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Sample records for superconducting high gradient

  1. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed

  2. Superconducting niobium cavities with high gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, P.; Saito, K.

    1992-01-01

    Present accelerator projects making use of superconducting cavity technology are constructed with design accelerating gradients E acc ranging between 5 MV/m and 8 MV/m and Q-values of several 10 9 . Future plans for upgrades of existing accelerators or for linear colliders call for gradients greater than 15 MV/m corresponding to peak surface electric fields above 30 MV/m. These demands challenge state-of-the-art production technology and require improvements in processing and handling of these cavities to overcome the major performance limitation of field emission loading. This paper reports on efforts to improve the performance of cavities made from niobium from different suppliers by using improved cleaning techniques after processing and ultrahigh vacuum annealing at temperatures of 1400 C. In single cell L-band cavities peak surface electric fields as high as 50 MV/m have been measured without significant field emission loading. (Author) 8 refs., fig

  3. The quest for high-gradient superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavities excel in applications requiring continuous waves or long pulse voltages. Since power losses in the walls of the cavity increase as the square of the accelerating voltage, copper cavities become uneconomical as demand for high continuous wave voltage grows with particle energy. For these reasons, RF superconductivity has become an important technology for high energy and high luminosity accelerators. The state of art in performance of sheet metal niobium cavities is best represented by the statistics of more than 300 5-cell, 1.5-GHz cavities built for CEBAF. Key aspects responsible for the outstanding performance of the CEBAF cavities set are the anti-multipactor, elliptical cell shape, good fabrication and welding techniques, high thermal conductivity niobium, and clean surface preparation. On average, field emission starts at the electric field of 8.7 MV/m, but there is a large spread, even though the cavities received nominally the same surface treatment and assembly procedures. In some cavities, field emission was detected as low as 3 MV/m. In others, it was found to be as high as 19 MV/m. As we will discuss, the reason for the large spread in the gradients is the large spread in emitter characteristics and the random occurrence of emitters on the surface. One important phenomenon that limits the achievable RF magnetic field is thermal breakdown of superconductivity, originating at sub-millimeter-size regions of high RF loss, called defects. Simulation reveal that if the defect is a normal conducting region of 200 mm radius, it will break down at 5 MV/m. Producing high gradients and high Q in superconducting cavities demands excellent control of material properties and surface cleanliness. The spread in gradients that arises from the random occurrence of defects and emitters must be reduced. It will be important to improve installation procedures to preserve the excellent gradients now obtained in laboratory test in vertical cryostats

  4. Tests of high gradient superconducting quadrupole magnets for the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamm, M.J.; Carson, J.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; McInturff, A.D.; Riddiford, A.; Strait, J.

    1989-09-01

    Tests have been completed on three prototype magnets and two production magnets to be used for the Tevatron Dφ/Bφ low- β insertion. These cold iron, two shell quadrupoles are made of 36 strand Rutherford type NbTi superconducting cable. Magnet field gradients well in excess of the design 1.41 T/cm have been achieved at a transfer function of 0.291 T/cm/kA. Quench performance at 4.2 K and 3.7 K and magnetic multipole measurement data are presented and discussed. 9 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Application and Prospect of Superconducting High Gradient Magnetic Separation in Disposal of Micro-fine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changqiao; Li, Suqin; Guo, Zijie; Kong, Jiawei

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic separation technology is playing an increasingly important role in the field of environmental protection such as waste gas, waste water and solid waste treatment. As a new type of solid waste treatment technology, superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is mainly applied in the separation of micro-fine weakly magnetic particles because of the advantages of high separation efficiency, energy saving, simple equipment and easy automation. In this paper, the basic principle of superconducting HGMS was firstly introduced, then the research status of scholars at home and aboard on the disposal of micro-fine tailings were summarized. Finally, the direction of development for HGMS was put forward.

  6. Design features of a seven-cell high-gradient superconducting cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.; Ledford, J.; Black, S.; Spalek, G.; DiMarco, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    A cavity development program is in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory to evaluate structures that could be used to accelerate pions. The work is being guided by the conceptual design of PILAC, a high-gradient superconducting linac for raising the energy of rapidly decaying intense pion beams generated by Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) to 1 GeV. The specification requires a cavity gradient of 12.5 MV/m at 805 MHz. The design of a seven-cell prototype cavity to achieve these high gradients has been completed by the Accelerator Technology division. The cavity is presently under procurement for high power testing a 2.0 K in 1993

  7. Measurement of time dependent fields in high gradient superconducting quadrupoles for the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamm, M.J.; Coulter, K.; Gourlay, S.; Jaffery, T.S.

    1990-10-01

    Magnetic field measurements have been performed on prototype and production magnets from two high gradient superconducting quadrupoles designs. One design is a double shell quadrupole with 36 strand Rutherford cable. The other design is a single shell quadrupole with 5 individually monolithic strands connected in series. These magnets have similar bore diameters and cable dimensions. However, there are significant differences between the two designs, as well as differences between prototype and production magnets within each design, with regard to Cu to superconductor ratio, filament diameter and filament spacing to strand diameter. The time dependence of fixed currents of the measured magnetic fields is discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  8. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Z. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hao, Z. K. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Liu, K. X. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zhao, H. Y. [OTIC, Ningxia (China); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high-efficiency high-gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  9. Feasibility of turbidity removal by high-gradient superconducting magnetic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hua; Li, Yiran; Xu, Fengyu; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have focused on pollutant removal by magnetic seeding and high-gradient superconducting magnetic separation (HGSMS). However, few works reported the application of HGSMS for treating non-magnetic pollutants by an industrial large-scale system. The feasibility of turbidity removal by a 600 mm bore superconducting magnetic separation system was evaluated in this study. The processing parameters were evaluated by using a 102 mm bore superconducting magnetic separation system that was equipped with the same magnetic separation chamber that was used in the 600 mm bore system. The double-canister system was used to process water pollutants. Analytical grade magnetite was used as a magnetic seed and the turbidity of the simulated raw water was approximately 110 NTU, and the effects of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and magnetic seeds on turbidity removal were evaluated. The use of more PAC and magnetic seeds had few advantages for the HGSMS at doses greater than 8 and 50 mg/l, respectively. A magnetic intensity of 5.0 T was beneficial for HGSMS, and increasing the flow rate through the steel wool matrix decreased the turbidity removal efficiency. In the breakthrough experiments, 90% of the turbidity was removed when 100 column volumes were not reached. The processing capacity of the 600 mm bore industry-scale superconducting magnetic separator for turbidity treatment was approximately 78.0 m(3)/h or 65.5 × 10(4) m(3)/a. The processing cost per ton of water for the 600 mm bore system was 0.1 $/t. Thus, the HGSMS separator could be used in the following special circumstances: (1) when adequate space is not available for traditional water treatment equipment, especially the sedimentation tank, and (2) when decentralized sewage treatment HGSMS systems are easier to transport and install.

  10. Recent development of high gradient superconducting magnetic separator for kaolin in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zian; Wang, Meifen; Ning, Fei Peng; Yang, Huan; Zhang, Guoqing; Hou, Zhi Long; Liu, Zhaong Xiu; Dai, Zhong [Institute of High Energy Physics and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Li, Pei Yong; Zhang, Yiting; Wang, Zhaolian [Weifang Xinli Superconducting Technology Co.,Ltd., Weifang (China)

    2017-03-15

    A series of high gradient superconducting magnetic separator (HGMS) for kaolin has been developed. It is used for processing kaolin to increase the brightness or whiteness whether it is for paper or ceramic applications. The HGMS system mainly consists of a solenoid magnet with a zero boil-off helium cryostat, a double reciprocating canisters system, and a PLC (Process Logic Controller) fully automatic control system based on SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system. We have successfully developed CGC-5.5/300 and CGC-5.0/500 HGMS systems in the recent years, and now three sets of them are on-site operation in different customers. This paper will present recent progress of the HGMS system, the results of some experiments on processing kaolin clay used HGMS, and the on-site operation.

  11. Recent development of high gradient superconducting magnetic separator for kaolin in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zian; Wang, Meifen; Ning, Fei Peng; Yang, Huan; Zhang, Guoqing; Hou, Zhi Long; Liu, Zhaong Xiu; Dai, Zhong; Li, Pei Yong; Zhang, Yiting; Wang, Zhaolian

    2017-01-01

    A series of high gradient superconducting magnetic separator (HGMS) for kaolin has been developed. It is used for processing kaolin to increase the brightness or whiteness whether it is for paper or ceramic applications. The HGMS system mainly consists of a solenoid magnet with a zero boil-off helium cryostat, a double reciprocating canisters system, and a PLC (Process Logic Controller) fully automatic control system based on SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system. We have successfully developed CGC-5.5/300 and CGC-5.0/500 HGMS systems in the recent years, and now three sets of them are on-site operation in different customers. This paper will present recent progress of the HGMS system, the results of some experiments on processing kaolin clay used HGMS, and the on-site operation

  12. A high gradient superconducting quadrupole for a low charge state ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    A superconducting quadrupole magnet has been designed for use as the focusing element in a low charge state linac proposed at Argonne. The expected field gradient is 350 T/m at an operating current of 53 A, and the bore diameter is 3 cm. The use of rare earth material holmium for pole tips provides about 10% more gradient then iron pole tips. The design and the status of construction of a prototype singlet magnet is described

  13. Design of shared instruments to utilize simulated gravities generated by a large-gradient, high-field superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Yin, D C; Liu, Y M; Shi, J Z; Lu, H M; Shi, Z H; Qian, A R; Shang, P

    2011-03-01

    A high-field superconducting magnet can provide both high-magnetic fields and large-field gradients, which can be used as a special environment for research or practical applications in materials processing, life science studies, physical and chemical reactions, etc. To make full use of a superconducting magnet, shared instruments (the operating platform, sample holders, temperature controller, and observation system) must be prepared as prerequisites. This paper introduces the design of a set of sample holders and a temperature controller in detail with an emphasis on validating the performance of the force and temperature sensors in the high-magnetic field.

  14. A high gradient test of a single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a feedback waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, Roman; Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Kazakov, Sergey; Wu, Genfa; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Rowe, Allan; Rathke, John

    2015-09-01

    The most severe problem of the international linear collider (ILC-type) is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the collider. In current technology, the maximum acceleration gradient in superconducting (SC) structures is determined mainly by the value of the surface RF magnetic field. In order to increase the gradient, a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure is suggested. Utilization of STWA structure with small phase advance per cell for future high energy linear colliders such as ILCs may provide an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 times larger [1] than a standing wave structure. However, STWA structure requires a feedback waveguide for power redirecting from the end of the structure back to the front end of accelerating structure. Recent tests of a 1.3 GHz model of a single-cell cavity with waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient of a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer [2]. In the present paper, high gradient test results are presented.

  15. Recent developments in the application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1991-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high- brightness ion beams. Since the last workshop, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm 2 ) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam impingement and cumulative beam breakup have also yielded encouraging results. Consequently, a section of superconducting resonators and focusing elements has been designed for tests with high-current deuteron beams. In addition, considerable data pertaining to the rf properties of high-T c superconductors has been collected at rf-field amplitudes and frequencies of interest in connection with accelerator operation. This paper summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will build upon it

  16. Adsorption combined with superconducting high gradient magnetic separation technique used for removal of arsenic and antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zenglu; Joshi, Tista Prasai; Liu, Ruiping; Li, Yiran; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2018-02-05

    Manganese iron oxide (MnFe 2 O 4 ), an excellent arsenic(As)/antimony(Sb) removal adsorbent, is greatly restricted for the solid-liquid separation. Through the application of superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) technique, we herein constructed a facility for the in situ solid-liquid separation of micro-sized MnFe 2 O 4 adsorbent in As/Sb removal process. To the relative low initial concentration 50.0μgL -1 , MnFe 2 O 4 material sorbent can still decrease As or Sb below US EPA's drinking water standard limit. The separation of MnFe 2 O 4 was mainly relied on the flow rate and the amount of steel wools in the HGMS system. At a flow rate 1Lmin -1 and 5% steel wools filling rate, the removal efficacies of As and Sb in natural water with the system were achieved to be 94.6% and 76.8%, respectively. At the meantime, nearly 100% micro-sized MnFe 2 O 4 solid in the continuous field was readily to be separated via HGMS system. In a combination with the experiment results and finite element simulation, the separation was seemed to be independent on the magnetic field intensity, and the maximum separation capacities in various conditions were well predicted using the Thomas model (R 2 =0.87-0.99). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of high gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities for international linear collider and energy recovery linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji; Furuta, Fumio; Saeki, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities were used for storage rings like TRISTAN at KEK, HERA at DESY and LEP-II at CERN in 1990-2000. This technology has been accepted as a common accelerator technology. In August 2004, ITPR recommended an electron/positron linear collider based on SRF technology for the future high energy physics. ICFA accepted the recommendation and named it ILC (International Linear Collider). SRF cavities have a very unique feature due to its very small surface resistance. Energy recovery is another very exciting application. Many laboratories are proposing ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) as a next bright photon source. In these accelerators, production of SRF cavities with reliably high performance is the most important issue. In this paper the activities of ILC high gradient cavities will be introduced. ERL activity will be briefly presented. (author)

  18. Development of High Gradient Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities for International Linear Collider and Energy Recovery Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kenji; Furuta, Fumio; Saeki, Takayuki

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities were used for storage rings like TRISTAN at KEK, HERA at DESY and LEP-II at CERN in 1990-2000. This technology has been accepted as a common accelerator technology. In August 2004, ITPR recommended an electron/positron linear collider based on SRF technology for the future high energy physics. ICFA accepted the recommendation and named it ILC (International Linear Collider). SRF cavities have a very unique feature due to its very small surface resistance. Energy recovery is another very exciting application. Many laboratories are proposing ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) as a next bright photon source. In these accelerators, production of SRF cavities with reliably high performance is the most important issue. In this paper the activities of ILC high gradient cavities will be introduced. ERL activity will be briefly presented.

  19. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, G.; Geng, R.; Lushtak, Y.; Manini, P.; Maccallini, E.; Stutzman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. The results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.

  20. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, G., E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Geng, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Lushtak, Y.; Manini, P.; Maccallini, E. [SAES Getters, S.p.A, Viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, MI (Italy); Stutzman, M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2017-01-11

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. The results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.

  1. High-gradient near-quench-limit operation of superconducting Tesla-type cavities in scope of the International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Omet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful demonstration of an ILC-like high-gradient near-quench-limit operation at the Superconducting RF Test Facility at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK in Japan. Preparation procedures necessary for the accelerator operation were conducted, such as rf phase calibration, beam-based gradient calibration, and automated beam compensation. Test runs were performed successfully for nominal operation, high-loaded Q (Q_{L} operation, and automated P_{k}Q_{L} operation. The results are described in terms of the achieved precision and stabilities of gradients and phases.

  2. A high gradient quadrupole magnet for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.; Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Mirk, K.; Peters, C.; Wandesforde, A.

    1987-03-01

    A quadrupole magnet for the SSC has been designed with a gradient of 234 T/m at 6500 A. Coil ID is 40 mm. The two-layer windings have 9 inner turns and 13 outer turns per pole with a wedge-shaped spacer in each layer. The 30-strand cable is identical to that used in the outer layer of the SSC dipole magnet. Interlocking aluminum alloy collars are compressed around the coils using a four-way press and are locked with four keys. The collared coil is supported and centered in a cold split iron yoke. A one-meter model was constructed and tested. Design details including quench behavior are presented

  3. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1987-07-01

    After a short account of the history of experimental studies on superconductivity, the microscopic theory of superconductivity, the calculation of the control temperature and its possible maximum value are presented. An explanation of the mechanism of superconductivity in recently discovered superconducting metal oxide ceramics and the perspectives for the realization of new high-temperature superconducting materials are discussed. 56 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Magnetophoretic velocimetry of manganese(II) in a single microdroplet in a flow system under a high gradient magnetic field generated with a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masayori; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2002-10-01

    An experimental system for magnetophoretic velocimetry, which could determine the volume magnetic susceptibility of a single particle dispersed in a liquid phase from a magnetophoretic velocity, has been developed. A micrometer-sized high-gradient magnetic field could be generated in a capillary by a pair of iron pole pieces in a superconducting magnet (10 T). The magnetophoretic behavior of a single particle in a capillary flow system was investigated under the inhomogeneous magnetic field. From the magnetophoretic velocity of a polystyrene latex particle dispersed in a MnCl2 aqueous solution, the product of the magnetic flux density and the gradient, B(dB/dx), was determined as a function of the position along the capillary. The maximum value of B(dB/dx) was 4.7 x 10(4) T2 m(-1), which was approximately 100 times higher than that obtained by two Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets (0.4 T). Organic droplets extracting manganese(II) with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide from MnCl2 solution were used as test samples. The difference of the volume magnetic susceptibility between the droplet and the medium could be determined from the magnetophoretic velocity. This method allowed us to continuously measure a volume magnetic susceptibility of 10-6 level for a picoliter droplet and to determine manganese(II) in the single droplet at the attomole level.

  5. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on superconductivity the absence of electrical resistance has always fascinated the mind of researchers with a promise of applications unachievable by conventional technologies. Since its discovery superconductivity has been posing many questions and challenges to solid state physics, quantum mechanics, chemistry and material science. Simulations arrived to superconductivity from particle physics, astrophysic, electronics, electrical engineering and so on. In seventy-five years the original promises of superconductivity were going to become reality: a microscopical theory gave to superconductivity the cloth of the science and the level of technological advances was getting higher and higher. High field superconducting magnets became commercially available, superconducting electronic devices were invented, high field accelerating gradients were obtained in superconductive cavities and superconducting particle detectors were under study. Other improvements came in a quiet progression when a tornado brought a revolution in the field: new materials had been discovered and superconductivity, from being a phenomenon relegated to the liquid Helium temperatures, became achievable over the liquid Nitrogen temperature. All the physics and the technological implications under superconductivity have to be considered ab initio

  6. High temperature interface superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T_c superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T_c Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  7. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This book discusses development in oxide materials with high superconducting transition temperature. Systems with Tc well above liquid nitrogen temperature are already a reality and higher Tc's are anticipated. The author discusses how the idea of a room-temperature superconductor appears to be a distinctly possible outcome of materials research

  8. Enhancement of the Accelerating Gradient in Superconducting Microwave Resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Martinello, Martina [IIT, Chicago; Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Zasadzinski, John [IIT, Chicago (main)

    2017-05-01

    The accelerating gradient of superconducting resonators can be enhanced by engineering the thickness of a dirty layer grown at the cavity's rf surface. In this paper the description of the physics behind the accelerating gradient enhancement by meaning of the dirty layer is carried out by solving numerically the the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equations for the layered system. The calculation shows that the presence of the dirty layer stabilizes the Meissner state up to the lower critical field of the bulk, increasing the maximum accelerating gradient.

  9. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  10. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temkin, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  11. Charge imbalance induced by a temperature gradient in superconducting aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamin, H.J.; Clarke, J.; Van Harlingen, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The quasiparticle transport current induced in a superconducting aluminum film by a temperature gradient has been measured by means of the spatially decaying charge imbalance generated near the end of the sample where the current is divergent. The magnitude and decay length of the charge imbalance are in good agreement with the predictions of a simple model that takes into account the nonuniformity of the temperature gradient. The inferred value of the thermopower in the superconducting state agrees reasonably well with the value measured in the normal state. Measurements of the decay length of charge imbalance induced by current injection yield a value of the inelastic relaxation time tau/sub E/ of about 2 ns. This value is substantially smaller than that obtained from other measurements for reasons that are not known

  12. Superconductivity at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, N B; Ginzburg, N I

    1969-07-01

    Work published during the last 3 or 4 yrs concerning the effect of pressure on superconductivity is reviewed. Superconducting modifications of Si, Ge, Sb, Te, Se, P and Ce. Change of Fermi surface under pressure for nontransition metals. First experiments on the influence of pressure on the tunneling effect in superconductors provide new information on the nature of the change in phonon and electron energy spectra of metals under hydrostatic compression. 78 references.

  13. Modern high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching Wu Chu

    1988-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, its unusual scientific challenge and great technological potential have been recognized. For the past three-quarters of a century, superconductivity has done well on the science front. This is because sueprconductivity is interesting not only just in its own right but also in its ability to act as a probe to many exciting nonsuperconducting phenomena. For instance, it has continued to provide bases for vigorous activities in condensed matter science. Among the more recent examples are heavy-fermion systems and organic superconductors. During this same period of time, superconductivity has also performed admirably in the applied area. Many ideas have been conceived and tested, making use of the unique characteristics of superconductivity - zero resistivity, quantum interference phenomena, and the Meissner effect. In fact, it was not until late January 1987 that it became possible to achieve superconductivity with the mere use of liquid nitrogen - which is plentiful, cheap, efficient, and easy to handle - following the discovery of supercondictivity above 90 K in Y-Ba-Cu-O, the first genuine quaternary superconductor. Superconductivity above 90 K poses scientific and technological challenges not previously encountered: no existing theories can adequately describe superconductivity above 40 K and no known techniques can economically process the materials for full-scale applications. In this paper, therefore, the author recalls a few events leading to the discovery of the new class of quaternary compounds with a superconducting transition temperature T c in the 90 K range, describes the current experimental status of high-temperature superconductivity and, finally, discusses the prospect of very-high-temperature superconductivity, i.e., with a T c substantially higher than 100 K. 97 refs., 7 figs

  14. Electromagnetic design, implementation and test of a superconducting undulator with a transverse gradient field amplitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso Rodriguez, Veronica

    2015-11-25

    This thesis describes the development of a novel superconducting transversal gradient undulator (TGU) designed to form a compact, highly brilliant laser-wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven radiation source. A TGU in combination with a dispersive beam transport line can be employed to produce undulator radiation with natural bandwidth despite the large energy spread of the LWFA. This thesis documents the construction, first tests and characterization of the full-scale TGU.

  15. Ultimate Gradient Limitation in Niobium Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The present study is addressed to the theoretical description of the ultimate gradient limitation in SRF cavities. Our intent is to exploit experimental data to confirm models which provide feed-backs on how to improve the current state-of-art. New theoretical insight on the cavities limiting factor can be suitable to improve the quench field of N-doped cavities, and therefore to take advantage of high Q0 at high gradients.

  16. Theory of high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper develops a semi-empirical electronic band structure for a high T c superconductor like YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6 - δ . The author accounts for the electrical transport properties on the model based on the correlated electron transfer arising from the electron-phonon interaction. The momentum pairing leading to the superconducting phase amongst the mobile charge carriers is shown

  17. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  18. Some theories of high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a brief review is given of some historical aspects of theoretical research on superconductivity including a discussion of BCS theory and some theoretical proposals for mechanisms which can cause superconductivity at high temperatures

  19. High-Tc superconducting electric motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiferl, R.; Stein, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the advantages and limitations of using superconductors in motors are discussed. A synchronous motor with a high temperature superconducting field winding for pump and fan drive applications is described and some of its unique design features are identified. A 10,000 horsepower superconducting motor design is presented. The critical field and current density requirements for high temperature superconducting wire in motors is discussed. Finally, recent progress in superconducting wire performance is presented

  20. Design considerations for high-current superconducting ion linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as fusion materials irradiation testing, spallation neutron source, transmutation of radioactive waste, tritium production, and energy production. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. Superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs, respectively. However, cost-effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement. Key aspects of high-current cw superconducting linac designs are explored in this context

  1. Superconductivity from magnetic elements under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsuya; Amaya, Kiichi; Suzuki, Naoshi; Onuki, Yoshichika

    2006-01-01

    Can we expect the appearance of superconductivity from magnetic elements? In general, superconductivity occurs in nonmagnetic metal at low temperature and magnetic impurities destroy superconductivity; magnetism and superconductivity are as incompatible as oil and water. Here, we present our experimental example of superconducting elements, iron and oxygen. They are magnetic at ambient pressure, however, they become nonmagnetic under high pressure, then superconductor at low temperature. What is the driving force of the superconductivity? Our understanding in the early stages was a simple scenario that the superconductive state was obtained as a consequence of an emergence of the nonmagnetic states. In both cases, we may consider another scenario for the appearance of superconductivity; the magnetic fluctuation mechanism in the same way as unconventional superconductors

  2. Development of high purity niobium material for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Koichi; Sakita, Kohei; Suzuki, Takafusa; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    For the superconducting niobium cavities, issues of thermal quench and field emission have to be solved to achieve a high field gradient (>25MV/m) for TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator). In order to overcome the quench, upgrading of thermal conductivity of niobium material at the low temperature is very important. On the reduction of the field emission not only dust particles but also defect, impurity and inhomogeneity should be considered. Therefore development of high purity niobium material is very important to solve these issues. This paper describes the our latest R and D for high purity niobium material. (author)

  3. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onnes, H.K.

    1988-01-01

    The author traces the development of superconductivity from 1911 to 1986. Some of the areas he explores are the Meissner Effect, theoretical developments, experimental developments, engineering achievements, research in superconducting magnets, and research in superconducting electronics. The article also mentions applications shown to be technically feasible, but not yet commercialized. High-temperature superconductivity may provide enough leverage to bring these applications to the marketplace

  4. High current and high power superconducting rectifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kate, H.H.J. ten; Bunk, P.B.; Klundert, L.J.M. van de; Britton, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Results on three experimental superconducting rectifiers are reported. Two of them are 1 kA low frequency flux pumps, one thermally and magnetically switched. The third is a low-current high-frequency magnetically switched rectifier which can use the mains directly. (author)

  5. CERN/KEK: Very high accelerating gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-01-15

    Full text: A world-wide effort is under way to develop linear electron-positron colliders so that physics experiments can be extended into a range of energies where circular machines (necessarily much larger than CERN's 27-kilometre LEP machine) would be crippled by synchrotron radiation. CERN is studying the feasibility of building a 2 TeV machine called CLIC powered not by individual klystrons, but by a high intensity electron 'drive' linac running parallel to the main linac (November 1990, page 7). This drive linac will itself be powered by similar superconducting cavities to those developed for LEP. A high gradient is an obvious design aim for any future high energy linear collider because it makes it shorter and therefore cheaper - the design figure for the CLIC machine is 80 MV/m. The CLIC study group has taken a significant step forward in demonstrating the technical feasibility of their machine by achieving peak and average accelerating gradients of 137 MV/m and 84 MV/m respectively in a short section of accelerating structure during high gradient tests at the Japanese KEK Laboratory last year. This result obtained within the framework of a CERN/KEK collaboration on linear colliders was obtained using a 20-cell accelerating section built at CERN using state-of the- art technology which served both as a model for CLIC studies as well as a prototype for the Japanese Linear Collider studies. The operating frequency of the model accelerating section is 2.6 times lower than the CLIC frequency but was chosen because a high power r.f. source and pulse compression scheme has been developed for this frequency at KEK. Testing CLIC models at 11.4 GHz is however more stringent than at 30 GHz because the chance of electrical breakdown increases as the frequency is lowered. This recent result clearly demonstrates that a gradient of 80 MV/m is feasible.

  6. CERN/KEK: Very high accelerating gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: A world-wide effort is under way to develop linear electron-positron colliders so that physics experiments can be extended into a range of energies where circular machines (necessarily much larger than CERN's 27-kilometre LEP machine) would be crippled by synchrotron radiation. CERN is studying the feasibility of building a 2 TeV machine called CLIC powered not by individual klystrons, but by a high intensity electron 'drive' linac running parallel to the main linac (November 1990, page 7). This drive linac will itself be powered by similar superconducting cavities to those developed for LEP. A high gradient is an obvious design aim for any future high energy linear collider because it makes it shorter and therefore cheaper - the design figure for the CLIC machine is 80 MV/m. The CLIC study group has taken a significant step forward in demonstrating the technical feasibility of their machine by achieving peak and average accelerating gradients of 137 MV/m and 84 MV/m respectively in a short section of accelerating structure during high gradient tests at the Japanese KEK Laboratory last year. This result obtained within the framework of a CERN/KEK collaboration on linear colliders was obtained using a 20-cell accelerating section built at CERN using state-of the- art technology which served both as a model for CLIC studies as well as a prototype for the Japanese Linear Collider studies. The operating frequency of the model accelerating section is 2.6 times lower than the CLIC frequency but was chosen because a high power r.f. source and pulse compression scheme has been developed for this frequency at KEK. Testing CLIC models at 11.4 GHz is however more stringent than at 30 GHz because the chance of electrical breakdown increases as the frequency is lowered. This recent result clearly demonstrates that a gradient of 80 MV/m is feasible

  7. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Mortensen, K.

    1988-12-01

    This report contains lecture notes of the basic lectures presented at the 1st Topsoee Summer School on Superconductivity held at Risoe National Laboratory, June 20-24, 1988. The following lecture notes are included: L.M. Falicov: 'Superconductivity: Phenomenology', A. Bohr and O. Ulfbeck: 'Quantal structure of superconductivity. Gauge angle', G. Aeppli: 'Muons, neutrons and superconductivity', N.F. Pedersen: 'The Josephson junction', C. Michel: 'Physicochemistry of high-T c superconductors', C. Laverick and J.K. Hulm: 'Manufacturing and application of superconducting wires', J. Clarke: 'SQUID concepts and systems'. (orig.) With 10 tabs., 128 figs., 219 refs

  8. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  9. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the worlds first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  10. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-01-01

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications

  11. Gauge Model of High-Tc Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Sze Kui

    2012-01-01

    A simple gauge model of superconductivity is presented. The seagull vertex term of this gauge model gives an attractive potential between electrons for the forming of Cooper pairs of superconductivity. This gauge model gives a unified description of superconductivity and magnetism including antiferromagnetism, pseudogap phenomenon, stripes phenomenon, paramagnetic Meissner effect, Type I and Type II supeconductivity and high-T c superconductivity. The doping mechanism of superconductivity is found. It is shown that the critical temperature T c is related to the ionization energies of elements and can be computed by a formula of T c . For the high-T c superconductors such as La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 , Y Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 , and MgB 2 , the computational results of T c agree with the experimental results.

  12. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakani, S.L.; Kakani, Shubhra

    2007-01-01

    The monograph provides readable introduction to the basics of superconductivity for beginners and experimentalists. For theorists, the monograph provides nice and brief description of the broad spectrum of experimental properties, theoretical concepts with all details, which theorists should learn, and provides a sound basis for students interested in studying superconducting theory at the microscopic level. Special chapter on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates is devoted

  13. Superconducting magnets in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodell, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    The applications of superconducting magnets in high energy physics in the last ten years have made feasible developments which are vital to high energy research. These developments include high magnetic field, large volume detectors, such as bubble chambers, required for effective resolution of high energy particle trajectories, particle beam transport magnets, and superconducting focusing and bending magnets for the very high energy accelerators and storage rings needed to pursue the study of interactions between elementary particles. The acceptance of superconductivity as a proven technology in high energy physics was reinforced by the recognition that the existing large accelerators using copper-iron magnets had reached practical limits in terms of magnetic field intensity, cost, space, and energy usage, and that large-volume, high-field, copper-iron magnets were not economically feasible. Some of the superconducting magnets and associated systems being used in and being developed for high energy physics are described

  14. Superconductivity in high energy particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmueser, P.

    2002-08-01

    The basics of superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the features which are relevant for the application in magnets and radio frequency cavities for high energy particle accelerators. The special properties of superconducting accelerator magnets are described in detail: design principles, magnetic field calculations, magnetic forces, quench performance, persistent magnetization currents and eddy currents. The design principles and basic properties of superconducting cavities are explained as well as the observed performance limitations and the countermeasures. The ongoing research efforts towards maximum accelerating fields are addressed and the coupling of radio frequency power to the particle beam is treated. (orig.)

  15. High gradient RF breakdown study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Scheitrum, G.; Hanna, S.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.

    1998-01-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and UC Davis have been investigating high gradient RF breakdown and its effects on pulse shortening in high energy microwave devices. RF breakdown is a critical issue in the development of high power microwave sources and next generation linear accelerators since it limits the output power of microwave sources and the accelerating gradient of linacs. The motivation of this research is to find methods to increase the breakdown threshold level in X-band structures by reducing dark current. Emphasis is focused on improved materials, surface finish, and cleanliness. The test platform for this research is a traveling wave resonant ring. A 30 MW klystron is employed to provide up to 300 MW of traveling wave power in the ring to trigger breakdown in the cavity. Five TM 01 cavities have previously been tested, each with a different combination of surface polish and/or coating. The onset of breakdown was extended up to 250 MV/m with a TiN surface finish, as compared to 210 MV/m for uncoated OFE copper. Although the TiN coating was helpful in depressing the field emission, the lowest dark current was obtained with a 1 microinch surface finish, single-point diamond-turned cavity

  16. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruana, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Despite reports of new, high-temperature superconductive materials almost every day, participants at the First Congress on Superconductivity do not anticipate commercial applications with these materials soon. What many do envision is the discovery of superconducting materials that can function at much warmer, perhaps even room temperatures. Others hope superconductivity will usher in a new age of technology as semiconductors and transistors did. This article reviews what the speakers had to say at the four-day congress held in Houston last February. Several speakers voiced concern that the Reagan administration's apparent lack of interest in funding superconductivity research while other countries, notably Japan, continue to pour money into research and development could hamper America's international competitiveness

  17. Development of high field superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Fujio; Takeo, Masakatsu.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, in connection with nuclear fusion research, the development of high field superconducting magnets showed rapid progress. The development of high field magnets of 15 T class by the techniques of winding after heat treatment has been continued in various places, as these techniques are suitable to make large magnets. In 1985, Kyushu University attained the record of 15.5 T. However in high field magnets, there are many problems peculiar to them, and the basic research related to those is demanded. In this report, these general problems, the experience of the design and manufacture in Kyushu University and the related problems are described. The superconducting magnet installed in the Superconducting Magnet Research Center of Kyushu University attained the record of 15.5 T for the first time in March, 1985. In superconducting magnets, very difficult problem must be solved since superconductivity, heat and mechanical force are inter related. The problems of the wire materials for high field, the scale of high field magnets, the condition limiting mean current density, and the development of high field magnets in Kyushu University are described. (Kako, I.)

  18. Superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation for the pretreatment of radioactive or mixed waste vitrification feeds. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Ritter, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    'Vitrification has been selected as a final waste form technology in the US for long-term storage of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). However, a foreseeable problem during vitrification in some waste feed streams lies in the presence of elements (e.g., transition metals) in the HLW that may cause instabilities in the final glass product. The formation of spinel compounds, such as Fe 3 O 4 and FeCrO 4 , results in glass phase separation and reduces vitrifier lifetime, and durability of the final waste form. A superconducting open gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) system maybe suitable for the removal of the deleterious transition elements (e.g. Fe, Co, and Ni) and other elements (lanthanides) from vitrification feed streams due to their ferromagnetic or paramagnetic nature. The OGMS systems are designed to deflect and collect paramagnetic minerals as they interact with a magnetic field gradient. This system has the potential to reduce the volume of HLW for vitrification and ensure a stable product. In order to design efficient OGMS and High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) processes, a fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the waste feed streams is required. Using HLW simulant and radioactive fly ash and sludge samples from the Savannah River Technology Center, Rocky Flats site, and the Hanford reservation, several techniques were used to characterize and predict the separation capability for a superconducting OGMS system.'

  19. High-current applications of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, P.

    1995-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: superconducting materials, design principles of superconducting magnets, magnets for research and engineering, superconductivity for power engineering, superconductivity in nuclear fusion technology, economical considerations

  20. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V. [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  1. Use of high-temperature superconducting films in superconducting bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cansiz, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) films deposited on substrates that are placed above bulk HTSs in an attempt to reduce rotational drag in superconducting bearings composed of a permanent magnet levitated above the film/bulk HTS combination. According to the critical state model, hysteresis energy loss is inversely proportional to critical current density, J c , and because HTS films typically have much higher J c than that of bulk HTS, the film/bulk combination was expected to reduce rotational losses by at least one order of magnitude in the coefficient of fiction, which in turn is a measure of the hysteresis losses. We measured rotational losses of a superconducting bearing in a vacuum chamber and compared the losses with and without a film present. The experimental results showed that contrary to expectation, the rotational losses are increased by the film. These results are discussed in terms of flux drag through the film, as well as of the critical state model

  2. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  3. High voltage superconducting switch for power application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mawardi, O.; Ferendeci, A.; Gattozzi, A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a novel interrupter which meets the requirements of a high voltage direct current (HVDC) power switch and at the same time doubles as a current limiter. The basic concept of the interrupter makes use of a fast superconducting, high capacity (SHIC) switch that carries the full load current while in the superconducting state and reverts to the normal resistive state when triggered. Typical design parameters are examined for the case of a HVDC transmission line handling 2.5KA at 150KVDC. The result is a power switch with superior performance and smaller size than the ones reported to date

  4. Superconducting magnets in nuclear and high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamelin, J.; Parain, J.; Perot, J.; Lesmond, C.

    1976-01-01

    A few examples of superconducting magnets developped at Saclay for high energy physics are presented. The OGA doublet is a large acceptance optical system consisting of two quadrupoles with maximum field gradients of 35 and 23 teslas per meter giving an increase of the beam acceptance by a factor 4. The ALEC dipole is a synchrotron magnet with a length of 1.5 meter and a field of 5 teslas, operating in pulse made at a frequency of 0.1 Hertz and entirely constructed in industry. The ECO project is a demonstration of electrical energy saving by means of superconductors. It consists in the replacement of conventional copper of a classical beam transport magnet by superconducting windings. The use of superconductors for polarized target magnets allows a large variety of configurations to be obtained in order to satisfy the acceptance and space requirements to the detectors around the targets [fr

  5. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishi Wan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equations of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.

  6. Superconductivity of high Tc Scientific revolution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquina, J.E.; Ridaura, R.; Gomez, R.; Marquina, V.; Alvarez, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    A short history of superconductivity, since its discovery by Bednorz and Muller to the development of new materials with high transition temperatures, is presented. Further evolvements are analyzed in terms of T.s. Kuhn conceptions expressed in his book. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. (Author) 4 refs

  7. The discovery of high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, K. A.; Bednorz, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    This article recalls the different stages which led to the display of high temperature superconductivity for Ba, La, Cu, O and the following avalanche of discoveries for other oxides; the numerous theoretical models which tentatively explain the current experimental results are also reviewed. 30 refs

  8. The discovery of high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, K.A.; Bednorz, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    This article recalls the different stages which led to the display of high temperature superconductivity for Ba La Cu O, and the following avalanche of discoveries for other oxides; the numerous theoretical models which tentatively explain the current experimental results are also reviewed [fr

  9. Mechanisms of conventional and high Tc superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresin, V.L.; Morawitz, H.; Wolf, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    This book gives a careful and objective review of theories of superconductivity in traditional superconductors, organics, and high Tc cuprates. Of course, the authors do still present their own theories of cuprate superconductivity, but only in the final chapter after other possibilities have been discussed. The book should be especially useful for researchers entering the field of high Tc superconductivity. The reviews of photon mediated pairing and strong coupling theory are very welcome, since much of this material has not been reviewed since the classic 1969 volume edited by Parks. In particular the authors dispel the various myths that phonon mediated pairing leads to upper bounds on Tc. In addition to phonon mediated pairing the book discussed in detail pairing due to exchange of acoustic (demon) plasmons, excitons, or magnetic fluctuations. There have been so many diverse mechanisms based on strong correlation and large U Hubbard models that a book like this can only discuss a limited selection of the main contenders. In particular here the emphasis on Fermi liquid based models no doubt reflects the authors' own point of view. A whole chapter discusses the concepts of induced superconductivity, in the proximity effect, and its application to materials with several different electronic subsystems

  10. Unprecedented quality factors at accelerating gradients up to 45 MVm-1 in niobium superconducting resonators via low temperature nitrogen infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Checchin, M.; Martinello, M.; Melnychuk, O. S.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Crawford, A. C.; Aderhold, S.; Bice, D.

    2017-09-01

    We report the finding of new surface treatments that permits one to manipulate the niobium resonator nitrogen content in the first few nanometers in a controlled way, and the resonator fundamental Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance and residual resistance accordingly. In particular, we find surface ‘infusion’ conditions that systematically (a) increase the quality factor of these 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) bulk niobium resonators, up to very high gradients; (b) increase the achievable accelerating gradient of the cavity compared to its own baseline with state-of-the-art surface processing. Cavities subject to the new surface process have more than two times the state-of-the-art Q at 2 K for accelerating fields >35 MVm-1. Moreover, very high accelerating gradients ˜45 MVm-1 are repeatedly reached, which correspond to peak magnetic surface fields of 190 mT, among the highest measured for bulk niobium cavities. These findings open the opportunity to tailor the surface impurity content distribution to maximize performance in Q and gradients, and have therefore very important implications on future performance and cost of SRF based accelerators. They also help deepen the understanding of the physics of the RF niobium cavity surface.

  11. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  12. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  13. High transition temperature superconducting integrated circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiIorio, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and fabrication of the first superconducting integrated circuit capable of operating at over 10K. The primary component of the circuit is a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) which is extremely sensitive to magnetic fields. The dc SQUID consists of two superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson microbridges that are fabricated using a novel step-edge process which permits the use of high transition temperature superconductors. By utilizing electron-beam lithography in conjunction with ion-beam etching, very small microbridges can be produced. Such microbridges lead to high performance dc SQUIDs with products of the critical current and normal resistance reaching 1 mV at 4.2 K. These SQUIDs have been extensively characterized, and exhibit excellent electrical characteristics over a wide temperature range. In order to couple electrical signals into the SQUID in a practical fashion, a planar input coil was integrated for efficient coupling. A process was developed to incorporate the technologically important high transition temperature superconducting materials, Nb-Sn and Nb-Ge, using integrated circuit techniques. The primary obstacles were presented by the metallurgical idiosyncrasies of the various materials, such as the need to deposit the superconductors at elevated temperatures, 800-900 0 C, in order to achieve a high transition temperature

  14. High {Tc} superconductivity: Symmetries and reflections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.C.

    1999-01-01

    This is a talk given at the Symposium Symmetries and Reflections, dedicated to Prof. C.N. Yang's retirement. In this talk, the author reflects on his personal interaction with Prof. Yang since his graduate career at SUNY Stony Brook, and his profound impact on his understanding of theoretical physics. He also reviews the SO(5) theory of high T c superconductivity and shows how his collaboration with Prof. Yang in 1990 lead to the foundation of this idea

  15. High Accelerating Field Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, R. S.; Saito, K.; Furuta, F.; Saeki, T.; Inoue, H.; Morozumi, Y.; Higo, T.; Higashi, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Kazakov, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Ueno, K.; Sato, M.

    2008-06-01

    We have conducted a study of a series of single cell superconducting RF cavities at KEK. These tests were designed to investigate the effect of surface treatment on the maximum accelerating field attainable. All of these cavities are of the ICHIRO shape, based on the Low Loss shape. Our results indicate that accelerating fields as high as the theoretical maximum of 50MV/m are attainable.

  16. High gradient magnetic separation applied to environmental remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.; Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; Schake, A.; de Aguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Tolt, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is an application of superconducting magnet technology to the separation of magnetic solids from other solids, liquids, or gases. The production of both high magnetic fields (>4 T) and large field gradients using superconducting magnet technology has made it possible to separate a previously unreachable but large family of paramagnetic materials. This is a powerful technique that can be used to separate widely dispersed contaminants from a host material and may be the only technique available for separating material in the colloidal state. Because it is a physical separation process, no additional waste is generated. We are applying this technology to the treatment of radioactive wastes for environmental remediation. We have conducted tests examining slurries containing nonradioactive, magnetic surrogates. Results from these studies were used to verify our analytical model of the separation process. The model describes the rate process for magnetic separation and is based on a force balance on the paramagnetic species. This model was used to support bench scale experiments and prototype separator design

  17. Research briefing on high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    The research briefing was prepared in response to the exciting developments in superconductivity in ceramic oxide materials announced earlier in 1987. The panel's specific charge was to examine not only the scientific opportunities in high-temperature superconductivity but also the barriers to commercial exploitation. While the base of experimental knowledge on the superconductors is growing rapidly, there is as yet no generally accepted theoretical explanation of their behavior. The fabrication and processing challenges presented by the materials suggest that the period or precommercial exploration for applications will probably extend for a decade or more. Near term prospects for applications include magnetic shielding, the voltage standard, superconducting quantum interference devices, infrared sensors, microwave devices, and analog signal processing. The panel also identified a number of longer-term prospects in high-field and large-scale applications, and in electronics. The United States' competitive position in the field is discussed, major scientific and technological objectives for research and development identified, and concludes with a series of recommendations.

  18. Magnetic levitation systems using a high-Tc superconducting bulk magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsaki, Hiroyuki [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kitahara, Hirotaka [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Masada, Eisuke [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Recent development of high-performance high-Tc bulk superconductors is making their application for electromagnetic force use feasible. We have studied electromagnetic levitation systems using high-Tc bulk superconducting material. In this paper, after an overview of superconducting magnetic levitation systems, with an emphasis on high-Tc bulk superconductor applications, experimental results of a high-Tc bulk EMS levitation and FEM analysis results of magnetic gradient levitation using bulk superconductor are described. Problems to be solved for their application are also discussed. (orig.)

  19. Aspects of high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutscher, G.

    1989-01-01

    We present some remarks on special features that distinguish the phenomenology of the new high T c oxides from that of the conventional superconductors. They include a measurable width of the critical region and a high sensitivity to crystallographic defects. A consistent Landau Ginsburg interpretation is possible, with a short coherence length <15 A and a penetration depth <900 A. The latter is somewhat smaller than the currently accepted value, and implies a broad band scheme

  20. Coreless Concept for High Gradient Induction Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    An induction linac cell for a high gradient is discussed. The proposed solid state coreless approach for the induction linac topology (SLIM(reg s ign)) is based on nanosecond mode operation. This mode may have an acceleration gradient comparable with gradients of rf- accelerator structures. The discussed induction system has the high electric efficiency. The key elements are a solid state semiconductor switch and a high electric density dielectric with a thin section length. The energy in the induction system is storied in the magnetic field. The nanosecond current break-up produces the high voltage. The induced voltage is used for acceleration. This manner of an operation allows the use of low voltage elements in the booster part and achieves a high accelerating gradient. The proposed topology was tested in POP (proof of principle) experiments

  1. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.W.B.; Noakes, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    This book is an elementray introduction into superconductivity. The topics are the superconducting state, the magnetic properties of superconductors, type I superconductors, type II superconductors and a chapter on the superconductivity theory. (WL)

  2. Gradient High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a gradient high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the simultaneous determination of phenylephrine (PHE) and ibuprofen (IBU) in solid ..... nimesulide, phenylephrine. Hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate and caffeine anhydrous in pharmaceutical dosage form. Acta Pol.

  3. Superconducting high frequency high power resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbis, C.; Vardiman, R.; Weinman, L.

    1974-01-01

    A niobium superconducting quarter-wave helical resonator has been designed and built. The resonator has been electron-beam welded and electropolished to produce a smooth flaw-free surface. This has been followed by an anodization to produce a 1000 A layer of Nb 2 0 5 . At the resonant frequency of approximately 15 MHz the unloaded Q was approximately equal to 4.6x10 6 with minimal dielectric support. With the resonator open to the helium bath to provide cooling, and rigidly supported by a teflon cylinder, 350 V of power were transferred at a doubly loaded Q of 3500. The extrapolation of the results to a Qsub(DL) of 1000 meet the power handling criteria of one kilowatt for the intended application. (author)

  4. Superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation for the pretreatment of radioactive or mixed waste vitrification feeds. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.; Doctor, R.D.; Landsberger, S.; Nunez, L.; Ritter, J.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective is to reduce the volume and cost of high-level waste glass produced during US DOE remediation activities by demonstrating that magnetic separation can separate crystalline, amorphous, and colloidal constituents in vitrification feed streams known to be deleterious to the production of borosilicate glass. Magnetic separation will add neither chemicals nor generate secondary waste streams. The project includes the systematic study of magnetic interactions of waste constituents under controlled physical and chemical conditions (e.g., hydration, oxidation, temperature) to identify mechanisms that control the magnetic properties. Partitioning of radionuclides to determine their sorption mechanisms is also being studied. The identification of fundamental magnetic properties within the microscopic chemical environment in combination with hydrodynamic and electrodynamic models provides insights into the design of a system for optimal separation. Following this, experimental studies using superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) will be conducted to validate its effectiveness as a pretreatment technique.'

  5. High-temperature superconducting conductors and cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.E.; Maley, M.P.; Boulaevskii, L.; Willis, J.O.; Coulter, J.Y.; Ullmann, J.L.; Cho, Jin; Fleshler, S.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a 3-year LDRD project at LANL. High-temperature superconductivity (HTS) promises more efficient and powerful electrical devices such as motors, generators, and power transmission cables; however this depends on developing HTS conductors that sustain high current densities J c in high magnetic fields at temperatures near liq. N2's bp. Our early work concentrated on Cu oxides but at present, long wire and tape conductors can be best made from BSCCO compounds with high J c at low temperatures, but which are degraded severely at temperatures of interest. This problem is associated with thermally activated motion of magnetic flux lines in BSCCO. Reducing these dc losses at higher temperatures will require a high density of microscopic defects that will pin flux lines and inhibit their motion. Recently it was shown that optimum defects can be produced by small tracks formed by passage of energetic heavy ions. Such defects result when Bi is bombarded with high energy protons. The longer range of protons in matter suggests the possibility of application to tape conductors. AC losses are a major limitation in many applications of superconductivity such as power transmission. The improved pinning of flux lines reduces ac losses, but optimization also involves other factors. Measuring and characterizing these losses with respect to material parameters and conductor design is essential to successful development of ac devices

  6. Operation and design selection of high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werfel, F N; Floegel-Delor, U; Riedel, T; Rothfeld, R; Wippich, D; Goebel, B

    2004-01-01

    Axial and radial high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic bearings are evaluated by their parameters. Journal bearings possess advantages over thrust bearings. High magnetic gradients in a multi-pole permanent magnet (PM) configuration, the surrounding melt textured YBCO stator and adequate designs are the key features for increasing the overall bearing stiffness. The gap distance between rotor and stator determines the specific forces and has a strong impact on the PM rotor design. We report on the designing, building and measuring of a 200 mm prototype 100 kg HTS bearing with an encapsulated and thermally insulated melt textured YBCO ring stator. The encapsulation requires a magnetically large-gap (4-5 mm) operation but reduces the cryogenic effort substantially. The bearing requires 3 l of LN 2 for cooling down, and about 0.2 l LN 2 h -1 under operation. This is a dramatic improvement of the efficiency and in the practical usage of HTS magnetic bearings

  7. Study on magnetic separation system using high Tc superconducting bulk magnets for water purification technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, T; Kanayama, H; Tanaka, K; Fukui, S; Ogawa, J; Sato, T; Ooizumi, M; Yamaguchi, M; Yokoyama, K; Noto, K

    2009-01-01

    The application of superconducting bulk magnets to the magnetic separation techniques has been investigated for the Mn-bearing waste water drained from the university laboratories. The research has been conducted in comparison with the electromagnets, and the cryo-cooled superconducting solenoid magnet. The separation ratios of ferrite precipitates including Mn element in the waste slurry were estimated by means of the high gradient magnetic separation method with ferromagnetic iron filters in the water channel and open gradient magnetic separation without them. As the magnetic force acting on the particles is given by the product of a magnetization of particles and a gradient of magnetic field, and a superconducting bulk magnet shows a sharp gradient of the magnetic field on the surface, the performances of the bulk magnet system were almost equivalent to those of the superconducting solenoid magnet with wide bore with respect to the magnetic separation ratios. The separation ratios for Mn have reached over 80 % for HGMS and 10 % for OGMS under the flow rates less than 3 liter/min.

  8. Compact high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet with holmium poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Lobb, C.T.; Menzel, M.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Walstrom, P.L. (Grumman Space Systems, Los Alamos, NM (United States))

    1992-03-15

    A compact high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet was designed and built with poles made of the rare-earth metal holmium. The magnet is intended for use in superconducting coupled-cavity linear accelerators where compact high-field quadrupoles are needed, but where the use of permanent magnets is ruled out because of trapped-flux losses. The magnet has a clear bore diameter of 1.8 cm, outside diameter of 11 cm, length of 11 cm, and pole tip length of 6 cm. The effect of using holmium, a material with a higher saturation field than iron, was investigated by replacing poles made of iron with identical poles made of holmium. The magnet was operated at a temperature of 4.2 K and reached a peak quadrupole field gradient of 355 T/m, a 10% increase over the same magnet with iron poles. This increase in performance is consistent with calculations based on B-H curves that were measured for holmium at 4.2 K. (orig.).

  9. Orsay: High-gradient experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Maintaining the tradition of its contribution to the LEP Injector Linac (LIL), Orsay's Linear Accelerator Laboratory (LAL) is carrying out an R&D programme entitled 'New accelerator physics experiments at LAL' (NEPAL). The aim is to contribute to the long-term development of high energy electron-positron linear colliders, where progress can be of short-term benefit both to conventional accelerators and to injectors in rings or free-electron lasers

  10. Relativistic klystrons for high-gradient accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westenskow, G.A.; Aalberts, D.P.; Boyd, J.K.; Deis, G.A.; Houck, T.L.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Ryne, R.D.; Yu, S.S.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental work is being performed by collaborators at LLNL, SLAC, and LBL to investigate relativistic klystrons as a possible rf power source for future high-gradient accelerators. The authors have learned how to overcome their previously reported problem of high power rf pulse shortening and have achieved peak rf power levels of 330 MW using an 11.4-GHz high-gain tube with multiple output structures. In these experiments the rf pulse is of the same duration as the beam current pulse. In addition, experiments have been performed on two short sections of a high-gradient accelerator using the rf power from a relativistic klystron. An average accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m has been achieved with 80-MW of rf power

  11. High Tc superconducting energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werfel, Frank [Adelwitz Technologiezentrum GmbH (ATZ), Arzberg-Adelwitz (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Electric energy is basic to heat and light our homes, to power our businesses and to transport people and goods. Powerful storage techniques like SMES, Flywheel, Super Capacitor, and Redox - Flow batteries are needed to increase the overall efficiency, stability and quality of electrical grids. High-Tc superconductors (HTS) possess superior physical and technical properties and can contribute in reducing the dissipation and losses in electric machines as motors and generators, in electric grids and transportation. The renewable energy sources as solar, wind energy and biomass will require energy storage systems even more as a key technology. We survey the physics and the technology status of superconducting flywheel energy storage (FESS) and magnetic energy storage systems (SMES) for their potential of large-scale commercialization. We report about a 10 kWh / 250 kW flywheel with magnetic stabilization of the rotor. The progress of HTS conductor science and technological engineering are basic for larger SMES developments. The performance of superconducting storage systems is reviewed and compared. We conclude that a broad range of intensive research and development in energy storage is urgently needed to produce technological options that can allow both climate stabilization and economic development.

  12. A conceptual design of high-temperature superconducting isochronous cyclotron magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, F.; Tang, Y.; Li, J.; Ren, L.; Shi, J.

    2011-01-01

    A design of High-temperature superconducting (HTS) isochronous cyclotron magnet is proposed. The maximum magnetic field of cyclotron main magnet reaches 3 T. Laying the HTS coil aboard the magnetic pole will raise the availability of the magnetic Field. Super-iron structure can provide a high uniformity and high gradient magnetic field. Super-iron structure can raise the availability of the HTS materials. Along with the development of High-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, the technology of HTS magnet is becoming increasingly important in the Cyclotron, which catches growing numbers of scholars' attentions. Based on the analysis of the problems met in the process of marrying superconducting materials with ferromagnetic materials, this article proposes a design of HTS isochronous cyclotron magnet. The process of optimization of magnet and the methods of realizing target parameters are introduced after taking finite element software as analyzing tools.

  13. A study on the development of high Tc superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, D. Y.; Hong, G. Y.; Lee, H. G.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, C. J.; Kwon, S. C.; Kim, K. B.; Kang, Y. H.; Chang, I. S.; Choi, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The major work of this project aims to develop the frictionless superconducting bearing with a high speed. The high magnetization YBaCuO bulk superconductor was prepared by Quasi-melt process. The frictionless superconducting magnetic bearing standed a rotating bar with a speed of 75,000 rpm, which were operated by an electric controller. The low temperature chemical vapor deposition technique was developed. YBaCuO superconducting film showing a superconductivity above 77K was successfully prepared at 650 deg C. Effect of oxygen partial pressure, substrate, deposition temperature on the film properties were also investigated. (Author)

  14. Use of high current density superconducting coils in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1979-11-01

    Superconducting magnets will play an important role in fusion research in years to come. The magnets which are currently proposed for fusion research use the concept of cryostability to insure stable operation of the superconducting coils. This paper proposes the use of adiabatically stable high current density superconducting coils in some types of fusion devices. The advantages of this approach are much lower system cold mass, enhanced cryogenic safety, increased access to the plasma and lower cost

  15. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries

  16. Overlap junctions for high coherence superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X.; Long, J. L.; Ku, H. S.; Lake, R. E.; Bal, M.; Pappas, D. P.

    2017-07-01

    Fabrication of sub-micron Josephson junctions is demonstrated using standard processing techniques for high-coherence, superconducting qubits. These junctions are made in two separate lithography steps with normal-angle evaporation. Most significantly, this work demonstrates that it is possible to achieve high coherence with junctions formed on aluminum surfaces cleaned in situ by Ar plasma before junction oxidation. This method eliminates the angle-dependent shadow masks typically used for small junctions. Therefore, this is conducive to the implementation of typical methods for improving margins and yield using conventional CMOS processing. The current method uses electron-beam lithography and an additive process to define the top and bottom electrodes. Extension of this work to optical lithography and subtractive processes is discussed.

  17. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Uherka, Kenneth L.; Abdoud, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing.

  18. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.; Abdoud, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure is disclosed. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing. 9 figs

  19. Overview of superconducting RF technology and its application to high-current linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as copious neutron production like that needed for transmutation of radioactive waste. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs. However, cost effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement

  20. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs

  1. Quasiparticles in the superconducting state of high-Tc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Shaginyan, V.R.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of quasiparticles in the superconducting state of high-T c metals within the framework of the theory of superconducting state based on the fermion condensation quantum phase transition is considered. It is shown that the behavior coincides with the behavior of Bogoliubov quasiparticles, whereas the maximum value of the superconducting gap and other exotic properties are determined by the presence of the fermion condensate. If at low temperatures the normal state is recovered by the application of a magnetic field suppressing the superconductivity, the induced state can be viewed as Landau-Fermi liquid. These observations are in good agreement with recent experimental facts [ru

  2. High temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisenoff, M.; Gubser, D.V.; Wolf, S.A.; Ritter, J.C.; Price, G.

    1991-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is exploring the feasibility of deploying high temperature superconductivity (HTS) devices and components in space. A variety of devices, primarily passive microwave and millimeter wave components, have been procured and will be integrated with a cryogenic refrigerator system and data acquisition system to form the space package, which will be launched late in 1992. This Space Experiment will demonstrate that this technology is sufficiently robust to survive the space environment and has the potential to significantly improved space communications systems. The devices for the initial launch (HTSSE-I) have been received by NRL and evaluated electrically, thermally and mechanically and will be integrated into the final space package early in 1991. In this paper the performance of the devices are summarized and some potential applications of HTS technology in space system are outlined

  3. High temperature superconductivity and cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitz, M.

    1990-01-01

    There are numerous historical and scientific parallels between high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and the newly emerging field of cold fusion (CF). Just as the charge carrier effective mass plays an important role in SC, the deuteron effective mass may play a vital role in CF. A new theory including effects of proximity, electron shielding, and decreased effective mass of the fusing nuclei can account for the reported CF results. A quantum-gas model that covers the range from low temperature to superhigh temperature SC indicates an increased T c with reduced dimensionality. A reduced dimensionality effect may also enhance CF. A relation is shown between CF and the significant cluster-impact fusion experiments

  4. High temperature superconducting Maglev equipment on vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. Y.; Wang, J. S.; Ren, Z. Y.; Zhu, M.; Jiang, H.; Wang, X. R.; Shen, X. M.; Song, H. H.

    2003-04-01

    Onboard high temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev equipment is a heart part of a HTS Maglev vehicle, which is composed of YBaCuO bulks and rectangle-shape liquid nitrogen vessel and used successfully in the first manned HTS Maglev test vehicle. Arrangement of YBaCuO bulks in liquid nitrogen vessel, structure of the vessel, levitation forces of a single vessel and two vessels, and total levitation force are reported. The first manned HTS Maglev test vehicle in the world has operated well more than one year after it was born on Dec. 31, 2000, and more than 23,000 passengers have taken the vehicle till now. Well operation of more than one year proves the reliability of the onboard HTS Maglev equipment.

  5. Superconducting magnets for high energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets were developed for the proton-proton intersecting storage accelerator ISABELLE. Full size prototypes of both kinds of magnets were constructed and successfully tested. The coils are fabricated from a single layer of wide braided superconductor and employ a low temperature iron core. This method of construction leads to two significant performance advantages; little or no training, and the ability of the coil to absorb its total magnetic stored energy without damage. A high pressure (15 atm) helium gas system is used for cooling. Measurements of the random field errors are compared with the expected field distribution. Three magnets (two dipoles and one quadrupole) were assembled into a segment of the accelerator ring structure (half cell). The performance of this magnet array, which is coupled in series both electrically and cryogenically, is also summarized

  6. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    During 2007, a large amount of the work was centred on the ITER project and related tasks. The activities based on low-temperature superconducting (LTS) materials included the manufacture and qualification of ITER full-size conductors under relevant operating conditions, the design of conductors and magnets for the JT-60SA tokamak and the manufacture of the conductors for the European dipole facility. A preliminary study was also performed to develop a new test facility at ENEA in order to test long-length ITER or DEMO full-size conductors. Several studies on different superconducting materials were also started to create a more complete database of superconductor properties, and also for use in magnet design. In this context, an extensive measurement campaign on transport and magnetic properties was carried out on commercially available NbTi strands. Work was started on characterising MgB 2 wire and bulk samples to optimise their performance. In addition, an intense experimental study was started to clarify the effect of mechanical loads on the transport properties of multi-filamentary Nb 3 Sn strands with twisted or untwisted superconducting filaments. The experimental activity on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials was mainly focussed on the development and characterisation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-X (YBCO) based coated conductors. Several characteristics regarding YBCO deposition, current transport performance and tape manufacture were investigated. In the framework of chemical approaches for YBCO film growth, a new method, developed in collaboration with the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca (TUCN), Romania, was studied to obtain YBCO film via chemical solution deposition, which modifies the well-assessed metallic organic deposition trifluoroacetate (MOD-TFA) approach. The results are promising in terms of critical current and film thickness values. YBCO properties in films with artificially added pinning sites were characterised in collaboration with

  7. High-field superconducting nested coil magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverick, C.; Lobell, G. M.

    1970-01-01

    Superconducting magnet, employed in conjunction with five types of superconducting cables in a nested solenoid configuration, produces total, central magnetic field strengths approaching 70 kG. The multiple coils permit maximum information on cable characteristics to be gathered from one test.

  8. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4 0 K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs

  9. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients. Weak upward flow through mesh. Top fluid more viscous. Unstable layer Instability Convection.

  10. High gradient accelerators for linear light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    Ultra-high gradient radio frequency linacs powered by relativistic klystrons appear to be able to provide compact sources of radiation at XUV and soft x-ray wavelengths with a duration of 1 picosecond or less. This paper provides a tutorial review of the physics applicable to scaling the present experience of the accelerator community to the regime applicable to compact linear light sources. 22 refs., 11 figs., 21 tabs

  11. A high temperature superconducting impulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locker, J.R.; Geers, S.

    1992-01-01

    A mechanism based upon the Superconducting Vector Switch (SVS) effect displays the property of impulse generation. In this paper the principle of operation of this impulse generator is discussed. Experimental results and analytical predictions are presented

  12. Variable high gradient permanent magnet quadrupole (QUAPEVA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteau, F.; Ghaith, A.; N'Gotta, P.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Valléau, M.; Kitegi, C.; Loulergue, A.; Vétéran, J.; Sebdaoui, M.; André, T.; Le Bec, G.; Chavanne, J.; Vallerand, C.; Oumbarek, D.; Cosson, O.; Forest, F.; Jivkov, P.; Lancelot, J. L.; Couprie, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Different applications such as laser plasma acceleration, colliders, and diffraction limited light sources require high gradient quadrupoles, with strength that can reach up to 200 T/m for a typical 10 mm bore diameter. We present here a permanent magnet based quadrupole (so-called QUAPEVA) composed of a Halbach ring and surrounded by four permanent magnet cylinders. Its design including magnetic simulation modeling enabling us to reach 201 T/m with a gradient variability of 45% and mechanical issues are reported. Magnetic measurements of seven systems of different lengths are presented and confirmed the theoretical expectations. The variation of the magnetic center while changing the gradient strength is ±10 μm. A triplet of QUAPEVA magnets is used to efficiently focus a beam with large energy spread and high divergence that is generated by a Laser Plasma Acceleration source for a free electron laser demonstration and has enabled us to perform beam based alignment and control the dispersion of the beam.

  13. Operating experience with high beta superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; Doolittle, L.R.; Benesch, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The number of installed and operational β=1 superconducting rf cavities has grown significantly over the last two years in accelerator laboratories in Europe, Japan and the U.S. The total installed acceleration capability as of mid-1993 is approximately 1 GeV at nominal gradients. Major installations at CERN, DESY, KEK and CEBAF have provided large increments to the installed base and valuable operational experience. A selection of test data and operational experience gathered to date is reviewed

  14. Operating experience with high beta superconducting rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; Doolittle, L.R.; Benesch, J.F.

    1993-06-01

    The number of installed and operational β = 1 superconducting rf cavities has grown significantly over the last two years in accelerator laboratories in Europe, Japan and the US. The total installed acceleration capability as of mid-1993 is approximately 1 GeV at nominal gradients. Major installations at CERN, DESY, KEK and CEBAF have provided large increments to the installed base and valuable operational experience. A selection of test data and operational experience gathered to date is reviewed

  15. Bi-based superconducting fibers with high critical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Yujing; He Yusheng; Liu Menglin; Mao Sining; Cai Liying; Wang Ying; Zhang Jincang; He Aisheng; Wang Jinsong

    1991-01-01

    Superconducting fibers of Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O high Tc superconducting materials have been prepared by means of the laser-heated pedestal growth (LHPG) method. The highest zero resistance temperature T c0 reaches is 114K, and the highest critical current density J c (77K, O T) is greater than 5000 A/cm 2 . As-grown superconducting fibers were successfully fabricated without post growth heat treatment. Amorphous materials were used for the first time to make high quality fibers. The influence of growth conditions, thermal treatment and the composition of the fibers were discussed. (author). 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  16. High-Tc cuprate superconductivity in a nutshell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Hyekyung; Haas, Stephan; Parker, David; Maki, Kazumi

    2005-01-01

    Since the discovery of high-T c cuprate superconductivity in 1986 many new experimental techniques and theoretical concepts have been developed. In particular it was shown that the BCS theory of d-wave superconductivity describes semi-quantitatively the high-T c superconductivity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that Volovik's approach is extremely useful for finding the quasiparticle properties in the vortex state. Here we survey these developments and forecast future directions. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. High-T{sub c} cuprate superconductivity in a nutshell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Hyekyung [Department of Physics, Hallym University, Chuncheon 200-702 (Korea); Haas, Stephan; Parker, David; Maki, Kazumi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0484 (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductivity in 1986 many new experimental techniques and theoretical concepts have been developed. In particular it was shown that the BCS theory of d-wave superconductivity describes semi-quantitatively the high-T{sub c} superconductivity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that Volovik's approach is extremely useful for finding the quasiparticle properties in the vortex state. Here we survey these developments and forecast future directions. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Introduction to superconductivity and high-Tc materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyrot, M.; Pavuna, D.

    1991-01-01

    What sets this book apart from other introductions to superconductivity and high-T c materials is its pragmatic approach. In this book the authors describe all relevant superconducting phenomena and rely on the macroscopic Ginzburg-Landau theory to derive the most important results. Examples are chosen from selected conventional superconductors like NbTi and compared to those high-T c materials. The text should be of interest to non-specialists in superconductivity either as a textbook for those entering the field (one semester course) or as researchers in advanced technologies and even some managers of interdisciplinary research projects

  19. Superatom representation of high-TC superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panas, Itai

    2012-01-01

    A “super-atom” conceptual interface between chemistry and physics is proposed in order to assist in the search for higher T C superconductors. The plaquettes generating the checkerboard superstructure in the cuprates, the C 60 molecules in K 3 C 60 , and the Mo 6 S 8 2- clusters in Chevrel phase materials offer such candidate super-atoms. Thus, in the present study high-T C superconductivity HTSC is articulated as the entanglement of two disjoint electronic manifolds in the vicinity of a common Fermi energy. The resulting HTSC ground state couples near-degenerate protected local super-atom states to virtual magnons in an antiferromagnetic AFM embedding. The composite Cooper pairs emerge as the interaction particles for virtual magnons mediated “self-coherent entanglement” of super-atom states. A Hückel type resonating valence bond RVB formalism is employed in order to illustrate the real-space Cooper pairs as well as their delocalization and Bose Einstein condensation BEC on a ring of super-atoms. The chemical potential μ BEC for Cooper pairs joining the condensate is formulated in terms of the super-exchange interaction, and consequently the T C in terms of the Neél temperature. A rationale for the robustness of the HTSC ground state is proposed: achieving local maximum “electron correlation entropy” at the expense of non-local phase rigidity.

  20. High critical temperature superconducting composite and fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubots, P.; Legat, D.

    1989-01-01

    The core comprises a high temperature superconducting sintered oxide coated with alumina or barium oxide covered with a first sheath in aluminum, a second sheath in niobium and a third sheath in copper [fr

  1. Leaders in high temperature superconductivity commercialization win superconductor industry award

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider curretn leads project head Amalia Ballarino named superconductor industry person of the year 2006. Former high temperature superconductivity program manager at the US Department of energy James Daley wins lifetime achievement award. (1,5 page)

  2. Second international Israeli conference on High Tc Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The superconductivity fields covered in this conference are: theory, applications, devices, flux properties high frequencies, Josephson junctions, magnetism, material sciences and physical properties of superconductors, spectroscopy and resonances and thin films

  3. Transmission Level High Temperature Superconducting Fault Current Limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Gary [SuperPower, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2016-10-05

    The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of utilizing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials in a Transmission Level Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL) application. During the project, the type of high-temperature superconducting material used evolved from 1st generation (1G) BSCCO-2212 melt cast bulk high-temperature superconductors to 2nd generation (2G) YBCO-based high-temperature superconducting tape. The SFCL employed SuperPower's “Matrix” technology, that offers modular features to enable scale up to transmission voltage levels. The SFCL consists of individual modules that contain elements and parallel inductors that assist in carrying the current during the fault. A number of these modules are arranged in an m x n array to form the current-limiting matrix.

  4. Materials Science of High-Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductor Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beasley, M. R

    2007-01-01

    This program was broadly focused on the materials science of high temperature superconducting coated conductors, which are of potential interest for application in electric power systems of interest to the Air Force...

  5. Analysis of mechanical characteristics of superconducting field coil for 17 MW class high temperature superconducting synchronous motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Park, S. I.; Im, S. H.; Kim, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting field coils using a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires with high current density generate high magnetic field of 2 to 5 [T] and electromagnetic force (Lorentz force) acting on the superconducting field coils also become a very strong from the point of view of a mechanical characteristics. Because mechanical stress caused by these powerful electromagnetic force is one of the factors which worsens the critical current performance and structural characteristics of HTS wire, the mechanical stress analysis should be performed when designing the superconducting field coils. In this paper, as part of structural design of superconducting field coils for 17 MW class superconducting ship propulsion motor, mechanical stress acting on the superconducting field coils was analyzed and structural safety was also determined by the coupling analysis system that is consists of commercial electromagnetic field analysis program and structural analysis program.

  6. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Kose, Katsumi

    2016-10-11

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (~54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach.

  7. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    KODAMA, Nao; KOSE, Katsumi

    2016-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (∼54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach. PMID:27001398

  8. Tunable high-gradient permanent magnet quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, B J A; Marks, N; Collomb, N A; Stokes, D G; Modena, M; Struik, M; Bartalesi, A

    2014-01-01

    A novel type of highly tunable permanent magnet (PM) based quadrupole has been designed by the ZEPTO collaboration. A prototype of the design (ZEPTO-Q1), intended to match the specification for the CLIC Drive Beam Decelerator, was built and magnetically measured at Daresbury Laboratory and CERN. The prototype utilises two pairs of PMs which move in opposite directions along a single vertical axis to produce a quadrupole gradient variable between 15 and 60 T/m. The prototype meets CLIC's challenging specification in terms of the strength and tunability of the magnet.

  9. On the superconducting phase diagram of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Cruz, F.

    1990-01-01

    The tendency of oxide superconductors to show granularity has been pointed out since the beginning of research on superconductivity in this type of materials. Nevertheless, only very recently the full phase diagram and characteristics of the grains have been determined. In this paper, the authors review and discuss the different critical fields and their relation to the transport of superconducting current. The superconducting response of single crystals of High Tc superconductors is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the behavior of the vortex lattice and, in particular, to the recent discovery of the quenching of H c1 in YBaCuO, several degrees below Tc

  10. Application of radiofrequency superconductivity to accelerators for high-current ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-current, high-brightness ion beam. During the last few years, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam halo, cumulative beam breakup and alternating-phase focusing have also yielded important results. This paper su-summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of superconducting accelerator technology for high-current ion beams

  11. Superconducting niobium in high rf magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.

    1988-01-01

    The benefit of superconducting cavities for accelerator applications depends on the field and Q/sub 0/ levels which can be achieved reliably in mass producible multicell accelerating structures. The presently observed field and Q/sub 0/ limitations are caused by anomalous loss mechanisms which are not correlated with the intrinsic properties of the pure superconductor but rather due to defects or contaminants on the superconducting surface. The ultimate performance levels of clean superconducting cavities built from pure Nb will be given by the rf critical field and the surface resistance of the superconductor. In the first part of this paper a short survey is given of the maximum surface magnetic fields achieved in single-cell cavities. The results of model calculations for the thermal breakdown induced by very small defects and for the transition to the defect free case is discussed in part 2. In the last chapter, a discussion is given for the rf critical field of Nb on the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau Theory. It is shown that not only purity but also the homogeneity of the material should become important for the performance of superconducting Nb cavities at field levels beyond 100mT. Measurement results of the upper critical field for different grades of commercially available Nb sheet materials are given. 58 references, 20 figures, 1 table

  12. High power density superconducting motor for control applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J; Granados, X; Lloberas, J; Torres, R; Grau, J; Maynou, R; Bosch, R

    2008-01-01

    A high dynamics superconducting low power motor for control applications has been considered for design. The rotor is cylindrical with machined bulks that generate the field by trapping flux in a four poles configuration. The toothless iron armature is wound by copper, acting iron only as magnetic screen. Details of the magnetic assembling, cryogenics and electrical supply conditioning will be reported. Improvements due to the use of a superconducting set are compared with performances of equivalent conventional motors

  13. Raman scattering and luminescence of high-Tc superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremenko, V.V.; Gnezdilov, V.P.; Fomin, V.I.; Fugol', I.Ya.; Samovarov, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Raman and luminescence spectra of high-T c superconducting oxides are summarized, mainly YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-σ and partly La 2-x Ba x CuO 4-σ . In raman spectra we succeeded to distinguish electron scattering to define the energy gap Δ in the superconducting state. The luminescence spectra are due to the emission of oxygen and interaction with conduction electrons. 70 refs.; 13 figs

  14. Alternative designs of high-temperature superconducting synchronous generators

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, K. F.; Lukasik, B.; Sykulski, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the different possible designs of both cored and coreless superconducting synchronous generators using high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, with particular reference to demonstrators built at the University of Southampton using BiSCCO conductors. An overview of the electromagnetic, thermal, and mechanical issues is provided, the advantages and drawbacks of particular designs are highlighted, the need for compromises is explained, and practical solutions are offer...

  15. Hall probe for measuring high currents in superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferendeci, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Constructional details of a compact Hall probe for measuring high currents in superconducting coils are given. The Hall probe is easy to assemble and can be inserted or removed from the system without breaking the superconducting loop. Upper current limit of the probe can be increased by using larger magnetic core material. Shielding becomes necessary if the probe holder is to be placed near large current dependent magnetic fields

  16. Use of high gradient magnetic separation for actinide application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    Decontamination of materials such as soils or waste water that contain radioactive isotopes, heavy metals, or hazardous components is a subject of great interest. Magnetic separation is a physical separation process that segregates materials on the basis of magnetic susceptibility. Because the process relies on physical properties, separations can be achieved while producing a minimum of secondary waste. Most traditional physical separation processes effectively treat particles larger than 70 microns. In many situations, the radioactive contaminants are found concentrated in the fine particle size fraction of less than 20 microns. For effective decontamination of the fine particle size fraction most current operations resort to chemical dissolution methods for treatment. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is able to effectively treat particles from 90 to ∼0.1 micron in diameter. The technology is currently used on the 60 ton per hour scale in the kaolin clay industry. When the field gradient is of sufficiently high intensity, paramagnetic particles can be physically captured and separated from extraneous nonmagnetic material. Because all actinide compounds are paramagnetic, magnetic separation of actinide containing mixtures is feasible. The advent of reliable superconducting magnets also makes magnetic separation of weakly paramagnetic species attractive. HGMS work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is being developed for soil remediation, waste water treatment and treatment of actinide chemical processing residues. LANL and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) have worked on a co-operative research and development agreement (CRADA) to develop HGMS for radioactive soil decontamination. The program is designed to transfer HGMS from the laboratory and other industries for the commercial treatment of radioactive contaminated materials. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Unprecedented quality factors at accelerating gradients up to 45 MVm -1 in niobium superconducting resonators via low temperature nitrogen infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Checchin, M.; Martinello, M.; Melnychuk, O. S.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Crawford, A. C.; Aderhold, S.; Bice, D.

    2017-08-14

    We report the finding of new surface treatments that permit to manipulate the niobium resonator nitrogen content in the first few nanometers in a controlled way, and the resonator fundamental Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance and residual resistance accordingly. In particular, we find surface infusion conditions that systematically a) increase the quality factor of these 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) bulk niobium resonators, up to very high gradients; b) increase the achievable accelerating gradient of the cavity compared to its own baseline with state-of-the-art surface processing. Cavities subject to the new surface process have larger than two times the state of the art Q at 2K for accelerating fields > 35 MV/m. Moreover, very high accelerating gradients ~ 45 MV/m are repeatedly reached, which correspond to peak magnetic surface fields of 190 mT, among the highest measured for bulk niobium cavities. These findings open the opportunity to tailor the surface impurity content distribution to maximize performance in Q and gradients, and have therefore very important implications on future performance and cost of SRF based accelerators. They also help deepen the understanding of the physics of the RF niobium cavity surface.

  18. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  19. Pair Fermi contour and high-temperature superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Belyavsky, V I

    2002-01-01

    The holes superconducting coupling with the pair high summarized pulse and the relative motion low pulses is considered with an account of the quasi-two-dimensional electron structure of the HTSC-cuprates with the clearly-pronounced nesting of the Fermi contour. The superconducting energy gap and the condensation energy are determined and their dependences on the doping level are qualitatively studied. It is shown that the energy gap takes place in some holes concentration area, limited on both sides. The superconducting state, whereby the condensation energy is positive, originates in the more narrower doping interval inside this area. The hole pair redistribution in the pulse space constitutes the cause of the superconducting state origination by the holes repulsive screened Coulomb interaction. The coupling mechanism discussed hereby, males it possible to explain qualitatively not only the phase diagram basic peculiarities but also the key experimental facts, related to the cuprate HTSC-materials

  20. A device for regulating the field generated by a superconducting winding or the gradient of same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duret, Denis; Dunand, J.-J.

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a stabilizing device which does not require the use of a specific solvent. Changes occurring in the field generated by the main winding and the correcting winding are transmitted by a superconducting unit to a quantum superconducting interferometer. An impedance measurement provides an error-signal, the latter being integrated for feeding the correcting winding. A form of embodiment relates to the regulation of a modulated field. This can be applied to nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers [fr

  1. High temperature superconductive flux gate magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenson, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a different type of HTS superconducting magnetometer based on the non-linear magnetic behavior of bulk HTS materials. The device design is based on the generation of second harmonics which arise as a result of non-linear magnetization observed in Type-II superconductors. Even harmonics are generated from the non-linear interaction of an ac excitation signal with an external DC magnetic field which acts as a bias signal

  2. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  3. Techniques for Ultra-high Magnetic Field Gradient NMR Diffusion Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Eric E.; Mitrovic, Vesna F.; Calder, Edward S.; Will Thomas, G.; Halperin, William P.; Reyes, Arneil P.; Kuhns, Philip L.; Moulton, William G.

    2001-03-01

    We report on development and application of techniques for ultraslow diffusion coefficient measurements through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in high magnetic field gradients. We have performed NMR experiments in a steady fringe field gradient of 175 T/m from a 23 T resistive Bitter magnet, as well as in a gradient of 42 T/m from an 8 T superconducting magnet. New techniques to provide optimum sensitivity in these experiments are described. To eliminate parasitic effects of the temporal instability of the resistive magnet, we have introduced a passive filter: a highly conductive cryogen-cooled inductive shield. We show experimental demonstration of such a shield’s effect on NMR performed in the Bitter magnet. For enhanced efficiency, we have employed “frequency jumping” in our spectrometer system. Application of these methods has made possible measurements of diffusion coefficients as low as 10-10 cm^2/s, probing motion on a 250 nm length scale.

  4. Multi-cell superconducting structures for high energy e+ e- colliders and free electron laser linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J

    2008-01-01

    This volume, which is the first in the EuCARD Editorial Series on “Accelerator Science and Technology”, is closely combined with the most advanced particle accelerators – based on Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) technology. In general, SRF research includes following areas: high gradient cavities, cavity prototyping, thin film technologies, large grain and mono-crystalline niobium and niobium alloys, quenching effects in superconducting cavities, SRF injectors, photo-cathodes, beam dynamics, quality of electron beams, cryogenics, high power RF sources, low level RF controls, tuners, RF power coupling to cavities, RF test infrastructures, etc. The monograph focuses on TESLA structures used in FLASH machine and planned for XFEL and ILC experiments.

  5. High-gradient compact linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Bruce M.

    1998-01-01

    A high-gradient linear accelerator comprises a solid-state stack in a vacuum of five sets of disc-shaped Blumlein modules each having a center hole through which particles are sequentially accelerated. Each Blumlein module is a sandwich of two outer conductive plates that bracket an inner conductive plate positioned between two dielectric plates with different thicknesses and dielectric constants. A third dielectric core in the shape of a hollow cylinder forms a casing down the series of center holes, and it has a dielectric constant different that the two dielectric plates that sandwich the inner conductive plate. In operation, all the inner conductive plates are charged to the same DC potential relative to the outer conductive plates. Next, all the inner conductive plates are simultaneously shorted to the outer conductive plates at the outer diameters. The signal short will propagate to the inner diameters at two different rates in each Blumlein module. A faster wave propagates quicker to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the closer spacing and lower dielectric constant. When the faster wave reaches the inner extents of the outer and inner conductive plates, it reflects back outward and reverses the field in that segment of the dielectric core. All the field segments in the dielectric core are then in unipolar agreement until the slower wave finally propagates to the third dielectric core across the dielectric plates with the wider spacing and higher dielectric constant. During such unipolar agreement, particles in the core are accelerated with gradients that exceed twenty megavolts per meter.

  6. Ultra-high gradient compact accelerator developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, G.J.H.; Wiel, van der M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Continued development of relatively compact, although not quite 'table-top', lasers with peak powers in the range up to 100 TW has enabled laser-plasma-based acceleration experiments with amazing gradients of up to 1 TV/m. In order to usefully apply such gradients to 'controlled' acceleration,

  7. A study on the development of high Tc superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Dong Yeon; Lee, Hee Gyoun; Kim, Chan Joong

    1990-01-01

    The microstructure, crystal structure and formation kinetics for the superconducting phases were studied in the lead-doped BiSrCaCuO system. The formation kinetics was also investigated in the samples with different Pb/Bi ratio and it was observed that the 30 % Pb addition is most perferable for the formation of the high T c phase. The formation of the high T c phase was delayed by the excessive addition of Pb. The lattice parameter (c) of the unit cell of both low T c and high T c phases increased with increasing Pb content. Superconducting thin film was sucessfully prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Film deposited on MgO substrate showed a T c , onset of 85 K and did not reach to zero resistivity down to 77 K. Superconducting 124 phase in Y-system, which is more stable than 123 phase at high temperature showed a T c , onser of 84 K. Additionally, 0.1 mole of Pb, Sn and Ca was substituted for yttrium in 124 phase, respectively. For Pb and Sn-subsituted specimens, 124 phase was formed and for Ca substituted specimen, 124 phase was not formed and revealed no superconductivity down to 77 K. For Sn-substituted specimens, 124 phase was formed but showed no superconductivity down to 77 K. (author)

  8. Modal bifurcation in a high-Tc superconducting levitation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, D; Fujiwara, S; Sugiura, T

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with modal bifurcation of a multi-degree-of-freedom high-T c superconducting levitation system. As modeling of large-scale high-T c superconducting levitation applications, where plural superconducting bulks are often used, it can be helpful to consider a system constituting of multiple oscillators magnetically coupled with each other. This paper investigates nonlinear dynamics of two permanent magnets levitated above high-T c superconducting bulks and placed between two fixed permanent magnets without contact. First, the nonlinear equations of motion of the levitated magnets were derived. Then the method of averaging was applied to them. It can be found from the obtained solutions that this nonlinear two degree-of-freedom system can have two asymmetric modes, in addition to a symmetric mode and an antisymmetric mode both of which also exist in the linearized system. One of the backbone curves in the frequency response shows a modal bifurcation where the two stable asymmetric modes mentioned above appear with destabilization of the antisymmetric mode, thus leading to modal localization. These analytical predictions have been confirmed in our numerical analysis and experiments of free vibration and forced vibration. These results, never predicted by linear analysis, can be important for application of high-T c superconducting levitation systems.

  9. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Mingji; Or, Siu Wing

    2017-01-01

    We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME) transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG) technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME vo...

  10. Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo [ed.

    2005-07-01

    Research on superconductivity at ENEA is mainly devoted to projects related to the ITER magnet system. In this framework, ENEA has been strongly involved in the design, manufacturing and test campaigns of the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), which reached a world record in operating current (up to 80 kA). Further to this result, the activities in 2004 were devoted to optimising the ITER conductor performance. ENEA participated in the tasks launched by EFDA to define and produce industrial-scale advanced Nb3Sn strand to be used in manufacturing the ITER high-field central solenoid (CS) and toroidal field (TF) magnets. As well as contributing to the design of the new strand and the final conductor layout, ENEA will also perform characterisation tests, addressing in particular the influence of mechanical stress on the Nb3Sn performance. As a member of the international ITER-magnet testing group, ENEA plays a central role in the measurement campaigns and data analyses for each ITER-related conductor and coil. The next phase in the R and D of the ITER magnets will be their mechanical characterisation in order to define the fabrication route of the coils and structures. During 2004 the cryogenic measurement campaign on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by-pass diode stacks was completed. As the diode-test activity was the only LHC contract to be finished on schedule, the 'Centre Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire' (CERN) asked ENEA to participate in an international tender for the cold check of the current leads for the LHC magnets. The contract was obtained, and during 2004, the experimental setup was designed and realised and the data acquisition system was developed. The measurement campaign was successfully started at the end of 2004 and will be completed in 2006.

  11. Chemical casting of high-Tc superconducting BiSCCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.E.; Das, B.N.; Rayne, R.J.; Bender, B.A.; Lechter, W.L.; Hoff, H.A.; Osofsky, M.S.; Soulen, R.J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    BiSCCO has been successfully cast into a number of useful shapes. This casting process differs significantly from traditional casting in that the process includes a change in the oxygen content of the melt. A heat treatment is required to restore the original chemistry, properly form the BiSCCO crystal structure and develop the superconducting properties. This paper emphasizes the microstructures of as-cast and heat treated BiSCCO. Casting causes considerable grain alignment of the BiSCCO platelets. The platelets align preferentially along the thermal gradients which exist during the solidification process

  12. A dielectric approach to high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanty, J.; Das, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The dielectric response of an electron-ion system to the presence of a pair of charges is investigated. From the nature of the dielectric function, it is shown that a strong attractive pair formation is possible depending on the dispersion of the ion branches. The latter brings a reduction to the sound velocity which is used as a criterion for the superconductivity. By solving the BCS equation with the above dielectric function, we obtain a reasonable value of T/sub c/. 17 refs., 1 fig

  13. Contribution to the study of superconducting magnets using high transition temperature superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecrevisse, Thibault

    2012-01-01

    The new industrial superconductors using high critical temperature compounds offer new possibilities for superconducting magnetism. Indeed they allow higher magnetic field with the same classical cryogenics at 4.2 K on one hand, and on the other hand they also pave the way for superconducting magnets working between 10 K and 30 K. The high temperature superconductors are then needed in order to produce magnetic fields higher than 16 T (case of HTS dipole insert for Large Hadron Collider at CERN) or to increase the specific density stored in one SMES (Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage, in the case of the SuperSMES ANR Project).Nevertheless the indisputable assets (critical temperature, critical magnetic field, mechanical stresses) brought by the use of High critical temperature superconductors like YBCO, used in superconducting magnets, require to solve some challenges. Their behavior is still badly understood, especially during the resistive transitions. To succeed in protecting these conductors we need a new reflection on protection schemes designed to avoid the thermal and mechanical damages. The answer to the question: 'Can we use those materials in the long run inside superconducting magnets?' is now inescapable.Some answers are given here. The use of the conductors is approached through various experimental studies to understand the material (electrical characterization and modeling of the critical surface) and to define the key stages of high critical temperature superconducting magnets manufacturing (work on the junctions between conductors and pancakes). This study led to the creation of two coils in order to identify the issues related to the use of YBCO tapes. A numerical thermo-electrical model of the high critical temperature superconductor has been developed and a numerical code based on the CEA software CASTEM (Finish Elements Model) allowed to study the resistive transition (or quench) behavior of those conductor and coil. The code has been

  14. Optically activated high Tc superconducting microbolometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yefremenko, V; Gordiyenko, E; Shustakova, G; Bader, S D; Karapetrov, G; Novosad, V

    2006-01-01

    A laser beam, precisely focused on the patterned superconducting structure, was used to nucleate a resistive area that is sensitive to external thermal effects. The electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching were applied as pattern transfer processes in epitaxial Y-Ba-Cu-O films. Two different sensor designs were tested: (i) 3 millimeters long and 40 micrometers wide stripe and (ii) 1.25 millimeters long, and 50 micron wide meander -like structure. It is shown experimentally that scanning the laser beam along the stripe leads to physical displacement of the sensitive area and, therefore may be used as a basis for imaging over a broad spectral range. For example, patterning the superconducting film into a meander structure is equivalent to a two-dimensional detector array. In additional to the simplicity of the detector fabrication sequence (one step mask transfer), a clear advantage of this approach is the simplicity of the read-out process: an image is formed by registering the signal with only two electrical terminals. The proposed approach can be extended for imaging over a wide spectral range

  15. Stability of high field superconducting dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinger, J.; Danby, G.; Foelsche, H.; Jackson, J.; Prodell, A.; Stevens, A.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting dipole magnets of the window-frame type were constructed and operated successfully at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Examples of this type of magnet are the 6 T ''Model T'' magnet, and the 4 T 8 0 superconducting bending magnet. The latter magnet operated reliably since October 1973 as part of the proton beam transport to the north experimental area at the BNL AGS with intensities of typically 8 x 10 12 protons at 28.5 GeV/c passing through the magnet in a curved trajectory with the proton beam center only 2.0 cm from the beam pipe at both ends and the middle of each of the two units comprising the magnet. The energy in the beam is approximately 40 kJ per 3 μsec pulse. Targets were inserted in the beam at locations 2 m and 5.6 m upstream of the first magnet unit to observe the effects of radiation heating. The 8 0 magnet demonstrated ultrastability, surviving 3 μsec thermal pulses delivering up to 1 kJ into the cold magnet at repetition periods as short as 1.3 sec

  16. Young's moduli of cables for high field superconductive dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shunji; Shintomi, Takakazu.

    1983-01-01

    Superconductive dipole magnets for big accelerators are subjected to enormous electro-magnetic force, when they are operated with high field such as 10 Tesla. They should be constructed by means of superconductive cables, which have high Young's modulus, to obtain good performance. To develop such cables we measured the Young's moduli of cables for practical use of accelerator magnets. They are monolithic and compacted strand cables. We measured also Young's moduli of monolithic copper and brass cables for comparison. The obtained data showed the Young's moduli of 35 and 15 GPa for the monolithic and compacted strand cables, respectively. (author)

  17. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  18. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections

  19. System considerations for airborne, high power superconducting generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southall, H.L.; Oberly, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    The design of rotating superconducting field windings in high power generators is greatly influenced by system considerations. Experience with two superconducting generators designed to produce 5 and 20 Mw resulted in a number of design restrictions. The design restrictions imposed by system considerations have not prevented low weight and high voltage power generation capability. The application of multifilament Nb;sub 3;Sn has permitted a large thermal margin to be designed into the rotating field winding. This margin permits the field winding to remain superconducting under severe system operational requirements. System considerations include: fast rotational startup, fast ramped magnetic fields, load induced transient fields and airborne cryogen logistics. Preliminary selection of a multifilament Nb;sub 3;Sn cable has resulted from these considerations. The cable will carry 864 amp at 8.5K and 6.8 Tesla. 10 refs

  20. Review of progress in superconducting high-beta structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundelin, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    During the past two years, there has been substantial progress in superconducting high-beta cavities in a number of areas. Understanding of the Q-disease, which occurs when a cavity is held for prolonged periods near 100 K, has advanced, and techniques for mitigating this problem have improved. Progress has been made in the use of high peak power processing to suppress field emission. Cell geometries have improved to reduce the ratio of peak surface electric field to accelerating field, and trapped mode behavior has been found to permit use of nine cells for some applications. The operating experience base for cavities installed in accelerators has increased substantially, as has the performance experience base for industrially manufactured cavities, including both solid niobium and sputter-coated copper. Additional applications for superconducting cavities have been identified. Progress has been made toward the design and construction of a Tera-Electron-Volt Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) test bed. (author). 25 refs., 1 fig

  1. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlikar, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Amongst the numerous scientific discoveries that the 20th century has to its credit, superconductivity stands out as an exceptional example of having retained its original dynamism and excitement even for more than 80 years after its discovery. It has proved itself to be a rich field by continually offering frontal challenges in both research and applications. Indeed, one finds that a majority of internationally renowned condensed matter theorists, at some point of their career, have found excitement in working in this important area. Superconductivity presents a unique example of having fetched Nobel awards as many as four times to date, and yet, interestingly enough, the field still remains open for new insights and discoveries which could undeniably be of immense technological value. 1 fig

  2. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book profiles the research activity of 42 companies in the superconductivity field, worldwide. It forms a unique and comprehensive directory to this emerging technology. For each research site, it details the various projects in progress, analyzes the level of activity, pinpoints applications and R and D areas, reviews strategies and provides complete contact information. It lists key individuals, offers international comparisons of government funding, reviews market forecasts and development timetables and features a bibliography of selected articles on the subject

  3. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buller, L.; Carrillo, F.; Dietert, R.; Kotziapashis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Superconductors are materials which combine the property of zero electric resistance with the capability to exclude any adjacent magnetic field. This leads to many large scale applications such as the much publicized levitating train, generation of magnetic fields in MHD electric generators, and special medical diagnostic equipment. On a smaller-scale, superconductive materials could replace existing resistive connectors and decrease signal delays by reducing the RLC time constants. Thus, a computer could operate at much higher speeds, and consequently at lower power levels which would reduce the need for heat removal and allow closer spacing of circuitry. Although technical advances and proposed applications are constantly being published, it should be recognized that superconductivity is a slowly developing technology. It has taken scientists almost eighty years to learn what they now know about this material and its function. The present paper provides an overview of the historical development of superconductivity and describes some of the potential applications for this new technology as it pertains to the electronics industry

  4. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-01-01

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans. PMID:28367906

  5. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-04-10

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans.

  6. Generation of high magnetic fields using superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyoshi, T.; Otsuka, A.; Kosuge, M.; Yuyama, M.; Nagai, H.; Matsumoto, F.

    2006-01-01

    High-field superconducting magnets have opened new frontiers for several kinds of applications, such as fusion reactors, particle accelerators, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers. The present record for the highest field in a fully superconducting state is 23.4 T. It was achieved with a combination of NbTi, Nb 3 Sn, and Bi-2212 conductors in 1999. Since high T c (critical temperature) superconductors (HTS) have sufficiently high critical current density even in excess of 30 T, they are promising for use as high-field superconducting magnets. However, several problems still remain to be resolved for practical applications, and the use of HTS coils will be limited to the inner part of a high-field magnet system in the near future. The required technologies to develop a high-field superconducting magnet with a field of up to 28 T have already been established. Such a magnet is certain to provide information to all leading research areas

  7. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  8. Possibility of high temperature superconducting phases in PdH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripodi, Paolo; Di Gioacchino, Daniele; Borelli, Rodolfo; Vinko, Jenny Darja

    2003-05-01

    Possible new superconducting phases with a high critical transition temperature (Tc) have been found in stable palladium-hydrogen (PdHx) samples for stoichiometric ratio x=H/Pd⩾1, in addition to the well-known low critical transition temperature (0⩽Tc⩽9) when x is in the range (0.75⩽x⩽1.00). Possible new measured superconducting phases with critical temperature in the range 51⩽Tc⩽295 K occur. This Tc varies considerably with every milli part of x when x exceeds unit. A superconducting critical current density Jc⩾6.1×104 A cm-2 has been measured at 77 K with HDC=0 T.

  9. Possibility of high temperature superconducting phases in PdH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripodi, Paolo; Di Gioacchino, Daniele; Borelli, Rodolfo; Vinko, Jenny Darja

    2003-05-15

    Possible new superconducting phases with a high critical transition temperature (T{sub c}) have been found in stable palladium-hydrogen (PdH{sub x}) samples for stoichiometric ratio x=H/Pd{>=}1, in addition to the well-known low critical transition temperature (0{<=}T{sub c}{<=}9) when x is in the range (0.75{<=}x{<=}1.00). Possible new measured superconducting phases with critical temperature in the range 51{<=}T{sub c}{<=}295 K occur. This T{sub c} varies considerably with every milli part of x when x exceeds unit. A superconducting critical current density J{sub c}{>=}6.1x10{sup 4} A cm{sup -2} has been measured at 77 K with H{sub DC}=0 T.

  10. High-energy neutron irradiation of superconducting compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweedler, A.R.; Snead, C.L.; Newkirk, L.; Valencia, F.; Geballe, T.H.; Schwall, R.H.; Matthias, B.T.; Corenswit, E.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of high-energy neutron irradiation (E greater than 1 MeV) at ambient reactor temperatures on the superconducting properties of a variety of superconducting compounds is reported. The materials studied include the A-15 compounds Nb 3 Sn, Nb 3 Al, Nb 3 Ga, Nb 3 Ge and V 3 Si, the C-15 Laves phase HfV 2 , the ternary molybdenum sulfide Mo 3 Pb 0 . 5 S 4 and the layered dichalcogenide NbSe 2 . The superconducting transition temperature has been measured for all of the above materials for neutron fluences up to 5 x 10 19 n/cm 2 . The critical current for multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn has also been determined for fields up to 16 T and fluences between 3 x 10 17 n/cm 2 and 1.1 x 10 19 n/cm 2

  11. High-temperature superconducting phase in rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedyaev, A.V.; Molodykh, O.Eh.; Savchenko, M.A.; Stefanovich, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    A possibility of high-temperature superconducting phase existence in rare e arth alloys with aluminium: TbAl-NdAl is predicted. Such a phase is shown t o exist at t approximately 40 k, however its existence is possible only in a nar row temperature range and it might be metastable. A possibility of a supercondu cting phase occurrence in spin glass is studied. It is shown that the first kin d phase transition to superconducting state may first occur under definite condi tions in the system. But the phase in question will be a low-temperature one be cause of rather inefficient elctron-phonon interaction. Further temperature dec rease would lead to an appearance of magnetic order and to disappearance of the superconductivity

  12. High Tc superconductivity in YBa2Cu3O7-x studied by PAC and PAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shengyun; Li Anli; Zheng Shengnan; Huang Hanchen; Li Donghong; Din Honglin; Du Hongshan; Sun Hancheng

    1993-01-01

    High T c superconductivity has been investigated in YBaCuO by both perturbed angular correlation and positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques as a function of temperature from 77 to 300 K. An abrupt change has been observed in the positron lifetime and Doppler broadening and the electric field gradient and its asymmetry parameter across T c , indicating a transition of two- to one-dimensional Cu-O-Cu chain structure and a charge transfer from CuO layers to CuO chains. An anomaly of the normal state has been demonstrated around 125 K, which is attributed to the structural instability. (orig.)

  13. Spin dynamics in high-TC superconducting cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourges, Ph.

    2003-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the detailed investigations of the magnetic resonance peak in the superconducting state of cuprates. The existence of such a peak could be the signature of a mechanism linked to magnetism that could explain high critical temperature superconductivity. Inelastic neutron scattering is an adequate tool for the understanding of cuprate properties because it reveals magnetic fluctuations whose behaviour and variety depend strongly on temperature and on the level of doping. The last part of this work is dedicated to the study of spin dynamics in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x system

  14. A commercial tokamak reactor using super high field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Williams, J.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper explores the range of possibilities for producing super high fields with advanced superconducting magnets. Obtaining magnetic fields greater than about 18 T at the coil in a large superconducting magnet system will require advances in many areas of magnet technology. These needs are discussed and potential solutions (advanced superconductors, structural materials and design methods) evaluated. A point design for a commercial reactor with magnetic field at the coil of 24 T and fusion power of 1800 MW is presented. Critical issues and parameters for magnet design are identified. 20 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport

  16. Conduction cooled high temperature superconducting dipole magnet for accelerator applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, N.; Nielsen, G.; Hauge, N.

    2012-01-01

    A 3T proof-of-principle dipole magnet for accelerator applications, based on 2nd generation high temperature superconducting tape was designed, built, and tested by a consortium under the lead of Danfysik. The magnet was designed to have a straight, circular bore with a good field region of radius...

  17. Oxygen stoichiometry and the high Tc superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarascon, J.M.; Bagley, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for determining the oxygen content in high Tc materials, such as thermogravimetric analysis and chemical analysis, are discussed. Consideration is given to La-based cuprates, Y-based cuprates, and Bi-based cuprates. Superconducting transition temperatures are analyzed as a function of the Cu(1)-O(4) bond lengths for several different compositions in the Y-based system. 28 references

  18. High-$T_c$ superconductivity by phase cloning

    CERN Document Server

    Ilieva, N; Ilieva, Nevena; Thirring, Walter

    2007-01-01

    We consider a BCS-type model in the spin formalism and argue that the structure of the interaction provides a mechanism for control over directions of the spin $\\vect S$ other than $S_z$, which is being controlled via the conventional chemical potential. We also find the conditions for the appearance of a high-$T_c$ superconducting phase.

  19. Critical current of high Tc superconducting Bi223/Ag tapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; ten Haken, Bernard; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of various high Tc superconducting Bi2223/Ag tapes indicates that the transport current is carried through two paths: one is through weakly-linked grain boundaries (Josephson junctions); another is through well-connected grains. The critical

  20. Conventional superconductivity at 203 K at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Eremets, Mikhail; Troyan, Ivan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Ksenofontov, Vadim; Shylin, Sergii [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitet Mainz, Staudingerweg 9, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A search for high, room temperature conventional superconductivity is promising as the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory in the Eliashberg formulation puts no apparent limits on T{sub c}. Materials with light elements are especially favorable as they provide high frequencies in the phonon spectrum. However only a moderately high T{sub c} = 39 K has been found in this search in MgB{sub 2}. We systematically studied metallic hydrogen and covalent hydrogen dominant compounds and found the record T{sub c} of 203 K at pressure 140 GPa in sulfur hydride. We proved occurrence of superconductivity by the sharp drop of the resistivity to zero; the decrease of T{sub c} with magnetic field; the pronounce isotope shift of T{sub c} in D{sub 2}S which evidences of a major role of phonons in the superconductivity; and the magnetic susceptibility measurements. The X-ray diffraction data confirmed that the superconductive phase has the predicted bcc structure. This phase can be considered as an atomic hydrogen superconductor stabilized by sulfur.

  1. A high Tc superconducting liquid nitrogen level sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, J. X.; Liu, H. K.; Dou, S. X.; Grantham, C.; Beer, J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The dramatic resistance change in the superconducting-normal transition temperature range enables a high T c superconductor to be considered for designing a liquid nitrogen level sensor. A (Bi,Pb) 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10+x Ag clad superconducting wire is selected and tested as a continuous liquid nitrogen level sensor to investigate the possibility for this application. The (Bi,Pb) 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10+x Ag clad superconducting wire has approximately 110 K critical temperature, with more flexible and stable properties compared with bulk shape ceramic high T c superconductors. The voltage drops across the sensor are tested with different immersion lengths in liquid nitrogen. The accuracy of the HTS sensor is analysed with its dR/dT in the superconducting-normal transition range. The voltage signal is sensitive to liquid nitrogen level change, and this signal can be optimized by controlling the transport current. The problems of the Ag clad superconductor are that the Ag sheath thermal conductivity is very high, and the sensor normal resistance is low. These are the main disadvantages for using such a wire as a continuous level sensor. However, a satisfactory accuracy can be achieved by control of the transport current. A different configuration of the wire sensor is also designed to avoid this thermal influence

  2. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingji; Or, Siu Wing

    2017-10-25

    We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME) transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG) technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME voltage between the two ME composites and is calibrated against transverse MFGs to give a high detection sensitivity of 0.4-30.6 V/(T/m), a strong common-mode magnetic field noise rejection rate of gradient noise of 0.16-620 nT/m/ Hz in a broad frequency range of 1 Hz-170 kHz under a small baseline of 35 mm. An analysis of experimental gradient noise spectra obtained in a magnetically-unshielded laboratory environment reveals the domination of the pink (1/ f ) noise, dielectric loss noise, and power-frequency noise below 3 kHz, in addition to the circuit noise above 3 kHz, in the gradient sensor. The high detection performance, together with the added merit of passive and direct ME conversion by the large ME effect in the ME composites, makes the gradient sensor suitable for the passive, direct, and broadband detection of transverse MFGs.

  3. Structural features that optimize high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Hinks, D.G.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Chmaissem, O.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Argyriou, D.N.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Mitchell, J.F.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Dabrowski, B.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of a large number of compounds have provided a consistent picture of what structural features give rise to the highest T c 's in copper-oxide superconductors. For example, various defects can be introduced into the blocking layer to provide the optimum carrier concentration, but defects that form in or adjacent to the CuO 2 layers will lower T c and eventually destroy superconductivity. After these requirements are satisfied, the highest T c 's are observed for compounds (such as the HgBa 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O 2n+2+x family) that have flat and square CuO 2 planes and long apical Cu-O bonds. This conclusion is confirmed by the study of materials in which the flatness of the CuO 2 plane can be varied in a systematic way. In more recent work, attention has focused on how the structure can be modified, for example, by chemical substitution, to improve flux pinning properties. Two strategies are being investigated: (1) Increasing the coupling of pancake vortices to form vortex lines by shortening or ''metallizing'' the blocking layer; and (2) the formation of defects that pin flux. (orig.)

  4. Structural features that optimize high temperature superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Hinks, D.G. Chmaissem, O.; Argyriou, D.N.; Mitchell, J.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dabrowski, B. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-01-01

    For example, various defects can be introduced into the blocking layer to provide the optimum carrier concentration, but defects that form in or adjacent to the CuO{sub 2} layers will lower T{sub c} and eventually destroy superconductivity. After these requirements are satisfied, the highest T{sub c}`s are observed for compounds (such as the HgBa{sub 2}Ca{sub n-1}CuO{sub 2n{plus}2{plus}x} family) that have flat and square CuO{sub 2} planes and long apical Cu-O bonds. This conclusion is confirmed by the study of materials in which the flatness of the CuO{sub 2} plane can be varied in a systematic way. In more recent work, attention has focused on how the structure can be modified, for example, by chemical substitution, to improve flux pinning properties. Two strategies are being investigated: (1) Increasing the coupling of pancake vortices to form vortex-lines by shortening or ``metallizing`` the blocking layer; and (2) the formation of defects that pin flux.

  5. Structural features that optimize high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Hinks, D.G. Chmaissem, O.; Argyriou, D.N.; Mitchell, J.F.; Dabrowski, B.

    1996-01-01

    For example, various defects can be introduced into the blocking layer to provide the optimum carrier concentration, but defects that form in or adjacent to the CuO 2 layers will lower T c and eventually destroy superconductivity. After these requirements are satisfied, the highest T c 's are observed for compounds (such as the HgBa 2 Ca n-1 CuO 2n+2+x family) that have flat and square CuO 2 planes and long apical Cu-O bonds. This conclusion is confirmed by the study of materials in which the flatness of the CuO 2 plane can be varied in a systematic way. In more recent work, attention has focused on how the structure can be modified, for example, by chemical substitution, to improve flux pinning properties. Two strategies are being investigated: (1) Increasing the coupling of pancake vortices to form vortex-lines by shortening or ''metallizing'' the blocking layer; and (2) the formation of defects that pin flux

  6. Abstracts of The First Polish-US Conference on High Temperature Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The current problems in high temperature superconductivity science have been presented at the conference. The two main topics have been mostly represented: superconducting material research and fundamental physical research on superconductivity mechanisms. Superconducting material preparation, chemical composition, magnetic and electrical properties of different type of high temperature superconductors, material structure and its influence on superconducting properties and related problems were included in the first of the general topics. In the range of second general topic of the two listed above, many theoretical models being applied for explanation of superconductivity mechanism in different systems up and below transition temperature were presented

  7. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  8. The eight superconducting quadrupoles for the ISR high-luminosity insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billan, J.; Henrichsen, K.N.; Laeger, H.; Lebrun, Ph.; Perin, R.; Pichler, S.; Pugin, P.; Resegotti, L.; Rohmig, P.; Tortschanoff, T.; Verdier, A.; Walckiers, L.; Wolf, R.

    1980-01-01

    Eight superconducting quadrupoles for a high-luminosity insertion in the ISR have been produced by industrial firms according to CERN design and manufacturing specifications, and assembled and tested at CERN. The horizontal cylindrical cryostats, which contain windings and steel yoke in a boiling helium bath, have a 173 mm warm bore. For 31 GeV beam energy, the maximum operating gradient on the quadrupole axis is 43 T m -1 and the maximum field in the windings is 5.5 T. Sextupole windings provide a linear variation of the gradient of up to 4 % over the bore width and dodecapole windings trim the field pattern as a function of excitation. This paper reports about production history, acceptance tests, and performance. The results of magnetic measurements are also summarized. The insertion will be installed into the ISR as from August 1980. (Auth.)

  9. HG2006 Workshop on High-Gradient Radio Frequency

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Meeting to be held at CERN on 25-27 September 2006 in Room 40/S2-B01 (Building 40). The objective of the workshop is to bring the high-gradient RF community together to present and discuss recent theoretical and experimental developments. Significant progress has recently been made in understanding the basic physics of rf breakdown and developing techniques for achieving higher gradients. This workshop should contribute to maintaining these efforts and to promoting contacts and collaboration. The scientific programme will be organized in half day sessions dedicated to: High-gradient rf experimental results Theory and computation High-gradient technology, materials and processing Specialized experiments on related high-gradient or high-power phenomenon like dc discharge and pulsed surface heating Reports from collaborations and projects. Each session will consist of selected presentations followed by a dedicated discussion. Information about the meeting and participant registration is available at http...

  10. Superconductivity of divalent Chevrel phases at very high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.S.; Guertin, R.P.; Hinks, D.G.; Jorgensen, J.; Capone II, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    The electrical resistivity and the superconducting transition temperatures were examined for three representative divalent Chevrel phase systems, SnMo 6 S 8 , EuMo 6 S 8 , and BaMo 6 S 8 , as a function of hydrostatic pressure to 2 GPa and in quasihydrostatic pressures to 10 GPa. In all systems, T/sub c/ is depressed to 0 K for sufficiently large pressures. For the Sn- and Eu-based systems, both highly purified samples and samples with controlled oxygen content were used. In an oxygenated SnMo 6 S 8 sample (less than 3% O 2 substituted for the S atoms) the pressure threshold and maximum T/sub c/ are 40% lower than in the pure sample, but for P>3.5 GPa the T/sub c/-P phase diagrams nearly coincide, with T/sub c/ reaching zero at an extrapolated pressure of about 12 GPa. In pure EuMo 6 S 8 , superconductivity appears only above a threshold pressure of about 1 GPa and is depressed to 0 K above 4.5 GPa. In an oxygenated sample the maximum T/sub c/ and the threshold pressure are depressed, and above about 3.5 GPa the T/sub c/-P phase diagrams coincide, as in the Sn-based system, although T/sub c/ is then rapidly depressed to 0 K at about 4.5 GPa. In a highly purified BaMo 6 S 8 sample superconductivity appears above about 2 GPa and is depressed to 0 K at extrapolated pressures above 12 GPa. A full transition to the zero-resistance superconducting state is observed in BaMo 6 S 8 . The data are discussed in terms of a model linking the rhombohedral-to-triclinic structural transition, the superconducting transition temperature, and the role of pressure in suppressing the structural transition

  11. Application of RF Superconductivity to High-Current Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.D.

    1998-01-01

    In 1997, the authors initiated a development program in Los Alamos for high-current superconducting proton-linac technology to build prototypes components of this linac to demonstrate the feasibility. The authors are building 700-MHz niobium cavities with elliptical shapes, as well as power couplers to transfer high RF power to these cavities. The cavities and power couplers will be integrated in cryostats as linac cryomodules. In this paper, they describe the linac design and the status of the development program

  12. Proceedings of a high temperature superconductivity strategy workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzfeld, A.

    1987-07-01

    The paper contains the proceedings of a high temperature superconductivity strategy workshop, held at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom, 1987. The purpose of the meeting was to consider the U.K. strategy to be adopted for the high Tsub(c) superconductors and their application. The notes are presented of five Working Groups examining the following subjects: materials preparation, structural evaluation, physical properties, theoretical studies, and applications. (UK)

  13. High speed data transmission at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1990-04-01

    High speed data transmission using fiber optics in the data acquisition system of the Superconducting Super Collider has been investigated. Emphasis is placed on the high speed data transmission system overview, the local data network and on subassemblies, such as optical transmitters and receivers. Also, the performance of candidate subassemblies having a low power dissipation for the data acquisition system is discussed. 14 refs., 5 figs

  14. An investigation into preparation of silver sheathed superconducting wires with a high critical temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaffron, Laurent

    1992-01-01

    We have shown that the critical current density of YBaCuO superconducting wires prepared using 'powder in tube' method is limited by the following principal factors: - cracks and porosity arising from the shrinkage of the powder during sintering, - irregularities in the wire section, - presence of secondary phases in the phase diagram of the three oxides, - incomplete re-oxidation at the centre of the wire, - insufficient, or complete lack of, texture in the wire, - presence of amorphous, non superconducting phase across the grains that blocks grain boundary migration. We have reduced the deleterious effects due to the first four factors by modifying prior nature of the powder, by reinforcing the sheath and by modifying the thermal treatments. We also used creep sintering to produce a strong texture; however, our study shows that texture, though necessary, is not a sufficient condition for a high current. This is because the latter is limited by the presence of the amorphous phase at too many grain boundaries. Finally, we have obtained wires in which grain boundaries are clean and which have very high critical currents by melting the wire in a thermal gradient and by passing it through the gradient very slowly. Such a technique, however, is too slow for producing superconductors. (author) [fr

  15. Superconducting Open-Gradient Magnetic Separation for the Pretreatment of Radioactive or Mixed Waste Vitrification Feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez', L.; Kaminsky', M.D.; Crawford, C.; Ritter, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    An open-gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) process is being considered to separate deleterious elements from radioactive and mixed waste streams prior to vitrification or stabilization. By physically segregating solid wastes and slurries based on the magnetic properties of the solid constituents, this potentially low-cost process may serve the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by reducing the large quantities of glass produced from defense-related high-level waste (HLW). Furthermore, the separation of deleterious elements from low-level waste (LLW) also can reduce the total quantity of waste produced in LLW immobilization activities. Many HLW 'and LLW waste' streams at both Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS) include constituents deleterious to the durability of borosilicate glass and the melter many of the constituents also possess paramagnetism. For example, Fe, Cr, Ni, and other transition metals may limit the waste loading and affect the durability of the glass by forming spine1 phases at the high operating temperature used in vitrification. Some magnetic spine1 phases observed in glass formation are magnetite (Fe,O,), chromite (FeCrO,), and others [(Fe, Ni, Mg, Zn, Mn)(Al, Fe, Ti, Cr)O,] as described elsewhere [Bates-1994, Wronkiewicz-1994] Stable spine1 phases can cause segregation between the glass and the crystalline phases. As a consequence of the difference in density, the spine1 phases tend to accumulate at the bottom of the glass melter, which decreases the conductivity and melter lifetime [Sproull-1993]. Crystallization also can affect glass durability [Jantzen-1985, Turcotte- 1979, Buechele-1990] by changing the chemical composition of the matrix glass surrounding the crystals or causing stress at the glass/crystal interface. These are some of the effects that can increase leaching [Jantzen-1985]. A SRS glass that was partially crystallized to contain 10% vol. crystals composed of spinels, nepheline, and acmite phases showed minimal changes in

  16. Response of high Tc superconducting Josephson junction to nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Honglin; Zhang Wanchang; Zhang Xiufeng

    1992-10-01

    The development of nuclear radiation detectors and research on high T c superconducting nuclear radiation detectors are introduced. The emphases are the principle of using thin-film and thick-film Josephson junctions (bridge junction) based on high T c YBCO superconductors to detect nuclear radiation, the fabrication of thin film and thick-film Josephson junction, and response of junction to low energy gamma-rays of 59.5 keV emitted from 241 Am and beta-rays of 546 keV. The results show that a detector for measuring nuclear radiation spectrum made of high T c superconducting thin-film or thick-film, especially, thick-film Josephson junction, certainly can be developed

  17. Microfluidic high gradient magnetic cell separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, David W.; Riehn, Robert; Sturm, James C.; Austin, Robert H.

    2006-04-01

    Separation of blood cells by native susceptibility and by the selective attachment of magnetic beads has recently been demonstrated on microfluidic devices. We discuss the basic principles of how forces are generated via the magnetic susceptibility of an object and how microfluidics can be combined with micron-scale magnetic field gradients to greatly enhance in principle the fractionating power of magnetic fields. We discuss our efforts and those of others to build practical microfluidic devices for the magnetic separation of blood cells. We also discuss our attempts to integrate magnetic separation with other microfluidic features for developing handheld medical diagnostic tools.

  18. High field superconducting magnets for accelerators and particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinger, J.; Danby, G.; Jackson, J.

    1975-01-01

    Experience in designing precision superconducting magnets for fields up to 60 kG is described. Realizable construction tolerances and their impact on field accuracy are discussed. For dipole fields up to 60 kG or more, rectangular coil window frame type magnets are compared with circular or elliptical coil designs. In all cases, the same superconductor current density versus maximum field performance is assumed. The comparison will include field quality and correction required as a function of aperture size, stored energy, ampere turns required, and overall magnet size. In quadrupole design the impact of the allowed superconductor current density being roughly inversely proportional to peak field is severe. For gradients up to one Tesla/cm or greater, similar comparisons for different types of quadrupole construction are made. (U.S.)

  19. Advances in high-gradient magnetic fishing for bioprocessing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goncalves Gomes, Claudia Sofia

    2006-01-01

    High-gradient magnetic fishing” (HGMF) er en metode til processering af fødestrømme med biologiske molekyler. HGMF integrerer brugen af superparamagnetiske adsorbenter med separation og processering med høj-gradient magnetisk separation (HGMS) i et magnetisk filter. Adsorbenterne er uporøse og...

  20. Final report: High current capacity high temperature superconducting film based tape for high field magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying Xin

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of the program was to establish the process parameters for the continuous deposition of high quality, superconducting YBCO films on one meter lengths of buffered RABiTS tape using MOCVD and to characterize the potential utility of the resulting tapes in high field magnet applications

  1. Progress with High-Field Superconducting Magnets for High-Energy Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ˜10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb3Sn superconductors. Nb3Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ˜15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. This review discusses the status and main results of Nb3Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.

  2. Vitaly Ginzburg and high temperature superconductivity: Personal reminiscences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazin, Igor I.

    2008-01-01

    This article is an attempt to give Western readers, as well as young researchers in Russia, a glance at the atmosphere in one of the leading physics institutions in the USSR from 1977-1988, through the eye of a graduate student and later a posdoc in the theory group led by Vitaly Ginzburg, arguably the most enthusiatic proponent of high-temperature superconductivity before the discovery of Bednorz and Muller. This is a very personal narration, wherein the events of my own life and career are inevitably intertwined with scientific events and with my reminiscences of great Russian physicists whom I had the pleasure to meet with while working in the 'High-Temperature Superconductivity Section' at the Lebedev Institute within the aforementioned 12 years

  3. Bec Model of HIGH-Tc Superconductivity in Layered Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, M.; Villarreal, C.; de Llano, M.

    2013-11-01

    High-Tc superconductivity in layered cuprates is described in a BCS-BEC formalism with linearly-dispersive s- and d-wave Cooper pairs moving in quasi-2D finite-width layers around the CuO2 planes. This yields a closed formula for Tc involving the layer width, the Debye frequency, the pairing energy and the in-plane penetration depth. The new formula has no free parameters and reasonably reproduces empirical values of superconducting Tcs for 11 different layered superconductors over a wide doping regime including YBCO itself as well as other compounds like LSCO, BSCCO and TBCCO. In agreement with the London formalism, the formula also yields a fair description of the Tc dependence of the lower critical magnetic field in highly underdoped YBCO.

  4. A Snapshot View of High Temperature Superconductivity 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, Ivan K. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Basov, Dimitri N. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2002-04-05

    This report outlines the conclusions of a workshop on High Temperature Superconductivity held April 5-8, 2002 in San Diego. The purpose of this report is to outline and highlight some outstanding and interesting issues in the field of High Temperature Superconductivity. The range of activities and new ideas that arose within the context of High Temperature Superconductors is so vast and extensive that it is impossible to summarize it in a brief document. Thus, this report does not pretend to be all-inclusive and cover all areas of activity. It is a restricted snapshot and it only presents a few viewpoints. The complexity and difficulties with high temperature superconductivity are well illustrated by the Buddhist parable of the blind men trying to describe “experimentally” an elephant. These very same facts clearly illustrate that this is an extremely active field, with many unanswered questions, and with a great future potential for discoveries and progress in many (sometimes unpredictable) directions. It is very important to stress that, independently of any current or future applications, this is a very important area of basic research.

  5. A Snapshot View of High Temperature Superconductivity 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Bansil, Arun; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2002-01-01

    This report outlines the conclusions of a workshop on High Temperature Superconductivity held April 5-8, 2002 in San Diego. The purpose of this report is to outline and highlight some outstanding and interesting issues in the field of High Temperature Superconductivity. The range of activities and new ideas that arose within the context of High Temperature Superconductors is so vast and extensive that it is impossible to summarize it in a brief document. Thus, this report does not pretend to be all-inclusive and cover all areas of activity. It is a restricted snapshot and it only presents a few viewpoints. The complexity and difficulties with high temperature superconductivity are well illustrated by the Buddhist parable of the blind men trying to describe ''experimentally'' an elephant. These very same facts clearly illustrate that this is an extremely active field, with many unanswered questions, and with a great future potential for discoveries and progress in many (sometimes unpredictable) directions. It is very important to stress that, independently of any current or future applications, this is a very important area of basic research.

  6. Gradient-induced longitudinal relaxation of hyperpolarized noble gases in the fringe fields of superconducting magnets used for magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wangzhi; Cleveland, Zackary I; Möller, Harald E; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-02-01

    When hyperpolarized noble gases are brought into the bore of a superconducting magnet for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or spectroscopy studies, the gases must pass through substantial field gradients, which can cause rapid longitudinal relaxation. In this communication, we present a means of calculating this spatially dependent relaxation rate in the fringe field of typical magnets. We then compare these predictions to experimental measurements of (3)He relaxation at various positions near a medium-bore 2-T small animal MRI system. The calculated and measured relaxation rates on the central axis of the magnet agree well and show a maximum (3)He relaxation rate of 3.83×10(-3) s(-1) (T(1)=4.4 min) at a distance of 47 cm from the magnet isocenter. We also show that if this magnet were self-shielded, its minimum T(1) would drop to 1.2 min. In contrast, a typical self-shielded 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner will induce a minimum on-axis T(1) of 12 min. Additionally, we show that the cylindrically symmetric fields of these magnets enable gradient-induced relaxation to be calculated using only knowledge of the on-axis longitudinal field, which can either be measured directly or calculated from a simple field model. Thus, while most MRI magnets employ complex and proprietary current configurations, we show that their fringe fields and the resulting gradient-induced relaxation are well approximated by simple solenoid models. Finally, our modeling also demonstrates that relaxation rates can increase by nearly an order of magnitude at radial distances equivalent to the solenoid radius. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Developments in the area of high-current-superconductivity in the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, W.; Arendt, F.; Bruenner, N.; Erb, J.; Fessler, N.; Hartwig, G.; Heinz, W.; Hofmann, A.; Juengst, K.P.; Katheder, H.

    1976-05-01

    In this report the development work is presented which has been done from 1971 to 1975 on High-Current-Superconducticity at the institute IEKP III. The report deals with the development, construction and operation of superconducting magnets, with material investigations and with the pursued applications of superconducting Magnettechnology in research and industry. (orig.) [de

  8. Simulation studies on high-gradient experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.

    1992-12-01

    Computer simulation of the characteristics of the dark current emitted from a 0.6 m long S-band accelerating structure has been made. The energy spectra and the dependence of the dark current on the structure length were simulated. By adjusting the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficients, the simulated energy spectra qualitatively reproduced the observed ones. It was shown that the dark current increases exponentially with the structure length. The measured value of the multiplication factor of the dark current per unit cell can be explained if the SEE coefficient is set to 1.2. The critical gradient for dark current capture E cri has been calculated for two structures of 180 cells. They are E cri [MV/m] = 13.1 f and 8.75 f for a/λ = 0.089 and 0.16, respectively, where f is the frequency in GHz, a the iris diameter and λ the wave length

  9. Colloquium: High pressure and road to room temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, Lev P.; Kresin, Vladimir Z.

    2018-01-01

    This Colloquium is concerned with the superconducting state of new high-Tc compounds containing hydrogen ions (hydrides). Recently superconductivity with the record-setting transition temperature of Tc=203 K was reported for sulfur hydrides under high pressure. In general, high pressure serves as a path finding tool toward novel structures, including those with very high Tc . The field has a rich and interesting history. Currently, it is broadly recognized that superconductivity in sulfur hydrides owes its origin to the phonon mechanism. However, the picture differs from the conventional one in important ways. The phonon spectrum in sulfur hydride is both broad and has a complex structure. Superconductivity arises mainly due to strong coupling to the high-frequency optical modes, although the acoustic phonons also make a noticeable contribution. A new approach is described, which generalizes the standard treatment of the phonon mechanism and makes it possible to obtain an analytical expression for Tc in this phase. It turns out that, unlike in the conventional case, the value of the isotope coefficient (for the deuterium-hydrogen substitution) varies with the pressure and reflects the impact of the optical modes. The phase diagram, that is the pressure dependence of Tc , is rather peculiar. A crucial feature is that increasing pressure results in a series of structural transitions, including the one which yields the superconducting phase with the record Tc of 203 K. In a narrow region near P ≈150 GPa the critical temperature rises sharply from Tc≈120 to ≈200 K . It seems that the sharp structural transition, which produces the high-Tc phase, is a first-order phase transition caused by interaction between the order parameter and lattice deformations. A remarkable feature of the electronic spectrum in the high-Tc phase is the appearance of small pockets at the Fermi level. Their presence leads to a two-gap spectrum, which can, in principle, be observed with the

  10. Superconductivity in the unconventional high pressure phase bismuth-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semeniuk, Konstantin; Brown, Philip; Vasiljkovic, Aleksandar; Grosche, Malte [University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    One of the most surprising developments in high pressure research was the realisation that many elements assume very unexpected high pressure structures, described in terms of extremely large or even infinite unit cells. Elemental bismuth, which has been known to undergo a series of pressure induced structural transitions between 25 kbar and 80 kbar, is an interesting example: the intermediate pressure Bi-III phase has a complex 'host-guest' structure consisting of two incommensurate sublattices. Since the unit cell is infinitely large, the description of electronic and lattice excitations is problematic. Apart from its metallic character and the observation of superconductivity at low temperature, little is known about the electronic structure in this phase. We investigate the electrical resistivity within the metallic Bi-III phase under high hydrostatic pressure and in applied magnetic field using a piston cylinder cell. Superconductivity is observed below 7.1 K, and we extract the temperature dependence of the upper critical field, which exceeds 2 T at low temperature. The normal state resistivity exhibits an approximately linear temperature dependence. This could be attributed to strong scattering from low-lying excitations, as caused by an unusually soft phonon spectrum. The results suggest that strong coupling superconductivity arises within the host-guest structure of Bi-III out of an unusual electronic state.

  11. Superconductivity at high pressure in NbSe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez Regueiro, M.; Castello, D.; Mignot, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured the electrical resistivity of NbSe 3 between 2 K and room temperature up to a pressure of 7.2 GPa. At P 1 = 3.5 GPa we observe the extinction of the high-temperature charge density wave (T 1 -CDW) and the enhancement of the superconducting critical temperature T c to ≅ 5 K. The logarithmic pressure slopes of T 1 (P 1 ) and T c (P > P 1 ) are found to be practically equal. A similar behaviour had been reported previously at lower pressures for T 2 (P 2 ) and T c (P 2 1 ) in the distorted state. We discuss these results in terms of an anisotropic superconducting state in NbSe 3 , with different gaps associated with different types of chains. 10 refs., 2 figs

  12. Correlation mediated superconductivity in a 'High-Tsub(c)' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, M.W.

    1987-08-01

    A simple model is presented to account for the High-Tsub(c) perovskite superconductors. The superconducting mechanism is purely electronic and comes from local Hubbard correlations. The model comprises a Hubbard model for the copper sites with a single particle oxygen band between the two copper Hubbard bands. The electrons move only between nearest neighbour atoms which are of different types. Using two very different approximation schemes, one related to 'Slave-Boson' mean field theory and the other based on an exact local Fermion transformation, the possibility of copper-oxygen or a mixture of copper-oxygen and oxygen-oxygen pairing is shown. The author believes that the most promising situation for superconductivity is with the Oxygen band over half-filled and closer in energy to the lower Hubbard band. (author)

  13. Design prospect of remountable high-temperature superconducting magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Hidetoshi, E-mail: hidetoshi.hashizume@qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Ito, Satoshi

    2014-10-15

    The remountable (mountable and demountable repeatedly) high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet has been proposed for huge and complex superconducting magnets in future fusion reactors to fabricate and repair easily the magnet and access inner structural components. This paper summarizes progress in R and D activities of mechanical joints of HTS conductors in terms of the electrical resistance and heat transfer performance at the joint region. The latest experimental results show the low joint resistance, 4 nΩ under 70 kA current condition using REBCO HTS conductor with mechanical lap joint system, and for the cooling system the maximum heat flux of 0.4 MW/m{sup 2} is removed by using bronze sintered porous media with sub-cooled liquid nitrogen. These values indicate that there is large possibility to design the remountable HTS magnet for fusion reactors.

  14. Design and application consideration of high temperature superconducting current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    As a potential major source of heat leak and the resultant cryogen boiloff, cryogenic current leads can significantly affect the refrigeration power requirement of cryogenic power equipment. Reduction of the heat leak associated with current leads can therefore contribute to the development and application of this equipment. Recent studies and tests have demonstrated that, due to their superconducting and low thermal conductivity properties, ceramic high temperature superconductor (HTSC) can be employed in current leads to significantly reduce the heat leak. However, realization of this benefit requires special design considerations pertaining to the properties and the fabrication technology of the relatively new ceramic superconductor materials. Since processing and fabrication technology are continuously being developed in the laboratories, data on material properties unrelated to critical states are quite limited. Therefore, design analysis and experiments have to be conducted in tandem to achieve a successful development. Due to the rather unique combination of superconducting and thermal conductivities which are orders of magnitude lower than copper, ceramic superconductors allow expansion of the operating scenarios of current leads. In addition to the conventional vapor-cooled lead type application, low heat leak conduction-cooled type current leads may be practical and are being developed. Furthermore, a current lead with an intermediate heat leak intercept has been successfully demonstrated in a multiple current lead assembly employing HTSC. These design and application considerations of high temperature superconducting current leads are addressed here

  15. High-Tc superconducting microbolometer for terahertz applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulysse, C.; Gaugue, A.; Adam, A.; Kreisler, A. J.; Villégier, J.-C.; Thomassin, J.-L.

    2002-05-01

    Superconducting hot electron bolometer mixers are now a competitive alternative to Schottky diode mixers in the terahertz frequency range because of their ultra wideband (from millimeter waves to visible light), high conversion gain, and low intrinsic noise level. High Tc superconductor materials can be used to make hot electron bolometers and present some advantage in term of operating temperature and cooling. In this paper, we present first a model for the study of superconducting hot electron bolometers responsivity in direct detection mode, in order to establish a firm basis for the design of future THz mixers. Secondly, an original process to realize YBaCuO hot electron bolometer mixers will be described. Submicron YBaCuO superconducting structures are expitaxially sputter deposited on MgO substrates and patterned by using electron beam lithography in combination with optical lithography. Metal masks achieved by electron beam lithography are insuring a good bridge definition and protection during ion etching. Finally, detection experiments are being performed with a laser at 850 nm wavelength, in homodyne mode in order to prove the feasibility and potential performances of these devices.

  16. High Pressure, High Gradient RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, R P

    2004-01-01

    High intensity, low emittance muon beams are needed for new applications such as muon colliders and neutrino factories based on muon storage rings. Ionization cooling, where muon energy is lost in a low-Z absorber and only the longitudinal component is regenerated using RF cavities, is presently the only known cooling technique that is fast enough to be effective in the short muon lifetime. RF cavities filled with high-pressure hydrogen gas bring two advantages to the ionization technique: the energy absorption and energy regeneration happen simultaneously rather than sequentially, and higher RF gradients and better cavity breakdown behavior are possible than in vacuum due to the Paschen effect. These advantages and some disadvantages and risks will be discussed along with a description of the present and desired RF R&D efforts needed to make accelerators and colliders based on muon beams less futuristic.

  17. Highly Sensitive Measurements of the Dark Current of Superconducting Cavities for TESLA Using a SQUID Based Cryogenic Current Comparator

    CERN Document Server

    Vodel, W; Nietzsche, S

    2004-01-01

    This contribution presents a Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) as an excellent tool for detecting dark currents generated, e.g. by superconducting cavities for the upcoming TESLA project (X-FEL) at DESY. To achieve the maximum possible energy the gradient of the superconducting RF cavities should be pushed close to the physical limit of 50 MV/m. The undesired field emission of electrons (so-called dark current) of the superconducting RF cavities at strong fields may limit the maximum gradient. The absolute measurement of the dark current in correlation with the gradient will give a proper value to compare and classify the cavities. The main component of the CCC is a highly sensitive LTS-DC SQUID system which is able to measure extremely low magnetic fields, e.g. caused by the dark current. For this reason the input coil of the SQUID is connected across a special designed toroidal niobium pick-up coil for the passing electron beam. A noise limited current resolution of nearly 2 pA/√(Hz) with a measu...

  18. JETC (Japanese Technology Evaluation Center) Panel Report on High Temperature Superconductivity in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Duane; Gamota, George

    1989-01-01

    The Japanese regard success in R and D in high temperature superconductivity as an important national objective. The results of a detailed evaluation of the current state of Japanese high temperature superconductivity development are provided. The analysis was performed by a panel of technical experts drawn from U.S. industry and academia, and is based on reviews of the relevant literature and visits to Japanese government, academic and industrial laboratories. Detailed appraisals are presented on the following: Basic research; superconducting materials; large scale applications; processing of superconducting materials; superconducting electronics and thin films. In all cases, comparisons are made with the corresponding state-of-the-art in the United States.

  19. High temperature superconducting YBCO microwave filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghabagheri, S.; Rasti, M.; Mohammadizadeh, M. R.; Kameli, P.; Salamati, H.; Mohammadpour-Aghdam, K.; Faraji-Dana, R.

    2018-06-01

    Epitaxial thin films of YBCO high temperature superconductor are widely used in telecommunication technology such as microwave filter, antenna, coupler and etc., due to their lower surface resistance and lower microwave loss than their normal conductor counterparts. Thin films of YBCO were fabricated by PLD technique on LAO substrate. Transition temperature and width were 88 K and 3 K, respectively. A filter pattern was designed and implemented by wet photolithography method on the films. Characterization of the filter at 77 K has been compared with the simulation results and the results for a made gold filter. Both YBCO and gold filters show high microwave loss. For YBCO filter, the reason may be due to the improper contacts on the feedlines and for gold filter, low thickness of the gold film has caused the loss increased.

  20. Applications of high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malozemoff, A.P.; Gallagher, W.J.; Schwall, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The new high temperature superconductors open up possibilities for applications in magnets, power transmission, computer interconnections, Josephson devices and instrumentation, among many others. The success of these applications hinges on many interlocking factors, including critical current density, critical fields, allowable processing temperatures, mechanical properties and chemical stability. An analysis of some of these factors suggests which applications may be the easiest to realize and which may have the greatest potential

  1. High-temperature superconducting current leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J. R.

    1992-07-01

    The use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) for current leads to deliver power to devices at liquid helium temperature is near commercial realization. The use of HTSs in this application has the potential to reduce refrigeration requirements and helium boiloff to values significantly lower than the theoretical best achievable with conventional leads. Considerable advantage is achieved by operating these leads with an intermediate temperature heat sink. The HTS part of the lead can be made from pressed and sintered powder. Powder-in-tube fabrication is also possible, however, the normal metal part of the lead acts as a thermal short and cannot provide much stabilization without increasing the refrigeration required. Lead stability favors designs with low current density. Such leads can be manufactured with today's technology, and lower refrigeration results from the same allowable burnout time. Higher current densities result in lower boiloff for the same lead length, but bumout times can be very short. In comparing experiment to theory, the density of helium vapor needs to be accounted for in calculating the expected boiloff. For very low-loss leads, two-dimensional heat transfer and the state of the dewar near the leads may play a dominant role in lead performance.

  2. Energy storage via high temperature superconductivity (SMES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkonen, R. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    The technology concerning high temperature superconductors (HTS) is matured to enabling different kind of prototype applications including SMES. Nowadays when speaking about HTS systems, attention is focused on the operating temperature of 20-30 K, where the critical current and flux density are fairly close to 4.2 K values. In addition by defining the ratio of the energy content of a novel HTS magnetic system and the required power to keep the system at the desired temperature, the optimum settles to the above mentioned temperature range. In the frame of these viewpoints a 5 kJ HTS SMES system has been designed and tested at Tampere University of Technology with a coil manufactured by American Superconductor (AMSC). The HTS magnet has inside and outside diameters of 252 mm and 317 mm, respectively and axial length of 66 mm. It operates at 160 A and carries a total of 160 kA-turns to store the required amount of energy. The effective magnetic inductance is 0.4 H and the peak axial field is 1.7 T. The magnet is cooled to the operating temperature of 20 K with a two stage Gifford-McMahon type cryocooler with a cooling power of 60 W at 77 K and 8 W at 20 K. The magnetic system has been demonstrated to compensate a short term loss of power of a sensitive consumer

  3. In-situ plasma processing to increase the accelerating gradients of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleans, M.; Tyagi, P. V.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C. J.; Ball, J. A.; Barnhart, D. L.; Blokland, W.; Crofford, M. T.; Degraff, B. D.; Gold, S. W.; Hannah, B. S.; Howell, M. P.; Kim, S.-H.; Lee, S.-W.; Mammosser, J.; Neustadt, T. S.; Saunders, J. W.; Stewart, S.; Strong, W. H.; Vandygriff, D. J.; Vandygriff, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new in-situ plasma processing technique is being developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the cavities in operation. The technique utilizes a low-density reactive oxygen plasma at room temperature to remove top surface hydrocarbons. The plasma processing technique increases the work function of the cavity surface and reduces the overall amount of vacuum and electron activity during cavity operation; in particular it increases the field emission onset, which enables cavity operation at higher accelerating gradients. Experimental evidence also suggests that the SEY of the Nb surface decreases after plasma processing which helps mitigating multipacting issues. In this article, the main developments and results from the plasma processing R&D are presented and experimental results for in-situ plasma processing of dressed cavities in the SNS horizontal test apparatus are discussed.

  4. High-temperature superconducting fault-current limiter - optimisation of superconducting elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study initiated to continue the work of a DTI-LINK Collaborative Research Programme 'Enhancing the Properties of Bulk High Temperature Superconductors and their Potential Application as Fault Current Limiters (FCL). Details are given of computer modelling of the quenching process involving the transition from superconducting to normal conducting states undergone by the material when large currents are present. The design of compound elements, and a multi-element model are described along with FCL design covering distribution bus-coupler, embedded generator connection, larger generator connection, hazardous area safety, and interconnection to fault-prone network. The evaluation of thermal loss, test equipment and schedule, the optimised element, installed cost data, and the UK market are considered

  5. High-gradient electron accelerator powered by a relativisitic klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Boyd, J.K.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Haimson, J.; Hoag, H.A.; Hopkins, D.B.; Houck, T.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Mecklenburg, B.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Ryne, R.D.; Sessler, A.M.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    We have used relativistic klystron technology to extract 290 MW of peak power at 11.4 GHz from an induction linac beam, and to power a short 11.4-GHz high-gradient accelerator. We have measured rf phase stability, field emission, and the momentum spectrum of an accelerated electron beam. An average accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m has been achieved with 80 MW of relativistic klystron power

  6. Optimization of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for the HighCurrent Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbi, GianLuca; Gourlay, Steve; Gung, Chen-yu; Hafalia, Ray; Lietzke, Alan; Martovetski, Nicolai; Mattafirri, Sara; Meinke, Rainer; Minervini, Joseph; Schultz, Joel; Seidl, Peter

    2005-09-16

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program is progressing through a series of physics and technology demonstrations leading to an inertial fusion power plant. The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physics of intense beams with high line-charge density. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles have been developed for the HCX magnetic transport studies. A baseline design was selected following several pre-series models. Optimization of the baseline design led to the development of a first prototype that achieved a conductor-limited gradient of 132 T/m in a 70 mm bore, without training, with measured field errors at the 0.1% level. Based on these results, the magnet geometry and fabrication procedures were adjusted to improve the field quality. These modifications were implemented in a second prototype. In this paper, the optimized design is presented and comparisons between the design harmonics and magnetic measurements performed on the new prototype are discussed.

  7. 3D Cones Acquisition of Human Extremity Imaging Using a 1.5T Superconducting Magnet and an Unshielded Gradient Coil Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-05-16

    We developed ultrashort echo-time (UTE) imaging sequences with 3D Cones trajectories for a home-built compact MRI system using a 1.5T superconducting magnet and an unshielded gradient coil set. We achieved less than 7 min imaging time and obtained clear in vivo images of a human forearm with a TE of 0.4 ms. We concluded that UTE imaging using 3D Cones acquisition was successfully implemented in our 1.5T MRI system.

  8. High-gradient normal-conducting RF structures for muon cooling channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corlett, J.N.; Green, M.A.; Hartman, N.; Ladran, A.; Li, D.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Moretti, A.; Jurgens, T.; Holtkamp, N.; Black, E.; Summers, D.; Booke, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present a status report on the research and development of high-gradient normal-conducting RF structures for the ionization cooling of muons in a neutrino factory or muon collider. High-gradient RF structures are required in regions enclosed in strong focusing solenoidal magnets, precluding the application of superconducting RF technology [1]. We propose using linear accelerating structures, with individual cells electromagnetically isolated, to achieve the required gradients of over 15 MV/m at 201 MHz and 30 MV/m at 805 MHz. Each cell will be powered independently, and cell length and drive phase adjusted to optimize shunt impedance of the assembled structure. This efficient design allows for relatively small field enhancement on the structure walls, and an accelerating field approximately 1.7 times greater than the peak surface field. The electromagnetic boundary of each cell may be provided by a thin Be sheet, or an assembly of thin-walled metal tubes. Use of thin, low-Z materials will allow passage of the muon beams without significant deterioration in beam quality due to scattering. R and D in design and analysis of robust structures that will operate under large electric and magnetic fields and RF current heating are discussed, including the experimental program based in a high-power test laboratory developed for this purpose

  9. Anomalous superconductivity in black phosphorus under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Tachikawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    Pressure induced superconductivity in single crystals of black phosphorus has been studied. Maximum onset Tsub(c) was near 13 K. The anomalous superconductivity may be explained in terms of excitonic mechanism. (author)

  10. Comparative Studies of High-Gradient Rf and Dc Breakdowns

    CERN Document Server

    Kovermann, Jan Wilhelm; Wuensch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC project is based on normal-conducting high-gradient accelerating structures with an average accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m. The maximum achievable gradient in these structures is limited by the breakdown phenomenon. The physics of breakdowns is not yet fully understood quantitatively. A full knowledge could have strong impact on the design, material choice and construction of rf structures. Therefore, understanding breakdowns has great importance to reaching a gradient of 100MV/m with an acceptable breakdown probability. This thesis addresses the physics underlying the breakdown effect, focusing on a comparison of breakdowns in rf structures and in a dc spark setup. The dc system is simpler, easier to benchmark against simulations, with a faster turnaround time, but the relationship to rf breakdown must be established. To do so, an experimental approach based on optical diagnostics and electrical measurements methods was made. Following an introduction into the CLIC project, a general theoretical ...

  11. Percolation modelling for highly aligned polycrystalline superconducting tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutter, N A; Glowacki, B A; Evetts, J E [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); IRC in Superconductivity, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2000-11-01

    Surface and bulk texture measurements have been carried out on highly aligned NiFe tapes, suitable for use as coated conductor substrates. Data from small-area electron backscatter diffraction measurements are compared with those from bulk x-ray analysis in the development of a two-dimensional percolation model, and the two are shown to give very similar results. No evidence of grain-to-grain correlation is found. The model is then developed to assess how the properties of a superconducting layer grown epitaxially on buffered tapes will depend on parameters such as sample size, grain size and the extent of grain alignment. (author)

  12. Progress in DOE high temperature superconductivity electric power applications program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, J.G.; Sheahn, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) leads national R and D effort to develop US industry's capability to produce a wide range of advanced energy-efficient electric power products. The immediate need is to make high temperature superconductivity (HTS) wire. Wire developers at the DOE National laboratories are working wit industrial partners toward this objective. In this paper, the authors describe the progress to date, citing both the difficulties associated with making wire from these ceramic materials, and achievements at several organizations. Results for progress over the next five years are stated

  13. High-temperature superconducting passive microwave devices, filters and antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, S.

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) passive microwave devices, such as filters and antennas, are promising devices. In particular, HTS filters may be successfully marketed in the near future. Cross-coupled filters, ring filters, and coplanar waveguide filters are good options to reduce filter size. On the other hand, HTS patch antennas which can be cooled by a cryo-cooler are also promising devices as well, since they show higher efficiency than normal antennas. This paper examines the design process and filter properties of HTS filters as well as the gains, directivity, and cooling system of HTS patch antennas. (author)

  14. High temperature superconductivity: Hope of a new technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Following the sensational report in 1986 from the IBM laboratory in Rueschlikon, Switzerland, that superconductivity - that permanent flow of current at temperatures close to absolute zero - is also possible at higher temperatures, the waves of enthusiasm among scientists at first rose high. They talked of a revolution in electrotechnology, especially since superconductors at room temperature seemed to have almost come within reach. In the meantime their thoughts on the matter are much more down to earth. What are the realistic fields of application for the 'new superconductors'? The questions are discussed by scientists, politicians and engineers. (orig.) [de

  15. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  16. Understanding and application of superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Byeong Mu; Lee, Chun Heung

    1997-02-01

    This book deals with superconducting materials, which contains from basic theory to application of superconducting materials. The contents of this book are mystery of superconducting materials, properties of superconducting materials, thermodynamics of superconducting materials, theoretical background of superconducting materials, tunnelling and quantum interference, classification and properties of superconducting materials, high temperature superconducting materials, production and analysis of superconducting materials and application of superconducting materials.

  17. High gradient linac for proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Benedetti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proposed for the first time almost 30 years ago, the research on radio frequency linacs for hadron therapy experienced a sparkling interest in the past decade. The different projects found a common ground on a relatively high rf operating frequency of 3 GHz, taking advantage of the availability of affordable and reliable commercial klystrons at this frequency. This article presents for the first time the design of a proton therapy linac, called TULIP all-linac, from the source up to 230 MeV. In the first part, we will review the rationale of linacs for hadron therapy. We then divided this paper in two main sections: first, we will discuss the rf design of the different accelerating structures that compose TULIP; second, we will present the beam dynamics design of the different linac sections.

  18. Heavy Metal Diffusion through Soft Clay under High Hydraulic Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheer Ahmed Almani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on the determination of contaminant transport parameters of heavy metal Zinc moving through saturated soft Bangkok undisturbed clay under high hydraulic gradients. These parameters were compared with contaminant transport determined under concentration gradient alone (pure diffusion. In total fifteen column tests were conducted and a mathematical model was applied to determine the coefficients. Two different source concentrations conditions, constant and decreasing, were applied. Testing periods were ranged from 15-60 days while hydraulic gradients were ranged from 0-500. The curves between relative concentration and time and pore volume were developed for the constant source condition whereas curves between source reservoirs concentrations and time were developed for decreasing source condition. The effective diffusion and distribution coefficients, De and Kd, were determined by curve fitting using the computer code POLLUTE v 6.3. The results showed that diffusion coefficient increases and distribution coefficient decreases as hydraulic gradient increases from 0 to high value of 500 due to contribution of dispersion and additional molecular diffusion at high advective velocity. Thus, testing at high gradients ensures the safe performance of earthen barriers under worse conditions.

  19. Development of large high current density superconducting solenoid magnets for use in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1977-05-01

    The development of a unique type of large superconducting solenoid magnet, characterized by very high current density windings and a two-phase helium tubular cooling system is described. The development of the magnet's conceptual design and the construction of two test solenoids are described. The successful test of the superconducting coil and its tubular cooling refrigeration system is presented. The safety, environmental and economic impacts of the test program on future developments in high energy physics are shown. Large solid angle particle detectors for colliding beam physics will analyze both charged and neutral particles. In many cases, these detectors will require neutral particles, such as gamma rays, to pass through the magnet coil with minimum interaction. The magnet coils must be as thin as possible. The use of superconducting windings allows one to minimize radiation thickness, while at the same time maximizing charged particle momentum resolution and saving substantial quantities of electrical energy. The results of the experimental measurements show that large high current density solenoid magnets can be made to operate at high stored energies. The superconducting magnet development described has a positive safety and environmental impact. The use of large high current density thin superconducting solenoids has been proposed in two high energy physics experiments to be conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Cornell University as a result of the successful experiments described

  20. Avoiding vacuum arcs in high gradient normal conducting RF structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sjøbæk, Kyrre Ness; Adli, Erik; Grudiev, Alexej; Wuensch, Walter

    In order to build the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC), accelerating structures reaching extremely high accelerating gradients are needed. Such structures have been built and tested using normal-conducting copper, powered by X-band RF power and reaching gradients of 100 MV/m and above. One phenomenon that must be avoided in order to reliably reach such gradients, is vacuum arcs or “breakdowns”. This can be accomplished by carefully designing the structure geometry such that high surface fields and large local power flows are avoided. The research presented in this thesis presents a method for optimizing the geometry of accelerating structures so that these breakdowns are made less likely, allowing the structure to operate reliably at high gradients. This was done primarily based on a phenomenological scaling model, which predicted the maximum gradient as a function of the break down rate, pulse length, and field distribution in the structure. The model is written in such a way that it allows direct comparis...

  1. Superconductivity of ternary metal compounds prepared at high pressures

    CERN Document Server

    Shirotani, I

    2003-01-01

    Various ternary metal phosphides, arsenides, antimonides, silicides and germanides have been prepared at high temperatures and high pressures. These ternary metal compounds can be classified into four groups: [1] metal-rich compounds MM' sub 4 X sub 2 and [2] MM'X, [3] non-metal-rich compounds MXX' and [4] MM' sub 4 X sub 1 sub 2 (M and M' = metal element; X and X' = non-metal element). We have studied the electrical and magnetic properties of these materials at low temperatures, and found many new superconductors with the superconducting transition temperature (T sub c) of above 10 K. The metal-rich compound ZrRu sub 4 P sub 2 with a tetragonal structure showed the superconducting transition at around 11 K, and had an upper critical field (H sub c sub 2) of 12.2 tesla (T) at 0 K. Ternary equiatomic compounds ZrRuP and ZrRuSi crystallize in two modifications, a hexagonal Fe sub 2 P-type structure [h-ZrRuP(Si)] and an orthorhombic Co sub 2 P-type structure [o-ZrRuP(Si)]. Both h-ZrRuP and h-ZrRuSi have rather h...

  2. Study of superconducting cavities for high power proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biarrotte, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The research program on hybrid reactors has started in France in order to study the technologies allowing the transmutation of radioactive wastes thanks to a spallation neutron source supplied by a linear high intensity proton accelerator. The study of the high energy part of this accelerator (superconducting accelerator for hybrid) has started, and its aim is the design of superconducting radiofrequency cavities which make the two different sections of the accelerator (0.47 and 0.65). This thesis presents the advance of the work carried out on this topic since 1997, in particular the design and optimization of the 5-cell cavities which work at the 704.4 MHz frequency. The experimental part of the study has been carried out in parallel with the industrial fabrication (Cerca) of several prototypes of mono-cell cavities. These cavities have shown very good RF performances during the tests in vertical cryostat; the A 102 A cavity, in particular develops a Q0 of 7.10 10 (indicating very low RF losses) and reaches an accelerator field of 25 MV/m, i.e. more than two times the specified value (about 10 MV/V). Finally, a new risk analysis method for the excitation of the upper modes is proposed. This method shows in particular the uselessness of the implementation of HOM couplers on the cavities for a continuous beam use. (J.S.)

  3. High-field superconducting window-frame beam-transport magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinger, J.; Carroll, A.; Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Leonhardt, W.; Prodell, A.; Skarita, J.

    1982-01-01

    The window-frame design for high-field superconducting beam-transport magnets was first applied to two, 2-m-long, 4-T modules of an 8 0 bending magent which has operated for nine years in the primary proton beam line at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The design of two 1.5-m long, 7.6-cm cold-bore superconducting windowframe magnets, described in this paper, intended for the external proton beam transport system at the AGS incorporated evolutionary changes. These magnets generated a maximum aperture field of 6.8 T with a peak field in the dipole coil of 7.1 T. Measured fields are very accurate and are compared to values calculated using the computer programs LINDA and POISSON. Results of quench-propagation studies demonstrate the excellent thermal stability of the magnets. The magnets quench safely without energy extraction at a maximum current density, J = 130 kA/cm 2 in the superconductor, corresponding to J = 57.6 kA/cm 2 overall the conductor at B = 6.7 T

  4. The DARPA manufacturing initiative in high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has a very aggressive Technology Base program in high temperature superconductivity. This program is expected to provide the basis for a specialized set of military products - passive microwave and millimeter wave devices - within the next three years. In order to get these high leverage products into military systems, a manufacturing base must be developed for HTSC components. A plan for DARPA in HTSC manufacturing is directly coupled with the ongoing DARPA materials and device oriented R and D program. In essence, this plan recommends a three phased effort: 1. Phase I (two years); Fund companies through R and D contracts for specialized HTSC components; prepare a detailed plan and develop an HTSC consortium. 2. Phase II (six years): Establish an HTSC Sematech initiative for electronic applications, including active devices. 3. Phase III (optional): Continue the HTSC Sematech with emphasis on high power applications

  5. Memory effect in the high-temperature superconducting bulks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xing-Yi; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, You-He

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Effects of temperature cycles on levitation force relaxation are investigated. •Memory effect of the YBCO bulks is observed in experiments. •With an increase of temperature, memory of the superconductor is gradually lost. -- Abstract: We present an experimental investigation of the relaxation of vertical force components in a high-temperature superconducting levitation system with different temperature cycle processes. For a selected ambient temperature (T 1 ) of the system, the experimental results show that the relaxations of the levitation forces are strongly dependent on the initial temperature. When the sample was submitted to temperature jumps around T 1 , the sample temperature was regulated at T 2 , and there were two cases of the experiments, ΔT = T 2 − T 1 0 (positive temperature cycle). It was found that in the case of negative temperature cycle, the superconducting samples have memory effect. And for the positive temperature cycle, with the experimental temperature increase, the memory effect of samples is gradually losing. Additionally, with the increase of temperature, the influences of the negative and positive temperature cycle on the levitation force relaxation are unsymmetrical. All the results are interpreted by using the characteristics of the free energy ‘ground’ plot of the Spin-glasses qualitatively

  6. Upper critical field measurements in high-Tc superconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousset, J. C.; Bobo, J. F.; Ulmet, J. P.; Rakoto, H.; Cheggour, N.

    We present upper critical field measurements on the superconducting oxides RE Ba2Cu3O7-δ (RE = Y, Gd) performed in a pulsed magnetic field up to 43 T. Values for Hc2 as high as 52 T and 77 T for Y and Gd respectively, are expected at 77 K. However, in order to observe no resistive behaviour up to 43 T the temperature must be decreased down to 50 K. In the case of oxygen deficient systems the magnetoresistance reveals two superconducting phases wich could be related to two different orders of oxygen vacancies. Nous présentons des mesures de champ critique Hc2 sur les supraconducteurs TR Ba 2Cu3O7-δ (TR = Y, Gd) réalisées en champ magnétique pulsé jusqu'à 43 T. Elles permettent de prévoir des valeurs de H c2 de 52 T et 77 T respectivement pour Y et Gd à 77 K. Cependant, pour ne pas observer de comportement résistif jusqu'au champ maximum, il est nécessaire de refroidir l'échantillon jusqu'à 50 K. Dans le cas des systèmes déficients en oxygène (δ important) nous mettons en évidence l'existence de deux phases supraconductrices qui pourraient être dues à deux ordres différents des lacunes d'oxygène.

  7. High temperature superconducting films by rf magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadin, A.M.; Ballentine, P.H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have produced sputtered films of Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O by rf magnetron sputtering from an oxide target consisting of loose reacted powder. The use of a large 8-inch stoichiometric target in the magnetron mode permits films located above the central region to be free of negative-ion resputtering effects, and hence yields reproducible, uniform stoichiometric compositions for a wide range of substrate temperatures. Superconducting YBCO films have been obtained either by sputtering at low temperatures followed by an 850 0 C oxygen anneal, or alternatively by depositing onto substrates heated to ∼600 - 650 0 C and cooling in oxygen. Films prepared by the former method on cubic zirconia substrate consist of randomly oriented crystallites with zero resistance above 83 K. Those deposited on zirconia at medium temperatures without the high-temperature anneal contain smooth partially oriented crystallites, with a slightly depressed T/sub c/ ∼75K. Finally, superconducting films have been deposited on MgO using a BiSrCaCu/sub 2/O/sub x/ powder target

  8. High speed superconducting flywheel system for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, H. J.; Urban, C.; Boegler, P.; Ritter, T.; Zaitsev, O.; Weber, K.; Rietschel, H.

    1994-12-01

    A prototype of a flywheel system with auto stable high temperature superconducting bearings was built and tested. The bearings offered good vertical and lateral stability. A metallic flywheel disk, ø 190 mm x 30 mm, was safely rotated at speeds up to 15000 rpm. The disk was driven by a 3 phase synchronous homopolar motor/generator. Maximum energy capacity was 3.8 Wh, maximum power was 1.5 KW. The dynamic behavior of the prototype was tested, characterized and evaluated with respect to axial and lateral stiffness, decay torques (bearing drag), vibrational modes and critical speeds. The bearings supports a maximum weight of 65 N at zero gap, axial and lateral stiffness at 1 mm gap were 440 N/cm and 130 N/cm, respectively. Spin down experiments were performed to investigate the energy efficiency of the system. The decay rate was found to depend upon background pressure in the vacuum chamber and upon the gap width in the bearing. At a background pressure of 5x10 -4 Torr, the coefficient of friction (drag-to-lift ratio) was measured to be 0.000009 at low speeds for 6 mm gap width in the bearing. Our results indicate that further refinement of this technology will allow operation of higly efficient superconducting flywheels in the kWh range.

  9. High-Density Superconducting Cables for Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C. G.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Henderson, S. W.; Ho, S. P.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Nati, F.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-07-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upcoming Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) receiver upgrade, scheduled to deploy in 2016, that will allow measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature to the highest precision yet with ACT. The AdvACT increase in sensitivity is partly provided by an increase in the number of transition-edge sensors (TESes) per array by up to a factor of two over the current ACTPol receiver detector arrays. The high-density AdvACT TES arrays require 70 \\upmu m pitch superconducting flexible cables (flex) to connect the detector wafer to the first-stage readout electronics. Here, we present the flex fabrication process and test results. For the flex wiring layer, we use a 400-nm-thick sputtered aluminum film. In the center of the cable, the wiring is supported by a polyimide substrate, which smoothly transitions to a bare (uncoated with polyimide) silicon substrate at the ends of the cable for a robust wedge wire-bonding interface. Tests on the first batch of flex made for the first AdvACT array show that the flex will meet the requirements for AdvACT, with a superconducting critical current above 1 mA at 500 mK, resilience to mechanical and cryogenic stress, and a room temperature yield of 97 %.

  10. Spin-polarons and high-Tc superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    The spin-polaron concept is introduced in analogy to ionic and electronic polarons and the assumptions underlying the author's approach to spin-polaron mediated high-T c superconductivity are discussed. Elementary considerations about the spin-polaron formation energy are reviewed and the possible origin of the pairing mechanism illustrated schematically. The electronic structure of the CuO 2 planes is treated from the standpoint of antiferromagnetic band calculations that lead directly to the picture of holes predominantly on the oxygen sublattice in a Mott-Hubbard/charge transfer insulator. Assuming the holes to be described in a Bloch representation but with the effective mass renormalized by spin-polaron formation, equations for the superconducting gap, Δ, and transition temperature, T c , are developed and the symmetry of Δ discussed. After further simplifications, T c is calculated as a function of the carrier concentration, x. It is shown that the calculated behavior of T c (x) follows the experimental results closely and leads to a natural explanation of the effects of under- and over-doping. The paper concludes with a few remarks about the evidence for the carriers being fermions (polarons) or bosons (bipolarons)

  11. High-Density Superconducting Cables for Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C. G.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Henderson, S. W.; Ho, S. P.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upcoming Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) receiver upgrade, scheduled to deploy in 2016, that will allow measure- ment of the cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature to the highest precision yet with ACT. The AdvACT increase in sensitivity is partly provided by an increase in the number of transition-edge sensors (TESes) per array by up to a factor of two over the current ACTPol receiver detector arrays. The high-density AdvACT TES arrays require 70 µ m pitch superconducting flexible cables (flex) to connect the detec- tor wafer to the first-stage readout electronics. Here, we present the flex fabrication process and test results. For the flex wiring layer, we use a 400-nm-thick sputtered alu- minum film. In the center of the cable, the wiring is supported by a polyimide substrate, which smoothly transitions to a bare (uncoated with polyimide) silicon substrate at the ends of the cable for a robust wedge wire-bonding interface. Tests on the first batch of flex made for the first AdvACT array show that the flex will meet the requirements for AdvACT, with a superconducting critical current above 1 mA at 500 mK, resilience to mechanical and cryogenic stress, and a room temperature yield of 97%.

  12. Superconductivity - applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the following subjects: 1) Electronics and high-frequency technology, 2) Superconductors for energy technology, 3) Superconducting magnets and their applications, 4) Electric machinery, 5) Superconducting cables. (WBU) [de

  13. Possible universal cause of high-Tc superconductivity in different metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Shaginyan, V.R.

    2002-01-01

    Using the theory of the high temperature superconductivity based on the idea of the fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT) it is shown that neither the d-wave pairing symmetry, nor the pseudogap phenomenon, nor the presence of the Cu-O 2 planes are of decisive importance for the existence of the high-T c superconductivity. The analysis of recent experimental data on this type of superconductivity in different materials is carried out. It is shown that these facts can be understood within the theory of superconductivity based on the FCQPT. The main features of a room-temperature superconductor are discussed [ru

  14. Superconducting magnets in high radiation environments: Design problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Lorant, S.J.; Tillmann, E.

    1989-11-01

    As part of the Stanford Linear Collider Project, three high-field superconducting solenoid magnets are used to rotate the spin direction of a polarized electron beam. The magnets are installed in a high-radiation environment, where they will receive a dose of approximately 10 3 rad per hour, or 10 8 rad over their lifetimes. This level of radiation and the location in which the magnets are installed, some 10 meters below ground in contiguous tunnels, required careful selection of materials for the construction of the solenoids and their ancillary cryogenic equipment, as well as the development of compatible component designs. This paper describes the materials used and the design of the equipment appropriate for the application. Included are summaries of the physical and mechanical properties of the materials and how they behave when irradiated. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  15. Metallicity gradient of the thick disc progenitor at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Daisuke; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Brook, Chris B.; Casagrande, Luca; Ciucă, Ioana; Gibson, Brad K.; Grand, Robert J. J.; Hayden, Michael R.; Hunt, Jason A. S.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a novel Markov Chain Monte Carlo chemical 'painting' technique to explore possible radial and vertical metallicity gradients for the thick disc progenitor. In our analysis, we match an N-body simulation to the data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey. We assume that the thick disc has a constant scaleheight and has completed its formation at an early epoch, after which time radial mixing of its stars has taken place. Under these assumptions, we find that the initial radial metallicity gradient of the thick disc progenitor should not be negative, but either flat or even positive, to explain the current negative vertical metallicity gradient of the thick disc. Our study suggests that the thick disc was built-up in an inside-out and upside-down fashion, and older, smaller and thicker populations are more metal poor. In this case, star-forming discs at different epochs of the thick disc formation are allowed to have different radial metallicity gradients, including a negative one, which helps to explain a variety of slopes observed in high-redshift disc galaxies. This scenario helps to explain the positive slope of the metallicity-rotation velocity relation observed for the Galactic thick disc. On the other hand, radial mixing flattens the slope of an existing gradient.

  16. Radiation Shielding Utilizing A High Temperature Superconducting Magnet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Project objective is to evaluate human radiation protection and architecture utilizing existing superconducting magnet technology while attempting to significantly...

  17. Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

  18. Microscopic Superconductivity and Room Temperature Electronics of High-Tc Cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fusui; Chen Wanfang

    2008-01-01

    This paper points out that the Landau criterion for macroscopic superfluidity of He II is only a criterion for microscopic superfluidity of 4 He, extends the Landau criterion to microscopic superconductivity in fermions (electron and hole) system and system with Cooper pairs without long-range phase coherence. This paper gives another three non-superconductive systems that are of microscopic superconductivity. This paper demonstrates that one application of microscopic superconductivity is to establish room temperature electronics of the high-T c cuprates

  19. Fabrication and characterizations of high-Tc superconducting ceramic/polymer 0--3 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, J.; Unsworth, J.

    1994-01-01

    High-T c superconducting ceramic YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x /thermosetting plastic 0--3 composites were fabricated. The structure, physical property, magnetic susceptibility, levitation, and mechanical strength of the composites were accessed. The influence of filler content on these properties was also studied. Although the 0--3 composites lack an electrical superconducting path through materials, the intrinsic diamagnetic properties were preserved. The magnetic superconducting transition temperature was not degraded. The values of magnetic susceptibility and levitation force for the composites were basically proportional to the actual volume fraction of superconducting filler. These new composite materials are most suitable for the applications in levitating vehicles and mechanical bearings

  20. Trapped magnetic field of a superconducting bulk magnet in high- Tc RE-Ba-Cu-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Yoo, Sang Im; Higuchi, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Yuichi; Kamijo, Hiroki; Nagashima, Ken; Murakami, Masato

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting magnets made of high-T c superconductors are promising for industrial applications. It is well known that REBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x and LRE (light rare-earth) Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-x superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical current density, J c , at 77 K and high magnetic fields. Therefore, the materials are very prospective for high magnetic field application as a superconducting permanent/bulk magnet with liquid-nitrogen refrigeration. LREBaCuO bulks, compared with REBaCuO bulks, exhibit a larger J c in high magnetic fields and a much improved irreversibility field, H irr , at 77 K. In this study, we discuss the possibility and trapped field properties of a superconducting bulk magnet, as well as the melt processing for bulk superconductors and their characteristic superconducting properties. One of the applications is a superconducting magnet for the future magnetically levitated (Maglev) train

  1. Application of high temperature superconductivity to electric motor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, J.S.; Sharma, D.K.; Jordan, H.E.; Edick, J.D.; Schiferl, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on progress made in a joint project conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute and Reliance Electric Company to study the possible application of High Temperature Super Conductors (HTSC), materials to electric motors. Specific applications are identified which can be beneficially served by motors constructed with HTSC materials. A summary is presented of the components and design issues related to HTSC motors designed for these applications. During the course of this development program, a three tier HTSC wire performance specification has evolved. The three specifications and the rationale behind these three levels of performance are explained. A description of a test motor that has been constructed to verify the electromagnetic analytical techniques of HTSC motor design is given. Finally, a DC motor with an HTSC field coil is described. Measured data with the motor running is presented showing that the motor is operating with the field winding in the superconducting state

  2. What is strange about high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božović, I.; He, X.; Wu, J.; Bollinger, A. T.

    2017-10-01

    Cuprate superconductors exhibit many features, but the ultimate question is why the critical temperature (Tc) is so high. The fundamental dichotomy is between the weak-pairing, Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) scenario, and Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of strongly-bound pairs. While for underdoped cuprates it is hotly debated which of these pictures is appropriate, it is commonly believed that on the overdoped side strongly-correlated fermion physics evolves smoothly into the conventional BCS behavior. Here, we test this dogma by studying the dependence of key superconducting parameters on doping, temperature, and external fields, in thousands of cuprate samples. The findings do not conform to BCS predictions anywhere in the phase diagram.

  3. Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are {approx}15mV in magnitude and lasts for {approx}30 {micro}sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets at currents up to {approx}20KA will also be shown.

  4. Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are ∼15mV in magnitude and lasts for ∼30(micro)sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb3Sn magnets at currents up to ∼20KA will also be shown

  5. Many-body problems in high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lu.

    1991-10-01

    In this brief review the basic experimental facts about high T c superconductors are outlined. The superconducting properties of these superconductors are not very different from those of the ordinary superconductors. However, their normal state properties cannot be described by the standard Fermi liquid (FL) theory. Our current understanding of the strongly correlated models is summarized. In one dimension these systems behave like a ''Luttinger liquid'', very much distinct from the FL. In spite of the enormous efforts made in two-dimensional studies, the question of FL vs non-FL behaviour is still open. The numerical results as well as various approximation schemes are discussed. Both the single hole problem in a quantum antiferromagnet and finite doping regime are considered. (author). 104 refs, 9 figs

  6. Superconducting magnet suspensions in high speed ground transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alston, I A

    1973-08-01

    A technical and economic definition of high speed ground transport systems using magnetic suspensions is given. The full range of common superconducting suspensions and of propulsions are covered with designs produced for speeds ranging from 100 m/s (225 miles/hr) to 250 m/s (560 mile/hr). Technical descriptions of the vehicles, their suspensions, propulsions and tracks are given in some detail and operating costs are presented for all the systems together with details of the breakdown of costs and the capital costs involved. The design assumptions, the costing procedure and a cost sensitivity study are presented. It is concluded that the systems are technically feasible; that they are suited to existing duorail track for low speed running and that, in these circumstances, they would be economically viable over many routes.

  7. Discovery of a Superconducting High-Entropy Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koželj, P.; Vrtnik, S.; Jelen, A.; Jazbec, S.; Jagličić, Z.; Maiti, S.; Feuerbacher, M.; Steurer, W.; Dolinšek, J.

    2014-09-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) are multicomponent mixtures of elements in similar concentrations, where the high entropy of mixing can stabilize disordered solid-solution phases with simple structures like a body-centered cubic or a face-centered cubic, in competition with ordered crystalline intermetallic phases. We have synthesized an HEA with the composition Ta34Nb33Hf8Zr14Ti11 (in at. %), which possesses an average body-centered cubic structure of lattice parameter a =3.36 Å. The measurements of the electrical resistivity, the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility, and the specific heat revealed that the Ta34Nb33Hf8Zr14Ti11 HEA is a type II superconductor with a transition temperature Tc≈7.3 K, an upper critical field μ0Hc2≈8.2 T, a lower critical field μ0Hc1≈32 mT, and an energy gap in the electronic density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level of 2Δ ≈2.2 meV. The investigated HEA is close to a BCS-type phonon-mediated superconductor in the weak electron-phonon coupling limit, classifying it as a "dirty" superconductor. We show that the lattice degrees of freedom obey Vegard's rule of mixtures, indicating completely random mixing of the elements on the HEA lattice, whereas the electronic degrees of freedom do not obey this rule even approximately so that the electronic properties of a HEA are not a "cocktail" of properties of the constituent elements. The formation of a superconducting gap contributes to the electronic stabilization of the HEA state at low temperatures, where the entropic stabilization is ineffective, but the electronic energy gain due to the superconducting transition is too small for the global stabilization of the disordered state, which remains metastable.

  8. Unconventional superconductivity in heavy fermionic and high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volovik, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    Splitting of the superconducting transition and glass spectrum in heavy fermion companies and oxide superconductors are discussed. The multicomponent order parameter leads to splitting of transition due to magnetic field, impurities, orthorhombic distortion, etc... Linear specific heat in oxide superconductors may be explained in terms of the Fermi-surface arising in superconducting state if interband is pairing strong enough

  9. The Application of High Temperature Superconducting Materials to Power Switches

    CERN Document Server

    March, S A; Ballarino, A

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting switches may find application in superconducting magnet systems that require energy extraction. Such superconducting switches could be bypass-switches that are operated in conjunction with a parallel resistor or dump-switches where all of the energy is dissipated in the switch itself. Bypass-switches are more suited to higher energy circuits as a portion of the energy can be dissipated in the external dump resistor. Dump- switches require less material and triggering energy as a lower switch resistance is needed to achieve the required total dump resistance. Both superconducting bypass-switches and superconducting dump-switches can be ther- mally activated. Switching times that are comparable to those obtained with mechanical bypass-switch systems can be achieved using a co-wound heater that is powered by a ca- pacitor discharge. Switches that have fast thermal diffusion times through the insulation can be modelled as a lumped system whereas those with slow thermal diffusion times were modelle...

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtele, J.S.; Bekefi, G.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.C.; Temkin, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-AC02-91-ER40648, ''Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration''. This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design, fabrication and testing of a 17GHz RF photocathode gun, which can produce 2ps electron pulses with up to 1nC of charge at 2MeV energy and at a 1OHz repetition rate. Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration at 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders

  11. Numerical solution of High-kappa model of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamikhova, R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We present formulation and finite element approximations of High-kappa model of superconductivity which is valid in the high {kappa}, high magnetic field setting and accounts for applied magnetic field and current. Major part of this work deals with steady-state and dynamic computational experiments which illustrate our theoretical results numerically. In our experiments we use Galerkin discretization in space along with Backward-Euler and Crank-Nicolson schemes in time. We show that for moderate values of {kappa}, steady states of the model system, computed using the High-kappa model, are virtually identical with results computed using the full Ginzburg-Landau (G-L) equations. We illustrate numerically optimal rates of convergence in space and time for the L{sup 2} and H{sup 1} norms of the error in the High-kappa solution. Finally, our numerical approximations demonstrate some well-known experimentally observed properties of high-temperature superconductors, such as appearance of vortices, effects of increasing the applied magnetic field and the sample size, and the effect of applied constant current.

  12. The infinite range Heisenberg model and high temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir-Kheli, Jamil

    1992-01-01

    The thesis deals with the theory of high temperature superconductivity from the standpoint of three-band Hubbard models.Chapter 1 of the thesis proposes a strongly coupled variational wavefunction that has the three-spin system of an oxygen hole and its two neighboring copper spins in a doublet and the background Cu spins in an eigenstate of the infinite range antiferromagnet. This wavefunction is expected to be a good "zeroth order" wavefunction in the superconducting regime of dopings. The three-spin polaron is stabilized by the hopping terms rather than the copper-oxygen antiferromagnetic coupling Jpd. Considering the effect of the copper-copper antiferromagnetic coupling Jdd, we show that the three-spin polaron cannot be pure Emery (Dg), but must have a non-negligible amount of doublet-u (Du) character for hopping stabilization. Finally, an estimate is made for the magnitude of the attractive coupling of oxygen holes.Chapter 2 presents an exact solution to a strongly coupled Hamiltonian for the motion of oxygen holes in a 1-D Cu-O lattice. The Hamiltonian separates into two pieces: one for the spin degrees of freedom of the copper and oxygen holes, and the other for the charge degrees of freedom of the oxygen holes. The spinon part becomes the Heisenberg antiferromagnet in 1-D that is soluble by the Bethe Ansatz. The holon piece is also soluble by a Bethe Ansatz with simple algebraic relations for the phase shifts.Finally, we show that the nearest neighbor Cu-Cu spin correlation increases linearly with doping and becomes positive at x [...] 0.70.

  13. Dependence of trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain Nb superconducting radio-frequency cavity on spatial temperature gradient during cooldown through Tc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shichun; Kubo, Takayuki; Geng, R. L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies by Romanenko et al. revealed that cooling down a superconducting cavity under a large spatial temperature gradient decreases the amount of trapped flux and leads to reduction of the residual surface resistance. In the present paper, the flux expulsion ratio and the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain cavity cooled down under a spatial temperature gradient up to 80 K /m are studied under various applied magnetic fields from 5 to 20 μ T . We show the flux expulsion ratio improves as the spatial temperature gradient increases, independent of the applied magnetic field: our results support and enforce the previous studies. We then analyze all rf measurement results obtained under different applied magnetic fields together by plotting the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance normalized by the applied magnetic field as a function of the spatial temperature gradient. All the data can be fitted by a single curve, which defines an empirical formula for the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance as a function of the spatial temperature gradient and applied magnetic field. The formula can fit not only the present results but also those obtained by Romanenko et al. previously. The sensitivity rfl of surface resistance from trapped magnetic flux of fine-grain and large-grain niobium cavities and the origin of d T /d s dependence of Rfl/Ba are also discussed.

  14. High and ulta-high gradient quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunk, W.O.; Walz, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    Small bore conventional dc quadrupoles with apertures from 1 to 2.578cm were designed and prototypes built and measured. New fabrication techniques including the use of wire electric discharge milling (EDM) to economically generate the pole tip contours and aperture tolerances are described. Magnetic measurement data from a prototype of a 1cm aperture quadrupole with possible use in future e + /e - super colliders are presented. At a current of 400A, the lens achieved a gradient of 2.475 T/cm, and had an efficiency of 76.6%

  15. High Gradient Accelerating Structures for Carbon Therapy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Faillace, L.; Goel, A.; Mustapha, B.; Nassiri, A.; Ostroumov, P.; Plastun, A.; Savin, E.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon therapy is the most promising among techniques for cancer treatment, as it has demonstrated significant improvements in clinical efficiency and reduced toxicity profiles in multiple types of cancer through much better localization of dose to the tumor volume. RadiaBeam, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, are developing an ultra-high gradient linear accelerator, Advanced Compact Carbon Ion Linac (ACCIL), for the delivery of ion-beams with end-energies up to 450 MeV/u for 12C6+ ions and 250 MeV for protons. In this paper, we present a thorough comparison of standing and travelling wave designs for high gradient S-Band accelerating structures operating with ions at varying velocities, relative to the speed of light, in the range 0.3-0.7. In this paper we will compare these types of accelerating structures in terms of RF, beam dynamics and thermo-mechanical performance.

  16. End design of the SSC 58 mm High Gradient Quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.

    1992-01-01

    The ''end'' design of the High Gradient Quad. was done with consideration to the integrated field harmonics, the iron contribution, and the maximum field at the conductor. Magnetic analysis was done on the return end only, however the physical dimension of the lead end were determined as well. Using the cross-section of the windings and Cook's program BEND, we generated the physical end windings around the return end. Placing a single wire at the center of each turn the integrated gradient was computed and iterating on the end block spacers the integrated harmonics minimized. The final geometry was then used for more, extensive calculations, such as the field at the conductor and the 3D field harmonics. For this detailed calculation we have placed a single line current at the center of each strand and included the iron contribution (μ = ∞), see Appendix C. With the termination of the iron serving as a reference, the maximum length of the inner and outer layers are 182 mm and 215 mm respectively. The magnetic length of the end was computed from the gradient function A 2 and was found to be 142 mm. In reality we expect the physical length of the end to be somewhat larger, however this should have little or no effect on the magnetic length. The gradient in the straight section is 212.44 T/m at 7000 A and the integrated value of the gradient is -3.01665 E5 (G) in the end region marked by the magnetic length of the end. The respective integrated harmonics for the end 12 pole and 20 pole are -10.6658 (G/CM 4 ) and 0.7279 (G/cm 8 ) corresponding to b 6 = 0.351 , b 10 = -0.024 units. The above was computed from the values of A 2 , A 6 , and A 10

  17. Critical currents and superconductivity ferromagnetism coexistence in high-Tc oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Khene, Samir

    2016-01-01

    The book comprises six chapters which deal with the critical currents and the ferromagnetism-superconductivity coexistence in high-Tc oxides. It begins by gathering key data for superconducting state and the fundamental properties of the conventional superconductors, followed by a recap of the basic theories of superconductivity. It then discusses the differences introduced by the structural anisotropy on the Ginzburg-Landau approach and the Lawrence-Doniach model before addressing the dynamics of vortices and the ferromagnetism-superconductivity coexistence in high-Tc oxides, and provides an outline of the pinning phenomena of vortices in these materials, in particular the pinning of vortices by the spins. It elucidates the methods to improve the properties of superconducting materials for industrial applications. This optimization aims at obtaining critical temperatures and densities of critical currents at the maximum level possible. Whereas the primary objective is the basic mechanisms pushing the superco...

  18. Reviews of large superconducting machines: Metallurgy, fabrication, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogner, G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews large superconducting machines presently in place or in experiment. The ''Cello'' particle detector magnet for the positron-electron colliding beam facility PETRA at DESY in Hamburg is shown, and the Fermi Lab, and the Brookhaven ISABELLE also described. Electrodynamic levitation systems are specified, as researched and developed in Germany and Japan. Of superconducting coils for magnetic separation, a high gradient magnetic separator with superconducting magnet and steel wool, and a Jones type high gradient magnetic separator are schematicized. Turbogenerators with superconductor field winding are studied. Superconducting high power cables include the flexible coaxial cable core consisting of a perforated polyethylene tube and test cables at Siemens and at Brookhaven. Magnet systems for fusion reactors include tokamaks and tandem mirrors, and the toroidal coil experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is described, among others. Superconducting magnets for MHD plants, and superconducting magnet energy storage (SME storage) are also discussed

  19. Pressure and high-Tc superconductivity in sulfur hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, Lev P; Kresin, Vladimir Z

    2016-05-11

    The paper discusses fundamentals of record-TC superconductivity discovered under high pressure in sulfur hydride. The rapid increase of TC with pressure in the vicinity of Pcr ≈ 123GPa is interpreted as the fingerprint of a first-order structural transition. Based on the cubic symmetry of the high-TC phase, it is argued that the lower-TC phase has a different periodicity, possibly related to an instability with a commensurate structural vector. In addition to the acoustic branches, the phonon spectrum of H3S contains hydrogen modes with much higher frequencies. Because of the complex spectrum, usual methods of calculating TC are here inapplicable. A modified approach is formulated and shown to provide realistic values for TC and to determine the relative contributions of optical and acoustic branches. The isotope effect (change of TC upon Deuterium for Hydrogen substitution) originates from high frequency phonons and differs in the two phases. The decrease of TC following its maximum in the high-TC phase is a sign of intermixing with pairing at hole-like pockets which arise in the energy spectrum of the cubic phase at the structural transition. On-pockets pairing leads to the appearance of a second gap and is remarkable for its non-adiabatic regime: hydrogen mode frequencies are comparable to the Fermi energy.

  20. Miniaturized high-temperature superconducting multiplexer with cascaded quadruplet structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhang; Jingping, Liu; Shaolin, Yan; Lan, Fang; Bo, Zhang; Xinjie, Zhao

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, compact high temperature superconducting (HTS) multiplexers are presented for satellite communication applications. The first multiplexer consists of an input coupling node and three high-order bandpass filters, which is named triplexer. The node is realized by a loop microstrip line instead of conventional T-junction to eliminate the redundant susceptance due to combination of three filters. There are two eight-pole band-pass filters and one ten-pole band-pass filter with cascaded quadruplet structure for realizing high isolation. Moreover, the triplexer is extended to a multiplexer with six channels so as to verify the expansibility of the suggested approach. The triplexer is fabricated using double-sided YBa2Cu3O7 thin films on a 38 × 25 mm2 LaAlO3 substrate. The experimental results, when compared with those ones from the T-junction multiplexer, show that our multiplexer has lower insertion loss, smaller sizes and higher isolation between any two channels. Also, good agreement has been achieved between simulations and measurements, which illustrate the effectiveness of our methods for the design of high performance HTS multiplexers.

  1. Superconducting Cable Development for Future High Energy Physics Detector Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, I. L.

    1995-11-01

    Under the leadership of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) an international ad hoc collaboration for superconducting cables developed an aluminium stabilised superconducting cable for future detector magnets. With the financial support of the Swiss government, this R&D work was carried out for the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). In this report the manufacturing process is described and results of the quality control measurements are summarised. These tests showed that the industrial manufacturing of an aluminium stabilised superconducting cable is feasible.

  2. Reduction of field emission in superconducting cavities with high power pulsed RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Crawford, C.; Kirchgessner, J.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Schmueser, P.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic study is presented of the effects of pulsed high power RF processing (HPP) as a method of reducing field emission (FE) in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to reach higher accelerating gradients for future particle accelerators. The processing apparatus was built to provide up to 150 kW peak RF power to 3 GHz cavities, for pulse lengths from 200 μs to 1 ms. Single-cell and nine-cell cavities were tested extensively. The thermal conductivity of the niobium for these cavities was made as high as possible to ensure stability against thermal breakdown of superconductivity. HPP proves to be a highly successful method of reducing FE loading in nine-cell SRF cavities. Attainable continuous wave (CW) fields increase by as much as 80% from their pre-HPP limits. The CW accelerating field achieved with nine-cell cavities improved from 8-15 MV/m with HPP to 14-20 MV/m. The benefits are stable with subsequent exposure to dust-free air. More importantly, HPP also proves effective against new field emission subsequently introduced by cold and warm vacuum ''accidents'' which admitted ''dirty'' air into the cavities. Clear correlations are obtained linking FE reduction with the maximum surface electric field attained during processing. In single cells the maximums reached were E peak =72 MV/m and H peak =1660 Oe. Thermal breakdown, initiated by accompanying high surface magnetic fields is the dominant limitation on the attainable fields for pulsed processing, as well as for final CW and long pulse operation. To prove that the surface magnetic field rather than the surface electric fields is the limitation to HPP effectiveness, a special two-cell cavity with a reduced magnetic to electric field ratio is successfully tested. During HPP, pulsed fields reach E peak =113 MV/m (H peak =1600 Oe) and subsequent CW low power measurement reached E peak =100 MV/m, the highest CW field ever measured in a superconducting accelerator cavity. ((orig.))

  3. Electronic and magnetic interactions in high temperature superconducting and high coercivity materials. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    The issue addressed in the research was how to understand what controls the competition between two types of phase transition (ordering) which may be present in a hybridizing correlated-electron system containing two transition-shell atomic species; and how the variation of behavior observed can be used to understand the mechanisms giving the observed ordered state. This is significant for understanding mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity and other states of highly correlated electron systems. Thus the research pertains to magnetic effects as related to interactions giving high temperature superconductivity; where the working hypothesis is that the essential feature governing the magnetic and superconducting behavior of copper-oxide-type systems is a cooperative valence fluctuation mechanism involving the copper ions, as mediated through hybridization effects dominated by the oxygen p electrons. (Substitution of praseodymium at the rare earth sites in the 1·2·3 material provides an interesting illustration of this mechanism since experimentally such substitution strongly suppresses and destroys the superconductivity; and, at 100% Pr, gives Pr f-electron magnetic ordering at a temperature above 16K). The research was theoretical and computational and involved use of techniques aimed at correlated-electron systems that can be described within the confines of model hamiltonians such as the Anderson lattice hamiltonian. Specific techniques used included slave boson methodology used to treat modification of electronic structure and the Mori projection operator (memory function) method used to treat magnetic response (dynamic susceptibility)

  4. Design considerations for a large aperture high field superconducting dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfoush, F.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-03-01

    The final phase of the Fermilab upgrade proposal calls for a new ring of superconducting magnets to be placed in the existing Main Accelerator tunnel. The goal of this design study is to specify a high field dipole (HFD) that is capable of supporting fixed target operation (ramping, resonant extraction) at a field of 6.6T (1.5 Tev) and colliding beam physics at 8.0T (1.8 Tev). The magnetic field quality at high field is set by the large amplitude orbits associated with resonant extraction. The field quality must therefore be at least as good as the existing Tevatron magnets which fulfill these criteria. The high fields and large aperture of this magnet result in large forces on the coil and collar assemblies. Therefore, the cold mass design must be able to sustain these forces while providing sufficient cooling to the coils during 4.2 K fixed target operation, and a minimum heat load during 1.8 K collider operation. The design work is still in progress but a cosine-theta, cold-iron dipole with a 70mm inner diameter coil has been tentatively adopted. This report presents details on the conductor and cable parameters, coil cross-section, projected manufacturing tolerances, iron yoke design, and cold mass assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Stability analysis of high temperature superconducting coil in liquid hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, T.; Yagai, T.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, it is expected that hydrogen plays an important role in energy source including electric power in near future. Liquid hydrogen has high potential for cooling down superconducting coil wound with high temperature superconductors (HTS), such as BSCCO, YBCO. In this paper, we study stabilities of the coils wound with BSCCO tapes, which are immersed in the liquid hydrogen, and compare stability results with those cooled by liquid helium. We treat a minimum propagation zone (MPZ) theory to evaluate the coil stability considering boiling heat flux of the liquid hydrogen, and specific heat, heat conduction and resistivity of HTS materials as a function of temperature. It is found that the coil cooled by the liquid hydrogen has higher stability margin than that cooled by the liquid helium. We compare the stability margins of both coils wound with Bi-2223/Ag tape and Bi-2212/Ag tape in liquid hydrogen. As a result, it is found that the stability of Bi-2212 coil is equivalent to that of Bi-2223 coil in low and high magnetic field, while the maximum current of Bi-2212 coil exceeds a little bit that of Bi-2223 coil in both magnetic fields

  6. High temperature superconductivity the road to higher critical temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an overview of material-specific factors that influence Tc and give rise to diverse Tc values for copper oxides and iron-based high- Tc superconductors on the basis of more than 25 years of experimental data, to most of which the author has made important contributions. The book then explains why both compounds are distinct from others with similar crystal structure and whether or not one can enhance Tc, which in turn gives a hint on the unresolved pairing mechanism. This is an unprecedented new approach to the problem of high-temperature superconductivity and thus will be inspiring to both specialists and non-specialists interested in this field.   Readers will receive in-depth information on the past, present, and future of high-temperature superconductors, along with special, updated information on what the real highest Tc values are and particularly on the possibility of enhancing Tc for each member material, which is important for application. At this time, the highest Tc has not been...

  7. Design considerations for a large aperture high field superconducting dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harfoush, F.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-03-01

    The final phase of the Fermilab upgrade proposal calls for a new ring of superconducting magnets to be placed in the existing Main Accelerator tunnel. The goal of this design study is to specify a high field dipole (HFD) that is capable of supporting fixed target operation (ramping, resonant extraction) at a field of 6.6T (1.5 Tev) and colliding beam physics at 8.0T (1.8 Tev). The magnetic field quality at high field is set by the large amplitude orbits associated with resonant extraction. The field quality must therefore be at least as good as the existing Tevatron magnets which fulfill these criteria. The high fields and large aperture of this magnet result in large forces on the coil and collar assemblies. Therefore, the cold mass design must be able to sustain these forces while providing sufficient cooling to the coils during 4.2 K fixed target operation, and a minimum heat load during 1.8 K collider operation. The design work is still in progress but a cosine-theta, cold-iron dipole with a 70mm inner diameter coil has been tentatively adopted. This report presents details on the conductor and cable parameters, coil cross-section, projected manufacturing tolerances, iron yoke design, and cold mass assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Superconducting cyclotron deflector conditioning status - an experience with high voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subhash; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Bhattacharjee, Tanushyam; De, Anirban; Paul, Santanu; Pal, Gautam; Saha, Subimal; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report about the status of the electrostatic deflector which will be used in K500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata. For extraction of beams from superconducting cyclotron we have to achieve 130 kV/cm. Titanium and tungsten are used for anode and septum respectively. The deflector fits within the median plane of the superconducting magnet. We report here the voltage limit, sparking rates, dark current levels and the effects observed on conditioning. For commissioning of the superconducting cyclotron, the plan is to accelerate Neon beam of 50 MeV/n for which the required extraction voltage is 81 kV/cm and we reached up to 110 kV/cm. The conditioning test chamber is maintained at a pressure of 8.0 x 10 -7 mbar. (author)

  9. Exciton interaction: its possible role in high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The recent remarkable developments in superconductivity has forced the group of physicists in the main stream of superconductivity research to re-examine the possible role of what has been referred to in the conference as novel mechanisms of superconductivity. The exciton mechanism is one such. While the many studies and developments in this subject are relatively well known to those involved in studies of organic superconductors and superconductors of reduced dimension, it appears that it is not well known to that large body of physicists involved in the more conventional mainstream of superconductivity. The salient features of the mechanism are reviewed and what it can and cannot do is discussed. Remarks are based on the most recent and most comprehensive review of the subject published in 1979, plus a few key papers since that time

  10. Prototyping high-gradient mm-wave accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Haase, Andrew; Neilson, Jeffrey; Tantawi, Sami

    2017-01-01

    We present single-cell accelerating structures designed for high-gradient testing at 110 GHz. The purpose of this work is to study the basic physics of ultrahigh vacuum RF breakdown in high-gradient RF accelerators. The accelerating structures are π-mode standing-wave cavities fed with a TM 01 circular waveguide. The structures are fabricated using precision milling out of two metal blocks, and the blocks are joined with diffusion bonding and brazing. The impact of fabrication and joining techniques on the cell geometry and RF performance will be discussed. First prototypes had a measured Q 0 of 2800, approaching the theoretical design value of 3300. The geometry of these accelerating structures are as close as practical to singlecell standing-wave X-band accelerating structures more than 40 of which were tested at SLAC. This wealth of X-band data will serve as a baseline for these 110 GHz tests. Furthermore, the structures will be powered with short pulses from a MW gyrotron oscillator. RF power of 1 MW may allow an accelerating gradient of 400 MeV/m to be reached.

  11. Analysis of thermodynamic properties for high-temperature superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushwah, S.S.; Shanker, J.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamic properties such as specific heat, Debye temperature, Einstein temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, bulk modulus, and Grueneisen parameter is performed for rare-earth-based, Tl-based, and Bi-based superconducting copper oxides. Values of thermodynamic parameters are calculated and reported. The relationship between the Debye temperature and the superconducting transition temperature is used to estimate the values of T c using the interaction parameters from Ginzburg. (orig.)

  12. Photoemission and the origin of high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, M. R.; Randeria, M.; Janko, B.; Campuzano, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The condensation energy can be shown to be a moment of the change in the occupied part of the spectral function when going from the normal to the superconducting state. As a consequence, there is a one to one correspondence between the energy gain associated with forming the superconducting ground state, and the dramatic changes seen in angle resolved photoemission spectra. Some implications this observation has are offered

  13. Influence of pulse electric current on structure and superconducting properties of high temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajchenko, A.I.; Flis, A.A.; Chernenko, L.I.; Kryuchkova, N.I.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of high-density pulse current treatment at room temperature on structure and superconducting properties of HTSC Y Ba 2 Cu 3 O x ceramics is studied. The structures of the samples are found to undergo appreciable changes as the density of pulse current is gradually increased from its minimum value; as a certain threshold value is attained, there occurs a melting-off of coarse grains with a partial destroying of intergrain contact areas followed by superconductivity loss. A further increase in the treatment current density results in a restoration of the superconducting properties probably due to the occurrence of aligned-with-current superconducting bridges between the melted-off grains. The superconducting transition temperature in the samples does not charge but subsequent thermal treatment causes this temperature to increase

  14. Photocathodes inside superconducting cavities. Studies on the feasibility of a superconducting photoelectron source of high brightness. External report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalke, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have done studies and experiments to explore the feasibility of a photoemission RF gun with a superconducting accelerator cavity. This concept promises to provide an electron beam of high brightness in continuous operation. It is thus of strong interest for a free-electron-laser or a linear collider based on a superconducting accelerator. In a first step we studied possible technical solutions for its components, especially the material of the photocathode and the geometrical shape of the cavity. Based on these considerations, we developed the complete design for a prototype electron source. The cathode material was chosen to be alkali antimonide. In spite of its sensitivity, it seems to be the best choice for a gun with high average current due to its high quantum efficiency. The cavity shape was at first a reentrant-type single cell of 500 MHz. It is now replaced by a more regular two-and-half cell shape, an independent half cell added for emittance correction. Its beam dynamics properties are investigated by numerical simulations; we estimated a beam brightness of about 5x10 11 A/(m.rad) 2 . But the mutual interactions between alkali antimonide photocathode and superconducting cavity must be investigated experimentally, because they are completely unkown. (orig.)

  15. Trial manufacture of liquid nitrogen cooling High Temperature Superconductivity Motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H; Nishikawa, T; Tsuda, T; Hondou, Y; Akita, Y; Takeda, T; Okazaki, T; Ohashi, S; Yoshida, Y

    2006-01-01

    We present a new high temperature superconductivity (HTS) synchronous motor using the liquid nitrogen as the refrigerant in this paper. This motor is designed to be used as the propulsion motor in ship. Because we use the liquid nitrogen as the refrigerant, it is possible to simplify the cooling equipments in the motor. And in our design, we apply the axial flux type of motor to simplify the cryostat of the HTS wires used to make the field coils. Here, the fields using the bismuth HTS wire for the HTS coils are fixed. Moreover, the cores used in the fields are separated from cryostat, and the armature applies the core-less structure. According to various the electromagnetic field analysis results, the new motor was designed and produced. The diameter of the motor is 650mm, and the width of the motor is 360mm. The motor's rated output is 8.8kW at 100rpm, while the overload output is 44kW, and the maximum efficiency is 97.7%. Also, in order to further miniaturize the motor, other magnetic field analysis have been done when the high-current-density type HTS wire was used and the permendur was used instead of magnetic steel plates. In this case, the motor's rated output is 12kW, and the overload output is 60kW

  16. Theory of high-T{sub C} superconductivity: transition temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harshman, Dale R [Physikon Research Corporation, Lynden, WA 98264 (United States); Fiory, Anthony T [Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Dow, John D, E-mail: drh@physikon.net [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2011-07-27

    It is demonstrated that the transition temperature (T{sub C}) of high-T{sub C} superconductors is determined by their layered crystal structure, bond lengths, valency properties of the ions, and Coulomb coupling between electronic bands in adjacent, spatially separated layers. Analysis of 31 high-T{sub C} materials (cuprates, ruthenates, ruthenocuprates, iron pnictides, organics) yields the universal relationship for optimal compounds, k{sub B}T{sub C0} ={beta}/{iota}{zeta}, where {iota} is related to the mean spacing between interacting charges in the layers, {zeta} is the distance between interacting electronic layers, {beta} is a universal constant and T{sub C0} is the optimal transition temperature (determined to within an uncertainty of {+-} 1.4 K by this relationship). Non-optimum compounds, in which sample degradation is evident, e.g. by broadened superconducting transitions and diminished Meissner fractions, typically exhibit reduced T{sub C} < T{sub C0}. It is shown that T{sub C0} may be obtained from an average of the Coulomb interaction forces between the two layers.

  17. High-temperature superconducting nanowires for photon detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpaia, R. [Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘Federico II’, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Ejrnaes, M. [CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Parlato, L. [CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘Federico II’, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Tafuri, F. [CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, I-81031 Aversa, CE (Italy); Cristiano, R. [CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Golubev, D. [Low Temperature Laboratory (OVLL), Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Sobolewski, Roman, E-mail: roman.sobolewski@rochester.edu [Institute of Electron Technology, PL-02668 Warszawa (Poland); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY 14627-0231 (United States); Bauch, T.; Lombardi, F. [Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); and others

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Homogeneous YBCO nanowires have been fabricated for photon detection applications. • Serial-parallel nanowire configuration leads to a large detector active area. • The YBCO nanowires exhibit critical current densities up to 106 A/cm{sup 2}. • The devices have been excited using a 1550-nm wavelength, pulsed laser irradiation. • Photoresponse signals have been measured and analyzed from 4 K up to the device T{sub c}. - Abstract: The possible use of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) for realizing superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors is a challenging, but also promising, aim because of their ultrafast electron relaxation times and high operating temperatures. The state-of-the-art HTS nanowires with a 50-nm thickness and widths down to 130 nm have been fabricated and tested under a 1550-nm wavelength laser irradiation. Experimental results presenting both the amplitude and rise times of the photoresponse signals as a function of the normalized detector bias current, measured in a wide temperature range, are discussed. The presence of two distinct regimes in the photoresponse temperature dependence is clearly evidenced, indicating that there are two different response mechanisms responsible for the HTS photoresponse mechanisms.

  18. Fabrication of high gradient insulators by stack compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John Richardson; Sanders, Dave; Hawkins, Steven Anthony; Norona, Marcelo

    2014-04-29

    Individual layers of a high gradient insulator (HGI) are first pre-cut to their final dimensions. The pre-cut layers are then stacked to form an assembly that is subsequently pressed into an HGI unit with the desired dimension. The individual layers are stacked, and alignment is maintained, using a sacrificial alignment tube that is removed after the stack is hot pressed. The HGI's are used as high voltage vacuum insulators in energy storage and transmission structures or devices, e.g. in particle accelerators and pulsed power systems.

  19. The LLNL/UCLA high gradient inverse free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. T.; Musumeci, P.; Anderson, G.; Anderson, S.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Gibson, D.; Tremaine, A.; Wu, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles California, 90095 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe the Inverse Free Electron Accelerator currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Upon completion of this accelerator, high brightness electrons generated in the photoinjector blowout regime and accelerated to 50 MeV by S-band accelerating sections will interact with > 4 TW peak power Ti:Sapphire laser in a highly tapered 50 cm undulator and experience an acceleration gradient of > 200 MeV/m. We present the final design of the accelerator as well as the results of start-to-end simulations investigating preservation of beam quality and tolerances involved with this accelerator.

  20. Cryocooled superconducting magnets for high magnetic fields at the HFLSM and future collaboration with the TML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, K; Nishijima, G; Awaji, S; Koyama, K; Takahashi, K; Kobayashi, N; Kiyoshi, T

    2006-01-01

    A hybrid magnet needs a large amount of liquid helium for operation. In order to make an easy-to-operate hybrid magnet system, we constructed a cryocooled 28 T hybrid magnet, consisting of an outer cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet and an inner traditional water-cooled 19 T resistive magnet. As a performance test, the cryocooled hybrid magnet generated 27.5 T in a 32 mm room temperature experimental bore. As long as Nb3Sn superconducting wires are employed, the expected maximum high field generation in the cryocooled superconducting magnet will be 17 T at 5 K. We adopted the high temperature superconducting insert coil, employing Ag-sheathed Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 superconducting tape. In combination with the low temperature 16.5 T back-up coil with a 174 mm cold bore, the cryocooled high temperature superconducting magnet successfully generated the total central field of 18.1 T in a 52 mm room temperature bore. As a next step, we start the collaboration with the National Institute for Materials Science for the new developmental works of a 30 T high temperature superconducting magnet and a 50 T-class hybrid magnet

  1. NMR initiatives on understanding high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaoka, Y.; Mukuda, H.; Shimizu, S.; Abe, M.; Iyo, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Kito, H.; Tokiwa, K.; Watanabe, T.

    2007-01-01

    We review a recent progress of NMR studies [H. Mukuda, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 96 (2006) 087001; S. Shimizu, et al., submitted for publication.] on multi-layered cuprates. This work has shed new light to a generic phase diagram of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) which suggests a competition between antiferromagnetism (AFM) and superconductivity (SC). The multi-layered cuprates include two types of CuO 2 planes, an outer CuO 2 plane (OP) in a pyramidal coordination and an inner CuO 2 plane (IP) in a square one with no apical oxygen. Remarkable feature of the multi-layered systems is the presence of ideally flat CuO 2 planes that are homogeneously doped. Systematic Cu-NMR studies on the optimally-doped five-layered HgBa 2 Ca 4 Cu 5 O 12+δ (Hg-1245(OPT)) and slightly overdoped Tl-1245(OVD) have revealed the coexistent phase of SC and AFM in a unit cell [H. Kotegawa, et al., Phys. Rev. B 64 (2001) 064515; H. Kotegawa, et al., Phys. Rev. B 69 (2004) 014501.]. The optimally doped two OPs are predominantly superconducting with T c =108 and 100K, whereas the under-doped three IPs show the AFM order below T N =60 and 45K for Hg-1245(OPT) and Tl-1245(OVD), respectively. Recently exciting is the finding of the uniform mixing of AFM and HTSC in a single CuO 2 layer in the under-doped Hg-1245(UD) and the heavily underdoped four-layered Ba 2 Ca 3 Cu 4 O 8 F 2 (0234F(2.0)) that has fluorine ions (F 1- ) as apical ions [H. Mukuda, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 96 (2006) 087001; S. Shimizu, et al., submitted for publication.]. In Hg-1245(UD) with T c =72K and T N =290K, the OPs exhibit the uniform mixing of AFM and HTSC with AFM moment of M AFM (OP)=0.1μ B , whereas the IPs are possibly AFM insulators with a small doping [H. Mukuda, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 96 (2006) 087001.]. In 0234F(2.0) with T c =55K and T N =100K, the uniform mixing of AFM and HTSC is demonstrated to take place in electron (n)-doped IPs [S. Shimizu, et al., submitted for publication.], thanks to insight

  2. Advanced control scenario of high-performance steady-state operation for JT-60 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, H.; Kurita, G.; Matsukawa, M.; Urata, K.; Sakurai, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Morioka, A.; Miura, Y.M.; Kizu, K.; Kamada, Y.; Sakasai, A.; Ishida, S.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma control on high-β N steady-state operation for JT-60 superconducting modification is discussed. Accessibility to high-β N exceeding the free-boundary limit is investigated with the stabilising wall of reduced-activated ferritic steel and the active feedback control of the in-vessel non-axisymmetric field coils. Taking the merit of superconducting magnet, advanced plasma control for steady-state high performance operation could be expected. (authors)

  3. Are we getting to the point of understanding high-temperature superconductivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, R.P.; Tsuei, C.C.; Newns, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    The model elaborated by van Hove allows a coherent explanation of various anomalies observed with the phenomenon of high-T c superconductivity, including the cause of T c reaching such a high value, or the materials behaving like marginal Fermi liquids. However, there remain other enigma to be solved before it will be possible to fully explain and understand high-T c superconductivity. (DG) [de

  4. Preparation and characterization of high-Tc superconducting thin films with high critical current densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vase, P.

    1991-08-01

    The project was carried out in relation to possible cable and electronics applications of high-T c materials. Laser ablation was used as the deposition technique because of its stoichiometry conservation. Films were made in the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 compound due to its relatively simple stoichiometry compared to other High-T c compounds. Much attention was paid to the critical current density. A very high critical current density was reached. By using texture analysis by X-ray diffraction, it was found that films with high critical current densities were epitaxial, while films with low critical current densities contained several crystalline orientations. Four techniques for patterning the films were used - photo lithography and wet etch, laser ablation lithography, laser writing and electron beam lithography and ion milling. Sub-micron patterning has been demonstrated without degradation of the superconducting properties. The achieved patterning resolution is sufficient for preparation of many superconducting components. (AB)

  5. High-T/sub c/ superconductor and its use in superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1988-02-01

    Many of the proposed uses for the high-T/sub c/ superconductor involve the creation of a magnetic field using superconducting coils. This report will assess what is known about the high-T/sub c/ superconductors and take a realistic look at their potential use in various kinds of superconducting magnets. Based on what is known about the high-T/sub c/ superconductors, one can make a ''wish list'' of things that will make such materials useful for magnets. Then, the following question is asked. If one had a high-T/sub c/ superconductor with the same properties as modern niobium-titanium superconductor, how would the superconductor work in a magnet environment? Finally, this report will show the potential impact of the ideal high-T/sub c/ superconductor on: 1) accelerator dipole and quadrupole magnets, 2) superconducting magnets for use in space, and 3) superconducting solenoids for magnetic resonance imaging. 78 refs., 11 tabs

  6. High Tc Superconducting Magnet Excited by a Semiconductor Thermoelectric Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, T.; Ono, M.; Tabe, S.; Oguchi, A.; Okamura, T.

    2006-04-01

    A high Tc superconducting (HTS) magnet excited by a thermal electromotive force of a thermoelectric element is studied. This HTS magnet has the advantages of compactness, lightweight and continuous excitation in comparison with conventional HTS magnets, because this HTS magnet does not need a large external power source. In this system, a heat input into the cryogenic environment is necessary to excite the thermoelectric element for constant operation. This heat generation, however, causes a rise in temperature of an HTS coil and reduces the system performance. In this paper, a newly designed magnet system which adopted a two-stage GM cryocooler was investigated. It enabled us to control the temperature of a thermoelectric element and that of an HTS coil independently. The temperature of the HTS coil could be kept at 10-20 K at the second stage of the GM cryocooler, while the thermoelectric element could be excited at higher temperature in the range of 50-70 K at the first stage, where the performance of the thermoelectric element was higher. The experimental results on this HTS magnet are shown and the possibility of the thermoelectric element as a main power source of the HTS magnets is discussed.

  7. A novel propulsion method for high- Tc superconducting maglev vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guangtong; Wang, Jiasu; Wang, Suyu; Liu, Minxian; Jing, Hua; Lu, Yiyun; Lin, Qunxu

    2008-01-01

    High-Tc superconducting (HTS) maglev is considered as a perfect transportation type because of its unique inherent stability. A direct current (DC) linear motor using the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) as the stator and the on-board coil as the rotor instead of the present inductive or synchronous alternate current (AC) linear motor which has an economic disadvantage due to the necessity to lay primary coil along the guideway is proposed in this paper. In order to modulate the magnetic field under the PMG, an inverse E shape ferromagnetic device (IESFD) core is designed. The possible winding method for the on-board coil is listed, and the analytical result shows that a considerable net ampere force and thus the propulsion force can be generated by this special structure. The influence of the concentrated effect of the IESFD on the maglev performance of HTS bulk is studied by a numerical program, and the results show that the levitation force with the IESFD is 90% of that without. It is also indicated that the load capability and lateral performance of the maglev vehicle combined this propulsion method can be improved thanks to the attractive effect between the IESFD and PMG. The cost of the HTS maglev vehicle will be remarkably reduced and then shorten the distance to practical application with this propulsion method.

  8. High density operation on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Gao

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the operation region has been studied in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak, and progress on the extension of the HT-7 ohmic discharge operation region is reported. A density corresponding to 1.2 times the Greenwald limit was achieved by RF boronization. The density limit appears to be connected to the impurity content and the edge parameters, so the best results are obtained with very clean plasmas and peaked electron density profiles. The peaking factors of electron density profiles for different current and line averaged densities were observed. The density behaviour and the fuelling efficiency for gas puffing (20-30%), pellet injection (70-80%) and molecular beam injection (40-50%) were studied. The core crash sawteeth and MHD behaviour, which were induced by an injected pellet, were observed and the events correlated with the change of current profile and reversed magnetic shear. The MARFE phenomena on HT-7 are summarized. The best correlation has been found between the total input ohmic power and the product of the edge line averaged density and Z eff . HT-7 could be easily operated in the high density region MARFE-free using RF boronization. (author)

  9. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Paula, L A N; Furtado, S R; Aguiar, O D; N F Oliveira Jr, N F Oliveira Jr; Castro, P J; Barroso, J J

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q 0 ) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 10 5 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 10 12 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ∼ 10 −22 Hz −1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA)

  10. High-temperature study of superconducting hydrogen and deuterium sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durajski, A.P. [Institute of Physics, Czestochowa University of Technology, Ave. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Szczesniak, R. [Institute of Physics, Czestochowa University of Technology, Ave. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Ave. Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Pietronero, L. [Sapienza, Universita di Roma, Dip. Fisica, P. le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Institute of Complex Systems, CNR, Via dei Taurini 19 Roma (Italy); London Institute for Mathematical Sciences, South Street 22, Mayfair London (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Hydrogen-rich compounds are extensively explored as candidates for a high-temperature superconductors. Currently, the measured critical temperature of 203 K in hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 3}S) is among the highest over all-known superconductors. In present paper, using the strong-coupling Eliashberg theory of superconductivity, we compared in detail the thermodynamic properties of two samples containing different hydrogen isotopes H{sub 3}S and D{sub 3}S at 150 GPa. Our research indicates that it is possible to reproduce the measured values of critical temperature 203 K and 147 K for H{sub 3}S and D{sub 3}S by using a Coulomb pseudopotential of 0.123 and 0.131, respectively. However, we also discuss a scenario in which the isotope effect is independent of pressure and the Coulomb pseudopotential for D{sub 3}S is smaller than for H{sub 3}S. For both scenarios, the energy gap, specific heat, thermodynamic critical field and related dimensionless ratios are calculated and compared with other conventional superconductors. We shown that the existence of the strong-coupling and retardation effects in the systems analysed result in significant differences between values obtained within the framework of the Eliashberg formalism and the prediction of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Theory of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisan, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up to the 1987 results on high temperature superconductivity. Contents: Phenomenological Theory of Superconductivity; Microscopic Theory of Superconductivity; Theory of Superconducting Alloys; Superconductors in a Magnetic Field; Superconductivity and Magnetic Order; Superconductivity in Quasi-One-Dimensional Systems; and Non-Conventional Superconductivity

  12. Separation of actinides by high-gradient magnetic filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, L.E.; Schliebe, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    High-gradient magnetic filtration has been identified as a candidate solid/liquid separation technique for removing actinide particulate from waste streams. Although HGMS is not intended to reduce the activity in the waste stream to below 100 nCi/g, it does offer two significant advantages: (a) selective removal of TRU solids for subsequent secondary processing and (b) reduced operating complications during solvent extraction due to solids accumulation in the interfacial region. Removal of > 95 wt% of the plutonium and americium solids is expected regardless of the solids present and their properties. Verification tests will be performed to validate this assumption

  13. Approaches to the high Tc superconductivity in β-(BEDT-TTF)2X structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumoto, M.; Anzai, H.; Murata, K.; Bando, H.; Kajimura, K.; Morita, S.; Ishiguro, T.; Saito, G.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental strategies to realize a high T c superconductivity comparable with the high-T c state of β-(BEDT-TTF) 2 I 3 by means of modification of the β-(BEDT-TTF) 2 X structure are discussed. Some experimental results related to such trials are presented, including the effect of anion alloying and the effect of solvent used for crystal growth on the superconductivity in β-(BEDT-TTF) 2 I 3 . (orig.)

  14. Stabilized superconducting materials and fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, B.; Dance, J.M.; Etourneau, J.; Lozano, L.; Tressaud, A.; Tournier, R.; Sulpice, A.; Chaussy, J.; Lejay, P.

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting ceramics are fluorinated at a temperature ≤ 120 0 C. Are also claimed new superconducting materials with a fluorine concentration gradient decreasing from the surface to the core. Superconductivity is stabilized and/or improved [fr

  15. Experimental evaluation of a high performance superconducting torquer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldie, J.H.; Avakian, K.M.; Downer, J.R.; Gerver, M.; Gondhalekar, V.; Johnson, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    SatCon has completed a two-year program to design and build a prototype demonstration of a torque actuator which employs a superconducting field magnet. The program culminated with the successful demonstration of close loop torque control, following a desired double version torque profile to an accuracy of approximately 1% of the peak torque of the profile. The targeted double version possessed a peak torque which matches the torque capacity of the M4500 CMG (controlled moment gyro), the largest Sperry double gimbal CMG. The research provided strong evidence of the feasibility of a SatCon-developed advanced concept CMG, depicted schematically in this paper, which would employ cryoresistive control coils in conjunction with an electromagnetically suspended rotor and superconducting source coil. The cryoresistive coils interact with the superconducting solenoid to develop the desired torque and, in addition, the required suspension forces

  16. Current high-temperature superconducting coils and applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, four projects for the application of Bi-based superconducting magnets to practical apparatus are currently underway. These projects involve the development of an insert magnet for a 1 GHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, a magnet for a silicon single-crystal pulling apparatus, a magnet for a magnetic separation system, and a 1 T pulse magnet for a superconducting magnet energy storage system. For example, the magnet for the silicon single-crystal pulling apparatus is of the class with stored energy of 1 MJ to be operated at around 20 K. This review focuses on the present status of the development of these magnets, followed by a discussion of the problems of the present superconducting tapes that need to be overcome for future applications. (author)

  17. Purification of power plant waters with high gradient magnetic filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.

    1993-04-01

    This is a report of a literature survey. Magnetic high gradient filtration is suitable for separations in difficult surroundings because it can be used in high pressure and temperature, the filtration can be automated and the filter does not contain components which have to be replaced. Magnetic separators for purification of power plant waters have been manufactured commercially for a long time, but they have not always worked satisfactorily especially when separating small particles. The corrosion products in power plant waters are usually ferrimagnetic or paramagnetic and are well suited for magnetic separation. The particle sizes varies considerable but at least in nuclear power plants they are mostly in the range 0.1-30 μ, some even smaller. According to different publications most 60 Co is in particles, while other publications indicate that more than 70 % is in solution. Similarly the data on the purification efficiency of 60 Co varies significantly. Even small magnetic fields are sufficient to separate large ferrimagnetic particles, but the separation of small and paramagnetic particles requires a field more than 20 kT and the high gradient. Presently available commercial separators are so efficient that its seems not to be economically worthwhile to develop them further to improve the filtration efficiency for small particles. Instead it might be worthwhile to investigate methods to increase the particle size by water chemistry methods. (Au). (25 refs., 2 figs.)

  18. Superconductivity in hydrogen-rich materials at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    A room temperature superconductor is probably one of the most desired systems in solid state physics. The highest critical temperature (T{sub c}) that has been achieved so far is in the copper oxide system: 133 kelvin (K) at ambient pressure ([82]Schilling et al. 1993) and 160 K under pressure ([42]Gao et al. 1994). The nature of superconductivity in the cuprates and in the recently discovered iron-based superconductor family (T{sub c}=57 K) is still not fully understood. In contrast, there is a class of superconductors which is well-described by the Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer (BCS) theory - conventional superconductors. Great efforts were spent in searching for high-temperature (T{sub c} > 77 K) conventional superconductor but only T{sub c} = 39 K has been reached in MgB2 ([68]Nagamatsu et al. 2001). BCS theory puts no bounds for T{sub c} as follows from Eliashberg's formulation of BCS theory. T{sub c} can be high, if there is a favorable combination of high-frequency phonons, strong electron-phonon coupling, and a high density of states. It does not predict however in which materials all three parameters are large. At least it gives a clear indication that materials with light elements are favorable as light elements provide high frequencies in the phonon spectrum. The lightest element is hydrogen, and Ashcroft made a first prediction that metallic hydrogen will be a high-temperature superconductor ([6]Ashcroft 1968). As pressure of hydrogen metallization was too high (about 400-500 GPa) for experimental techniques then he proposed that compounds dominated by hydrogen (hydrides) also might be good high temperature superconductors ([6]Ashcroft 1968; [7]Ashcroft 2004). A lot of the followed calculations supported this idea. T{sub c} in the range of 50-235 kelvin was predicted for many hydrides. Unfortunately, only a moderate T{sub c} of 17 kelvin has been observed experimentally ([27]Eremets et al. 2008) so far. A goal of the present work is to find a

  19. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e⁺/e⁻ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  20. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e@@@/e@@@ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  1. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS.

  2. The disparate impact of the ion temperature gradient and the density gradient on edge transport and the low-high transition in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2009-01-01

    Steepening of the ion temperature gradient in nonlinear fluid simulations of the edge region of a tokamak plasma causes a rapid degradation in confinement. As the density gradient steepens, there is a continuous improvement in confinement analogous to the low (L) to high (H) transition observed in tokamaks. In contrast, as the ion temperature gradient steepens, there is a rapid increase in the particle and energy fluxes and no L-H transition. For a given pressure gradient, confinement always improves when more of the pressure gradient arises from the density gradient, and less of the pressure gradient arises from the ion temperature gradient.

  3. Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-24

    Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field ({approx}2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 {micro}s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 10{sup 5} RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS

  4. Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field (∼2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 (micro)s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 10 5 RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS operating at 30

  5. Particle capture efficiency in a multi-wire model for high gradient magnetic separation

    KAUST Repository

    Eisenträ ger, Almut; Vella, Dominic; Griffiths, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is an efficient way to remove magnetic and paramagnetic particles, such as heavy metals, from waste water. As the suspension flows through a magnetized filter mesh, high magnetic gradients around the wires

  6. High gradient magnetic filters for boiler water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harland, J.R.; Nichols, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    Heavy metal oxide suspended solids in those steam condensates recycled to the boilers produce buildup within the boiler tubes which can lead to unequal and reduced heat transfer efficiency, and indirectly, to boiler tube failures. Recommended reductions in such suspended solids in feedwater to the economizers of modern high pressure boilers to levels of under 10 ppb have been published. The industrially-available SALA-HGMF magnetic filter has achieved these desired suspended solids levels in treating steam condensates. The high gradient magnetic filter has been shown in pilot tests to achieve and even exceed the recommended low level suspended solids in a practical and efficient industrial system. Such electromagnetic filters, when combined with good system chemistry, have achieved low single number parts per billion levels of several heavy metals with very high single-pass efficiencies

  7. Coaxial two-channel high-gradient dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Sotnikov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme for a dielectric wakefield accelerator is proposed that employs a cylindrical multizone dielectric structure configured as two concentric dielectric tubes with outer and inner vacuum channels for drive and accelerated bunches. Analytical and numerical studies have been carried out for such coaxial dielectric-loaded structures (CDS for high-gradient acceleration. An analytical theory of wakefield excitation by particle bunches in a multizone CDS has been formulated. Numerical calculations are presented for an example of a CDS using dielectric tubes with dielectric permittivity 5.7, having external diameters of 2.121 and 0.179 mm with inner diameters of 2.095 and 0.1 mm. An annular 5 GeV, 6 nC electron bunch with rms length of 0.035 mm energizes a wakefield on the structure axis having an accelerating gradient of ∼600  MeV/m with a transformer ratio ∼8∶1. The period of the accelerating field is ∼0.33  mm. If the width of the drive bunch channel is decreased, it is possible to obtain an accelerating gradient of >1  GeV/m while keeping the transformer ratio approximately the same. Full numerical simulations using a particle-in-cell code have confirmed results of the linear theory and furthermore have shown the important influence of the quenching wave that restricts the region of the wakefield to within several periods following the drive bunch. Numerical simulations for another example have shown nearly stable transport of drive and accelerated bunches through the CDS, using a short train of drive bunches.

  8. Superatom representation of high-T{sub C} superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panas, Itai, E-mail: itai@chalmers.se [Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Division of Energy and Materials, Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-10-15

    A 'super-atom' conceptual interface between chemistry and physics is proposed in order to assist in the search for higher T{sub C} superconductors. The plaquettes generating the checkerboard superstructure in the cuprates, the C{sub 60} molecules in K{sub 3}C{sub 60}, and the Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{sup 2-} clusters in Chevrel phase materials offer such candidate super-atoms. Thus, in the present study high-T{sub C} superconductivity HTSC is articulated as the entanglement of two disjoint electronic manifolds in the vicinity of a common Fermi energy. The resulting HTSC ground state couples near-degenerate protected local super-atom states to virtual magnons in an antiferromagnetic AFM embedding. The composite Cooper pairs emerge as the interaction particles for virtual magnons mediated 'self-coherent entanglement' of super-atom states. A Hueckel type resonating valence bond RVB formalism is employed in order to illustrate the real-space Cooper pairs as well as their delocalization and Bose Einstein condensation BEC on a ring of super-atoms. The chemical potential {mu}{sub BEC} for Cooper pairs joining the condensate is formulated in terms of the super-exchange interaction, and consequently the T{sub C} in terms of the Neel temperature. A rationale for the robustness of the HTSC ground state is proposed: achieving local maximum 'electron correlation entropy' at the expense of non-local phase rigidity.

  9. Infinite-range Heisenberg model and high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir-Kheli, Jamil; Goddard, William A., III

    1993-11-01

    A strongly coupled variational wave function, the doublet spin-projected Néel state (DSPN), is proposed for oxygen holes in three-band models of high-temperature superconductors. This wave function has the three-spin system of the oxygen hole plus the two neighboring copper atoms coupled in a spin-1/2 doublet. The copper spins in the neighborhood of a hole are in an eigenstate of the infinite-range Heisenberg antiferromagnet (SPN state). The doublet three-spin magnetic polaron or hopping polaron (HP) is stabilized by the hopping terms tσ and tτ, rather than by the copper-oxygen antiferromagnetic coupling Jpd. Although, the HP has a large projection onto the Emery (Dg) polaron, a non-negligible amount of doublet-u (Du) character is required for optimal hopping stabilization. This is due to Jdd, the copper-copper antiferromagnetic coupling. For the copper spins near an oxygen hole, the copper-copper antiferromagnetic coupling can be considered to be almost infinite ranged, since the copper-spin-correlation length in the superconducting phase (0.06-0.25 holes per in-plane copper) is approximately equal to the mean separation of the holes (between 2 and 4 lattice spacings). The general DSPN wave function is constructed for the motion of a single quasiparticle in an antiferromagnetic background. The SPN state allows simple calculations of various couplings of the oxygen hole with the copper spins. The energy minimum is found at symmetry (π/2,π/2) and the bandwidth scales with Jdd. These results are in agreement with exact computations on a lattice. The coupling of the quasiparticles leads to an attraction of holes and its magnitude is estimated.

  10. Processing of flexible high-Tc superconducting wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.I.; Modi, V.

    1989-01-01

    Wires superconducting at temperatures above 77 K are produced by using YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 materials. Flexibility was obtained by support from prefabricated fibers or a metallic coating on the extruded YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 wires. The microstructure, the T c and the critical current densities of the wires were determined. Processing variables and steps are described

  11. Carbon-based superconductors towards high-Tc superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, Junji

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of Condensed Matter Physics; Spin-state Crossover; Li Ion Battery; Huge Thermoelectric Power; Room-temperature Ferromagnetism; Partially Disordered Antiferromagnetic Transition; Superconductivity; Transport Properties Combined with Charge, Spin, and Orbital; Magnetoresistance and Spin Blocade; Intrinsic Inhomogeneity; Move/diffuse and Charge/discharge Effect.

  12. High-kinetic inductance additive manufactured superconducting microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric T.; Rosen, Yaniv J.; Materise, Nicholas; Woollett, Nathan; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Y. Morris; Torres, Sharon G.; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; DuBois, Jonathan L.

    2017-11-01

    Investigations into the microwave surface impedance of superconducting resonators have led to the development of single photon counters that rely on kinetic inductance for their operation, while concurrent progress in additive manufacturing, "3D printing," opens up a previously inaccessible design space for waveguide resonators. In this manuscript, we present results from the synthesis of these two technologies in a titanium, aluminum, vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) superconducting radio frequency resonator which exploits a design unattainable through conventional fabrication means. We find that Ti-6Al-4V has two distinct superconducting transition temperatures observable in heat capacity measurements. The higher transition temperature is in agreement with DC resistance measurements, while the lower transition temperature, not previously known in the literature, is consistent with the observed temperature dependence of the superconducting microwave surface impedance. From the surface reactance, we extract a London penetration depth of 8 ± 3 μm—roughly an order of magnitude larger than other titanium alloys and several orders of magnitude larger than other conventional elemental superconductors.

  13. Improving superconducting RF technology for high energy particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leconte, P.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the state of the art is given. It shows recent proofs of success of the technology. An important R and D effort remains to be done in order to collect all the expectable benefits of RF superconductivity. (author)

  14. A high efficiency superconducting nanowire single electron detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosticher, M.; Ladan, F.R.; Maneval, J.P.; Dorenbos, S.N.; Zijlstra, T.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Zwiller, V.; Lupa?cu, A.; Nogues, G.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of single electrons using a Nb0.7Ti0.3N superconducting wire deposited on an oxidized silicon substrate. While it is known that this device is sensitive to single photons, we show that it also detects single electrons with kilo-electron-volt energy emitted from the cathode of

  15. Superconducting permanent magnets for high-temperature operation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirsa, Miloš; Muralidhar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, Suppl. D (2004), D441-D444 ISSN 0011-4626. [Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism. Košice, 12.07.2004-15.07.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : superconducting magnets * ternary LRE-123 compounds * mesoscopic defects Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  16. The power processor of a high temperature superconducting energy storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, J. [Power Electronics, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This report introduces the structure and properties of a power processor unit for a high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage system which is bused in an UPS demonstration application. The operation is first demonstrated using simulations. The software based operating and control system utilising combined Delta-Sigma and Sliding-Mode control is described shortly. Preliminary test results using a conventional NbTi superconducting energy y storage magnet operating at 4.2 K is shown. (orig.)

  17. Metallic Contaminant Detection using a High-Temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Akai, Tomohiro; Takemoto, Makoto; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Takeyoshi; Ikeda, Yoshio; Suzuki, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    We develop magnetic metallic contaminant detectors using high-temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (HTS-SQUIDs) for industrial products. Finding ultra-small metallic contaminants is an important issue for manufacturers producing commercial products such as lithium ion batteries. If such contaminants cause damages, the manufacturer of the product suffers a big financial loss due to having to recall the faulty products. Previously, we described a system for finding such ultra-small particles in food. In this study, we describe further developments of the system, for the reduction of the effect of the remnant field of the products, and we test the parallel magnetization of the products to generate the remnant field only at both ends of the products. In addition, we use an SQUID gradiometer in place of the magnetometer to reduce the edge effect by measuring the magnetic field gradient. We test the performances of the system and find that tiny iron particles as small as 50 × 50 μm 2 on the electrode of a lithium ion battery could be clearly detected. This detection level is difficult to achieve when using other methods. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  18. The origins of macroscopic quantum coherence in high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Philip; Nottale, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a new theoretical approach to superconductivity in p-type cuprates. • Electron pairing mechanisms in the superconducting and pseudogap phases are proposed. • A scale free network of dopants is key to macroscopic quantum coherence. - Abstract: A new, theoretical approach to macroscopic quantum coherence and superconductivity in the p-type (hole doped) cuprates is proposed. The theory includes mechanisms to account for e-pair coupling in the superconducting and pseudogap phases and their inter relations observed in these materials. Electron pair coupling in the superconducting phase is facilitated by local quantum potentials created by static dopants in a mechanism which explains experimentally observed optimal doping levels and the associated peak in critical temperature. By contrast, evidence suggests that electrons contributing to the pseudogap are predominantly coupled by fractal spin waves (fractons) induced by the fractal arrangement of dopants. On another level, the theory offers new insights into the emergence of a macroscopic quantum potential generated by a fractal distribution of dopants. This, in turn, leads to the emergence of coherent, macroscopic spin waves and a second associated macroscopic quantum potential, possibly supported by charge order. These quantum potentials play two key roles. The first involves the transition of an expected diffusive process (normally associated with Anderson localization) in fractal networks, into e-pair coherence. The second involves the facilitation of tunnelling between localized e-pairs. These combined effects lead to the merger of the super conducting and pseudo gap phases into a single coherent condensate at optimal doping. The underlying theory relating to the diffusion to quantum transition is supported by Coherent Random Lasing, which can be explained using an analogous approach. As a final step, an experimental program is outlined to validate the theory and suggests a new

  19. Cold Test Results of the ISAC-II Medium Beta High Gradient Cryomodule

    CERN Document Server

    Laxdal, R E; Clark, G S; Fong, K; Mitra, A K; Poirier, R L; Rawnsley, B; Ries, T; Sekatchev, I; Stanford, G; Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    Many proposals (RIA, Eurisol, ISAC-II) are emerging for a new generation of high gradient heavy ion accelerators. The ISAC-II medium beta cryomodule represents the first realized application that encorporates many new techniques to improve the performance over machines presently being used for beam delivery. The machine lattice, compatible with multi-charge acceleration, uses high field (9T) superconducting solenoids with bucking coils for active fringe field compensation. The bulk niobium quarter wave medium beta cavity produces 6 MV/m over an effective length of 18cm with a peak surface field of ~30 MV/m. TRIUMF has developed a mechanical tuner capable of both coarse (kHz) and fine (Hz) frequency adjustments of the cavity. The demonstrated tuner resolution is better than 0.1 μm (0.6 Hz). A new rf coupling loop has been developed that operates at 200 Watts forward power with less than 0.5 Watt of power being added to the helium load. Cold alignment in ISAC-II has been done with rf pick-ups using a ...

  20. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Wang

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ∼140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ∼140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ∼140 MV

  1. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  2. High gradient tests of SLAC Linear Collider Accelerator Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.; Deruyter, H.; Eichner, J.; Fant, K.H.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Loewen, R.; Menegat, L.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the current SLAC R ampersand D program to develop room temperature accelerator structures for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The structures are designed to operate at 11.4 GHz at an accelerating gradient in the range of 50 to 100 MV/m. In the past year a 26 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, a 75 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, and a 1.8 m traveling-wave section with detuned deflecting modes have been high-power tested. The paper presents a brief description of the RF test setup, the design and manufacturing details of the structures, and a discussion of test results including field emission, RF processing, dark current spectrum and RF breakdown

  3. Charged particle beam scanning using deformed high gradient insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu -Jiuan

    2015-10-06

    Devices and methods are provided to allow rapid deflection of a charged particle beam. The disclosed devices can, for example, be used as part of a hadron therapy system to allow scanning of a target area within a patient's body. The disclosed charged particle beam deflectors include a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) with a hollow center and a dielectric wall that is substantially parallel to a z-axis that runs through the hollow center. The dielectric wall includes one or more deformed high gradient insulators (HGIs) that are configured to produce an electric field with an component in a direction perpendicular to the z-axis. A control component is also provided to establish the electric field component in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis and to control deflection of a charged particle beam in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis as the charged particle beam travels through the hollow center of the DWA.

  4. Modified Magnicon for High-Gradient Accelerator R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis, and low-power cold tests are described on a modified design intended for the Ka-band pulsed magnicon now in use for high-gradient accelerator R and D and rare elementary particle searches at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. The modification is mainly to the output cavity of the magnicon, which presently operates in the TM310 mode. It is proposed to substitute for this a dual-chamber TE311 cavity structure. The first chamber is to extract about 40% of the beam power (about 25 MW) at 34.272 GHz, while the second chamber is to convey the power to four WR-28 output waveguides. Minor design changes are also proposed for the penultimate 11.424 GHz cavity and the beam collector. The intention of these design changes is to allow the magnicon to operate reliably 24/7, with minor sensitivity to operating parameters.

  5. Modified Magnicon for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-19

    Analysis, and low-power cold tests are described on a modified design intended for the Ka-band pulsed magnicon now in use for high-gradient accelerator R and D and rare elementary particle searches at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. The modification is mainly to the output cavity of the magnicon, which presently operates in the TM310 mode. It is proposed to substitute for this a dual-chamber TE311 cavity structure. The first chamber is to extract about 40% of the beam power (about 25 MW) at 34.272 GHz, while the second chamber is to convey the power to four WR-28 output waveguides. Minor design changes are also proposed for the penultimate 11.424 GHz cavity and the beam collector. The intention of these design changes is to allow the magnicon to operate reliably 24/7, with minor sensitivity to operating parameters.

  6. High coherence plane breaking packaging for superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronn, Nicholas T.; Adiga, Vivekananda P.; Olivadese, Salvatore B.; Wu, Xian; Chow, Jerry M.; Pappas, David P.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate a pogo pin package for a superconducting quantum processor specifically designed with a nontrivial layout topology (e.g., a center qubit that cannot be accessed from the sides of the chip). Two experiments on two nominally identical superconducting quantum processors in pogo packages, which use commercially available parts and require modest machining tolerances, are performed at low temperature (10 mK) in a dilution refrigerator and both found to behave comparably to processors in standard planar packages with wirebonds where control and readout signals come in from the edges. Single- and two-qubit gate errors are also characterized via randomized benchmarking, exhibiting similar error rates as in standard packages, opening the possibility of integrating pogo pin packaging with extensible qubit architectures.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of high Tc superconducting thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Narayan, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the pulsed laser evaporation (PLE) technique for deposition of thin films characterized by a number of unique properties. Based on the experimental characteristics, a theoretical model is developed which considers the formation and anisotropic three dimensional expansion of the laser generated plasma. This model explains most of the experimental features observed in PLE. We have also employed the PLE technique for in-situ fabrication of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 superconducting thin films on different substrates in the temperature range of 500--650 degrees C. At temperatures below 600 degrees C, a biased interposing ring between the substrate and the target was found to significantly improve the superconducting properties. The minimum ion channeling yields were between 3--3.5% for films deposited on (100) SrTiO 3 and (100) LaAlO 3 substrates

  8. Magnet field design considerations for a high energy superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botman, J.I.M.; Craddock, M.K.; Kost, C.J.; Richardson, J.R.

    1983-08-01

    This paper reports the pole shape designs for a two stage superconducting isochronous cyclotron combination (CANUCK) to accelerate 100 μA proton beams to 15 GeV. The pole shape of the 15 sectors of the first stage 3.5 GeV proton cyclotron provides isochronism over the full energy range and a constant axial tune over all but the lowest energies. Progress on the pole design of the 42 sector 15 GeV second stage is also reported. The magnetic fields are computed from the current distribution of the superconducting coils and the infinitely thin current sheets simulating the fully saturated poles. A least squares method is used to minimize deviations from isochronism by adjusting the size of various elemental shim coils placed around the main coil. The method to obtain the desired axial tune is described

  9. Superconductivity revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    While the macroscopic phenomenon of superconductivity is well known and in practical use worldwide in many industries, including MRIs in medical diagnostics, the current theoretical paradigm for superconductivity (BCS theory) suffers from a number of limitations, not the least of which is an adequate explanation of high temperature superconductivity. This book reviews the current theory and its limitations and suggests new ideas and approaches in addressing these issues. The central objective of the book is to develop a new, coherent, understandable theory of superconductivity directly based on molecular quantum mechanics.

  10. A superconducting maglev test facility for high speed transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, R.G.; Mulhall, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    A 550 m long straight track for research into magnetically levitated vehicles has been constructed at the University of Warwick. The flat guideway comprises two strips of aluminium, interacting with the vehicle borne superconducting magnets to produce both lift and guidance. For propulsion a petrol driven winch is provided, though it is to be replaced later by a linear electric motor. Problems of engineering cryostats for magnetic levitation are briefly discussed. (author)

  11. High temperature superconducting compounds II; Proceedings of the Second Symposium, Anaheim, CA, Feb. 20, 21, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whang, S.H.; Dasgupta, A.; Laibowitz, R.

    1990-01-01

    Various topics relevant to the production and implementation of high-temperature superconducting compounds are highlighted including critical current; texturing; ceramics and novel processing; composites; deformation and consolidation; thin films; microstructures; tapes, filaments, and ribbons; and thermodynamics. The thermally activated flux creep, critical current density and current enhancement in high-temperature superconductors are addressed. Also discussed are the phase stability and microstructure of doped superconductors, mechanical considerations in the processing of high-Tc superconductors, fabrication and application of high current density, high RTc superconducting thin films and devices, the effect of substrate temperature and RF biasing on the composition of sputtered Bi-based superconducting thin films, and optical electron microanalysis of cuprate superconductors. The microstructure dependence of critical current density and fabrication of double-layered ribbons from cuprate are also discussed

  12. Southwire's High Temperature Superconducting Cable Development - Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Uday; Lindsay, David

    2005-01-01

    at ORNL for the DC Ic, voltage withstand, ac loss, and other properties using both the Vacuum and Pressure Terminations. The design concept was proven with the 5-m cables and the same design was used for the 30-m cables. Three 30-m cables were constructed during the first two quarters of 1999. The cables were made on flexible formers but they were introduced into three separate rigid vacuum jacketed pipes (VJP). The cables passed the DC Ic tests that were carried out at the manufacturing site. A site was developed at Southwire with a switch yard, liquid nitrogen tank, a cryogenic cooling and delivery system, and a control room with PLC control for the system. The HTS cables were installed by the third quarter of 1999. The HTS cables were energized Jan. 6, 2000. The official opening was carried out on Feb. 18, 2000. As of April 30, 2005 the HTS site has been operating at 100% load for >29,000 hours. Since June 1, 2001 the system has logged over 21,000 hours at full load without an operator on duty at the site. The cryogenic system has been under operation for more than two years and has proven very reliable. Southwire has developed World's First Industrial HTS cable and is continuing to prove its reliability. This report contains several sections outlined below that are related to Southwire's HTS cable development: (1) High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) Tapes; (2) Hand Wound 1-m Cables; (3) Development of Facilities for Construction and testing of HTS cables; (4) 5-m HTS Cables; (5) 30-m HTS Cables, Installation at Southwire; (6) Continued Developments; and (7) Publications. Each of the above sections provide only a short report. The details are given in separate volumes (Vol. 1 to Vol. 7) with separate appendices for each section. These are available at the Cofer Center Technical Library

  13. Quench protection and design of large high-current-density superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1981-03-01

    Although most large superconducting magnets have been designed using the concept of cryostability, there is increased need for large magnets which operate at current densities above the cryostable limit (greater than 10 8 Am -2 ). Large high current density superconducting magnets are chosen for the following reasons: reduced mass, reduced coil thickness or size, and reduced cost. The design of large high current density, adiabatically stable, superconducting magnets requires a very different set of design rules than either large cryostable superconducting magnets or small self-protected high current density magnets. The problems associated with large high current density superconducting magnets fall into three categories; (a) quench protection, (b) stress and training, and (c) cryogenic design. The three categories must be considered simultaneously. The paper discusses quench protection and its implication for magnets of large stored energies (this includes strings of smaller magnets). Training and its relationship to quench protection and magnetic strain are discussed. Examples of magnets, built at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and elsewhere using the design guidelines given in this report, are presented

  14. Modal bifurcation in a high-T{sub c} superconducting levitation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, D; Fujiwara, S; Sugiura, T, E-mail: sugiura@mech.keio.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    This paper deals with modal bifurcation of a multi-degree-of-freedom high-T{sub c} superconducting levitation system. As modeling of large-scale high-T{sub c} superconducting levitation applications, where plural superconducting bulks are often used, it can be helpful to consider a system constituting of multiple oscillators magnetically coupled with each other. This paper investigates nonlinear dynamics of two permanent magnets levitated above high-T{sub c} superconducting bulks and placed between two fixed permanent magnets without contact. First, the nonlinear equations of motion of the levitated magnets were derived. Then the method of averaging was applied to them. It can be found from the obtained solutions that this nonlinear two degree-of-freedom system can have two asymmetric modes, in addition to a symmetric mode and an antisymmetric mode both of which also exist in the linearized system. One of the backbone curves in the frequency response shows a modal bifurcation where the two stable asymmetric modes mentioned above appear with destabilization of the antisymmetric mode, thus leading to modal localization. These analytical predictions have been confirmed in our numerical analysis and experiments of free vibration and forced vibration. These results, never predicted by linear analysis, can be important for application of high-T{sub c} superconducting levitation systems.

  15. Superconducting cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, A.; Funkenbusch, P.D.; Chang, G.C.S.; Burns, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Two distant classes of superconducting cermets can be distinguished, depending on whether or not a fully superconducting skeleton is established. Both types of cermets have been successfully fabricated using non-noble metals, with as high as 60wt% of the metal phase. The electrical, magnetic and mechanical behavior of these composites is discussed

  16. Large high current density superconducting solenoids for use in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Taylor, J.D.

    1976-05-01

    Very often the study of high energy physics in colliding beam storage-rings requires a large magnetic field volume in order to detect and analyze charged particles which are created from the collision of two particle beams. Large superconducting solenoids which are greater than 1 meter in diameter are required for this kind of physics. In many cases, interesting physics can be done outside the magnet coil, and this often requires that the amount of material in the magnet coil be minimized. As a result, these solenoids should have high current density (up to 10 9 A m -2 ) superconducting windings. The methods commonly used to stabilize large superconducting magnets cannot be employed because of this need to minimize the amount of material in the coils. A description is given of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory program for building and testing prototype solenoid magnets which are designed to operate at coil current densities in excess of 10 9 A m -2 with magnetic stored energies which are as high as 1.5 Megajoules per meter of solenoid length. The coils use intrinsically stable multifilament Nb--Ti superconductors. Control of the magnetic field quench is achieved by using a low resistance aluminum bore tube which is inductively coupled to the coil. The inner cryostat is replaced by a tubular cooling system which carries two phase liquid helium. The magnet coil, the cooling tubes, and aluminum bore tube are cast in epoxy to form a single unified magnet and cryogenic system which is about 2 centimeters thick. The results of the magnet coil tests are discussed

  17. The design of a five-cell high-current superconducting cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongming; Zhu Feng; Quan Shengwen; Liu Kexin; Nassiri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Energy recovery linacs are promising for achieving high average current with superior beam quality. The key component for accelerating such high-current beams is the superconducting radio-frequency cavity. The design of a 1.3 GHz five-cell high-current superconducting cavity has been carried out under cooperation between Peking University and the Argonne National Laboratory. The radio-frequency properties, damping of the higher order modes, multipacting and mechanical features of this cavity have been discussed and the final design is presented. (authors)

  18. Study of flow fractionation characteristics of magnetic chromatography utilizing high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fukui, Yoshihiro Shoji, Jun Ogawa, Tetsuo Oka, Mitsugi Yamaguchi, Takao Sato, Manabu Ooizumi, Hiroshi Imaizumi and Takeshi Ohara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present numerical simulation of separating magnetic particles with different magnetic susceptibilities by magnetic chromatography using a high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The transient transport is numerically simulated for two kinds of particles having different magnetic susceptibilities. The time evolutions were calculated for the particle concentration in the narrow channel of the spiral arrangement placed in the magnetic field. The field is produced by the highly magnetized high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The numerical results show the flow velocity difference of the particle transport corresponding to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility, as well as the possible separation of paramagnetic particles of 20 nm diameter.

  19. Study of flow fractionation characteristics of magnetic chromatography utilizing high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Satoshi; Shoji, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Jun; Oka, Tetsuo; Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Sato, Takao; Ooizumi, Manabu; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Ohara, Takeshi

    2009-02-01

    We present numerical simulation of separating magnetic particles with different magnetic susceptibilities by magnetic chromatography using a high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The transient transport is numerically simulated for two kinds of particles having different magnetic susceptibilities. The time evolutions were calculated for the particle concentration in the narrow channel of the spiral arrangement placed in the magnetic field. The field is produced by the highly magnetized high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The numerical results show the flow velocity difference of the particle transport corresponding to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility, as well as the possible separation of paramagnetic particles of 20 nm diameter.

  20. Problems of high temperature superconductivity in three-dimensional systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geilikman, B T

    1973-01-01

    A review is given of more recent papers on this subject. These papers have dealt mainly with two-dimensional systems. The present paper extends the treatment to three-dimensional systems, under the following headings: systems with collective electrons of one group and localized electrons of another group (compounds of metals with non-metals-dielectrics, organic substances, undoped semiconductors, molecular crystals); experimental investigations of superconducting compounds of metals with organic compounds, dielectrics, semiconductors, and semi-metals; and systems with two or more groups of collective electrons. Mechanics are considered and models are derived. 86 references.

  1. Research on DC-RF superconducting photocathode injector for high average power FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Kui; Hao Jiankui; Hu Yanle; Zhang Baocheng; Quan Shengwen; Chen Jiaer; Zhuang Jiejia

    2001-01-01

    To obtain high average current electron beams for a high average power Free Electron Laser (FEL), a DC-RF superconducting injector is designed. It consists of a DC extraction gap, a 1+((1)/(2)) superconducting cavity and a coaxial input system. The DC gap, which takes the form of a Pierce configuration, is connected to the 1+((1)/(2)) superconducting cavity. The photocathode is attached to the negative electrode of the DC gap. The anode forms the bottom of the ((1)/(2)) cavity. Simulations are made to model the beam dynamics of the electron beams extracted by the DC gap and accelerated by the superconducting cavity. High quality electron beams with emittance lower than 3 π-mm-mrad can be obtained. The optimization of experiments with the DC gap, as well as the design of experiments with the coaxial coupler have all been completed. An optimized 1+((1)/(2)) superconducting cavity is in the process of being studied and manufactured

  2. Robust zero resistance in a superconducting high-entropy alloy at pressures up to 190 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Wang, Honghong; von Rohr, Fabian; Wang, Zhe; Cai, Shu; Zhou, Yazhou; Yang, Ke; Li, Aiguo; Jiang, Sheng; Wu, Qi; Cava, Robert J.; Sun, Liling

    2017-12-01

    We report the observation of extraordinarily robust zero-resistance superconductivity in the pressurized (TaNb)0.67(HfZrTi)0.33 high-entropy alloy--a material with a body-centered-cubic crystal structure made from five randomly distributed transition-metal elements. The transition to superconductivity (TC) increases from an initial temperature of 7.7 K at ambient pressure to 10 K at ˜60 GPa, and then slowly decreases to 9 K by 190.6 GPa, a pressure that falls within that of the outer core of the earth. We infer that the continuous existence of the zero-resistance superconductivity from 1 atm up to such a high pressure requires a special combination of electronic and mechanical characteristics. This high-entropy alloy superconductor thus may have a bright future for applications under extreme conditions, and also poses a challenge for understanding the underlying quantum physics.

  3. Magnetic performance of new Fermilab high gradient quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanft, R.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Gourlay, S.A.; Lamm, M.J.; McInturff, A.D.; Mokhtarani, A.; Riddiford, A.

    1991-05-01

    For the Fermilab Tevatron low beta insertions installed in 1990--1991 as part of a luminosity upgrade there were built approximately 35 superconducting cold iron quadrupoles utilizing a two layer cos 2θ coil geometry with 76 mm diameter aperature. The field harmonics and strengths of these magnets obtained by measurement at cryogenic conditions are presented. Evidence for a longitudinal periodic structure in the remnant field is shown. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Superconducting RF activities at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Sears, J.; Shu, Q.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper outlines the RF superconductivity research and development work that has taken place at Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies over the past years. The work that has been performed since the last RF superconductivity workshop is emphasized together with a discussion of the direction of future efforts. Past work is summarized first, focusing on research and development activities in the area of RF superconductivity. Superconducting TeV linear collider is then discussed focusing on the application of superconducting RF to a future TeV linear collider. Linear collider structure development is then described centering on the development of a simpler (thereby cheaper) structure for a TeV linear collider. B-factory with superconducting RF is outlined focusing on the formulation of a conceptual design for a B-factory. B-factory structure development is discussed in relation to the advancement in the capability of SC cavities to carry beam currents of several amperes necessary for a high luminosity storage ring. High gradients are discussed as the key to the realization of a high energy superconducting linac or a superconducting RF B-factory. (N.K.)

  5. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Aiying [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Lu, Jian, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Y. Morris, E-mail: ymwang@llnl.gov [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility, leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.

  6. Possible high-T/sub c/ superconductivity in thin wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.C.; Mendoza, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    A heuristic approach to the theory of superconductivity based on a simple physical picture and capable of treating the simultaneous participation of multiple bosonic modes that mediate the pairing interaction is first developed. The effect of the bosonic mode damping is also accounted for. We then propose a possible mechanism of superconductivity in slender electronic systems of finite cross sections based on the pairing interaction mediated by the multiple modes of acoustic plasmons in these structures. Such modes include the quasi-one-dimensional plasmon as well as the so-called slender acoustic plasmons. The critical temperature and the energy gap/T/sub c/ ratio are then calculated by the heuristic method just developed. Numerical results on T/sub c/ in various samples are presented, showing T/sub c/ in the 150--200 K range. The ratio 2Δ 0 /T/sub c/ differs generally from the BCS value due to the temperature dependence of the mode damping. The associated coherence length is shown to be considerably smaller than the transverse dimension of the wires

  7. Development of high field superconducting Tokamak 'TRIAM-1M'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takao; Suzuki, Shohei; Nishi, Masatsugu; Kawasaki, Takahide.

    1984-01-01

    The tokamak nuclear fusion apparatus ''TRIAM-1M'' which is constructed in the Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, has a number of distinctive features as compared with other tokamak projects, that is, the toroidal field coils are made of superconductors for the first time in Japan, and the apparatus is small and has strong magnetic field. Hitachi Ltd. designed and has forwarded the manufacture of the TRIAM-1M. In this paper, the total constitution of the apparatus and the design and manufacture of the plasma vacuum vessel, superconducting toroidal coils and others are reported. The objectives of research are the containment of strong field tokamak plasma and the establishment of the law of proportion, the development of turbulent flow heating method, the adoption of mixed wave current driving method and the practical use of Nb 3 Sn superconducting coils. The apparatus is composed of the vacuum vessel containing plasma, toroidal field coils, poloidal field coils, current transformer coils and turbulent flow heating coils for plasma heating, heat insulating vacuum vessel and supporting structures. The evacuating facility, helium liquefying refrigerator and cooling water facility are installed around the main body. (Kako, I.)

  8. A high field and cryogenic test facility for neutron irradiated superconducting wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, A.; Miyata, H.; Yoshida, M.; Iio, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Yamazaki, M.; Toyama, T.

    2017-12-01

    A 15.5 T superconducting magnet and a variable temperature insert (VTI) system were installed at a radiation control area in Oarai center in Tohoku University to investigate the superconducting properties of activated superconducting materials by fast neutron. The superconductivity was measured at cryogenic temperature and high magnetic field. During these tests, some inconvenient problems were observed and the additional investigation was carried out. The variable temperature insert was designed and assembled to perform the superconducting property tests. without the liquid helium. To remove the heat induced by radiation and joule heating, high purity aluminum rod was used in VTI. The thermal contact was checked by FEM analysis and an additional support was added to confirm the decreasing the stress concentration and the good thermal contact. After the work for improvement, it was affirmed that the test system works well and all troubles were resolved. In this report, the improved technical solution is described and the first data set on the irradiation effect on Nb3Sn wire is presented.

  9. The spheromak as a prototype for ultra-high-field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.; Jardin, S.C.

    1987-08-01

    In view of current progress in the development of superconductor materials, the ultimate high-field limit of superconducting magnets is likely to be set by mechanical stress problems. Maximum field strength should be attainable by means of approximately force-free magnet windings having favorable ''MHD'' stability properties (so that small winding errors will not grow). Since a low-beta finite-flux-hole spheromak configuration qualifies as a suitable prototype, the theoretical and experimental spheromak research effort of the past decade has served to create a substantial technical basis for the design of ultra-high-field superconducting coils. 11 refs

  10. Modeling and comparison of superconducting linear actuators for highly dynamic motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruyn B.J.H. de

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical modeling method for AC losses in highly dynamic linear actuators with high temperature superconducting (HTS tapes. The AC losses and generated force of two actuators, with different placement of the cryostats, are compared. In these actuators, the main loss component in the superconducting tapes are hysteresis losses, which result from both the non-sinusoidal phase currents and movement of the permanent magnets. The modeling method, based on the H-formulation of the magnetic fields, takes into account permanent magnetization and movement of permanent magnets. Calculated losses as function of the peak phase current of both superconducting actuators are compared to those of an equivalent non-cryogenic actuator.

  11. Interplay of CDW, SDW and superconductivity in high-T{sub c} cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, S K [K.D. Science College, Pochilima, Hinjilicut 761 101, Ganjam, Orissa (India); Rout, G.C., E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.i [Condensed Matter Physics Group, Dept. of Applied Physics and Ballistics, F.M. University, Balasore 756 019, Orissa (India)

    2009-07-01

    We present a model calculation of the interplay of the charge density wave (CDW), spin density wave (SDW) and superconductivity in high temperature superconductors. In low doping situation the long range antiferromagnetic order is destroyed to give rise to SDW state accompanied by a CDW state in the system due to doping. For suitable doping the superconductivity appears in the system. The CDW state may describe the pseudogap phenomenon which co-exists with the superconducting phase and extends to normal phase in high-T{sub c} systems. These three competiting interactions co-exist together. These three gap parameters are calculated from the model Hamiltonian and solved self-consistently. By varying their coupling constants their interplay are investigated. Finally density of states is calculated for the conduction band which displays the experimental conductance data of Ekino et al. [T. Ekino, Y. Sezaki, H. Fujji, Phys. Rev. B 60 (1999) 6916].

  12. Interplay of CDW, SDW and superconductivity in high-Tc cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panda, S.K.; Rout, G.C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a model calculation of the interplay of the charge density wave (CDW), spin density wave (SDW) and superconductivity in high temperature superconductors. In low doping situation the long range antiferromagnetic order is destroyed to give rise to SDW state accompanied by a CDW state in the system due to doping. For suitable doping the superconductivity appears in the system. The CDW state may describe the pseudogap phenomenon which co-exists with the superconducting phase and extends to normal phase in high-T c systems. These three competiting interactions co-exist together. These three gap parameters are calculated from the model Hamiltonian and solved self-consistently. By varying their coupling constants their interplay are investigated. Finally density of states is calculated for the conduction band which displays the experimental conductance data of Ekino et al. [T. Ekino, Y. Sezaki, H. Fujji, Phys. Rev. B 60 (1999) 6916].

  13. A new hybrid protection system for high-field superconducting magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravaioli, Emanuele; Datskov, V.I.; Kirby, G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Verweij, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    The new generation of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets poses a challenge concerning the protection of the magnet coil in the case of a quench. The very high stored energy per unit volume requires a fast and efficient quench heating system in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A

  14. High quality superconducting titanium nitride thin film growth using infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgovkin, A.; Chaudhuri, S.; Ruhtinas, A.; Lahtinen, M.; Sajavaara, T.; Maasilta, I. J.

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting titanium nitride (TiN) thin films were deposited on magnesium oxide, sapphire and silicon nitride substrates at 700 °C, using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique, where infrared (1064 nm) pulses from a solid-state laser were used for the ablation from a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere. Structural studies performed with x-ray diffraction showed the best epitaxial crystallinity for films deposited on MgO. In the best films, superconducting transition temperatures, T C, as high as 4.8 K were observed, higher than in most previous superconducting TiN thin films deposited with reactive sputtering. A room temperature resistivity down to ∼17 μΩ cm and residual resistivity ratio up to 3 were observed in the best films, approaching reported single crystal film values, demonstrating that PLD is a good alternative to reactive sputtering for superconducting TiN film deposition. For less than ideal samples, the suppression of the film properties were correlated mostly with the unintended incorporation of oxygen (5–10 at%) in the film, and for high oxygen content films, vacuum annealing was also shown to increase the T C. On the other hand, superconducting properties were surprisingly insensitive to the nitrogen content, with high quality films achieved even in the highly nitrogen rich, Ti:N = 40/60 limit. Measures to limit oxygen exposure during deposition must be taken to guarantee the best superconducting film properties, a fact that needs to be taken into account with other deposition methods, as well.

  15. High-Q, high gradient niobium-coated cavities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Valente, A M; Van't Hof, C A

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting cavities made by sputter-deposition of a thin niobium film onto copper have proven over the years to be a viable alternative to bulk niobium, the best example being the very successful operation of LEP at 200 GeV. It will be shown that this technology, investigated at 1.5 GHz by a dedicated R&D effort at CERN, can be developed to unprecedented performance, proving that no fundamental limitation prevents high quality factors to be maintained over a broad range of accelerating field.

  16. Superconducting technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Superconductivity has a long history of about 100 years. Over the past 50 years, progress in superconducting materials has been mainly in metallic superconductors, such as Nb, Nb-Ti and Nb 3 Sn, resulting in the creation of various application fields based on the superconducting technologies. High-T c superconductors, the first of which was discovered in 1986, have been changing the future vision of superconducting technology through the development of new application fields such as power cables. On basis of these trends, future prospects of superconductor technology up to 2040 are discussed. In this article from the viewpoints of material development and the applications of superconducting wires and electronic devices. (author)

  17. Recovery time of high temperature superconducting tapes exposed in liquid nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Jie; Zeng, Weina; Yao, Zhihao; Zhao, Anfeng; Hu, Daoyu; Hong, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel method based on a sequence of AC pulses is presented. • Liquid nitrogen temperature is used as criterion to judge whether the sample has recovered. • Recovery time of some tape doesn't increase with the amplitude of fault current. • This phenomenon is caused by boiling heat transfer process of liquid nitrogen. • This phenomenon can be used in optimizing both the limiting rate and reclosing system. - Abstract: The recovery time is a crucial parameter to high temperature superconducting tapes, especially in power applications. The cooperation between the reclosing device and the superconducting facilities mostly relies on the recovery time of the superconducting tapes. In this paper, a novel method is presented to measure the recovery time of several different superconducting samples. In this method criterion used to judge whether the sample has recovered is the liquid nitrogen temperature, instead of the critical temperature. An interesting phenomenon is observed during the testing of superconducting samples exposed in the liquid nitrogen. Theoretical explanations of this phenomenon are presented from the aspect of heat transfer. Optimization strategy of recovery characteristics based on this phenomenon is also briefly discussed.

  18. Performance of a superconducting, high field subcentimeter undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Sampson, W.; Woodle, M.

    1991-01-01

    A Superconducting 8.80mm wavelength undulator is under construction for the 500nm Free-Electron Laser at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We present results on the design, construction and performance of this novel undulator structure. A field on axis of 0.51T has been measured for a 4.40mm gap, with a current 20% below the quench current. Our simple design focuses on minimizing the accumulation of errors by minimizing the numbers of parts and by using a ferromagnetic yoke. The magnetic field error is less than 0.30% rms as manufactured (without shimming). The third harmonic content is less than 0.1% of the fundamental

  19. High Power CW Superconducting Linacs for EURISOL and XADS

    CERN Document Server

    Biarrotte, J L

    2004-01-01

    A multi-MW superconducting proton linac is proposed as the baseline solution for the EURISOL and the XADS driver accelerators. In the EURISOL project, which studies the design of the next-generation European ISOL facility, it is used to produce both neutron-deficient and neutron-rich exotic nuclei far from the valley of stability. In the PDS-XADS project, which aims to the demonstration of the feasibility of an ADS system for nuclear waste transmutation, it is used to produce the neutron flux required by the associated sub-critical reactor. In this paper, we report the main results and conclusions reached within these preliminary design studies. A special emphasis is given on the on-going and future R&D to be done to accomplish the demonstration of the full technology.

  20. Step edge Josephson junctions and high temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, Alasdair J.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) gradiometers based on the high temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO). A step-edge Josephson junction fabrication process was developed to produce sufficiently steep (>60 deg) step-edges such that junctions exhibited RSJ-like current-voltage characteristics. The mean I C R N product of a sample of twenty step-edge junctions was 130μV. Step-edge dc SQUIDs with inductances between 67pH and 114pH were fabricated. Generally the SQUIDs had an intrinsic white flux noise in the 10-30μΦ 0 /√Hz range, with the best device, a 70pH SQUID, exhibiting a white flux noise of 5μΦ 0 /√Hz. Different first-order SQUID gradiometer designs were fabricated from single layers of YBCO. Two single-layer gradiometer (SLG) designs were fabricated on 10x10mm 2 substrates. The best balance and lowest gradient sensitivity measured for these devices were 1/300 and 308fT/cm√Hz (at 1 kHz) respectively. The larger baseline and larger flux capture area of the pick-up loops in a large area SLG design, fabricated on 30x10mm 2 substrates, resulted in significant improvements in the balance and gradient field sensitivity with 1/1000 and 50fT/cm√Hz (at 1kHz) measured respectively. To reduce the uniform field effective area of SLOs and therefore reduce the direct pick-up of environmental field noise when operated unshielded, a novel gradiometric SQUID (G-SQUID) device was developed. Fabricated from a single layer of YBCO, the G-SQUIDs with inductances of 67pH, had small uniform field effective areas of approximately 2μm 2 - more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the uniform field effective areas of conventional narrow linewidth SQUIDs of similar inductance. Two designs of G-SQUID were fabricated on 10x10mm 2 substrates. Due to their small effective areas, when cooled unshielded these devices showed no increase in their white flux noise. The best balance achieved for a G

  1. Interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gariglio, S., E-mail: stefano.gariglio@unige.ch [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Gabay, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bat 510, Université Paris-Sud 11, Centre d’Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Triscone, J.-M. [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We discuss interfacial superconductivity, a field boosted by the discovery of the superconducting interface between LaAlO. • This system allows the electric field control and the on/off switching of the superconducting state. • We compare superconductivity at the interface and in bulk doped SrTiO. • We discuss the role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. • We briefly discuss superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments. • Recent observations of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} are presented. - Abstract: Low dimensional superconducting systems have been the subject of numerous studies for many years. In this article, we focus our attention on interfacial superconductivity, a field that has been boosted by the discovery of superconductivity at the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}. We explore the properties of this amazing system that allows the electric field control and on/off switching of superconductivity. We discuss the similarities and differences between bulk doped SrTiO{sub 3} and the interface system and the possible role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. We also, more briefly, discuss interface superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments, and the recent observation of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3}.

  2. A high-gradient high-duty-factor Rf photo-cathode electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, Robert A.; Hartman, Neal; Lidia, Steven M.; Wang, Shaoheng

    2002-01-01

    We describe the analysis and preliminary design of a high-gradient, high-duty factor RF photocathode gun. The gun is designed to operate at high repetition rate or CW, with high gradient on the cathode surface to minimize emittance growth due to space charge forces at high bunch charge. The gun may also be operated in a solenoidal magnetic field for emittance compensation. The design is intended for use in short-pulse, high-charge, and high-repetition rate applications such as linac based X-ray sources. We present and compare the results of gun simulations using different codes, as well as RF and thermal analysis of the structure

  3. A high-gradient high-duty-factor RF photo-cathode electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, Robert; Hartman, N.; Lidia, S.; Wang, S.H.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the analysis and preliminary design of a high-gradient, high-duty factor RF photocathode gun. The gun is designed to operate at high repetition rate or CW, with high gradient on the cathode surface to minimize emittance growth due to space charge forces at high bunch charge. The gun may also be operated in a solenoidal magnetic field for emittance compensation. The design is intended for use in short-pulse, high-charge, and high-repetition rate applications such as linac based X-ray sources. We present and compare the results of gun simulations using different codes, as well as RF and thermal analysis of the structure

  4. Direct Observation of High-Temperature Superconductivity in One-Unit-Cell FeSe Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wen-Hao; Zhang Jin-Song; Li Fang-Sen; Guo Ming-Hua; Ding Hao; Tang Chen-Jia; Wang Qing-Yan; He Ke; Ji Shuai-Hua; Chen Xi; Sun Yi; Zhao Yan-Fei; Xing Ying; Wang Hui-Chao; Zhang Hui-Min; Peng Jun-Ping; Li Zhi; Wang Meng; Fujita Takeshi; Hirata Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    We prepared one-unit-cell (1-UC) thick FeSe films on insulating SrTiO 3 substrates with non-superconducting FeTe protection layers by molecular beam epitaxy for ex situ studies. By direct transport and magnetic measurements, we provide definitive evidence for high temperature superconductivity in the 1-UC FeSe films with an onset T C above 40 K and an extremely large critical current density J C ∼1.7×10 6 A/cm 2 at 2 K, which are much higher than T C ∼8 K and J C ∼10 4 A/cm 2 for bulk FeSe, respectively. Our work may pave the way to enhancing and tailoring superconductivity by interface engineering. (express letter)

  5. Superconducting linac beam dynamics with high-order maps for RF resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, A A; Pardo, R C; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.11.177

    2004-01-01

    The arbitrary-order map beam optics code COSY Infinity has recently been adapted to calculate accurate high-order ion-optical maps for electrostatic and radio-frequency accelerating structures. The beam dynamics of the superconducting low-velocity positive-ion injector linac for the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab is used to demonstrate some advantages of the new simulation capability. The injector linac involves four different types of superconducting accelerating structures and has a total of 18 resonators. The detailed geometry for each of the accelerating cavities is included, allowing an accurate representation of the on- and off-axis electric fields. The fields are obtained within the code from a Poisson-solver for cylindrically symmetric electrodes of arbitrary geometry. The transverse focusing is done with superconducting solenoids. A detailed comparison of the transverse and longitudinal phase space is made with the conventional ray-tracing code LINRAY. The two codes are evaluated for ease ...

  6. High T[sub c] superconductivity in YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] studied by PAC and PAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Shengyun (China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China)); Li Anli (China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China)); Zheng Shengnan (China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China)); Huang Hanchen (China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China)); Li Donghong (China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China)); Din Honglin (China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China)); Du Hongshan (China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China)); Sun Hancheng (China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China))

    1993-11-01

    High T[sub c] superconductivity has been investigated in YBaCuO by both perturbed angular correlation and positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques as a function of temperature from 77 to 300 K. An abrupt change has been observed in the positron lifetime and Doppler broadening and the electric field gradient and its asymmetry parameter across T[sub c], indicating a transition of two- to one-dimensional Cu-O-Cu chain structure and a charge transfer from CuO layers to CuO chains. An anomaly of the normal state has been demonstrated around 125 K, which is attributed to the structural instability. (orig.)

  7. Theory of high-Tc superconducting cuprates based on experimental evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrikosov, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    A model of superconductivity in layered high-temperature superconducting cuprates is proposed, based on the extended saddle point singularities in the electron spectrum, weak screening of the Coulomb interaction and phonon-mediated interaction between electrons plus a small short-range repulsion of Hund's, or spin-fluctuation, origin. This permits to explain the large values of Tc, features of the isotope effect on oxygen and copper, the existence of two types of the order parameter, the peak in the inelastic neutron scattering, the positive curvature of the upper critical field, as function of temperature etc

  8. Capital and operating cost estimates for high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenung, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Fagaly, R.L.; Heiberger, M.; Stephens, R.B.; Leuer, J.A.; Guzman, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Capital and operating costs have been estimated for mid-scale (2 to 200 Mwh) superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) designed to use high temperature superconductors (HTS). Capital costs are dominated by the cost of superconducting materials. Operating costs, primarily for regeneration, are significantly reduced for HTS-SMES in comparison to low temperature, conventional systems. This cost component is small compared to other O and M and capital components, when levelized annual costs are projected. In this paper, the developments required for HTS-SMES feasibility are discussed

  9. AC Losses and Their Thermal Effect in High Temperature Superconducting Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Mijatovic, Nenad; Zou, Shengnan

    2015-01-01

    In transient operations or fault conditions, high temperature superconducting (HTS) machines suffer AC losses which have an influence on the thermal stability of superconducting windings. In this paper, a method to calculate AC losses and their thermal effect in HTS machines is presented....... The method consists of three sub-models that are coupled only in one direction. The magnetic field distribution is first solved in a machine model, assuming a uniform current distribution in HTS windings. The magnetic fields on the boundaries are then used as inputs for an AC loss model which has...

  10. Superconductive properties, interaction mechanisms, materials preparation and electronic transport in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saemann-Ischenko, G.

    1993-01-01

    The final report is composed of eight chapters dealing with the following aspects: I. Mixed state, critical currents, anisotropy, intrinsic and extrinsic pinning. II. Microwave properties and far-infrared reflectivity of epitactic HTSC films. III. Hall effect at the states of normal conductivity and superconductivity, magnetoresistance, superconducting fluctuation phenomena. IV. Effects of the nuclear and the electronic energy loss. V. Scanning electron microscopy. VI. p- and n-doped high-Tc superconductors: Charge symmetry and magnetism. VII. Preparation methods. VIII. Electrochemical examinations of HTSC films and HTSC monocrystals at low temperatures. (orig./MM) [de

  11. High Tc superconducting three-terminal device under quasi-particle injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Kabasawa, U.; Tonouchi, M.; Kobayashi, T.

    1988-01-01

    A new type of the current injection type three terminal device was fabricated using the high Tc YBaCuO thin epitaxial films, wherein the hot quasi-particle injection effect on the superconducting current was closely examined. The zero bias drain current was efficiently suppressed by the injection of the hot quasi-particles through the gate electrode. Though it is speculative, a comparison of the experimental results and analyses based on the familiar BCS theory intimates that the main mechanism of the current modulation is the non-equilibrium superconductivity due to accumulation of the excess quasi-particles

  12. Theory of High-T{sub c} Superconducting Cuprates Based on Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrikosov, A. A.

    1999-12-10

    A model of superconductivity in layered high-temperature superconducting cuprates is proposed, based on the extended saddle point singularities in the electron spectrum, weak screening of the Coulomb interaction and phonon-mediated interaction between electrons plus a small short-range repulsion of Hund's, or spin-fluctuation, origin. This permits to explain the large values of T{sub c}, features of the isotope effect on oxygen and copper, the existence of two types of the order parameter, the peak in the inelastic neutron scattering, the positive curvature of the upper critical field, as function of temperature etc.

  13. Cryogenic magnet case and distributed structural materials for high-field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, L.T.; Miller, J.R.; Kerns, J.A.; Myall, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    The superconducting magnets of the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER II) will generate high magnetic fields over large bores. The resulting electromagnetic forces require the use of large volumes of distributed steel and thick magnet case for structural support. Here we review the design allowables, calculated loads and forces, and structural materials selection for TIBER II. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Short Circuits of a 10 MW High Temperature Superconducting Wind Turbine Generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, X.; Polinder, H.; Liu, D.; Mijatovic, Nenad; Holbøll, Joachim; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    Direct drive high temperature superconducting (HTS) wind turbine generators have been proposed to tackle challenges for ever increasing wind turbine ratings. Due to smaller reactances in HTS generators, higher fault currents and larger transient torques could occur if sudden short circuits happen at

  15. Superconductivity of high Tc Scientific revolution?; Superconductividad de alta Tc una revolucion cientifica?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquina, J E; Ridaura, R; Gomez, R; Marquina, V; Alvarez, J L

    1998-12-31

    A short history of superconductivity, since its discovery by Bednorz and Muller to the development of new materials with high transition temperatures, is presented. Further evolvements are analyzed in terms of T.s. Kuhn conceptions expressed in his book. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. (Author) 4 refs.

  16. Adaptation of superconducting fault current limiter to high-speed reclosing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, T.; Yanabu, S.

    2009-01-01

    Using a high temperature superconductor, we constructed and tested a model superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL). The superconductor might break in some cases because of its excessive generation of heat. Therefore, it is desirable to interrupt early the current that flows to superconductor. So, we proposed the SFCL using an electromagnetic repulsion switch which is composed of a superconductor, a vacuum interrupter and a by-pass coil, and its structure is simple. Duration that the current flow in the superconductor can be easily minimized to the level of less than 0.5 cycle using this equipment. On the other hand, the fault current is also easily limited by large reactance of the parallel coil. There is duty of high-speed reclosing after interrupting fault current in the electric power system. After the fault current is interrupted, the back-up breaker is re-closed within 350 ms. So, the electromagnetic repulsion switch should return to former state and the superconductor should be recovered to superconducting state before high-speed reclosing. Then, we proposed the SFCL using an electromagnetic repulsion switch which employs our new reclosing function. We also studied recovery time of the superconductor, because superconductor should be recovered to superconducting state within 350 ms. In this paper, the recovery time characteristics of the superconducting wire were investigated. Also, we combined the superconductor with the electromagnetic repulsion switch, and we did performance test. As a result, a high-speed reclosing within 350 ms was proven to be possible.

  17. Interplay between spin polarization and color superconductivity in high density quark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providência, João; Providência, Constança

    2013-01-01

    Here, it is suggested that a four-point interaction of the tensor type may lead to spin polarization in quark matter at high density. It is found that the two-flavor superconducting phase and the spin polarized phase correspond to distinct local minima of a certain generalized thermodynamical pot...

  18. Systematics in positron annihilation lifetime analysis of high Tc superconducting transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Radousky, H.B.; Wachs, A.L.; Fluss, M.J.; Turchi, P.E.A.; Jean, Y.C.; Sunder, C.S.; Chu, C.W.; Peng, J.L.; Folkerts, T.J.; Shelton, R.N.; Hinks, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Values of the positron lifetime have previously been observed to change with temperature below T c in high T c superconducting oxides. The authors report new measurements on Ba .6 K .4 Bio 3 and Nd 1.85 Ce .15 CuO 4

  19. Superconducting accelerator technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Hartline, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Modern and future accelerators for high energy and nuclear physics rely increasingly on superconducting components to achieve the required magnetic fields and accelerating fields. This paper presents a practical overview of the phenomenon of superconductivity, and describes the design issues and solutions associated with superconducting magnets and superconducting rf acceleration structures. Further development and application of superconducting components promises increased accelerator performance at reduced electric power cost

  20. Design of high-energy high-current linac with focusing by superconducting solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batskikh, G.I.; Belugin, V.M.; Bondarev, B.I. [Moscow Radiotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The advancement of MRTI design for 1.5 GeV and 250 mA ion CW linac was presented in a previous report. In this new linac version all the way from input to output the ions are focused by magnetic fields of superconducting solenoids. The ion limit current is far beyond the needed value. The linac focusing channel offers major advantages over the more conventional ones. The acceptance is 1.7 times as large for such focusing channel as for quadrupole one. Concurrently, a random perturbation sensitivity for such channel is one order of magnitude smaller than in quadrupole channel. These focusing channel features allow to decrease beam matched radius and increase a linac radiation purity without aperture growth. {open_quotes}Regotron{close_quotes} is used as high power generator in linac main part. But D&W cavities need not be divided into sections connected by RF-bridges which denuded them of high coupling factor.

  1. Construction of a prototype superconducting quadrupole magnet for a high-luminosity insertion at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billan, J.; Perin, R.; Resegotti, L.; Tortschanoff, T.; Wolf, R.

    1976-01-01

    An account is given of the design and construction of a prototype superconducting magnet providing a high field gradient over a large aperture. After stressing the importance of careful definition and monitoring of all the steps involved, the authors present the manufacturing process in full, together with a description of the materials, techniques, facilities, and tools employed in the fabrication of the various components and in their assembly. The superconductor is NbTi in a copper matrix. The magnet has auxiliary sextupole and 12-pole windings; the warm bore diameter is 173 mm and the magnetic length 1.25 m. During tests, a maximum gradient of 47 T/m was obtained, with a peak field in the windings of 6.1 T and a stored energy of 700 kJ. Eight such magnets have been proposed as part of a system for focusing the proton beams of the ISR at one of the crossing points in order to achieve locally increased luminosity. (author)

  2. Hyperfine interactions in iron substituted high-Tc superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.E.; Saitovitch, E.B.; Lam, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The hyperfine interactions in Fe substituted copper oxide ternary and quaternary compounds with perovskite-related structures are studied, using the Local Density theory in an embedded cluster approach. The self-consistent electronic structure is examined for Cu and Fe sites in a number of plausible local geometries representative of La 2 Cu O 4 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and related materials. Moessbauer isomer shifts, electric fields gradients, magnetic moments, and contact hyperfine fields are presented for comparison with experiment and discussed in light of lattice structure data. (author)

  3. Design and Test of a Thermal Triggered Persistent Current System using High Temperature Superconducting Tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Keun [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyoungku [Electro-Mechanical Research Institute, Hyundai Heavy Industries, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Min Cheol [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Seong Eun [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yong Soo [Department of Electrical Engineering, Ansan College of Technology, 671 Choji-Dong, Danwon-Gu, Ansan, 425-792 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jin [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Tae Kuk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-01

    A superconducting magnet which is operated in persistent current mode in SMES, NMR, MRI and MAGLEV has many advantages such as high uniformity of magnetic field and reduced thermal loss. A high temperature superconducting (HTS) persistent current switch (PCS) system was designed and tested in this research. The HTS PCS was optimally designed using two different HTS tapes, second generation coated conductor (CC) HTS tape and Bi-2223 HTS tape by the finite element method (FEM) in thermal quench characteristic view. The CC tape is more prospective applicable wire in these days for its high n value and critical current independency from external magnetic field than Bi-2223 tape. Also a prototype PCS system using Bi-2223 tape was manufactured and tested. The PCS system consists of a PCS part, a heater which induces the PCS to quench, and a superconducting magnet. The test was performed in various conditions of transport current. An initial current decay appeared when the superconducting magnet was energized in a PCS system was analyzed. This paper would be foundation of HTS PCS researches.

  4. Theoretical study of stability and superconductivity of ScHn (n =4 -8 ) at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shifeng; Sheng, Xiaowei; Yan, Xiaozhen; Chen, Yangmei; Song, Bo

    2017-09-01

    The synthesis of hydrogen sulfides, with the potential of high-temperature superconductivity, was recently proposed at high Tc = 203 K. It motivated us to employ an ab initio approach for the predictions of crystal structures to find the stable scandium hydrides. In addition to the earlier predicted three stoichiometries of ScH, ScH2, and ScH3, we identify three other metallic stoichiometries of ScH4, ScH6, and ScH8, which show superconductivity at significantly higher temperatures. The phases of ScH4 and ScH6, whose stability does not require extremely high pressures (ZPE), are primarily ionic compounds containing exotic quasimolecular H2 arrangements. The present electron-phonon calculations revealed the superconductive potential of ScH4 and ScH6 with estimated Tc of 98 K and 129 K at 200 GPa and 130 GPa, respectively. The superconductivity of ScHn stems from the large electron-phonon coupling associated with the wagging, bending, and intermediate-frequency modes attributed mainly to the hydrogen atoms.

  5. Anomalous anisotropic compression behavior of superconducting CrAs under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenhai; Wu, Wei; Hu, Qingyang; Zhao, Jinggeng; Li, Chunyu; Yang, Ke; Cheng, Jinguang; Luo, Jianlin; Wang, Lin; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2015-01-01

    CrAs was observed to possess the bulk superconductivity under high-pressure conditions. To understand the superconducting mechanism and explore the correlation between the structure and superconductivity, the high-pressure structural evolution of CrAs was investigated using the angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The structure of CrAs remains stable up to 1.8 GPa, whereas the lattice parameters exhibit anomalous compression behaviors. With increasing pressure, the lattice parameters a and c both demonstrate a nonmonotonic change, and the lattice parameter b undergoes a rapid contraction at ∼0.18−0.35 GPa, which suggests that a pressure-induced isostructural phase transition occurs in CrAs. Above the phase transition pressure, the axial compressibilities of CrAs present remarkable anisotropy. A schematic band model was used to address the anomalous compression behavior of CrAs. The present results shed light on the structural and related electronic responses to high pressure, which play a key role toward understanding the superconductivity of CrAs. PMID:26627230

  6. Measures of maximum magnetic field in 3 GHz radio frequency superconducting cavities; Mesures du gradient accelerateur maximum dans des cavites supraconductrices en regime impulsionnel a 3 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Catherine [Paris-11 Univ., 91 Orsay (France)

    2000-01-19

    Theoretical models have shown that the maximum magnetic field in radio frequency superconducting cavities is the superheating field H{sub sh}. For niobium, H{sub sh} is 25 - 30% higher than the thermodynamical H{sub c} field: H{sub sh} within (240 - 274) mT. However, the maximum magnetic field observed so far is in the range H{sub c,max} = 152 mT for the best 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. This field is lower than the critical field H{sub c1} above which the superconductor breaks up into divided normal and superconducting zones (H{sub c1}{<=}H{sub c}). Thermal instabilities are responsible for this low value. In order to reach H{sub sh} before thermal breakdown, high power short pulses are used. The cavity needs then to be strongly over-coupled. The dedicated test bed has been built from the collaboration between Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) - Sezione di Genoa, and the Service d'Etudes et Realisation d'Accelerateurs (SERA) of Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL). The maximum magnetic field, H{sub rf,max}, measurements on INFN cavities give lower results than the theoretical speculations and are in agreement with previous results. The superheating magnetic fields is linked to the magnetic penetration depth. This superconducting characteristic length can be used to determine the quality of niobium through the ratio between the resistivity measured at 300 K and 4.2 K in the normal conducting state (RRR). Results have been compared to previous ones and agree pretty well. They show that the RRR measured on cavities is superficial and lower than the RRR measured on samples which concerns the volume. (author)

  7. Superconducting magnet system for the AGS high energy unseparated beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, G.; Aggus, J.; Bamberger, J.

    1975-01-01

    A beam line to the Multi-Particle Spectrometer capable of handling 30 GeV/c secondary beams will consist of four large identical superconducting dipoles and a number of room temperature quadrupoles. The total bending angle is 20 0 , 5 0 per magnet, and the room temperature aperture required in the dipoles is 20 cm. The four dipoles will be of the cos theta type and will have an overall length of 2.5 m and nominal maximum field of 4.0 T at 2800 A. The conductor will be a thin, wide metal-impregnated braid. The circular aperture is surrounded by coils which are a six-block approximation to a single-layer cos theta current sheet, and a coaxial cylinder of laminated iron at helium temperature. Each magnet will weigh about 10 tons. The design of the dewar including its heat load is discussed. The system is planned to be operational in Fall 1975. (U.S.)

  8. Superconducting fluctuations and pseudogap in high-Tc cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alloul H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Large pulsed magnetic fields up to 60 Tesla are used to suppress the contribution of superconducting fluctuations (SCF to the ab-plane conductivity above Tc in a series of YBa2Cu3O6+x. These experiments allow us to determine the field Hc’(T and the temperature Tc’ above which the SCFs are fully suppressed. A careful investigation near optimal doping shows that Tc’ is higher than the pseudogap temperature T*, which is an unambiguous evidence that the pseudogap cannot be assigned to preformed pairs. Accurate determinations of the SCF contribution to the conductivity versus temperature and magnetic field have been achieved. They can be accounted for by thermal fluctuations following the Ginzburg-Landau scheme for nearly optimally doped samples. A phase fluctuation contribution might be invoked for the most underdoped samples in a T range which increases when controlled disorder is introduced by electron irradiation. Quantitative analysis of the fluctuating magnetoconductance allows us to determine the critical field Hc2(0 which is found to be be quite similar to Hc’ (0 and to increase with hole doping. Studies of the incidence of disorder on both Tc’ and T* allow us to to propose a three dimensional phase diagram including a disorder axis, which allows to explain most observations done in other cuprate families.

  9. The Path to High Q-Factors in Superconducting Accelerating Cavities: Flux Expulsion and Surface Resistance Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    causing temperature rising. The physics behind the magnetic flux expulsion is also analyzed, showing that during a fast cooldown the magnetic field structures, called vortices, tend to move in the same direction of the thermal gradient, from the Meissner state region to the mixed state region, minimizing the Gibbs free energy. On the other hand, during a slow cool down, not only the vortices movement is limited by the absence of thermal gradients, but, also, at the end of the superconducting transition, the magnetic field concentrates along randomly distributed normal-conducting region from which it cannot be expelled anymore. The systematic study of the surface resistance components performed for the different surface treatments, reveals that the BCS surface resistance and the trapped flux surface resistance have opposite trends as a function of the surface impurity content, defined by the mean free path. At medium field value, the BCS surface resistance is minimized for nitrogen-doped cavities and significantly larger for standard niobium cavities. On the other hand, Nitrogen-doped cavities show larger dissipation due to trapped flux. This is consequence of the bell-shaped trend of the trapped flux sensitivity as a function of the mean free path. Such experimental findings allow also a better understanding of the RF dissipation due to trapped flux. The best compromise between all the surface resistance components, taking into account the possibility of trapping some external magnetic field, is given by light nitrogen-doping treatments. However, the beneficial effects of the nitrogen-doping is completely lost when large amount of magnetic field is trapped during the cooldown, underlying the importance of both cooldown and magnetic field shielding optimization in high quality factors cryomodules.

  10. The path to high Q-factors in superconducting accelerating cavities: Flux expulsion and surface resistance optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinello, Martina

    causing temperature rising. The physics behind the magnetic flux expulsion is also analyzed, showing that during a fast cooldown the magnetic field structures, called vortices, tend to move in the same direction of the thermal gradient, from the Meissner state region to the mixed state region, minimizing the Gibbs free energy. On the other hand, during a slow cool down, not only the vortices movement is limited by the absence of thermal gradients, but, also, at the end of the superconducting transition, the magnetic field concentrates along randomly distributed normal-conducting region from which it cannot be expelled anymore. The systematic study of the surface resistance components performed for the different surface treatments, reveals that the BCS surface resistance and the trapped flux surface resistance have opposite trends as a function of the surface impurity content, defined by the mean free path. At medium field value, the BCS surface resistance is minimized for nitrogen-doped cavities and significantly larger for standard niobium cavities. On the other hand, Nitrogen-doped cavities show larger dissipation due to trapped flux. This is consequence of the bell-shaped trend of the trapped flux sensitivity as a function of the mean free path. Such experimental findings allow also a better understanding of the RF dissipation due to trapped flux. The best compromise between all the surface resistance components, taking into account the possibility of trapping some external magnetic field, is given by light nitrogen-doping treatments. However, the beneficial effects of the nitrogen-doping is completely lost when large amount of magnetic field is trapped during the cooldown, underlying the importance of both cooldown and magnetic field shielding optimization in high quality factors cryomodules.

  11. Comparison study of cable geometries and superconducting tape layouts for high-temperature superconductor cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Wurui; Shao, Tianchong; Gao, Yuanwen

    2018-04-01

    High-temperature superconductor (HTS) rare-earth-barium-copper-oxide (REBCO) tapes are very promising for use in high-current cables. The cable geometry and the layout of the superconducting tapes are directly related to the performance of the HTS cable. In this paper, we use numerical methods to perform a comparison study of multiple-stage twisted stacked-tape cable (TSTC) conductors to find better cable structures that can both improve the critical current and minimize the alternating current (AC) losses of the cable. The sub-cable geometry is designed to have a stair-step shape. Three superconducting tape layouts are chosen and their transport performance and AC losses are evaluated. The magnetic field and current density profiles of the cables are obtained. The results show that arrangement of the superconducting tapes from the interior towards the exterior of the cable based on their critical current values in descending order can enhance the cable's transport capacity while significantly reducing the AC losses. These results imply that cable transport capacity improvements can be achieved by arranging the superconducting tapes in a manner consistent with the electromagnetic field distribution. Through comparison of the critical currents and AC losses of four types of HTS cables, we determine the best structural choice among these cables.

  12. Macroscopic Magnetic Coupling Effect: The Physical Origination of a High-Temperature Superconducting Flux Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Coombs, Tim

    2018-04-01

    We have uncovered at the macroscopic scale a magnetic coupling phenomenon in a superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 -δ (YBCO) film, which physically explains the mechanism of the high-temperature superconducting flux pump. The coupling occurs between the applied magnetic poles and clusters of vortices induced in the YBCO film, with each cluster containing millions of vortices. The coupling energy is verified to originate from the inhomogeneous field of the magnetic poles, which reshapes the vortex distribution, aggregates millions of vortices into a single cluster, and accordingly moves with the poles. A contrast study is designed to verify that, to provide the effective coupling energy, the applied wavelength must be short while the field amplitude must be strong, i.e., local-field inhomogeneity is the crucial factor. This finding broadens our understanding of the collective vortex behavior in an applied magnetic field with strong local inhomogeneity. Moreover, this phenomenon largely increases the controlled vortex flow rate by several orders of magnitude compared with existing methods, providing motivation for and physical support to a new branch of wireless superconducting dc power sources, i.e., the high-temperature superconducting flux pump.

  13. Mechanism of high-T{sub c} superconductivity studied by neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Kazuyoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1998-03-01

    La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} is one of the typical high-T{sub c} cuprates where Sr-doping creates many phases from the Mott insulator at x=0 nonsuperconducting metal for x>0.26; the high-T{sub c} superconductivity appears for 0.06{<=}x{<=}0.26. We have grown large single crystals of La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} over a wide the doping rate up to x=0.3 and performed systematic neutron scattering experiments for the first time. We obtained several results indicating an intimate relation between the dynamical spin correlations and the superconductivity. Incommensurate spatial modulation appears in the antiferromagnetic spin correlations beyond x=0.05 close to the lower boundary of the superconducting phase. We found that the degree of the spatial modulation or the incommensurability {delta} increases with doping and T{sub c} is linearly scaled with {delta} for x{<=}0.15. A well-defined spin excitation gap was observed only for x=0.15 where the T{sub c} reaches the maximum value. And the dynamical spin coherence degrades upon doping with x>>0.15. There results strongly suggest the essential role of the magnetically correlated region and the spatial spin modulation in the CuO{sub 2} planes to sustain or create the superconductivity. (author)

  14. A high gradient quadrupole magnet for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.; Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Mirk, K.; Peters, C.; Wandesforde, A.

    1987-01-01

    A quadrupole magnet for the SSC has been designed with a gradient of 234 T/m at 6500 A. Coil I.D. is 40 mm. The two-layer windings have 9 inner turns and 13 outer turns per pole with a wedge-shaped space in each layer. The 30-strand cable is identical to that used in the outer layer of the SSC dipole magnet. Interlocking aluminum alloy collars are compressed around the coil using a four-way press and are locked with four keys. The collared coil is supported and centered in a cold split iron yoke. A one-meter model was constructed and tested. Design details including quench behavior are presented. The quadrupole magnets proposed for the main SSC rings have a design gradient of 230 T/m. For one proposed 60 degree lattice cell, each 3-m long quad is separated by five 17-m long dipole magnets

  15. State of the art and trends of high-Tc superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a brief account is given on some aspects of the development of high-T c Superconductivity since the last edition of the SATT Conference. This year significant results have been obtained in the challenging endeavor of increasing high critical current densities and in the context of high-T c junctions. The attention is confined to achievements and perspectives in these two topics

  16. A Cryogenic Magnetostrictive Actuator Using a Persistent High Temperature Superconducting Magnet. Part 1; Concept and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Garnett; Bromberg, Leslie; Teter, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenic magnetostrictive materials, such as rare earth zinc crystals, offer high strains and high forces with minimally applied magnetic fields, making the material ideally suited for deformable optics applications. For cryogenic temperature applications the use of superconducting magnets offer the possibility of a persistent mode of operation, i.e., the magnetostrictive material will maintain a strain field without power. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are attractive options if the temperature of operation is higher than 10 degrees Kelvin (K) and below 77 K. However, HTS wires have constraints that limit the minimum radius of winding, and even if good wires can be produced, the technology for joining superconducting wires does not exist. In this paper, the design and capabilities of a rare earth zinc magnetostrictive actuator using bulk HTS is described. Bulk superconductors can be fabricated in the sizes required with excellent superconducting properties. Equivalent permanent magnets, made with this inexpensive material, are persistent, do not require a persistent switch as in HTS wires, and can be made very small. These devices are charged using a technique which is similar to the one used for charging permanent magnets, e.g., by driving them into saturation. A small normal conducting coil can be used for charging or discharging. Because of the magnetic field capability of the superconductor material, a very small amount of superconducting magnet material is needed to actuate the rare earth zinc. In this paper, several designs of actuators using YBCO and BSCCO 2212 superconducting materials are presented. Designs that include magnetic shielding to prevent interaction between adjacent actuators will also be described. Preliminary experimental results and comparison with theory for BSCCO 2212 with a magnetostrictive element will be discussed.

  17. Hole superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.; Marsiglio, F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors review recent work on a mechanism proposed to explain high T c superconductivity in oxides as well as superconductivity of conventional materials. It is based on pairing of hole carriers through their direct Coulomb interaction, and gives rise to superconductivity because of the momentum dependence of the repulsive interaction in the solid state environment. In the regime of parameters appropriate for high T c oxides this mechanism leads to characteristic signatures that should be experimentally verifiable. In the regime of conventional superconductors most of these signatures become unobservable, but the characteristic dependence of T c on band filling survives. New features discussed her include the demonstration that superconductivity can result from repulsive interactions even if the gap function does not change sign and the inclusion of a self-energy correction to the hole propagator that reduces the range of band filling where T c is not zero

  18. Strong correlations and the search for high-Tc superconductivity in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, J. M.; Calderón, M. J.; Liu, J.; Muñoz, M. C.; Bascones, E.

    2017-02-01

    Undoped iron superconductors accommodate n =6 electrons in five d orbitals. Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that the strength of correlations increases with hole doping, as the electronic filling approaches half filling with n =5 electrons. This evidence delineates a scenario in which the parent compound of iron superconductors is the half-filled system, in analogy to cuprate superconductors. In cuprates the superconductivity can be induced upon electron or hole doping. In this work we propose to search for high-Tc superconductivity and strong correlations in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides with n slave-spin and multiorbital random-phase-approximation calculations we analyze the strength of the correlations and the superconducting and magnetic instabilities in these systems with the main focus on LaCrAsO. We find that electron-doped LaCrAsO is a strongly correlated system with competing magnetic interactions, with (π ,π ) antiferromagnetism and nodal d -wave pairing being the most plausible magnetic and superconducting instabilities, respectively.

  19. Use of a High-Temperature Superconducting Coil for Magnetic Energy Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagnard, J-F; Crate, D; Jamoye, J-F; Laurent, Ph; Mattivi, B; Cloots, R; Ausloos, M; Genon, A; Vanderbemden, Ph

    2006-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage device (SMES) has been realised using a 350 m-long BSCCO tape wound as a ''pancake'' coil. The coil is mounted on a cryocooler allowing temperatures down to 17.2 K to be achieved. The temperature dependence of coil electrical resistance R(T) shows a superconducting transition at T = 102.5 K. Measurements of the V(I) characteristics were performed at several temperatures between 17.2 K and 101.5 K to obtain the temperature dependence of the critical current (using a 1 μV/cm criterion). Critical currents were found to exceed 100 A for T < 30 K. An electronic DC-DC converter was built in order to control the energy flow in and out of the superconducting coil. The converter consists of a MOS transistor bridge switching at a 80 kHz frequency and controlled with standard Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) techniques. The system was tested using a 30 V squared wave power supply as bridge input voltage. The coil current, the bridge input and output voltages were recorded simultaneously. Using a 10 A setpoint current in the superconducting coil, the whole system (coil + DC-DC converter) can provide a stable output voltage showing uninterruptible power supply (UPS) capabilities over 1 s

  20. Impurity band Mott insulators: a new route to high Tc superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Baskaran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Last century witnessed the birth of semiconductor electronics and nanotechnology. The physics behind these revolutionary developments is certain quantum mechanical behaviour of 'impurity state electrons' in crystalline 'band insulators', such as Si, Ge, GaAs and GaN, arising from intentionally added (doped impurities. The present article proposes that certain collective quantum behaviour of these impurity state electrons, arising from Coulomb repulsions, could lead to superconductivity in a parent band insulator, in a way not suspected before. Impurity band resonating valence bond theory of superconductivity in boron doped diamond, recently proposed by us, suggests possibility of superconductivity emerging from impurity band Mott insulators. We use certain key ideas and insights from the field of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates and organics. Our suggestion also offers new possibilities in the field of semiconductor electronics and nanotechnology. The current level of sophistication in solid state technology and combinatorial materials science is very well capable of realizing our proposal and discover new superconductors.

  1. High-temperature superconductivity in solid solutions based on mixed yttrium and barium cuprate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazuev, G.V.; Kirsanov, N.A.; Makarova, O.V.; Zubkov, V.G.; Shveikin, G.P.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (T c = 30-40 K) in mixed lanthanum and alkaline earth cuprates La 2-x M x CuO 4 , where M = Ba and Ca (1-3) stimulated an extensive search for new superconducting phases based on mixed oxides of these elements. The superconducting transition temperature T c in LnBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-z phases is practically independent of the REE and lies between 90-96 K. The crystal structure of superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-z is similar to perovskite, has orthorhombic symmetry (4,5), and is related to the lanthanum barium cuprite tetragonal defect structure La 3 Ba 3 Cu 6 O 14.1 (8). A study of possible solid solutions (SS) based on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-z through iso- or heterovalent substitution for Y 3+ and Ba 2+ and of their electrical properties seems warranted. In the present work, the authors report the synthesis, x-ray diffraction study, and specific electric resistivity of SS Y 1-x M x (Ba 1-y M y ') 2 Cu 3 O 7-z , where M = La, Lu, Sc, In, K, Zr, and Ce and M' = Ca, Sr, Mg, K, and La

  2. The vortex structure and flux creep within superconducting permanent-magnet high aspect-ratio discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.H.P.; Younas, I.

    1997-01-01

    Inhomogeneous type II superconducting discs magnetized by an applied field will retain some magnetization when field is switched off so the superconducting disc will behave as a permanent magnet after flux creep has reduced to a low value.This paper examines the superconducting vortex structure within superconducting permanent-magnet high aspect-ratio discs which is consistent with the calculated magnetic field distribution.The discs, with radius R, have the axis along the z-direction and the mid-plane of the disc corresponds to z = 0. These discs with large aspect ratios in the remnant state have a region between radius r l and R where the magnetic field is reversed. Surrounding the line r = r l and z = 0 there is a region where H cl which is in the Meissner state. Near r l the vortex lines are strongly curved. For radii r l vortex lines creep to larger values of r. For radii r > r l vortex lines creep to smaller values of r, meet at r l with vortex lines of opposite sign and form a continuous loop which decreases in size and is finally annihilated in the Meissner region. Flux creep induces lossless currents in the Meissner region. (author)

  3. A vibrating wire parallel to a high temperature superconducting slab. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saif, A G; El-sabagh, M A [Department of Mathematic and Theoretical physics, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The power losses problem for an idealized high temperature type II superconducting system of a simple geometry is studied. This system is composed of a vibrating normal conducting wire (two wires) carrying a direct current parallel to an uniaxial anisotropic type II superconducting slab (moving slab). First, the electromagnetic equation governing the dynamics of this system, and its solutions are obtained. Secondly, a modified anisotropic london equation is developed to study these systems in the case of the slab moving. Thirdly, it is found that, the power losses is dependent on the frequency, london penetration depth, permeability, conductivity, velocity, and the distance between the normal conductors and the surfaces of the superconducting slab. Moreover, the power losses decreases as the distance between the normal conductors and the surface of the superconducting slab decreases; and increases as the frequency, the london penetration depth, permeability, conductivity, and velocity are increased. These losses along the versor of the anisotropy axis is increased as {lambda}{sub |}| increases. Moreover, it is greater than the power losses along the crystal symmetry direction. In the isotropic case as well as the slab thickness tends to infinity, agreement with previous results are obtained. 2 figs.

  4. Superconducted tour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-09-15

    Superconductivity - the dramatic drop in electrical resistance in certain materials at very low temperatures - has grown rapidly in importance over the past two or three decades to become a key technology for high energy particle accelerators. It was in this setting that a hundred students and 15 lecturers met in Hamburg in June for a week's course on superconductivity in particle accelerators, organized by the CERN Accelerator School and the nearby DESY Laboratory.

  5. The stress-strain relationship for multilayers of the high Tc superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, H.; Yamamura, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the calculation of the stress-strain relationship for multilayers of the high Tc superconducting oxides. The elucidation of this relationship is expected quite helpful for the preparation of high-quality multilayers of these materials. This calculation is possible to do in the same way of Timoshenko's bi-metal treatment. The authors did computation of the residual stress and strain, and the state of stress and strain for these multilayers has been acquired in detail by this calculation

  6. An investigation in texturing high Tc superconducting ceramics by creep sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnier, P.; Deschanels, X.; Maurice, F.; Schmirgeld, L.; Aguillon, C.; Senoussi, S.; Mac Carthy, M.; Tatlock, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    We study in detail the possibility of high-T c superconducting ceramics texturing by high pressing them during sintering. We show texture variations as a function of the applied load, of the deformation, of the temperature, and of the sintering stage length, of the rate of variation of temperature, of the material nature in contact with ceramic and of the original powder quality. We present results obtained by optical microscopy, electronic microscopy, X-rays, and local chemical analysis

  7. 6. Trilateral German-Russian-Ukrainian seminar on high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Kornilov, E.I.

    1993-01-01

    The proceedings of the 6. Trilateral German-Russian-Ukrainian seminar on high-temperature superconductivity are reported. Nuclear methods (neutron diffraction, neutron polarization, Raman scattering, ESR) applied to study rare earth cuprates are described. The reports dealing with fundamental experimental studies and theoretical investigations are presented. The source materials for preparation of high-tc superconductors and the ways of their preparation, as well as their physico-chemical properties are considered

  8. Metallorganic precursors route for high Tc superconducting materials and related phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran-porter, D.; Gonzalez, A.; Sanchis, M.J.; Beltran-porter, A.; Ibanez, R.; Sapina, F.

    1991-01-01

    The adequacy of the precursors approach for high Tc superconducting materials is validated by means of three examples of a new synthesis of mixed oxides which are directly related to the high Tc superconductors. The synthesis temperature is lowered significantly, and the need for extending the classic 'building block' approach is shown. The hypothesis that topochemical reactions from molecular to extended solids are posssible is proven. 28 refs

  9. Analysis of eddy current loss in high-Tc superconducting power cables with respect to various structure of stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S. J.; Song, M. K.; Lee, S. J.; Cho, J. W.; Sim, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    The High-Tc superconducting power cable consists of a multi-layer high-Tc superconducting cable core and a stabilizer which is used to bypass the current at fault time. Eddy current loss is generated in the stabilizer in normal operating condition and affects the whole system. In this paper, the eddy current losses are analyzed with respect to various structure of stabilizer by using opera-3d. Moreover, optimal conditions of the stabilizer are derived to minimize the eddy current losses from the analyzed results. The obtained results could be applied to the design and manufacture of the high-Tc superconducting power cable system.

  10. High-T /SUB c/ Superconducting integrated circuit: a dc SQUID with input coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Iorio, M.S.; Beasley, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    We have fabricated a high transition temperature superconducting integrated circuit consisting of a dc SQUID and an input coupling coil. The purpose is to ascertain the generic problems associated with constructing a high-T /SUB c/ circuit as well as to fabricate a high performance dc SQUID. The superconductor used for both the SQUID and the input coil is Nb 3 Sn which must be deposited at 800 0 C. Importantly, the insulator separating SQUID and input coil maintains its integrity at this elevated temperature. A hole in the insulator permits contact to the innermost winding of the coil. This contact has been achieved without significant degradation of the superconductivity. Consequently, the device operates over a wide temperature range, from below 4.2 K to near T /SUB c/

  11. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q0 applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, S.; Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-01

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb3Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb3Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q0 out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q0 at quench of 8 × 109. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above Hc1, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q0 values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb3Sn cavities in future applications.

  12. Preprocessing of gravity gradients at the GOCE high-level processing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Johannes; Rispens, Sietse; Gruber, Thomas; Koop, Radboud; Schrama, Ernst; Visser, Pieter; Tscherning, Carl Christian; Veicherts, Martin

    2009-07-01

    One of the products derived from the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) observations are the gravity gradients. These gravity gradients are provided in the gradiometer reference frame (GRF) and are calibrated in-flight using satellite shaking and star sensor data. To use these gravity gradients for application in Earth scienes and gravity field analysis, additional preprocessing needs to be done, including corrections for temporal gravity field signals to isolate the static gravity field part, screening for outliers, calibration by comparison with existing external gravity field information and error assessment. The temporal gravity gradient corrections consist of tidal and nontidal corrections. These are all generally below the gravity gradient error level, which is predicted to show a 1/ f behaviour for low frequencies. In the outlier detection, the 1/ f error is compensated for by subtracting a local median from the data, while the data error is assessed using the median absolute deviation. The local median acts as a high-pass filter and it is robust as is the median absolute deviation. Three different methods have been implemented for the calibration of the gravity gradients. All three methods use a high-pass filter to compensate for the 1/ f gravity gradient error. The baseline method uses state-of-the-art global gravity field models and the most accurate results are obtained if star sensor misalignments are estimated along with the calibration parameters. A second calibration method uses GOCE GPS data to estimate a low-degree gravity field model as well as gravity gradient scale factors. Both methods allow to estimate gravity gradient scale factors down to the 10-3 level. The third calibration method uses high accurate terrestrial gravity data in selected regions to validate the gravity gradient scale factors, focussing on the measurement band. Gravity gradient scale factors may be estimated down to the 10-2 level with this

  13. A review of basic phenomena and techniques for sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auciello, O. (Microelectronics Center of North Carolina, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA) North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.; Lichtenwalner, D.J. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Krauss, A.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The processes involved in plasma and ion beam sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting thin films are critically reviewed. Recent advances in the development of these techniques are discussed in relation to basic physical phenomena, specific to each technique, which must be understood before high quality films can be produced. Control of film composition is a major issue in sputter-deposition of multicomponent materials. Low temperature processing of films is a common goal for each technique, particularly in relation to integrating high temperature superconducting films with the current microelectronics technology. It has been understood for some time that for Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} deposition, the most intensely studied high-{Tc} compound, incorporation of sufficient oxygen into the film during deposition is necessary to produce as-deposited superconducting films at relatively substrate temperatures. Recent results have shown that with the use of suitable buffer layers, high quality Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} sputtered films can be obtained on Si substrates without the need for post-deposition anneal processing. This review is mainly focussed on issues related to sputter-deposition of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films, although representative results concerning the bismuth and thallium based compounds are included. 143 refs., 11 figs.

  14. Combining gradient structure and TRIP effect to produce austenite stainless steel with high strength and ductility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, X.L.; Yang, M.X.; Yuan, F.P.; Chen, L.; Zhu, Y.T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a design strategy to combine the benefits from both gradient structure and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP). The resultant TRIP-gradient steel takes advantage of both mechanisms, allowing strain hardening to last to a larger plastic strain. 304 stainless steel sheets were treated by surface mechanical attrition to synthesize gradient structure with a central coarse-grained layer sandwiched between two grain-size gradient layers. The gradient layer is composed of submicron-sized parallelepiped austenite domains separated by intersecting ε-martensite plates, with increasing domain size along the depth. Significant microhardness heterogeneity exists not only macroscopically between the soft coarse-grained core and the hard gradient layers, but also microscopically between the austenite domain and ε-martensite walls. During tensile testing, the gradient structure causes strain partitioning, which evolves with applied strain, and lasts to large strains. The γ → α′ martensitic transformation is triggered successively with an increase of the applied strain and flow stress. Importantly, the gradient structure prolongs the TRIP effect to large plastic strains. As a result, the gradient structure in the 304 stainless steel provides a new route towards a good combination of high strength and ductility, via the co-operation of both the dynamic strain partitioning and TRIP effect.

  15. Realisation and instrumentation of high current power station for superconducting cables testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnaud, S.

    2000-05-01

    This report deals with the designing of a high current station able to test electric properties of superconductors. This test station will be used for testing the superconducting wires of large hadron collider detectors in CERN. The high current test station will have to generate high intensity continuous current in a magnetic field of 0 to 5 tesla and in temperature conditions of 4.2 K. The length of wire samples submitted to the uniform magnetic field is 300 mm and the installation is fitted with equipment able to measure the magnetic field perpendicular to either faces of the wire. The peculiarity of this station is to use a superconducting transformer in order to generate the high current. The first part of this work recalls important notions concerning superconductivity. The second part presents the high current station by describing the superconducting transformer and the sample-holder. We have studied the designing of a transformer able to yield a secondary current whose intensity reaches 100 kA, such intensity generates powerful electromagnetic forces (566 kN/m) in case of defect, so the sample-holder has to be carefully design to bear them. The third part presents the cryogenic component of the station, the instrumentation of the sample-holder and the method used to measure secondary currents. In the last part we present the performance of a prototype transformer, this prototype is able to deliver a 22 kA secondary current for a 160 A primary current, the uncertainty on the measured value of the secondary current is about 3%

  16. Feasibility study of electric motors constructed with high temperature superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    The potential application of high temperature superconducting (HTSC) materials to electric motors is discussed. The specific application area of motors in electric power generating stations has been selected and a feasible study has been initiated on the use of HTSC materials in the design of motors for this application. A progress report on this feasibility study is presented. Technical challenges in both the development of HTSC wire and the design of a motor to utilize this wire are discussed. Finally, the results of design calculations comparing a superconducting motor with one of conventional design are presented assuming that success can be achieved in overcoming the technical problems which must be resolved to produce a high performance HTSC wire

  17. The impact of high temperature superconductivity on the electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolsky, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The progress and prospects for the application of high temperature superconductivity to the Electric Power Sector has been the topic of an IEA Implementing Agreement, begun in 1990. The present Task Members are Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom and the United States. As a result of the Implementing Agreement, work has been done by the Operating Agent with the full participation of all the member countries. This work has facilitated the exchange of information among experts in all countries and has documented relevant assessments. Further, this work has examined the status of high amperage conductor, fault-current limiters, superconducting magnetic energy storage, cables, rotating machines, refrigeration, and studies of the power system. The Task Members find more progress toward applications than many expected five years ago and the grounds for further international collaboration to hasten the use of superconductors in the power sector, early in the 21st century

  18. High-temperature superconducting phase of HBr under pressure predicted by first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qinyan; Lu, Pengchao; Xia, Kang; Sun, Jian; Xing, Dingyu

    2017-08-01

    The high pressure phases of HBr are explored with an ab initio crystal structure search. By taking into account the contribution of zero-point energy (ZPE), we find that the P 4 /n m m phase of HBr is thermodynamically stable in the pressure range from 150 to 200 GPa. The superconducting critical temperature (Tc) of P 4 /n m m HBr is evaluated to be around 73 K at 170 GPa, which is the highest record so far among binary halogen hydrides. Its Tc can be further raised to around 95K under 170 GPa if half of the bromine atoms in the P 4 /n m m HBr are substituted by the lighter chlorine atoms. Our study shows that, in addition to lower mass, higher coordination number, shorter bonds, and more highly symmetric environment for the hydrogen atoms are important factors to enhance the superconductivity in hydrides.

  19. Crystal Structure and Superconductivity of PH 3 at High Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hanyu [Geophysical; Department; Li, Yinwei [School; Gao, Guoying [State; Tse, John S. [Department; State; Naumov, Ivan I. [Geophysical

    2016-02-04

    We have performed a systematic structure search on solid PH3 at high pressures using the particle swarm optimization method. At 100–200 GPa, the search led to two structures which along with others have P–P bonds. These structures are structurally and chemically distinct from those predicted for the high-pressure superconducting H2S phase, which has a different topology (i.e., does not contain S–S bonds). Phonon and electron–phonon coupling calculations indicate that both structures are dynamically stable and superconducting. The pressure dependence and critical temperature for the monoclinic (C2/m) phase of 83 K at 200 GPa are in excellent agreement with a recent experimental report.

  20. A new hybrid protection system for high-field superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Kirby, G; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    The new generation of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets poses a challenge concerning the protection of the magnet coil in the case of a quench. The very high stored energy per unit volume requires a fast and efficient quench heating system in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A new protection system for superconducting magnets is presented, comprising a combination of a novel coupling-loss induced quench (CLIQ) system and conventional quench heaters. CLIQ can provoke a very fast transition to the normal state in coil windings by introducing coupling loss and thus heat in the coil's conductor. The advantage of the hybrid protection system is a global transition, resulting in a much faster current decay, a significantly lower hot-spot temperature, and a more homogeneous temperature distribution in the magnet's coil.

  1. Misfit dislocations and phase transformations in high-T sub c superconducting films

    CERN Document Server

    Gutkin, M Y

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical model is suggested that describes the effects of misfit stresses on defect structures, phase content and critical transition temperature T sub c in high-T sub c superconducting films. The focus is placed on the exemplary case of YBaCuO films deposited onto LaSrAlO sub 4 substrates. It is theoretically revealed here that misfit stresses are capable of inducing phase transformations controlled by the generation of misfit dislocations in growing cuprate films. These transformations, in the framework of the suggested model, account for experimental data on the influence of the film thickness on phase content and critical temperature T sub c of superconducting cuprate films, reported in the literature. The potential role of stress-assisted phase transformations in suppression of critical current density across grain boundaries in high-T sub c superconductors is briefly discussed.

  2. Routes to High-Temperature Superconductivity: A Lesson from FeSe/SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dung-Hai

    2018-03-01

    Raising the superconducting transition temperature to a point where applications are practical is one of the most important challenges in science. In this review, we aim at gaining insights on the Tc controlling factors for a particular high-temperature superconductor family - the FeSe-based superconductors. In particular, we discuss the mechanisms by which the Cooper pairing temperature is enhanced from ˜8 K in bulk FeSe to ˜80 K in the interface between an atomic layer of FeSe and SrTiO3. This includes the experimental hints and the theoretical simulation of the involved mechanisms. We end by applying these insights to suggest some possible high-temperature superconducting systems.

  3. One- and two-dimensional sublattices as preconditions for high-Tc superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, E.

    1989-01-01

    In an earlier paper it was proposed describing superconductivity in the framework of a nonadiabatic Heisenberg model in order to interprete the outstanding symmetry proper ties of the (spin-dependent) Wannier functions in the conduction bands of superconductors. This new group-theoretical model suggests that Cooper pair formation can only be mediated by boson excitations carrying crystal-spin-angular momentum. While in the three-dimensionally isotropic lattices of the standard superconductors phonons are able to transport crystal-spin-angular momentum, this is not true for phonons propagating through the one- or two-dimensional Cu-O sublattices of the high-T c compounds. Therefore, if such an anisotropic material is superconducting, it is necessarily higher-energetic excitations (of well-defined symmetry) which mediate pair formation. This fact is proposed being responsible for the high transition temperatures of these compounds. (author)

  4. Microwave superconductivity for particle accelerators - How the high TC superconductors measure up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.; Green, K.; Gruschus, J.

    1988-01-01

    Application of superconducting niobium cavities to accelerators for high energy physics, nuclear physics and free electron laser is growing rapidly. Cornell has a long standing effort in the development of superconducting RF accelerator technology. Nb cavities developed here from the basis for constructing the world's highest energy electron accelerator for nuclear physics. These cavities have set a standard against which the behavior of the new superconductors must be compared. From available results on dc critical fields, and the energy gap, it appears that the new materials could make a significant impact on the capabilities of future accelerators. Crucial to this assessment, however, are direct microwave loss measurements, together with measurements of the energy gap and RF frequency dependence as well as the behavior at high RF fields. Latest results on these properties for bulk sintered ceramics, thin films and single crystals at RF frequencies of 1.5 and 6 Ghz are presented

  5. Research and development project for flywheel energy storage system using high-temperature superconducting magnetic bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinagawa, Jiro; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    1996-01-01

    Recent progress in the research and development of an yttrium-based oxide high-temperature superconductor has enabled the production of a large-diameter bulk with a strong flux-pinning force. A combination of this superconductor and a permanent magnet makes it feasible to fabricate a non-contact, non-controlled superconducting magnetic bearing with a very small rotational loss. Use of the superconducting magnetic bearing for a flywheel energy storage system may pave the way to the development of a new energy storage system that has great energy storage efficiency. >From relevant data measured with a miniature model of the high-temperature superconducting magnetic bearing, a conceptual design of an 8 MWh flywheel energy storage system was developed, using the new bearing which proved to be potentially capable of achieving a high energy storage efficiency of 84%. A 100 Wh-class experimental system was install that attained a high revolution rate of 17.000 rpm. (author)

  6. Microwave dynamics of high aspect ratio superconducting nanowires studied using self-resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavicca, Daniel F.; Adams, Jesse K.; Grant, Lierd E.; McCaughan, Adam N.; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-06-01

    We study the microwave impedance of extremely high aspect ratio (length/width ≈ 5000) superconducting niobium nitride nanowires. The nanowires are fabricated in a compact meander geometry that is in series with the center conductor of a 50 Ω coplanar waveguide transmission line. The transmission coefficient of the sample is measured up to 20 GHz. At high frequency, a peak in the transmission coefficient is seen. Numerical simulations show that this is a half-wave resonance along the length of the nanowire, where the nanowire acts as a high impedance, slow wave transmission line. This resonance sets the upper frequency limit for these nanowires as inductive elements. Fitting simulations to the measured resonance enables a precise determination of the nanowire's complex sheet impedance at the resonance frequency. The real part is a measure of dissipation, while the imaginary part is dominated by kinetic inductance. We characterize the dependence of the sheet resistance and sheet inductance on both temperature and current and compare the results to recent theoretical predictions for disordered superconductors. These results can aid in the understanding of high frequency devices based on superconducting nanowires. They may also lead to the development of novel superconducting devices such as ultra-compact resonators and slow-wave structures.

  7. Fabrication of Chemically Doped, High Upper Critical Field Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzik, James, V.

    2005-10-13

    Controlled chemical doping of magnesium diboride (MgB2) has been shown to substantially improve its superconducting properties to the levels required for high field magnets, but the doping is difficult to accomplish through the usual route of solid state reaction and diffusion. Further, superconducting cables of MgB2 are difficult to fabricate because of the friable nature of the material. In this Phase I STTR project, doped and undoped boron fibers were made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several >100m long batches of doped and undoped fiber were made by CVD codeposition of boron plus dopants. Bundles of these fibers infiltrated with liquid magnesium and subsequently converted to MgB2 to form Mg-MgB2 metal matrix composites. In a parallel path, doped boron nano-sized powder was produced by a plasma synthesis technique, reacted with magnesium to produce doped MgB2 superconducting ceramic bodies. The doped powder was also fabricated into superconducting wires several meters long. The doped boron fibers and powders made in this program were fabricated into fiber-metal composites and powder-metal composites by a liquid metal infiltration technique. The kinetics of the reaction between boron fiber and magnesium metal was investigated in fiber-metal composites. It was found that the presence of dopants had significantly slowed the reaction between magnesium and boron. The superconducting properties were measured for MgB2 fibers and MgB2 powders made by liquid metal infiltration. Properties of MgB2 products (Jc, Hc2) from Phase I are among the highest reported to date for MgB2 bulk superconductors. Chemically doped MgB2 superconducting magnets can perform at least as well as NbTi and NbSn3 in high magnetic fields and still offer an improvement over the latter two in terms of operating temperature. These characteristics make doped MgB2 an effective material for high magnetic field applications, such as magnetic confined fusion, and medical MRI devices. Developing

  8. Fabrication of Chemically Doped, High Upper Critical Field Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzik, James V.

    2005-01-01

    Controlled chemical doping of magnesium diboride (MgB2) has been shown to substantially improve its superconducting properties to the levels required for high field magnets, but the doping is difficult to accomplish through the usual route of solid state reaction and diffusion. Further, superconducting cables of MgB2 are difficult to fabricate because of the friable nature of the material. In this Phase I STTR project, doped and undoped boron fibers were made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several >100m long batches of doped and undoped fiber were made by CVD codeposition of boron plus dopants. Bundles of these fibers infiltrated with liquid magnesium and subsequently converted to MgB2 to form Mg-MgB2 metal matrix composites. In a parallel path, doped boron nano-sized powder was produced by a plasma synthesis technique, reacted with magnesium to produce doped MgB2 superconducting ceramic bodies. The doped powder was also fabricated into superconducting wires several meters long. The doped boron fibers and powders made in this program were fabricated into fiber-metal composites and powder-metal composites by a liquid metal infiltration technique. The kinetics of the reaction between boron fiber and magnesium metal was investigated in fiber-metal composites. It was found that the presence of dopants had significantly slowed the reaction between magnesium and boron. The superconducting properties were measured for MgB2 fibers and MgB2 powders made by liquid metal infiltration. Properties of MgB2 products (Jc, Hc2) from Phase I are among the highest reported to date for MgB2 bulk superconductors. Chemically doped MgB2 superconducting magnets can perform at least as well as NbTi and NbSn3 in high magnetic fields and still offer an improvement over the latter two in terms of operating temperature. These characteristics make doped MgB2 an effective material for high magnetic field applications, such as magnetic confined fusion, and medical MRI devices. Developing

  9. ac superconducting articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    A noval ac superconducting cable is described. It consists of a composite structure having a superconducting surface along with a high thermally conductive material wherein the superconducting surface has the desired physical properties, geometrical shape and surface finish produced by the steps of depositing a superconducting layer upon a substrate having a predetermined surface finish and shape which conforms to that of the desired superconducting article, depositing a supporting layer of material on the superconducting layer and removing the substrate, the surface of the superconductor being a replica of the substrate surface

  10. Superconductivity suppression near metal-dielectric in transition highly disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchinskij, Eh.Z.; Sadovskij, M.V.; Ehrkabaev, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of temperature suppression of superconducting transition T c within wide limits of disorders values from low-disordered to highly-disordered ones caused by formation of the Coulomb gap in the states density are studied on the bases of the earlier proposed self consistent theory on the metal-dielectric. It is shown that the proposed theory gives satisfactory description of experimental data for a number of the systems under study

  11. 2+1 topological term, anyons and their possible application in high Tc superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Chuanjie.

    1990-01-01

    I review pedagogically some aspects about the SO(3) non-linear σ-model and the topological Hopf term (or the abelian Chern-Simons term). I argue that the presence of the topological Chern-Simons term is irrelevant (for regular gauge field configurations). I also give a brief introduction to the ideal anyon gas approach to high T c superconductivity. (author). 18 refs

  12. Superconducting Quadrupoles for the ISR High Luminosity insertion Coil cross section

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This picture shows a cut out section of an ISR High Luminosity (low beta) Quadrupole. One can clearly see the distribution of conductors and spacers which produces the wanted quadrupolar field. The spacers are made of pure copper and the central pole of stainless steel.The superconducting wire may be seen in photo 8008591X. See also pictures 7702690X, 8008591X, 7702698X.

  13. Characterization of the superconducting state in hafnium hydride under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, A. M.; Szewczyk, K. A.; Jarosik, M. W.; Szcześniak, K. M.; Sowińska, M. A.; Szcześniak, D.

    2018-05-01

    The hydrogen-rich compounds at high pressure may exhibit notably high superconducting transition temperatures. In the paper, we have calculated the basic thermodynamic parameters of the superconducting state in two selected phases of HfH2 hydride under high-pressure respectively at 180 GPa for Cmma and 260 GPa for P21 / m . Calculations has been conducted in the framework of the Eliashberg formalism. In particular, we have determined the values of the critical temperature (TC) to be equal to 8 K and 13 K for the Cmma and P21 / m phases, respectively. Moreover, we have estimated other thermodynamic properties such as the order parameter (Δ (T)) , the thermodynamic critical field (HC (T)) , and the specific heat for the normal (CN) and superconducting (CS) state. Finally, we have shown that the characteristic ratios: RΔ = 2 Δ (0) /kBTC and RC = ΔC (TC) /CN (TC) , which are related to the above thermodynamic functions, slightly differ from the predictions of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory due to the strong-coupling and retardation effects.

  14. High-pressure effects on the superconductivity of β-pyrochlore oxides AOs2O6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Takaki; Takeshita, Nao; Terakura, Chikeko; Takagi, Hidenori; Tokura, Yoshinori; Yonezawa, Shigeki; Muraoka, Yuji; Hiroi, Zenji

    2006-01-01

    High-pressure effects on the superconducting transitions of β-pyrochlore oxide superconductors AOs 2 O 6 (A=Cs, Rb, K) are studied by measuring resistivity under high pressures up to 16 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature T c first increases with increasing pressure in all the compounds and then exhibits a broad maximum at 7.6 K (6 GPa), 8.2 K (2 GPa) and 10 K (0.6 GPa) for A=Cs, Rb and K, respectively. Finally, the superconductivity is suppressed completely at a critical pressure near 7 and 6 GPa for A=Rb and K and probably above 10 GPa for A=Cs. Characteristic changes in the temperature dependence of resistivity of RbOs 2 O 6 under high pressure. The residual resistivity largely increases with pressure above 4 GPa and, as a result, resistivity indicates small temperature dependence down to 4.2 K at 7 GPa and application of further pressure up to 10 GPa indicates that temperature dependence of resistivity decrease below 100 K. This characteristic behavior in the β-pyrochlore oxides may originate from the nesting of nearly octahedron shape of Fermi surface

  15. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytnikov, V. E.; Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  16. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sytnikov, V. E., E-mail: vsytnikov@gmail.com; Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A. [JSC NTTs FSC EES (Russian Federation); Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V. [JSC Irkutskkabel (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  17. A new wire fabrication processing using high Ga content Cu-Ga compound in V3Ga compound superconducting wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishinuma, Yoshimitsu; Nishimura, Arata; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Iijima, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Takao

    2007-01-01

    A superconducting magnet system is also one of the important components in an advanced magnetic confinement fusion reactor. Then it is required to have a higher magnetic field property to confine and maintain steady-sate burning deuterium (D)-tritium (T) fusion plasma in the large interspace during the long term operation. Burning plasma is sure to generate 14 MeV fusion neutrons during deuterium-tritium reaction, and fusion neutrons will be streamed and penetrated to superconducting magnet through large ports with damping neutron energy. Therefore, it is necessary to consider carefully not only superconducting property but also neutron irradiation property in superconducting materials for use in a future fusion reactor, and a 'low activation and high field superconducting magnet' will be required to realize the fusion power plant beyond International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). V-based superconducting material has a much shorter decay time of induced radioactivity compared with the Nb-based materials. We thought that the V 3 Ga compound was one of the most promising materials for the 'low activation and higher field superconductors' for an advanced fusion reactor. However, the present critical current density (J c ) property of V 3 Ga compound wire is insufficient for apply to fusion magnet applications. We investigated a new route PIT process using a high Ga content Cu-Ga compound in order to improve the superconducting property of the V 3 Ga compound wire. (author)

  18. Determination of boundaries between ranges of high and low gradient of beam profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendykier, Jacek; Bieniasiewicz, Marcin; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Jedynak, Tadeusz; Kośniewski, Wiktor; Reudelsdorf, Marta; Wendykier, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of treatment planning system commissioning by introducing a new method of determination of boundaries between high and low gradient in beam profile. The commissioning of a treatment planning system is a very important task in the radiation therapy. One of the main goals of this task is to compare two field profiles: measured and calculated. Applying points of 80% and 120% of nominal field size can lead to the incorrect determination of boundaries, especially for small field sizes. The method that is based on the beam profile gradient allows for proper assignment of boundaries between high and low gradient regions even for small fields. TRS 430 recommendations for commissioning were used. The described method allows a separation between high and low gradient, because it directly uses the value of the gradient of a profile. For small fields, the boundaries determined by the new method allow a commissioning of a treatment planning system according to the TRS 430, while the point of 80% of nominal field size is already in the high gradient region. The method of determining the boundaries by using the beam profile gradient can be extremely helpful during the commissioning of the treatment planning system for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy or for other techniques which require very small field sizes.

  19. High gradient test of the C-band choke-mode type accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, T.; Shintake, T.; Baba, H.; Togawa, K.; Onoe, K.; Marechal, X.; Takashima, T.; Takahashi, S.; Matsumoto, H.

    2004-01-01

    The C-band (5712 MHz) choke-mode type accelerating structure will be used for SPring-8 Compact SASE-FEL Source (SCSS). To make the accelerator length short, we designed the field gradient as high as 40 MV/m. Since it is higher gradient than other traditional electron accelerators, we have to carefully check its performance (RF breakdown, dark current emission, etc.) in the high gradient test stand. The first experiment will be scheduled in this summer. In this paper, we will describe the preparation progress for the test. (author)

  20. A study on the effect of tantalum-impurity content on the superconducting properties of niobium materials used for making superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. B.; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Tiwari, M. K.; Lodha, G. S.; Myneni, G. R.

    2012-11-01

    Niobium materials in highly pure form are used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities. We present here a study of the superconducting properties of such niobium materials that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities after determining their tantalum-impurity contents using a synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy technique. Our results show that there is a small change in superconducting parameters such as TC,HC1 and HC2 when the tantalum-impurity content varies from ≈150 to ≈1300 ppm. In contrast, a buffered chemical polishing of the same niobium samples changes all these superconducting parameters more significantly. The implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed.

  1. A study on the effect of tantalum-impurity content on the superconducting properties of niobium materials used for making superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S B; Sharath Chandra, L S; Chattopadhyay, M K; Tiwari, M K; Lodha, G S; Myneni, G R

    2012-01-01

    Niobium materials in highly pure form are used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities. We present here a study of the superconducting properties of such niobium materials that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities after determining their tantalum-impurity contents using a synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy technique. Our results show that there is a small change in superconducting parameters such as T C ,H C1 and H C2 when the tantalum-impurity content varies from ≈150 to ≈1300 ppm. In contrast, a buffered chemical polishing of the same niobium samples changes all these superconducting parameters more significantly. The implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed. (paper)

  2. Finding new superconductors: the spin-fluctuation gateway to high Tc and possible room temperature superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, David

    2013-10-24

    We propose an experiment-based strategy for finding new high transition temperature superconductors that is based on the well-established spin fluctuation magnetic gateway to superconductivity in which the attractive quasiparticle interaction needed for superconductivity comes from their coupling to dynamical spin fluctuations originating in the proximity of the material to an antiferromagnetic state. We show how lessons learned by combining the results of almost three decades of intensive experimental and theoretical study of the cuprates with those found in the decade-long study of a strikingly similar family of unconventional heavy electron superconductors, the 115 materials, can prove helpful in carrying out that search. We conclude that, since Tc in these materials scales approximately with the strength of the interaction, J, between the nearest neighbor local moments in their parent antiferromagnetic state, there may not be a magnetic ceiling that would prevent one from discovering a room temperature superconductor.

  3. Interacting two-level defects as sources of fluctuating high-frequency noise in superconducting circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Clemens [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Lisenfeld, Juergen [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Shnirman, Alexander [Institut fuer Theory der Kondensierten Materie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); LD Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Poletto, Stefano [IBM TJ Watson Research Centre, Yorktown Heights (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Since the very first experiments, superconducting circuits have suffered from strong coupling to environmental noise, destroying quantum coherence and degrading performance. In state-of-the-art experiments, it is found that the relaxation time of superconducting qubits fluctuates as a function of time. We present measurements of such fluctuations in a 3D-transmon circuit and develop a qualitative model based on interactions within a bath of background two-level systems (TLS) which emerge from defects in the device material. In our model, the time-dependent noise density acting on the qubit emerges from its near-resonant coupling to high-frequency TLS which experience energy fluctuations due to their interaction with thermally fluctuating TLS at low frequencies. We support the model by providing experimental evidence of such energy fluctuations observed in a single TLS in a phase qubit circuit.

  4. Crystal layered structure and superconducting high-Tc behaviour of the mercurocuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzemsky, A.L.; Kuzemskaya, I.G.; Cheglokov, A.A.

    1998-10-01

    The high-T c superconducting behaviour of the mercurocuprate family HgBa 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O 2n+2+δ was analyzed from the point of view of their layered crystal structure. A dependence of superconducting critical temperature for different members of mercurocuprate family was studied in terms of phenomenological model of layered superconductors. The redistribution of charge was taken into account. This leads to an observable nonmonotonic ''bell''-shaped dependence of T c (n) with a maximum at n=3 and provides a quantitative explanation of the experiments. It was shown that the correlations between the copper valence, lattice parameters, extra oxygen contents and number of layers are essential factors for the physical behaviour and HTSC characterization of the mercurocuprates. (author)

  5. RE-Ba-Cu-O for high functional superconducting permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, S.I.; Higuchi, T.; Sakai, N.; Murakami, M.; Fujimoto, H.

    1998-01-01

    Among various potential applications of melt-textured RE-Ba-Cu-O (REBCO, RE: rare earth elements) superconductors, we have examined the bulk application as the superconducting permanent magnet, especially for the magnetically-levitated (MAGLEV) train. Compared with Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO), oxygen-controlled melt-growth (OCMG)-processed LREBCO (LRE: light rare earth elements) bulk superconductors are more promising for this application because of larger critical current density (J c ) values in high field and higher irreversibility field (B irr ) within the range of the liquid nitrogen refrigeration (63-77 K), implying that even higher trapped fields (B t ) are achievable in principle. In this paper, material requirements of superconducting bulks for the MAGLEV train are first presented and then processing aspects for the fabrication of good LREBCO bulks are described. (orig.)

  6. High field septum magnet using a superconducting shield for the Future Circular Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Barna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A zero-field cooled superconducting shield is proposed to realize a high-field (3–4 T septum magnet for the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron (FCC-hh ring. Three planned prototypes using different materials and technical solutions are presented, which will be used to evaluate the feasibility of this idea as a part of the FCC study. The numerical simulation methods are described to calculate the field patterns around such a shield. A specific excitation current configuration is presented that maintains a fairly homogeneous field outside of a rectangular shield in a wide range of field levels from 0 to 3 Tesla. It is shown that a massless septum configuration (with an opening in the shield is also possible and gives satisfactory field quality with realistic superconducting material properties.

  7. Development of L-band niobium superconducting RF cavities with high accelerating field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki; Kako, Eiji; Shishido, Toshio; Matsuoka, Masanori; Suzuki, Takafusa; Higuchi, Tamawo.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavity is a candidate for the TeV energy e + /e - linear collider of next generation if the accelerating field is improved to 25-30 MV/m and much cost down is achieved in cavity fabrication. Since 1990, KEK has continued R and D of L-band niobium superconducting cavities focusing on the high field issue. A serious problem like Q-degradation due to vacuum discharge came out on the way, however, it has been overcome and presently all of cavities which were annealed at 1400degC achieved the accelerating field of >25 MV/m with enough Qo value. Recent results on single cell cavities are described in this paper. (author)

  8. Gauge models of planar high-temperature superconductivity without parity violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavromatos, N.E.; Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy

    1993-02-01

    A status report is given of a parity-invariant model of two-dimensional superconductivity. The model consists of two-species of fermions coupled with opposite sign to an Abelian gauge field and is closely related to QED 3 . The dynamical generation of a parity-conserving fermion mass and the finite temperature symmetry restoration transition is studied, and it is shown, how the parity-invariant model arises as an effective long-wavelength theory of the dynamics of holes in a two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnetic system on a bi-partite lattice. The model exhibits type-II superconductivity without parity or time-reversal symmetry violation, a high value of 2 Δ /k B T c , flux quantization with quantum hc/2e and a two-dimensional Meissner effect. (author) 82 refs.; 15 figs.; 4 tabs

  9. High field septum magnet using a superconducting shield for the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069375

    2017-01-01

    A zero-field cooled superconducting shield is proposed to realize a high-field (3–4 T) septum magnet for the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron (FCC-hh) ring. Three planned prototypes using different materials and technical solutions are presented, which will be used to evaluate the feasibility of this idea as a part of the FCC study. The numerical simulation methods are described to calculate the field patterns around such a shield. A specific excitation current configuration is presented that maintains a fairly homogeneous field outside of a rectangular shield in a wide range of field levels from 0 to 3 Tesla. It is shown that a massless septum configuration (with an opening in the shield) is also possible and gives satisfactory field quality with realistic superconducting material properties.

  10. Highly conductive polymers: superconductivity in nanochannels or an experimental artifact?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, Harley; Park, Seongho; Zhirnov, Victor; Cavin, Ralph; Kohl, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    There is a significant body of literature concerning the potential formation of electrically conductive moieties in polymeric materials. The conductive path is not associated with conjugation (such as in the case of 'conductive polymers') but rather associated with a new conductivity route. The objective of the experiments reported herein was to provide insight into the phenomenon of unusually high electrical conductivity in polymers that have been reported by several research groups. In some experiments, the test apparatus did indeed indicate high levels of conductance. Arguments pro and con for high conductivity based on known physical phenomena and the collected data were examined.

  11. Prediction of high-Tc conventional superconductivity in the ternary lithium borohydride system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokail, Christian; von der Linden, Wolfgang; Boeri, Lilia

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the superconducting ternary lithium borohydride phase diagram at pressures of 0 and 200 GPa using methods for evolutionary crystal structure prediction and linear-response calculations for the electron-phonon coupling. Our calculations show that the ground state phase at ambient pressure, LiBH4, stays in the P n m a space group and remains a wide band-gap insulator at all pressures investigated. Other phases along the 1 :1 :x Li:B:H line are also insulating. However, a full search of the ternary phase diagram at 200 GPa revealed a metallic Li2BH6 phase, which is thermodynamically stable down to 100 GPa. This superhydride phase, crystallizing in a F m 3 ¯m space group, is characterized by sixfold hydrogen-coordinated boron atoms occupying the fcc sites of the unit cell. Due to strong hydrogen-boron bonding this phase displays a critical temperature of ˜100 K between 100 and 200 GPa. Our investigations confirm that ternary compounds used in hydrogen-storage applications should exhibit high-Tc conventional superconductivity in diamond anvil cell experiments, and suggest a viable route to optimize the superconducting behavior of high-pressure hydrides, exploiting metallic covalent bonds.

  12. Rotational loss of a ring-shaped flywheel supported by high Tc superconducting levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Hidekazu; Tawara, Taichi; Shimada, Ryuichi.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental results for the rotational loss of a ring-shaped flywheel supported by high T c superconducting levitation. Superconducting levitation is appropriate for rotating a ring-shaped flywheel which has neither shaft nor hub because it is a non-contact and automatically stable levitation without any control systems. The rotational loss has been investigated using a small-scaled experimental machine consisting of 16 bulk superconductors 46 mm in diameter and a ring-shaped flywheel about 300 mm in diameter. The rotational loss decreased as the levitation gap height increased. In low-speed rotational regions, the rotational loss was in proportion to the rotation speed and depended more on the levitation gap. In high-speed rotational regions, the rotational loss was in proportion to the third power of the rotation speed and depended less on the levitation gap. The cubic rotational loss in He was reduced to one-fifth of that in air. The magnetic field pinned in bulk superconductors induces a loss in the materials composing the ring-shaped flywheel. The rotational loss of a ring-shaped flywheel supported by superconducting levitation can be reduced by improving the uniformity of the magnetic fields along the ring, enlargement of the bulk superconductor(s), and densely arranging the bulk superconductors. (author)

  13. Methods and systems for fabricating high quality superconducting tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkic, Goran; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2018-02-13

    An MOCVD system fabricates high quality superconductor tapes with variable thicknesses. The MOCVD system can include a gas flow chamber between two parallel channels in a housing. A substrate tape is heated and then passed through the MOCVD housing such that the gas flow is perpendicular to the tape's surface. Precursors are injected into the gas flow for deposition on the substrate tape. In this way, superconductor tapes can be fabricated with variable thicknesses, uniform precursor deposition, and high critical current densities.

  14. Discovery of a Superconducting High-Entropy Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Kozelj P.; Vrtnik S.; Jelen A.; Jazbec S.; Jaglicic Z.; Maiti S.; Feuerbacher M.; Steurer W.; Dolinsek J.

    2014-01-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) are multicomponent mixtures of elements in similar concentrations where the high entropy of mixing can stabilize disordered solid solution phases with simple structures like a bodycentered cubic or a face centered cubic in competition with ordered crystalline intermetallic phases. We have synthesized an HEA with the composition Ta34Nb33Hf8Zr14Ti11 (in at. ) which possesses an average body centered cubic structure of lattice parameter a = 3.36 Å. The measurements of ...

  15. Practical considerations in the design and operation of superconducting structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwettman, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    During the past few years, considerable experience has been gained in the operation of prototype superconducting accelerators under beam line conditions. As a result of this experience, important aspects of structure design and important questions related to the long term operation of superconducting structures have been brought into sharper focus. For applications where low power loss and high duty factor, or exceptional beam quality and stable operation, are essential properties, and where modest energy gradients can be tolerated, superconducting structures are distinctly superior to conventional room temperature structures. (auth)

  16. Large gradient high magnetic fields affect osteoblast ultrastructure and function by disrupting collagen I or fibronectin/αβ1 integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Rong Qian

    Full Text Available The superconducting magnet generates a field and field gradient product that can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF, which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g, was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. The effects of LG-HMF on the ultrastructure and function of osteoblast-like cells (MG-63 and MC3T3-E1 and the underlying mechanism were investigated by transmission electromicroscopy (TEM, MTT, and cell western (ICW assays. Under LG-HMF significant morphologic changes in osteoblast-like cells occurred, including expansion of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, an increased number of lysosomes, distorted microvilli, and aggregates of actin filaments. Compared to controls, cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP secretion were significantly increased, and collagen I (col I, fibronectin (FN, vinculin, integrin α3, αv, and β1 expression were changed under LG-HMF conditions. In conclusion, LG-HMF affects osteoblast ultrastructure, cell viability, and ALP secretion, and the changes caused by LG-HMF may be related to disrupting col I or FN/αβ1 integrin.

  17. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruvalds, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermi liquid nesting in high temperature superconductors; optical properties of high temperature superconductors; Hall effect in superconducting La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 ; source of high transition temperatures; and prospects for new superconductors

  18. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future High Energy Proton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Interest in high field dipoles has been given a boost by new proposals to build a high-energy proton-proton collider to follow the LHC and programs around the world are taking on the task to answer the need. Studies aiming toward future high-energy proton-proton colliders at the 100 TeV scale are now being organized. The LHC and current cost models are based on technology close to four decades old and point to a broad optimum of operation using dipoles with fields between 5 and 12T when site constraints, either geographical or political, are not a factor. Site geography constraints that limit the ring circumference can drive the required dipole field up to 20T, which is more than a factor of two beyond state-of-the-art. After a brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the challenges facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, High Energy Physics, US Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  19. Quasi permanent superconducting magnet of very high field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y.; Liu, J.; Weinstein, R.; Chen, I. G.; Parks, D.; Xu, J.; Obot, V.; Foster, C.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in a quasi-permanent magnet made of high temperature superconductor. The material has an average of 40 percent molar excess of Y, relative to Y1Ba2Cu3O7 and has been irradiated with high energy light ions at 200 MeV. The magnet, which traps 1.52 T at 77.3 K, traps nearly 4 T at 64.5 K. No evidence of giant flux jump or sample cracking was observed.

  20. Methods and systems for fabricating high quality superconducting tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majkic, Goran; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2018-02-13

    An MOCVD system fabricates high quality superconductor tapes with variable thicknesses. The MOCVD system can include a gas flow chamber between two parallel channels in a housing. A substrate tape is heated and then passed through the MOCVD housing such that the gas flow is perpendicular to the tape's surface. Precursors are injected into the gas flow for deposition on the substrate tape. In this way, superconductor tapes can be fabricated with variable thicknesses, uniform precursor deposition, and high critical current densities.

  1. The high field superconducting magnet program at LLNL: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Chaplin, M.R.; Kerns, J.A.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Slack, D.S.; Summers, L.T.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    In FY 86 the program continued along several interrelated thrust areas. These thrust areas have been broadly labeled as follows: (1) Superconductor Research and Technology; (2) Magnet Systems Materials Technology; (3) Magnet Systems Design Technology; (4) High Field Test Facility; and (5) Technology Transfer

  2. Incorporating YBCO Coated Conductors in High-speed Superconducting Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    4.0 kW/lb (8.82 kW/kg). The machine configuration chosen by GE for design was a homopolar inductor alternator (HIA) which locates the...extremely severe ac loss environment. Even if this is ultimately impossible for high speed generators, it may not preclude lower speed motors and

  3. Sudden flux change studies in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, S.; Bordini, B.; Carcagno, R.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the High Field Magnet Program at Fermilab many magnets have been tested which utilize multi strand Rutherford type cable made of state-of-the art Nb 3 Sn strands. During these magnet tests we observed sudden flux changes by monitoring coil voltages and the magnetic field close to the magnets. These flux changes might be linked to magnet instabilities. The voltage spike signals were correlated with quench antenna signals, a strong indication that these are magnet phenomena. With a new high resolution voltage spike detection system, we were able to observe the detailed structure of the spikes. Two fundamentally different signal shapes were distinguished, most likely generated by different mechanisms

  4. High Temperature Superconducting Films and Multilayers for Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-19

    Vol. 1292 (1990). U Chisholm, A. Gupta, S. Shinde and R.B. Bnidges. GAN. Connell and 1B. Boyce, Laibowitz, " Lanthanum Gallate Sub- "Properties of...aluminate or gallate ..._.........102 24 - 2:2:4:5 structure ........................ 115 IN - Interface reactions ............ 93 #M - MgO substrates...Draper with the measure- High-Tc Superconductors,’ Physica C. on Lanthanum Aluminate Subsbates." in ments of surface resistance; T.T. Vol. 153-155,19M8 pp

  5. Near field plasmonic gradient effects on high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Chen, Li; Sun, Mengtao

    2015-01-14

    Near field gradient effects in high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) are a recent developing ultra-sensitive optical and spectral analysis technology on the nanoscale, based on the plasmons and plasmonic gradient enhancement in the near field and under high vacuum. HV-TERS can not only be used to detect ultra-sensitive Raman spectra enhanced by surface plasmon, but also to detect clear molecular IR-active modes enhanced by strongly plasmonic gradient. Furthermore, the molecular overtone modes and combinational modes can also be experimentally measured, where the Fermi resonance and Darling-Dennison resonance were successfully observed in HV-TERS. Theoretical calculations using electromagnetic field theory firmly supported experimental observation. The intensity ratio of the plasmon gradient term over the linear plasmon term can reach values greater than 1. Theoretical calculations also revealed that with the increase in gap distance between tip and substrate, the decrease in the plasmon gradient was more significant than the decrease in plasmon intensity, which is the reason that the gradient Raman can be only observed in the near field. Recent experimental results of near field gradient effects on HV-TERS were summarized, following the section of the theoretical analysis.

  6. Technical tasks in superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kenji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The feature of superconducting rf cavities is an extremely small surface resistance on the wall. It brings a large energy saving in the operation, even those are cooled with liquid helium. That also makes possible to operate themselves in a higher field gradient comparing to normal conducting cavities, and brings to make accelerators compact. These merits are very important for the future accelerator engineering which is planed at JAERI for the neutron material science and nuclear waste transmutation. This machine is a high intensity proton linac and uses sc cavities in the medium and high {beta} sections. In this paper, starting R and D of proton superconducting cavities, several important technical points which come from the small surface resistance of sc cavities, are present to succeed it and also differences between the medium and high - {beta} structures are discussed. (author)

  7. Levitation properties of a ring-shaped flywheel supported by high Tc superconducting levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Hidekazu; Tawara, Taichi; Shimada, Ryuichi.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new combination of high T c superconducting levitation and ring-shaped flywheel energy storage systems. Superconducting levitation is appropriate for rotating a ring-shaped flywheel which has neither shaft nor hub, because it is a non-contact and automatically stable levitation without any control systems. The levitation properties such as static and dynamic lateral stiffnesses, lateral damping, and lateral vibration during rotation have been investigated using a small-scaled experimental machine consisting of 16 bulk superconductors 46 mm in diameter and a ring-shaped flywheel about 300 mm in diameter. The spring constant increased as the levitation gap height decreased, and the dynamic spring constant was slightly higher than the static constant. The damping coefficient increased as the gap height decreased and the vibration amplitude increased. The experimental critical speed was in good agreement with the calculated one using a one-degree of freedom model. Finally, the possibility of large-scaled practical systems is discussed from the viewpoint of superconducting levitation. (author)

  8. Application of a phenomenological model for the surface impedance in high temperature superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosquera, A.S.; Landinez Tellez, D.A.; Roa-Rojas, J.

    2007-01-01

    We report the application of a phenomenological model for the microwave surface impedance in high temperature superconducting films. This model is based on the modified two-fluid model, in which the real and imaginary parts of the surface impedance use the modelling parameter γ. This is responsible for the superconducting and normal charge carrier density and is used for the description of the temperature dependence of the London penetration depth λ L (T) including λ L (0). The relaxation time model also uses the γ parameter in combination with the residual resistance parameter α. The parameter δ 1 1 , γ, α, and δ 2 . The parameter δ 2 n (T) is a result of the competition between the increase of the relaxation time and the decrease of the normal charge-carrier density. We applied this model to analyze experimental results of MgB 2 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and GdBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ superconducting material. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. An investigation of texturing by magnetic and mechanical techniques in high critical temperature superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschanels, X.

    1992-11-01

    The principal goal of this work is to quantify the influence of texture of ceramic superconductors ReBaCuO (Re=Dy, Y) on their critical current density (Jc). The magnetic alignment of particles at ambient temperature is the first technique who has allowed us to produce superconducting (Meissner effect) and textured ceramics. However, these materials are very brittle because of their porosity and this makes it impossible to measure their Jc. Press-forging (or creep sintering) is the second technique who has allowed us to prepare highly textured ceramics materials which are also dense. We have studied the influence of various conditions of thermomechanical treatment (sintering time and temperature, applied load, rate of deformation, density of the material at the beginning) on the texture quality. We have shown that at 900 deg, the eutectic liquid formed by BaCuO 2 , CuO and YBa 2 Cu 3 0 7-Y various mechanisms that help explain the formation of observed texture. After the oxidation stage which requires heat treatment under controlled atmospheres, we obtain superconducting ceramics (Tc=85 K). Moreover, this study also shows that the texture can improve the Jc by 400%, to 750 A/cm 2 at 77 K in the best specimens. This low value is explained by the presence of non-superconducting secondary phases and amorphous phases at the grain boundaries. (Author). 120 refs., figs., tabs

  10. Microwave effective surface impedance of structures including a high-Tc superconducting film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartemann, P.

    1992-01-01

    The microwave effective surface impedances of different stacks made of high-temperature superconducting films, dielectric materials and bulk normal metals were computed. The calculations were based on the two-fluid model of superconductors and the conventional transmission line theory. These effective impedances are compared to the calculated intrinsic surface impedances of the stacked superconducting films. The considered superconducting material has been the oxide YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 epitaxially grown on crystalline substrates (MgO, LaAlO 3 , SrTiO 3 ), the film thickness ranging from a few nm to 1μm. Discrepancies between the effective surface resistances or reactances and the corresponding intrinsic values were determined at 10 GHz for non resonant or resonant structures. At resonance the surface resistance discrepancy exhibits a sharp peak which reaches 10 4 or more in relative value according to the geometry and the used materials. Obviously the effective surface reactance shows also huge variations about the resonance and may be negative. Moreover geometries allowing to obtain an effective resistance smaller than the film intrinsic value have been found. The effects of the resonance phenomenon on the electromagnetic wave reflectivity and reflection phase shift are investigated. Therefore the reported theoretical results demonstrate that the effective surface impedance of YBCO films with a thickness smaller than 500 nm can be very different from the intrinsic film impedance according to the structures. (Author). 3 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Assessment of potential advantages of high Tc-superconductors for technical application of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, F.; Juengst, K.P.; Komarek, P.; Maurer, W.

    1987-09-01

    A first assessment of the technical and economical consequences of liquid nitrogen cooling of new superconductors is given. For the investigation the applications of superconductivity are classified in two categories: First, systems where superconductors are practically indispensable for achieving the system's objectives; second, superconductor applications in competition with highly developed conventional technologies. Further development of those superconducting systems in the first category for which the cost of cryogenic equipment is a smaller fraction of the total system cost (e.g. fusion reactor or MHD generator) will hardly be affected. However, for systems like particle accelerators, research magnets, and NMR spectroscopy and imaging systems, the cryogenic equipment expenditures are significant and LN 2 cooling leads here to a reduction of investment and operating costs, to simplified handling and maintenance, to better reliability and availability, and will thereby improve the acceptance and further spread of these systems. In the second category each application of superconductivity has to be compared with its conventional counterpart, separately. Here, electonic components, power switches, resistive current limiters, and especially the power transmission cables are those applications which look most promising. For magnet applications the main advantageous arguments are less the cost saving aspect but more the higher reliability, simplicity, N 2 -availability, and ease of handling. (orig.) [de

  12. Quark condensation, induced symmetry breaking and color superconductivity at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeld, Kurt; Rho, Mannque

    1999-01-01

    The phase structure of hadronic matter at high density relevant to the physics of compact stars and relativistic heavy-ion collisions is studied in a low-energy effective quark theory. The relevant phases that figure are (1) chiral condensation, (2) diquark color condensation (color superconductivity) and (3) induced Lorentz-symmetry breaking (''ISB''). For a reasonable strength for the effective four-Fermi current-current interaction implied by the low-energy effective quark theory for systems with a Fermi surface we find that the ''ISB'' phase sets in together with chiral symmetry restoration (with the vanishing quark condensate) at a moderate density while color superconductivity associated with scalar diquark condensation is pushed up to an asymptotic density. Consequently, color superconductivity seems rather unlikely in heavy-ion collisions although it may play a role in compact stars. Lack of confinement in the model makes the result of this analysis only qualitative but the hierarchy of the transitions we find seems to be quite robust

  13. The US market for high-temperature superconducting wire in transmission cable applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, D

    1996-04-01

    Telephone interviews were conducted with 23 utility engineers concerning the future prospects for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables. All have direct responsibility for transmission in their utility, most of them in a management capacity. The engineers represented their utilities as members of the Electric Power Research Institute`s Underground Transmission Task Force (which has since been disbanded). In that capacity, they followed the superconducting transmission cable program and are aware of the cryogenic implications. Nineteen of the 23 engineers stated the market for underground transmission would grow during the next decade. Twelve of those specified an annual growth rate; the average of these responses was 5.6%. Adjusting that figure downward to incorporate the remaining responses, this study assumes an average growth rate of 3.4%. Factors driving the growth rate include the difficulty in securing rights-of-way for overhead lines, new construction techniques that reduce the costs of underground transmission, deregulation, and the possibility that public utility commissions will allow utilities to include overhead costs in their rate base. Utilities have few plans to replace existing cable as preventive maintenance, even though much of the existing cable has exceeded its 40-year lifetime. Ten of the respondents said the availability of a superconducting cable with the same life-cycle costs as a conventional cable and twice the ampacity would induce them to consider retrofits. The respondents said a cable with those characteristics would capture 73% of their cable retrofits.

  14. Bridging the Gap for High-Coherence, Strongly Coupled Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Jonilyn; Kim, David; Baldo, Peter; Day, Alexandra; Fitch, George; Holihan, Eric; Hover, David; Samach, Gabriel; Weber, Steven; Oliver, William

    Crossovers can play a critical role in increasing superconducting qubit device performance, as long as device coherence can be maintained even with the increased fabrication and circuit complexity. Specifically, crossovers can (1) enable a fully-connected ground plane, which reduces spurious modes and crosstalk in the circuit, and (2) increase coupling strength between qubits by facilitating interwoven qubit loops with large mutual inductances. Here we will describe our work at MIT Lincoln Laboratory to integrate superconducting air bridge crossovers into the fabrication of high-coherence capacitively-shunted superconducting flux qubits. We will discuss our process flow for patterning air bridges by resist reflow, and we will describe implementation of air bridges within our circuits. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  15. High-temperature superconductivity from fine-tuning of Fermi-surface singularities in iron oxypnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnukha, A.; Evtushinsky, D. V.; Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; Büchner, B.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Batlogg, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    In the family of the iron-based superconductors, the REFeAsO-type compounds (with RE being a rare-earth metal) exhibit the highest bulk superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) up to 55 K and thus hold the key to the elusive pairing mechanism. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the intrinsic electronic structure of SmFe0.92Co0.08AsO (Tc = 18 K) is highly nontrivial and consists of multiple band-edge singularities in close proximity to the Fermi level. However, it remains unclear whether these singularities are generic to the REFeAsO-type materials and if so, whether their exact topology is responsible for the aforementioned record Tc. In this work, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the inherent electronic structure of the NdFeAsO0.6F0.4 compound with a twice higher Tc = 38 K. We find a similarly singular Fermi surface and further demonstrate that the dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in this compound correlates closely with the fine-tuning of one of the band-edge singularities to within a fraction of the superconducting energy gap Δ below the Fermi level. Our results provide compelling evidence that the band-structure singularities near the Fermi level in the iron-based superconductors must be explicitly accounted for in any attempt to understand the mechanism of superconducting pairing in these materials.

  16. Cryogenics Vision Workshop for High-Temperature Superconducting Electric Power Systems Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energetics, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems sponsored the Cryogenics Vision Workshop, which was held on July 27, 1999 in Washington, D.C. This workshop was held in conjunction with the Program's Annual Peer Review meeting. Of the 175 people attending the peer review meeting, 31 were selected in advance to participate in the Cryogenics Vision Workshops discussions. The participants represented cryogenic equipment manufactures, industrial gas manufacturers and distributors, component suppliers, electric power equipment manufacturers (Superconductivity Partnership Initiative participants), electric utilities, federal agencies, national laboratories, and consulting firms. Critical factors were discussed that need to be considered in describing the successful future commercialization of cryogenic systems. Such systems will enable the widespread deployment of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) electric power equipment. Potential research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities and partnership opportunities for advancing suitable cryogenic systems were also discussed. The workshop agenda can be found in the following section of this report. Facilitated sessions were held to discuss the following specific focus topics: identifying Critical Factors that need to be included in a Cryogenics Vision for HTS Electric Power Systems (From the HTS equipment end-user perspective) identifying R and D Needs and Partnership Roles (From the cryogenic industry perspective) The findings of the facilitated Cryogenics Vision Workshop were then presented in a plenary session of the Annual Peer Review Meeting. Approximately 120 attendees participated in the afternoon plenary session. This large group heard summary reports from the workshop session leaders and then held a wrap-up session to discuss the findings, cross-cutting themes, and next steps. These summary reports are presented in this document. The ideas and suggestions raised during

  17. Electronic properties of high-Tc superconductors. The normal and the superconducting state of high-Tc materials. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmany, H.; Mehring, M.; Fink, J.

    1993-01-01

    The International Winter School on Electronic Properties of High-Temperature Superconductors, held between March 7-14, 1992, in Kirchberg, (Tyrol) Austria, was the sixth in a series of meetings to be held at this venue. Four of the earlier meetings were dedicated to issues in the field of conducting polymers, while the winter school held in 1990 was devoted to the new discipline of high-Tc superconductivity. This year's meeting constituted a forum not only for the large number of scientists engaged in high-Tc research, but also for those involved in the new and exciting field of fullerenes. Many of the issues raised during the earlier winter schools on conducting polymers, and the last one on high-Tc superconductivity, have taken on a new significance in the light of the discovery of superconducting C 60 materials. The Kirchberg meetings are organized in the style of a school where experienced scientists from universities, research laboratories and industry have the opportunity to discuss their most recent results, and where students and young scientists can learn about the present status of research and applications from some of the most eminent workers in their field. In common with the previous winter school on high-Tc superconductors, the present one focused on the electronic properties of the cuprate superconductors. In addition, consideration was given to related compounds which are relevant to the understanding of the electronic structure of the cuprates in the normal state, to other oxide superconductors and to fulleride superconductors. Contributions dealing with their preparation, transport and thermal properties, high-energy spectroscopies, nuclear magnetic resonance, inelastic neutron scattering, and optical spectroscopy are presented in this volume. The theory of the normal and superconducting states also occupies a central position. (orig.)

  18. HIGH-GRADIENT, HIGH-TRANSFORMER-RATIO, DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-04-12

    The Phase I work reported here responds to DoE'ss stated need "...to develop improved accelerator designs that can provide very high gradient (>200 MV/m for electrons...) acceleration of intense bunches of particles." Omega-P's approach to this goal is through use of a ramped train of annular electron bunches to drive a coaxial dielectric wakefield accelerator (CDWA) structure. This approach is a direct extension of the CDWA concept from acceleration in wake fields caused by a single drive bunch, to the more efficient acceleration that we predict can be realized from a tailored (or ramped) train of several drive bunches. This is possible because of a much higher transformer ratio for the latter. The CDWA structure itself has a number of unique features, including: a high accelerating gradient G, potentially with G > 1 GeV/m; continuous energy coupling from drive to test bunches without transfer structures; inherent transverse focusing forces for particles in the accelerated bunch; highly stable motion of high charge annular drive bunches; acceptable alignment tolerances for a multi-section system. What is new in the present approach is that the coaxial dielectric structure is now to be energized by-not one-but by a short train of ramped annular-shaped drive bunches moving in the outer coaxial channel of the structure. We have shown that this allows acceleration of an electron bunch traveling along the axis in the inner channel with a markedly higher transformer ratio T than for a single drive bunch. As described in this report, the structure will be a GHz-scale prototype with cm-scale transverse dimensions that is expected to confirm principles that can be applied to the design of a future THz-scale high gradient (> 500 MV/m) accelerator with mm-scale transverse dimensions. We show here a new means to significantly increase the transformer ratio T of the device, and thereby to significantly improve its suitability as a flexible and effective component in

  19. High Q-factor tunable superconducting HF circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Vopilkin, E A; Pavlov, S A; Ponomarev, L I; Ganitsev, A Y; Zhukov, A S; Vladimirov, V V; Letyago, A G; Parshikov, V V

    2001-01-01

    Feasibility of constructing a high Q-factor (Q approx 10 sup 5) mechanically tunable in a wide range of frequencies (12-63 MHz) vibration circuit of HF range was considered. The tunable circuit integrates two single circuits made using YBaCuO films. The circuit frequency is tuned by changing distance X (capacity) between substrates. Potentiality of using substrates of lanthanum aluminate, neodymium gallate and strontium titanate for manufacture of single circuits was considered. Q-factor of the circuit amounted to 68000 at resonance frequency of 6.88 MHz

  20. High Q-factor tunable superconducting HF circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vopilkin, E.A.; Parafin, A.E.; Pavlov, S.A.; Ponomarev, L.I.; Ganitsev, A.Yu.; Zhukov, A.S.; Vladimirov, V.V.; Letyago, A.G.; Parshikov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    Feasibility of constructing a high Q-factor (Q ∼ 10 5 ) mechanically tunable in a wide range of frequencies (12-63 MHz) vibration circuit of HF range was considered. The tunable circuit integrates two single circuits made using YBaCuO films. The circuit frequency is tuned by changing distance X (capacity) between substrates. Potentiality of using substrates of lanthanum aluminate, neodymium gallate and strontium titanate for manufacture of single circuits was considered. Q-factor of the circuit amounted to 68000 at resonance frequency of 6.88 MHz [ru