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.D.

    1981-01-01

    The present status of applications based on the phenomena of superconductivity are reviewed. Superconducting materials, large scale applications, the Josephson effect and its applications, and superconductivity in instrumentation, are considered. The influence that superconductivity has had on modern theories of elementary particles, such as gauge symmetry breaking, is discussed. (U.K.)

  12. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  13. Electromagnetic Interference in Smart Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank; Keyer, Cees

    2017-01-01

    The increasing conducted interference caused by modern electronic equipment is causing more problems for electronic, or static, energy meters. If equipped with a communication link they are called smart meter. Because the smart meter is a key device in smart grids, any deviation has huge impact on

  14. Superconducting detectors for semiconductor quantum photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reithmaier, Guenther M.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we present the first successful on-chip detection of quantum light, thereby demonstrating the monolithic integration of superconducting single photon detectors with individually addressable semiconductor quantum dots in a prototypical quantum photonic circuit. Therefore, we optimized both the deposition of high quality superconducting NbN thin films on GaAs substrates and the fabrication of superconducting detectors and successfully integrated these novel devices with GaAs/AlGaAs ridge waveguides loaded with self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots.

  15. 13th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    EUCAS is a worldwide forum for scientists and engineers, and provides an ideal platform to share knowledge and the most recent advances in all areas of applied superconductivity: from large-scale applications to miniature electronics devices, with a traditional focus on advanced materials and conductors. The broad scope is at the same time a challenge and an opportunity to foster novel, inter-disciplinary approaches and promote cross-fertilization among the various fields of applied superconductivity.

  16. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shohei.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the plasma confining efficiency in a thermonuclear device having magnet coils using super-conducting wires by decreasing the uneven magnetic field resulted from current supply terminals and wirings. Constitution: Current introduction terminals of magnet coils using superconducting wires are short circuitted with a superconducting short circuit wire. Upon supplying current to the coils, the resistance of the coils is rendered superconductive and the resistance of the short circuit wire is rendered normally conductive heated by a heater and the switch is closed. In this case, most parts of the current are flown through the resistance of the coils and the switch is opened when the current arrives at a predetermined value to render the resistance of the short circuit wire superconductive. Then, the current transfers from the thyristor power source to the resistance of the short circuit wire, whereby the resistance of the coils and that of the short circuit wire from a permanent current loop. In this conditions, since current flows through the short circuit wire and the coils and not to the current introduction terminals, no uniform magnetic field is generated. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  18. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1987-07-01

    After a short account of the history of experimental studies on superconductivity, the microscopic theory of superconductivity, the calculation of the control temperature and its possible maximum value are presented. An explanation of the mechanism of superconductivity in recently discovered superconducting metal oxide ceramics and the perspectives for the realization of new high-temperature superconducting materials are discussed. 56 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  19. Superconducting accelerator technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Hartline, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Modern and future accelerators for high energy and nuclear physics rely increasingly on superconducting components to achieve the required magnetic fields and accelerating fields. This paper presents a practical overview of the phenomenon of superconductivity, and describes the design issues and solutions associated with superconducting magnets and superconducting rf acceleration structures. Further development and application of superconducting components promises increased accelerator performance at reduced electric power cost

  20. Imaging of current distributions in superconducting thin film structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doenitz, D.

    2006-01-01

    Local analysis plays an important role in many fields of scientific research. However, imaging methods are not very common in the investigation of superconductors. For more than 20 years, Low Temperature Scanning Electron Microscopy (LTSEM) has been successfully used at the University of Tuebingen for studying of condensed matter phenomena, especially of superconductivity. In this thesis LTSEM was used for imaging current distributions in different superconducting thin film structures: - Imaging of current distributions in Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer, also known as SIFS junctions, showed inhomogeneous current transport over the junctions which directly led to an improvement in the fabrication process. An investigation of improved samples showed a very homogeneous current distribution without any trace of magnetic domains. Either such domains were not present or too small for imaging with the LTSEM. - An investigation of Nb/YBCO zigzag Josephson junctions yielded important information on signal formation in the LTSEM both for Josephson junctions in the short and in the long limit. Using a reference junction our signal formation model could be verified, thus confirming earlier results on short zigzag junctions. These results, which could be reproduced in this work, support the theory of d-wave symmetry in the superconducting order parameter of YBCO. Furthermore, investigations of the quasiparticle tunneling in the zigzag junctions showed the existence of Andreev bound states, which is another indication of the d-wave symmetry in YBCO. - The LTSEM study of Hot Electron Bolometers (HEB) allowed the first successful imaging of a stable 'Hot Spot', a self-heating region in HEB structures. Moreover, the electron beam was used to induce an - otherwise unstable - hot spot. Both investigations yielded information on the homogeneity of the samples. - An entirely new method of imaging the current distribution in superconducting interference devices

  1. Magnetic and superconducting phase diagram of Nb/Gd/Nb trilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaydukov, Yu. N.; Vasenko, A. S.; Kravtsov, E. A.; Progliado, V. V.; Zhaketov, V. D.; Csik, A.; Nikitenko, Yu. V.; Petrenko, A. V.; Keller, T.; Golubov, A. A.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Ustinov, V. V.; Aksenov, V. L.; Keimer, B.

    2018-04-01

    We report on a study of the structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of Nb (25 nm ) /Gd (df) /Nb (25 nm ) hybrid structures of a superconductor/ ferromagnet (S/F) type. The structural characterization of the samples, including careful determination of the layer thickness, was performed using neutron and x-ray scattering with the aid of depth-sensitive mass spectrometry. The magnetization of the samples was determined by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectometry, and the presence of magnetic ordering for all samples down to the thinnest Gd(0.8 nm) layer was shown. The analysis of the neutron spin asymmetry allowed us to prove the absence of magnetically dead layers in junctions with Gd interlayer thickness larger than one monolayer. The measured dependence of the superconducting transition temperature Tc(df) has a damped oscillatory behavior with well-defined positions of the minimum at df=3 nm and the following maximum at df=4 nm, in qualitative agreement with prior work [J. S. Jiang et al., Phys. Rev. B 54, 6119 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevB.54.6119]. We use a theoretical approach based on the Usadel equations to analyze the experimental Tc(df) dependence. The analysis shows that the observed minimum at df=3 nm can be described by the so-called zero to π phase transitions of highly transparent S/F interfaces with a superconducting correlation length ξf≈4 nm in Gd. This penetration length is several times higher than for strong ferromagnets like Fe, Co, and Ni, thus simplifying the preparation of S/F structures with df˜ξf which are of topical interest in superconducting spintronics.

  2. Electron quantum interferences and universal conductance fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, A.; Pichard, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    Quantum interferences yield corrections to the classical ohmic behaviour predicted by Boltzmann theory in electronic transport: for instance the well-known ''weak localization'' effects. Furthermore, very recently, quantum interference effects have been proved to be responsible for statistically different phenomena, associated with Universal Conductance Fluctuations and observed on very small devices [fr

  3. Quantum interference in plasmonic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeres, Reinier W; Kouwenhoven, Leo P; Zwiller, Valery

    2013-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (plasmons) are a combination of light and a collective oscillation of the free electron plasma at metal/dielectric interfaces. This interaction allows subwavelength confinement of light beyond the diffraction limit inherent to dielectric structures. As a result, the intensity of the electromagnetic field is enhanced, with the possibility to increase the strength of the optical interactions between waveguides, light sources and detectors. Plasmons maintain non-classical photon statistics and preserve entanglement upon transmission through thin, patterned metallic films or weakly confining waveguides. For quantum applications, it is essential that plasmons behave as indistinguishable quantum particles. Here we report on a quantum interference experiment in a nanoscale plasmonic circuit consisting of an on-chip plasmon beamsplitter with integrated superconducting single-photon detectors to allow efficient single plasmon detection. We demonstrate a quantum-mechanical interaction between pairs of indistinguishable surface plasmons by observing Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference, a hallmark non-classical interference effect that is the basis of linear optics-based quantum computation. Our work shows that it is feasible to shrink quantum optical experiments to the nanoscale and offers a promising route towards subwavelength quantum optical networks.

  4. Induced superconductivity in the topological insulator mercury telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a topological insulator (TI) and a superconductor (S), which together form a TI/S interface, is expected to influence the possible surface states in the TI. It is of special interest, if the theoretical prediction of zero energy Majorana states in this system is verifiable. This thesis presents the experimental realization of such an interface between the TI strained bulk HgTe and the S Nb and studies if the afore mentioned expectations are met. As these types of interfaces were produced for the first time the initial step was to develop a new lithographic process. Optimization of the S deposition technique as well as the application of cleaning processes allowed for reproducible fabrication of structures. In parallel the measurement setup was upgraded to be able to execute the sensitive measurements at low energy. Furthermore several filters have been implemented into the system to reduce high frequency noise and the magnetic field control unit was additionally replaced to achieve the needed resolution in the μT range. Two kinds of basic geometries have been studied: Josephson junctions (JJs) and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). A JJ consists of two Nb contacts with a small separation on a HgTe layer. These S/TI/S junctions are one of the most basic structures possible and are studied via transport measurements. The transport through this geometry is strongly influenced by the behavior at the two S/TI interfaces. In voltage dependent differential resistance measurements it was possible to detect multiple Andreev reflections in the JJ, indicating that electrons and holes are able to traverse the HgTe gap between both interfaces multiple times while keeping phase coherence. Additionally using BTK theory it was possible to extract the interface transparency of several junctions. This allowed iterative optimization for the highest transparency via lithographic improvements at these interfaces. The increased transparency and

  5. Superconducting composites materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerjouan, P.; Boterel, F.; Lostec, J.; Bertot, J.P.; Haussonne, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The new superconductor materials with a high critical current own a large importance as well in the electronic components or in the electrotechnical devices fields. The deposit of such materials with the thick films technology is to be more and more developed in the years to come. Therefore, we tried to realize such thick films screen printed on alumina, and composed mainly of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ material. We first realized a composite material glass/YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ , by analogy with the classical screen-printed inks where the glass ensures the bonding with the substrate. We thus realized different materials by using some different classes of glass. These materials owned a superconducting transition close to the one of the pure YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ material. We made a slurry with the most significant composite materials and binders, and screen-printed them on an alumina substrate preliminary or not coated with a diffusion barrier layer. After firing, we studied the thick films adhesion, the alumina/glass/composite material interfaces, and their superconducting properties. 8 refs.; 14 figs.; 9 tabs [fr

  6. Additive Manufactured Superconducting Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric; Rosen, Yaniv; Woolleet, Nathan; Materise, Nicholas; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Morris; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Dubois, Jonathan

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities provide an ultra-low dissipative environment, which has enabled fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, materials properties, and the search for new particles in and beyond the standard model. However, resonator designs are constrained by limitations in conventional machining techniques. For example, current through a seam is a limiting factor in performance for many waveguide cavities. Development of highly reproducible methods for metallic parts through additive manufacturing, referred to colloquially as 3D printing\\x9D, opens the possibility for novel cavity designs which cannot be implemented through conventional methods. We present preliminary investigations of superconducting cavities made through a selective laser melting process, which compacts a granular powder via a high-power laser according to a digitally defined geometry. Initial work suggests that assuming a loss model and numerically optimizing a geometry to minimize dissipation results in modest improvements in device performance. Furthermore, a subset of titanium alloys, particularly, a titanium, aluminum, vanadium alloy (Ti - 6Al - 4V) exhibits properties indicative of a high kinetic inductance material. This work is supported by LDRD 16-SI-004.

  7. Overview of Superconductivity and Challenges in Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flükiger, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved during the last few decades in the various fields of applied superconductivity, while the related low temperature technology has reached a high level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are so far the most successful applications, with tens of thousands of units worldwide, but high potential can also be recognized in the energy sector, with high energy cables, transformers, motors, generators for wind turbines, fault current limiters and devices for magnetic energy storage. A large number of magnet and cable prototypes have been constructed, showing in all cases high reliability. Large projects involving the construction of magnets, solenoids as well as dipoles and quadrupoles are described in the present book. A very large project, the LHC, is currently in operation, demonstrating that superconductivity is a reliable technology, even in a device of unprecedented high complexity. A project of similar complexity is ITER, a fusion device that is presently under construction. This article starts with a brief historical introduction to superconductivity as a phenomenon, and some fundamental properties necessary for the understanding of the technical behavior of superconductors are described. The introduction of superconductivity in the industrial cycle faces many challenges, first for the properties of the base elements, e.g. the wires, tapes and thin films, then for the various applied devices, where a number of new difficulties had to be resolved. A variety of industrial applications in energy, medicine and communications are briefly presented, showing how superconductivity is now entering the market.

  8. Summer Course on the Science and Technology of Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, W D; Mathews, W N; The science and technology of superconductivity

    1973-01-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911 by H. Kamerlingh Onnes, of the order of half a billion dollars has been spent on research directed toward understanding and utiliz­ ing this phenomenon. This investment has gained us fundamental understanding in the form of a microscopic theory of superconduc­ tivity. Moreover, superconductivity has been transformed from a laboratory curiosity to the basis of some of the most sensitive and accurate measuring devices known, a whole host of other elec­ tronic devices, a soon-to-be new international standard for the volt, a prototype generation of superconducting motors and gener­ ators, and magnets producing the highest continuous magnetic fields yet produced by man. The promise of more efficient means of power transmission and mass transportation, a new generation of superconducting motors and generators, and computers and other electronic devices with superconducting circuit elements is all too clear. The realization of controlled thermonuclear fu...

  9. ac superconducting articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    A noval ac superconducting cable is described. It consists of a composite structure having a superconducting surface along with a high thermally conductive material wherein the superconducting surface has the desired physical properties, geometrical shape and surface finish produced by the steps of depositing a superconducting layer upon a substrate having a predetermined surface finish and shape which conforms to that of the desired superconducting article, depositing a supporting layer of material on the superconducting layer and removing the substrate, the surface of the superconductor being a replica of the substrate surface

  10. Characterization of 3-dimensional superconductive thin film components for gravitational experiments in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hechler, S.; Nawrodt, R.; Nietzsche, S.; Vodel, W.; Seidel, P. [Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik; Dittus, H. [ZARM, Univ. Bremen (Germany); Loeffler, F. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are used for high precise gravitational experiments. One of the most impressive experiments is the satellite test of the equivalence principle (STEP) of NASA/ESA. The STEP mission aims to prove a possible violation of Einstein's equivalence principle at an extreme level of accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 18} in space. In this contribution we present an automatically working measurement equipment to characterize 3-dimensional superconducting thin film components like i.e. pick-up coils and test masses for STEP. The characterization is done by measurements of the transition temperature between the normal and the superconducting state using a special built anti-cryostat. Above all the setup was designed for use in normal LHe transport Dewars. The sample chamber has a volume of 150 cm{sup 3} and can be fully temperature controlled over a range from 4.2 K to 300 K with a resolution of better then 100 mK. (orig.)

  11. Superconductivity Series in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Ionic Gating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yoshida, Masaro; Miyazaki, Jun; Inoue, Naoko; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Functionalities of two-dimensional (2D) crystals based on semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have now stemmed from simple field effect transistors (FETs) to a variety of electronic and opto-valleytronic devices, and even to superconductivity. Among them, superconductivity is the

  12. A thermally switched 9 kA superconducting rectifier fluxpump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Bunk, Paul B.; Steffens, Harry A.; van de Klundert, Louis J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of superconducting rectifier-fluxpumps has to be demonstrated at current levels of 10 - 100 kA, where is asked for in the superconducting devices now being planned. An intensive program has been started at the low temperature division of the University of Twente to construct such

  13. Field-Induced Superconductivity in Electric Double Layer Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ueno, Kazunori; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Yuan, Hongtao; Ye, Jianting; Kawasaki, Masashi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    Electric field tuning of superconductivity has been a long-standing issue in solid state physics since the invention of the field-effect transistor (FET) in 1960. Owing to limited available carrier density in conventional FET devices, electric-field-induced superconductivity was believed to be

  14. Superconducting quantum bits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooij, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Superconducting devices can be used to explore the boundaries between the quantum and classical worlds, and could also have applications in quantum information. The quantum world looks very different to the ordinary world. A quantum particle can, for instance, be in two places simultaneously, while its speed and position cannot both be measured with complete accuracy at the same time. Moreover, if its mass is small enough, a quantum particle can tunnel through energy barriers that its classical counterparts could never cross. Physicists are comfortable with the use of quantum mechanics to describe atomic and subatomic particles. However, in recent years we have discovered that micron-sized objects that have been produced using standard semiconductor-fabrication techniques - objects that are small on everyday scales but large compared with atoms - can also behave as quantum particles. These artificial quantum objects might one day be used as 'quantum bits' in a quantum computer that could perform certain computational tasks much faster than any classical computing device. Before then, however, these devices will allow us to explore the interface between the quantum and classical worlds, and to study how interactions with external degrees of freedom lead to a gradual disappearance of quantum behaviour. (U.K.)

  15. Superconducting technology program Sandia 1996 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.P.

    1997-02-01

    Sandia's Superconductivity Technology Program is a thallium-based high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, open-system thick film conductor development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The research efforts currently underway are: (1) Process development and characterization of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting closed system wire and tape, (2) Investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based thick films using two-zone processing, and (3) Cryogenic design of a 30K superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY96 in each of these areas

  16. Superconducting (YBa2Cu3O7-δ) and manganite (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3) oxide thin film based devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechin, Laurence

    2005-01-01

    This manuscript presents my research activity since my PhD thesis defended in 1993. I mainly worked on two types of oxides: YBCO et LSMO. I always kept in mind the development of devices as a whole, i.e. from the thin film to the device characterization. One part of my work has been devoted to the study of structural, electrical or magnetic properties of the thin films in order to optimize deposition conditions. Both YBCO and LSMO oxides present a perovskite structure and require similar deposition conditions (700 - 750 C in O 2 pressure). I used three deposition methods: pulsed laser deposition, on axis high pressure sputtering and RF off axis sputtering. (author)

  17. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991

  18. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-01-15

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991.

  19. Superconducting self-correcting harmonic coils for pulsed superconducting dipole or multipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dael, A.; Kircher, F.; Perot, J.

    1975-01-01

    Due to the zero resistance of a superconducting wire, an induced current in a closed superconducting circuit is continuously exactly opposed to its cause. This phenomenon was applied to the correction of the field harmonics of a pulsed magnet by putting short-circuited superconducting coils of particular symmetry in the useful aperture of the magnet. After a review of the main characteristics of such devices, the construction of two correcting coils (quadrupole and sextupole) is described. Experimental results of magnetic efficiency and time behavior are given; they are quite encouraging, since the field harmonics were reduced by one or two orders of magnitude

  20. Development of a superconducting position sensor for the Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Odile Helene

    The Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) is a joint NASA/ESA mission that proposes to measure the differential acceleration of two cylindrical test masses orbiting the earth in a drag-free satellite to a precision of 10-18 g. Such an experiment would conceptually reproduce Galileo's tower of Pisa experiment with a much longer time of fall and greatly reduced disturbances. The superconducting test masses are constrained in all degrees of freedom except their axial direction (the sensitive axis) using superconducting bearings. The STEP accelerometer measures the differential position of the masses in their sensitive direction using superconducting inductive pickup coils coupled to an extremely sensitive magnetometer called a DC-SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device). Position sensor development involves the design, manufacture and calibration of pickup coils that will meet the acceleration sensitivity requirement. Acceleration sensitivity depends on both the displacement sensitivity and stiffness of the position sensor. The stiffness must kept small while maintaining stability of the accelerometer. Using a model for the inductance of the pickup coils versus displacement of the test masses, a computer simulation calculates the sensitivity and stiffness of the accelerometer in its axial direction. This simulation produced a design of pickup coils for the four STEP accelerometers. Manufacture of the pickup coils involves standard photolithography techniques modified for superconducting thin-films. A single-turn pickup coil was manufactured and produced a successful superconducting coil using thin-film Niobium. A low-temperature apparatus was developed with a precision position sensor to measure the displacement of a superconducting plate (acting as a mock test mass) facing the coil. The position sensor was designed to detect five degrees of freedom so that coupling could be taken into account when measuring the translation of the plate

  1. Theory of itinarant ferromagnetism in superconducting semimetals. Theorie du ferromagnetisme itinerant dans des semimetaux supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do Tran, C; Nguyen Van, C [Groupe de Physique Theorique, Inst. National Polytechnique de Hanoi (Viet Nam); Nguyen Manh, D [Groupe de Physique Theorique, Inst. National Polytechnique de Hanoi (Viet Nam) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Lab. d' Etudes des Proprietes Electroniques des Solides, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1991-11-01

    A theory of itinerant ferromagnetism in superconducting semimetals is proposed. A nonzero mean magnetisation appears in the superconducting state due to the interaction (interference) of spin density wave (SDW), charge density wave (CDW) and Cooper pair wave. Phase diagram and physical properties of the states considered are investigated analytically and numerically. (orig.).

  2. Superconductivity and ferromagnetism in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duming

    unitary (weak localization) class. A comprehensive interpretation of data obtained from electrical transport, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, and scanning tunneling microscopy indicates that the ferromagnetism responsible for modifications in the surface states occurs in nanoscale regions on the surface where magnetic atoms segregate during sample growth. This suggests that some aspects of the observed magnetoconductance may indeed originate from surface transport despite the non-ideal nature of the samples. These observations are consistent with the prediction of a time-reversal symmetry breaking gap, which is further supported by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements.

  3. IETS and quantum interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Destructive quantum interference in single molecule electronics is an intriguing phenomenon; however, distinguishing quantum interference effects from generically low transmission is not trivial. In this paper, we discuss how quantum interference effects in the transmission lead to either low...... suppressed when quantum interference effects dominate. That is, we expand the understanding of propensity rules in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy to molecules with destructive quantum interference....

  4. Superconducting current in a bisoliton superconductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, V.N.; Kruchinin, S.P.; Ponezha, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the transition into a superconducting state with the current which is described by a bisoliton superconductivity model is accompanied by the deformation of the spectrum of one-particle states of the current carriers. The deformation value is proportional to the conducting current force. The residuaby resistance in such state is absent

  5. Ballistic superconductivity in semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Gül, Önder; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Nowak, Michał P.; Wimmer, Michael; Zuo, Kun; Mourik, Vincent; de Vries, Folkert K.; van Veen, Jasper; de Moor, Michiel W. A.; Bommer, Jouri D. S.; van Woerkom, David J.; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastien R; Bakkers, Erik P.A.M.; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Cassidy, Maja C.; Koelling, Sebastian; Goswami, Srijit; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have opened new research avenues in quantum transport owing to their confined geometry and electrostatic tunability. They have offered an exceptional testbed for superconductivity, leading to the realization of hybrid systems combining the macroscopic quantum properties of superconductors with the possibility to control charges down to a single electron. These advances brought semiconductor nanowires to the forefront of efforts to realize topological superconductivity and Majorana modes. A prime challenge to benefit from the topological properties of Majoranas is to reduce the disorder in hybrid nanowire devices. Here we show ballistic superconductivity in InSb semiconductor nanowires. Our structural and chemical analyses demonstrate a high-quality interface between the nanowire and a NbTiN superconductor that enables ballistic transport. This is manifested by a quantized conductance for normal carriers, a strongly enhanced conductance for Andreev-reflecting carriers, and an induced hard gap with a significantly reduced density of states. These results pave the way for disorder-free Majorana devices. PMID:28681843

  6. Second international Israeli conference on High Tc Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The superconductivity fields covered in this conference are: theory, applications, devices, flux properties high frequencies, Josephson junctions, magnetism, material sciences and physical properties of superconductors, spectroscopy and resonances and thin films

  7. Modeling and Development of Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines a research project as the central component of a Ph.D. program focused on the device physics of superconducting nanowire single photon...

  8. Applied superconductivity and cryogenic research activities in NIFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, T.; Sagara, A.; Imagawa, S.; Yamada, S.; Takahata, K.; Yanagi, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Maekawa, R.; Iwamoto, A.; Hamaguchi, S.; Sato, M.; Noda, N.; Yamauchi, K.; Komori, A.; Motojima, O.

    2006-01-01

    Since the foundation of National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in 1989, the primary mission of the applied superconductivity and cryogenic researches has been focused on the development of the large helical device (LHD): the largest fusion experimental apparatus exclusively utilizing superconducting technologies. The applied superconductivity and cryogenics group in NIFS was organized to be responsible for this activity. As a result of extensive research activities, the construction of LHD was completed in 1997. Since then, the LHD superconducting system has been demonstrating high availability of more than 97% during eight years operation and it keeps proving high reliability of large-scale superconducting systems. This paper describes the extensive activities of the applied superconductivity and cryogenic researches in NIFS during and after the development of LHD and the fundamental researches that aim at realizing a helical-type fusion reactor

  9. Characterizing Ensembles of Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Adam; Birenbaum, Jeff; Hover, David; Rosenberg, Danna; Weber, Steven; Yoder, Jonilyn L.; Kerman, Jamie; Gustavsson, Simon; Kamal, Archana; Yan, Fei; Oliver, William

    We investigate ensembles of up to 48 superconducting qubits embedded within a superconducting cavity. Such arrays of qubits have been proposed for the experimental study of Ising Hamiltonians, and efficient methods to characterize and calibrate these types of systems are still under development. Here we leverage high qubit coherence (> 70 μs) to characterize individual devices as well as qubit-qubit interactions, utilizing the common resonator mode for a joint readout. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  10. New two-port multimode interference reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, E.; Smit, M.K.; Wale, M.J.; Leijtens, X.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-mode interference reflectors (MIRs) are versatile components. Two new MIR designs with a fixed 50/50 reflection to transmission ratio are introduced. Measurements on these new devices and on devices similar to those in [1] are presented and compared to the design values. Measured losses are

  11. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  12. Superconducting transformers, rectifiers, and switches. (Review paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatov, V.E.; Koval'kov, G.A.; Moskvitin, A.I.

    Cryogenic rectifiers using power cryotrons have been fabricated by many foreign firms since 1960. Present-day flux pumps require a low voltage power supply (several tens of millivolts) and a high current (kiloamperes). Increasing the power supply voltage will quadratically increase the flux pump losses and, given the limitations of existing materials, are not economically profitable. Present-day, cryotron-type flux pumps can best be used in power systems as a power supply for superconducting magnets, solenoids, storage devices, and superconducting exciting coils for turbogenerators. To increase the voltage of the next generation of transformers for superconducting dc power transmission, a research program must be set up to improve the cryotrons and to develop systems based on a different principle of operation, for example, semiconductor devices based on the principle of the volume effect in the intermediate environment

  13. Future of IT, PT and superconductivity technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2003-10-01

    Recently the Information Technology is developing very rapidly and the total traffic on the Internet is increasing dramatically. The numerous equipments connected to the Internet must be operated at very high-speed and the electricity consumed in the Internet is also increasing. Superconductivity devices of very high-speed and very low power consumption must be introduced. These superconducting devices will play very important roles in the future information society. Coated conductors will be used to generate extremely high magnetic fields of beyond 20 T at low temperatures. At the liquid nitrogen temperature they can find many applications in a wide range of Power Technology and other industries, since we have already large critical current and brilliant magnetic field dependences in some prototypes of coated conductors. It is becoming certain that the market for the superconductivity technology will be opened between the years of 2005 and 2010.

  14. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Laboratory report on RF superconductivity at Peking University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kui, Zhao; Baocheng, Zhang; Lifang, Wang; Jin, Yu; Rongli, Geng; Genfa, Wu; Tong, Wang; Jinhu, Song; Chia-erh, Chen

    1996-01-01

    The activities on RF superconductivity at Peking University in the past two years are reported. Two 1.5 GHz Nb cavities were successfully fabricated using Chinese Nb sheets in 1994. One of the cavities has been measured, and the results are given. A laser driven DC electron gun has been designed and constructed which is the pre-testing device of photo-electron gun using superconducting cavity. A series of experiments on the cathode and cavity will be performed in the near future. Two superconducting accelerating devices are being considered for two projects in China. (R.P.)

  16. Superconducting Magnetometry for Cardiovascular Studies and AN Application of Adaptive Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Mark Curtis

    Sensitive magnetic detectors utilizing Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) have been developed and used for studying the cardiovascular system. The theory of magnetic detection of cardiac currents is discussed, and new experimental data supporting the validity of the theory is presented. Measurements on both humans and dogs, in both healthy and diseased states, are presented using the new technique, which is termed vector magnetocardiography. In the next section, a new type of superconducting magnetometer with a room temperature pickup is analyzed, and techniques for optimizing its sensitivity to low-frequency sub-microamp currents are presented. Performance of the actual device displays significantly improved sensitivity in this frequency range, and the ability to measure currents in intact, in vivo biological fibers. The final section reviews the theoretical operation of a digital self-optimizing filter, and presents a four-channel software implementation of the system. The application of the adaptive filter to enhancement of geomagnetic signals for earthquake forecasting is discussed, and the adaptive filter is shown to outperform existing techniques in suppressing noise from geomagnetic records.

  17. AC loss in superconducting tapes and cables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, M.P.

    2000-01-01

    The present study discusses the AC loss in high-temperature superconductors. Superconducting materials with a relatively high critical temperature were discovered in 1986. They are presently developed for use in large-scale power-engineering devices such as power-transmission cables, transformers

  18. Signal processing: opportunities for superconductive circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralston, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Prime motivators in the evolution of increasingly sophisticated communication and detection systems are the needs for handling ever wider signal bandwidths and higher data processing speeds. These same needs drive the development of electronic device technology. Until recently the superconductive community has been tightly focused on digital devices for high speed computers. The purpose of this paper is to describe opportunities and challenges which exist for both analog and digital devices in a less familiar area, that of wideband signal processing. The function and purpose of analog signal-processing components, including matched filters, correlators and Fourier transformers, will be described and examples of superconductive implementations given. A canonic signal-processing system is then configured using these components in combination with analog/digital converters and digital output circuits to highlight the important issues of dynamic range, accuracy and equivalent computation rate. Superconductive circuits hold promise for processing signals of 10-GHz bandwidth. Signal processing systems, however, can be properly designed and implemented only through a synergistic combination of the talents of device physicists, circuit designers, algorithm architects and system engineers. An immediate challenge to the applied superconductivity community is to begin sharing ideas with these other researchers

  19. Half-metallic superconducting triplet spin multivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidoust, Mohammad; Halterman, Klaus

    2018-02-01

    We study spin switching effects in finite-size superconducting multivalve structures. We examine F1F2SF3 and F1F2SF3F4 hybrids where a singlet superconductor (S) layer is sandwiched among ferromagnet (F) layers with differing thicknesses and magnetization orientations. Our results reveal a considerable number of experimentally viable spin-valve configurations that lead to on-off switching of the superconducting state. For S widths on the order of the superconducting coherence length ξ0, noncollinear magnetization orientations in adjacent F layers with multiple spin axes leads to a rich variety of triplet spin-valve effects. Motivated by recent experiments, we focus on samples where the magnetizations in the F1 and F4 layers exist in a fully spin-polarized half-metallic phase, and calculate the superconducting transition temperature, spatially and energy resolved density of states, and the spin-singlet and spin-triplet superconducting correlations. Our findings demonstrate that superconductivity in these devices can be completely switched on or off over a wide range of magnetization misalignment angles due to the generation of equal-spin and opposite-spin triplet pairings.

  20. Devices That May Interfere with Pacemakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Communications Commission (FCC) makes new frequencies available. Newer cellphones using these new frequencies might make pacemakers less reliable. A group of cellphone companies is studying that possibility. Bluetooth® headsets do ...

  1. Superconducting microtraps for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufnagel, C.

    2011-01-01

    Atom chips are integrated devices in which atoms and atomic clouds are stored and manipulated in miniaturized magnetic traps. State of the art fabrication technologies allow for a flexible design of the trapping potentials and consequently provide extraordinary control over atomic samples, which leads to a promising role of atom chips in the engineering and investigation of quantum mechanical systems. Naturally, for quantum mechanical applications, the atomic coherence has to be preserved. Using room temperature circuits, the coherence time of atoms close to the surface was found to be drastically limited by thermal current fluctuations in the conductors. Superconductors offer an elegant way to circumvent thermal noise and therefore present a promising option for the coherent manipulation of atomic quantum states. In this thesis trapping and manipulation of ultracold Rubidium atoms in superconducting microtraps is demonstrated. In this connection the unique properties of superconductors are used to build traps based on persistent currents, the Meissner effect and remanent magnetization. In experiment it is shown, that in superconducting atom chips, thermal magnetic field noise is significantly reduced. Furthermore it is demonstrated, that atomic samples can be employed to probe the properties of superconducting materials. (author) [de

  2. Photolithographically patterened thin-film multilayer devices of YBa2Cu3O7-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, J.J.; Wellstood, F.C.; Quan, D.; Clarke, J.

    1990-09-01

    We have fabricated thin-film YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x -SrTiO 3 -YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x multilayer interconnect structures in which each in situ laser-deposited film is independently patterned by photolithography. In particular, we have constructed the two key components necessary for a superconducting multilayer interconnect technology, crossovers and window contacts. As a further demonstration of the technology, we have fabricated a thin-film flux transformer, suitable for use with a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID), that includes a ten-turn input coil with 6μm linewidth. Transport measurements showed that the critical temperature was 87K and the critical current was 135 μA at 82K. 7 refs., 6 figs

  3. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  4. Superconductivity and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Roque, António; Sousa, Duarte M.; Fernão Pires, Vítor; Margato, Elmano

    2017-01-01

    Trabalho apresentado em International Conference on Renewable Energies and Power Quality (ICREPQ’17), 4 a 6 de Abril de 2017, Málaga, Espanha The research in the field of superconductivity has led to the synthesis of superconducting materials with features that allow you to expand the applicability of this kind of materials. Among the superconducting materials characteristics, the critical temperature of the superconductor is framing the range and type of industrial applications that can b...

  5. Superconducting machines. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    A brief account is given of the principles of superconductivity and superconductors. The properties of Nb-Ti superconductors and the method of flux stabilization are described. The basic features of superconducting d.c. machines are illustrated by the use of these machines for ship propulsion, steel-mill drives, industrial drives, aluminium production, and other d.c. power supplies. Superconducting a.c. generators and their design parameters are discussed. (U.K.)

  6. Superconductivity in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Lawson, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The trends in the occurrence of superconductivity in actinide materials are discussed. Most of them seem to show simple transition metal behavior. However, the superconductivity of americium proves that the f electrons are localized in that element and that ''actinides'' is the correct name for this row of elements. Recently the superconductivity of UBe 13 and UPt 3 has been shown to be extremely unusual, and these compounds fall in the new class of compounds now known as heavy fermion materials

  7. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-10-15

    The Second Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity was held at CERN from 23-27 July, four years after the first, organized at Karlsruhe. 35 invited talks were presented to the about 80 participants from Australia, Brazil, Europe, Japan and the United States. For the first time, ten Laboratories operating or planning superconducting accelerators for heavy ions participated and shared their experience with the community proposing the use of superconducting accelerating sections for electron accelerators.

  8. WORKSHOP: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The Second Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity was held at CERN from 23-27 July, four years after the first, organized at Karlsruhe. 35 invited talks were presented to the about 80 participants from Australia, Brazil, Europe, Japan and the United States. For the first time, ten Laboratories operating or planning superconducting accelerators for heavy ions participated and shared their experience with the community proposing the use of superconducting accelerating sections for electron accelerators

  9. Superconductivity and magnetism: Materials properties and developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, N H; Bay, N; Grivel, J C [and others

    2003-07-01

    The 24th Risoe International Symposium on Materials Science focuses on development of new materials, devices and applications, as well as experimental and theoretical studies of novel and unexplained phenomena in superconductivity and magnetism, e.g. within high.T{sub c} superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB{sub 2}, CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin-tronics. The aim is to stimulate exchange of ideas and establish new collaborations between leading Danish and international scientists. The topics are addressed by presentations from 24 invited speakers and by 41 contributed papers. (ln)

  10. Superconducting Detectors for Superlight Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-01-08

    We propose and study a new class of superconducting detectors that are sensitive to O(meV) electron recoils from dark matter-electron scattering. Such devices could detect dark matter as light as the warm dark-matter limit, m(X)≳1  keV. We compute the rate of dark-matter scattering off of free electrons in a (superconducting) metal, including the relevant Pauli blocking factors. We demonstrate that classes of dark matter consistent with terrestrial and cosmological or astrophysical constraints could be detected by such detectors with a moderate size exposure.

  11. Superconductivity and magnetism: Materials properties and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Bay, N.; Grivel, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    The 24th Risoe International Symposium on Materials Science focuses on development of new materials, devices and applications, as well as experimental and theoretical studies of novel and unexplained phenomena in superconductivity and magnetism, e.g. within high.T c superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB 2 , CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin-tronics. The aim is to stimulate exchange of ideas and establish new collaborations between leading Danish and international scientists. The topics are addressed by presentations from 24 invited speakers and by 41 contributed papers. (ln)

  12. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, J.; Purcell, J.

    1978-01-01

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  13. Geometrical resonance effects in thin superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedellec, P.

    1977-01-01

    Electron tunneling density of states measurements on thick and clear superconducting films (S 1 ) backed by films in the normal or superconducting state (S 2 ) show geometrical resonance effects associated with the spatial variation of Δ(x), the pair potential, near the interface S 1 -S 2 . The present understanding of this so-called 'Tomasch effect' is described. The dispersion relation and the nature of excitations in the superconducting state are introduced. It is shown that the introduction of Green functions give a general description of the superconducting state. The notion of Andreev scattering at the S 1 -S 2 interface is presented and connect the geometrical resonance effects to interference process between excitations. The different physical parameters involved are defined and used in the discussion of some experimental results: the variation of the period in energy with the superconducting thickness is connected to the renormalized group velocity of excitations traveling perpendicular to the film. The role of the barrier potential at the interface on the Tomasch effect is described. The main results discussed are: the decrease of the amplitude of the Tomasch structures with energy is due to the loss of the mixed electron-hole character of the superconducting excitations far away from the Fermi level; the variation of the pair potential at the interface is directly related to the amplitude of the oscillations; the tunneling selectivity is an important parameter as the amplitude as well as the phase of the oscillations are modified depending on the value of the selectivity; the phase of the Tomasch oscillations is different for an abrupt change of Δ at the interface and for a smooth variation. An ambiguity arises due to the interplay between these parameters. Finally, some experiments, which illustrate clearly the predicted effects are described [fr

  14. Superconductivity and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadoni, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper, after a short introduction to superconductivity and to multifilamentary superconducting composites is aiming to review the state of the art and the future perspective of some of the applications of the superconducting materials. The main interest is focussed to large scale applications like, for istance, magnets for accelerators or fusion reactors, superconducting system for NMR thomography, etc. A short paragraph is dedicated to applications for high sensitivity instrumentation. The paper is then concluded by some considerations about the potentialities of the newly discovered high critical temperature materials

  15. Superconducting linear accelerator cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Elkonin, B.V.; Sokolowski, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A large vertical cryostat for a superconducting linear accelerator using quarter wave resonators has been developed. The essential technical details, operational experience and performance are described. (author)

  16. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  17. Superconductivity and fusion energy—the inseparable companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Pierluigi

    2015-02-01

    Although superconductivity will never produce energy by itself, it plays an important role in energy-related applications both because of its saving potential (e.g., power transmission lines and generators), and its role as an enabling technology (e.g., for nuclear fusion energy). The superconducting magnet’s need for plasma confinement has been recognized since the early development of fusion devices. As long as the research and development of plasma burning was carried out on pulsed devices, the technology of superconducting fusion magnets was aimed at demonstrations of feasibility. In the latest generation of plasma devices, which are larger and have longer confinement times, the superconducting coils are a key enabling technology. The cost of a superconducting magnet system is a major portion of the overall cost of a fusion plant and deserves significant attention in the long-term planning of electricity supply; only cheap superconducting magnets will help fusion get to the energy market. In this paper, the technology challenges and design approaches for fusion magnets are briefly reviewed for past, present, and future projects, from the early superconducting tokamaks in the 1970s, to the current ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and W7-X projects and future DEMO (Demonstration Reactor) projects. The associated cryogenic technology is also reviewed: 4.2 K helium baths, superfluid baths, forced-flow supercritical helium, and helium-free designs. Open issues and risk mitigation are discussed in terms of reliability, technology, and cost.

  18. Interference Lithography for Vertical Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balls, Amy; Pei, Lei; Kvavle, Joshua; Sieler, Andrew; Schultz, Stephen; Linford, Matthew; Vanfleet, Richard; Davis, Robert

    2009-10-01

    We are exploring low cost approaches for fabricating three dimensional nanoscale structures. These vertical structures could significantly improve the efficiency of devices made from low cost photovoltaic materials. The nanoscale vertical structure provides a way to increase optical absorption in thin photovoltaic films without increasing the electronic carrier separation distance. The target structure is a high temperature transparent template with a dense array of holes on a 400 - 600 nm pitch fabricated by a combination of interference lithography and nanoembossing. First a master was fabricated using ultraviolet light interference lithography and the pattern was transferred into a silicon wafer master by silicon reactive ion etching. Embossing studies were performed with the master on several high temperature polymers.

  19. Overview of Superconductivity and Challenges in Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Flükiger, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved during the last few decades in the various fields of applied superconductivity, while the related low temperature technology has reached a high level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are so far the most successful applications, with tens of thousands of units worldwide, but high potential can also be recognized in the energy sector, with high energy cables, transformers, motors, generators for wind turbines, fault current limiters and devices for magnetic energy storage. A large number of magnet and cable prototypes have been constructed, showing in all cases high reliability. Large projects involving the construction of magnets, solenoids as well as dipoles and quadrupoles are described in the present book. A very large project, the LHC, is currently in operation, demonstrating that superconductivity is a reliable technology, even in a device of unprecedented high complexity. A project of similar complexity is ITER, a fusion device...

  20. Hybrid quantum systems: Outsourcing superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Andrew

    Superconducting qubits offer excellent prospects for manipulating quantum information, with good qubit lifetimes, high fidelity single- and two-qubit gates, and straightforward scalability (admittedly with multi-dimensional interconnect challenges). One interesting route for experimental development is the exploration of hybrid systems, i.e. coupling superconducting qubits to other systems. I will report on our group's efforts to develop approaches that will allow interfacing superconducting qubits in a quantum-coherent fashion to spin defects in solids, to optomechanical devices, and to resonant nanomechanical structures. The longer term goals of these efforts include transferring quantum states between different qubit systems; generating and receiving ``flying'' acoustic phonon-based as well as optical photon-based qubits; and ultimately developing systems that can be used for quantum memory, quantum computation and quantum communication, the last in both the microwave and fiber telecommunications bands. Work is supported by Grants from AFOSR, ARO, DOE and NSF.

  1. A venture capital view of superconductivity electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.

    1987-01-01

    Many venture capital backed start-up companies have followed major technological innovations in recent years. However, the field of electronics based on the use of superconducting devices (i.e. the Josephson Junction) has been a noteworthy exception. Until 1983, the bulk of the American development effort on superconductivity electronics was conducted by IBM where the focus was to demonstrate the feasibility of a superconducting computer prototype. Other activities using Josephson Junctions involved the development and production of magnetic sensing instruments and modest quantities of magnetometers which were marketed by several very small companies primarily for laboratory use. In addition, other applications in radiation sensing and biomagnetism and research leading to practical systems were ongoing in several organizations

  2. Conductive polymer switch for controlling superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Grassi, J.; Lo, K.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    The preparation of a hybrid conducting polymer/high-temperature superconductor device consisting of a polypyrrole coated YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-σ microbridge is reported. Electrochemical techniques are exploited to alter the oxidation state of the polymer and, in doing so, it is found for the first time that superconductivity can be modulated in a controllable and reproducible fashion by a polymer layout. Whereas the neutral (insulating) polypyrrole only slightly influences the electrical properties of the underlying YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-σ film, the oxidized (conductive) polymer depresses T c by up to 50K. In a similar fashion, the oxidation state of the polymer is found to reversibly modulate the magnitude of J c , the superconducting critical current. Thus, a new type of molecule switch for controlling superconductivity is demonstrated

  3. Quantum acoustics with superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiwen

    2017-04-01

    The ability to engineer and manipulate different types of quantum mechanical objects allows us to take advantage of their unique properties and create useful hybrid technologies. Thus far, complex quantum states and exquisite quantum control have been demonstrated in systems ranging from trapped ions to superconducting resonators. Recently, there have been many efforts to extend these demonstrations to the motion of complex, macroscopic objects. These mechanical objects have important applications as quantum memories or transducers for measuring and connecting different types of quantum systems. In particular, there have been a few experiments that couple motion to nonlinear quantum objects such as superconducting qubits. This opens up the possibility of creating, storing, and manipulating non-Gaussian quantum states in mechanical degrees of freedom. However, before sophisticated quantum control of mechanical motion can be achieved, we must realize systems with long coherence times while maintaining a sufficient interaction strength. These systems should be implemented in a simple and robust manner that allows for increasing complexity and scalability in the future. In this talk, I will describe our recent experiments demonstrating a high frequency bulk acoustic wave resonator that is strongly coupled to a superconducting qubit using piezoelectric transduction. In contrast to previous experiments with qubit-mechanical systems, our device requires only simple fabrication methods, extends coherence times to many microseconds, and provides controllable access to a multitude of phonon modes. We use this system to demonstrate basic quantum operations on the coupled qubit-phonon system. Straightforward improvements to the current device will allow for advanced protocols analogous to what has been shown in optical and microwave resonators, resulting in a novel resource for implementing hybrid quantum technologies.

  4. Magnetic-Field-Tunable Superconducting Rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting electronic components have been developed that provide current rectification that is tunable by design and with an externally applied magnetic field to the circuit component. The superconducting material used in the device is relatively free of pinning sites with its critical current determined by a geometric energy barrier to vortex entry. The ability of the vortices to move freely inside the device means this innovation does not suffer from magnetic hysteresis effects changing the state of the superconductor. The invention requires a superconductor geometry with opposite edges along the direction of current flow. In order for the critical current asymmetry effect to occur, the device must have different vortex nucleation conditions at opposite edges. Alternative embodiments producing the necessary conditions include edges being held at different temperatures, at different local magnetic fields, with different current-injection geometries, and structural differences between opposite edges causing changes in the size of the geometric energy barrier. An edge fabricated with indentations of the order of the coherence length will significantly lower the geometric energy barrier to vortex entry, meaning vortex passage across the device at lower currents causing resistive dissipation. The existing prototype is a two-terminal device consisting of a thin-film su - perconducting strip operating at a temperature below its superconducting transition temperature (Tc). Opposite ends of the strip are connected to electrical leads made of a higher Tc superconductor. The thin-film lithographic process provides an easy means to alter edge-structures, current-injection geo - metries, and magnetic-field conditions at the edges. The edge-field conditions can be altered by using local field(s) generated from dedicated higher Tc leads or even using the device s own higher Tc superconducting leads.

  5. Superconducting rf activities at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.; Hakimi, M.; Kirchgessner, J.

    1988-01-01

    Development of rf superconductivity for high energy accelerators has been a robust activity at the Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies (LNS) for many years. In order to realize the potential of rf superconductivity, a two-pronged approach has been followed. On the one hand accelerator applications were selected where the existing state-of-the art of superconducting rf is competitive with alternate technologies, then LNS engaged in a program to design, construct and test suitable superconducting cavities, culminating in a full system test in an operating accelerator. On the second front the discovery and invention of ideas, techniques and materials required to make superconducting rf devices approach the ideal in performance has been aggressively pursued. Starting with the development of superconducting cavities for high energy electron synchrotrons, the technology was extended to high energy e + e - storage rings. The LE5 cavity design has now been adopted for use in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). When completed, this project will be one of the largest applications of SRF technology, using 440 LE5 modules[4]. In the last two years, the cavity design and the technology have been transferred to industry and CEBAF. Cornell has tested the early industrial prototypes and cavity pairs. LNS has developed, in collaboration with CEBAF, designs and procedures for cavity pair and cryomodule assembly and testing. Advanced research for future electron accelerators is badly needed if particle physicists hope to expand the energy frontier. Superconducting cavity technology continues to offer attractive opportunities for further advances in achievable voltage at reasonable cost for future accelerators. For Nb, the full potential implies an order of magnitude increase over current capabilities. 20 references, 11 figures

  6. Radiation effects on superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of radiation on the superconducting transition temperature (T/sub c/), upper critical field (H/sub c2/), and volume-pinning-force density (F/sub p/) were discussed for the three kinds of superconducting material (elements, alloys, and compounds). 11 figures, 3 tables, 86 references

  7. Superconducting elliptical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J K

    2011-01-01

    We give a brief overview of the history, state of the art, and future for elliptical superconducting cavities. Principles of the cell shape optimization, criteria for multi-cell structures design, HOM damping schemes and other features are discussed along with examples of superconducting structures for various applications.

  8. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  9. Superconducting rotating machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L. Jr.; Kirtley, J.L. Jr.; Thullen, P.

    1975-01-01

    The opportunities and limitations of the applications of superconductors in rotating electric machines are given. The relevant properties of superconductors and the fundamental requirements for rotating electric machines are discussed. The current state-of-the-art of superconducting machines is reviewed. Key problems, future developments and the long range potential of superconducting machines are assessed

  10. Superconductivity in bad metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ''bad metals'' with such a poor conductivity that the usual mean-field theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Some consequences for high temperature superconductors are described

  11. Submicron superconducting structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovashkin, A.I.; Lykov, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of works concerning superconducting structures of submicron dimensions and a system of such structures is given. It is noted that usage of the above structures in superconducting microelectronics permits, first, to increase the element packing density, to decrease the signal transmission time, capacity, power dissipated in high-frequency applications. Secondly, negligible coherence length in transition metals, their alloys and high-temperature compounds also restrict the dimensions of superconducting weak couplings when the 'classical' Josephson effect is displayed. The most effective methods for production of submicron superconducting structures are the following: lithography, double scribering. Recently the systems of superconducting submicron elements are extensively studied. It is shown that such systems can be phased by magnetic field

  12. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    , the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10......We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However...

  13. Superconducting Wind Turbine Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunying Pan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is well known as a renewable energy because its clean and less polluted characteristic, which is the foundation of development modern wind electricity. To find more efficient wind turbine is the focus of scientists around the world. Compared from conventional wind turbines, superconducting wind turbine generators have advantages at zero resistance, smaller size and lighter weight. Superconducting wind turbine will inevitably become the main trends in this area. This paper intends to introduce the basic concept and principle of superconductivity, and compare form traditional wind turbine to obtain superiority, then to summary three proposed machine concept.While superconductivity have difficulty  in modern technology and we also have proposed some challenges in achieving superconducting wind turbine finally.

  14. Embracing interference in wireless systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gollakota, Shyamnath

    2014-01-01

    The wireless medium is a shared resource. If nearby devices transmit at thesame time, their signals interfere, resulting in a collision. In traditionalnetworks, collisions cause the loss of the transmitted information. For thisreason, wireless networks have been designed with the assumption thatinterference is intrinsically harmful and must be avoided.This book, a revised version of the author's award-winning Ph.D.dissertation, takes an alternate approach: Instead of viewing interferenceas an inherently counterproductive phenomenon that should to be avoided, wedesign practical systems that tra

  15. Quantum Computation with Superconducting Quantum Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orlando, Terry P

    2008-01-01

    .... Important to the future implementation of these qubits for quantum computing applications is the demonstration of microwave sideband cooling of the qubits as well as a resonant read-out scheme...

  16. Superconducting quantum devices. Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.

    1985-08-01

    Looking back over this, the third IC SQUID conference, and trying to compare the state of our field now with the way it was at the time of the second conference in 1980, the author realized that while there has been tremendous progress in some areas, in others there have been considerable disappointments and setbacks. In attempting to assess the many things that we have heard in the last four days, some idea of the status of the various subdivisions of the field was given

  17. Theory and application of high temperature superconducting eddy current probes for nondestructive evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James Ronald

    1998-10-01

    Several High-T c Superconducting (HTS) eddy current probes have been developed for applications in electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of conducting materials. The probes utilize high-T c SUperconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers to detect the fields produced by the perturbation of induced eddy currents resulting from subsurface flaws. Localized HTS shields are incorporated to selectively screen out environmental electromagnetic interference and enable movement of the instrument in the Earth's magnetic field. High permeability magnetic shields are employed to focus flux into, and thereby increase the eddy current density in the metallic test samples. NDE test results are presented, in which machined flaws in aluminum alloy are detected by probes of different design. A novel current injection technique performing NDE of wires using SQUIDs is also discussed. The HTS and high permeability shields are designed based on analytical and numerical finite element method (FEM) calculations presented here. Superconducting and high permeability magnetic shields are modeled in uniform noise fields and in the presence of dipole fields characteristic of flaw signals. Several shield designs are characterized in terms of (1) their ability to screen out uniform background noise fields; (2) the resultant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and (3) the extent to which dipole source fields are distorted. An analysis of eddy current induction is then presented for low frequency SQUID NDE. Analytical expressions are developed for the induced eddy currents and resulting magnetic fields produced by excitation sources above conducting plates of varying thickness. The expressions derived here are used to model the SQUID's response to material thinning. An analytical defect model is also developed, taking into account the attenuation of the defect field through the conducting material, as well as the current flow around the edges of the flaw. Time harmonic

  18. Phase-controlled coherent population trapping in superconducting quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Guang-Ling; Wang Yi-Ping; Chen Ai-Xi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influences of the-applied-field phases and amplitudes on the coherent population trapping behavior in superconducting quantum circuits. Based on the interactions of the microwave fields with a single Δ-type three-level fluxonium qubit, the coherent population trapping could be obtainable and it is very sensitive to the relative phase and amplitudes of the applied fields. When the relative phase is tuned to 0 or π, the maximal atomic coherence is present and coherent population trapping occurs. While for the choice of π/2, the atomic coherence becomes weak. Meanwhile, for the fixed relative phase π/2, the value of coherence would decrease with the increase of Rabi frequency of the external field coupled with two lower levels. The responsible physical mechanism is quantum interference induced by the control fields, which is indicated in the dressed-state representation. The microwave coherent phenomenon is present in our scheme, which will have potential applications in optical communication and nonlinear optics in solid-state devices. (paper)

  19. Conceptual study of superconducting urban area power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, Mathias; Gold-acker, Wilfried; Bach, Robert; Prusseit, Werner; Willen, Dag; Poelchau, Juri; Linke, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Efficient transmission, distribution and usage of electricity are fundamental requirements for providing citizens, societies and economies with essential energy resources. It will be a major future challenge to integrate more sustainable generation resources, to meet growing electricity demand and to renew electricity networks. Research and development on superconducting equipment and components have an important role to play in addressing these challenges. Up to now, most studies on superconducting applications in power systems have been concentrated on the application of specific devices like for example cables and current limiters. In contrast to this, the main focus of our study is to show the consequence of a large scale integration of superconducting power equipment in distribution level urban power systems. Specific objectives are to summarize the state-of-the-art of superconducting power equipment including cooling systems and to compare the superconducting power system with respect to energy and economic efficiency with conventional solutions. Several scenarios were considered starting from the replacement of an existing distribution level sub-grid up to a full superconducting urban area distribution level power system. One major result is that a full superconducting urban area distribution level power system could be cost competitive with existing solutions in the future. In addition to that, superconducting power systems offer higher energy efficiency as well as a number of technical advantages like lower voltage drops and improved stability.

  20. Interference-exact radiative transfer equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partanen, Mikko; Haÿrynen, Teppo; Oksanen, Jani

    2017-01-01

    Maxwell's equations with stochastic or quantum optical source terms accounting for the quantum nature of light. We show that both the nonlocal wave and local particle features associated with interference and emission of propagating fields in stratified geometries can be fully captured by local damping...... and scattering coefficients derived from the recently introduced quantized fluctuational electrodynamics (QFED) framework. In addition to describing the nonlocal optical interference processes as local directionally resolved effects, this allows reformulating the well known and widely used radiative transfer...... equation (RTE) as a physically transparent interference-exact model that extends the useful range of computationally efficient and quantum optically accurate interference-aware optical models from simple structures to full optical devices....

  1. Experimentally verified inductance extraction and parameter study for superconductive integrated circuit wires crossing ground plane holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourie, Coenrad J; Wetzstein, Olaf; Kunert, Juergen; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Toepfer, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    As the complexity of rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) circuits increases, both current and power consumption of the circuits become important design criteria. Various new concepts such as inductive biasing for energy efficient RSFQ circuits and inductively coupled RSFQ cells for current recycling have been proposed to overcome increasingly severe design problems. Both of these techniques use ground plane holes to increase the inductance or coupling factor of superconducting integrated circuit wires. New design tools are consequently required to handle the new topographies. One important issue in such circuit design is the accurate calculation of networks of inductances even in the presence of finite holes in the ground plane. We show how a fast network extraction method using InductEx, which is a pre- and post-processor for the magnetoquasistatic field solver FastHenry, is used to calculate the inductances of a set of SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) with ground plane holes of different sizes. The results are compared to measurements of physical structures fabricated with the IPHT Jena 1 kA cm −2 RSFQ niobium process to verify accuracy. We then do a parameter study and derive empirical equations for fast and useful estimation of the inductance of wires surrounded by ground plane holes. We also investigate practical circuits and show excellent accuracy. (paper)

  2. Model for an irreversible bias current in the superconducting qubit measurement process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, G. D.; Williams, D. A.; Holmes, C. A.; Stace, T. M.; Spiller, T. P.; Barrett, S. D.; Milburn, G. J.; Hasko, D. G.

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting charge-phase ''quantronium'' qubit is considered in order to develop a model for the measurement process used in the experiment of Vion et al. [Science 296, 886 (2002)]. For this model we propose a method for including the bias current in the readout process in a fundamentally irreversible way, which to first order is approximated by the Josephson junction tilted-washboard potential phenomenology. The decohering bias current is introduced in the form of a Lindblad operator and the Wigner function for the current-biased readout Josephson junction is derived and analyzed. During the readout current pulse used in the quantronium experiment we find that the coherence of the qubit initially prepared in a symmetric superposition state is lost at a time of 0.2 ns after the bias current pulse has been applied, a time scale that is much shorter than the experimental readout time. Additionally we look at the effect of Johnson-Nyquist noise with zero mean from the current source during the qubit manipulation and show that the decoherence due to the irreversible bias current description is an order of magnitude smaller than that found through adding noise to the reversible tilted-washboard potential model. Our irreversible bias current model is also applicable to persistent-current-based qubits where the state is measured according to its flux via a small-inductance direct-current superconducting quantum interference device

  3. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil S.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, S. Harvey; hide

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization o[ the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 128mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bo|ometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  4. Stress analysis of superconducting magnets for magnetic fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, J.E.; Gray, W.H.; Baudry, T.V.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting devices involve several factors that normally are not encountered in the structural analysis of more common systems. Several of these factors ae noted and methods for including them in an analysis are cited. To illustrate the state of the analysis art for superconducting magnets, in magnetic fusion reactors, two specific projects are illustrated. They are the Large Coil Program (LCP) and the Engineering Test Facility (ETF).

  5. Superconducting Nanowires as Nonlinear Inductive Elements for Qubits

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, Jaseung; Manucharyan, Vladimir; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    We report microwave transmission measurements of superconducting Fabry-Perot resonators (SFPR), having a superconducting nanowire placed at a supercurrent antinode. As the plasma oscillation is excited, the supercurrent is forced to flow through the nanowire. The microwave transmission of the resonator-nanowire device shows a nonlinear resonance behavior, significantly dependent on the amplitude of the supercurrent oscillation. We show that such amplitude-dependent response is due to the nonl...

  6. Stress analysis of superconducting magnets for magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.E.; Gray, W.H.; Baudry, T.V.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting devices involve several factors that normally are not encountered in the structural analysis of more common systems. Several of these factors ae noted and methods for including them in an analysis are cited. To illustrate the state of the analysis art for superconducting magnets, in magnetic fusion reactors, two specific projects are illustrated. They are the Large Coil Program (LCP) and the Engineering Test Facility

  7. Dark Matter Interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kouvaris, Christoforos; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We study different patterns of interference in WIMP-nuclei elastic scattering that can accommodate the DAMA and CoGeNT experiments via an isospin violating ratio $f_n/f_p=-0.71$. We study interference between the following pairs of mediators: Z and Z', Z' and Higgs, and two Higgs fields. We show ...

  8. Electron Interference in Ballistic Graphene Nanoconstrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baringhaus, Jens; Settnes, Mikkel; Aprojanz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    We realize nanometer size constrictions in ballistic graphene nanoribbons grown on sidewalls of SiC mesa structures. The high quality of our devices allows the observation of a number of electronic quantum interference phenomena. The transmissions of Fabry-Perot-like resonances are probed...

  9. Superconducting materials and magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Superconducting Materials and Magnets was convened by the IAEA and held by invitation of the Japanese government on September 4-6, 1989 in Tokyo. The meeting was hosted by the National Research Institute for Metals. Topics of the conference related to superconducting magnets and technology with particular application to fusion and the superconducting supercollider. Technology using both high and low-temperature superconductors was discussed. This document is a compendium of the papers presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. ESCAR superconducting magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, W.S.; Meuser, R.B.; Pope, W.L.; Green, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-four superconducting dipoles, each about 1 meter long, provide the guide field for the Experimental Superconducting Accelerator Ring proton accelerator--storage ring. Injection of 50 MeV protons corresponds to a 3 kG central dipole field, and a peak proton energy of 4.2 GeV corresponds to a 46 kG central field. Thirty-two quadrupoles provide focusing. The 56 superconducting magnets are contained in 40 cryostats that are cryogenically connected in a novel series ''weir'' arrangement. A single 1500 W refrigeration plant is required. Design and testing of the magnet and cryostat system are described. (U.S.)

  11. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  12. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ''bad metals'', with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described

  13. Superconducting active impedance converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures

  14. Introduction to superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Darriulat, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The lecture series will address physicists, such as particle and nuclear physicists, familiar with non-relativistic quantum mechanics but not with solid state physics. The aim of this introduction to low temperature superconductivity is to give sufficient bases to the student for him/her to be able to access the scientific literature on this field. The five lectures will cover the following topics : 1. Normal metals, free electron gas, chambers equation. 2. Cooper pairs, the BCS ground state, quasi particle excitations. 3. DC superconductivity, Meissner state, dirty superconductors.4. Self consistent approach, Ginsburg Landau equations, Abrikosov fluxon lattice. 5. Josephson effects, high temperature superconductivity.

  15. Excitonic quantum interference in a quantum dot chain with rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Suc-Kyoung; Nam, Seog Woo; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang

    2008-04-16

    We demonstrate excitonic quantum interference in a closely spaced quantum dot chain with nanorings. In the resonant dipole-dipole interaction model with direct diagonalization method, we have found a peculiar feature that the excitation of specified quantum dots in the chain is completely inhibited, depending on the orientational configuration of the transition dipole moments and specified initial preparation of the excitation. In practice, these excited states facilitating quantum interference can provide a conceptual basis for quantum interference devices of excitonic hopping.

  16. Imaging of current distributions in superconducting thin film structures; Abbildung von Stromverteilungen in supraleitenden Duennfilmstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doenitz, D.

    2006-10-31

    Local analysis plays an important role in many fields of scientific research. However, imaging methods are not very common in the investigation of superconductors. For more than 20 years, Low Temperature Scanning Electron Microscopy (LTSEM) has been successfully used at the University of Tuebingen for studying of condensed matter phenomena, especially of superconductivity. In this thesis LTSEM was used for imaging current distributions in different superconducting thin film structures: - Imaging of current distributions in Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer, also known as SIFS junctions, showed inhomogeneous current transport over the junctions which directly led to an improvement in the fabrication process. An investigation of improved samples showed a very homogeneous current distribution without any trace of magnetic domains. Either such domains were not present or too small for imaging with the LTSEM. - An investigation of Nb/YBCO zigzag Josephson junctions yielded important information on signal formation in the LTSEM both for Josephson junctions in the short and in the long limit. Using a reference junction our signal formation model could be verified, thus confirming earlier results on short zigzag junctions. These results, which could be reproduced in this work, support the theory of d-wave symmetry in the superconducting order parameter of YBCO. Furthermore, investigations of the quasiparticle tunneling in the zigzag junctions showed the existence of Andreev bound states, which is another indication of the d-wave symmetry in YBCO. - The LTSEM study of Hot Electron Bolometers (HEB) allowed the first successful imaging of a stable 'Hot Spot', a self-heating region in HEB structures. Moreover, the electron beam was used to induce an - otherwise unstable - hot spot. Both investigations yielded information on the homogeneity of the samples. - An entirely new method of imaging the current distribution in superconducting interference

  17. ORPUS 1: a pulsed superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwall, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A recent series of reference designs for Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR's) has indicated that superconducting poloidal field (PF) coils will be necessary for successful operation of these devices. It would also be desirable to use superconducting PF coils in earlier tokamak fusion devices if such coils could be developed quickly enough. The PF coil performance requirements are briefly reviewed and some implications for the coil design are developed. A small coil (stored energy 14 kJ) has been built using construction techniques similar to those which could be employed for PF coils. The coil has been charged at rates up to 2 T/sec. Both maximum field and charging rate were limited by available power supplies. Loss measurements were carried out during pulsed operation and data for hysteretic and eddy current loss are presented. The loss measurement system used allows considerable insight into the effects of conductor motion and training

  18. High temperature superconductive flux gate magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenson, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a different type of HTS superconducting magnetometer based on the non-linear magnetic behavior of bulk HTS materials. The device design is based on the generation of second harmonics which arise as a result of non-linear magnetization observed in Type-II superconductors. Even harmonics are generated from the non-linear interaction of an ac excitation signal with an external DC magnetic field which acts as a bias signal

  19. Superconducting magnet systems in EPR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.F.

    1976-10-01

    Tokamak experiments have reached a stage where large scale application of superconductors can be envisaged for machines becoming operational within the next decade. Existing designs for future devices already indicate some of the tasks and problems associated with large superconducting magnet systems. Using this information the coming magnet system requirements are summarized, some design considerations given and in conclusion a brief survey describes already existing Tokamak magnet development programs. (orig.) [de

  20. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  1. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.; Chaud, X.; Gautier-Picard, P.

    1996-01-01

    Superconductors, especially high T c ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO

  2. Superconducting Technology Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    This Superconducting Technology Assessment (STA) has been conducted by the National Security Agency to address the fundamental question of a potential replacement for silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS...

  3. Superconductivity: materials and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Kircher, F.; Leveque, J.; Tixador, P.

    2008-01-01

    This digest paper presents the different types of superconducting materials: 1 - the low-TC superconductors: the multi-filament composite as elementary constituent, the world production of NbTi, the superconducting cables of the LHC collider and of the ITER tokamak; 2 - the high-TC superconductors: BiSrCaCuO (PIT 1G) ribbons and wires, deposited coatings; 3 - application to particle physics: the the LHC collider of the CERN, the LHC detectors; 4 - applications to thermonuclear fusion: Tore Supra and ITER tokamaks; 5 - NMR imaging: properties of superconducting magnets; 6 - applications in electrotechnics: cables, motors and alternators, current limiters, transformers, superconducting energy storage systems (SMES). (J.S.)

  4. Superconductivity: Heike's heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Marel, D.; Golden, M.

    2011-01-01

    A century ago, Heike Kamerlingh Onnes discovered superconductivity. And yet, despite the conventional superconductors being understood, the list of unconventional superconductors is growing — for which unconventional theories may be required.

  5. RADIOFREQUENCY SUPERCONDUCTIVITY: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency is already playing an important role in the beam acceleration system for the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at the Japanese KEK Laboratory and new such systems are being prepared for other major machines. Thus the fourth Workshop on Radiofrequency Superconductivity, organized by KEK under the chairmanship of local specialist Yuzo Kojima and held just before the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators, had much progress to review and even more to look forward to

  6. Stacked magnet superconducting bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, T.K. II; Saville, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting bearing is described, comprising: a plurality of permanent magnets magnetized end-to-end and stacked side-by-side in alternating polarity, such that flux lines flow between ends of adjacent magnets; isolating means, disposed between said adjacent magnets, for reducing flux leakage between opposing sides of said adjacent magnets; and a member made of superconducting material having at least one surface in communication with said flux lines

  7. Superconductivity at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, N B; Ginzburg, N I

    1969-07-01

    Work published during the last 3 or 4 yrs concerning the effect of pressure on superconductivity is reviewed. Superconducting modifications of Si, Ge, Sb, Te, Se, P and Ce. Change of Fermi surface under pressure for nontransition metals. First experiments on the influence of pressure on the tunneling effect in superconductors provide new information on the nature of the change in phonon and electron energy spectra of metals under hydrostatic compression. 78 references.

  8. Superconductivity: A critical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacchetti, Nicola

    1997-01-01

    It is some forty years now that superconductivity has entered into the field of applied Physics. Countless applications have been proposed some of which have been successfully tested in the form of prototypes and relatively few have become widely used products. This article offers an objective examination of what applied superconductivity represents in the area of modern technology highlighting its exclusive advantages and its inevitable limitations

  9. Generalized Superconductivity. Generalized Levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, B.; Agop, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the recent papers, the gravitational superconductivity is described. We introduce the concept of generalized superconductivity observing that any nongeodesic motion and, in particular, the motion in an electromagnetic field, can be transformed in a geodesic motion by a suitable choice of the connection. In the present paper, the gravitoelectromagnetic London equations have been obtained from the generalized Helmholtz vortex theorem using the generalized local equivalence principle. In this context, the gravitoelectromagnetic Meissner effect and, implicitly, the gravitoelectromagnetic levitation are given. (authors)

  10. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  11. Superconducting Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized superconducting fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs by potassium (K intercalation. They showed large superconducting volume fractions, as high as 80%. The superconducting transition temperature at 17 K was independent of the K content (x in the range between 1.6 and 6.0 in K-doped C60 nanowhiskers (KxC60NWs, while the superconducting volume fractions changed with x. The highest shielding fraction of a full shielding volume was observed in the material of K3.3C60NW by heating at 200 °C. On the other hand, that of a K-doped fullerene (K-C60 crystal was less than 1%. We report the superconducting behaviors of our newly synthesized KxC60NWs in comparison to those of KxC60 crystals, which show superconductivity at 19 K in K3C60. The lattice structures are also discussed, based on the x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses.

  12. Generation of three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of superconducting qubits by using dressed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Chen, Ye-Hong; Shi, Zhi-Cheng; Shan, Wu-Jiang; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2017-12-01

    Combining the advantages of the dressed states and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits, we propose an efficient scheme to generate Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states for three SQUID qubits. Firstly, we elaborate how to generate GHZ states of three SQUID qubits by choosing a set of dressed states suitably. Then, we compare the scheme by using dressed states with that via the adiabatic passage. Lastly, the influence of various decoherence factors, such as cavity decay, spontaneous emission and dephasing, is analyzed numerically. All of the results show that the GHZ state can be obtained fast and with high fidelity and that the present scheme is robust against the cavity decay and spontaneous emission. In addition, our scheme is more stable against the dephasing than the adiabatic scheme.

  13. High-current applications of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, P.

    1995-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: superconducting materials, design principles of superconducting magnets, magnets for research and engineering, superconductivity for power engineering, superconductivity in nuclear fusion technology, economical considerations

  14. Quantum information processing with superconducting circuits: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendin, G.

    2017-10-01

    During the last ten years, superconducting circuits have passed from being interesting physical devices to becoming contenders for near-future useful and scalable quantum information processing (QIP). Advanced quantum simulation experiments have been shown with up to nine qubits, while a demonstration of quantum supremacy with fifty qubits is anticipated in just a few years. Quantum supremacy means that the quantum system can no longer be simulated by the most powerful classical supercomputers. Integrated classical-quantum computing systems are already emerging that can be used for software development and experimentation, even via web interfaces. Therefore, the time is ripe for describing some of the recent development of superconducting devices, systems and applications. As such, the discussion of superconducting qubits and circuits is limited to devices that are proven useful for current or near future applications. Consequently, the centre of interest is the practical applications of QIP, such as computation and simulation in Physics and Chemistry.

  15. Propagation of a normal-superconducting interface in type I superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delon, P.

    1976-01-01

    The speed of propagation of an N-S boundary was measured as a function of temperature, and, when the superconductive phase increases, two minima are observed in the speed. Limited thermal conductivity gives the minimum situated at the highest temperature, the second minimum is caused by interference of quasi-particles through a superconductive sheet which covers a part of the normal state [fr

  16. Durability Evaluation of Superconducting Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Akihiko; Ogata, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Masahiko; Asahara, Tetsuo; Herai, Toshiki; Nishikawa, Yoichi

    2006-06-01

    It is one of the most essential things to verify the durability of devices and components of JR-Maglev system to realize the system into the future inauguration. Since the load requirements were insufficient in terms of the durability under vibrations under mere running tests carried out on Yamanashi Maglev Test Line hereinafter referred to YMTL, we have developed supplemental method with bench tests. Superconducting magnets hereinafter referred to SCM as used in the experimental running for the last seven years on the YMTL were brought to Kunitachi Technical Research Institute; we conducted tests to evaluate the durability of SCM up to a period of the service life in commercial use. The test results have indicated that no irregularity in each part of SCM proving that SCM are sufficiently durable for the practical application.

  17. Durability Evaluation of Superconducting Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akihiko; Ogata, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Masahiko; Asahara, Tetsuo; Herai, Toshiki; Nishikawa, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    It is one of the most essential things to verify the durability of devices and components of JR-Maglev system to realize the system into the future inauguration. Since the load requirements were insufficient in terms of the durability under vibrations under mere running tests carried out on Yamanashi Maglev Test Line hereinafter referred to YMTL, we have developed supplemental method with bench tests. Superconducting magnets hereinafter referred to SCM as used in the experimental running for the last seven years on the YMTL were brought to Kunitachi Technical Research Institute; we conducted tests to evaluate the durability of SCM up to a period of the service life in commercial use. The test results have indicated that no irregularity in each part of SCM proving that SCM are sufficiently durable for the practical application

  18. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando, E-mail: fluis@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC—Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Sesé, Javier [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos [Dpto. de Ingeniería Electrónica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Majer, Johannes [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  19. Broadband sample holder for microwave spectroscopy of superconducting qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averkin, A. S.; Karpov, A.; Glushkov, E.; Abramov, N.; Shulga, K.; Huebner, U.; Il'ichev, E.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    We present a practical design and implementation of a broadband sample holder suitable for microwave experiments with superconducting integrated circuits at millikelvin temperatures. Proposed design can be easily integrated in standard dilution cryostats, has flat pass band response in a frequency range from 0 to 32 GHz, allowing the RF testing of the samples with substrate size up to 4 × 4 mm 2 . The parasitic higher modes interference in the holder structure is analyzed and prevented via design considerations. The developed setup can be used for characterization of superconducting parametric amplifiers, bolometers, and qubits. We tested the designed sample holder by characterizing of a superconducting flux qubit at 20 mK temperature

  20. Induction shimming: A new shimming concept for superconductive undulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wollmann

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Undulators are the most advanced sources for the generation of synchrotron radiation. The photons generated by a single electron add up coherently along the electron trajectory. In order to do so, the oscillatory motion of the electron has to be in phase with the emitted photons along the whole undulator. Small magnetic errors can cause unwanted destructive interferences. In standard permanent magnet undulators, the magnetic errors are reduced by applying shimming techniques. Superconductive undulators have higher magnetic fields than permanent magnet undulators but shimming is more complex. In this paper it is shown that coupled superconductive loops installed along the surface of the superconductive undulator coil can significantly reduce the destructive effect of the field errors. This new idea might allow the building of undulators with a superior field quality.

  1. New Fast Response Thin Film-Based Superconducting Quench Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; van de Camp, W; Ravaioli, E; Teixeira, A; ten Kate, H H J

    2014-01-01

    Quench detection on superconducting bus bars and other devices with a low normal zone propagation velocity and low voltage build-up is quite difficult with conventional quench detection techniques. Currently, on ATLAS superconducting bus bar sections, superconducting quench detectors (SQD) are mounted to detect quench events. A first version of the SQD essentially consists of an insulated superconducting wire glued to a superconducting bus line or windings, which in the case of a quench rapidly builds up a relatively high resistance that can be easily and quietly detected. We now introduce a new generation of drastically improved SQDs. The new version makes the detection of quenches simpler, more reliable, and much faster. Instead of a superconducting wire, now a superconducting thin film is used. The layout of the sensor shows a meander like pattern that is etched out of a copper coated 25 mu m thick film of Nb-Ti glued in between layers of Kapton. Since the sensor is now much smaller and thinner, it is easi...

  2. Superconducting Technology Program: Sandia 1993 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.P.

    1994-05-01

    Sandia's STP program is a four-part high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, thallium-based HTS film development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The four research efforts currently underway are: (1) process research on the material synthesis of high-temperature superconductors; (2) investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting thick films; (3) process development and characterization of high-temperature superconducting wire and tape, and (4) cryogenic design of a high-temperature superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY93 in each of these four areas. A brief background of each project is included to provide historical context and perspective. Major areas of research are described, although no attempt has been made to exhaustively include all work performed in each of these areas

  3. Superconducting nanostructured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metlushko, V.

    1998-01-01

    Within the last year it has been realized that the remarkable properties of superconducting thin films containing a periodic array of defects (such as sub-micron sized holes) offer a new route for developing a novel superconducting materials based on precise control of microstructure by modern photolithography. A superconductor is a material which, when cooled below a certain temperature, loses all resistance to electricity. This means that superconducting materials can carry large electrical currents without any energy loss--but there are limits to how much current can flow before superconductivity is destroyed. The current at which superconductivity breaks down is called the critical current. The value of the critical current is determined by the balance of Lorentz forces and pinning forces acting on the flux lines in the superconductor. Lorentz forces proportional to the current flow tend to drive the flux lines into motion, which dissipates energy and destroys zero resistance. Pinning forces created by isolated defects in the microstructure oppose flux line motion and increase the critical current. Many kinds of artificial pinning centers have been proposed and developed to increase critical current performance, ranging from dispersal of small non-superconducting second phases to creation of defects by proton, neutron or heavy ion irradiation. In all of these methods, the pinning centers are randomly distributed over the superconducting material, causing them to operate well below their maximum efficiency. We are overcome this drawback by creating pinning centers in aperiodic lattice (see Fig 1) so that each pin site interacts strongly with only one or a few flux lines

  4. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamsen, A B; Seiler, E; Zirngibl, T; Andersen, N H; Mijatovic, N; Traeholt, C; Pedersen, N F; Oestergaard, J; Noergaard, P B

    2010-01-01

    We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However, the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10 MW is suggested to secure the accumulation of reliability experience. Finally, the quantities of high temperature superconducting tape needed for a 10 kW and an extreme high field 10 MW generator are found to be 7.5 km and 1500 km, respectively. A more realistic estimate is 200-300 km of tape per 10 MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train.

  5. A step towards controlled fusion reactors: Tore Supra tokamak with superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1988-01-01

    Tore Supra technology has to solve all the problems related to the development and the installaion of superconducting coils and associated cryogenic devices. Tore Supra will allow to get a significative experience to prepare next machines. Specifications and needs of tokamaks concerning the superconducting coils of future machines are recalled [fr

  6. Multiplexing Superconducting Qubit Circuit for Single Microwave Photon Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, R. E.; Senior, J.; Saira, O.-P.; Pekola, J. P.; de Graaf, S. E.; Lindström, T.; Pashkin, Yu A.

    2017-10-01

    We report on a device that integrates eight superconducting transmon qubits in λ /4 superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators fed from a common feedline. Using this multiplexing architecture, each resonator and qubit can be addressed individually, thus reducing the required hardware resources and allowing their individual characterisation by spectroscopic methods. The measured device parameters agree with the designed values, and the resonators and qubits exhibit excellent coherence properties and strong coupling, with the qubit relaxation rate dominated by the Purcell effect when brought in resonance with the resonator. Our analysis shows that the circuit is suitable for generation of single microwave photons on demand with an efficiency exceeding 80%.

  7. Radiation effects on superconducting fusion magnet components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fusion devices based on the magnetic confinement principle heavily rely on the existence and performance of superconducting magnets and have always significantly contributed to advancing superconductor and magnet technology to their limits. In view of the presently ongoing construction of the tokamak device ITER and the stellerator device Wendelstein 7X and their record breaking parameters concerning size, complexity of design, stored energy, amperage, mechanical and magnetic forces, critical current densities and stability requirements, it is deemed timely to review another critical parameter that is practically unique to these devices, namely the radiation response of all magnet components to the lifetime fluence of fast neutrons and gamma rays produced by the fusion reactions of deuterium and tritium. I will review these radiation effects in turn for the currently employed standard "technical" low temperature superconductors NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, the stabilizing material (Cu) as well as the magnet insulation materials and conclude by discussing the potential of high temperature superconducting materials for future generations of fusion devices, such as DEMO. (author)

  8. Athermal avalanche in bilayer superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, V. B., E-mail: verma@nist.gov; Lita, A. E.; Stevens, M. J.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2016-03-28

    We demonstrate that two superconducting nanowires separated by a thin insulating barrier can undergo an avalanche process. In this process, Joule heating caused by a photodetection event in one nanowire and the associated production of athermal phonons which are transmitted through the barrier cause the transition of the adjacent nanowire from the superconducting to the normal state. We show that this process can be utilized in the fabrication of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, reduce system jitter, maximize device area, and increase the external efficiency over a very broad range of wavelengths. Furthermore, the avalanche mechanism may provide a path towards a superconducting logic element based on athermal gating.

  9. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, D.H.; Cui, D.J.; Li, B.; Teng, Y.; Zheng, G.L.; Wang, X.Q.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density for SMES system. • Increasing the effective current density in the superconducting coils or optimizing the configuration of the SMES coil could improve the energy storage density. • A new conceive of energy compression is also proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage

  10. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.H., E-mail: lindehua_cn@yahoo.com.cn [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); Cui, D.J.; Li, B.; Teng, Y.; Zheng, G.L. [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); Wang, X.Q. [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density for SMES system. • Increasing the effective current density in the superconducting coils or optimizing the configuration of the SMES coil could improve the energy storage density. • A new conceive of energy compression is also proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage.

  11. Superconductivity and macroscopic quantum phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogovin, D.; Scully, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is often asserted that superconducting systems are manifestations of quantum mechanics on a macroscopic scale. In this review article it is demonstrated that this quantum assertion is true within the framework of the microscopic theory of superconductivity. (Auth.)

  12. Superconducting state mechanisms and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kresin, Vladimir Z; Wolf, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    'Superconducting State' provides a very detailed theoretical treatment of the key mechanisms of superconductivity, including the current state of the art (phonons, magnons, and plasmons). A very complete description is given of the electron-phonon mechanism responsible for superconductivity in the majority of superconducting systems, and the history of its development, as well as a detailed description of the key experimental techniques used to study the superconducting state and determine the mechanisms. In addition, there are chapters describing the discovery and properties of the key superconducting compounds that are of the most interest for science, and applications including a special chapter on the cuprate superconductors. It provides detailed treatments of some very novel aspects of superconductivity, including multiple bands (gaps), the "pseudogap" state, novel isotope effects beyond BCS, and induced superconductivity.

  13. Fullerides - Superconductivity at the limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, Thomas T. M.

    The successful synthesis of highly crystalline Cs3C60, exhibiting superconductivity up to a record temperature for fullerides of 38 K, demonstrates a powerful synthetic route for investigating the origin of superconductivity in this class of materials.

  14. Superconducting Ferromagnetic Nanodiamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gufei; Samuely, Tomas; Xu, Zheng; Jochum, Johanna K; Volodin, Alexander; Zhou, Shengqiang; May, Paul W; Onufriienko, Oleksandr; Kačmarčík, Jozef; Steele, Julian A; Li, Jun; Vanacken, Johan; Vacík, Jiri; Szabó, Pavol; Yuan, Haifeng; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Cerbu, Dorin; Samuely, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2017-06-27

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are two mutually antagonistic states in condensed matter. Research on the interplay between these two competing orderings sheds light not only on the cause of various quantum phenomena in strongly correlated systems but also on the general mechanism of superconductivity. Here we report on the observation of the electronic entanglement between superconducting and ferromagnetic states in hydrogenated boron-doped nanodiamond films, which have a superconducting transition temperature T c ∼ 3 K and a Curie temperature T Curie > 400 K. In spite of the high T Curie , our nanodiamond films demonstrate a decrease in the temperature dependence of magnetization below 100 K, in correspondence to an increase in the temperature dependence of resistivity. These anomalous magnetic and electrical transport properties reveal the presence of an intriguing precursor phase, in which spin fluctuations intervene as a result of the interplay between the two antagonistic states. Furthermore, the observations of high-temperature ferromagnetism, giant positive magnetoresistance, and anomalous Hall effect bring attention to the potential applications of our superconducting ferromagnetic nanodiamond films in magnetoelectronics, spintronics, and magnetic field sensing.

  15. Interference and Sensitivity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWeele, Tyler J; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Halloran, M Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Causal inference with interference is a rapidly growing area. The literature has begun to relax the "no-interference" assumption that the treatment received by one individual does not affect the outcomes of other individuals. In this paper we briefly review the literature on causal inference in the presence of interference when treatments have been randomized. We then consider settings in which causal effects in the presence of interference are not identified, either because randomization alone does not suffice for identification, or because treatment is not randomized and there may be unmeasured confounders of the treatment-outcome relationship. We develop sensitivity analysis techniques for these settings. We describe several sensitivity analysis techniques for the infectiousness effect which, in a vaccine trial, captures the effect of the vaccine of one person on protecting a second person from infection even if the first is infected. We also develop two sensitivity analysis techniques for causal effects in the presence of unmeasured confounding which generalize analogous techniques when interference is absent. These two techniques for unmeasured confounding are compared and contrasted.

  16. Binaural Interference: Quo Vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerger, James; Silman, Shlomo; Silverman, Carol; Emmer, Michele

    2017-04-01

    The reality of the phenomenon of binaural interference with speech recognition has been debated for two decades. Research has taken one of two avenues; group studies or case reports. In group studies, a sample of the elderly population is tested on speech recognition under three conditions; binaural, monaural right and monaural left. The aim is to determine the percent of the sample in which the expected outcome (binaural score-better-than-either-monaural score) is reversed (i.e., one of the monaural scores is better than the binaural score). This outcome has been commonly used to define binaural interference. The object of group studies is to answer the "how many" question, what is the prevalence of binaural interference in the sample. In case reports the binaural interference conclusion suggested by the speech recognition tests is not accepted until it has been corroborated by other independent diagnostic audiological measures. The aim is to attempt to determine the basis for the findings, to answer the "why" question. This article is at once tutorial, editorial and a case report. We argue that it is time to accept the reality of the phenomenon of binaural interference, to eschew group statistical approaches in search of an answer to the "how many" question, and to focus on individual case reports in search of an answer to the "why" question. American Academy of Audiology.

  17. Testimony of the Council on Superconductivity for American Competitiveness before Texas A and M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Council on Superconductivity for American Competitiveness (CSAC) is a private, non-profit association of small and large American corporations, as well as universities, research institutes, national laboratories and individuals concerned with the emerging technological and commercial potential of superconductivity. CSAC's purpose is to both educate and inform its members of developments in the laboratory, the entrepreneurial sector, the U.S. Congress and the Federal agencies that may have a bearing on the ultimate competitive posture of this nation as we proceed to the realm of device commercialization utilizing superconductivity as a technology base. This paper present CSAC's report on superconductivity

  18. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-01-01

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately

  19. Apparatus and method to pulverize rock using a superconducting electromagnetic linear motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatiev, Alex (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A rock pulverizer device based on a superconducting linear motor. The superconducting electromagnetic rock pulverizer accelerates a projectile via a superconducting linear motor and directs the projectile at high speed toward a rock structure that is to be pulverized by collision of the speeding projectile with the rock structure. The rock pulverizer is comprised of a trapped field superconducting secondary magnet mounted on a movable car following a track, a wire wound series of primary magnets mounted on the track, and the complete magnet/track system mounted on a vehicle used for movement of the pulverizer through a mine as well as for momentum transfer during launch of the rock breaking projectile.

  20. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C. [eds.] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  1. High temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisenoff, M.; Gubser, D.V.; Wolf, S.A.; Ritter, J.C.; Price, G.

    1991-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is exploring the feasibility of deploying high temperature superconductivity (HTS) devices and components in space. A variety of devices, primarily passive microwave and millimeter wave components, have been procured and will be integrated with a cryogenic refrigerator system and data acquisition system to form the space package, which will be launched late in 1992. This Space Experiment will demonstrate that this technology is sufficiently robust to survive the space environment and has the potential to significantly improved space communications systems. The devices for the initial launch (HTSSE-I) have been received by NRL and evaluated electrically, thermally and mechanically and will be integrated into the final space package early in 1991. In this paper the performance of the devices are summarized and some potential applications of HTS technology in space system are outlined

  2. Superconductive analogue of spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigel'man, M.; Ioffe, L.; Vinokur, V.; Larkin, A.

    1987-07-01

    The properties of granular superconductors in magnetic fields, namely the existence of a new superconductive state analogue of the low-temperature superconductive state in spin glasses are discussed in the frame of the infinite-range model and the finite-range models. Experiments for elucidation of spin-glass superconductive state in real systems are suggested. 30 refs

  3. Quenches in large superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Green, M.A.; Lecomte, P.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.; Vuillemin, V.

    1977-08-01

    The development of large high current density superconducting magnets requires an understanding of the quench process by which the magnet goes normal. A theory which describes the quench process in large superconducting magnets is presented and compared with experimental measurements. The use of a quench theory to improve the design of large high current density superconducting magnets is discussed

  4. On anyon superconductivity--

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.-H.; Wilczek, F.; Witten, E.; Halperin, B.I.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate the statistical mechanics of a gas of fractional statistics particles in 2 + 1 dimensions. In the case of statistics very close to Fermi statistics (statistical parameter θ = π(1 - 1/n), for large n), the effect of the statistics is a weak attraction. Building upon earlier RPA calculation for the case n = 2, the authors argue that for large n perturbation theory is reliable and exhibits superfluidity (or superconductivity after coupling to electromagnetism). They describe the order parameter for this superconductng phase in terms of spontaneous breaking of commutativity of translations as opposed to the usual pairing order parameters. The vortices of the superconducting anyon gas are charged, and superconducting order parameters of the usual type vanish. They investigate the characteristic P and T violating phenomenology

  5. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  6. Superconducting linac booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, B.; Betigeri, M.G.; Pandey, M.K.; Pillay, R.G.; Kurup, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    The report on superconducting LINAC booster, which is a joint project of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), brings out the work accomplished so far towards the development of the technology of superconducting LINAC to boost the energy of ions from the 14UD Pelletron. The LINAC is modular in construction with each module comprising of a helium cryostat housing four lead-plated quarter wave resonators. The resonators are superconducting for temperatures below 7.19K. An energy boost of 2 MeV/q per module is expected to be achieved. The first module and the post-tandem superbuncher have been fabricated and tested on the LINAC beam line. This report gives a summary of the technological achievements and also brings out the difficulties encountered during the R and D phase. (author)

  7. Superconducting accelerator magnet design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting dipoles, quadrupoles and correction magnets are necessary to achieve the high magnetic fields required for big accelerators presently in construction or in the design phase. Different designs of superconducting accelerator magnets are described and the designs chosen at the big accelerator laboratories are presented. The most frequently used cosθ coil configuration is discussed in detail. Approaches for calculating the magnetic field quality including coil end fields are presented. Design details of the cables, coils, mechanical structures, yokes, helium vessels and cryostats including thermal radiation shields and support structures used in superconducting magnets are given. Necessary material properties are mentioned. Finally, the main results of magnetic field measurements and quench statistics are presented. (orig.)

  8. Large Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Védrine, P.

    2014-07-17

    The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb−Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb$_{3}$Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

  9. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  10. Crystalline color superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark; Bowers, Jeffrey A.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2001-01-01

    In any context in which color superconductivity arises in nature, it is likely to involve pairing between species of quarks with differing chemical potentials. For suitable values of the differences between chemical potentials, Cooper pairs with nonzero total momentum are favored, as was first realized by Larkin, Ovchinnikov, Fulde, and Ferrell (LOFF). Condensates of this sort spontaneously break translational and rotational invariance, leading to gaps which vary periodically in a crystalline pattern. Unlike the original LOFF state, these crystalline quark matter condensates include both spin-zero and spin-one Cooper pairs. We explore the range of parameters for which crystalline color superconductivity arises in the QCD phase diagram. If in some shell within the quark matter core of a neutron star (or within a strange quark star) the quark number densities are such that crystalline color superconductivity arises, rotational vortices may be pinned in this shell, making it a locus for glitch phenomena

  11. Large Superconducting Magnet Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Védrine, P [Saclay (France)

    2014-07-01

    The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb−Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

  12. Superconducting nano-strip particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiano, R; Ejrnaes, M; Casaburi, A; Zen, N; Ohkubo, M

    2015-01-01

    We review progress in the development and applications of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors. Particle detectors based on superconducting nano-strips stem from the parent devices developed for single photon detection (SSPD) and share with them ultra-fast response times (sub-nanosecond) and the ability to operate at a relatively high temperature (2–5 K) compared with other cryogenic detectors. SSPDs have been used in the detection of electrons, neutral and charged ions, and biological macromolecules; nevertheless, the development of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors has mainly been driven by their use in time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) where the goal of 100% efficiency at large mass values can be achieved. Special emphasis will be given to this case, reporting on the great progress which has been achieved and which permits us to overcome the limitations of existing mass spectrometers represented by low detection efficiency at large masses and charge/mass ambiguity. Furthermore, such progress could represent a breakthrough in the field. In this review article we will introduce the device concept and detection principle, stressing the peculiarities of the nano-strip particle detector as well as its similarities with photon detectors. The development of parallel strip configuration is introduced and extensively discussed, since it has contributed to the significant progress of TOF-MS applications. (paper)

  13. Superconducting materials for large scale applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Significant improvements in the properties of superconducting materials have occurred recently. These improvements are being incorporated into the latest generation of wires, cables, and tapes that are being used in a broad range of prototype devices. These devices include new, high field accelerator and NMR magnets, magnets for fusion power experiments, motors, generators, and power transmission lines. These prototype magnets are joining a wide array of existing applications that utilize the unique capabilities of superconducting magnets:accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider, fusion experiments such as ITER, 930 MHz NMR, and 4 Tesla MRI. In addition, promising new materials such as MgB2 have been discovered and are being studied in order to assess their potential for new applications. In this paper, we will review the key developments that are leading to these new applications for superconducting materials. In some cases, the key factor is improved understanding or development of materials with significantly improved properties. An example of the former is the development of Nb3Sn for use in high field magnets for accelerators. In other cases, the development is being driven by the application. The aggressive effort to develop HTS tapes is being driven primarily by the need for materials that can operate at temperatures of 50 K and higher. The implications of these two drivers for further developments will be discussed. Finally, we will discuss the areas where further improvements are needed in order for new applications to be realized

  14. Superconductivity, magnetics, cryogenics, and vacuum coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.E.; Ballou, J.K.; Beaver, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Engineering Sciences Department continued to provide consultation, design, and experiment to support the plasma physics activities of the Division while inaugurating a comprehensive program to develop superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion devices. This newly funded program is aimed at producing toroidal superconducting magnets for an experimental power reactor by the mid 1980's. Other superconducting work, such as the 14-T niobium tin solenoid designed last year for use in Moessbauer experiments, has been fabricated, successfully tested, and delivered to the Physics Division. This coil, which used a 1.27-cm wide Nb 3 Sn conductor operating at 14 T with a coil current density of 11,000 A/cm, represents an advance in the state-of-the-art. The conceptual design was provided for a subcooler to extend the ORMAK operating temperature to 70 0 K and thus allow operation at fields up to 25 kG with the present generators. The detailed design, fabrication, installation supervision, and acceptance testing of the subcooler were provided by the UCCND engineering organization. Further support to the ORMAK program was provided by the vacuum-coating activity through an investigation of sputtering erosion of the ORMAK liner. In addition, a program was undertaken to develop a variety of refractory surfaces of metals, alloys, and intermetallic compounds on stainless steel for use as first walls in future fusion devices. Adherent thick-film metallic and compound coatings deposited in vacuum by several mechanisms were produced and tested. (U.S.)

  15. A Superconducting Dual-Channel Photonic Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Manjappa, Manukumara; Cong, Longqing; Krishnamoorthy, Harish N S; Savinov, Vassili; Pitchappa, Prakash; Singh, Ranjan

    2018-06-05

    The mechanism of Cooper pair formation and its underlying physics has long occupied the investigation into high temperature (high-T c ) cuprate superconductors. One of the ways to unravel this is to observe the ultrafast response present in the charge carrier dynamics of a photoexcited specimen. This results in an interesting approach to exploit the dissipation-less dynamic features of superconductors to be utilized for designing high-performance active subwavelength photonic devices with extremely low-loss operation. Here, dual-channel, ultrafast, all-optical switching and modulation between the resistive and the superconducting quantum mechanical phase is experimentally demonstrated. The ultrafast phase switching is demonstrated via modulation of sharp Fano resonance of a high-T c yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) superconducting metamaterial device. Upon photoexcitation by femtosecond light pulses, the ultrasensitive cuprate superconductor undergoes dual dissociation-relaxation dynamics, with restoration of superconductivity within a cycle, and thereby establishes the existence of dual switching windows within a timescale of 80 ps. Pathways are explored to engineer the secondary dissociation channel which provides unprecedented control over the switching speed. Most importantly, the results envision new ways to accomplish low-loss, ultrafast, and ultrasensitive dual-channel switching applications that are inaccessible through conventional metallic and dielectric based metamaterials. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Electric smog: telemetry interference between ICD and LVAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, David; König, Thorben; Müller-Leisse, Johanna; Michalski, Roman; Oswald, Hanno; Schmitto, Jan D; Bauersachs, Johann; Veltmann, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Electromagnetic interferences between implantable cardioverter/defibrillators (ICD) and left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) impacting telemetry have been described in previous generations of ICD as well as LVAD, but have been predominantly overcome in current ICD generations. After introduction of a new fully magnetically levitated centrifugal continuous-flow circulatory pump, we report a case of tenacious telemetry interference between the HeartMate 3 LVAD and an ICD after battery exchange to an Iforia 5. Initialization of the initial telemetry handshake was only possible using several specific maneuvers simultaneously. In order to exclude device-device interference, we suggest to place the ICD above the LVAD before implantation and to test for possible telemetry interferences.

  17. Generalized Multiphoton Quantum Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Tillmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonclassical interference of photons lies at the heart of optical quantum information processing. Here, we exploit tunable distinguishability to reveal the full spectrum of multiphoton nonclassical interference. We investigate this in theory and experiment by controlling the delay times of three photons injected into an integrated interferometric network. We derive the entire coincidence landscape and identify transition matrix immanants as ideally suited functions to describe the generalized case of input photons with arbitrary distinguishability. We introduce a compact description by utilizing a natural basis that decouples the input state from the interferometric network, thereby providing a useful tool for even larger photon numbers.

  18. Interference in immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Interfering factors are evident in both limited reagent (radioimmunoassay) and excess reagent (immunometric assay) technologies and should be suspected whenever there is a discrepancy between analytical results and clinical findings in the investigation of particular diseases. The overall effect of interference in immunoassay is analytical bias in result, either positive or negative of variable magnitude. The interference maybe caused by a wide spectrum of factors from poor sample collection and handling to physiological factors e.g. lipaemia, heparin treatment, binding protein abnormalities, autoimmunity and drug treatments. The range of interfering factors is extensive and difficult to discuss effectively in a short review

  19. Superconducting current generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genevey, P.

    1970-01-01

    After a brief summary of the principle of energy storage and liberation with superconducting coils,two current generators are described that create currents in the range 600 to 1400 A, used for two storage experiments of 25 kJ and 50 kJ respectively. The two current generators are: a) a flux pump and b) a superconducting transformer. Both could be developed into more powerful units. The study shows the advantage of the transformer over the flux pump in order to create large currents. The efficiencies of the two generators are 95 per cent and 40 to 60 per cent respectively. (author) [fr

  20. Materials for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    The ideal material for superconducting cavities should exhibit a high critical temperature, a high critical field, and, above all, a low surface resistance. Unfortunately, these requirements can be conflicting and a compromise has to be found. To date, most superconducting cavities for accelerators are made of niobium. The reasons for this choice are discussed. Thin films of other materials such as NbN, Nb 3 Sn, or even YBCO compounds can also be envisaged and are presently investigated in various laboratories. It is shown that their success will depend critically on the crystalline perfection of these films. (author)