WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconducting detector array

  1. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  2. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allman, M. S., E-mail: shane.allman@boulder.nist.gov; Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States); Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Kumor, D. [Purdue University, 610 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  3. A Near-Infrared 64-pixel Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detector Array with Integrated Multiplexed Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Allman, M S; Stevens, M; Gerrits, T; Horansky, R D; Lita, A E; Marsili, F; Beyer, A; Shaw, M D; Kumor, D; Mirin, R; Nam, S W

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array, as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  4. High density processing electronics for superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, W.K., E-mail: bill@xia.com [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Road, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Harris, J.T. [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Road, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Friedrich, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) are excellent soft x-ray (100–2000 eV) detectors, particularly for synchrotron applications, because of their ability to obtain energy resolutions below 10 eV at count rates approaching 10 kcps. In order to achieve useful solid detection angles with these very small detectors, they are typically deployed in large arrays – currently with 100+ elements, but with 1000 elements being contemplated. In this paper we review a 5-year effort to develop compact, computer controlled low-noise processing electronics for STJ detector arrays, focusing on the major issues encountered and our solutions to them. Of particular interest are our preamplifier design, which can set the STJ operating points under computer control and achieve 2.7 eV energy resolution; our low noise power supply, which produces only 2 nV/√Hz noise at the preamplifier's critical cascode node; our digital processing card that digitizes and digitally processes 32 channels; and an STJ I–V curve scanning algorithm that computes noise as a function of offset voltage, allowing an optimum operating point to be easily selected. With 32 preamplifiers laid out on a custom 3U EuroCard, and the 32 channel digital card in a 3U PXI card format, electronics for a 128 channel array occupy only two small chassis, each the size of a National Instruments 5-slot PXI crate, and allow full array control with simple extensions of existing beam line data collection packages.

  5. A 2-D Array of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) Far-IR Thermal Detectors for Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakew, Brook

    2009-01-01

    A 2-D array of superconducting Magnesium Diboride(MgB2) far IR thermal detectors has been fabricated. Such an array is intended to be at the focal plane of future generation thermal imaging far-IR instruments that will investigate the outer planets and their icy moons. Fabrication and processing of the pixels of the array as well as noise characterization of architectured MgB2 thin films will be presented. Challenges and solutions for improving the performance of the array will be discussed.

  6. Superconducting Thin-Film Interconnects for Cryogenic Photon Detector Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced imaging spectrometers for x-ray astronomy will require significant improvements in the high density interconnects between the detector arrays and the first...

  7. 64-pixel NbTiN superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array for spatially resolved photon detection

    CERN Document Server

    Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen; Terai, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    We present the characterization of two-dimensionally arranged 64-pixel NbTiN superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array for spatially resolved photon detection. NbTiN films deposited on thermally oxidized Si substrates enabled the high-yield production of high-quality SSPD pixels, and all 64 SSPD pixels showed uniform superconducting characteristics. Furthermore, all of the pixels showed single-photon sensitivity, and 60 of the 64 pixels showed a pulse generation probability higher than 90% after photon absorption. As a result of light irradiation from the single-mode optical fiber at different distances between the fiber tip and the active area, the variations of system detection efficiency in each pixel showed reasonable Gaussian distribution to represent the spatial distributions of photon flux intensity.

  8. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Electronics for Large Superconducting Tunnel Junction Detector Arrays for Synchrotron Soft X-ray Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, William K

    2009-03-06

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors offer a an approach to detecting soft x-rays with energy resolutions 4-5 times better and at rates 10 faster than traditions semiconductor detectors. To make such detectors feasible, however, then need to be deployed in large arrays of order 1000 detectors, which in turn implies that their processing electronics must be compact, fully computer controlled, and low cost per channel while still delivering ultra-low noise performance so as to not degrade the STJ's performance. We report on our progress in designing a compact, low cost preamplifier intended for this application. In particular, we were able to produce a prototype preamplifier of 2 sq-cm area and a parts cost of less than $30 that matched the energy resolution of the best conventional system to date and demonstrated its ability to acquire an STJ I-V curve under computer control, the critical step for determining and setting the detectors' operating points under software control.

  9. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  10. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Ejrnaes, M [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Naples (Italy); Esposito, E [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Lisitskyi, M P [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Nappi, C [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Pagano, S [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Perez de Lara, D [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  11. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  12. Superconducting Tunnel Junction Arrays for UV Photon Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative method is described for the fabrication of superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector arrays offering true "three dimensional" imaging throughout...

  13. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, V; Cirillo, M; Lucci, M; Ottaviani, I; Scherillo, A; Celentano, G; Pietropaolo, A

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the supercond...

  14. Progress Towards High-Sensitivity Arrays of Detectors of Sub-mm Radiation Using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with Integrated Radio Frequency Single-Electron Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Prober, D. E.; Rhee, K. W.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Teufel, J.; Wollack, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    For high resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the FIR and submillimeter, space observatories will demand sensitive, fast, compact, low-power detector arrays with 104 pixels and sensitivity less than 10(exp -20) W/Hz(sup 0.5). Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junctions with integrated rf single-electron transistor readout amplifiers have the potential for achieving this high level of sensitivity, and can take advantage of an rf multiplexing technique. The device consists of an antenna to couple radiation into a small superconducting volume and cause quasiparticle excitations, and a single-electron transistor to measure current through junctions contacting the absorber. We describe optimization of device parameters, and results on fabrication techniques for producing devices with high yield for detector arrays. We also present modeling of expected saturation power levels, antenna coupling, and rf multiplexing schemes.

  15. Progress Towards High-Sensitivity Arrays of Detectors of Sub-mm Radiation using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with Radio-Frequency Single-Electron Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Wollack, E. J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The science drivers for the SPIRIT/SPECS missions demand sensitive, fast, compact, low-power, large-format detector arrays for high resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the far infrared and submillimeter. Detector arrays with 10,000 pixels and sensitivity less than 10(exp 20)-20 W/Hz(exp 20)0.5 are needed. Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junction detectors with integrated rf single-electron transistor readout amplifiers have the potential for achieving this high level of sensitivity, and can take advantage of an rf multiplexing technique when forming arrays. The device consists of an antenna structure to couple radiation into a small superconducting volume and cause quasiparticle excitations, and a single-electron transistor to measure currents through tunnel junction contacts to the absorber volume. We will describe optimization of device parameters, and recent results on fabrication techniques for producing devices with high yield for detector arrays. We will also present modeling of expected saturation power levels, antenna coupling, and rf multiplexing schemes.

  16. Superconducting Single Photon Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbos, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of a detector for single photons, particles of light. New techniques are being developed that require high performance single photon detection, such as quantum cryptography, single molecule detection, optical radar, ballistic imaging, circuit testing and fluoresc

  17. Improvement of soft x-ray detection performance in superconducting-tunnel-junction array detectors with close-packed arrangement by three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, G.; Ukibe, M.; Ohkubo, M.

    2015-10-01

    Superconducting-tunnel-junction (STJ) array detectors have exhibited excellent characteristics for fluorescence-yield x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) for trace light elements in structural and functional materials. For XAFS, we have developed new fabrication processes for close-packed STJ pixels by using a three-dimensional structure (3D-STJ), in which the layers of STJ pixels are formed after caldera planarization of the base SiO2 layer deposited on the patterned wiring leads. The 3D-STJ has an operation yield of 88% and a mean energy resolution of 23.8 +/-1.9 eV for the C-Kα x-ray.

  18. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally tunable superconductor hole array with active control over their resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons . The array was lithographically fabricated on high temperature YBCO superconductor and characterized by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from the virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to the real surface plasmon mode. The highly tunable superconducting plasmonic hole arrays may have promising applications in the design of low-loss, large dynamic range amplitude modulation, and surface plasmon based terahertz devices.

  19. Update on the Fabrication and Performance of 2-D Arrays of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) Thermal Detectors for Outer-Planets Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakew, Brook; Aslam, S.

    2011-01-01

    Detectors with better performance than the current thermopile detectors that operate at room temperature will be needed at the focal plane of far-infrared instruments on future planetary exploration missions. We will present an update on recent results from the 2-D array of MgB2 thermal detectors being currently developed at NASA Goddard. Noise and sensitivity results will be presented and compared to thermal detectors currently in use on planetary missions.

  20. Crosstalk-free operation of multielement superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array integrated with single-flux-quantum circuit in a 0.1 W Gifford-McMahon cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Taro; Miki, Shigehito; Terai, Hirotaka; Makise, Kazumasa; Wang, Zhen

    2012-07-15

    We demonstrate the successful operation of a multielement superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SSPD) array integrated with a single-flux-quantum (SFQ) readout circuit in a compact 0.1 W Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. A time-resolved readout technique, where output signals from each element enter the SFQ readout circuit with finite time intervals, revealed crosstalk-free operation of the four-element SSPD array connected with the SFQ readout circuit. The timing jitter and the system detection efficiency were measured to be 50 ps and 11.4%, respectively, which were comparable to the performance of practical single-pixel SSPD systems.

  1. Superconducting tunnel junction detectors for soft x-ray astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeve, P.; Hijmering, R. A.; Martin, D. D. E.; Jerjen, I.; Peacock, A.; Venn, R.

    2006-06-01

    The requirement on energy resolution for detectors in future X-ray satelite missions such as XEUS (X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy mission) is 80%. In addition, the requirements for field of view and angular resolution demand a detector array of typically 150x150 micron sized pixels in a 30x30 pixel format. DROIDs (Distributed Read Out Imaging Devices), consisting of a superconducting absorber strip with superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as read-out devices on either end, can fulfill these requirements. The amplitudes of the two signals from the STJs provide information on the absorption position and the energy of the incoming photon in the absorber. In this paper we present the development status of Ta/Al 1-D DROIDs, as well as the the short term development program that should result in a full size XEUS array.

  2. Superconducting Detectors for Superlight Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-01-08

    We propose and study a new class of superconducting detectors that are sensitive to O(meV) electron recoils from dark matter-electron scattering. Such devices could detect dark matter as light as the warm dark-matter limit, m(X)≳1  keV. We compute the rate of dark-matter scattering off of free electrons in a (superconducting) metal, including the relevant Pauli blocking factors. We demonstrate that classes of dark matter consistent with terrestrial and cosmological or astrophysical constraints could be detected by such detectors with a moderate size exposure.

  3. Infrared Superconducting Single-Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    group realized small microstrip devices, the next iteration of which may narrow the line width to below 100 nm, entering the single-photon detection...and will explore superconducting detectors with integrated waveguide circuits and novel deposition techniques. 15. SUBJECT...world record quantum cryptography demonstrations [9] and operation of quantum waveguide circuits at telecom wavelengths [10]. Beyond the quantum

  4. Nuclear Electronics: Superconducting Detectors and Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polushkin, Vladimir

    2004-06-01

    With the commercialisation of superconducting particles and radiation detectors set to occur in the very near future, nuclear analytical instrumentation is taking a big step forward. These new detectors have a high degree of accuracy, stability and speed and are suitable for high-density multiplex integration in nuclear research laboratories and astrophysics. Furthermore, superconducting detectors can also be successfully applied to food safety, airport security systems, medical examinations, doping tests & forensic investigations. This book is the first to address a new generation of analytical tools based on new superconductor detectors demonstrating outstanding performance unsurpassed by any other conventional devices. Presenting the latest research and development in nanometer technologies and biochemistry this book: * Discusses the development of nuclear sensing techniques. * Provides guidance on the design and use of the next generation of detectors. * Describes cryogenic detectors for nuclear measurements and spectrometry. * Covers primary detectors, front-end readout electronics and digital signal processing. * Presents applications in nanotechnology and modern biochemistry including DNA sequencing, proteinomics, microorganisms. * Features examples of two applications in X-ray electron probe nanoanalysis and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This comprehensive treatment is the ideal reference for researchers, industrial engineers and graduate students involved in the development of high precision nuclear measurements, nuclear analytical instrumentation and advanced superconductor primary sensors. This book will also appeal to physicists, electrical and electronic engineers in the nuclear industry.

  5. Superconducting Kinetic Inductance Detectors for astronomy and particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M.; Goupy, J.; D`Addabbo, A.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Catalano, A.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-07-01

    Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) represent a novel detector technology based on superconducting resonators. Since their first demonstration in 2003, they have been rapidly developed and are today a strong candidate for present and future experiments in the different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. This has been possible thanks to the unique features of such devices: in particular, they couple a very high sensitivity to their intrinsic suitability for frequency domain multiplexed readout, making the fabrication of large arrays of ultrasensitive detectors possible. There are many fields of application that can profit of such detectors. Here, we will briefly review the principle of operation of a KID, and give two sample applications, to mm-wave astronomy and to particle physics.

  6. Superconducting Kinetic Inductance Detectors for astronomy and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, M., E-mail: martino.calvo@neel.cnrs.fr [Institute Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Goupy, J.; D' Addabbo, A.; Benoit, A. [Institute Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Bourrion, O. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Catalano, A. [Institute Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Monfardini, A. [Institute Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2016-07-11

    Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) represent a novel detector technology based on superconducting resonators. Since their first demonstration in 2003, they have been rapidly developed and are today a strong candidate for present and future experiments in the different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. This has been possible thanks to the unique features of such devices: in particular, they couple a very high sensitivity to their intrinsic suitability for frequency domain multiplexed readout, making the fabrication of large arrays of ultrasensitive detectors possible. There are many fields of application that can profit of such detectors. Here, we will briefly review the principle of operation of a KID, and give two sample applications, to mm-wave astronomy and to particle physics.

  7. Superconducting submillimeter and millimeter wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahum, M.

    1992-10-20

    The series of projects described in this dissertation was stimulated by the discovery of high temperature superconductivity. Our goal was to develop useful applications which would be competitive with the current state of technology. The high-[Tc] microbolometer was developed into the most sensitive direct detector of millimeter waves, when operated at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The thermal boundary resistance of thin YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]0[sub 7-[delta

  8. Development of superconducting tunnel junction radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katagiri, Masaki; Kishimoto, Maki; Ukibe, Masahiro; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Nakazawa, Masaharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Kurakado, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Kenji; Maehata, Keisuke

    1998-07-01

    Study on development of high energy resolution X-ray detector using superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) for radiation detection was conducted for 5 years under cooperation of University of Tokyo group and Kyushu University group by Quantum measurement research group of Advanced fundamental research center of JAERI. As the energy resolution of STJ could be obtained better results than that of Si semiconductor detector told to be actually best at present, this study aimed to actualize an X-ray detector usable for the experimental field and to elucidate radiation detection mechanism due to STJ. The STJ element used for this study was the one developed by Kurakado group of Nippon Steel Corp. As a results, some technical problems were almost resolved, which made some trouble when using the STJ element to detection element of X-ray spectrometer. In order to make the X-ray detector better, it is essential to manufacture a STJ element and develop serial junction type STJ element on the base of optimization of the element structure and selection and single crystallization of new superconducting materials such as Ta and others, activating the research results. (G.K.)

  9. Feedhorn-Coupled Transition-Edge Superconducting Bolometer Arrays for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubmayr, J.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J.; Becker, D.; Cho, H.-M.; Datta, R.; Duff, S. M.; Grace, E.; Halverson, N.; Henderson, S. W.; hide

    2015-01-01

    NIST produces large-format, dual-polarization-sensitive detector arrays for a broad range of frequencies (30-1400 GHz). Such arrays enable a host of astrophysical measurements. Detectors optimized for cosmic microwave background observations are monolithic, polarization-sensitive arrays based on feedhorn and planar Nb antenna-coupled transition-edge superconducting (TES) bolometers. Recent designs achieve multiband, polarimetric sensing within each spatial pixel. In this proceeding, we describe our multichroic, feedhorn-coupled design; demonstrate performance at 70-380 GHz; and comment on current developments for implementation of these detector arrays in the advanced Atacama Cosmology Telescope receiver

  10. Superconducting tunnel junctions as direct detectors for submillimeter astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, John Daniel

    This thesis presents measurements on the of performance of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) as direct detectors for submillimeter radiation. Over the past several decades, STJ's have been successfully implemented as energy-resolving detectors of X-ray and optical photons. This work extends their application to ultra-sensitive direct detection of photons near 100 GHz. The focus of this research is to integrate the detector with a readout that is sensitive, fast, and able to be scaled for use in large format arrays. We demonstrate the performance of a radio frequency single electron transistor (RF-SET) configured as a transimpedance current amplifier as one such readout. Unlike traditional semiconductor amplifiers, the RF-SET is compatible with cryogenic operation and naturally lends itself to frequency domain multiplexing. This research progressed to the invention of RF-STJ, whereby the same RF reflectometry as used in the RF-SET is applied directly to the detector junction. This results in a greatly simplified design that preserves many of the advantages of the RF-SET while achieving comparable sensitivity. These experiments culminate in calibration of the detector with an on-chip, mesoscopic noise source. Millimeter wave Johnson noise from a gold microbridge illuminates the detector in situ. This allows for direct measurement of the "optical" properties of the detector and its RF readout, including the response time, responsivity and sensitivity.

  11. Instrumentation for multi-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Bhowmik

    2001-07-01

    The new generation of detector arrays require complex instrumentation and data acquisition system to ensure increased reliability of operation, high degree of integration, software control and faster data handling capability. The main features of some of the existing multi-detector arrays like MSU 4 array, Gammasphere and Eurogam are summarized. The instrumentation for the proposed INGA array in India is discussed.

  12. Superconducting Quantum Arrays for Broadband RF Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, V.; Sharafiev, A.; Soloviev, I.; Kolotinskiy, N.; Mukhanov, O.

    2014-05-01

    Superconducting Quantum Arrays (SQAs), homogenous arrays of Superconducting Quantum Cells, are developed for implementation of broadband radio frequency (RF) systems capable of providing highly linear magnetic signal to voltage transfer with high dynamic range, including active electrically small antennas (ESAs). Among the proposed quantum cells which are bi-SQUID and Differential Quantum Cell (DQC), the latter delivered better performance for SQAs. A prototype of the transformer-less active ESA based on a 2D SQA with nonsuperconducting electric connection of the DQCs was fabricated using HYPRES niobium process with critical current density 4.5 kA/cm2. The measured voltage response is characterized by a peak-to-peak swing of ~100 mV and steepness of ~6500 μV/μT.

  13. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING QUADRUPOLE ARRAYS FOR MULTIPLE BEAM TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainer Meinke

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this research was to develop concepts for affordable, fully functional arrays of superconducting quadrupoles for multi-beam transport and focusing in heavy ion fusion (HIF)accelerators. Previous studies by the Virtual National Laboratory (VNL) collaboration have shown that the multi-beam transport system (consisting of alternating gradient quadrupole magnets, a beam vacuum system, and the beam monitor and control system) will likely be one of the most expensive and critical parts of such an accelerator. This statement is true for near-term fusion research accelerators as well as accelerators for the ultimate goal of power production via inertial fusion. For this reason, research on superconducting quadrupole arrays is both timely and important for the inertial fusion energy (IFE) research program. This research will also benefit near-term heavy ion fusion facilities such as the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE)and/or the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). We considered a 2-prong approach that addresses the needs of both the nearer and longer term requirements of the inertial fusion program. First, we studied the flat coil quadrupole design that was developed by LLNL; this magnet is 150 mm long with a 50 mm aperture and thus is suitable for near term experiments that require magnets of a small length to aperture ratio. Secondly, we studied the novel double-helix quadrupole (DHQ) design in a small (3 x 3) array configuration; this design can provide an important step to the longer term solution of low-cost, easy to manufacture array constructions. Our Phase I studies were performed using the AMPERES magnetostatic analysis software. Consideration of these results led to plans for future magnet R&D construction projects. The first objective of Phase I was to develop the concept of a superconducting focusing array that meets the specific requirements of a heavy ion fusion accelerator. Detailed parameter studies for such quadrupole arrays were performed

  15. Heterodyne spectroscopy with superconducting single-photon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Yu. V.; Shcherbatenko, M. L.; Semenov, A. V.; Kovalyuk, V. V.; Korneev, A. A.; Goltsman, G. N.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate successful operation of a Superconducting Single Photon Detector (SSPD) as the core element in a heterodyne receiver. Irradiating the SSPD by both a local oscillator power and signal power simultaneously, we observed beat signal at the intermediate frequency of a few MHz. Gain bandwidth was found to coincide with the detector single pulse width, where the latter depends on the detector kinetic inductance, determined by the superconducting nanowire length.

  16. Heterodyne spectroscopy with superconducting single-photon detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobanov Yu.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate successful operation of a Superconducting Single Photon Detector (SSPD as the core element in a heterodyne receiver. Irradiating the SSPD by both a local oscillator power and signal power simultaneously, we observed beat signal at the intermediate frequency of a few MHz. Gain bandwidth was found to coincide with the detector single pulse width, where the latter depends on the detector kinetic inductance, determined by the superconducting nanowire length.

  17. Optimized Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors to Maximize Absorptance

    CERN Document Server

    Csete, Maria; Szenes, Andras; Banhelyi, Balazs; Csendes, Tibor; Szabo, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of four types of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors, nano-cavity-array- (NCA-), nano-cavity-deflector-array- (NCDA-), nano-cavity-double-deflector-array- (NCDDA-) and nano-cavity-trench-array- (NCTA-) integrated (I-A-SNSPDs) devices was optimized in three periodicity intervals commensurate with half-, three-quarter- and one SPP wavelength. The optimal configurations capable of maximizing NbN absorptance correspond to periodicity dependent tilting in S-orientation (90{\\deg} azimuthal orientation). In NCAI-A-SNSPDs absorptance maxima are reached at the plasmonic Brewster angle (PBA) due to light tunneling. The absorptance maximum is attained in a wide plasmonic-pass-band in NCDAI_1/2*lambda-A, inside a flat-plasmonic-pass-band in NCDAI_3/4*lambda-A and inside a narrow plasmonic-band in NCDAI_lambda-A. In NCDDAI_1/2*lambda-A bands of strongly-coupled cavity and plasmonic modes cross, in NCDDAI_3/4*lambda-A an inverted-plasmonic-band-gap develops, while in NCDDAI_lambda-A ...

  18. Si:As BIB detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, R.; Petroff, M. D.; Speer, J. J.; Stapelbroek, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights of the results obtained on arsenic-doped silicon blocked impurity band (BIB) detectors and arrays since the invention of the BIB concept a few years ago are presented. After a brief introduction and a description of the BIB concept, data will be given on single detector performance. Then different arrays that were fabricated will be described and test data presented.

  19. Superconducting submillimeter and millimeter wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahum, Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-10-20

    The series of projects described in this dissertation was stimulated by the discovery of high temperature superconductivity. Our goal was to develop useful applications which would be competitive with the current state of technology. The high-Tc microbolometer was developed into the most sensitive direct detector of millimeter waves, when operated at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The thermal boundary resistance of thin YBa2Cu307-δ films was subsequently measured and provided direct evidence for the bolometric response of high-Tc films to fast (ns) laser pulses. The low-Tc microbolometer was developed and used to make the first direct measurements of the frequency dependent optical efficiency of planar lithographed antennas. The hot-electron microbolometer was invented less than a year prior to the writing of this dissertation. Our analysis, presented here, indicates that it should be possible to attain up to two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than that of the best available direct detectors when operated at the same temperature. The temperature readout scheme for this device could also be used to measure the intrinsic interaction between electrons and phonons in a metal with a sensitivity that is five orders of magnitude better than in previous measurements. Preliminary measurements of quasiparticle trapping effects at the interface between a metal and a superconductor are also presented.

  20. A readout for large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Sean; Mazin, Benjamin A; Serfass, Bruno; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; Duan, Ran; Raffanti, Rick; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting detectors capable of counting single photons and measuring their energy in the UV, optical, and near-IR. MKIDs feature intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) at microwave frequencies, allowing the construction and readout of large arrays. Due to the microwave FDM, MKIDs do not require the complex cryogenic multiplexing electronics used for similar detectors, such as transition edge sensors, but instead transfer this complexity to room temperature electronics where they present a formidable signal processing challenge. In this paper, we describe the first successful effort to build a readout for a photon counting optical/near-IR astronomical instrument, the ARray Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry. This readout is based on open source hardware developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. Designed principally for radio telescope backends, it is flexible enough to be used for a variety of signal processing applications.

  1. A readout for large arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McHugh, Sean; Serfass, Bruno; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; Duan, Ran; Raffanti, Rick; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting detectors capable of counting single photons and measuring their energy in the UV, optical, and near-IR. MKIDs feature intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) at microwave frequencies, allowing the construction and readout of large arrays. Due to the microwave FDM, MKIDs do not require the complex cryogenic multiplexing electronics used for similar detectors, such as Transition Edge Sensors (TESs), but instead transfer this complexity to room temperature electronics where they present a formidable signal processing challenge. In this paper we describe the first successful effort to build a readout for a photon counting optical/near-IR astronomical instrument, the ARray Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry (ARCONS). This readout is based on open source hardware developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER). Designed principally for radio telescope backends, it is flexible...

  2. A superconducting focal plane array for ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Mazin, Benjamin A; Meeker, Seth R; O'Brien, Kieran; McHugh, Sean; Langman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors, or MKIDs, have proven to be a powerful cryogenic detector technology due to their sensitivity and the ease with which they can be multiplexed into large arrays. A MKID is an energy sensor based on a photon-variable superconducting inductance in a lithographed microresonator, and is capable of functioning as a photon detector across the electromagnetic spectrum as well as a particle detector. Here we describe the first successful effort to create a photon-counting, energy-resolving ultraviolet, optical, and near infrared MKID focal plane array. These new Optical Lumped Element (OLE) MKID arrays have significant advantages over semiconductor detectors like charge coupled devices (CCDs). They can count individual photons with essentially no false counts and determine the energy and arrival time of every photon with good quantum efficiency. Their physical pixel size and maximum count rate is well matched with large telescopes. These capabilities enable powerful new astrophy...

  3. Superconducting nanowire detector jitters limited by detector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Calandri, Niccolò; Zhu, Di; Dane, Andrew; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-01-01

    Detection jitter quantifies variance introduced by the detector in the determination of photon arrival time. It is a crucial performance parameter for systems using superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs). In this work, we have demonstrated that the detection timing jitter is limited in part by the spatial variation of photon detection events along the length of the wire. This distribution causes the generated electrical pulses to arrive at the readout at varied times. We define this jitter source as geometric jitter since it is related to the length and area of the SNSPD. To characterize the geometric jitter, we have constructed a novel differential cryogenic readout with less than 7 ps of electronic jitter that can amplify the pulses generated from the two ends of an SNSPD. By differencing the measured arrival times of the two electrical pulses, we were able to partially cancel out the difference of the propagation times and thus reduce the uncertainty of the photon arrival time. Our exper...

  4. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  5. Code-division multiplexing of superconducting transition-edge sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, K. D.; Niemack, M. D.; Beyer, J.; Cho, H. M.; Doriese, W. B.; Hilton, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.; Vale, L. R.

    2010-03-01

    Multiplexed superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) amplifiers have recently enabled the deployment of kilopixel arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) detectors on a variety of receivers for astrophysics. Existing multiplexing techniques for TES arrays, however, have constraints due to aliasing of SQUID noise, the size of the required filtering elements, or the complexity of the room-temperature electronics that make it difficult to scale to much larger arrays. We have developed a Walsh code-division SQUID multiplexer that has the potential to enable the multiplexing of larger arrays or pixels with faster thermal response times. The multiplexer uses superconducting switches to modulate the polarity of coupling between N individual TES detectors and a single output SQUID channel. The polarities of the detector signals are switched in the pattern of an N × N Walsh matrix, so a frame composed of N orthogonal samples can be used to reconstruct the detector signals without degradation. We present an analysis of the circuit architecture and preliminary results.

  6. Fabrication of Superconducting Detectors for Studying the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ari-David

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting detectors offer unparalleled means of making astronomical/cosmological observations. Fabrication of these detectors is somewhat unconventional; however, a lot of novel condensed matter physics/materials scientific discoveries and semiconductor fabrication processes can be generated in making these devices.

  7. Considerations about an improved superconducting cable for Linear Collider Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2009-01-01

    This note puts together arguments, discussed within the Linear Collider Detector community in the last months, about setting up an R&D program aiming to demonstrate the industrial feasibility and build a significant prototype length (tbd) of superconducting cable for next HEP detector magnets.

  8. The physics of nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renema, Jelmer Jan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the detection mechanism in superconducting single photon detectors via quantum detector tomography. We find that the detection event is caused by diffusion of quasiparticles from the absorption spot, combined with entrance of a vortex. Moreover, we investigate the behaviour of

  9. Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andrew D.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Marsili, Francesco; Cohen, Justin D.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Painter, Oskar J.; Shaw, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated WSi-based superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors coupled to SiNx waveguides with integrated ring resonators. This photonics platform enables the implementation of robust and efficient photon-counting detectors with fine spectral resolution near 1550 nm.

  10. Superconducting detector dynamics studied by quantum pump-probe spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, R.W.; Zwiller, V.

    2012-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) on the picosecond time-scale using a correlated photon-pair source based on spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), corresponding to a pump-probe experiment at the single-photon level. We show that the detector can oper

  11. Orthogonal sequencing multiplexer for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with RSFQ electronics readout circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofherr, Matthias; Wetzstein, Olaf; Engert, Sonja; Ortlepp, Thomas; Berg, Benjamin; Ilin, Konstantin; Henrich, Dagmar; Stolz, Ronny; Toepfer, Hannes; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Siegel, Michael

    2012-12-17

    We propose an efficient multiplexing technique for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors based on an orthogonal detector bias switching method enabling the extraction of the average count rate of a set of detectors by one readout line. We implemented a system prototype where the SNSPDs are connected to an integrated cryogenic readout and a pulse merger system based on rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) electronics. We discuss the general scalability of this concept, analyze the environmental requirements which define the resolvability and the accuracy and demonstrate the feasibility of this approach with experimental results for a SNSPD array with four pixels.

  12. A superconducting NbN detector for neutral nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Marksteiner, M; Sclafani, M; Haslinger, P; Ulbricht, H; Korneev, A; Semenov, A; Goltsman, G; Arndt, M

    2014-01-01

    We present a proof-of-principle study of superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) for the detection of individual neutral molecules/nanoparticles at low energies. The new detector is applied to characterize a laser desorption source for biomolecules and it allows to retrieve the arrival time distribution of a pulsed molecular beam containing the amino acid tryptophan, the polypeptide gramicidin as well as insulin, myoglobin and hemoglobin. We discuss the experimental evidence that the detector is actually sensitive to isolated neutral particles.

  13. Superconducting Coset Topological Fluids in Josephson Junction Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Diamantini, M C; Trugenberger, C A; Sodano, Pasquale; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2006-01-01

    We show that the superconducting ground state of planar Josephson junction arrays is a P- and T-invariant coset topological quantum fluid whose topological order is characterized by the degeneracy 2 on the torus. This new mechanism for planar superconductivity is the P- and T-invariant analogue of Laughlin's quantum Hall fluids. The T=0 insulator-superconductor quantum transition is a quantum critical point characterized by gauge fields and deconfined degrees of freedom. Experiments on toroidal Josephson junction arrays could provide the first direct evidence for topological order and superconducting quantum fluids.

  14. Inhomogeneous critical current in nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudio, R., E-mail: r.gaudio@tue.nl; Hoog, K. P. M. op ' t; Zhou, Z.; Sahin, D.; Fiore, A. [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-01

    A superconducting thin film with uniform properties is the key to realize nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) with high performance and high yield. To investigate the uniformity of NbN films, we introduce and characterize simple detectors consisting of short nanowires with length ranging from 100 nm to 15 μm. Our nanowires, contrary to meander SSPDs, allow probing the homogeneity of NbN at the nanoscale. Experimental results, endorsed by a microscopic model, show the strongly inhomogeneous nature of NbN films on the sub-100 nm scale.

  15. Astronomical Image Processing with Array Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Houde, Martin

    2007-01-01

    We address the question of astronomical image processing from data obtained with array detectors. We define and analyze the cases of evenly, regularly, and irregularly sampled maps for idealized (i.e., infinite) and realistic (i.e., finite) detectors. We concentrate on the effect of interpolation on the maps, and the choice of the kernel used to accomplish this task. We show how the normalization intrinsic to the interpolation process must be carefully accounted for when dealing with irregularly sampled grids. We also analyze the effect of missing or dead pixels in the array, and their consequences for the Nyquist sampling criterion.

  16. Standard guide for digital detector array radiology

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This standard is a user guide, which is intended to serve as a tutorial for selection and use of various digital detector array systems nominally composed of the detector array and an imaging system to perform digital radiography. This guide also serves as an in-detail reference for the following standards: Practices E2597, , and E2737. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. New Fast Response Thin Film-Based Superconducting Quench Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; van de Camp, W; Ravaioli, E; Teixeira, A; ten Kate, H H J

    2014-01-01

    Quench detection on superconducting bus bars and other devices with a low normal zone propagation velocity and low voltage build-up is quite difficult with conventional quench detection techniques. Currently, on ATLAS superconducting bus bar sections, superconducting quench detectors (SQD) are mounted to detect quench events. A first version of the SQD essentially consists of an insulated superconducting wire glued to a superconducting bus line or windings, which in the case of a quench rapidly builds up a relatively high resistance that can be easily and quietly detected. We now introduce a new generation of drastically improved SQDs. The new version makes the detection of quenches simpler, more reliable, and much faster. Instead of a superconducting wire, now a superconducting thin film is used. The layout of the sensor shows a meander like pattern that is etched out of a copper coated 25 mu m thick film of Nb-Ti glued in between layers of Kapton. Since the sensor is now much smaller and thinner, it is easi...

  18. Superconducting tunnel junction array development for high-resolution energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barfknecht, A. T.; Cramer, S. P; Frank, M.; Friedrich, S.; Hiller, L. J.; Labov, S. E.; Mears, C. A.; Niderost, B.

    1998-07-01

    Cryogenic energy-dispersive x-ray detectors are being developed because of their superior energy resolution ((less than or equal to) 10 eV FWHM for keV x rays) compared to semiconductor EDS systems. So far, their range of application is limited due to their comparably small size and low count rate. We present data on the development of superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector arrays to address both of these issues. A single STJ detector has a resolution around 10 eV below 1 keV and can be operated at count rates of order 10,000 counts/s. We show that the simultaneous operation of several STJ detectors does not diminish their energy resolution significantly, while increasing the detector area and the maximum count rate by a factor given by the total number of independent channels.

  19. Encapsulated thermopile detector array for IR microspectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, H.; Emadi, A.; De Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    The miniaturized IR spectrometer discussed in this paper is comprised of: slit, planar imaging diffraction grating and Thermo-Electric (TE) detector array, which is fabricated using CMOS compatible MEMS technology. The resolving power is maximized by spacing the TE elements at an as narrow as possib

  20. SCUBA-2 instrument: an application of large-format superconducting bolometer arrays for submillimetre astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Matthew Ian

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns technical aspects related to the design and operation of the submillimetre common-user bolometer array 2 (SCUBA-2) instrument, a new wide-field camera for submillimetre astronomy currently undergoing commissioning on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Offering unprecedented sensitivity and mapping capabilities, SCUBA-2 is expected to make a major impact in surveys of the sky at submillimetre wavelengths, a largely unexplored part of the electromagnetic spectrum, and provide better understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies, stars and planets by providing large, unbiased samples of such objects. SCUBA-2 uses large arrays of bolometers, with superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs) as the temperature-sensitive element. TES devices are a relatively new technology, utilising the sharp resistance change between the normal and superconducting states to make a sensitive thermistor. Kilopixel arrays of such devices are multiplexed using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). This thesis derives the key detector performance parameters, and presents analysis of engineering data to confirm the detector performance on array scales. A key issue for bolometric instruments for far infrared and submillimetre astronomy is the need to operate at extremely low temperatures in the sub-kelvin and millikelvin ranges to achieve the necessary detector sensitivity. This work describes the design, testing and performance of the liquid cryogen-free millikelvin cryostat, the first such instrument to be deployed for astronomy. Subsequent chapters detail the design and testing of a magnetic shielding scheme for the instrument, an important aspect of the operation of superconducting devices. Based on experience with the construction and testing of this instrument, a number of potential improvements for future instruments are presented and discussed.

  1. Characterization of parallel superconducting nanowire single photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejrnaes, M; Casaburi, A; Pagano, S; Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica ' E Caianiello' , 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Quaranta, O; Marchetti, S [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E R Caianiello' , Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Gaggero, A; Mattioli, F; Leoni, R [CNR-Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, 00156 Roma (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) have been realized using an innovative parallel wire configuration. This configuration allows, at the same time, a large detection area and a fast response, with the additional advantage of large signal amplitudes. The detectors have been thoroughly characterized in terms of signal properties (amplitude, risetime and falltime), detector operation (latching and not latching) and quantum efficiency (at 850 nm). It has been shown that the parallel SNSPD is able to provide significantly higher maximum count rates for large area SNSPDs than meandered SNSPDs. Through a proper parallel wire configuration the increase in maximum count rate can be obtained without latching problems.

  2. Single photonics at telecom wavelengths using nanowire superconducting detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Zinoni, C; Fiore, A; Gerardino, A; Goltsman, G N; Li, L H; Lunghi, L; Marsili, F; Smirnov, K V; Vakhtomin, Y B; Vakhtomin, Yu. B.

    2006-01-01

    Single photonic applications - such as quantum key distribution - rely on the transmission of single photons, and require the ultimate sensitivity that an optical detector can achieve. Single-photon detectors must convert the energy of an optical pulse containing a single photon into a measurable electrical signal. We report on fiber-coupled superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) with specifications that exceed those of avalanche photodiodes (APDs), operating at telecommunication wavelength, in sensitivity, temporal resolution and repetition frequency. The improved performance is demonstrated by measuring the intensity correlation function g(2)(t) of single-photon states at 1300nm produced by single semiconductor quantum dots (QDs).

  3. Design and Fabrication of a Two-Dimensional Superconducting Pop-up Bolometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Chervenak, James A.; Allen, Christine A.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Irwin, Kent D.; Stacey, Gordon J.; Page, Lyman A.

    2004-01-01

    We have been developing an architecture for producing large format, two dimensional arrays of close-packed bolometers, which will enable submillimeter cameras and spectrometers to obtain images and spectra orders of magnitude faster than present instruments. The low backgrounds achieved in these instruments require very sensitive detectors with NEPs of order 5 x 10(exp -18) W/square root of Hz. Superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers can be close-packed using the Pop-up Detector (PUD) format, and SQUID multiplexers operating at the detector base temperature can be intimately coupled to them. The array unit cell is 8 x 32 pixels, using 32- element detector and multiplexer components. We have fabricated an engineering model array with this technology which features a very compact, modular approach for large format arrays. We report on the production of the 32-element components for the arrays. Planned instruments using this array architecture include the Submillimeter and Far-InfraRed Experiment (SAFIRE) on the SOFIA airborne observatory, the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) for the AST/RO observatory, the Millimeter Bolometer Camera for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (MBC/ACT), and the Redshift (Z) Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS j.

  4. Integrated superconducting detectors on semiconductors for quantum optics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniber, M.; Flassig, F.; Reithmaier, G.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum photonic circuits can be used to efficiently generate, manipulate, route and exploit nonclassical states of light for distributed photon-based quantum information technologies. In this article, we review our recent achievements on the growth, nanofabrication and integration of high-quality, superconducting niobium nitride thin films on optically active, semiconducting GaAs substrates and their patterning to realize highly efficient and ultra-fast superconducting detectors on semiconductor nanomaterials containing quantum dots. Our state-of-the-art detectors reach external detection quantum efficiencies up to 20 % for ~4 nm thin films and single-photon timing resolutions <72 ps. We discuss the integration of such detectors into quantum dot-loaded, semiconductor ridge waveguides, resulting in the on-chip, time-resolved detection of quantum dot luminescence. Furthermore, a prototype quantum optical circuit is demonstrated that enabled the on-chip generation of resonance fluorescence from an individual InGaAs quantum dot, with a linewidth <15 μeV displaced by 1 mm from the superconducting detector on the very same semiconductor chip. Thus, all key components required for prototype quantum photonic circuits with sources, optical components and detectors on the same chip are reported.

  5. Probing quantum coherence in arrays of superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Alexandra; Rivas, Angel; Huelga, Susana; Plenio, Martin [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In the mid-80's the so-called phenomenon of dynamic localization was shown for a charged particle moving under the influence of a sinusoidally-varying time-dependent electric field, and more recently similar resonances in the conduction were found to be present also in ion channels. In this work we study the conditions under which this dynamic localization can be found in arrays of superconducting qubits. This phenomenon can serve as a signature of quantum coherence in such systems and moreover could be checked experimentally by various groups constructing arrays of superconducting flux qubits.

  6. Optimized Superconducting Quadrupole Arrays for Multiple Beam Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.; Ball, Millicent, J.

    2005-09-20

    This research project advanced the development of reliable, cost-effective arrays of superconducting quadrupole magnets for use in multi-beam inertial fusion accelerators. The field in each array cell must be identical and meet stringent requirements for field quality and strength. An optimized compact array design using flat double-layer pancake coils was developed. Analytical studies of edge termination methods showed that it is feasible to meet the requirements for field uniformity in all cells and elimination of stray external field in several ways: active methods that involve placement of field compensating coils on the periphery of the array or a passive method that involves use of iron shielding.

  7. Spallation reactions studied with 4-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Galin

    2001-07-01

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the study of spallation reactions in basic nuclear physics as well as in potential applications. Spallation reactions induced by light projectiles (protons, antiprotons, pions, etc.) in the GeV range allow the formation of hot nuclei which do not suffer the collective excitations (compression, rotation, deformation) unavoidable when using massive projectiles. Such nuclei provide an ideal testbench for probing their decay as a function of excitation energy. In these investigations, 4-detector arrays for charged particles and neutrons play a major role in the event-by-event sorting according to the excitation energy of the nucleus. Spallation reactions induced on heavy nuclei allow the conversion of the incident GeV proton into several tens of evaporated neutrons. The neutron production in thick targets has been investigated in great detail thanks to the use of high efficiency neutron detector arrays. When scattered on samples of inert or biological materials, these neutrons can be used to study details of the material structure. They could also be utilized for the transmutation of long-lived nuclear wastes or for the feeding of sub-critical nuclear reactors. The role of different types of multi-detector arrays is highlighted in this paper. Several references are also given for different uses of high efficiency neutron detectors in other contexts.

  8. Superconducting NbN microstrip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedenig, R.; Niinikoski, T.O. E-mail: niinikos@cernvm.cern.ch; Berglund, P.; Kyynaeraeinen, J.; Costa, L.; Valtonen, M.; Linna, R.; Salmi, J.; Seppae, H.; Suni, I

    1999-09-01

    Superconducting NbN strip transmission line counters and coupling circuits were processed on silicon wafers using thin-film techniques, and they were characterized with several methods to verify the design principles. The stripline circuits, designed using microwave design rules, were simulated using a circuit design tool enhanced to include modelling of the superconducting lines. The strips, etched out of the 282 nm thick top NbN film with resistivity 284 {mu}{omega} cm at 20 K, have critical temperatures in the range 12-13 K and a critical current density approximately J{sub c}(0)=3.3x10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}. The linearized heat transfer coefficient between the strip and the substrate is approximately 1.1x10{sup 5} W/m{sup 2} K and the healing length is about 1.6 {mu}m between 3 and 5 K temperatures. Traversing 5 MeV {alpha}-particles caused the strips to quench. No events due to electrons could be detected in agreement with the predicted signal amplitude which is below the noise threshold of our wideband circuitry. The strip bias current and hence the signal amplitude were limited due to a microbridge at the isolator step of the impedance transformer.

  9. Superconducting NbN microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wedenig, R; Berglund, P; Kyynäräinen, J; Da Costa, L N; Valtonen, M J; Linna, R; Salmi, J; Seppä, H; Suni, I

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting NbN strip transmission line counters and coupling circuits were processed on silicon wafers using thin film techniques, and they were characterized with several methods to verify the design principles. The stripline circuits, designed using microwave design rules, were simulated using a circuit design tool enhanced to include modelling of the superconducting lines. The strips, etched out of the 282 nm thick top NbN film with resistivity 284 µ?cm at 20 K, have critical temperatures in the range 12 to 13 K and a critical current density approximately Jc(0) = 3.3·105 A/cm2. The linearized heat transfer coefficient between the strip and the substrate is approximately 1.1·105 W/(m2K) and the healing length is about 1.6 µm between 3 and 5 K temperatures. Traversing 5 MeV a-particles caused the strips to quench. No events due to electrons could be detected in agreement with the predicted signal amplitude which is below the noise threshold of our wideband circuitry. The strip bias current and henc...

  10. A superconducting focal plane array for ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazin, Benjamin A; Bumble, Bruce; Meeker, Seth R; O'Brien, Kieran; McHugh, Sean; Langman, Eric

    2012-01-16

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors, or MKIDs, have proven to be a powerful cryogenic detector technology due to their sensitivity and the ease with which they can be multiplexed into large arrays. A MKID is an energy sensor based on a photon-variable superconducting inductance in a lithographed microresonator, and is capable of functioning as a photon detector across the electromagnetic spectrum as well as a particle detector. Here we describe the first successful effort to create a photon-counting, energy-resolving ultraviolet, optical, and near infrared MKID focal plane array. These new Optical Lumped Element (OLE) MKID arrays have significant advantages over semiconductor detectors like charge coupled devices (CCDs). They can count individual photons with essentially no false counts and determine the energy and arrival time of every photon with good quantum efficiency. Their physical pixel size and maximum count rate is well matched with large telescopes. These capabilities enable powerful new astrophysical instruments usable from the ground and space. MKIDs could eventually supplant semiconductor detectors for most astronomical instrumentation, and will be useful for other disciplines such as quantum optics and biological imaging.

  11. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  12. Countermeasures Against Blinding Attack on Superconducting Nanowire Detectors for QKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elezov M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs are used in Quantum Key Distribution (QKD instead of single-photon avalanche photodiodes. Recently bright-light control of the SSPD has been demonstrated. This attack employed a “backdoor” in the detector biasing technique. We developed the autoreset system which returns the SSPD to superconducting state when it is latched. We investigate latched state of the SSPD and define limit conditions for effective blinding attack. Peculiarity of the blinding attack is a long nonsingle photon response of the SSPD. It is much longer than usual single photon response. Besides, we need follow up response duration of the SSPD. These countermeasures allow us to prevent blind attack on SSPDs for Quantum Key Distribution.

  13. Single photon source characterization with a superconducting single photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hadfield, R H; Miller, A J; Mirin, R P; Nam, S W; Schwall, R E; Stevens, M J; Gruber, Steven S.; Hadfield, Robert H.; Miller, Aaron J.; Mirin, Richard P.; Nam, Sae Woo; Schwall, Robert E.; Stevens, Martin J.

    2005-01-01

    Superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) based on nanopatterned niobium nitride wires offer single photon counting at fast rates, low jitter, and low dark counts, from visible wavelengths well into the infrared. We demonstrate the first use of an SSPD, packaged in a commercial cryocooler, for single photon source characterization. The source is an optically pumped, microcavity-coupled InGaAs quantum dot, emitting single photons on demand at 902 nm. The SSPD replaces the second silicon Avalanche Photodiode (APD) in a Hanbury-Brown Twiss interferometer measurement of the source second-order correlation function, g (2) (tau). The detection efficiency of the superconducting detector system is >2 % (coupling losses included). The SSPD system electronics jitter is 170 ps, versus 550 ps for the APD unit, allowing the source spontaneous emission lifetime to be measured with improved resolution.

  14. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  15. Superconductive combinational logic circuit using magnetically coupled SQUID array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanashi, Y., E-mail: yamanasi@ynu.ac.j [Interdisciplinary Research Center, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Umeda, K.; Sai, K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we propose the development of superconductive combinational logic circuits. One of the difficulties in designing superconductive single-flux-quantum (SFQ) digital circuits can be attributed to the fundamental nature of the SFQ circuits, in which all logic gates have latching functions and are based on sequential logic. The design of ultralow-power superconductive digital circuits can be facilitated by the development of superconductive combinational logic circuits in which the output is a function of only the present input. This is because superconductive combinational logic circuits do not require determination of the timing adjustment and clocking scheme. Moreover, semiconductor design tools can be used to design digital circuits because CMOS logic gates are based on combinational logic. The proposed superconductive combinational logic circuits comprise a magnetically coupled SQUID array. By adjusting the circuit parameters and coupling strengths between neighboring SQUIDs, fundamental combinational logic gates, including the AND, OR, and NOT gates, can be built. We have verified the accuracy of the operations of the fundamental logic gates by analog circuit simulations.

  16. Interstitial vortex in superconducting film with periodic hole arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Shi-Kun; Zhang Wei-Jun; Wen Zhen-Chao; Xiao Hong; Han Xiu-Feng; Gu Chang-Zhi; Qiu Xiang-Gang

    2012-01-01

    The response of superconducting Nb films with a diluted triangular and square array of holes to a perpendicular magnetic field are investigated.Due to small edge-to-edge separation of the holes,the patterned films are similar to multi-connected superconducting islands.Two regions in the magnetoresistance R(H) curves can be identified according to the field intervals of the resistance minima.Moreover,in between these two regions,variation of the minima spacing was observed.Our results provide strong evidence of the coexistence of interstitial vortices in the islands and fluxoids in the holes.

  17. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  18. Superconducting Magnets for Accelerators and Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2003-01-01

    The development of superconductors for magnet applications has received a strong boost from the High Energy Physics (HEP) community, both for detector magnets and for accelerator magnets. The demand for very high current density (both Jc and Jc,overall), for fine filaments, for control of the copper content, for very compact cables with large current capability, the ability to superstabilize large cables at moderate cost, together with necessity of producing hundreds of tons of materials for large projects, have been the main motivation for the continued improvement of practical superconductors. HEP has provided so far, and still does nowadays, a unique forum where material scientists, fabrication engineers and final users, i.e. magnet designers and magnet constructors, gather together and, by sharing their knowledge and their needs, are able to accomplish real progress in the technology. In particular accelerator magnets have reached a point where, in order to go beyond the 9 T limit of the present LHC in co...

  19. Low-energy CZT detector array for the ASIM mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cenkeramaddi, Linga Reddy; Genov, Georgi; Kohfeldt, Anja

    2012-01-01

    In this article we introduce the low-energy CZT (CdZnTe) 16 384-pixel detector array on-board the Atmosphere Space Interaction Monitor (ASIM), funded by the European Space Agency. This detector is a part of the larger Modular X-and Gamma-ray sensor (MXGS). The CZT detector array is sensitive...

  20. First astronomical images obtained with an array of multiplexed superconducting bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staguhn, J.G. [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States) and SSAI, 10210 Greenbelt Road, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States)]. E-mail: johannes.staguhn@gsfc.nasa.gov; Benford, D.J. [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Moseley, S.H. [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Allen, C.A. [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kennedy, C.R. [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Notre Dame University, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Lefranc, S. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay (France); Maher, S.F. [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); SSAI, 10210 Greenbelt Road, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Pajot, F. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay (France); Rioux, C. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay (France); Shafer, R.A. [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Voellmer, G.M. [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    We present multicolor images of Jupiter observed in the 350{mu}m band with the first deployed astronomical instrument to use multiplexed superconducting bolometers. The Fabry-Perot Interferometer Bolometer Research Experiment (FIBRE) is a broadband submillimeter spectrometer that made these images in July 2004 at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). FIBREs detectors are superconducting bilayer transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers read out by a SQUID multiplexer. An order-sorted Fabry-Perot provides illumination of a 16-element linear bolometer array, resulting in five orders at a spectral resolution R of 1200 covering a band of 17 of the observed wavelength. The optics permit these orders to be scanned to cover the entirety of either the 350 or 450{mu}m bands.

  1. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Michael G.; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  2. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, Michael G; Hadfield, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    We explore optimised control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) through bright illumination. We consider the behaviour of the SNSPD in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching) in long-running quantum key distribution experiments. We propose and demonstrate an effective bright-light attack on this realistic configuration, by applying transient blinding illumination lasting for a fraction of a microsecond and producing several deterministic fake clicks during this time. We show that this attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and is hence not introducing significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  3. Superconducting single photon detectors integrated with diamond nanophotonic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Rath, Patrik; Ferrari, Simone; Sproll, Fabian; Lewes-Malandrakis, Georgia; Brink, Dietmar; Ilin, Konstantin; Siegel, Michael; Nebel, Christoph; Pernice, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Photonic quantum technologies promise to repeat the success of integrated nanophotonic circuits in non-classical applications. Using linear optical elements, quantum optical computations can be performed with integrated optical circuits and thus allow for overcoming existing limitations in terms of scalability. Besides passive optical devices for realizing photonic quantum gates, active elements such as single photon sources and single photon detectors are essential ingredients for future optical quantum circuits. Material systems which allow for the monolithic integration of all components are particularly attractive, including III-V semiconductors, silicon and also diamond. Here we demonstrate nanophotonic integrated circuits made from high quality polycrystalline diamond thin films in combination with on-chip single photon detectors. Using superconducting nanowires coupled evanescently to travelling waves we achieve high detection efficiencies up to 66 % combined with low dark count rates and timing resolu...

  4. Flux avalanches in Nb superconducting shifted strip arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Mawatari, Y.; Ibuka, J.; Tada, S.; Pyon, S.; Nagasawa, S.; Hidaka, M.; Maezawa, M.; Tamegai, T.

    2013-09-01

    Flux penetrations into three-dimensional Nb superconducting strip arrays, where two layers of strip arrays are stacked by shifting a half period, are studied using a magneto-optical imaging method. Flux avalanches are observed when the overlap between the top and bottom layers is large even if the width of each strip is well below the threshold value. In addition, anomalous linear avalanches perpendicular to the strip are observed in the shifted strip array when the overlap is very large and the thickness of the superconductor is greater than the penetration depth. We discuss possible origins for the flux avalanches, including linear ones, by considering flux penetration calculated by the Campbell method assuming the Bean model.

  5. Broadband illumination of superconducting pair breaking photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruswamy, T.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the detailed behaviour of superconducting pair breaking photon detectors such as Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) requires knowledge of the nonequilibrium quasiparticle energy distributions. We have previously calculated the steady state distributions resulting from uniform absorption of monochromatic sub gap and above gap frequency radiation by thin films. In this work, we use the same methods to calculate the effect of illumination by broadband sources, such as thermal radiation from astrophysical phenomena or from the readout system. Absorption of photons at multiple above gap frequencies is shown to leave unchanged the structure of the quasiparticle energy distribution close to the superconducting gap. Hence for typical absorbed powers, we find the effects of absorption of broadband pair breaking radiation can simply be considered as the sum of the effects of absorption of many monochromatic sources. Distribution averaged quantities, like quasiparticle generation efficiency η, match exactly a weighted average over the bandwidth of the source of calculations assuming a monochromatic source. For sub gap frequencies, however, distributing the absorbed power across multiple frequencies does change the low energy quasiparticle distribution. For moderate and high absorbed powers, this results in a significantly larger η-a higher number of excess quasiparticles for a broadband source compared to a monochromatic source of equal total absorbed power. Typically in KIDs the microwave power absorbed has a very narrow bandwidth, but in devices with broad resonance characteristics (low quality factors), this increase in η may be measurable.

  6. Position resolution of a double junction superconductive detector based on a single material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samedov, V. V.

    2008-02-01

    The Naples group from Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare presented the results of theoretical investigations of a new class of superconductive radiation detectors - double junction superconductive detector based on a single material [1]. In such detectors, the absorption of energy occurs in a long superconductive strip while two superconductive tunnel junctions positioned at the ends of the strip provide the readout of the signals. The main peculiarity of this type of detectors is that they are based on a single superconducting material, i.e., without trapping layers at the ends of the strip. In this paper, general approach to the position resolution of this type of detectors has been attempted. The formula for the position resolution is derived. It is shown that the application of the aluminium for the absorber may be the best possible way not only due to the small gap energy, but also mainly for STJ fabrication technology based on the aluminium oxide tunnel barrier.

  7. MEGHNAD – A multi element detector array for heavy ion collision studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satyajit Saha

    2001-07-01

    In the coming decade, the expanding field of experimental nuclear physics in our country is going to see a quantum leap in research and developmental activities with new accelerator facilities like the variable energy cyclotron with ECR heavy ion source, the upcoming K-500 superconducting cyclotron, both at VECC, Calcutta, and the superconducting linac boosters at both the Pelletron Accelerator Facilities at TIFR, Mumbai and NSC, New Delhi. When heavy ion beam available from such machines fall on a target and undergo collision, very rich and often pristine fields of research open up. In order to carry on such activities, we have taken up a project to build a multi element gamma, heavy ion and neutron array of detectors (MEGHNAD) to detect and study the properties of a wide variety of particles like neutrons, protons, light mass clusters, massive ejected fragments, and gamma rays with good solid angle coverage and efficiency. Design of the detector array, performance of the prototype detector and brief outline of the research programme to be undertaken with the detector array will be discussed.

  8. Fabrication of Pop-up Detector Arrays on Si Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mary J.; Allen, Christine A.; Gordon, Scott A.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Mott, David B.; Stahle, Caroline K.; Wang, Liqin L.

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity is a basic requirement for a new generation of thermal detectors. To meet the requirement, close-packed, two-dimensional silicon detector arrays have been developed in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the task is to fabricate detector arrays configured with thermal detectors such as infrared bolometers and x-ray calorimeters to use in space fliGht missions. This paper focuses on the fabrication and the mechanical testing of detector arrays in a 0.2 mm pixel size, the smallest pop-up detectors being developed so far. These array structures, nicknamed "PUDS" for "Pop-Up Detectors", are fabricated on I pm thick, single-crystal, silicon membranes. Their designs have been refined so we can utilize the flexibility of thin silicon films by actually folding the silicon membranes to 90 degrees in order to obtain close-packed two-dimensional arrays. The PUD elements consist of a detector platform and two legs for mechanical support while also serving as electrical and thermal paths. Torsion bars and cantilevers connecting the detector platform to the legs provide additional flexures for strain relief. Using micro-electromechanical structure (MEMS) fabrication techniques, including photolithography, anisotropic chemical etching, reactive-ion etching, and laser dicing, we have fabricated PLTD detector arrays of fourteen designs with a variation of four parameters including cantilever length, torsion bar length and width, and leg length. Folding tests were conducted to test mechanical stress distribution for the array structures. We obtained folding yields and selected optimum design parameters to reach minimal stress levels. Computer simulation was also employed to verify mechanical behaviors of PUDs in the folding process. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was utilized to examine the flatness of detectors and the alignment of detector pixels in arrays. The fabrication of thermistors and heaters on the pop-up detectors is under way

  9. Electronics design of a PET detector module with APD array

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Yong

    2002-01-01

    The author summarizes the advantages of APD-array for using in PET scanner. The front-end electronics for an experimental APD detector module was built and tested. According to the characteristics of APD-array and the demands of the signal readout in PET scanner, the full electronics system of an APD detector module was designed and presented in detail

  10. The Impact of Array Detectors on Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Stephen C.; Pommier, Carolyn J. S.; Denton, M. Bonner

    2007-01-01

    The impact of array detectors in the field of Raman spectroscopy and all low-light-level spectroscopic techniques is examined. The high sensitivity of array detectors has allowed Raman spectroscopy to be used to detect compounds at part per million concentrations and to perform Raman analyses at advantageous wavelengths.

  11. Superconducting Quantum Arrays for Wideband Antennas and Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhanov, O.; Prokopemko, G.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Iinetference Filters (SQIF) consist of a two-dimensional array of niobium Josephson Junctions formed into N loops of incommensurate area. This structure forms a magnetic field (B) to voltage transducer with an impulse like response at B0. In principle, the signal-to-noise ratio scales as the square root of N and the noise can be made arbitrarily small (i.e. The SQIF chips are expected to exhibit quantum limited noise performance). A gain of about 20 dB was recently demonstrated at 10 GHz.

  12. A new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Qi; Xie Zhong Shen; Cao Jin Yun; Niu Shen Gli; Ouyang Xia Opin

    2002-01-01

    A new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector has been developed. The detector consists of a bee-hive-shaped lead absorber, a scintillating fiber array, a light guide, a filter and a photomultiplier tube. The experimental results show that the new detector's neuron-to-gamma sensitivity ratio is improved about six times compared to traditional plastic scintillation detectors to 2.5 MeV neutrons and 1.25 MeV gamma rays. Hence, the detector should be very useful in the measurements of pulsed neutrons from fission reactions in a neutron-gamma mixed field.

  13. Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors for quantum information and communications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhen; Fujiwara, Mikio

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPD or SSPD) are highly promising devices in the growing field of quantum information and communications technology. We have developed a practical SSPD system with our superconducting thin films and devices fabrication, optical coupling packaging, and cryogenic technology. The SSPD system consists of six-channel SSPD devices and a compact Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler, and can operate continuously on 100 V ac power without the need for any cryogens. The SSPD devices were fabricated from high-quality niobium nitride (NbN) ultra-thin films that were epitaxially grown on single-crystal MgO substrates. The packaged SSPD devices were temperature stabilized to 2.96 K +/- 10 mK. The system detection efficiency for an SSPD device with an area of 20x20 $\\mu m^2$ was found to be 2.6% and 4.5% at wavelengths of 1550 and 1310 nm, respectively, at a dark count rate of 100 c/s, and a jitter of 100 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM). We also performed ultra-fast BB84 q...

  14. Promising X-ray fluorescence tests for superconducting tunneljunction detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Robinson, Arthur L.

    2001-05-15

    Scientists in the Physical Biosciences Division of the Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) studying transition metals in proteins with fluorescence-detected L-edge absorption spectroscopy have found the measurements to be extremely challenging. The difficulty is that the metal centers are present in very dilute concentrations so that their weak fluorescence is often obscured by strong background signals carbon and oxygen. To solve this problem, the Berkeley group has been working with researchers from the Advanced Detector Group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on an energy-dispersive superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector. These devices in principle have the energy resolution needed to reveal the metal signal. The most recent results with the latest version of the detector on Beamline 4.0.1-2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) illustrate the promise of the cryogenic detector strategy not only for this application but also for spectroscopy of other types of dilute samples. Transition-metal complexes are key elements in many biologically important processes that are catalyzed by proteins (enzymes), photosynthesis being a prime example. The changes in that occur in electronic structure throughout a catalytic cycle are the subject of much research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of these processes. L-edge x-ray spectroscopy offers several advantages relative to the more common K-edge techniques, since it involves allowed transitions to the d-orbitals associated with metal-ligand bonding. It also has a rich multiplet structure interpretable by theory and higher spectral resolution.

  15. Results from the Puebla extensive air shower detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, H.; Martinez, O.; Moreno, E.; Cotzomi, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Saavedrac, O.

    2003-07-01

    We describe the design and operation of the first stage of the EAS-UAP extensive air shower array, as a detector of very high energy cosmic rays ( Eo > 10 14eV). The array is located at the Campus of Puebla University and consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors, with an active surface of 1 m2 each and a detector spacing of 20 m in a square grid. In this report we discuss the stability and the calibration of the detector array, as derived from the 10 detectors in operation in the first stage. The main characteristics of the array allow us also to use it as an educational and training facility. First distributions of the arrival direction and the lateral shower srpead are also given.

  16. Matrix of integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high timing resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Schuck, Carsten; Minaeva, Olga; Li, Mo; Gol'tsman, Gregory; Sergienko, Alexander V; Tang, Hong X

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a large grid of individually addressable superconducting single photon detectors on a single chip. Each detector element is fully integrated into an independent waveguide circuit with custom functionality at telecom wavelengths. High device density is achieved by fabricating the nanowire detectors in traveling wave geometry directly on top of silicon-on-insulator waveguides. Our superconducting single-photon detector matrix includes detector designs optimized for high detection efficiency, low dark count rate and high timing accuracy. As an example, we exploit the high timing resolution of a particularly short nanowire design to resolve individual photon round-trips in a cavity ring-down measurement of a silicon ring resonator.

  17. Technical design of a detector to be operated at the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Soleoidal Detector Collaboration: Summary and overview of the detector; physics and detector requirements; central tracking system; superconducting magnet; calorimetry; muon system; electronics; online computing; offline computing; safety; experimental facilities; installation; test and calibration beam plan; and cost and schedule summary.

  18. 1-D array of perforated diode neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, Walter J. [Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: wjm4444@ksu.edu; Bellinger, Steven L.; Unruh, Troy C.; Henderson, Chris M.; Ugorowski, Phil; Morris-Lee, Bryce [Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Taylor, Russell D. [Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); McGregor, Douglas S. [Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: mcgregor@ksu.edu

    2009-06-01

    Performance of a 4 cm long 64-pixel perforated diode neutron detector array is compared with an identical array of thin-film coated diodes. The perforated neutron detector design has been adapted to a 1-D pixel array capable of 120 {mu}m spatial resolution and counting efficiency greater than 12%. Deep vertical trenches filled with {sup 6}LiF provide outstanding improvement in efficiency over thin-film coated diode designs limited to only 4.5%. This work marks the final step towards the construction of a much larger array consisting of 1024 pixels spanning 10 cm. The larger detector array will be constructed with a sub-array of 64-pixel sensors, and will be used for small-angle neutron scattering experiments at the Spallation Neutron Source of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  19. Recent upgrades and performance of the CACTUS detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, A.; Bergholt, L.; Guttormsen, M. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The SCANDITRONIX MC-35 cyclotron laboratory, including the Oslo Cyclotron, has been in operation since 1980. The main auxiliary equipment consists of the multi-detector system CACTUS. During the last years, new, high efficiency Ge(HP) detectors were purchased and integrated in the CACTUS detector array. In this connection, the electronical setup was revised and altered. Several drawbacks of the old setup could be pointed out and eliminated. A test of the performance of all detector array elements was made with high accuracy. 27 refs.

  20. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on SOI for near-infrared range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trojan, Philipp; Il' in, Konstantin; Henrich, Dagmar; Hofherr, Matthias; Doerner, Steffen; Siegel, Michael [Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme (IMS), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Semenov, Alexey [Institut fuer Planetenforschung, DLR, Berlin-Adlershof (Germany); Huebers, Heinz-Wilhelm [Institut fuer Planetenforschung, DLR, Berlin-Adlershof (Germany); Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors are promising devices for photon detectors with high count rates, low dark count rates and low dead times. At wavelengths beyond the visible range, the detection efficiency of today's SNSPDs drops significantly. Moreover, the low absorption in ultra-thin detector films is a limiting factor over the entire spectral range. Solving this problem requires approaches for an enhancement of the absorption range in feeding the light to the detector element. A possibility to obtain a better absorption is the use of multilayer substrate materials for photonic waveguide structures. We present results on development of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors made from niobium nitride on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) multilayer substrates. Optical and superconducting properties of SNSPDs on SOI will be discussed and compared with the characteristics of detectors on common substrates.

  1. Mercury Cadmium Telluride Photoconductive Long Wave Infrared Linear Array Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risal Singh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1-x, CdxTe (MCT photoconductive long wave infrared linear arrays are still in demand due to several advantages. The linear array technology is well established, easier, economical and is quite relevant to thermal imaging even today. The scan thermal imaging systems based on this technology offer wider field of view coverage and capacity for higher resolution in the scan direction relative to staring systems that use expensive and yet to mature focal plane array detector technology. A critical review on photoconductive n-Hg1-x CdxTe linear array detector technology for the long wave infrared range has been presented. The emphasis lies on detector design and processing technology. The critical issues of diffusion and drift effects, Hi-Lo and heterostructure blocking contacts, surface passivation, and other related aspects have been considered from the detector design angle. The device processing technology aspects are of vital importance

  2. Hybridization of detector array and integrated circuit for readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1992-04-01

    A process is explained for fabricating a detector array in a layer of semiconductor material on one substrate and an integrated readout circuit in a layer of semiconductor material on a separate substrate in order to select semiconductor material for optimum performance of each structure, such as GaAs for the detector array and Si for the integrated readout circuit. The detector array layer is lifted off its substrate, laminated on the metallized surface on the integrated surface, etched with reticulating channels to the surface of the integrated circuit, and provided with interconnections between the detector array pixels and the integrated readout circuit through the channels. The adhesive material for the lamination is selected to be chemically stable to provide electrical and thermal insulation and to provide stress release between the two structures fabricated in semiconductor materials that may have different coefficients of thermal expansion.

  3. PbS-PbSe IR detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, John R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A silicon wafer is provided which does not employ individually bonded leads between the IR sensitive elements and the input stages of multiplexers. The wafer is first coated with lead selenide in a first detector array area and is thereafter coated with lead sulfide within a second detector array area. The described steps result in the direct chemical deposition of lead selenide and lead sulfide upon the silicon wafer to eliminate individual wire bonding, bumping, flip chipping, planar interconnecting methods of connecting detector array elements to silicon chip circuitry, e.g., multiplexers, to enable easy fabrication of very long arrays. The electrode structure employed, produces an increase in the electrical field gradient between the electrodes for a given volume of detector material, relative to conventional electrode configurations.

  4. Fiber-coupled NbN superconducting single-photon detectors for quantum correlation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slysz, W.; Wegrzecki, M.; Bar, J.; Grabiec, P.; Gorska, M.; Reiger, E.; Dorenbos, S.; Zwiller, V.; Milostnaya, I.; Minaeva, O.

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated fiber-coupled superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs), designed for quantum-correlationtype experiments. The SSPDs are nanostructured (~100-nm wide and 4-nm thick) NbN superconducting meandering stripes, operated in the 2 to 4.2 K temperature range, and known for ultrafast

  5. Data acquisition for experiments with multi-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chatterjee; Sushil Kamerkar; A K Jethra; S Padmini; M P Diwakar; S S Pande; M D Ghodgaonkar

    2001-07-01

    Experiments with multi-detector arrays have special requirements and place higher demands on computer data acquisition systems. In this contribution we discuss data acquisition systems with special emphasis on multi-detector arrays and in particular we describe a new data acquisition system, AMPS which we have developed recently which is in regular use in experiments at the Pelletron Laboratory, Mumbai. This includes the in-house development of a dedicated crate controller, PC interface card and software.

  6. Particle Identification in the NIMROD-ISiS Detector Array

    CERN Document Server

    Wuenschel, S; May, L W; Wada, R; Yennello, S J

    2009-01-01

    Interest in the influence of the neutron-to-proton (N/Z) ratio on multifragmenting nuclei has demanded an improvement in the capabilities of multi-detector arrays as well as the companion analysis methods. The particle identification method used in the NIMROD-ISiS 4 $\\pi$ array is described. Performance of the detectors and the analysis method are presented for the reaction of 86Kr+64Ni at 35MeV/u.

  7. HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement-Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement - based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0006 HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement - Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors Philip Walther UNIVERSITT...HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement - Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-11-1-3004 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  8. The surface detector array of the Telescope Array experiment to explore the highest energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Miyauchi, H; Murano, Y; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment, located in the western desert of Utah,USA, is designed for observation of extensive air showers from extremely high energy cosmic rays. The experiment has a surface detector array surrounded by three fluorescence detectors to enable simultaneous detection of shower particles at ground level and fluorescence photons along the shower track. The TA surface detectors and fluorescence detectors started full hybrid observation in March, 2008. In this article we describe the design and technical features of the TA surface detector.

  9. An integrated single photon detector array using porous anodic alumina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melai, J.; Salm, C.; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.M.; Visschers, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the work is fabrication of a photon detector array made using IC compatible wafer-scale post-processing stepts. Plans will be presented to outline these fabrication steps. The detector comprises an integrated Micro-Channel-Plate and an imaging chip like Medipix2. The aim of the work is fa

  10. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  11. Fano fluctuations in superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozorezov, A. G.; Lambert, C.; Marsili, F.; Stevens, M. J.; Verma, V. B.; Allmaras, J. P.; Shaw, M. D.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, Sae Woo

    2017-08-01

    Because of their universal nature, Fano fluctuations are expected to influence the response of superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs). We predict that photon counting rate (P C R ) as a function of bias current (IB) in SNSPDs is described by an integral over a transverse coordinate-dependent complementary error function. Fano fluctuations in the amount of energy deposited into the electronic system contribute to the finite width of this error function Δ IB . The local response of an SNSPD can also affect this width: the location of the initial photon absorption site across the width of the wire can impact the probability of vortex-antivortex unbinding and vortex entry from the edges. In narrow-nanowire SNSPDs, the local responses are uniform, and Fano fluctuations dominate Δ IB . We demonstrate good agreement between theory and experiments for a series of bath temperatures and photon energies in narrow-wire WSi SNSPDs. In a wide-nanowire device, the strong local dependence will introduce a finite width to the P C R curve, but with sharp cusps. We show how Fano fluctuations can smooth these features to produce theoretical curves that better match experimental data. We also show that the time-resolved hotspot relaxation curves predicted by Fano fluctuations match the previously measured Lorentzian shapes (except for their tails) over the entire range of bias currents investigated experimentally.

  12. New air fluorescence detectors employed in the Telescope Array experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tokuno, H; Takeda, M; Kadota, K; Ikeda, D; Chikawa, M; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Honda, K; Inoue, N; Kakimoto, F; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Matthews, J N; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Okuda, T; Ozawa, S; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Shibata, T; Taketa, A; Thomas, S B; Tomida, T; Tsunesada, Y; Udo, S; Abu-zayyad, T; Aida, R; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fukuda, T; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Iguchi, T; Ikuta, K; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Miyauchi, H; Murano, Y; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Oshima, A; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takita, M; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Troitsky, S; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007, the Telescope Array (TA) experiment, based in Utah, USA, has been observing ultra high energy cosmic rays to understand their origins. The experiment involves a surface detector (SD) array and three fluorescence detector (FD) stations. FD stations, installed surrounding the SD array, measure the air fluorescence light emitted from extensive air showers (EASs) for precise determination of their energies and species. The detectors employed at one of the three FD stations were relocated from the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment. At the other two stations, newly designed detectors were constructed for the TA experiment. An FD consists of a primary mirror and a camera equipped with photomultiplier tubes. To obtain the EAS parameters with high accuracies, understanding the FD optical characteristics is important. In this paper, we report the characteristics and installation of new FDs and the performances of the FD components. The results of the monitored mirror reflectance during the observation ti...

  13. Superconducting detector of IR single-photons based on thin WSi films

    CERN Document Server

    Seleznev, V A; Vakhtomin, Yu B; Morozov, P V; Zolotov, P I; Vasilev, D D; Moiseev, K M; Malevannaya, E I; Smirnov, K V

    2016-01-01

    We have developed the deposition technology of WSi thin films 4 to 9 nm thick with high temperature values of superconducting transition (Tc~4 K). Based on deposed films there were produced nanostructures with indicative planar sizes ~100 nm, and the research revealed that even on nanoscale the films possess of high critical temperature values of the superconducting transition (Tc~3.3-3.7K ) which certifies high quality and homogeneity of the films created. The first experiments on creating superconducting single-photon detectors showed that the detectors SDE (system detection efficiency) with increasing bias current (Ib) reaches a constant value of ~30% (for 1550 nm) defined by infrared radiation absorption by the superconducting structure. To enhance radiation absorption by the superconductor there were created detectors with cavity structures which demonstrated a practically constant value of quantum efficiency >65% for bias currents Ib>=0.6Ic. The minimal dark counts level (DC) made 1 s^-1 limited with ba...

  14. A Study of Lane Differentiation Using An Array of Detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKigney E. A. (Edward A.); Gholkar, R. V. (Rohun V.); Vega, D. A. (Daniel A.)

    2004-01-01

    The authors discuss a method for locating a radioactive source in the context of determining which lane a source is in on a roadway. This method is appropriate for use over a large range of source velocities, and could provide an advance alarm prior to a vehicle passing a portal monitor. This is a novel method which uses data from the entire array simultaneously to locate the source, rather than relying on only one or two sensors. A description of the underlying method will be given, along with results from five and six detector arrays. The five detector array was used mainly for static tests. The six detector array was used for dynamic tests, including slow movement of a source in a vehicle.

  15. Nanorod Array Solid State Neutron Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR project, Synkera proposes to develop and commercialize solid-state neutron detectors of a unique architecture that will enable sensor modules...

  16. Bolometeric detector arrays for CMB polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Day, P.; Goldin, A.; Golwala, S.; Holmes, W.; Irwin, K.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Rossinot, P.; Sterb, J.; Vayonakis, A.; Wang, G.; Yun, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the development of antenna coupled bolometers for CMB polarization experiments. The necessary components of a bolometric CMB polarimeter - a beam forming element, a band defining filter, and detectors - are all fabricated on a silicon chip with photolithography.

  17. Surface detector array for the Pierre Auger observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, H.; Garipov, G. K.; Khrenov, B. A.; Martínez, O.; Moreno, E.; Villaseñor, L.; Zepeda, A.

    2001-05-01

    The Pierre Auger international collaboration will install two observatories, one in the southern hemisphere and other in the northern hemisphere. Each observatory will consist of two different subsystem: a surface detector array of about 1600 water Cherenkov detectors (WCD) and a set of fluorescence eyes to measure the longitudinal development of air showers. The large area covered by the surface detectors requires efficient calibration and monitoring methods that can be implemented remotely. We present several complementary methods to calibrate and monitor the performance of the individual surface detector stations. We also present some results of the studies made with a full size prototype tank in Puebla, Mexico and in Malargue, Argentina. .

  18. Research of High Sensitivity Uncooled Infrared Detector Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Pingchuan [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Bo, E-mail: redmoon123456@126.com, E-mail: lhzyzb@126.com [Luohe Vocational Technology College, Luohe 462002 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The infrared thermal imaging technology has been widely used in military and civilian fields and the field of the infrared detection and infrared thermal imaging technology has been of concern for a long time. On infrared thermal imaging, its core components for the infrared focal plane arrays, how to develop a high sensitivity of the multi-focal plane infrared detector is a key issue. Although the Common focal plane array of quantum has high sensitivity, but it requires low temperature cooling work environment and led to complexity and high cost, difficult to compact. Conventional uncooled infrared focal plane array is contrast to the quantum focal plane arrays. Therefore, this article preceded by the uncooled infrared detector array to improve the wide temperature sensitivity in examining the feasibility PMN composite film, materials composition, structure design and preparation process technology.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of a single detector unit for the neutron detector array NEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, PL 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Palacz, M., E-mail: palacz@slcj.uw.edu.pl [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, PL 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Nyberg, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Angelis, G. de [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, Caen (France); Di Nitto, A. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Egea, J. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Erduran, M.N. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University Istanbul (Turkey); Ertuerk, S. [Nigde Universitesi, Fen-Edebiyat Falkueltesi, Fizik Boeluemue, Nigde (Turkey); Farnea, E. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Gadea, A. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Gonzalez, V. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); Gottardo, A. [Padova University, Padua (Italy); Hueyuek, T. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Kownacki, J. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, PL 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Pipidis, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Roeder, B. [LPC-Caen, ENSICAEN, IN2P3/CNRS et Universite de Caen, Caen (France); Soederstroem, P.-A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Sanchis, E. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); Tarnowski, R. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, PL 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2012-05-01

    A study of the dimensions and performance of a single detector of the future neutron detector array NEDA was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations, using GEANT4. Two different liquid scintillators were evaluated: the hydrogen based BC501A and the deuterated BC537. The efficiency and the probability that one neutron will trigger a signal in more than one detector were investigated as a function of the detector size. The simulations were validated comparing the results to experimental measurements performed with two existing neutron detectors, with different geometries, based on the liquid scintillator BC501.

  20. AIGO: a southern hemisphere detector for the worldwide array of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P; Blair, D G; Coward, D; Davidson, J; Dumas, J-C; Howell, E; Ju, L; Wen, L; Zhao, C [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J; Inta, R [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Munch, J; Ottaway, D J; Veitch, P; Hosken, D [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Melatos, A; Chung, C; Sammut, L, E-mail: pbarriga@cyllene.uwa.edu.a [School of Physics University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)

    2010-04-21

    This paper describes the proposed AIGO detector for the worldwide array of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The first part of the paper summarizes the benefits that AIGO provides to the worldwide array of detectors. The second part gives a technical description of the detector, which will follow closely the Advanced LIGO design. Possible technical variations in the design are discussed.

  1. Performance of a superconducting single photon detector with nano-antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chao; Jiao Rong-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    The performance of single-photon detectors can be enhanced by using nano-antenna.The characteristics of the superconducting nano-wire single-photon detector with cavity plus anti-reflect coating and specially designed nanoantenna is analysed.The photon collection efficiency of the detector is enhanced without damaging the detector's speed,thus getting rid of the dilemma of speed and efficiency.The characteristics of nano-antenna are discussed,such as the position and the effect of the active area,and the best result is given.The photon collection efficiency is increased by 92 times compared with that of existing detectors.

  2. The Detector Calibration System for the CUORE cryogenic bolometer array

    CERN Document Server

    Cushman, J S; Davis, C J; Ejzak, L; Lenz, D; Lim, K E; Heeger, K M; Maruyama, R H; Nucciotti, A; Sangiorgio, S; Wise, T

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of $^{130}$Te and other rare events. The CUORE detector consists of 988 TeO$_2$ bolometers operated underground at 10~mK in a dilution refrigerator at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Candidate events are identified through a precise measurement of their energy. The absolute energy response of the detectors is established by the regular calibration of each individual bolometer using gamma sources. The close-packed configuration of the CUORE bolometer array combined with the extensive shielding surrounding the detectors requires the placement of calibration sources within the array itself. The CUORE Detector Calibration System is designed to insert radioactive sources into and remove them from the cryostat while respecting the stringent heat load, radiopurity, and operational requirements of the experiment. This paper describes the design, commissioning...

  3. Neutron detector array at IUAC: Design features and instrumentation developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Sugathan; A Jhingan; K S Golda; T Varughese; S Venkataramanan; N Saneesh; V V Satyanarayana; S K Suman; J Antony; Ruby Shanti; K Singh; S K Saini; A Gupta; A Kothari; P Barua; Rajesh Kumar; J Zacharias; R P Singh; B R Behera; S K Mandal; I M Govil; R K Bhowmik

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics and performance of the newly commissioned neutron detector array at IUAC are described. The array consists of 100 BC501 liquid scintillators mounted in a semispherical geometry and are kept at a distance of 175 cm from the reaction point. Each detector is a 5″ × 5″ cylindrical cell coupled to 5″ diameter photomultiplier tube (PMT). Signal processing is realized using custom-designed home-made integrated electronic modules which perform neutron–gamma discrimination using zero cross timing and time-of-flight (TOF) technique. Compact custom-built high voltage power supply developed using DC–DC converters are used to bias the detector. The neutrons are recorded in coincidence with fission fragments which are detected using multi-wire proportional counters mounted inside a 1m diameter SS target chamber. The detectors and electronics have been tested off-line using radioactive sources and the results are presented.

  4. High-energy interactions in Kinetic Inductance Detectors arrays

    CERN Document Server

    D'Addabbo, A; Goupy, J; Benoit, A; Bourrion, O; Catalano, A; Macias-Perez, J F; Monfardini, A

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of Cosmic Rays on the detectors are a key problem for space-based missions. We are studying the effects of such interactions on arrays of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), in order to adapt this technology for use on board of satellites. Before proposing a new technology such as the Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a space-based mission, the problem of the Cosmic Rays that hit the detectors during in-flight operation has to be studied in detail. We present here several tests carried out with KID exposed to radioactive sources, which we use to reproduce the physical interactions induced by primary Cosmic Rays, and we report the results obtained adopting different solutions in terms of substrate materials and array geometries. We conclude by outlining the main guidelines to follow for fabricating KID for space-based applications.

  5. Integrated Miniature Arrays of Optical Biomolecule Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Lin, Ying; Le, Thanh

    2009-01-01

    Integrated miniature planar arrays of optical sensors for detecting specific biochemicals in extremely small quantities have been proposed. An array of this type would have an area of about 1 cm2. Each element of the array would include an optical microresonator that would have a high value of the resonance quality factor (Q . 107). The surface of each microresonator would be derivatized to make it bind molecules of a species of interest, and such binding would introduce a measurable change in the optical properties of the microresonator. Because each microresonator could be derivatized for detection of a specific biochemical different from those of the other microresonators, it would be possible to detect multiple specific biochemicals by simultaneous or sequential interrogation of all the elements in the array. Moreover, the derivatization would make it unnecessary to prepare samples by chemical tagging. Such interrogation would be effected by means of a grid of row and column polymer-based optical waveguides that would be integral parts of a chip on which the array would be fabricated. The row and column polymer-based optical waveguides would intersect at the elements of the array (see figure). At each intersection, the row and column waveguides would be optically coupled to one of the microresonators. The polymer-based waveguides would be connected via optical fibers to external light sources and photodetectors. One set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the row waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the sources to the resonators; the other set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the column waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the microresonators to the photodetectors. Each microresonator could be addressed individually by row and column for measurement of its optical transmission. Optionally, the chip could be fabricated so that each microresonator would lie inside a microwell, into which a microscopic liquid sample could be dispensed.

  6. Conference on physics from large {gamma}-ray detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The conference on {open_quotes}Physics from Large {gamma}-ray Detector Arrays{close_quotes} is a continuation of the series of conferences that have been organized every two years by the North American Heavy-ion Laboratories. The aim of the conference this year was to encourage discussion of the physics that can be studied with such large arrays. This volume is the collected proceedings from this conference. It discusses properties of nuclear states which can be created in heavy-ion reactions, and which can be observed via such detector systems.

  7. Detectors based on silicon photomultiplier arrays for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llosa, G.; Barrio, J.; Cabello, J.; Lacasta, C.; Oliver, J. F. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - IFIC-CSIC/UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Rafecas, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - IFIC-CSIC/UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular Y Nuclear, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Stankova, V.; Solaz, C. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - IFIC-CSIC/UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Bisogni, M. G.; Del Guerra, A. [Universite di Pisa, INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have experienced a fast development and are now employed in different research fields. The availability of 2D arrays that provide information of the interaction position in the detector has had a high interest for medical imaging. Continuous crystals combined with segmented photodetectors can provide higher efficiency than pixellated crystals and very high spatial resolution. The IRIS group at IFIC is working on the development of detector heads based on continuous crystals coupled to SiPM arrays for different applications, including a small animal PET scanner in collaboration with the Univ. of Pisa and INFN Pisa, and a Compton telescope for dose monitoring in hadron therapy. (authors)

  8. Spin analogs of superconductivity and integer quantum Hall effect in an array of spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by the successful idea of using weakly coupled quantum electronic wires to realize the quantum Hall effects and the quantum spin Hall effects, we theoretically study two systems composed of weakly coupled quantum spin chains within the mean-field approximations, which can exhibit spin analogs of superconductivity and the integer quantum Hall effect. First, a certain bilayer of two arrays of interacting spin chains is mapped, via the Jordan-Wigner transformation, to an attractive Hubbard model that exhibits fermionic superconductivity, which corresponds to spin superconductivity in the original spin Hamiltonian. Secondly, an array of spin-orbit-coupled spin chains in the presence of a suitable external magnetic field is transformed to an array of quantum wires that exhibits the integer quantum Hall effect, which translates into its spin analog in the spin Hamiltonian. The resultant spin superconductivity and spin integer quantum Hall effect can be characterized by their ability to transport spin without any resistance.

  9. Different approaches to generate matching effects using arrays in contact with superconducting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, J.; Gomez, A.; Luis-Hita, J.; Rollano, V.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Vicent, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    Superconducting films in contact with non-superconducting regular arrays can exhibit commensurability effects between the vortex lattice and the unit cell of the pinning array. These matching effects yield a slowdown of the vortex flow and the corresponding dissipation decrease. The superconducting samples are Nb films grown on Si substrates. We have studied these matching effects with the array on top, embedded or threading the Nb superconducting films and using different materials (Si, Cu, Ni, Py dots and dots fabricated with Co/Pd multilayers). These hybrids allow for studying the contribution of different pinning potentials to the matching effects. The main findings are: (i) Periodic roughness induced in the superconducting film is enough to generate resistivity minima; (ii) A minor effect is achieved by magnetic pinning from periodic magnetic field potentials obtained by dots with out of plane magnetization grown on top of the superconducting film, (iii) In the case of array of magnetic dots embedded in the films, vortex flow probes the magnetic state; i.e. magnetoresistance measurements detect the magnetic state of very small nanomagnets. In addition, we have studied the role played by the local order in the commensurability effects. This was attained using an array that mimics a smectic crystal. We have found that preserving the local order is crucial. If the local order is not retained the magnetoresistance minima vanish.

  10. Superconducting single-photon detectors for integrated quantum optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahl, Oliver

    2016-01-29

    This thesis reports on the implementation and characterization of a fully integrated single-photon detector. Several detector circuits are realized and it is shown that the detectors exhibit supreme detection performance over a wide optical spectrum. The detectors' scalability is showcased by the parallel operation of multiple detectors within a single integrated circuit. These demonstrations are essential for future developments in integrated quantum optics.

  11. FFTS readout for large arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, S J C; Baselmans, J J A; Klein, B; Güsten, R

    2009-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) have great potential for large very sensitive detector arrays for use in, for example, sub-mm imaging. Being intrinsically readout in the frequency domain, they are particularly suited for frequency domain multiplexing allowing $\\sim$1000s of devices to be readout with one pair of coaxial cables. However, this moves the complexity of the detector from the cryogenics to the warm electronics. We present here the concept and experimental demonstration of the use of Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FFTS) readout, showing no deterioration of the noise performance compared to low noise analog mixing while allowing high multiplexing ratios.

  12. Dark counts in superconducting single-photon NbN/NiCu detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, L.; Nasti, U.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Myoren, H.; Sobolewski, Roman; Pepe, G.

    2015-05-01

    Nanostripes of hybrid superconductor/ferromagnetic (S/F) NbN/NiCu bilayers and pure superconducting NbN nanostripes have been investigated in dark count experiments. Presence of a ferromagnetic layer influences the superconducting properties of the S/F bilayer, such as the critical current density and the transient photoresponse. The observed significant decrease of the dark-count rate is discussed in terms of vortex-related fluctuation models to shed more light in the intriguing question of the basic mechanism responsible for dark counts in superconducting nanostripe single photon detectors.

  13. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, S W; Austermann, J; Baildon, T; Battaglia, N; Beall, J A; Becker, D; De Bernardis, F; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Choi, S K; Coughlin, K P; Crowley, K T; Datta, R; Devlin, M J; Duff, S M; Dunner, R; Dunkley, J; van Engelen, A; Gallardo, P A; Grace, E; Hasselfield, M; Hills, F; Hilton, G C; Hincks, A D; Hlozek, R; Ho, S P; Hubmayr, J; Huffenberger, K; Hughes, J P; Irwin, K D; Koopman, B J; Kosowsky, A B; Li, D; McMahon, J; Munson, C; Nati, F; Newburgh, L; Niemack, M D; Niraula, P; Page, L A; Pappas, C G; Salatino, M; Schillaci, A; Schmitt, B L; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J L; Simon, S M; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Stevens, J R; Thornton, R; Van Lanen, J; Vavagiakis, E M; Ward, J T; Wollack, E J

    2015-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies -- imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution -- will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor (TES) polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new ...

  14. Installation and Operation of the SNO Neutral Current Detector Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    SNO Collaboration; McGee, S.; Rielage, K.

    2005-06-01

    An array of low background detectors designed to capture neutrons liberated by interactions with solar neutrinos was recently installed in the heavy water region of the SNO experiment. The neutral current detector (NCD) array consists of 36 proportional counters filled with 3He-CF4 gas and 4 proportional counters filled with 4He-CF4. Special hardware conforming to the high radiopurity requirements in SNO was used to assemble and deploy these counters. Neutron events detected by the NCD array are distinguished from various types of backgrounds on an event-by-event basis using the NCD data acquisition system (NCDDAQ), which employs a mixture of commercial and custom-built electronics equipment. The NCDDAQ is controlled by a custom-built Object-oriented Realtime Control and Acquisition (ORCA) software program, and is fully integrated into the SNO PMT data acquisition system to provide shared trigger information and a combined data stream.

  15. Installation and Operation of the SNO Neutral Current Detector Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, J. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); McGee, S. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195 (United States); Rielage, K. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    An array of low background detectors designed to capture neutrons liberated by interactions with solar neutrinos was recently installed in the heavy water region of the SNO experiment. The neutral current detector (NCD) array consists of 36 proportional counters filled with {sup 3}He-CF{sub 4} gas and 4 proportional counters filled with {sup 4}He-CF{sub 4}. Special hardware conforming to the high radiopurity requirements in SNO was used to assemble and deploy these counters. Neutron events detected by the NCD array are distinguished from various types of backgrounds on an event-by-event basis using the NCD data acquisition system (NCDDAQ), which employs a mixture of commercial and custom-built electronics equipment. The NCDDAQ is controlled by a custom-built Object-oriented Realtime Control and Acquisition (ORCA) software program, and is fully integrated into the SNO PMT data acquisition system to provide shared trigger information and a combined data stream.

  16. Prototype imaging Cd-Zn-Te array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloser, P.F.; Narita, T.; Grindlay, J.E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Shah, K. [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc., Watertown, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The authors describe initial results of their program to develop and test Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors with a pixellated array readout. Their primary interest is in the development of relatively thick CZT detectors for use in astrophysical coded aperture telescopes with response extending over the energy range {approximately}10--600 keV. The coded aperture imaging configuration requires only relatively large area pixels (1--3 mm), whereas the desired high energy response requires detector thicknesses of at least 3--5 mm. They have developed a prototype detector employing a 10 x 10 x 5 mm CZT substrate and 4 x 4 pixel (1.5 mm each) readout with gold metal contacts for the pixels and continuous gold contact for the bias on the opposite detector face. This MSM contact configuration was fabricated by RMD and tested at Harvard for uniformity, efficiency and spatial as well as spectral resolution. The authors have developed an ASIC readout (IDE-VA-1) and analysis system and report results, including {approximately}4% (FWHM) energy resolution at 60 keV. A prototype design for a full imaging detector array is discussed.

  17. Digital data acquisition for the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipschutz, S., E-mail: lipschutz@nscl.msu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Zegers, R.G.T.; Hill, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Liddick, S.N. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Noji, S., E-mail: noji@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Prokop, C.J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Scott, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Solt, M., E-mail: mrsolt@stanford.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI (United States); and others

    2016-04-11

    A digital data acquisition system (DDAS) has been implemented for the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA). LENDA is an array of 24 BC-408 plastic-scintillator bars designed to measure low-energy neutrons with kinetic energies in the range of 100 keV–10 MeV from (p,n)-type charge-exchange reactions. Compared to the previous data acquisition (DAQ) system for LENDA, DDAS offers the possibility to lower the neutron detection threshold, increase the overall neutron-detection efficiency, decrease the dead time of the system, and allow for easy expansion of the array. The system utilized in this work was XIA's Digital Gamma Finder Pixie-16 250 MHz digitizers. A detector-limited timing resolution of 400 ps was achieved for a single LENDA bar. Using DDAS, the neutron detection threshold of the system was reduced compared to the previous analog system, now reaching below 100 keV. The new DAQ system was successfully used in a recent charge-exchange experiment using the {sup 16}C(p,n) reaction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL).

  18. Investigation of spontaneous magnetization of coupled 2×2 superconducting π ring array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhuang-Zhi; Wang Fu-Ren; Yang Tao; Liu Xin-Yuan; Ma Ping; Xie Fei-Xiang; Nie Rui-Juan; Dai Yuan-Dong

    2004-01-01

    We present the theoretical investigation of spontaneous magnetization of a coupled 2 × 2 π ring array. It is indicated by free energy calculation that the system has the lowest energy when the four π rings have the full antiparallel configuration. Furthermore, the numerical evaluation results show that the system which favours full antiparallel spontaneous magnetization is a quantum effect deriving from the phase cohering of the superconducting quantum wavefunctions in the four superconducting rings through the shared Josephson junctions.

  19. New air fluorescence detectors employed in the Telescope Array experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuno, H., E-mail: htokuno@cr.phys.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Tameda, Y.; Takeda, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Kadota, K. [Tokyo City University, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ikeda, D. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fujii, T. [Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); University of Tokyo, Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Honda, K. [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Inoue, N. [Saitama University, Saitama, Saitama (Japan); Kakimoto, F. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Kawana, S. [Saitama University, Saitama, Saitama (Japan); Kido, E. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Matthews, J.N. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Nonaka, T. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Ogio, S.; Okuda, S. [Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Ozawa, S. [Waseda University, Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sagawa, H. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Sakurai, N. [Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2012-06-01

    Since 2007, the Telescope Array (TA) experiment, based in Utah, USA, has been observing ultra high energy cosmic rays to understand their origins. The experiment includes a surface detector (SD) array and three fluorescence detector (FD) stations. The FD stations, installed surrounding the SD array, measure the air fluorescence light emitted from extensive air showers (EASs) for precise determination of their energies and species. The detectors employed at one of the three FD stations were relocated from the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) experiment. At the other two stations, newly designed detectors were constructed for the TA experiment. An FD consists of a primary mirror and a camera equipped with photomultiplier tube pixels. To obtain the EAS parameters with high accuracy, understanding the FD optical characteristics is important. In this paper, we report the characteristics and installation of the new FDs and the performances of the FD components. The results of the monitored mirror reflectance during the observation time are also described in this report.

  20. Gate tunability and collapse of superconductivity in hybrid tin-graphene Josephson junction arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, Vincent

    The accessible and surface-exposed 2D electron gas offered by graphene provides indeed an ideal platform on which to tune, via application of an electrostatic gate, the coupling between adsorbates deposited on its surface. We have experimentally studied the case of graphene transistors which channel is decorated with an array of superconducting tin nanoparticles. They induce via percolation of proximity effect a global 2D superconducting state which critical temperature Tc can be tuned by gate voltage. When the Graphene show strong disorder, it is possible to tune via the applied gate voltage the system towards an insulating state, demonstrating the possibility to trigger a superconducting to insulator transition, which features ressembles those found in granular superconductors. In this work, graphene monolayers are surface-conjugated to regular arrays of superconducting disk-shaped metal islands, whose inter-island distances were patterned to be in the quasi-ballistic limit of the underlying 2D electron gas. Arrays can be made on a large range of geometry and density, up to the highly diluted limit with less than 5% surface coverage and few micrometers in between islands. In the lower temperature limit (graphene sheet. Interestingly, the superconducting state vanishes exponentially in gate voltage and rests in a metallic state, caused by quantum fluctuations of phase is found for diluted and regular arrays. This peculiar behaviour provides evidence for recently developed theory, and may provide a hint to the understanding of long-standing issue of ``zero-temperature'' bosonic metallic state

  1. A THz Superconducting Imaging Array Developed for the DATE5 Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sheng-Cai; Zhang, Wen; Li, Jing; Miao, Wei; Lin, Zhen-Hui; Lou, Zheng; Yao, Qi-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Dome A in Antarctica, located at an altitude of 4093 m and with very low temperature in winter down to -83^{circ }C, is an exceptionally dry site. Measurements of the atmospheric transmission in the range of 0.75-15 THz by a Far-infrared/THz Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) strongly suggest that Dome A is a unique site for ground-based THz observations, especially for the 200- and 350-micron windows. A 5-m THz telescope (DATE5) is therefore proposed for Chinese Antarctic Kunlun Observatory. We are currently developing a THz superconducting imaging array (TeSIA) for the DATE5. The TeSIA will be working at the 350-\\upmu m window, with a pixel number of 32 × 32 and a sensitivity (NEP) of ˜ 10^{-16} W/Hz^{0.5}. Ti transition-edge sensors with time-domain multiplexing and TiN microwave kinetic inductance detectors with frequency-domain multiplexing are both developed for the TeSIA. In this paper, detailed system designs and some measurement results will be presented.

  2. High field matching effects in superconducting Nb porous arrays catalyzed from anodic alumina templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinckx, W.; Vanacken, J.; Moshchalkov, V.V.;

    2007-01-01

    Vortex pinning in a superconducting Nb thin film deposited on an anodically grown alumina template is investigated. Anodic oxidation of aluminium layers permits under specific conditions the formation of highly ordered porous alumina, a membrane-like structure consisting of triangular arrays...... of parallel pores. Its pore diameter and interpore distance are set by careful tuning of the anodization parameters. A superconducting Nb thin film is deposited directly onto the alumina film. The porous alumina acts as a template and it allows Nb to form a periodic pinning array during its growth. Pinning...

  3. Saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaocong; Sun, Shiyi; Kuang, Cuifang; Ge, Baoliang; Wang, Wensheng; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (vFED) has been proposed recently to enhance the lateral resolution of confocal microscopy with a detector array, implemented by scanning a doughnut-shaped pattern. Theoretically, the resolution can be enhanced by around 1.3-fold compared with that in confocal microscopy. For further improvement of the resolving ability of vFED, a novel method is presented utilizing fluorescence saturation for super-resolution imaging, which we called saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (svFED). With a point detector array, matched solid and hollow point spread functions (PSF) can be obtained by photon reassignment, and the difference results between them can be used to boost the transverse resolution. Results show that the diffraction barrier can be surpassed by at least 34% compared with that in vFED and the resolution is around 2-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy.

  4. Shielding optimization studies for the detector systems of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    Preliminary shielding optimization studies for the Superconducting Super Collider`s Solenoidal Detector Collaboration detector system were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1993. The objective of the study was to reduce the neutron and gamma-ray fluxes leaving the shield to a level that resulted in insignificant effects on the functionality of the detector system. Steel and two types of concrete were considered as components of the shield, and the shield was optimized according to thickness, weight, and cost. Significant differences in the thicknesses, weights, and costs were noted for the three optimization parameters. Results from the study are presented.

  5. UV-sensitive superconducting nanowire single photon detectors for integration in an ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Slichter, D H; Leibfried, D; Mirin, R P; Nam, S W; Wineland, D J

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate superconducting nanowire single photon detectors with 76 +/- 4 % system detection efficiency at a wavelength of 315 nm and an operating temperature of 3.2 K, with a background count rate below 1 count per second at saturated detection efficiency. We propose integrating these detectors into planar surface electrode radio-frequency Paul traps for use in trapped ion quantum information processing. We operate detectors integrated into test ion trap structures at 3.8 K both with and without typical radio-frequency trapping electric fields. The trapping fields reduce system detection efficiency by 9 %, but do not increase background count rates.

  6. The Telescope Array Middle Drum fluorescence detector simulation on GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Zayyad, Tareq; Telescope-Array Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been recognized and widely used as an accelerator for many scientific calculations. In general, problems amenable to parallelization are ones that benefit most from the use of GPUs. The Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence detector response to air showers presents many opportunities for parallelization. In this paper we report on a Monte Carlo program used for the simulation of the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detector located at the Middle Drum site which uses GPU acceleration. All of the physics simulation from shower development, light production and atmospheric attenuation, as well as, the realistic detector optics and electronics simulations are done on the GPU. A detailed description of the code implementation is given, and results on the accuracy and performance of the simulation are presented as well. Improvements in computational throughput in excess of 50× are reported and the accuracy of the results is on par with the CPU implementation of the simulation.

  7. Imaging MAMA detector systems. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  8. READOUT SYSTEM FOR ARRAYS OF FRISCH-RING CDZNTE DETECTORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CUI, Y.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; DE GERONIMO, G.; O' CONNOR, P.; JAMES, R.B.; KARGAR, A.; HARRISON, M.J.; MCGREGOR, D.S.

    2006-10-29

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution for identifying isotopes, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. We will fabricate and test at Brookhaven National Laboratory an integrated module of a 64-element array of 6 x 6 x 12 mm{sup 3} Frisch-ring detectors, coupled with a readout electronics system. It supports 64 readout channels, and includes front-end electronics, signal processing circuit, USB interface and high-voltage power supply. The data-acquisition software is used to process the data stream, which includes amplitude and timing information for each detected event. This paper describes the design and assembly of the detector modules, readout electronics, and a conceptual prototype system. Some test results are also reported.

  9. The detector calibration system for the CUORE cryogenic bolometer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Jeremy S.; Dally, Adam; Davis, Christopher J.; Ejzak, Larissa; Lenz, Daniel; Lim, Kyungeun E.; Heeger, Karsten M.; Maruyama, Reina H.; Nucciotti, Angelo; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Wise, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te and other rare events. The CUORE detector consists of 988 TeO2 bolometers operated underground at 10 mK in a dilution refrigerator at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Candidate events are identified through a precise measurement of their energy. The absolute energy response of the detectors is established by the regular calibration of each individual bolometer using gamma sources. The close-packed configuration of the CUORE bolometer array combined with the extensive shielding surrounding the detectors requires the placement of calibration sources within the array itself. The CUORE Detector Calibration System is designed to insert radioactive sources into and remove them from the cryostat while respecting the stringent heat load, radiopurity, and operational requirements of the experiment. This paper describes the design, commissioning, and performance of this novel source calibration deployment system for ultra-low-temperature environments.

  10. Development and Production of Array Barrier Detectors at SCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Benny, Y.; Berkowicz, E.; Cohen, Y.; Dobromislin, R.; Fraenkel, R.; Gershon, G.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Ilan, E.; Karni, Y.; Klin, O.; Kodriano, Y.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nevo, I.; Nitzani, M.; Pivnik, I.; Rappaport, N.; Rosenberg, O.; Shtrichman, I.; Shkedy, L.; Snapi, N.; Talmor, R.; Tessler, R.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2017-09-01

    XB n or XB p barrier detectors exhibit diffusion-limited dark currents comparable with mercury cadmium telluride Rule-07 and high quantum efficiencies. In 2011, SemiConductor Devices (SCD) introduced "HOT Pelican D", a 640 × 512/15- μm pitch InAsSb/AlSbAs XB n mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detector with a 4.2- μm cut-off and an operating temperature of ˜150 K. Its low power (˜3 W), high pixel operability (>99.5%) and long mean time to failure make HOT Pelican D a highly reliable integrated detector-cooler product with a low size, weight and power. More recently, "HOT Hercules" was launched with a 1280 × 1024/15- μm format and similar advantages. A 3-megapixel, 10- μm pitch version ("HOT Blackbird") is currently completing development. For long-wave infrared applications, SCD's 640 × 512/15- μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" XB p type II superlattice (T2SL) detector has a ˜9.3- μm cut-off wavelength. The detector contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, and is fabricated into focal plane array (FPA) detectors using standard production processes including hybridization to a digital silicon read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), glue underfill and substrate thinning. The ROIC has been designed so that the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector family. The Pelican-D LW FPA has a quantum efficiency of ˜50%, and operates at 77 K with a pixel operability of >99% and noise equivalent temperature difference of 13 mK at 30 Hz and F/2.7.

  11. Superconducting detector of IR single-photons based on thin WSi films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, V. A.; Divochiy, A. V.; Vakhtomin, Yu B.; Morozov, P. V.; Zolotov, P. I.; Vasil'ev, D. D.; Moiseev, K. M.; Malevannaya, E. I.; Smirnov, K. V.

    2016-08-01

    We have developed the deposition technology of WSi thin films 4 to 9 nm thick with high temperature values of superconducting transition (Tc~4 K). Based on deposed films there were produced nanostructures with indicative planar sizes ~100 nm, and the research revealed that even on nanoscale the films possess of high critical temperature values of the superconducting transition (Tc~3.3-3.7 K) which certifies high quality and homogeneity of the films created. The first experiments on creating superconducting single-photon detectors showed that the detectors’ SDE (system detection efficiency) with increasing bias current (I b) reaches a constant value of ~30% (for X=1.55 micron) defined by infrared radiation absorption by the superconducting structure. To enhance radiation absorption by the superconductor there were created detectors with cavity structures which demonstrated a practically constant value of quantum efficiency >65% for bias currents Ib>0.6-Ic. The minimal dark counts level (DC) made 1 s-1 limited with background noise. Hence WSi is the most promising material for creating single-photon detectors with record SDE/DC ratio and noise equivalent power (NEP).

  12. Muon-hadron detector of the carpet-2 array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhappuev, D. D.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Klimenko, N. F.

    2016-05-01

    The 1-GeV muon-hadron detector of the Carpet-2 multipurpose shower array at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory, Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences (INR, Moscow, Russia) is able to record simultaneously muons and hadrons. The procedure developed for this device makes it possible to separate the muon and hadron components to a high degree of precision. The spatial and energy features of the muon and hadron extensive-air-shower components are presented. Experimental data from the Carpet-2 array are contrasted against data from the EAS-TOP and KASCADE arrays and against the results of the calculations based on the CORSIKA (GHEISHA + QGSJET01) code package and performed for primary protons and iron nuclei.

  13. Cryogenic time-domain multiplexer based on SQUID arrays and superconducting/normal conducting switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beev, N.; Kiviranta, M.; van der Kuur, J.; Bruijn, M.; Brandel, O.; Linzen, S.; Fritzsch, L.; Ahoranta, J.; Penttilä, J.; Roschier, L.

    2014-05-01

    We have demonstrated the operation of a 12-channel Beyer-style SQUID-based time domain multiplexer. It was manufactured using a fabrication process that is cross-compatible between VTT and IPHT-Jena. The multiplexer consists of twelve 12-SQUID series arrays, each shunted by a Zappe-style interferometer array acting as a flux-controlled superconducting/normal conducting switch. By keeping all switches but one in the superconducting state, it is possible to select one active readout channel at a time. A flux feedback coil common to all SQUID arrays allows realization of a flux-locked loop. We present characteristics of the multiplexer and measurement data from experiments with a 25-pixel X-ray calorimeter array operated at T < 100 mK in a dilution refrigerator.

  14. Characterization of a Prototype TES-Based Anti-coincidence Detector for Use with Future X-ray Calorimeter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, S. E.; Yoon, W. S.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lee, S.-J.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2016-07-01

    For future X-ray observatories utilizing transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, an anti-coincidence detector (anti-co) is required to discriminate X-ray (˜ 0.1-10 keV) signals from non-X-ray background events, such as ionizing particles. We have developed a prototype anti-co that utilizes TESs, which will be compatible with the TES focal-plane arrays planned for future X-ray observatories. This anti-co is based upon the cryogenic dark matter search II detector design. It is a silicon wafer covered with superconducting collection fins and TES microcalorimeters. Minimum ionizing particles deposit energy while passing through the silicon. The athermal phonons produced by these events are absorbed in the superconducting fins, breaking Cooper pairs. The resulting quasiparticles diffuse along the superconducting fin, producing a signal when they reach the TES. By determining a correlation between detections in the anti-co and the X-ray detector one can identify and flag these background events. We have fabricated and tested a single-channel prototype anti-co device on a 1.5 × 1.9 cm^2 chip. We have measured the signals in this device from photons of several energies between 1.5 and 60 keV, as well as laboratory background events, demonstrating a threshold ˜ 100 times lower than is needed to detect minimum ionizing particles.

  15. Mechanical design and development of TES bolometer detector arrays for the Advanced ACTPol experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan T; Beall, James A; Choi, Steve K; Crowley, Kevin T; Devlin, Mark J; Duff, Shannon M; Gallardo, Patricio M; Henderson, Shawn W; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Simon, Sara M; Staggs, Suzanne T; Thornton, Robert; Ullom, Joel N; Vavagiakis, Eve M; Wollack, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling ~5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline profile leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at t...

  16. A new detector array for charged particle spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cowin, R L; Chappell, S P G; Clarke, N M; Freer, M; Fulton, B R; Cunningham, R A; Curtis, N; Dillon, G; Lilley, J; Jones, C D; Lee, P; Rae, W D M

    1999-01-01

    A compact and highly segmented detector array consisting of 44 gas-silicon-caesium iodide, position sensitive, particle identification detector telescopes and up to 10 position-sensitive, silicon strip detectors has been constructed for the study of light-ion-heavy-ion reactions including cluster break-up in the energy range 5-15 MeV/nucleon. The detectors are housed in a purpose built vacuum chamber. The telescopes are placed in fixed positions, covering the forward hemisphere from 3 to 30 deg. in the laboratory with the target placed at 535 mm from the front of the telescopes or 6-52 deg. with the target placed at 215 mm. The strip detectors are placed in any of 30 fixed positions in the forward hemisphere. For 85 MeV sup 1 sup 2 C ions the telescope energy resolution (gas plus silicon) is 345 keV with an angular resolution of 0.03 deg. . Using the gas-silicon section ions with Z up to 21 can be identified. For ions that pass through the silicon isotopic identification is achieved using the silicon-CsI comb...

  17. Prototype Imaging Cd-Zn-Te Array Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Grindlay, J E; Shah, K

    1998-01-01

    We describe initial results of our program to develop and test Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors with a pixellated array readout. Our primary interest is in the development of relatively thick CZT detectors for use in astrophysical coded aperture telescopes with response extending over the energy range $\\sim 10-600$ keV. The coded aperture imaging configuration requires only relatively large area pixels (1-3 mm), whereas the desired high energy response requires detector thicknesses of at least 3-5 mm. We have developed a prototype detector employing a 10 x 10 x 5 mm CZT substrate and 4 x 4 pixel (1.5 mm each) readout with gold metal contacts for the pixels and continuous gold contact for the bias on the opposite detector face. This MSM contact configuration was fabricated by RMD and tested at Harvard for uniformity, efficiency and spatial as well as spectral resolution. We have developed an ASIC readout (IDE-VA-1) and analysis system and report results, including $\\sim 4$% (FWHM) energy resolution at 60 keV. A protot...

  18. Superconducting microstrip detectors Addendum to proposal DRDC-P-53

    CERN Document Server

    Borer, K; Palmieri, V G; Pretzl, Klaus P; Li, Z; Heijne, Erik H M; Lourenço, C; Niinikoski, T O; Ropotar, I; Sonderegger, P; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, Mara; Pirollo, S; Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; Bell, W; Smith, K; Berglund, P; Koivuniemi, J H; Valtonen, M J; Mukhanov, O; de Boer, Wim; Grigoriev, E; Heising, S; Casagrande, L; Cindro, V; Mikuz, M; Zavrtanik, M; Da Vià, C; Konorov, I; Paul, S; Buontempo, S; D'Ambrosio, N; Granata, V; Pagano, S; Ruggiero, G; Takada, S; Esposito, A P; Salmi, J; Seppä, H; Suni, I; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1999-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result. Several CERN experiments are potential users of cold radiation hard tracking devices. The first goal of the proposed extension of the RD39 programme is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particu...

  19. Topological detector: measuring continuous dosimetric quantities with few-element detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaohui; Brivio, Davide; Sajo, Erno; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2016-08-21

    A prototype topological detector was fabricated and investigated for quality assurance of radiation producing medical devices. Unlike a typical array or flat panel detector, a topological detector, while capable of achieving a very high spatial resolution, consists of only a few elements and therefore is much simpler in construction and more cost effective. The key feature allowing this advancement is a geometry-driven design that is customized for a specific dosimetric application. In the current work, a topological detector of two elements was examined for the positioning verification of the radiation collimating devices (jaws, MLCs, and blades etc). The detector was diagonally segmented from a rectangular thin film strip (2.5 cm  ×  15 cm), giving two contiguous but independent detector elements. The segmented area was the central portion of the strip measuring 5 cm in length. Under irradiation, signals from each detector element were separately digitized using a commercial multichannel data acquisition system. The center and size of an x-ray field, which were uniquely determined by the collimator positions, were shown mathematically to relate to the difference and sum of the two signals. As a proof of concept, experiments were carried out using slit x-ray fields ranging from 2 mm to 20 mm in size. It was demonstrated that, the collimator positions can be accurately measured with sub-millimeter precisions.

  20. Topological detector: measuring continuous dosimetric quantities with few-element detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaohui; Brivio, Davide; Sajo, Erno; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    A prototype topological detector was fabricated and investigated for quality assurance of radiation producing medical devices. Unlike a typical array or flat panel detector, a topological detector, while capable of achieving a very high spatial resolution, consists of only a few elements and therefore is much simpler in construction and more cost effective. The key feature allowing this advancement is a geometry-driven design that is customized for a specific dosimetric application. In the current work, a topological detector of two elements was examined for the positioning verification of the radiation collimating devices (jaws, MLCs, and blades etc). The detector was diagonally segmented from a rectangular thin film strip (2.5 cm  ×  15 cm), giving two contiguous but independent detector elements. The segmented area was the central portion of the strip measuring 5 cm in length. Under irradiation, signals from each detector element were separately digitized using a commercial multichannel data acquisition system. The center and size of an x-ray field, which were uniquely determined by the collimator positions, were shown mathematically to relate to the difference and sum of the two signals. As a proof of concept, experiments were carried out using slit x-ray fields ranging from 2 mm to 20 mm in size. It was demonstrated that, the collimator positions can be accurately measured with sub-millimeter precisions.

  1. Characterization of NbN films for superconducting nanowire single photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcdonald, Ross D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ayala - Valenzuela, Oscar E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weisse - Bernstein, Nina R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williamson, Todd L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoffbauer, M. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graf, M. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabin, M. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-14

    Nanoscopic superconducting meander patterns offer great promise as a new class of cryogenic radiation sensors capable of single photon detection. To realize this potential, control of the superconducting properties on the nanoscale is imperative. To this end, Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors (SNSPDs) are under development by means Energetic Neutral Atom Beam Lithography and Epitaxy, or ENABLE. ENABLE can growth highly-crystalline, epitaxial thin-film materials, like NbN, at low temperatures; such wide-ranging control of fabrication parameters is enabling the optimization of film properties for single photon detection. T{sub c}, H{sub c2}, {zeta}{sub GL} and J{sub c} of multiple thin films and devices have been studied as a function of growth conditions. The optimization of which has already produced devices with properties rivaling all reports in the existing literature.

  2. Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, David M.; Hancock, Bruce R.; Key, Richard W.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Wrigley, Chris J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sander, Stanley P.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.

    2013-01-01

    The GEO-CAPE mission described in NASA's Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey requires high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution measurements to monitor and characterize the rapidly changing chemistry of the troposphere over North and South Americas. High-frame-rate focal plane arrays (FPAs) with many pixels are needed to enable such measurements. A high-throughput digital detector readout integrated circuit (ROIC) that meets the GEO-CAPE FPA needs has been developed, fabricated, and tested. The ROIC is based on an innovative charge integrating, fast, high-precision analog-to-digital circuit that is built into each pixel. The 128×128-pixel ROIC digitizes all 16,384 pixels simultaneously at frame rates up to 16 kHz to provide a completely digital output on a single integrated circuit at an unprecedented rate of 262 million pixels per second. The approach eliminates the need for off focal plane electronics, greatly reducing volume, mass, and power compared to conventional FPA implementations. A focal plane based on this ROIC will require less than 2 W of power on a 1×1-cm integrated circuit. The ROIC is fabricated of silicon using CMOS technology. It is designed to be indium bump bonded to a variety of detector materials including silicon PIN diodes, indium antimonide (InSb), indium gallium arsenide (In- GaAs), and mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) detector arrays to provide coverage over a broad spectral range in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet spectral ranges.

  3. LENDA, a Low Energy Neutron Detector Array for experiments with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Perdikakis, G; Austin, Sam M; Bazin, D; Caesar, C; Cannon, S; Deaven, J M; Doster, H J; Guess, C J; Hitt, G W; Marks, J; Meharchand, R; Nguyen, D T; Peterman, D; Prinke, A; Scott, M; Shimbara, Y; Thorne, K; Valdez, L; Zegers, R G T

    2011-01-01

    The Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) is a neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab- oratory (NSCL) for use in inverse kinematics experiments with rare isotope beams. Its design has been motivated by the need to study the spin-isospin response of unstable nuclei using (p, n) charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies (> 100 MeV/u). It can be used, however, for any reaction study that involves emission of low energy neutrons (150 keV - 10 MeV). The array consists of 24 plastic scintillator bars and is capable of registering the recoiling neutron energy and angle with high detection efficiency. The neutron energy is determined by the time-of-flight technique, while the position of interaction is deduced using the timing and energy information from the two photomultipliers of each bar. A simple test setup utilizing radioactive sources has been used to characterize the array. Results of test measurements are compared with simulations. A neut...

  4. LENDA: A low energy neutron detector array for experiments with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdikakis, G., E-mail: perdikak@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Sasano, M.; Austin, Sam M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Caesar, C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Cannon, S. [Hastings College, Hastings, NE 68901 (United States); Deaven, J.M.; Doster, H.J.; Guess, C.J.; Hitt, G.W. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Marks, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Meharchand, R. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Nguyen, D.T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Peterman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); and others

    2012-09-11

    The Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) is a neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) for use in inverse kinematics experiments with rare isotope beams. Its design has been motivated by the need to study the spin-isospin response of unstable nuclei using (p,n) charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies (>100MeV/u). It can be used, however, for any reaction study that involves emission of low energy neutrons (150 keV to 10 MeV). The array consists of 24 plastic scintillator bars and is capable of registering the recoiling neutron energy and angle with high detection efficiency. The neutron energy is determined by the time-of-flight technique, while the position of interaction is deduced using the timing and energy information from the two photomultipliers of each bar. A simple test setup utilizing radioactive sources has been used to characterize the array. Results of test measurements are compared with simulations. A neutron energy threshold of <150keV, an intrinsic time (position) resolution of {approx} 400 ps ({approx} 6 cm) and an efficiency >20% for neutrons below 4 MeV have been obtained.

  5. Standard practice for radiological examination using digital detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice establishes the minimum requirements for radiological examination for metallic and nonmetallic material using a digital detector array (DDA) system. 1.2 The requirements in this practice are intended to control the quality of radiologic images and are not intended to establish acceptance criteria for parts or materials. 1.3 This practice covers the radiologic examination with DDAs including DDAs described in Practice E2597 such as a device that contains a photoconductor attached to a Thin Film Transistor (TFT) read out structure, a device that has a phosphor coupled directly to an amorphous silicon read-out structure, and devices where a phosphor is coupled to a CMOS (Complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor) array, a Linear Detector Array (LDA) or a CCD (charge coupled device) crystalline silicon read-out structure. 1.4 The DDA shall be selected for an NDT application based on knowledge of the technology described in Guide , and of the selected DDA properties provided by the manufactu...

  6. Development of superconducting Klystron cavity for the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liccardo, Vincenzo; de França, Enrique Klai

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting reentrant cavities can be used in parametric transducers for Gravitational Wave antennas. The Mario Schenberg detector, which is being built by the GRAVITON group at Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), basically consists of a resonant mass (ball) and a set of parametric transducers in order to monitor the fundamental modes of vibration. When coupled to the antenna, the transducer-sphere system will work as a mass-spring system. In this work the main task is the development of parametric transducers consisting of reentrant superconducting cavity with high performance to be implemented in the Mario Schenberg detector. Many geometries, materials and designs have been tested and compared to optimize parameters such as electric and mechanical Q-factor. The aim is the construction of a complete set of nine parametric transducers that, attached to the spherical antenna, will possibly reach the sensitivity $h$ $\\sim$ 10$^{-22}$ $Hz$$^{-1/2}$ in the near future.

  7. Quantum phase-slips in superconducting AlO{sub x} nanowire arrays at microwave frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skacel, Sebastian T.; Pfirrmann, Marco; Voss, Jan N.; Muenzberg, Julian; Radtke, Lucas; Probst, Sebastian; Rotzinger, Hannes [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weides, Martin [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Mooij, Hans E. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Ustinov, Alexey V. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Russian Quantum Center, 100 Novaya St., Skolkovo, Moscow region, 143025 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    Superconducting nanowires in the quantum phase slip (QPS) regime allow to study the flux and phase dynamics in duality to Josephson junction systems. However, due to the vanishing self-capacitance of the nanowires, the microwave response significantly differs. We experimentally study parallel arrays of nanowires which are embedded in a resonant circuit at GHz frequencies. The samples are probed at ultra-low microwave power and applied magnetic field at mK temperatures. The AlO{sub x} nanowires, with a sheet resistance in the kΩ range, are fabricated by sputter deposition of aluminium in a controlled oxygen atmosphere. The wires are defined with conventional electron beam lithography down to a width of approximately 15 nm. We present the fabrication of the nanowire arrays and measurement results for arrays coupled to superconducting microwave resonators.

  8. Probing the Hotspot Interaction Length in NbN Nanowire Superconducting Single-Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Renema, J J; Wang, Q; van Exter, M P; Fiore, A; de Dood, M J A

    2016-01-01

    We measure the maximal distance at which two absorbed photons can jointly trigger a detection event in NbN nanowire superconducting single photon detector (SSPD) microbridges by comparing the one-photon and two-photon efficiency of bridges of different overall lengths, from 0 to 400 nm. We find a length of $23 \\pm 2$ nm. This value is in good agreement with to size of the quasiparticle cloud at the time of the detection event.

  9. Promising X-ray fluorescent tests for superconducting tunnel junction detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Robinson, Art

    2001-01-11

    Scientists in the Physical Biosciences Division of the Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) studying transition metals in proteins with fluorescence-detected L-edge absorption spectroscopy have found the measurements to be extremely challenging. The difficulty is that the metal centers are present in very dilute concentrations so that their weak fluorescence is often obscured by strong background signals from carbon and oxygen. To solve this problem, the Berkeley group has been working with researchers from the Advanced Detector Group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on an energy-dispersive superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector. These devices in principle have the energy resolution needed to reveal the metal signal. The most recent results with the latest version of the detector on Beamline 4.0.1-2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) illustrate the promise of the cryogenic detector strategy not only for this application but also for spectroscopy of other types of dilute samples.

  10. Single-photon source characterization with infrared-sensitive superconducting single-photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hadfield, R H; Nam, S W; Stevens, M J; Hadfield, Robert H.; Mirin, Richard P.; Nam, Sae Woo; Stevens, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    Single-photon sources and detectors are key enabling technologies in quantum information processing. Nanowire-based superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) offer single-photon detection from the visible well into the infrared with low dark counts, low jitter and short dead times. We report on the high fidelity characterization (via antibunching and spontaneous emission lifetime measurements) of a cavity-coupled single-photon source at 902 nm using a pair of SSPDs. The twin SSPD scheme reported here is well-suited to the characterization of single-photon sources at telecom wavelengths (1310 nm, 1550 nm).

  11. Optically probing the detection mechanism in a molybdenum silicide superconducting nanowire single-photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Caloz, Misael; Timoney, Nuala; Weiss, Markus; Gariglio, Stefano; Warburton, Richard J; Schönenberger, Christian; Renema, Jelmer; Zbinden, Hugo; Bussieres, Felix

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the detection mechanism in a meandered molybdenum silicide (MoSi) superconducting nanowire single-photon detector by characterising the detection probability as a function of bias current in the wavelength range of 750 to 2050 nm. Contrary to some previous observations on niobium nitride (NbN) or tungsten silicide (WSi) detectors, we find that the energy-current relation is nonlinear in this range. Furthermore, thanks to the presence of a saturated detection efficiency over the whole range of wavelengths, we precisely quantify the shape of the curves. This allows a detailed study of their features, which are indicative of both Fano fluctuations and position-dependent effects.

  12. Strengthening Superconductivity in Macro-Arrays of Nanoclusters and Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    into the field of superconductivity (Figure 1.2). Kamerlingh Onnes’ great achievement was reaching 4.2 K with helium , as his discovery of zero...and TE102 cavity. Temperature control is achieved by a ColdEdge cryogen-free cryostat, capable of reaching T = 4 K by a flow of helium transfer gas...chamber. The FeSe0.1Te0.9 thin films were deposited at 400°C on single crystal STO (001) and glass substrates with a KrF excimer laser (Lambda

  13. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  14. Superconducting MgB{sub 2} films as radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Takekazu; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Kato, Masaru [Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan); Miki, Shigehito; Shimakage, Hisashi; Wang, Zhen [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Hyogo (Japan); Satoh, Kazuo; Yotsuya, Tsutomu [Technology Research Institute of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan); Machida, Masahiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The thermal response of a membrane-structured MgB{sub 2} film can be used to detect various sorts of radiations. High-quality MgB{sub 2} films were prepared by a sputtering technique. The MgB{sub 2} radiation detector consisted of an MgB{sub 2} thin-film meander line on a 0.5-{mu}m-thick SiN membrane. The detector devices were placed in a 4 K refrigerator, and the operating temperature was controlled at a certain temperature below T{sub c}. Light from a 20-ps pulsed laser directly irradiated the MgB{sub 2} device; the end of the optical fiber was fixed in front of the device. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and a GP-IB attenuator were used to control the laser power, and the output voltage was observed through a low-noise amplifier by using a digital oscilloscope. The output signals caused by thermal response were clearly observed. Systematic studies of the output signals were conducted, and effects of device design, dc bias conditions, bias temperature, and input laser power were considered. We report the out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics, which was investigated by means of extensive computer simulations based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations, thermodynamics, and electrodynamics. Large-scale calculations were carried out under the realistic conditions of actual devices by using an Earth Simulator (ES). One attractive application is to use the device as a novel neutron detector by employing the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction with a local energy release of 2.3 MeV.

  15. High-Speed, Low Power 256 Channel Gamma Radiation Array Detector ASIC Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building on prior success in detector electronics, we propose to design and fabricate a 256 channel readout ASIC for solid state gamma radiation array detectors...

  16. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Y; Sauvestre, J E; Maréchal, F; Ottini, S; Alamanos, N; Barbier, A; Beaumel, D; Bonnereau, B; Charlet, D; Clavelin, J F; Courtat, P; Delbourgo-Salvador, P; Douet, R; Engrand, M; Ethvignot, T; Gillibert, A; Khan, E; Lapoux, V; Lagoyannis, A; Lavergne, L; Lebon, S; Lelong, P; Lesage, A; Le Ven, V; Lhenry, I; Martin, J M; Musumarra, A; Pita, S; Petizon, L; Pollacco, E; Pouthas, J; Richard, A; Rougier, D; Santonocito, D; Scarpaci, J A; Sida, J L; Soulet, C; Stutzmann, J S; Suomijärvi, T; Szmigiel, M; Volkov, P; Voltolini, G

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm sup 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and a...

  17. In-line X-slot element focal plane array of kinetic inductance detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacono, A.; Freni, A.; Neto, A.; Gerini, G.

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic Inductance Detectors are very promising THz imaging devices to be used in Focal Plane Array configuration. In this work a new antenna feed element has been studied and optimized. Preliminary results on array configuration are also shown.

  18. Capillary Array Waveguide Amplified Fluorescence Detector for mHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2013-09-01

    array can potentially be used for sensitive analysis of multiple fluorescent detection assays simultaneously. The simple phone based capillary array approach presented in this paper is capable of amplifying weak fluorescent signals thereby improving the sensitivity of optical detectors based on mobile phones. This may allow sensitive biological assays to be measured with low sensitivity detectors and may make mHealth practical for many diagnostics applications, especially in resource-poor and global health settings.

  19. Antenna coupled detectors for 2D staring focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritz, Michael A.; Kolasa, Borys; Lail, Brian; Burkholder, Robert; Chen, Leonard

    2013-06-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmW)/sub-mmW/THz region of the electro-magnetic spectrum enables imaging thru clothing and other obscurants such as fog, clouds, smoke, sand, and dust. Therefore considerable interest exists in developing low cost millimeter-wave imaging (MMWI) systems. Previous MMWI systems have evolved from crude mechanically scanned, single element receiver systems into very complex multiple receiver camera systems. Initial systems required many expensive mmW integrated-circuit low-noise amplifiers. In order to reduce the cost and complexity of the existing systems, attempts have been made to develop new mmW imaging sensors employing direct detection arrays. In this paper, we report on Raytheon's recent development of a unique focal plane array technology, which operates broadly from the mmW through the sub-mmW/THz region. Raytheon's innovative nano-antenna based detector enables low cost production of 2D staring mmW focal plane arrays (mmW FPA), which not only have equivalent sensitivity and performance to existing MMWI systems, but require no mechanical scanning.

  20. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Lab, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op ' t; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A. [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sahin, D. [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Centre for Quantum Photonics, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Driessen, E. F. C. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPSMS, 38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPSMS, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  1. Free-space-coupled superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors for infrared optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellei, Francesco; Cartwright, Alyssa P; McCaughan, Adam N; Dane, Andrew E; Najafi, Faraz; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-02-22

    This paper describes the construction of a cryostat and an optical system with a free-space coupling efficiency of 56.5% ± 3.4% to a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) for infrared quantum communication and spectrum analysis. A 1K pot decreases the base temperature to T = 1.7 K from the 2.9 K reached by the cold head cooled by a pulse-tube cryocooler. The minimum spot size coupled to the detector chip was 6.6 ± 0.11 µm starting from a fiber source at wavelength, λ = 1.55 µm. We demonstrated photon counting on a detector with an 8 × 7.3 µm2 area. We measured a dark count rate of 95 ± 3.35 kcps and a system detection efficiency of 1.64% ± 0.13%. We explain the key steps that are required to improve further the coupling efficiency.

  2. High Density Planar High Temperature Superconducting Josephson Junctions Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    TIT,) 3 dependance . At lower temperatures it follows a (1 - T/T,)2 depen- dance ........ ................................... 57 4.7 Shapiro steps in...70 4.23 Dependance of the critical current for a ten junction array on mi- crowave power ..................................... 71 4.24 Resistance vs...GHz microwave radiation. (b) Microwave power dependance of the critical current and 1st-order Shapiro step. 76 5.2 (a) Single junction critical current

  3. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  4. Nb(x)Ti(1-x)N Superconducting-Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jeffrey A.; Farr, William H.; Leduc, Henry G.; Bumble, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in which Nb(x)Ti(1-x)N (where xcryptography. Nb(x)Ti(1-x)N is a solid solution of NbN and TiN, and has many properties similar to those of NbN. It has been found to be generally easier to stabilize Nb(x)Ti(1-x)N in the high-superconducting-transition temperature phase than it is to so stabilize NbN. In addition, the resistivity and penetration depth of polycrystalline films of Nb(x)Ti(1-x)N have been found to be much smaller than those of films of NbN. These differences have been hypothesized to be attributable to better coupling at grain boundaries within Nb(x)Ti(1-x)N films.

  5. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  6. Matrix-addressed x-ray detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Robert A.; Apte, Raj B.; Boyce, James B.; Ho, Jackson; Lau, Rachel; Lemmi, Francesco; Lu, Jeng-Ping; Mulato, Marcelo; Ready, Steve E.; Van Schuylenbergh, Koenraad

    2000-11-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) technology has created a successful manufacturing business for large area active matrix arrays, of which liquid crystal displays (AMLCD) are the best known, and image sensors are an emerging technology for medical x-ray imaging. The large area, flat plate, format is the key feature of the technology that sets it apart from other digital imaging approaches. The principal requirements for medical imaging are sensitivity and high dynamic range. A-Si:H detectors have already proved to perform at least as well as x-ray film for radiographic applications and comparable to image intensifiers for fluoroscopy. There are several approaches to improving the performance of the image sensors is order to achieve higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution. This paper describes some of these approaches.

  7. Gamma Ray Array Detector Trigger Sub-System

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong-Wei, Du; Yi, Qian; KongJie,

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Array Detector (GRAD) is one of External Target Facility (ETF) subsystems at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou. The trigger subsystem of the GRAD has been developed based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) and PXI interface. The GRAD trigger subsystem makes prompt L1 trigger decisions to select valid events. These decisions are made by processing the hit signals from 1024 CsI scintillators of the GRAD. According to the physical requirements, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates 12-bit trigger signals that are passed to the ETF global trigger system. In addition, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates trigger data that are packed and transmitted to the host computer via PXI bus for off-line analysis. The trigger processing is implemented in the front-end electronics and one FPGA of the trigger module. The logic of PXI transmission and reconfiguration is implemented in the other FPGA of the trigger module. The reliable and efficient performance in the Gamma-ray experiments demonstrates th...

  8. Coherent detection of weak signals with superconducting nanowire single photon detector at the telecommunication wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbatenko, M.; Lobanov, Y.; Semenov, A.; Kovalyuk, V.; Korneev, A.; Ozhegov, R.; Kaurova, N.; Voronov, B.; Goltsman, G.

    2017-05-01

    Achievement of the ultimate sensitivity along with a high spectral resolution is one of the frequently addressed problems, as the complication of the applied and fundamental scientific tasks being explored is growing up gradually. In our work, we have investigated performance of a superconducting nanowire photon-counting detector operating in the coherent mode for detection of weak signals at the telecommunication wavelength. Quantum-noise limited sensitivity of the detector was ensured by the nature of the photon-counting detection and restricted by the quantum efficiency of the detector only. Spectral resolution given by the heterodyne technique and was defined by the linewidth and stability of the Local Oscillator (LO). Response bandwidth was found to coincide with the detector's pulse width, which, in turn, could be controlled by the nanowire length. In addition, the system noise bandwidth was shown to be governed by the electronics/lab equipment, and the detector noise bandwidth is predicted to depend on its jitter. As have been demonstrated, a very small amount of the LO power (of the order of a few picowatts down to hundreds of femtowatts) was required for sufficient detection of the test signal, and eventual optimization could lead to further reduction of the LO power required, which would perfectly suit for the foreseen development of receiver matrices and the need for detection of ultra-low signals at a level of less-than-one-photon per second.

  9. Development of the superconducting detectors and read-out for the X-IFU instrument on board of the X-ray observatory Athena

    CERN Document Server

    Gottardi, Luciano; Bruijn, Marcel P; Hartog, Roland den; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Jackson, Brian; Kiviranta, Mikko; van der Kuur, Jan; van Weers, Henk

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected by ESA as its second large-class mission. The future European X-ray observatory will study the hot and energetic Universe with its launch foreseen in 2028. Microcalorimeters based on superconducting Transition-edge sensor (TES) are the chosen technology for the detectors array of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board of Athena. The X-IFU is a 2-D imaging integral-field spectrometer operating in the soft X-ray band (0.3 -12 keV). The detector consists of an array of 3840 TESs coupled to X-ray absorbers and read out in the MHz bandwidth using Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). The proposed design calls for devices with a high filling-factor, high quantum e?ciency, relatively high count-rate capability and an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV. The paper will review the basic principle and the physics of the TES-based microcalorimeters and present the state-...

  10. Development of the superconducting detectors and read-out for the X-IFU instrument on board of the X-ray observatory Athena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottardi, L., E-mail: l.gottardi@sron.nl [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Akamatsu, H.; Bruijn, M.P.; Hartog, R. den; Herder, J.-W. den; Jackson, B. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kiviranta, M. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kuur, J. van der; Weers, H. van [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-07-11

    The Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected by ESA as its second large-class mission. The future European X-ray observatory will study the hot and energetic Universe with its launch foreseen in 2028. Microcalorimeters based on superconducting Transition-edge sensor (TES) are the chosen technology for the detectors array of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board of Athena. The X-IFU is a 2-D imaging integral-field spectrometer operating in the soft X-ray band (0.3–12 keV). The detector consists of an array of 3840 TESs coupled to X-ray absorbers and read out in the MHz bandwidth using Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). The proposed design calls for devices with a high filling-factor, high quantum efficiency, relatively high count-rate capability and an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV. The paper will review the basic principle and the physics of the TES-based microcalorimeters and present the state-of-the art of the FDM read-out.

  11. Development of the superconducting detectors and read-out for the X-IFU instrument on board of the X-ray observatory Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardi, L.; Akamatsu, H.; Bruijn, M. P.; den Hartog, R.; den Herder, J.-W.; Jackson, B.; Kiviranta, M.; van der Kuur, J.; van Weers, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected by ESA as its second large-class mission. The future European X-ray observatory will study the hot and energetic Universe with its launch foreseen in 2028. Microcalorimeters based on superconducting Transition-edge sensor (TES) are the chosen technology for the detectors array of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board of Athena. The X-IFU is a 2-D imaging integral-field spectrometer operating in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV). The detector consists of an array of 3840 TESs coupled to X-ray absorbers and read out in the MHz bandwidth using Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). The proposed design calls for devices with a high filling-factor, high quantum efficiency, relatively high count-rate capability and an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV. The paper will review the basic principle and the physics of the TES-based microcalorimeters and present the state-of-the art of the FDM read-out.

  12. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  13. Demonstration of a passive, low-noise, millimeter-wave detector array for imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, David; Grossman, Erich

    2009-05-01

    The design of a millimeter-wave (MMW) camera is presented. The camera is meant to serve as a demonstration platform for a new 32-channel MMW detector array that requires no pre-amplification prior to detection. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have worked with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and several contractors for four years to develop an affordable MMW detector array technology suitable for use in a large staring array. The camera described uses one particular embodiment of detector array that resulted from the program. This paper reviews the design of the MMW optics that will be used to form imagery with the linear array and the tradeoffs made in that design. Also presented are the results of laboratory tests of the detector array that were made at both ARL and NIST.

  14. Design of polarization-insensitive superconducting single photon detectors with high-index dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, Luca; Monroy, E; Gérard, J M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the design of superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors which are insensitive to the polarization of the incident light is investigated. By using high-refractive-index dielectrics, the index mismatch between the nanowire and the surrounding media is reduced. This enhances the absorption of light with electric field vector perpendicular to the nanowire segments, which is generally hindered in this kind of detectors. Building on this principle and focusing on NbTiN nanowire devices, we present several easy-to-realize cavity architectures which allow high absorption efficiency (in excess of 90%) and polarization insensitivity simultaneously. Designs based on ultranarrow nanowires, for which the polarization sensitivity is much more marked, are also presented. Finally, we briefly discuss the specific advantages of this approach in the case of WSi or MoSi nanowires.

  15. Design of polarization-insensitive superconducting single photon detectors with high-index dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, L.; Zwiller, V.; Monroy, E.; Gérard, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the design of superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors which are insensitive to the polarization of the incident light is investigated. By using high-refractive-index dielectrics, the index mismatch between the nanowire and the surrounding media is reduced. This enhances the absorption of light with electric field vector perpendicular to the nanowire segments, which is generally hindered in these kind of detectors. Building on this principle and focusing on NbTiN nanowire devices, we present several easy-to-realize cavity architectures which allow high absorption efficiency (in excess of 90%) and polarization insensitivity simultaneously. Designs based on ultranarrow nanowires, for which the polarization sensitivity is much more marked, are also presented. Finally, we briefly discuss the specific advantages of this approach in the case of WSi or MoSi nanowires.

  16. Appropriate microwave frequency selection for biasing superconducting hot electron bolometers as terahertz direct detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S. L.; Li, X. F.; Jia, X. Q.; Kang, L.; Jin, B. B.; Xu, W. W.; Chen, J.; Wu, P. H.

    2017-04-01

    Terahertz (THz) direct detectors based on superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) hot electron bolometers (HEBs) and biased by a simple microwave (MW) source have been studied. The frequency and power of the MW are selected by measuring the MW responses of the current–voltage (I–V) curves and resistance–temperature (R–T) curves of the NbN HEBs. The non-uniform absorption theory is used to explain the current jumps in the I–V curves and the resistance jumps in the R–T curves. Compared to the thermal biasing, the MW biasing method can improve the sensitivity, make the readout system much easier and consumes less liquid helium, which is important for long lasting experiments. The noise equivalent power (NEP) of 1.6 pW Hz‑1/2 and the response time of 86 ps are obtained for the detectors working at 4.2 K and 0.65 THz.

  17. Superconducting Magnet with the Minimum Steel Yoke for the Hadron Future Circular Collider Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Dudarev, A.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mentink, M.; Da Silva, H. Pais; Rolando, G.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Berriaud, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a hadron Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) with a center-of-mass energy of the order of 100 TeV in a new tunnel of 80-100 km circumference assumes the determination of the basic requirements for its detectors. A superconducting solenoid magnet of 12 m diameter inner bore with the central magnetic flux density of 6 T in combination with two superconducting dipole and two conventional toroid magnets is proposed for a FCC-hh experimental setup. The coil of 23.468 m long has seven 3.35 m long modules included into one cryostat. The steel yoke with a mass of 22.6 kt consists of two barrel layers of 0.5 m radial thickness, and the 0.7 m thick nose disk and four 0.6 m thick end-cap disks each side. The maximum outer diameter of the yoke is 17.7 m; the length is 62.6 m. The air gaps between the end-cap disks provide the installation of the muon chambers up to the pseudorapidity about \\pm 2.7. The superconducting dipole magnets allow measuring the charged particle momenta in the pseudora...

  18. Fabrication of a Silicon Backshort Assembly for Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Erik J.; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Denis, Kevin L.; Eimer, Joseph; Lourie, Nathan; Marriage, Tobias; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a ground-based instrument that will measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background to search for evidence for gravitational waves from a posited epoch of inflation early in the Universe s history. This measurement will require integration of superconducting transition-edge sensors with microwave waveguide inputs with excellent control of systematic errors, such as unwanted coupling to stray signals at frequencies outside of a precisely defined microwave band. To address these needs we present work on the fabrication of micromachined silicon, producing conductive quarter-wave backshort assemblies for the CLASS 40 GHz focal plane. Each 40 GHz backshort assembly consists of three degeneratively doped silicon wafers. Two spacer wafers are micromachined with through-wafer vias to provide a 2.04 mm long square waveguide delay section. The third wafer terminates the waveguide delay in a short. The three wafers are bonded at the wafer level by Au-Au thermal compression bonding then aligned and flip chip bonded to the CLASS detector at the chip level. The micromachining techniques used have been optimized to create high aspect ratio waveguides, silicon pillars, and relief trenches with the goal of providing improved out of band signal rejection. We will discuss the fabrication of integrated CLASS superconducting detector chips with the quarter-wave backshort assemblies.

  19. Physics and application of photon number resolving detectors based on superconducting parallel nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsili, F; Bitauld, D; Jahanmirinejad, S; Fiore, A [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, NL-5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gaggero, A; Leoni, R; Mattioli, F [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (IFN), CNR, via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: marsili@MIT.EDU

    2009-04-15

    The parallel nanowire detector (PND) is a photon number resolving (PNR) detector that uses spatial multiplexing on a subwavelength scale to provide a single electrical output proportional to the photon number. The basic structure of the PND is the parallel connection of several NbN superconducting nanowires ({approx}100 nm wide, a few nm thick), folded in a meander pattern. PNDs were fabricated on 3-4 nm thick NbN films grown on MgO (T{sub S} = 400 deg. C) substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering in an Ar/N{sub 2} gas mixture. The device performance was characterized in terms of speed and sensitivity. PNDs showed a counting rate of 80 MHz and a pulse duration as low as 660 ps full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). Building the histograms of the photoresponse peak, no multiplication noise buildup is observable. Electrical and optical equivalent models of the device were developed in order to study its working principle, define design guidelines and develop an algorithm to estimate the photon number statistics of an unknown light. In particular, the modeling provides novel insight into the physical limit to the detection efficiency and to the reset time of these detectors. The PND significantly outperforms existing PNR detectors in terms of simplicity, sensitivity, speed and multiplication noise.

  20. Development of microwave-multiplexed superconductive detectors for the HOLMES experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachero, A.; Becker, D.; Bennett, D. A.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J. D.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Maino, M.; Mates, J. A. B.; Puiu, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Reintsema, C. D.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.; Vale, L. R.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the progress on low temperature detector technologies has allowed design of large scale experiments aiming at pushing down the sensitivity on the neutrino mass below 1 eV. Even with outstanding performances in both energy (~eV on keV) and time resolution (~ 1 μs) on the single channel, a large number of detectors working in parallel is required to reach a sub-eV sensitivity. HOLMES is a new experiment to directly measure the neutrino mass with a sensitivity as low as 2eV. HOLMES will perform a calorimetric measurement of the energy released in the electron capture (EC) decay of 163 Ho. In its final configuration, HOLMES will deploy 1000 detectors of low temperature microcalorimeters with implanted 163 Ho nuclei. The baseline sensors for HOLMES are Mo/Cu TESs (Transition Edge Sensors) on SiNx membrane with gold absorbers. The readout is based on the use of rf-SQUIDs as input devices with flux ramp modulation for linearization purposes; the rf-SQUID is then coupled to a superconducting lambda/4-wave resonator in the GHz range, and the modulated signal is finally read out using the homodyne technique. The TES detectors have been designed with the aim of achieving an energy resolution of a few eV at the spectrum endpoint and a time resolution of a few micro-seconds, in order to minimize pile-up artifacts.

  1. Multiplexed readout of MMC detector arrays using non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    OpenAIRE

    Kempf, S.; Wegner, M; Gastaldo, L.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.

    2013-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to x-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQU...

  2. Observation of high Tc one dimensional superconductivity in 4 angstrom carbon nanotube arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Bing

    2017-02-14

    The only known approach to fabricate large, uniform arrays of 4-Å single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is by using zeolite crystals as the template, in which the nanotubes are formed by chemical vapor deposition inside the linear channels of the AlPO-5 (AFI for short) zeolite. However, up to now the pore filling factor has been very low, as evidenced by the weight percentage of carbon in thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements. In this work, we show that by using a new, micro-platelet AFI crystals as the template, combined with the use of a new CVD process, we can increase the TGA result to 22.5wt%, which translates to a pore filling factor of 91%. We have observed one dimensional (1D) superconductivity in such samples. The temperature dependence of resistance shows a smooth decreasing trend below 60 K, and the differential resistance displays a gap that disappears above the 1D superconducting initiation temperature. The observed behaviour is shown to agree very well with the theoretical predictions of 1D superconductivity.

  3. Observation of high Tc one dimensional superconductivity in 4 angstrom carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Liu, Yang; Chen, Qihong; Lai, Zhiping; Sheng, Ping

    2017-02-01

    The only known approach to fabricate large, uniform arrays of 4-Å single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is by using zeolite crystals as the template, in which the nanotubes are formed by chemical vapor deposition inside the linear channels of the AlPO4-5 (AFI for short) zeolite. However, up to now the pore filling factor has been very low, as evidenced by the weight percentage of carbon in thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements. In this work, we show that by using a new, micro-platelet AFI crystals as the template, combined with the use of a new CVD process, we can increase the TGA result to 22.5wt%, which translates to a pore filling factor of 91%. We have observed one dimensional (1D) superconductivity in such samples. The temperature dependence of resistance shows a smooth decreasing trend below 60 K, and the differential resistance displays a gap that disappears above the 1D superconducting initiation temperature. The observed behaviour is shown to agree very well with the theoretical predictions of 1D superconductivity.

  4. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  5. Free space-coupled superconducting nanowire single photon detectors for infrared optical communications

    CERN Document Server

    Bellei, Francesco; McCaughan, Adam N; Dane, Andrew E; Najafi, Faraz; Zhao, Quinyuan; Berggren, Karl K

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of a cryostat and an optical system with a free-space coupling efficiency of 56.5% +/- 3.4% to a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) for infrared quantum communication and spectrum analysis. A 1K pot decreases the base temperature to T = 1.7 K from the 2.9 K reached by the cold head cooled by a pulse-tube cryocooler. The minimum spot size coupled to the detector chip was 6.6 +/- 0.11 {\\mu}m starting from a fiber source at wavelength, {\\lambda} = 1.55 {\\mu}m. We demonstrated efficient photon counting on a detector with an 8 x 7.3 {\\mu}m^2 area. We measured a dark count rate of 95 +/- 3.35 kcps and a system detection efficiency of 1.64% +/- 0.13%. We explain the key steps that are required to further improve the coupling efficiency.

  6. Position dependent spatial and spectral resolution measurement of distributed readout superconducting imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmering, R. A.; Verhoeve, P.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Martin, D. D. E.; Wigmore, J. K.; Jerjen, I.; Venn, R.; Groot, P. J.

    2008-04-01

    We present direct measurements of spatial and spectral resolution of cryogenic distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs). The spatial and spectral resolutions have been experimentally determined by scanning a 10μm spot of monochromatic visible light across the detector. The influences of the photon energy, bias voltage, and absorber length and width on the spatial and spectral resolutions have been examined. The confinement of quasiparticles in the readout sensors (superconducting tunnel junctions) as well as the detector's signal amplitude can be optimized by tuning the bias voltage, thereby improving both the spatial and spectral resolutions. Changing the length of the absorber affects the spatial and spectral resolutions in opposite manner, making it an important parameter to optimize the DROID for the application at hand. The results have been used to test expressions for photon energy, position, and spatial and spectral resolutions which have been derived by using an existing one-dimensional model. The model is found to accurately describe the experimental data, but some limitations have been identified. In particular, the model's assumption that the two sensors have identical response characteristics and noise, the approximation of the detailed quasiparticle dynamics in the sensors by border conditions, and the use of a one-dimensional diffusion process is not always adequate.

  7. Waveguide Integrated Superconducting Single Photon Detectors Implemented as Coherent Perfect Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Akhlaghi, Mohsen K; Young, Jeff F

    2014-01-01

    At the core of an ideal single photon detector is an active material that ideally absorbs and converts photons to discriminable electronic signals. A large active material volume favours high-efficiency absorption, but often at the expense of conversion efficiency, noise, speed and timing accuracy. The present work demonstrates how the concept of coherent perfect absorption can be used to relax this trade-off for a waveguide-integrated superconducting nanowire single photon detector. A very short (8.5$\\mu$m long) and narrow (8$\\times$35nm$^2$) U-shaped NbTiN nanowire atop a silicon-on-insulator waveguide is turned into a perfect absorber by etching an asymmetric nanobeam cavity around it. At 2.05K, the detectors show $\\sim$96$\\pm$12% on-chip quantum efficiency for 1545nm photons with an intrinsic dark count rate $<$0.1Hz. The estimated timing jitter is $\\sim$53ps full-width at half-maximum and the reset time is $<$7ns, both extrinsically limited by readout electronics. This architecture is capable of pu...

  8. Lattices of ultracold atom traps over arrays of nano- and mesoscopic superconducting disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovsky, Vladimir; Prigozhin, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    A lattice of traps for ultracold neutral atoms is a promising tool for experimental investigation in quantum physics and quantum information processing. We consider regular arrays of thin film type-II superconducting nanodisks, with only one pinned vortex in each of them, and also arrays of mesoscopic disks, each containing many vortices whose distribution is characterized by the superconducting current density. In both cases we show theoretically that the induced magnetic field can create a 3D lattice of magnetic traps for cold atoms without any additional bias field. Applying a bias DC field parallel to the superconductor surface, one can control the depth and sizes of the traps, their heights above the chip surface, potential barriers between the traps, as well as the structure and dimension of the lattices. In the adiabatic approximation the atom cloud shape is represented by the shape of a closed iso-surface of the magnetic field magnitude chosen in accordance with the atom cloud temperature. The computed trap sizes, heights and the distances between the neighboring traps are typically from tens to hundreds nanometers for nanodisks and of the order of 1 μm for mesoscopic disks. Our calculations show that the depth of magnetic traps on mesoscopic disks is, typically, between 0.3 G and 7.6 G; for the nanodisks the depth is about 0.3 G.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of the standardization of {sup 22}Na using scintillation detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y., E-mail: yss.sato@aist.go.j [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Quantum Radiation Division, Radioactivity and Neutron Section, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Murayama, H. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamada, T. [Japan Radioisotope Association, 2-28-45, Hon-komagome, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8941 (Japan); National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Quantum Radiation Division, Radioactivity and Neutron Section, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Tohoku University, 6-6, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Hasegawa, T. [Kitasato University, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Oda, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Nakacho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Unno, Y.; Yunoki, A. [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Quantum Radiation Division, Radioactivity and Neutron Section, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    In order to calibrate PET devices by a sealed point source, we contrived an absolute activity measurement method for the sealed point source using scintillation detector arrays. This new method was verified by EGS5 Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Method for producing a hybridization of detector array and integrated circuit for readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1993-08-01

    A process is explained for fabricating a detector array in a layer of semiconductor material on one substrate and an integrated readout circuit in a layer of semiconductor material on a separate substrate in order to select semiconductor material for optimum performance of each structure, such as GaAs for the detector array and Si for the integrated readout circuit. The detector array layer is lifted off its substrate, laminated on the metallized surface on the integrated surface, etched with reticulating channels to the surface of the integrated circuit, and provided with interconnections between the detector array pixels and the integrated readout circuit through the channels. The adhesive material for the lamination is selected to be chemically stable to provide electrical and thermal insulation and to provide stress release between the two structures fabricated in semiconductor materials that may have different coefficients of thermal expansion.

  11. Method of fabricating a PbS-PbSe IR detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, John R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A silicon wafer is provided which does not employ individually bonded leads between the IR sensitive elements and the input stages of multiplexers. The wafer is first coated with lead selenide in a first detector array area and is thereafter coated with lead sulfide within a second detector array area. The described steps result in the direct chemical deposition of lead selenide and lead sulfide upon the silicon wafer to eliminate individual wire bonding, bumping, flip chiping, planar interconnecting methods of connecting detector array elements to silicon chip circuitry, e.g., multiplexers, to enable easy fabrication of very long arrays. The electrode structure employed, produces an increase in the electrical field gradient between the electrodes for a given volume of detector material, relative to conventional electrode configurations.

  12. Characteristics of stereo images from detectors in focal plane array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jung-Young; Yeom, Seokwon; Chun, Joo-Hwan; Guschin, Vladmir P; Lee, Dong-Su

    2011-07-01

    The equivalent ray geometry of two horizontally aligned detectors at the focal plane of the main antenna in a millimeter wave imaging system is analyzed to reveal the reason why the images from the detectors are fused as an image with a depth sense. Scanning the main antenna in both horizontal and vertical directions makes each detector perform as a camera, and the two detectors can work like a stereo camera in the millimeter wave range. However, the stereo camera geometry is different from that of the stereo camera used in the visual spectral range because the detectors' viewing directions are diverging to each other and they are a certain distance apart. The depth sense is mainly induced by the distance between detectors. The images obtained from the detectors in the millimeter imaging system are perceived with a good depth sense. The disparities responsible for the depth sense are identified in the images.

  13. Characterization of superconducting nanowire single-photon detector with artificial constrictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Statistical studies on the performance of different superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs on one chip suggested that random constrictions existed in the nanowire that were barely registered by scanning electron microscopy. With the aid of advanced e-beam lithography, artificial geometric constrictions were fabricated on SNSPDs as well as single nanowires. In this way, we studied the influence of artificial constrictions on SNSPDs in a straight forward manner. By introducing artificial constrictions with different wire widths in single nanowires, we concluded that the dark counts of SNSPDs originate from a single constriction. Further introducing artificial constrictions in SNSPDs, we studied the relationship between detection efficiency and kinetic inductance and the bias current, confirming the hypothesis that constrictions exist in SNSPDs.

  14. Singlet oxygen luminescence detection with a fiber-coupled superconducting nanowire single-photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemmell, Nathan R; Liu, Baochang; Tanner, Michael G; Dorenbos, Sander N; Zwiller, Valery; Patterson, Michael S; Buller, Gerald S; Wilson, Brian C; Hadfield, Robert H; 10.1364/OE.21.005005

    2013-01-01

    Direct monitoring of singlet oxygen (1O2) luminescence is a particularly challenging infrared photodetection problem. 1O2, an excited state of the oxygen molecule, is a crucial intermediate in many biological processes. We employ a low noise superconducting nanowire single-photon detector to record 1O2 luminescence at 1270 nm wavelength from a model photosensitizer (Rose Bengal) in solution. Narrow band spectral filtering and chemical quenching is used to verify the 1O2 signal, and lifetime evolution with the addition of protein is studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate the detection of 1O2 luminescence through a single optical fiber, a marked advance for dose monitoring in clinical treatments such as photodynamic therapy.

  15. On site calibration for new fluorescence detectors of the telescope array experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuno, H. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)], E-mail: htokuno@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Murano, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kawana, S. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Tameda, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Taketa, A.; Ikeda, D.; Udo, S. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Ogio, S. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Azuma, R.; Fukuda, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Inoue, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kadota, K. [Faculty of Knowledge Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Kakimoto, F. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Shibata, T.; Takeda, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Tsunesada, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    The Telescope Array experiment is searching for the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using a ground array of particle detectors and three fluorescence telescope stations. The precise calibration of the fluorescence detectors is important for small systematic errors in shower reconstruction. This paper details the process of calibrating cameras for two of the fluorescence telescope stations. This paper provides the operational results of these camera calibrations.

  16. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  17. High performance fiber-coupled NbTiN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors with Gifford-McMahon cryocooler

    CERN Document Server

    Miki, Shigehito; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    We present high performance fiber-coupled niobium titanium nitride superconducting nanowire single photon detectors fabricated on thermally oxidized silicon substrates. The best device showed a system detection efficiency (DE) of 74%, dark count rate of 100 c/s, and full width at half maximum timing jitter of 68 ps under a bias current of 18.0 uA with a practical Gifford-McMahon cryocooler system. We also introduced six detectors into the cryocooler and confirmed that the system DE of all detectors was higher than 63% at the dark count rate of 100 c/s.

  18. High performance fiber-coupled NbTiN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors with Gifford-McMahon cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen

    2013-04-22

    We present high performance fiber-coupled niobium titanium nitride superconducting nanowire single photon detectors fabricated on thermally oxidized silicon substrates. The best device showed a system detection efficiency (DE) of 74%, dark count rate of 100 c/s, and full width at half maximum timing jitter of 68 ps under a bias current of 18.0 μA with a practical Gifford-McMahon cryocooler system. We also introduced six detectors into the cryocooler and confirmed that the system DE of all detectors was higher than 67% at the dark count rate of 100 c/s.

  19. Multiplexed readout of MMC detector arrays using non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Kempf, S; Gastaldo, L; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C

    2013-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to x-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQUID multiplexer that operates in the frequency domain and that employs non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs to transduce the detector signals into a frequency shift of high $Q$ resonators which can be monitored by using standard microwave measurement techniques. In this paper we discuss the design and the expected performance of a recently developed and fabricated 64 pixel detector array with integrated microwave SQUID multiplexer. First experimental data were obtained characterizing dc-SQUIDs with virtually identical washer design.

  20. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  1. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Castro, M. L. Diaz; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Aguera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santo, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single det

  2. Fast Fourier transform spectrometer readout for large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baryshev, A. M.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Klein, B.; Guesten, R.

    2009-01-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors have great potential for large, very sensitive detector arrays for use in, for example, submillimeter imaging. Being intrinsically readout in the frequency domain, they are particularly suited for frequency domain multiplexing allowing similar to 1000 s of devi

  3. Brief Introduction to the γ-DETECTOR Array at Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, W.; Zhang, N. T.; Liu, M. L.; Zheng, Y.; Fang, Y. D.; Zhou, X. H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Lei, X. G.; Guo, Y. X.

    2013-11-01

    A new γ-detector array at Institute of modern physics in Lanzhou is now in construction. The spherical frame is designed using Solidworks, and is assembled by 4 kinds of irregular polygons. 32 detectors could be placed on this frame in maximum, which are arranged with 4-4-4-8-4-4-4 configuration.

  4. MCNP6 and DRiFT modeling efforts for the NEUANCE/DANCE detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinilla, Maria Isabel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-30

    This report seeks to study and benchmark code predictions against experimental data; determine parameters to match MCNP-simulated detector response functions to experimental stilbene measurements; add stilbene processing capabilities to DRiFT; and improve NEUANCE detector array modeling and analysis using new MCNP6 and DRiFT features.

  5. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Castro, M. L. Diaz; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Aguera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santo, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single det

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  7. National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND): A versatile tool for nuclear reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golda, K.S., E-mail: goldaks@gmail.com [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Jhingan, A.; Sugathan, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Singh, Hardev [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Singh, R.P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Behera, B.R. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Mandal, S. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, New Delhi 110007 (India); Kothari, A.; Gupta, Arti; Zacharias, J.; Archunan, M.; Barua, P.; Venkataramanan, S.; Bhowmik, R.K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Govil, I.M. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Datta, S.K.; Chatterjee, M.B. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-11-01

    The first phase of the National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) consisting of 26 neutron detectors has been commissioned at the Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. The motivation behind setting up of such a detector system is the need for more accurate and efficient study of reaction mechanisms in the projectile energy range of 5–8 MeV/n using heavy ion beams from a 15 UD Pelletron and an upgraded LINAC booster facility at IUAC. The above detector array can be used for inclusive as well as exclusive measurements of reaction products of which at least one product is a neutron. While inclusive measurements can be made using only the neutron detectors along with the time of flight technique and a pulsed beam, exclusive measurements can be performed by detecting neutrons in coincidence with charged particles and/or fission fragments detected with ancillary detectors. The array can also be used for neutron tagged gamma-ray spectroscopy in (HI, xn) reactions by detecting gamma-rays in coincidence with the neutrons in a compact geometrical configuration. The various features and the performance of the different aspects of the array are described in the present paper. -- Highlights: •We report the design, fabrication and installation of a 26 element modular neutron detection system (NAND). •The array has been designed for the fusion–fission studies at near and above the barrier energies. •The relevant characteristics of the array are studied exhaustively and reported. •The efficiency of the detectors are measured and compared with the monte carlo simulations. •The second phase of the array will be augmented with 80 more neutron detectors which will enable the system to measure the neutron multiplicity distribution.

  8. Kinetic Inductance Detectors Based Receiver Array Architectures for Imaging at THz Frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacono, A.; Neto, A.; Gerini, G.; Baselmans, J.; Yates, S.; Baryshev, A.; Hoevers, H.

    2009-01-01

    A novel strategy for broad band focal plane array design, resulting from the two years long cooperation between TNO and SRON (Space Research Organization Netherlands), is proposed. Its purpose is to couple the radiation from a Large F/D reflector system to an array of Kinetic Inductance detectors th

  9. A linear monolithic 4-6 on silicon IR detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, J.; Vermeiren, J.; Zogg, H.; Masek, J.; Fabbricotti, M.

    1992-12-01

    A linear array of monolithically grown PbTe and PbSnSe detectors on (111)-Si for MWIR and TIR imaging applications was designed and processed. The array consists of a staggered row of 2 by 128 detectors on a 100 micrometers pitch. The readout circuitry, integrated on the Si substrate consists of a COS multiplexer with a direct injection input stage, a charge reduction stage and charge to voltage conversion stage for each individual detector. This XDI (MultipeXed Direct Injection) circuit also allows for on-chip nonuniformity compensation with a switched capacitor network.

  10. Study on data acquisition circuit used in SSPA linear array detector X-ray detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wei Biao; Che Zhen Ping

    2002-01-01

    After SSPA used as X-ray array detector is developed, the authors take a research on the data acquisition circuit applied to the detector. The experiment designed has verified the feasibility of application of this array detector and its data acquisition circuit to X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). The preliminary test results indicate that the method of the X-ray detection is feasible for industry X-CT nondestructive testing, which brings about advantage for detecting and measuring with high resolution, good efficiency and low cost

  11. Nuclear structure at high spin using multidetector gamma array and ancillary detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Muralithar

    2014-04-01

    A multidetector gamma array (GDA), for studying nuclear structure was built with ancillary devices namely gamma multiplicity filter and charged particle detector array. This facility was designed for in-beam gamma spectroscopy measurements in fusion evaporation reactions at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. Description of the facility and in-beam performance with two experimental studies done are presented. This array was used in a number of nuclear spectroscopic and reaction investigations.

  12. Multi-anode microchannel arrays - New detectors for imaging and spectroscopy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Consideration is given to the construction and operation of multi-anode microchannel array detector systems having formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels. Such arrays are being developed for imaging and spectroscopy at soft X-ray, ultraviolet and visible wavelengths from balloons, sounding rockets and space probes. Both discrete-anode and coincidence-anode arrays are described. Two types of photocathode structures are evaluated: an opaque photocathode deposited directly on the curved-channel MCP and an activated cathode deposited on a proximity-focused mesh. Future work will include sensitivity optimization in the different wavelength regions and the development of detector tubes with semitransparent proximity-focused photocathodes.

  13. Trigger and Aperture of the Surface Detector Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; DuVernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcău, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2011-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above $3\\times 10^{18}$ eV, for all zenith angles between 0$^\\circ$ and 60$^\\circ$, independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  14. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J. [National Technological University, Faculty Mendoza (CONICET/CNEA), Mendoza (Argentina); Abreu, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahn, E.J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ambrosio, M. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Anticic, T. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Anzalone, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo (INAF), Palermo (Italy); Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Arganda, E. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Arisaka, K. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Asorey, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Assis, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aublin, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France)

    2010-01-21

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above 3x10{sup 18}eV, for all zenith angles between 0 deg. and 60 deg., independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  15. High-efficiency microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors that are arrayed, dual-integrated, and stacked

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellinger, Steven L., E-mail: slb3888@ksu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Fronk, Ryan G. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Sobering, Timothy J. [Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); McGregor, Douglas S. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Silicon diodes with large aspect ratio 3D microstructures backfilled with {sup 6}LiF show a significant increase in neutron detection efficiency beyond that of conventional thin-film coated planar devices. Described in this work are advancements in the technology using detector stacking methods and summed-detector 6 Multiplication-Sign 6-element arraying methods to dramatically increase the sensitivity to thermal neutrons. The intrinsic detection efficiency of the 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 array for normal-incident 0.0253 eV neutrons was found 6.8% compared against a calibrated {sup 3}He proportional counter. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid-state semiconductor neutron detectors utilizing {sup 6}LiF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large aspect ratio 3D microstructured silicon diodes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrayed solid-state semiconductor neutron detectors.

  16. The array of scintillation detectors with natural boron for EAS neutrons investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromushkin, D. M.; Bogdanov, F. A.; Khokhlov, S. S.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shulzhenko, I. A.; Stenkin, Yu. V.; Yashin, I. I.; Yurin, K. O.

    2017-07-01

    The new URAN array has been constructed in the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow, Russia). It is aimed at studying of primary cosmic rays in the "knee" region of energy spectrum and detects neutrons produced in interactions of EAS particles with nuclei of atmosphere or matter. The array consists of 72 detectors based on the scintillator with natural boron. Scintillator represents a silicon plate with the granules of ZnS(Ag) and B2O3 mixture. The area of the detector is 0.36 sq. m. Detectors are located on two roofs of the MEPhI laboratory buildings and are combined into clusters of 12 detectors. The structure and the main elements of the URAN array are described.

  17. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Mičanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santo, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above 3×1018eV, for all zenith angles between 0∘ and 60∘, independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  18. Electronics for the Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the University of Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, E.; Conde, R.; Martínez, O.; Murrieta, T.; Salazar, H.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we describe in detail the electronics cards that were designed to be the basis of the data acquisition system (DAS) of the extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla. The purpose of this observatory is to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors (12 in the first stage) and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (one of 10 m2 cross section and five smaller ones of 1.86 m2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. The electronics described here uses analog to digital converters of 10 bits working at a sampling speed of 40 MS/s and field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

  19. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-05

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays.

  20. Symmetric dynamic behaviour of a superconducting proximity array with respect to field reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankhorst, M.; Poccia, N.

    2017-01-01

    As the complexity of strongly correlated systems and high temperature superconductors increases, so does also the essential complexity of defects found in these materials and the complexity of the supercurrent pathways. It can be therefore convenient to realize a solid-state system with regular supercurrent pathways and without the disguising effects of disorder in order to capture the essential characteristics of a collective dynamics. Using a square array of superconducting islands placed on a normal metal, we observe a state in which magnetic field-induced vortices are frozen in the dimples of the egg crate potential by their strong repulsion interaction. In this system a dynamic vortex Mott insulator transition has been previously observed. In this work, we will show the symmetric dynamic behaviour with respect to field reversal and we will compare it with the asymmetric behaviour observed at the dynamic vortex Mott transition.

  1. Results from the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S.W.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bernaxdini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Birone, A.; Boeser, S.; Botnerg, O.; Bouhali, O.; Burgess, T.; Carius, S.; Castermans, T.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D.F.; Davour, A.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Ekstroem, P.; Feser, T.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gaug, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Koci, B.; Koepke, L.; Kuehn, K.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Neunhoeffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Yodh, G.; Young, S

    2003-04-01

    We show new results from both the older and newer incarnations of AMANDA (AMANDA-1310 and AMANDA-II, respectively). These results demonstrate that AMANDA is a functioning, multipurpose detector with significant physics and astrophysics reach. They include a new higher-statistics measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino flux and preliminary results from searches for a variety of sources of ultrahigh energy neutrinos: generic point sources, gamma-ray bursters and diffuse sources producing muons in the detector, and diffuse sources producing electromagnetic or hadronic showers in or near the detector.

  2. Automated response matching for organic scintillation detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinall, M. D.; Joyce, M. J.; Cave, F. D.; Plenteda, R.; Tomanin, A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper identifies a digitizer technology with unique features that facilitates feedback control for the realization of a software-based technique for automatically calibrating detector responses. Three such auto-calibration techniques have been developed and are described along with an explanation of the main configuration settings and potential pitfalls. Automating this process increases repeatability, simplifies user operation, enables remote and periodic system calibration where consistency across detectors' responses are critical.

  3. Non-volatile resistive photo-switches for flexible image detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Sebastian; Wolf, Christoph; Sax, Stefan; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2015-09-01

    The increasing quest to find lightweight, conformable or flexible image detectors for machine vision or medical imaging brings organic electronics into the spotlight for these fields of application. Here were we introduce a unique imaging device concept and its utilization in an organic, flexible detector array with simple passive matrix wiring. We present a flexible organic image detector array built up from non-volatile resistive multi-bit photo-switchable elements. This unique realization is based on an organic photodiode combined with an organic resistive memory device wired in a simple crossbar configuration. The presented concept exhibits significant advantages compared to present organic and inorganic detector array technologies, facilitating the detection and simultaneous storage of the image information in one detector pixel, yet also allowing for simple read-out of the information from a simple passive-matrix crossbar wiring. This concept is demonstrated for single photo-switchable pixels as well as for arrays with sizes up to 32 by 32 pixels (1024 bit). The presented results pave the way for a versatile flexible and easy-to-fabricate sensor array technology. In a final step, the concept was expanded to detection of x-rays.

  4. Measurements and analysis of optical crosstalk in a microwave kinetic inductance detector array

    CERN Document Server

    Bisigello, L; Ferrari, L; Baselmans, J J A; Baryshev, A M

    2016-01-01

    The main advantage of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector arrays (MKID) is their multiplexing capability, which allows for building cameras with a large number of pixels and good sensitivity, particularly suitable to perform large blank galaxy surveys. However, to have as many pixels as possible it is necessary to arrange detectors close in readout frequency. Consequently KIDs overlap in frequency and are coupled to each other producing crosstalk. Because crosstalk can be only minimised by improving the array design, in this work we aim to correct for this effect a posteriori. We analysed a MKID array consisting of 880 KIDs with readout frequencies at 4-8 GHz. We measured the beam patterns for every detector in the array and described the response of each detector by using a two-dimensional Gaussian fit. Then, we identified detectors affected by crosstalk above -30 dB level from the maximum and removed the signal of the crosstalking detectors. Moreover, we modelled the crosstalk level for each KID as a func...

  5. Dosimetric characterization of a commercial two-dimensional array detector; Caracterizacao dosimetrica de um detector matricial bidimensional comercial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gialluisi, Bruno L.; Santos, Gabriela R. dos; Sales, Camila P. de; Resende, Guilherme R.A.; Habitzreuter, Angela B.; Rodrigues, Laura N., E-mail: brunogialluisi@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-04-15

    This paper investigates the dosimetric characteristics and performance of an array detector commercially available. The device is the I'mRT MatriXX® which is a two-dimensional detector array used in the verification of complex radiotherapy plans. It consists of 1,020 parallel plate ion chamber arranged in a 32x32 grid. Dose linearity was studied and its response was linear within the range of 5 to 1000 MU (R{sup 2} = 1). Dose rate dependence showed a maximum deviation of 0,62% comparatively with readings to 320 cGy/min. The detector stability was verified through repeated irradiations. Output factors matched well with measurements made with a Farmer chamber with an average deviation of 1,54%. The detector's effective point of measurement was determined and the inverse square law was also verified with a percentage deviation smaller than 3%. The results show that this detector can be used for quality control in IMRT thus reducing the time spent in the dosimetric verification of radiation fields. (author)

  6. Surface Micromachined Arrays of Transition-Edge Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative surface micromachining technique is described for the fabrication of closely-packed arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) x-ray microcalorimeters....

  7. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hao; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 um. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.

  8. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for NEOCam

    CERN Document Server

    Dorn, M; McMurtry, C; Hartman, S; Mainzer, A; McKelvey, M; McMurray, R; Chevara, D; Rosser, J

    2016-01-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ~10 ${\\mu}$m intended for the NEOCam space mission were subjected to proton beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested - one with 800 $\\mu$m substrate intact, one with 30 $\\mu$m substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes elevated signal in non-hit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in non-hit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30 ${\\mu}$m substrate. The detector array with full 800 ${\\mu}$m substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm$^2$-s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (~ 750 e$^-$/s) and 34.4 MeV ($\\sim$ 6...

  9. The DUV Stability of Superlattice-Doped CMOS Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T.; Dickie, M.; Cheng, P.; Greer, H. F.; Nikzad, S.; Sgro, J.; Tsur, S.

    2013-01-01

    JPL and Alacron have recently developed a high performance, DUV camera with a superlattice doped CMOS imaging detector. Supperlattice doped detectors achieve nearly 100% internal quantum efficiency in the deep and far ultraviolet, and a single layer, Al2O3 antireflection coating enables 64% external quantum efficiency at 263nm. In lifetime tests performed at Applied Materials using 263 nm pulsed, solid state and 193 nm pulsed excimer laser, the quantum efficiency and dark current of the JPL/Alacron camera remained stable to better than 1% precision during long-term exposure to several billion laser pulses, with no measurable degradation, no blooming and no image memory at 1000 fps.

  10. Mass Composition Sensitivity of an Array of Water Cherenkov and Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Javier G; Roth, Markus

    2011-01-01

    We consider a hybrid array composed of scintillation and water Cherenkov detectors designed to measure the cosmic ray primary mass composition at energies of about 1 EeV. We have developed a simulation and reconstruction chain to study the theoretical performance of such an array. In this work we investigate the sensitivity of mass composition observables in relation to the geometry of the array. The detectors are arranged in a triangular grid with fixed 750 m spacing and the configuration of the scintillator detectors is optimized for mass composition sensitivity. We show that the performance for composition determination can be compared favorably to that of Xmax measurements after the difference in duty cycles is considered.

  11. IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grbovic, Dragoslav [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Rajic, Slobodan [ORNL; Datskos, Panos G [ORNL; Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we describe the fabrication of an array of bimaterial detectors for infrared (IR) imaging that utilize SiO2 as a structural material. All the substrate material underneath the active area of each detector element was removed. Each detector element incorporates an optical resonant cavity layer in the IR absorbing region of the sensing element. The simplified microfabrication process requires only four photolithographic steps with no wet etching or sacrificial layers. The thermomechanical deflection sensitivity was 7.9 10-3 rad/K which corresponds to a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 2.9 mK. In the present work the array was used to capture IR images while operating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and no need for vacuum packaging. The average measured NETD of our IR detector system was approximately 200 mK but some sensing elements exhibited an NETD of 50 mK.

  12. Image quality evaluation of linear plastic scintillating fiber array detector for X-ray imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Mehdi NASSERI; MA Qing-Li; YIN Ze-Jie

    2004-01-01

    It is important to assess image quality, in order to ensure that the imaging system is performing optimally and also identify the weak points in an imaging system. Three parameters mostly leading to image degradation are contrast, spatial resolution and noise. There is always a trade-off between spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio,but in scintillating fiber array detectors spatial resolution is not as important as signal to noise ratio, so we paid more attention to contrast and SNR of the system. By using GEANT4 Monte Carlo detector simulation toolkit, some effective parameters of the linear plastic scintillating fiber (PSF) array as an imaging detector were investigated. Finally we show that it is possible to use this kind of detector to take CT and DR (Digital Radiography) image under certain conditions.

  13. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.L. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Martel, I. [Dpto de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, CH 1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Jiménez, R. [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Galán, J., E-mail: jgalan@diesia.uhu.es [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Salmerón, P. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain)

    2016-09-11

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from {sup 12}C up to {sup 84}Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  14. Analysis of upper and lower bounds of the frame noise in linear detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper estimates the upper and lower bounds of the frame noise of a linear detector array that uses a one-dimensional scan pattern. Using chi-square distribution, it is analytically shown why it is necessary to use the average of the variances and not the average of the standard deviations to estimate these bounds. Also, a criteria for determining whether any excessively noisy lines exist among the detectors is derived from these bounds. Using a Gaussian standard random variable generator, these bounds are demonstrated to be accurate within the specified confidence interval. A silicon detector array is then used for actual dark current measurements. The criterion developed for determination of noisy detectors is checked on the experimentally obtained data.

  15. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. L.; Martel, I.; Jiménez, R.; Galán, J.; Salmerón, P.

    2016-09-01

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from 12C up to 84Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  16. A tiled CCD detector with 2x2 array and tapered fibre optics for electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Faruqi, A R; Cattermole, D M; Stubbings, S

    2002-01-01

    Charge coupled devices (CCD)-based detectors have made a major impact on data collection in electron microscopy over the past few years. There have been a number of successful applications of CCDs in electron crystallography of two-dimensional protein crystal arrays but high-resolution imaging has been hampered by the relatively poor spatial resolution (and fewer independent pixels) compared to film. A partial solution to this problem, presented in this paper, are to design detectors with larger effective pixel sizes and with more pixels. A CCD detector with a much greater number of 'independent' pixels, achieved by tiling a 2x2 array of CCDs, each of which has 1242x1152 pixels is described here. The sensitive area of the detector, using fibre optics with a demagnification of 2.5 : 1, is 140x130 mm sup 2; the pixel size is 56 mu m square and there is a total of approx 2500x2300 pixels.

  17. Calibration and quality control of a multi leaf collimator using linear array of detectors; Calibracion y control de calidad de un colimador multilaminas mediante array lineal de detectores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suero Rodrigo, M. A.; Marques Fraguela, E.

    2011-07-01

    The protocol for calibration and quality control established by Siemens for the multi leaf collimator (MLC) of Primus electron linear accelerators, using the light field coincidence with the beam of radiation to determine the position of the blades. In this paper, we illustrate the use of a calibration method for determining the positions of MLC plates radiologically with the help of a linear array of detectors, based on the proposal Lopes et al (2007).

  18. Measuring 235U(n,xnγ) Cross Sections with HPGe Detector Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zhao-hui; WANG; Qi; SU; Xiao-bin; LI; Xia; HOU; Long; ZHANG; Kai; CHEN; Hong-tao; ZHAO; Fang

    2015-01-01

    We had built the array of HPGe detectors,which is used to measure theγrays from(n,xn)reaction.The detection system,acquisition system and analysis method have been improved to meet the requirement of prompt gamma ray measurement.According to the research of angular distribution of secondary gamma ray,we adjust the location and angle of detectors(Fig.1).Due to the absence of suitable sample,

  19. Energy spectrum of UHECRs measured by newly constructed fluorescence detectors in Telescope Array experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujii Toshihiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Telescope Array (TA experiment is the largest hybrid detector to observe ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs in the northern hemisphere. In the TA experiment, we newly designed and constructed 24 fluorescence detectors (FDs located at two stations. We report the energy spectrum of UHECRs with energies above 1017.5 eV from analyzing data collected by the new FDs during the first 3.7 years in monocular mode.

  20. The water Cherenkov detector array for studies of cosmic rays at the University of Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotzomi, J.; Moreno, E.; Murrieta, T.; Palma, B.; Pérez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villaseñor, L.

    2005-11-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hybrid extensive air shower detector array built on the Campus of the University of Puebla ( 19∘N, 90∘W, 800 g/cm2) to measure the energy, arrival direction and composition of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1 PeV, i.e., around the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. The array consists of 3 water Cherenkov detectors of 1.86 m2 cross-section and 12 liquid scintillator detectors of 1 m2 distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. We discuss the calibration and stability of the array for both sets of detectors and report on preliminary measurements and reconstruction of the lateral distributions for the electromagnetic (EM) and muonic components of extensive air showers. We also discuss how the hybrid character of the array can be used to measure mass composition of the primary cosmic rays by estimating the relative contents of muons with respect to the EM component of extensive air showers. This facility is also used to train students interested in the field of cosmic rays.

  1. Hybrid Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the University of Puebla to Study Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, O.; Pérez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villaseñor, L.

    We describe the design of an extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla (located at 19°N, 90°W, 800 gcm -2) to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors (12 in the first stage) and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (one of 10 m 2 cross section and five smaller ones of 1.86 m 2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m 2. In this paper we discuss the calibration and stability of the array, and discuss the capability of hybrid arrays, such as this one consisting of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator detectors, to allow a separation of the electromagnetic and muon components of extensive air showers. This separation plays an important role in the determination of the mass and identity of the primary cosmic ray. This facility is also used to train students interested in the field of cosmic rays.

  2. A sub-millimeter resolution PET detector module using a multi-pixel photon counter array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tae Yong; Wu, Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Siegel, Stefan B; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2010-05-07

    A PET block detector module using an array of sub-millimeter lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount, semiconductor photosensors has been developed. The detector consists of a LSO array, a custom acrylic light guide, a 3 x 3 multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) array (S10362-11-050P, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) and a readout board with a charge division resistor network. The LSO array consists of 100 crystals, each measuring 0.8 x 0.8 x 3 mm(3) and arranged in 0.86 mm pitches. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to aid the design and fabrication of a custom light guide to control distribution of scintillation light over the surface of the MPPC array. The output signals of the nine MPPC are multiplexed by a charge division resistor network to generate four position-encoded analog outputs. Flood image, energy resolution and timing resolution measurements were performed using standard NIM electronics. The linearity of the detector response was investigated using gamma-ray sources of different energies. The 10 x 10 array of 0.8 mm LSO crystals was clearly resolved in the flood image. The average energy resolution and standard deviation were 20.0% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and +/-5.0%, respectively, at 511 keV. The timing resolution of a single MPPC coupled to a LSO crystal was found to be 857 ps FWHM, and the value for the central region of detector module was 1182 ps FWHM when +/-10% energy window was applied. The nonlinear response of a single MPPC when used to read out a single LSO was observed among the corner crystals of the proposed detector module. However, the central region of the detector module exhibits significantly less nonlinearity (6.5% for 511 keV). These results demonstrate that (1) a charge-sharing resistor network can effectively multiplex MPPC signals and reduce the number of output signals without significantly degrading the performance of a PET detector and (2) a custom light guide to permit light sharing

  3. Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the Universidad Autonoma de Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotzomi, J.; Moreno, E.; Aguilar, S.; Palma, B.; Martinez, O.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.

    2002-07-01

    We describe the operation of an Extensive Air Shower Array located at the campus of the FCFM-BUAP. The array consists of 8 liquid scintillation detectors with a surface of 1 m2 each and a detector spacing of 20 m in a square grid. The array was designed to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary particles that generate extensive air showers (EAS) in the region of 1013 eV - 1016 eV. The angular distribution measured with this array, Cos8(Theta) xSin(Theta), agrees very well with the literature. We also present the measured energies of a number of vertical showers in the range of 5 x1012 eV to 5 x1013 eV.

  4. Implementation of digital multiplexing for high resolution X-ray detector arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate for the first time the use of the novel Multiple Module Multiplexer (MMMIC) for a 2×2 array of new electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) based x-ray detectors. It is highly desirable for x-ray imaging systems to have larger fields of view (FOV) extensible in two directions yet to still be capable of doing high resolution imaging over regions-of-interest (ROI). The MMMIC achieves these goals by acquiring and multiplexing data from an array of imaging modules thereby enabling a larger FOV, and at the same time allowing high resolution ROI imaging through selection of a subset of modules in the array. MMMIC also supports different binning modes. This paper describes how a specific two stage configuration connecting three identical MMMICs is used to acquire and multiplex data from a 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors. The first stage contains two MMMICs wherein each MMMIC is getting data from two EMCCD detectors. The multiplexed data from these MMMICs is then forwarded to the second stage MMMIC in the similar fashion. The second stage that has only one MMMIC gives the final 12 bit multiplexed data from four modules. This data is then sent over a high speed Camera Link interface to the image processing computer. X-ray images taken through the 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors using this two stage configuration of MMMICs are shown successfully demonstrating the concept.

  5. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section with Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and Surface Array in Hybrid Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Chae, M J; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, W R; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda1, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan1, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, K; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki1, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzawa, T; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2015-01-01

    In this work we are reporting on the measurement of the proton-air inelastic cross section $\\sigma^{\\rm inel}_{\\rm p-air}$ using the Telescope Array (TA) detector. Based on the measurement of the $\\sigma^{\\rm inel}_{\\rm p-air}$ the proton-proton cross section $\\sigma_{\\rm p-p}$ value is also determined at $\\sqrt{s} = 95$ TeV. Detecting cosmic ray events at ultra high energies with Telescope Array enables us to study this fundamental parameter that we are otherwise unable to access with particle accelerators. The data used in this report is collected over five years using hybrid events observed by the Middle Drum fluorescence detector together with the surface array detector. The value of the $\\sigma^{\\rm inel}_{\\rm p-air}$ is found to be equal to $ 567.0 \\pm 70.5 [{\\rm Stat.}] ^{+25}_{-29} [{\\rm Sys.}]$ mb. The total proton-proton cross section is subsequently inferred from Glauber Formalism and Block, Halzen and Stanev QCD inspired fit and is found to be equal to $170_{-44}^{+48} [{\\rm Stat.}] \\pm _{-19}^{+1...

  6. MUDAL: a 4 pi multi-detector array in Lanzhou for charged particle detection at HIRFL

    CERN Document Server

    Li Song Lin; Jin Ge; Xu Hu Shan; Yin Xu; Wang Xiao Qiu; Li Zu Yu; Lu Jun

    2002-01-01

    A 4 pi multidetector array of measuring charged particle is described. It consists of 276 detector units, each unit composed of fast and slow plastic scintillator phoswiches, fast plastic scintillator and CsI(Tl) phoswiches and silicon detector telescopes. It covers geometrically 86% of the 4 pi solid angle and has very low detection thresholds. The detectors, operated under vacuum, is axially symmetric. sup 1 sup , sup 2 sup , sup 3 H, sup 3 sup , sup 4 He and the elements from Li to Ar can be identified and their energies measured over a large dynamic range

  7. Detector block based on arrays of 144 SiPMs and monolithic scintillators: A performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, A.J.; Conde, P.; Iborra, A. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain); Aguilar, A. [Communications and Digital Systems Design Group (DSDC), Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Bellido, P. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain); García-Olcina, R. [Communications and Digital Systems Design Group (DSDC), Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Hernández, L.; Moliner, L.; Rigla, J.P.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M.J.; Sánchez, F.; Seimetz, M.; Soriano, A. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain); Torres, J. [Communications and Digital Systems Design Group (DSDC), Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Vidal, L.F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a detector block composed by a monolithic LYSO scintillator coupled to a custom made 12×12 SiPMs array. The design is mainly focused to applications such as Positron Emission Tomography. The readout electronics is based on 3 identical and scalable Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC). We have determined the main performance of the detector block namely spatial, energy, and time resolution but also the system capability to determine the photon depth of interaction, for different crystal surface treatments. Intrinsic detector spatial resolution values as good as 1.7 mm FWHM and energies of 15% for black painted crystals were measured.

  8. 1D goes 2D: A Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in superconducting arrays of 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhe

    2010-10-01

    We report superconducting resistive transition characteristics for array(s) of coupled 4-Angstrom single wall carbon nanotubes embedded in aluminophosphate-five zeolite. The transition was observed to initiate at 15 K with a slow resistance decrease switching to a sharp, order of magnitude drop between 7.5 and 6.0 K with strong (anisotropic) magnetic field dependence. Both the sharp resistance drop and its attendant nonlinear IV characteristics are consistent with the manifestations of a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition that establishes quasi long range order in the plane transverse to the c-axis of the nanotubes, leading to an inhomogeneous system comprising 3D superconducting regions connected by weak links. Global coherence is established at below 5 K with the appearance of a well-defined supercurrent gap/low resistance region at 2 K. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Project -- Fully Integrated Linear Detector ArrayStatus Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Roney; Robert Seifert; Bob Pink; Mike Smith

    2011-09-01

    The field-portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) x-ray inspection systems developed for the Project Manager for NonStockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) over the past 13 years have used linear diode detector arrays from two manufacturers; Thomson and Thales. These two manufacturers no longer produce this type of detector. In the interest of insuring the long term viability of the portable DRCT single munitions inspection systems and to improve the imaging capabilities, this project has been investigating improved, commercially available detectors. During FY-10, detectors were evaluated and one in particular, manufactured by Detection Technologies (DT), Inc, was acquired for possible integration into the DRCT systems. The remainder of this report describes the work performed in FY-11 to complete evaluations and fully integrate the detector onto a representative DRCT platform.

  10. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  11. THz Direct Detector and Heterodyne Receiver Arrays in Silicon Nanoscale Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzyb, Janusz; Pfeiffer, Ullrich

    2015-10-01

    The main scope of this paper is to address various implementation aspects of THz detector arrays in the nanoscale silicon technologies operating at room temperatures. This includes the operation of single detectors, detectors operated in parallel (arrays), and arrays of detectors operated in a video-camera mode with an internal reset to support continuous-wave illumination without the need to synchronize the source with the camera (no lock-in receiver required). A systematic overview of the main advantages and limitations in using silicon technologies for THz applications is given. The on-chip antenna design challenges and co-design aspects with the active circuitry are thoroughly analyzed for broadband detector/receiver operation. A summary of the state-of-the-art arrays of broadband THz direct detectors based on two different operation principles is presented. The first is based on the non-quasistatic resistive mixing process in a MOSFET channel, whereas the other relies on the THz signal rectification by nonlinearity of the base-emitter junction in a high-speed SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). For the MOSFET detector arrays implemented in a 65 nm bulk CMOS technology, a state-of-the-art optical noise equivalent power (NEP) of 14 pW/ at 720 GHz was measured, whereas for the HBT detector arrays in a 0.25 μm SiGe process technology, an optical NEP of 47 pW/ at 700 GHz was found. Based on the implemented 1k-pixel CMOS camera with an average power consumption of 2.5 μW/pixel, various design aspects specific to video-mode operation are outlined and co-integration issues with the readout circuitry are analyzed. Furthermore, a single-chip 2 × 2 array of heterodyne receivers for multi-color active imaging in a 160-1000 GHz band is presented with a well-balanced NEP across the operation bandwidth ranging from 0.1 to 0.24 fW/Hz (44.1-47.8 dB single-sideband NF) and an instantaneous IF bandwidth of 10 GHz. In its present implementation, the receiver RF

  12. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  13. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  14. High-efficiency WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors for quantum state engineering in the near infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Jeannic, H Le; Cavaillès, A; Marsili, F; Shaw, M D; Huang, K; Morin, O; Nam, S W; Laurat, J

    2016-01-01

    We report on high-efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors based on amorphous WSi and optimized at 1064 nm. At an operating temperature of 1.8 K, we demonstrated a 93% system detection efficiency at this wavelength with a dark noise of a few counts per second. Combined with cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion, this fiber-coupled detector enabled us to generate narrowband single photons with a heralding efficiency greater than 90% and a high spectral brightness of $0.6\\times10^4$ photons/(s$\\cdot$mW$\\cdot$MHz). Beyond single-photon generation at large rate, such high-efficiency detectors open the path to efficient multiple-photon heralding and complex quantum state engineering.

  15. Conceptual design of the early implementation of the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) with AGATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueyuek, Tayfun; Gadea, Andres; Domingo-Pardo, Cesar [Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC, Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Di Nitto, Antonio [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli (Italy); Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Jaworski, Grzegorz; Javier Valiente-Dobon, Jose; De Angelis, Giacomo; Modamio, Victor; Triossi, Andrea [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy); Nyberg, Johan [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden); Palacz, Marcin [University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Soederstroem, Paer-Anders [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Aliaga-Varea, Ramon Jose [Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC, Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, I3M, Valencia (Spain); Atac, Ayse [Ankara University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara (Turkey); The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Collado, Javier; Egea, Francisco Javier; Gonzalez, Vicente; Sanchis, Enrique [University of Valencia, Department of Electronic Engineering, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); Erduran, Nizamettin [Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul (Turkey); Ertuerk, Sefa [University of Nigde, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Arts, Nigde (Turkey); France, Gilles de [CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, CEA/DSAM, Caen (France); Gadea, Rafael; Herrero-Bosch, Vicente [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, I3M, Valencia (Spain); Kaskas, Ayse [Ankara University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara (Turkey); Moszynski, Marek [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Wadsworth, Robert [University of York, Department of Physics, York (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    The NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) project aims at the construction of a new high-efficiency compact neutron detector array to be coupled with large γ -ray arrays such as AGATA. The application of NEDA ranges from its use as selective neutron multiplicity filter for fusion-evaporation reaction to a large solid angle neutron tagging device. In the present work, possible configurations for the NEDA coupled with the Neutron Wall for the early implementation with AGATA has been simulated, using Monte Carlo techniques, in order to evaluate their performance figures. The goal of this early NEDA implementation is to improve, with respect to previous instruments, efficiency and capability to select multiplicity for fusion-evaporation reaction channels in which 1, 2 or 3 neutrons are emitted. Each NEDA detector unit has the shape of a regular hexagonal prism with a volume of about 3.23l and it is filled with the EJ301 liquid scintillator, that presents good neutron- γ discrimination properties. The simulations have been performed using a fusion-evaporation event generator that has been validated with a set of experimental data obtained in the {sup 58}Ni + {sup 56}Fe reaction measured with the Neutron Wall detector array. (orig.)

  16. Characterization of thermal cross-talk in a MEMS-based thermopile detector array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, H.; Grabarnik, S.; Emadi, A.; De Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    The spectral resolution of a MEMS-based IR microspectrometer critically depends on the thermal cross-talk between adjacent TE elements in the detector array. Thermal isolation between elements is realized by using bulk micromachining directly following CMOS processing. This paper reports on the char

  17. First Data with the Hybrid Array of Gamma-Ray Detectors (HAGRiD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karl; Burcher, S.; Carter, A. B.; Gryzwacz, R.; Jones, K. L.; Munoz, S.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Schmitt, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Chipps, K. A.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Baugher, T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Toomey, B.

    2016-09-01

    The structure of nuclei provides insight into astrophysical reaction rates that are difficult to measure directly. These studies are often performed with transfer reaction and beta-decay measurements. These experiments benefit from particle-gamma coincident measurements providing information beyond that of particle detection alone. The Hybrid Array of Gamma Ray Detectors (HAGRiD) of LaBr3(Ce) scintillators has been designed with this purpose in mind. The design of the array permits it to be coupled with particle detector systems, such as the Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors and the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE). It is also designed to operate with the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) advanced target system. HAGRiD's design avoids compromising the charged-particle angular resolution due to compact geometries often used to increase the gamma efficiency in other systems. First experimental data with HAGRiD coupled to VANDLE as well as ORRUBA and JENSA will be presented. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Nuclear Physics and the National Science Foundation.

  18. Conceptual design of the early implementation of the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) with AGATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüyük, Tayfun; Di Nitto, Antonio; Jaworski, Grzegorz; Gadea, Andrés; Javier Valiente-Dobón, José; Nyberg, Johan; Palacz, Marcin; Söderström, Pär-Anders; Jose Aliaga-Varea, Ramon; de Angelis, Giacomo; Ataç, Ayşe; Collado, Javier; Domingo-Pardo, Cesar; Egea, Francisco Javier; Erduran, Nizamettin; Ertürk, Sefa; de France, Gilles; Gadea, Rafael; González, Vicente; Herrero-Bosch, Vicente; Kaşkaş, Ayşe; Modamio, Victor; Moszynski, Marek; Sanchis, Enrique; Triossi, Andrea; Wadsworth, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) project aims at the construction of a new high-efficiency compact neutron detector array to be coupled with large γ-ray arrays such as AGATA. The application of NEDA ranges from its use as selective neutron multiplicity filter for fusion-evaporation reaction to a large solid angle neutron tagging device. In the present work, possible configurations for the NEDA coupled with the Neutron Wall for the early implementation with AGATA has been simulated, using Monte Carlo techniques, in order to evaluate their performance figures. The goal of this early NEDA implementation is to improve, with respect to previous instruments, efficiency and capability to select multiplicity for fusion-evaporation reaction channels in which 1, 2 or 3 neutrons are emitted. Each NEDA detector unit has the shape of a regular hexagonal prism with a volume of about 3.23l and it is filled with the EJ301 liquid scintillator, that presents good neutron- γ discrimination properties. The simulations have been performed using a fusion-evaporation event generator that has been validated with a set of experimental data obtained in the 58Ni + 56Fe reaction measured with the Neutron Wall detector array.

  19. Development of Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array for a new EAS hybrid Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jinsheng; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Ying; Zhai, Liuming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiaobin; Lin, Yuhui; Zhang, Xueyao; Feng, Cunfeng; Jia, Huanyu; Zhou, Xunxiu; DanZengLuoBu,; Chen, Tianlu; Li, Haijin; Liu, Maoyuan; Yuan, Aifang

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition at the "knee" energy region, we have been developinga new type air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522$^\\circ$ E, 30.102$^\\circ$ N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m$^2$) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thick and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to $10^{6}$ MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named "YAC-I", consists of 16 YAC detectors each having the size 40 cm $\\times$ 50 cm and distributing in a grid with an effective area of 10 m$^{2}$. YAC-I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment,...

  20. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  1. Testing and assembly of the detectors for the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera on ACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriage, T. A.; Chervenak, J. A.; Doriese, W. B.

    2006-04-01

    The Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera (MBAC) for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope consists of three Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays to make simultaneous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background in three frequency bands. MBAC TESs are NASA Goddard Pop-Up Detectors (PUD) which are read-out by NIST time-domain multiplexers. MBAC is constructed by stacking 1×32 TES columns to form the 32×32 element arrays. The arrays are modular (connectorized) at the 1×32 column level such that array assembly is reversible and camera repair possible. Prior to assembly, each column is tested in a quick (2h) cycling 4He/3He adsorption refrigerator. Tests include measurements of TES current voltage curves and TES complex impedance.

  2. Performance Measurements On A 32X32 InSb-CID Detector Array For Astronomical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiphene, D.; Lacombe, F.; Rouan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The use at liquid helium temperature of a InSb-CID detector array differs significantly from opera-tion at conditions usually adopted by the manufacturer (77K). In particular, the dark current behaviour hugely changes between the two temperatures. Only the tunnel current, independant of temperature conditions, is still active at 4.2K while the thermal-family currents vanish. We have studied the tunnel current of one InSb-MIS detector to determine its suitability to the low background conditions that will be met in the space experiment ISO. The search for the maximum integration time and the best quantum efficiency, the constraint about the photonic response linearity (especially at low photon flux), and the reduction of the readout noise constitute the main points of this study. Moreover, laboratory measurements showed secondary effects due to the detector (lag) or to the wiring (crosstalk). The CID array reactions to high energy radiations (Gamma rays) are finally discussed.

  3. Multiple detector focal plane array ultraviolet spectrometer for the AMPS laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of meeting the requirements of the amps spectroscopic instrumentation by using a multi-element focal plane detector array in a conventional spectrograph mount was examined. The requirements of the detector array were determined from the optical design of the spectrometer which in turn depends on the desired level of resolution and sensitivity required. The choice of available detectors and their associated electronics and controls was surveyed, bearing in mind that the data collection rate from this system is so great that on-board processing and reduction of data are absolutely essential. Finally, parallel developments in instrumentation for imaging in astronomy were examined, both in the ultraviolet (for the Large Space Telescope as well as other rocket and satellite programs) and in the visible, to determine what progress in that area can have direct bearing on atmospheric spectroscopy.

  4. ZnMgO Nanowire Based Detectors and Detector Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this STTR program, Structured Materials Industries (SMI) and partners propose to develop an electrically contacted zinc magnesium oxide (ZnMgO) nanowire array for...

  5. Multiplexed Readout of MMC Detector Arrays Using Non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, S.; Wegner, M.; Gastaldo, L.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.

    2014-08-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to X-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQUID multiplexer that employs non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs to create a frequency shift of high resonators that is in accordance with the detector signal and that can be monitored by using standard microwave measurement techniques. In this paper we discuss the design of a recently developed and fabricated 64 pixel detector array with integrated microwave SQUID multiplexer that was produced to test the suitability of this readout technique. The characterization of dc-SQUIDs with virtually identical washer design compared to the rf-SQUIDs of the SQUID multiplexer revealed that the crucial SQUID parameters such as the critical current of the Josephson junctions or the washer inductance are close to the design values and anticipates a successful operation of the SQUID multiplexer.

  6. InGaAs Schottky barrier diode array detectors integrated with broadband antenna (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Eui Su; Park, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Il-Min; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2017-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) waves have been actively studied for the applications of astronomy, communications, analytical science and bio-technologies due to their low energy and high frequency. For example, THz systems can carry more information with faster rates than GHz systems. Besides, THz waves can be applied to imaging, sensing, and spectroscopy. Furthermore, THz waves can be used for non-destructive and non-harmful tomography of living objects. In this reasons, Schottky barrier diodes (SBD) have been widely used as a THz detector for their ultrafast carrier transport, high responsivity, high sensitivity, and excellent noise equivalent power. Furthermore, SBD detectors envisage developing THz applications at low cost, excellent capability, and high yield. Since the major concerns in the THz detectors for THz imaging systems are the realizations of the real-time image acquisitions via a reduced acquisition time, rather than the conventional raster scans that obtains an image by pixel-by-pixel acquisitions, a line-scan based systems utilizes an array detector with an 1 × n SBD array is preferable. In this study, we fabricated the InGaAs based SBD array detectors with broadband antennas of log-spiral and square-spiral patterns. To optimize leakage current and ideality factor, the dependence to the doping levels of ohmic and Schottky layers have been investigated. In addition, the dependence to the capacitance and resistance to anode size are also examined as well. As a consequence, the real-time THz imaging with our InGaAs SBD array detector have been successfully obtained.

  7. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelljes, T S; Harmeyer, A; Reuter, J; Looe, H K; Chofor, N; Harder, D; Poppe, B

    2015-04-01

    The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm(2) measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array's readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor kNR for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array's central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1% over the range from 5 to 1000 MU. The

  8. New detector array - the HRIBF Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinska-Cichocka, Marzena; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof; Karny, Marek; Kuzniak, Aleksandra; Grzywacz, Robert; Rasco, Charlie; Miller, David; Gross, Carl J.; Johnson, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The construction of a new Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be presented. The total absorption gamma spectra measured with MTAS will be used to derive a true beta-feeding pattern and resulting beta strength function for fission products. In particular, the measurements of decay heat released by radioactive nuclei produced in nuclear fuels at power reactors will be performed. MTAS is made up of 19 large NaI(Tl) crystals each encapsulated with a 0.8-mm-thick carbon fiber. There are also two 1-mm- thick Silicon Strip Detectors surrounding a moving tape collector that count beta-energy loss signals. The structure is shielded by more than 1-inch of lead around MTAS which reduces background radiation significantly. MTAS efficiency for full energy deposition of gamma ray approaches nearly 90% for 300 keV gammas and over 75% for a 5 MeV gamma transition. Research supported by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics.

  9. Magnetic field induced phase branches of the superconducting transition in two-dimensional square Π-loop arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dang-Ting; Tian Ye; Chen Geng-Hua; Yang Qian-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Based on the results of explicit forms of free energy density for each possible arrangement of magnetization fluxes in large-scale two-dimensional (2D) square Π-loop arrays given by Li et al [2007 Chin.Phys.16 1450],the field-cooled superconducting phase transition is further investigated by analysing the free energy of the arrays with a simplified symmetrical model.Our analytical result is exactly the same as that obtained in Li's paper by means of numerical calculations.It is shown that the phase transition splits into two branches with either ferromagnetic or anti-ferromagnetic flux ordering,which depends periodically on the strength of external magnetic flux φe through each loop and monotonically on the screen parameter β of the loops in the arrays.In principle,the diagram of the phase branches is similar to that of its one-dimensional counterpart.The influence of thermal fluctuation on the flux ordering during the transition from normal to superconducting states of the Π-loop arrays is also discussed.

  10. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tate, Mark W; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert M; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2015-01-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (EMPAD - electron microscope pixel array detector) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128 x 128 pixel detector consists of a 500 um thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as loc...

  11. Multiplexed Readout for 1000-pixel Arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    van Rantwijk, Joris; van Loon, Dennis; Yates, Stephen; Baryshev, Andrey; Baselmans, Jochem

    2015-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) are the most attractive radiation detectors for far-infrared and sub-mm astronomy: They combine ultimate sensitivity with the possibility to create very large detector arrays, in excess of 10 000 pixels. This is possible by reading-out the arrays using RF frequency division multiplexing, which allows multiplexing ratios in excess of 1000 pixels per readout line. We describe a novel readout system for large arrays of MKIDs, operating in a 2 GHz band in the 4-8 GHz range. The readout, which is a combination of a digital front- and back-end and an analog up- and down-converter system, can read out up to 4000 detectors simultaneously with 1 kHz datarate. The system achieves a readout noise power spectral density of -98 dBc/Hz while reading 1000 carriers simultaneously, which scales linear with the number of carriers. We demonstrate that 4000 state-of-the-art Aluminium-NbTiN MKIDs can be read out without deteriorating their intrinsic performance.

  12. The performance of a prototype array of water Cherenkov detectors for the LHAASO project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Q. [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Bai, Y.X.; Bi, X.J.; Cao, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chang, J.F. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, G.; Chen, M.J. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, S.M. [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, S.Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, T.L. [University of Tibet, Lhasa 851600 (China); Chen, X. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Y.T. [University of Yunnan, Kunming 650091 (China); Cui, S.W. [Normal University of Hebei, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Dai, B.Z. [University of Yunnan, Kunming 650091 (China); Du, Q. [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Danzengluobu [University of Tibet, Lhasa 851600 (China); Feng, C.F. [University of Shandong, Jinan 250100 (China); Feng, S.H.; Gao, B. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao, S.Q. [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); and others

    2013-10-01

    A large high-altitude air-shower observatory (LHAASO) is to be built at Shangri-La, Yunnan Province, China. This observatory is intended to conduct sub-TeV gamma astronomy, and as an important component of the LHAASO project, a water Cherenkov detector array (WCDA) is proposed. To investigate engineering issues and fully understand the water Cherenkov technique for detecting air showers, a prototype array at 1% scale of the LHAASO-WCDA has been built at Yang-Ba-Jing, Tibet, China. This paper introduces the prototype array setup and studies its performance by counting rate of each photomultiplier tube (PMT), trigger rates at different PMT multiplicities, and responses to air showers. Finally, the reconstructed shower directions and angular resolutions of the detected showers for the prototype array are given. -- Highlights: • The technique of the water Cherenkov array is studied. • Engineering issues of the water Cherenkov array are investigated. • The PMTs and electronics of the water Cherenkov array are tested. • Some key parameters of the water Cherenkov array are measured.

  13. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Philipp, Hugh T.; Wilke, Robin N.; Aquila, Andrew; Osterhoff, Markus; Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S.; Zozulya, Alexey V.; Salditt, Tim; Gruner, Sol M.; Mancuso, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 108 8-keV photons pixel−1 s−1, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 1010 photons µm−2 s−1 within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described. PMID:25178008

  14. Multiplexed readout demonstration of a TES-based detector array in a resistance locked loop

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kuur, Jan; Kiviranta, Mikko; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Khosropanah, Pourya; Hartog, Roland den; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Jackson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    TES-based bolometer and microcalorimeter arrays with thousands of pixels are under development for several space-based and ground-based applications. A linear detector response and low levels of cross talk facilitate the calibration of the instruments. In an effort to improve the properties of TES-based detectors, fixing the TES resistance in a resistance-locked loop (RLL) under optical loading has recently been proposed. Earlier theoretical work on this mode of operation has shown that the detector speed, linearity and dynamic range should improve with respect to voltage biased operation. This paper presents an experimental demonstration of multiplexed readout in this mode of operation in a TES-based detector array with noise equivalent power values (NEP) of $3.5\\cdot 10^{-19} $W/$\\sqrt{\\mathrm{Hz}}$. The measured noise and dynamic properties of the detector in the RLL will be compared with the earlier modelling work. Furthermore, the practical implementation routes for future FDM systems for the readout of ...

  15. Photoacoustic projection imaging using a 64-channel fiber optic detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Felbermayer, Karoline; Bouchal, Klaus-Dieter; Veres, Istvan A.; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present photoacoustic projection imaging with a 64-channel integrating line detector array, which average the pressure over cylindrical surfaces. For imaging, the line detectors are arranged parallel to each other on a cylindrical surface surrounding a specimen. Thereby, the three-dimensional imaging problem is reduced to a twodimensional problem, facilitating projection imaging. After acquisition of a dataset of pressure signals, a twodimensional photoacoustic projection image is reconstructed. The 64 channel line detector array is realized using optical fibers being part of interferometers. The parts of the interferometers used to detect the ultrasonic pressure waves consist of graded-index polymer-optical fibers (POFs), which exhibit better sensitivity than standard glass-optical fibers. Ultrasonic waves impinging on the POFs change the phase of light in the fiber-core due to the strain-optic effect. This phase shifts, representing the pressure signals, are demodulated using high-bandwidth balanced photo-detectors. The 64 detectors are optically multiplexed to 16 detection channels, thereby allowing fast imaging. Results are shown on a Rhodamine B dyed microsphere.

  16. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaart, Dennis R; van Dam, Herman T; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J

    2009-06-07

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e.g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanche photodiodes. Here we present a novel detector design with DOI correction, in which a position-sensitive SiPM array is used to read out a monolithic scintillator. Initial characterization of a prototype detector consisting of a 4 x 4 SiPM array coupled to either the front or back surface of a 13.2 mm x 13.2 mm x 10 mm LYSO:Ce(3+) crystal shows that front-side readout results in significantly better performance than conventional back-side readout. Spatial resolutions <1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) were measured at the detector centre in response to an approximately 0.54 mm FWHM diameter test beam. Hardly any resolution losses were observed at angles of incidence up to 45 degrees , demonstrating excellent DOI correction. About 14% FWHM energy resolution was obtained. The timing resolution, measured in coincidence with a BaF(2) detector, equals 960 ps FWHM.

  17. Assessment of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2-D image acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da; Santanna, Claudio Reis de [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: borges@ien.gov.br; santanna@ien.gov.br; Braz, Delson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br; Carvalho, Denise Pires de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Fisiologia Endocrina]. E-mail: dencarv@ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array to be used coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD), through a fiber optic plate. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits a 2-dimensional imaging acquisition of a cell thyroid tissue application with high resolution and detection efficiency in order to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A point or volumetric source - detector simulation by using a MCNP4B general code, considering different source energies, detector materials and geometry including pixel sizes and reflector types was performed. In this study, simulations were performed for 7 x 7 and 127 x 127 arrays using CsI(Tl) and BGO scintillation crystals with pixel size ranging from 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} to 10 x 10 {mu}m{sup 2} and radiation thickness ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The effect of all these parameters was investigated to find the best source-detector system that result in an image with the best contrast details. The results showed that it is possible to design a specific imaging system that allows searching for in-vitro studies, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology. (author)

  18. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaart, Dennis R; Dam, Herman T van; Seifert, Stefan; Beekman, Freek J [Delft University of Technology, Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Loehner, Herbert [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: d.r.schaart@tudelft.nl

    2009-06-07

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e.g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanche photodiodes. Here we present a novel detector design with DOI correction, in which a position-sensitive SiPM array is used to read out a monolithic scintillator. Initial characterization of a prototype detector consisting of a 4 x 4 SiPM array coupled to either the front or back surface of a 13.2 mm x 13.2 mm x 10 mm LYSO:Ce{sup 3+} crystal shows that front-side readout results in significantly better performance than conventional back-side readout. Spatial resolutions <1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) were measured at the detector centre in response to an {approx}0.54 mm FWHM diameter test beam. Hardly any resolution losses were observed at angles of incidence up to 45 deg., demonstrating excellent DOI correction. About 14% FWHM energy resolution was obtained. The timing resolution, measured in coincidence with a BaF{sub 2} detector, equals 960 ps FWHM.

  19. X-ray Characterization of a Multichannel Smart-Pixel Array Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Steve; Haji-Sheikh, Michael; Huntington, Andrew; Kline, David; Lee, Adam; Li, Yuelin; Rhee, Jehyuk; Tarpley, Mary; Walko, Donald A.; Westberg, Gregg; Williams, George; Zou, Haifeng; Landahl, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Voxtel VX-798 is a prototype X-ray pixel array detector (PAD) featuring a silicon sensor photodiode array of 48 x 48 pixels, each 130 mu m x 130 mu m x 520 mu m thick, coupled to a CMOS readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The first synchrotron X-ray characterization of this detector is presented, and its ability to selectively count individual X-rays within two independent arrival time windows, a programmable energy range, and localized to a single pixel is demonstrated. During our first trial run at Argonne National Laboratory's Advance Photon Source, the detector achieved a 60 ns gating time and 700 eV full width at half-maximum energy resolution in agreement with design parameters. Each pixel of the PAD holds two independent digital counters, and the discriminator for X-ray energy features both an upper and lower threshold to window the energy of interest discarding unwanted background. This smart-pixel technology allows energy and time resolution to be set and optimized in software. It is found that the detector linearity follows an isolated dead-time model, implying that megahertz count rates should be possible in each pixel. Measurement of the line and point spread functions showed negligible spatial blurring. When combined with the timing structure of the synchrotron storage ring, it is demonstrated that the area detector can perform both picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements.

  20. Bias dependence of the response of superconducting tunnel junctions used as photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Poelaert, A; Peacock, A; Kozorezov, A; Wigmore, J K

    2000-01-01

    In the last decade, several research groups have developed superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) for photon detection in astronomy. Despite extensive studies, the behavior of multi-layered devices, subject to the superconducting proximity effect (proximized devices), has remained difficult to model. Recently, a new model has been presented, leading to a more realistic approach for the photon detection within an STJ. This model is based on the existence of local traps in the superconducting electrodes of the STJ. In this paper, we show that the new model is successful in predicting the bias dependence of the response of an STJ. The bias dependence also demonstrates that the quasiparticles, i.e. the charge carriers created as a result of the photon absorption process, cannot relax down to the superconducting energy gap. This result is important, since most theoretical developments to date (implicitly) assume that quasiparticle relax to the gap energy. crystal-structure; energy-levels; tantalum-; traps cooper-p...

  1. Operation of a titanium nitride superconducting microresonator detector in the nonlinear regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swenson, L.J.; Day, P.K.; Eom, B.H.; Leduc, H.G.; Llombart, N.; McKenney, C.M.; Noroozian, O.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2013-01-01

    If driven sufficiently strongly, superconducting microresonators exhibit nonlinear behavior including response bifurcation. This behavior can arise from a variety of physical mechanisms including heating effects, grain boundaries or weak links, vortex penetration, or through the intrinsic nonlineari

  2. Study on simulation and experiment of array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS (High-field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry) was introduced, with which the size of the FAIMS system was reduced. With simple structure, good stability, low noise, large measurements range, this detector can work under the condition of atmospheric pressure. The array micro Faraday cup was composed of gate electrode, sensitive electrode and shielding electrode. The sensitive electrode was made of tens of crossing silicon columns with diameter of 200 μm. It was fabricated through typical MEMS technology, which was compatible completely with plane FAIMS. It was shown from FLUENT simulation result that the resistance to gas motion was low and the flow field distribution was helpful for full absorption of the ion in this array design. Through electricity simulation, the method to reduce interference on the detection signal of the micro Faraday cup was given out. Connecting with KEITHLEY 237 ampere meter, the noise level of the array micro Faraday cup was lower than 0.5 pA. The output signal of the acetone sample measured by experiment was about 210 pA. Through contrast experiment, the design parameter of the micro Faraday cup was obtained primarily. This array micro Faraday cup can meet the requirements of the FAIMS system.

  3. Neutron-induced reaction cross-section measurements using a small multi-detector array and description of a large array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J-P Meulders; I Slypen; S Benck; E Raeymackers; J Cabrera; Ch Dufauquez; T Keutgen; V Roberfroid; I Tilquin; Y El Masri; V Corcalciuc; N Nice

    2001-07-01

    The experimental setup of Louvain-la-Neuve (UCL-Belgium) used to perform lightcharged particle production experiment in fast neutron-induced reactions is presented. A short description of the neutron modular detector DEMON is also given. DEMON is a detector array for neutrons emitted in heavy ion induced reactions at low to intermediate energies.

  4. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelljes, T. S., E-mail: tenzin.s.stelljes@uni-oldenburg.de; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Poppe, B. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26129 (Germany); Harmeyer, A.; Reuter, J. [WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm{sup 2} measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor k{sub NR} for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1

  5. Fabrication of Silicon Backshorts with Improved Out-of-Band Rejection for Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Erik J.; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Denis, Kevin L.; Eimer, Joseph; Lourie, Nathan; Marriage, Tobias; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Towner, Deborah; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a ground-based instrument that will measure the polarization of the cosmic microqave background to search for gravitational waves form a posited epoch of inflation early in the universe's history. This measurement will require integration of superconducting transition-edge sensors with microwave waveguide inputs with good conrol of systematic errors, such as unwanted coupling to stray signals at frequencies outside of a precisely defined microwave band. To address these needs we will present work on the fabrication of silicon quarter-wave backshorts for the CLASS 40GHz focal plane. The 40GHz backshort consists of three degeneratively doped silicon wafers. Two spacer wafers are micromachined with through wafer vins to provide a 2.0mm long square waveguide. The third wafer acts as the backshort cap. The three wafers are bonded at the wafer level by Au-Au thermal compression bonding then aligned and flip chip bonded to the CLASS detector at the chip level. The micromachining techniques used have been optimized to create high aspect ratio waveguides, silicon pillars, and relief trenches with the goal of providing improved out of band signal rejection. We will discuss the fabrication of integrated CLASS superconducting detectors with silicon quarter wave backshorts and present current measurement results.

  6. Materials preparation and fabrication of pyroelectric polymer/silicon MOSFET detector arrays. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomfield, P. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    1992-03-27

    The authors have delivered several 64-element linear arrays of pyroelectric elements fully integrated on silicon wafers with MOS readout devices. They have delivered detailed drawings of the linear arrays to LANL. They have processed a series of two inch wafers per submitted design. Each two inch wafer contains two 64 element arrays. After spin-coating copolymer onto the arrays, vacuum depositing the top electrodes, and polarizing the copolymer films so as to make them pyroelectrically active, each wafer was split in half. The authors developed a thicker oxide coating separating the extended gate electrode (beneath the polymer detector) from the silicon. This should reduce its parasitic capacitance and hence improve the S/N. They provided LANL three processed 64 element sensor arrays. Each array was affixed to a connector panel and selected solder pads of the common ground, the common source voltage supply connections, the 64 individual drain connections, and the 64 drain connections (for direct pyroelectric sensing response rather than the MOSFET action) were wire bonded to the connector panel solder pads. This entails (64 + 64 + 1 + 1) = 130 possible bond connections per 64 element array. This report now details the processing steps and the progress of the individual wafers as they were carried through from beginning to end.

  7. Superconducting single X-ray photon detector based on W0.8Si0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, X; Schilling, A

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated a superconducting single X-ray photon detector based on W0.8Si0.2, and we characterized its basic detection performance for keV-photons at different temperatures. The detector has a critical temperature of 4.97 K, and it is able to be operated up to 4.8 K, just below the critical temperature. The detector starts to react to X-ray photons at relatively low bias currents, less than 1% of Ic at T = 1.8 K, and it shows a saturated count rate dependence on bias current at all temperatures, indicating that the optimum internal quantum efficiency can always be reached. Dark counts are negligible up to the highest investigated bias currents (99% of Ic) and operating temperature (4.8 K). The latching effect affects the detector performance at all temperatures due to the fast recovery of the bias current; however, further modifications of the device geometry are expected to reduce the tendency for latching.

  8. Superconducting single X-ray photon detector based on W0.8Si0.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofu Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a superconducting single X-ray photon detector based on W0.8Si0.2, and we characterized its basic detection performance for keV-photons at different temperatures. The detector has a critical temperature of 4.97 K, and it is able to be operated up to 4.8 K, just below the critical temperature. The detector starts to react to X-ray photons at relatively low bias currents, less than 1% of Ic at T = 1.8 K, and it shows a saturated count rate dependence on bias current at all temperatures, indicating that the optimum internal quantum efficiency can always be reached. Dark counts are negligible up to the highest investigated bias currents (99% of Ic and operating temperature (4.8 K. The latching effect affects the detector performance at all temperatures due to the fast recovery of the bias current; however, further modifications of the device geometry are expected to reduce the tendency for latching.

  9. Investigation of Very Fast Light Detectors: Silicon Photomultiplier and Micro PMT for a Cosmic Ray Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Omar; Reyes, Liliana; Hooks, Tyler; Perez, Luis; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To construct a cosmic detector array using 4 scintillation detectors, we investigated 2 recent light sensor technologies from Hamamatsu, as possible readout detectors. First, we investigated several homemade versions of the multipixel photon counter (MPPC) light sensors. These detectors were either biased with internal or external high voltage power supplies. We made extensive measurements to confirm for the coincidence of the MPPC devices. Each sensor is coupled to a wavelength shifting fiber (WSF) that is embedded along a plastic scintillator sheet (30cmx60cmx1/4''). Using energetic cosmic rays, we evaluated several of these homemade detector modules placed above one another in a light proof enclosure. Next, we assembled 2 miniaturized micro photomultiplier (micro PMT), a device recently marketed by Hamamatsu. These sensors showed very fast response times. With 3 WSF embedded in scintillator sheets, we performed coincidence experiments. The detector waveforms were captured using the 5GS/sec domino ring sampler, the DRS4 and our workflow using the CERN PAW package and data analysis results would be presented. Title V Grant.

  10. Quantum efficiency performances of the NIR European Large Format Array detectors tested at ESTEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzet, P.-E.; Duvet, L.; de Wit, F.; Beaufort, T.; Blommaert, S.; Butler, B.; Van Duinkerken, G.; ter Haar, J.; Heijnen, J.; van der Luijt, K.; Smit, H.

    2015-10-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 10/12/2015, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 10/23/2015. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. The Payload Technology Validation Section (SRE-FV) at ESTEC has the goal to validate new technology for future or on-going mission. In this framework, a test set up to characterize the quantum efficiency of near-infrared (NIR) detectors has been created. In the context of the NIR European Large Format Array ("LFA"), 3 deliverables detectors coming from SELEX-UK/ATC (UK) on one side, and CEA/LETI- CEA/IRFU-SOFRADIR (FR) on the other side were characterized. The quantum efficiency of an HAWAII-2RG detector from Teledyne was as well measured. The capability to compare on the same setup detectors from different manufacturers is a unique asset for the future mission preparation office. This publication will present the quantum efficiency results of a HAWAII-2RG detector from Teledyne with a 2.5um cut off compared to the LFA European detectors prototypes developed independently by SELEX-UK/ATC (UK) on one side, and CEA/LETI- CEA/IRFU-SOFRADIR (FR) on the other side.

  11. Underground Water Cherenkov Muon Detector Array with the Tibet Air Shower Array for Gamma-Ray Astronomy in the 100 TeV Region

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Feng Zhao Yang; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Feng Cun Feng; Feng, Z; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanj, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Tori, S; Wang, B; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhamg, N J; Zhamg, X, Y; Zhamg, Y; Zhamg, Yi; Zha Xisang Zhu; Zhou, X X; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We propose to build a large water-Cherenkov-type muon-detector array (Tibet MD array) around the 37,000 m$^{2}$ Tibet air shower array (Tibet AS array) already constructed at 4,300 m above sea level in Tibet, China. Each muon detector is a waterproof concrete pool, 6 m wide $\\times$ 6 m long $\\times$ 1.5 m deep in size, equipped with a 20 inch-in-diameter PMT. The Tibet MD array consists of 240 muon detectors set up 2.5 m underground. Its total effective area will be 8,640 m$^{2}$ for muon detection. The Tibet MD array will significantly improve gamma-ray sensitivity of the Tibet AS array in the 100 TeV region (10-1000 TeV) by means of gamma/hadron separation based on counting the number of muons accompanying an air shower. The Tibet AS+MD array will have the sensitivity to gamma rays in the 100 TeV region by an order of magnitude better than any other previous existing detectors in the world.

  12. Feasibility Study for a Dual Field of View-Single Detector Array Infrared System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    the background is shown in Figure 2-8. In this system the field stop is scare I with a vertical slit and essentially all the energy falling on the...cylindrical mirror will be o focused as a vertical iine on the detector array. Several of the previous problems have been solved in this system. The...patterns Limillid only by DAC, AD,,.J Access y u, limited by speed. anid Display Mtsaitor strict possible formats. xalbe Modification of timing salto

  13. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS): 38 GHz detector array of bolometric polarimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Appel, John W; Amiri, Mandana; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Harrington, Kathleen; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F; Huang, Caroline; Irwin, Kent; Jones, Glenn; Karakla, John; Kogut, Alan J; Larson, David; Limon, Michele; Lowry, Lindsay; Marriage, Tobias; Mehrle, Nicholas; Miller, Amber D; Miller, Nathan; Moseleyb, Samuel H; Novakh, Giles; Reintsemad, Carl; Rostemab, Karwan; Stevensonb, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wagner, Emily; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) experiment aims to map the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at angular scales larger than a few degrees. Operating from Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert of Chile, it will observe over 65% of the sky at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. In this paper we discuss the design, construction, and characterization of the CLASS 38 GHz detector focal plane, the first ever Q-band bolometric polarimeter array.

  14. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS): 38 GHz Detector Array of Bolometric Polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, John W.; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Harrington, Kathleen; Kogut, Alan J..; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel H.; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) experiment aims to map the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at angular scales larger than a few degrees. Operating from Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert of Chile, it will observe over 65% of the sky at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. In this paper we discuss the design, construction, and characterization of the CLASS 38 GHz detector focal plane, the first ever Q-band bolometric polarimeter array.

  15. The feasibility of low-mass conductors for toroidal superconducting magnets for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luton, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    An earlier study by Luton and Bonanos concluded that the design and fabrication of superconducting toroidal bending magnets would require a major effort but would be feasible. This study is an extension to examine the feasibility of low-mass conductors for such use. It included a literature search, consultations, with conductor manufacturers, and design calculations, but no experimental work. An unoptimized sample design that used a residual resistivity ratio for aluminum of 1360 and a current density of 3.5 kA/cm{sup 2} over the uninsulated conductor for a 4.5-T toroid with 1 GJ of stored energy obtained a hot-spot temperature of 120 K with a maximum dump voltage of 3.6 kV and 24% of the initial current inductively transferred into the shorted aluminum structure. The stability margin was 200 mJ/cm{sup 3} of cable space. Limiting the quench pressure to 360 atm to give conservative stresses in the sheath and assuming that the whole flow path quenched immediately resulted in helium taps that could be a kilometer apart if the flow friction factor were the same as that experienced in the Westinghouse (W) Large Coil Task (LCT) coil. This indicates that the 520-m conductor length of each of the 72 individual coil segments of a toroid would be a single flow path. If some practical uncertainties can be favorably resolved by producing and testing sample conductors, the use of a conductor with clad-aluminum stabilizer and extruded aluminum-alloy sheath should be feasible and economical. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Lung counting: comparison of detector performance with a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fibre end caps, and the effect on mda calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Hauck, Barry; Kramer, Gary H

    2012-08-01

    This study described the performance of an array of high-purity Germanium detectors, designed with two different end cap materials-steel and carbon fibre. The advantages and disadvantages of using this detector type in the estimation of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for different energy peaks of isotope (152)Eu were illustrated. A Monte Carlo model was developed to study the detection efficiency for the detector array. A voxelised Lawrence Livermore torso phantom, equipped with lung, chest plates and overlay plates, was used to mimic a typical lung counting protocol with the array of detectors. The lung of the phantom simulated the volumetric source organ. A significantly low MDA was estimated for energy peaks at 40 keV and at a chest wall thickness of 6.64 cm.

  17. Performance of the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, W. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Madurga, M.; Matei, C.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Bardayan, D. W.; Brune, C. R.; Allen, J.; Allen, J. M.; Bergstrom, Z.; Blackmon, J.; Brewer, N. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Copp, P.; Howard, M. E.; Ikeyama, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Manning, B.; Massey, T. N.; Matos, M.; Merino, E.; O'Malley, P. D.; Raiola, F.; Reingold, C. S.; Sarazin, F.; Spassova, I.; Taylor, S.; Walter, D.

    2016-11-01

    The Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) is a new, highly efficient plastic-scintillator array constructed for decay and transfer reaction experimental setups that require neutron detection. The versatile and modular design allows for customizable experimental setups including beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy and (d,n) transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics. The neutron energy and prompt-photon discrimination is determined through the time of flight technique. Fully digital data acquisition electronics and integrated triggering logic enables some VANDLE modules to achieve an intrinsic efficiency over 70% for 300-keV neutrons, measured through two different methods. A custom GEANT4 simulation models aspects of the detector array and the experimental setups to determine efficiency and detector response. A low detection threshold, due to the trigger logic and digitizing data acquisition, allowed us to measure the light-yield response curve from elastically scattered carbon nuclei inside the scintillating plastic from incident neutrons with kinetic energies below 2 MeV.

  18. A Noble Gas Detector with Electroluminescence Readout based on an Array of APDs

    CERN Document Server

    Bourguille, B; Gil-Botella, I; Lux, T; Palomares, C; Sanchez, F; Santorelli, R

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the operation of an array of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) for the readout of an electroluminescence detector. The detector contains 24 APDs with a pitch of 15 mm between them allowing energy and position measurements simultaneously. Measurements were performed in xenon (3.8 bar) and argon (4.8 bar) showing a good energy resolution of 5.3% FWHM at 60 keV in xenon and 9.4% in argon respectively. In X-ray energies of 13 could be clearly separated from the pedestals indicating that this kind of technology might be also interesting for dark matter detectors. Following Monte Carlo studies the performance could be improved significantly by reducing the pitch between the sensors.

  19. Development of arrays of Silicon Drift Detectors and readout ASIC for the SIDDHARTA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglia, R.; Schembari, F.; Bellotti, G.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Ficorella, F.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the development of new Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and readout electronics for the upgrade of the SIDDHARTA experiment. The detector is based on a SDDs array organized in a 4×2 format with each SDD square shaped with 64 mm2 (8×8) active area. The total active area of the array is therefore 32×16 mm2 while the total area of the detector (including 1 mm border dead area) is 34 × 18mm2. The SIDDHARTA apparatus requires 48 of these modules that are designed and manufactured by Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK). The readout electronics is composed by CMOS preamplifiers (CUBEs) and by the new SFERA (SDDs Front-End Readout ASIC) circuit. SFERA is a 16-channels readout ASIC designed in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology, which features in each single readout channel a high order shaping amplifier (9th order Semi-Gaussian complex-conjugate poles) and a high efficiency pile-up rejection logic. The outputs of the channels are connected to an analog multiplexer for the external analog to digital conversion. An on-chip 12-bit SAR ADC is also included. Preliminary measurements of the detectors in the single SDD format are reported. Also measurements of low X-ray energies are reported in order to prove the possible extension to the soft X-ray range.

  20. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.giewekemeyer@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Philipp, Hugh T. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Wilke, Robin N. [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Aquila, Andrew [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Osterhoff, Markus [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Zozulya, Alexey V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Gruner, Sol M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Kavli Institute of Cornell for Nanoscience, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mancuso, Adrian P. [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-08-07

    The advantages of a novel wide dynamic range hard X-ray detector are demonstrated for (ptychographic) coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 10{sup 8} 8-keV photons pixel{sup −1} s{sup −1}, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 10{sup 10} photons µm{sup −2} s{sup −1} within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described.

  1. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    A high-speed pixel array detector for time-resolved X-ray imaging at synchrotrons has been developed. The ability to isolate single synchrotron bunches makes it ideal for time-resolved dynamical studies. A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  2. Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

    1982-10-01

    The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired ..delta..p/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200..mu.. resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A.

  3. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B. [Xsirius, Inc, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  4. Uniform non-stoichiometric titanium nitride thin films for improved kinetic inductance detector array

    CERN Document Server

    Coiffard, G; Driessen, E F C; Pignard, S; Calvo, M; Catalano, A; Goupy, J; Monfardini, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the fabrication of homogeneous sub-stoichiometric titanium nitride films for microwave kinetic inductance detector (mKID) arrays. Using a 6 inch sputtering target and a homogeneous nitrogen inlet, the variation of the critical temperature over a 2 inch wafer was reduced to <25 %. Measurements of a 132-pixel mKID array from these films reveal a sensitivity of 16 kHz/pW in the 100 GHz band, comparable to the best aluminium mKIDs. We measured a noise equivalent power of NEP = 3.6e-15 Hz/Hz^(1/2). Finally, we describe possible routes to further improve the performance of these TiN mKID arrays.

  5. Microelectrode arrays with overlapped diffusion layers as electroanalytical detectors: theory and basic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomčík, Peter

    2013-10-11

    This contribution contains a survey of basic literature dealing with arrays of microelectrodes with overlapping diffusion layers as prospective tools in contemporary electrochemistry. Photolithographic thin layer technology allows the fabrication of sensors of micrometric dimensions separated with a very small gap. This fact allows the diffusion layers of single microelectrodes to overlap as members of the array. Various basic types of microelectrode arrays with interacting diffusion layers are described and their analytical abilities are accented. Theoretical approaches to diffusion layer overlapping and the consequences of close constitution effects such as collection efficiency and redox cycling are discussed. Examples of basis applications in electroanalytical chemistry such as amperometric detectors in HPLC and substitutional stripping voltammetry are also given.

  6. Microelectrode Arrays with Overlapped Diffusion Layers as Electroanalytical Detectors: Theory and Basic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Tomčík

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This contribution contains a survey of basic literature dealing with arrays of microelectrodes with overlapping diffusion layers as prospective tools in contemporary electrochemistry. Photolithographic thin layer technology allows the fabrication of sensors of micrometric dimensions separated with a very small gap. This fact allows the diffusion layers of single microelectrodes to overlap as members of the array. Various basic types of microelectrode arrays with interacting diffusion layers are described and their analytical abilities are accented. Theoretical approaches to diffusion layer overlapping and the consequences of close constitution effects such as collection efficiency and redox cycling are discussed. Examples of basis applications in electroanalytical chemistry such as amperometric detectors in HPLC and substitutional stripping voltammetry are also given.

  7. HgCdTe Infrared Avalanche Photodiode Single Photon Detector Arrays for the LIST and Other Decadal Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a HgCdTe avalanche photodiode (APD)  SWIR/IR linear mode photon counting (LMPC) array detector system in support of the LIST lidar. Provide a new type...

  8. NORSAR Final Scientific Report Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2009-04-16

    Correlation detection is a relatively new approach in seismology that offers significant advantages in increased sensitivity and event screening over standard energy detection algorithms. The basic concept is that a representative event waveform is used as a template (i.e. matched filter) that is correlated against a continuous, possibly multichannel, data stream to detect new occurrences of that same signal. These algorithms are therefore effective at detecting repeating events, such as explosions and aftershocks at a specific location. This final report summarizes the results of a three-year cooperative project undertaken by NORSAR and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The overall objective has been to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection using waveform correlation. The principal goal is to develop an adaptive processing algorithm. By this we mean that the detector is initiated using a basic set of reference ('master') events to be used in the correlation process, and then an automatic algorithm is applied successively to provide improved performance by extending the set of master events selectively and strategically. These additional master events are generated by an independent, conventional detection system. A periodic analyst review will then be applied to verify the performance and, if necessary, adjust and consolidate the master event set. A primary focus of this project has been the application of waveform correlation techniques to seismic arrays. The basic procedure is to perform correlation on the individual channels, and then stack the correlation traces using zero-delay beam forming. Array methods such as frequency-wavenumber analysis can be applied to this set of correlation traces to help guarantee the validity of detections and lower the detection threshold. In principle, the deployment of correlation detectors against seismically active regions could involve very large numbers of very specific

  9. A two dimensional silicon detectors array for quality assurance in stereotactic radiotherapy: MagicPlate-512

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldosari, A. H.; Petasecca, M., E-mail: marcop@uow.edu.au; Espinoza, A.; Newall, M.; Fuduli, I.; Porumb, C.; Alshaikh, S.; Alrowaili, Z. A.; Weaver, M.; Metcalfe, P.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Carolan, M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Perevertaylo, V. [SPA-BIT, KIEV 02232 (Ukraine)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Silicon diode arrays are commonly implemented in radiation therapy quality assurance applications as they have a number of advantages including: real time operation (compared to the film) and high spatial resolution, large dynamic range and small size (compared to ionizing chambers). Most diode arrays have detector pitch that is too coarse for routine use in small field applications. The goal of this work is to characterize the two-dimensional monolithic silicon diode array named “MagicPlate-512” (MP512) designed for QA in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radio surgery (SRS). Methods: MP512 is a silicon monolithic detector manufactured on ap-type substrate. An array contains of 512 pixels with size 0.5 × 0.5 mm{sup 2} and pitch 2 mm with an overall dimension of 52 × 52 mm{sup 2}. The MP512 monolithic detector is wire bonded on a printed circuit board 0.5 mm thick and covered by a thin layer of raisin to preserve the silicon detector from moisture and chemical contamination and to protect the bonding wires. Characterization of the silicon monolithic diode array response was performed, and included pixels response uniformity, dose linearity, percent depth dose, output factor, and beam profiling for beam sizes relevant to SBRT and SRS and depth dose response in comparison with ionization chamber. Results: MP512 shows a good dose linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.998) and repeatability within 0.2%. The measured depth dose response for field size of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} agreed to within 1.3%, when compared to a CC13 ionization chamber for depths in PMMA up to 30 cm. The output factor of a 6 MV Varian 2100EX medical linac beam measured by MP512 at the isocenter agrees to within 2% when compared to PTW diamond, Scanditronix point EDD-2 diode and MOSkin detectors for field sizes down to 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}. An over response of 4% was observed for square beam size smaller than 1 cm when compared to EBT3 films, while the beam profiles (FWHM) of MP

  10. A high resolution germanium detector array for hypernuclear studies at PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Gerl, Juergen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharov, Ivan [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico, Torino (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Institute for Nuclear Physics, JGU Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The PANDA experiment, planned at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, aims at the high resolution γ-spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei. For this purpose a devoted detector setup is required, consisting of a primary nuclear target, an active secondary target and a germanium detector array for the γ-spectroscopy. Due to the limited space within the PANDA detector a compact design is required. In particular the conventional LN{sub 2} cooling system must be replaced by an electro mechanical device and a new arrangement of the crystals is needed. This presentation shows the progress in the development of the germanium detectors. First results of in-beam measurements at COSY with a new electro mechanically cooled single crystal prototype are presented. Digital pulse shape analysis is used to disentangle pile up events due to the high event rate. This analysis technique also allows to recover the high original energy resolution in case of neutron damage. Finally the status of the new triple crystal detector prototype is given.

  11. Tuning of superconducting nanowire single-photon detector parameters for VLSI circuit testing using time-resolved emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahgat Shehata, A.; Stellari, F.

    2015-01-01

    Time-Resolved Emission (TRE) is a truly non-invasive technique based on the detection of intrinsic light emitted by integrated circuits that is used for the detection of timing related faults from the backside of flip-chip VLSI circuits. Single-photon detectors with extended sensitivity in the Near Infrared (NIR) are used to perform time-correlated single-photon counting measurements and retrieve the temporal distribution of the emitted photons, thus identifying gates switching events. The noise, efficiency and jitter performance of the detector are crucial to enable ultra-low voltage waveform sensitivity. For this reason, cryogenically cooled Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors (SNSPDs) offer superior performance compared to state-of-the-art Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs). In this paper we will discuss how detector front-end electronics parameters, such as bias current, RF attenuation and comparator threshold, can be tailored to optimize the measurement Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), defined as the ratio between the switching emission peak amplitude and the standard deviation of the noise in the time interval in which there are no photons emitted from the circuit. For example, reducing the attenuation and the threshold of the comparator used to detect switching events may lead to an improvement of the jitter, due to the better discrimination of the detector firing, but also a higher sensitivity to external electric noise disturbances. Similarly, by increasing the bias current, both the detection efficiency and the jitter improve, but the noise increases as well. For these reasons an optimization of the SNR is necessary. For this work, TRE waveforms were acquired from a 32 nm Silicon On Insulator (SOI) chip operating down to 0.4 V using different generations of SNSPD systems.

  12. Report of the Task Force on detector Research and Development for the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-06-01

    This report contains a: Report of the working group on tracking devices; report of the working group on calorimetry; report of the working group on muon, electron and hadron identification; report of the working group on electronics, triggering, data acquisition and computing; report of the working group on superconducting magnets; and report of the working group on Monte Carlo development.

  13. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Vasan, S N Swetadri; Cartwright, A N; Titus, A H; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x- ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm(2) (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of- interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures.

  14. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Cartwright, A. N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x-ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 ×1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2 (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of-interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures.

  15. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C; Hartsough, Neal E; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm(2)/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a (57)Co source. An output rate of 6×10(6) counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and

  16. Current status of the new LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detector array GALATEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Christopher; Neumann-Cosel, Peter von; Ries, Philipp; Pietralla, Norbert; Scheit, Heiko; Schnorrenberger, Linda [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Lefol, Ronan [University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    In contrast to common scintillation materials like NaI and BaF{sub 2} the recently developed LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detectors allow measurements with excellent time resolution and high efficiency while retaining a good energy resolution. To perform successful (e,e{sup '}γ) and (γ,γ{sup '}γ) coincidence experiments at the linear electron accelerator S-DALINAC all three features are of utmost importance. We present the current status of the new LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detector array GALATEA (GAmma LAnthanum bromide Top Efficiency Array) consisting of 18 large 3'' x 3'' LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detectors. One focus is on the completely digital DAQ based on flash ADCs and newly developed pulse shape analysis methods for timing and particle identification. The performance of GALATEA is discussed regarding energy resolution, time resolution, linearity and efficiency. The results are compared to GEANT4 simulations.

  17. Leaky Lens Based UWB Focal Plane Arrays for Sub-mm Wave Imaging Based on Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neto, A.

    2008-01-01

    A novel strategy for broad band focal plane array design is proposed. Its purpose is to couple the radiation from a Large FID reflector system to an array of Kinetic Inductance detectors that are being investigated and realized at SRON. To maximize the benefits from using their BW properties the ide

  18. Numerical method to optimize the Polar-Azimuthal Orientation of Infrared Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Csete, Mária; Najafi, Faraz; Hu, Xiaolong; Berggren, Karl K

    2011-01-01

    A novel finite-element method for calculating the illumination-dependence of absorption in three-dimensional nanostructures is presented based on the RF module of the COMSOL software package. This method is capable of numerically determining the optical response and near-field distribution of sub-wavelength periodic structures as a function of illumination orientations specified by polar angle, fi, and azimuthal angle, gamma. The method was applied to determine the illumination-angle-dependent absorptance in cavity-based superconducting-nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) designs. Niobium-nitride stripes based on dimensions of conventional SNSPDs and integrated with ~ quarter-wavelength hydrogensilsesquioxane-filled nano-optical cavities and covered by a thin gold film acting as a reflector were illuminated from below by p-polarized light in this study. The numerical results were compared to results from complementary transfer-matrix-method calculations on composite layers made of analogous film-stacks. T...

  19. High-efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors fabricated from MoSi thin-films

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, V B; Bussières, F; Horansky, R D; Dyer, S D; Lita, A E; Vayshenker, I; Marsili, F; Shaw, M D; Zbinden, H; Mirin, R P; Nam, S W

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate high-efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) fabricated from MoSi thin-films. We measure a maximum system detection efficiency (SDE) of 87 +- 0.5 % at 1542 nm at a temperature of 0.7 K, with a jitter of 76 ps, maximum count rate approaching 10 MHz, and polarization dependence as low as 3.4 +- 0.7 % The SDE curves show saturation of the internal efficiency similar to WSi-based SNSPDs at temperatures as high as 2.3 K. We show that at similar cryogenic temperatures, MoSi SNSPDs achieve efficiencies comparable to WSi-based SNSPDs with nearly a factor of two reduction in jitter.

  20. Fast IR Array Detector for Transverse Beam Diagnostics at DA{\\Phi}NE

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, A; Clozza, A; Drago, A; Grilli, A; Marcelli, A; Raco, A; Sorchetti, R; Gambicorti, L; De Sio, A; Pace, E; Piotrowski, J

    2010-01-01

    At the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) an infrared (IR) array detector with fast response time has been built and assembled in order to collect the IR image of e-/e+ sources of the DA{\\Phi}NE collider. Such detector is made by 32 bilinear pixels with an individual size of 50x50 {\\mu}m2 and a response time of ~1 ns. In the framework of an experiment funded by the INFN Vth Committee dedicated to beam diagnostics, the device with its electronic board has been tested and installed on the DA{\\Phi}NE positron ring. A preliminary characterization of few pixels of the array and of the electronics has been carried out at the IR beamline SINBAD at DA{\\Phi}NE. In particular the detection of the IR source of the e- beam has been observed using four pixels of the array acquiring signals simultaneously with a four channels scope at 1 GHz and at 10 Gsamples/s. The acquisition of four pixels allowed monitoring in real time differences in the bunch signals in the vertical d...

  1. Digital Data Acquisition For the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA)

    CERN Document Server

    Lipschutz, S; Hill, J; Liddick, S N; Noji, S; Prokop, C J; Scott, M; Solt, M; Sullivan, C; Tompkins, J

    2016-01-01

    A digital data acquisition system (DDAS) has been implemented for the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA). LENDA is an array of 24 BC-408 plastic-scintillator bars designed to measure low-energy neutrons with kinetic energies in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV from (p,n)-type charge-exchange reactions. Compared to the previous data acquisition (DAQ) system for LENDA, DDAS offers the possibility to lower the neutron detection threshold, increase the overall neutron-detection efficiency, decrease the dead time of the system, and allow for easy expansion of the array. The system utilized in this work was XIA's Digital Gamma Finder Pixie-16 250 MHz digitizers. A detector-limited timing resolution of 400 ps was achieved for a single LENDA bar. Using DDAS, the neutron detection threshold of the system was reduced compared to the previous analog system, now reaching below 100 keV. The new DAQ system was successfully used in a recent charge-exchange experiment using the $^{16}$C(p,n) reaction at the National Sup...

  2. Nuclear physics with superconducting cyclotron at Kolkata: Scopes and possibilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sailajananda Bhattacharya

    2010-08-01

    The K500 superconducting cyclotron at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, India is getting ready to deliver its first accelerated ion beam for experiment. At the same time, the nuclear physics programme and related experimental facility development activities are taking shape. A general review of the nuclear physics research opportunities with the superconducting cyclotron and the present status of the development of different detector arrays and other experimental facilities will be presented.

  3. Proposal for a GHz count rate near-IR single-photon detector based on a nanoscale superconducting transition edge sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Santavicca, Daniel F; Prober, Daniel E; 10.1117/12.883979

    2012-01-01

    We describe a superconducting transition edge sensor based on a nanoscale niobium detector element. This device is predicted to be capable of energy-resolved near-IR single-photon detection with a GHz count rate. The increased speed and sensitivity of this device compared to traditional transition edge sensors result from the very small electronic heat capacity of the nanoscale detector element. In the present work, we calculate the predicted thermal response time and energy resolution. We also discuss approaches for achieving efficient optical coupling to the sub-wavelength detector element using a resonant near-IR antenna.

  4. Large-area NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detectors with saturated detection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan P.; Grein, Matthew E.; Gudmundsen, Theodore J.; McCaughan, Adam; Najafi, Faraz; Berggren, Karl K.; Marsili, Francesco; Dauler, Eric A.

    2015-05-01

    Superconducting circuits comprising SNSPDs placed in parallel—superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors, or SNAPs—have previously been demonstrated to improve the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by increasing the critical current. In this work, we employ a 2-SNAP superconducting circuit with narrow (40 nm) niobium nitride (NbN) nanowires to improve the system detection efficiency to near-IR photons while maintaining high SNR. Additionally, while previous 2-SNAP demonstrations have added external choke inductance to stabilize the avalanching photocurrent, we show that the external inductance can be entirely folded into the active area by cascading 2-SNAP devices in series to produce a greatly increased active area. We fabricated series-2-SNAP (s2-SNAP) circuits with a nanowire length of 20 μm with cascades of 2-SNAPs providing the choke inductance necessary for SNAP operation. We observed that (1) the detection efficiency saturated at high bias currents, and (2) the 40 nm 2-SNAP circuit critical current was approximately twice that for a 40 nm non-SNAP configuration.

  5. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  6. Analysis of lichen substances including triterpenoids by high performance liquid chromatography with a differential refractive index detector and a photodiode array detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hikari SATO; Kojiro HARA; Masashi KOMINE; Yoshikazu YAMAMOTO

    2011-01-01

    A new method for analysis of lichen triterpenoids was established using high performance liquid chromatography with the combination of a differential refractive index detector (RID) and a photodiode array detector (PDA).It is proved that this method was convenient to detect and identify aromatic and aliphatic lichen substances; it enabled quantitative analysis of substances having no or less absorption of ultraviolet rays such as triterpenoids.In addition,they can be measured in high accuracy compared with the TLC method.

  7. Tiled Array of Pixelated CZT Imaging Detectors for ProtoEXIST2 and MIRAX-HXI

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Jaesub; Grindlay, Jonathan; Rodrigues, Barbara; Ellis, Jon Robert; Baker, Robert; Barthelmy, Scott; Mao, Peter; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Apple, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    We have assembled a tiled array (220 cm2) of fine pixel (0.6 mm) imaging CZT detectors for a balloon borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope, ProtoEXIST2. ProtoEXIST2 is a prototype experiment for a next generation hard X-ray imager MIRAX-HXI on board Lattes, a spacecraft from the Agencia Espacial Brasilieira. MIRAX will survey the 5 to 200 keV sky of Galactic bulge, adjoining southern Galactic plane and the extragalactic sky with 6' angular resolution. This survey will open a vast discovery space in timing studies of accretion neutron stars and black holes. The ProtoEXIST2 CZT detector plane consists of 64 of 5 mm thick 2 cm x 2 cm CZT crystals tiled with a minimal gap. MIRAX will consist of 4 such detector planes, each of which will be imaged with its own coded-aperture mask. We present the packaging architecture and assembly procedure of the ProtoEXIST2 detector. On 2012, Oct 10, we conducted a successful high altitude balloon experiment of the ProtoEXIST1 and 2 telescopes, which demonstrates their technolog...

  8. Trigger electronics of the new Fluorescence Detectors of the Telescope Array Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tameda, Yuichiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)], E-mail: tame@cr.phys.titech.ac.jp; Taketa, Akimichi [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Smith, Jeremy D. [Institute for High Energy Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Tanaka, Manobu [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Fukushima, Masaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Jui, Charles C.H. [Institute for High Energy Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Kadota, Ken' ichi [Faculty of Knowledge Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Kakimoto, Fumio [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Matsuda, Takeshi [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Matthews, John N. [Institute for High Energy Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Ogio, Shoichi [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Tatsunobu; Takeda, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Thomas, Stanton B. [Institute for High Energy Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Tokuno, Hisao [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Tsunesada, Yoshiki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)] (and others)

    2009-10-11

    The Telescope Array Project is an experiment designed to observe Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays via a 'hybrid' detection technique utilizing both fluorescence light detectors (FDs) and scintillator surface particle detectors (SDs). We have installed three FD stations and 507 SDs in the Utah desert, and initiated observations from March 2008. The northern FD station reuses 14 telescopes from the High Resolution Fly's Eye, HiRes-I station. Each of the two southern FD stations contains 12 new telescopes utilizing new FADC electronics. Each telescope is instrumented with a camera composed of 256 PMTs. Since the detectors are composed of many PMTs and each PMT detects fluorescence photons together with the vast amount of night sky background, a sophisticated triggering system is required. In this paper, we describe the trigger electronics of these new FD stations. We also discuss performance of the FDs with this triggering system, in terms of efficiencies and apertures for various detector configurations.

  9. Low noise CMOS readout for CdZnTe detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobson, C G; Lev, S B; Nemirovsky, Y

    1999-01-01

    A low noise CMOS readout for CdTe and CdZnTe X- and gamma-ray detector arrays has been designed and implemented in the CMOS 2 mu m low noise analog process provided by the multi-chip program of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Implementation Service. The readout includes CMOS low noise charge sensitive preamplifier and a multiplexed semi-Gaussian pulse shaper. Thus, each detector has a dedicated charge sensitive preamplifier that integrates its signal, while a single shaping amplifier shapes the pulses after the multiplexer. Low noise and low-power operation are achieved by optimizing the input transistor of the charge sensitive preamplifier. Two optimization criteria are used to reduce noise. The first criterion is based on capacitance matching between the input transistor and the detector. The second criterion is based on bandwidth optimization, which is obtained by tailoring the shaper parameters to the particular noise mechanisms of the MOS transistor and the CdZnTe detector. Furthermore, the multiplexing functi...

  10. Low noise CMOS readout for CdZnTe detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobson, C.G.; Asa, G.; Lev, S. Bar; Nemirovsky, Y. E-mail: nemirov@ee.technion.ac.il

    1999-06-01

    A low noise CMOS readout for CdTe and CdZnTe X- and gamma-ray detector arrays has been designed and implemented in the CMOS 2 {mu}m low noise analog process provided by the multi-chip program of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Implementation Service. The readout includes CMOS low noise charge sensitive preamplifier and a multiplexed semi-Gaussian pulse shaper. Thus, each detector has a dedicated charge sensitive preamplifier that integrates its signal, while a single shaping amplifier shapes the pulses after the multiplexer. Low noise and low-power operation are achieved by optimizing the input transistor of the charge sensitive preamplifier. Two optimization criteria are used to reduce noise. The first criterion is based on capacitance matching between the input transistor and the detector. The second criterion is based on bandwidth optimization, which is obtained by tailoring the shaper parameters to the particular noise mechanisms of the MOS transistor and the CdZnTe detector. Furthermore, the multiplexing function incorporated in the shaper provides low power and reduces chip area. The system is partitioned into a chip containing the charge amplifiers and a chip containing the semi-Gaussian pulse shaper and multiplexer. This architecture minimizes coupling from multiplexer switches as well as shaper output to the input of the charge sensitive preamplifiers.

  11. InGaAs Schottky barrier diode array detector for a real-time compact terahertz line scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Pil; Ko, Hyunsung; Park, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Namje; Yoon, Young-Jong; Shin, Jun-Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2013-11-04

    We present a terahertz (THz) broadband antenna-integrated 1 × 20 InGaAs Schottky barrier diode (SBD) array detector with an average responsivity of 98.5 V/W at a frequency of 250 GHz, which is measured without attaching external amplifiers and Si lenses, and an average noise equivalent power (NEP) of 106.6 pW/√Hz. The 3-dB bandwidth of the SBD detector is also investigated at approximately 180 GHz. For implementing an array-type SBD detector by a simple fabrication process to achieve a high yield, a structure comprising an SiN(x) layer instead of an air bridge between the anode and the cathode is designed. THz line beam imaging using a Gunn diode emitter with a center frequency of 250 GHz and a 1 × 20 SBD array detector is successfully demonstrated.

  12. Ordering and manipulation of the magnetic moments in large-scale superconducting pi-loop arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgenkamp, Hans; Ariando,; Smilde, Henk-Jan H.; Blank, Dave H.A.; Rijnders, Guus; Rogalla, Horst; Kirtley, John R.; Tseui, Chang C.

    2003-01-01

    Since the discovery of high-transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductivity in layered copper oxides1, many researchers have searched for similar behaviour in other layered metal oxides involving 3d-transition metals, such as cobalt and nickel. Such attempts have so far failed, with the result th

  13. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum Observed with the Surface Detector of the Telescope Array Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) collaboration has measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays for energies above 1.6x10^(18) eV in its first three years of operation. The spectrum shows a dip at an energy of 5x10^(18) eV and a steepening at 5x10^(19) eV which is consistent with the expectation from the GZK cutoff. Here we use a new technique that involves generating a complete simulation of the TA surface detector. The procedure starts with shower simulations using the CORSIKA Monte Carlo program where we have solved the problems caused by use of the "thinning" approximation. This simulation method allows us to make an accurate calculation of the acceptance of the detector for the energies concerned.

  14. Design and operation of a 2-D thin-film semiconductor neutron detector array for use as a beamport monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, Troy C.; Bellinger, Steven L. [SMART Laboratory, Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Huddleston, David E. [Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); McNeil, Walter J.; Patterson, Eric [SMART Laboratory, Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Sobering, Tim J. [Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); McGregor, Douglas S. [SMART Laboratory, Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: mcgregor@ksu.edu

    2009-06-01

    Silicon-based diodes coated with a thin film of neutron reactive materials have been shown to produce excellent low-efficiency neutron detectors. This work employs the same technology, but groups 25 equally sized and spaced diodes on a single 29 mm by 29 mm substrate. A 5x5 array was fabricated and coated with a thin film of {sup 6}LiF for use as a low-efficiency neutron beam monitor. The 5x5 neutron detector array is coupled to an array of amplifiers, allowing the response to be interpreted using a LabVIEW FPGA. The 5x5 array has been characterized in a diffracted neutron beam. This work is a part of on-going research to develop various designs of high- and low-efficiency semiconductor neutron detectors.

  15. A Failure Mode in Dense Infrared Detector Arrays Resulting in Increased Dark Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkie, Benjamin; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a failure mode that arises in dense infrared focal plane detector arrays as a consequence of the interactions of neighboring pixels through the minority carrier profiles in the common absorber layer. We consider the situation in which one pixel in a hexagonal array becomes de-biased relative to its neighbors and show that the dark current in the six neighboring pixels increases exponentially as a function of the difference between the nominal and anomalous biases. Moreover, we show that the current increase in the six nearest-neighbor pixels is in total larger than that by which the current in the affected pixel decreases, causing a net increase in the dark current. The physical origins of this effect are explained as being due to increased lateral diffusion currents that arise as a consequence of breaking the symmetry of the minority carrier profiles. We then perform a parametric study to quantify the magnitude of this effect for a number of detector geometric parameters, operating temperatures, and spectral bands. Particularly, numerical simulations are carried out for short-, mid-, and long-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detectors operating between 77 K and 210 K. We show that this effect is most prevalent in architectures for which the lateral diffusion current is the largest component of the total dark current—high operating temperature devices with narrow epitaxial absorber thicknesses and pitches small compared to the diffusion length of minority carriers. These results could prove significant particularly for short- and mid-wave infrared detectors, which are typically designed to fit these conditions.

  16. Electrode thickness measurement of a Si(Li) detector for the SIXA array

    OpenAIRE

    Tikkanen, T. (Tiia); Hamalainen, K.; Huotari, S.

    1997-01-01

    Cathode electrodes of the Si(Li) detector elements of the SIXA X-ray spectrometer array are formed by gold-palladium alloy contact layers. The equivalent thickness of gold in one element was measured by observing the characteristic L-shell X-rays of gold excited by monochromatised synchrotron radiation with photon energies above the L3 absorption edge of gold. The results obtained at 4 different photon energies below the L2 edge yield an average value of 22.4(35) nm which is consistent with t...

  17. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  18. Observation of high energy atmospheric neutrinos with antarctic muon and neutrino detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Andres, E.; Bai, X.; Barouch, G.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Boyce, M.M.; Carius, S.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Costa, C.G.S.; Cowen, D.F.; Dalberg, E.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Feser, T.; Frere, J.-M.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gaug, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Heukenkamp, H.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koci, B.; Kopke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.M.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Miller, T.C.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Neunhoffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Reed, C.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Starinsky, N.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Streicher, O.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedeman, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2002-05-07

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) began collecting data with ten strings in 1997. Results from the first year of operation are presented. Neutrinos coming through the Earth from the Northern Hemisphere are identified by secondary muons moving upward through the array. Cosmic rays in the atmosphere generate a background of downward moving muons, which are about 10{sup 6} times more abundant than the upward moving muons. Over 130 days of exposure, we observed a total of about 300 neutrino events. In the same period, a background of 1.05 x 10{sup 9} cosmic ray muon events was recorded. The observed neutrino flux is consistent with atmospheric neutrino predictions. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that 90 percent of these events lie in the energy range 66 GeV to 3.4 TeV. The observation of atmospheric neutrinos consistent with expectations establishes AMANDA-B10 as a working neutrino telescope.

  19. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Stave, Sean C., E-mail: Sean.Stave@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 14}N(p,γ){sup 15}O{sup ⁎} reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  20. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Daigle, Stephen [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Buckner, Matt [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Erikson, Luke E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Sean C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Champagne, Art [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Cooper, Andrew [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Downen, Lori [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kelly, Keegan [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Sallaska, Anne [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  1. Graphical user interface for a dual-module EMCCD x-ray detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Gupta, Sandesh K.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    A new Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed using Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) for a high-resolution, high-sensitivity Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII), which is a new x-ray detector for radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging, consisting of an array of Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) each having a variable on-chip electron-multiplication gain of up to 2000x to reduce the effect of readout noise. To enlarge the field-of-view (FOV), each EMCCD sensor is coupled to an x-ray phosphor through a fiberoptic taper. Two EMCCD camera modules are used in our prototype to form a computer-controlled array; however, larger arrays are under development. The new GUI provides patient registration, EMCCD module control, image acquisition, and patient image review. Images from the array are stitched into a 2kx1k pixel image that can be acquired and saved at a rate of 17 Hz (faster with pixel binning). When reviewing the patient's data, the operator can select images from the patient's directory tree listed by the GUI and cycle through the images using a slider bar. Commonly used camera parameters including exposure time, trigger mode, and individual EMCCD gain can be easily adjusted using the GUI. The GUI is designed to accommodate expansion of the EMCCD array to even larger FOVs with more modules. The high-resolution, high-sensitivity EMCCD modular-array SSXII imager with the new user-friendly GUI should enable angiographers and interventionalists to visualize smaller vessels and endovascular devices, helping them to make more accurate diagnoses and to perform more precise image-guided interventions.

  2. Superconducting NbN single-photon detectors on GaAs with an AlN buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Ekkehart; Merker, Michael; Ilin, Konstantin; Siegel, Michael [Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme (IMS), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Hertzstrasse 16, 76187 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    GaAs is the material of choice for photonic integrated circuits. It allows the monolithic integration of single-photon sources like quantum dots, waveguide based optical circuits and detectors like superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) onto one chip. The growth of high quality NbN films on GaAs is challenging, due to natural occurring surface oxides and the large lattice mismatch of about 27%. In this work, we try to overcome these problems by the introduction of a 10 nm AlN buffer layer. Due to the buffer layer, the critical temperature of 6 nm thick NbN films was increased by about 1.5 K. Furthermore, the critical current density at 4.2 K of NbN flim deposited onto GaAs with AlN buffer is 50% higher than of NbN film deposited directly onto GaAs substrate. We successfully fabricated NbN SNSPDs on GaAs with a AlN buffer layer. SNSPDs were patterned using electron-beam lithography and reactive-ion etching techniques. Results on the study of detection efficiency and jitter of a NbN SNSPD on GaAs, with and without AlN buffer layer will be presented and discussed.

  3. Local detection efficiency of a NbN superconducting single photon detector explored by a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Renema, Jelmer J; Engel, Andreas; van Exter, Martin P; de Dood, Michiel J A

    2015-09-21

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the local response of a superconducting single photon detector using a sharp metal tip in a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope. The optical absorption is obtained by simulating the tip-detector system, where the tip-detector is illuminated from the side, with the tip functioning as an optical antenna. The local detection efficiency is calculated by considering the recently introduced position-dependent threshold current in the detector. The calculated response for a 150 nm wide detector shows a peak close to the edge that can be spatially resolved with an estimated resolution of ∼ 20 nm, using a tip with parameters that are experimentally accessible.

  4. Large-Area Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detector with Double-Stage Avalanche Structure

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel design of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs), which combines the advantages of multi-stage avalanche SNAPs to lower the avalanche current I_AV and that of series-SNAPs to reduce the reset time. As proof of principle, we fabricated 800 devices with large detection area (15 um * 15 um) and five different designs on a single silicon chip for comparison, which include standard SNSPDs, series-3-SNAPs and our modified series-SNAPs with double-stage avalanch...

  5. Design of a Dry Dilution Refrigerator for MMC Gamma Detector Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boyd, Stephen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cantor, Robin

    2017-04-03

    The goal of this LCP is to develop an ultra-high resolution gamma detector based on magnetic microcalorimeters (MMCs) for accurate non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. For highest energy resolution, we will introduce erbium-doped silver (Ag:Er) as a novel sensor material to replace current Au:Er sensors. The detector sensitivity will be increased by developing arrays of 32 Ag:Er pixels read out by 16 SQUID preamplifiers. MMC detectors require operating temperatures of ~15 mK and thus the use of a dilution refrigerator, and the desire for user-friendly operation without cryogenic liquids requires that this refrigerator use pulse-tube pre-cooling to ~4 K. For long-term reliability, we intend to re-design the heat switch that is needed to apply the magnetizing current to the Ag:Er sensor and that used to fail in earlier designs after months of operation. A cryogenic Compton veto will be installed to reduce the spectral background of the MMC, especially at low energies where ultra-high energy resolution is most important. The goals for FY16 were 1) to purchase a liquid-cryogen-free dilution refrigerator and adapt it for MMC operation, and 2) to fabricate Ag:Er-based MMC γ-detectors with improved performance and optimize their response. This report discusses the design of the instruments, and progress in MMC detector fabrication. Details of the MMC fabrication have been discussed in an April 2016 report to DOE.

  6. Effect of hexagonal patterned arrays and defect geometry on the critical current of superconducting films

    CERN Document Server

    Sadovskyy, I A; Xiao, Z -L; Kwok, W -K; Glatz, A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the effect of pinning on the vortex dynamics in superconductors is a key factor towards controlling critical current values. Large-scale simulations of vortex dynamics can provide a rational approach to achieve this goal. Here, we use the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations to study thin superconducting films with artificially created pinning centers arranged periodically in hexagonal lattices. We calculate the critical current density for various geometries of the pinning centers --- varying their size, strength, and density. Furthermore, we shed light upon the influence of pattern distortion on the magnetic field dependent critical current. We compare our result directly with available experimental measurements on patterned molybdenum-germanium films, obtaining good agreement. Our results give important systematic insights into the mechanisms of pinning in these artificial pinning landscapes and open a path for tailoring superconducting films with desired critical current behavior.

  7. Effect of hexagonal patterned arrays and defect geometry on the critical current of superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadovskyy, I. A.; Wang, Y. L.; Xiao, Z. -L.; Kwok, W. -K.; Glatz, A.

    2017-02-07

    Understanding the effect of pinning on the vortex dynamics in superconductors is a key factor towards controlling critical current values. Large-scale simulations of vortex dynamics can provide a rational approach to achieve this goal. Here, we use the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations to study thin superconducting films with artificially created pinning centers arranged periodically in hexagonal lattices. We calculate the critical current density for various geometries of the pinning centers—varying their size, strength, and density. Furthermore, we shed light upon the influence of pattern distortion on the magnetic-field-dependent critical current. We compare our result directly with available experimental measurements on patterned molybdenum-germanium films, obtaining good agreement. Our results give important systematic insights into the mechanisms of pinning in these artificial pinning landscapes and open a path for tailoring superconducting films with desired critical current behavior.

  8. Characterization and Modeling of Superconducting Josephson Junction Arrays at Low Voltage and Liquid Helium Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Applied Research Under authority of A. D. Ramirez , Head Advanced Systems and Applied Sciences Division iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This...to the characteristics and extract the non -ideality. These capabilities and calibration results will assist in the characterization of advanced...superconducting cryogenic temperatures. At this temperature, the I-V curve is linear . This linearity occurs because when the Josephson junctions are not in

  9. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-01

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments.

  10. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng, E-mail: lizheng@xtu.edu.cn [School of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Chen, Wei [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-11-21

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments.

  11. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-02-06

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8-14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  12. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Hack

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In terahertz (THz materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8–14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i vanadium oxide; (ii amorphous silicon; (iii a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  13. Faraday cup detector array with electronic multiplexing for multichannel mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Scheidemann, A A; Schumacher, F J; Isakharov, A

    2002-01-01

    A Faraday cup detector array (FCDA) and electronic multiplexing circuit have been developed for position sensitive ion beam detection. The entire FCDA always remains open to intercept the incident ion beam flux, and each cup is periodically and sequentially discharged through the electronic multiplexer. This produces true multichannel ion beam detection since none of the incident ion beam flux is lost, as is the case for scanning position sensitive detectors, and higher sensitivity detection is thus obtained. The FCDA consists of a one-dimensional or two-dimensional array of individual cups which are electrostatically isolated from each other by means of an intervening ground conductor, with resulting fill factors F of 58% to 85%. Each cup acts as a charge collector and integrator which is quickly discharged during the readout to create a time-multiplexed output signal that gives the position distribution of the ion beam. When N cups are sequentially scanned and read out, the ion collection efficiency is F(1-...

  14. Attenuation study for Tibet Water Cherenkov Muon Detector Array-A

    CERN Document Server

    Gou, Quanbu; Liu, Cheng; Feng, Zhaoyang; Qian, Xiangli; Hou, Zhengtao

    2011-01-01

    The attenuation study of the long cable used in Tibet Water Cherenkov Muon Detector Array-A, called Tibet MD-A (one of 12 Tibet MD detectors), under the 37000 m2 Tibet air shower array, is reported. The cable frequency response is measured by using the sinusoidal signals, with which the influence of the cable on the pulse rise time is obtained. For the reason that the commercial 20 inch PMT (R3600_06) has a waterproof connection with the signal cable, one end of the signal cable is permanently connected to the PMT. Terminal reflection method is tested and used for measuring the signal attenuation. During the measurement, a practical way to eliminate the uncertainty caused by the baseline of the signal is achieved. To check the terminal reflection method, comparison measurement between it and QDC data taking method are carried out by using open-ended cables. The confirmed terminal reflection method is a fast and convenient method being suitable to online measure the signal attenuation for Tibet MD-A. The measu...

  15. Performance analysis of MIMO FSO systems with radial array beams and finite sized detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, Muhsin C.; Kamacıoǧlu, Canan; Uysal, Murat; Baykal, Yahya

    2014-10-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems are employed in free space optical (FSO) links to mitigate the degrading effects of atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we consider a MIMO FSO system with practical transmitter and receiver configurations that consists of a radial laser array with Gaussian beams and finite sized detectors. We formulate the average received intensity and the power scinitillation as a function of the receiver coordinates in the presence of weak atmospheric turbulence by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. Then, integrations over the finite sized multiple detectors are performed and the effect of the receiver aperture averaging is quantified. We further derive an outage probability expression of this MIMO system in the presence of turbulence-induced fading channels. Using the derived expressions, we demonstrate the effect of several practical system parameters such as the ring radius, the number of array beamlets, the source size, the link length, structure constant and the receiver aperture radius on the system performance.

  16. Performance assessment of a 2D array of plastic scintillation detectors for IMRT quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2013-07-01

    The purposes of this work are to assess the performance of a 2D plastic scintillation detectors array prototype for quality assurance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to determine its sensitivity and specificity to positioning errors of one multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf and one MLC leaf bank by applying the principles of signal detection theory. Ten treatment plans (step-and-shoot delivery) and one volumetric modulated arc therapy plan were measured and compared to calculations from two treatment-planning systems (TPSs) and to radiochromic films. The averages gamma passing rates per beam found for the step-and-shoot plans were 95.8% for the criteria (3%, 2 mm), 97.8% for the criteria (4%, 2 mm), and 98.1% for the criteria (3%, 3 mm) when measurements were compared to TPS calculations. The receiver operating characteristic curves for the one leaf errors and one leaf bank errors were determined from simulations (theoretical upper limits) and measurements. This work concludes that arrays of plastic scintillation detectors could be used for IMRT quality assurance in clinics. The use of signal detection theory could improve the quality of dosimetric verifications in radiation therapy by providing optimal discrimination criteria for the detection of different classes of errors.

  17. CMOS detector arrays in a virtual 10-kilopixel camera for coherent terahertz real-time imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppel, Sebastian; Lisauskas, Alvydas; Max, Alexander; Krozer, Viktor; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate the principle applicability of antenna-coupled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect transistor arrays as cameras for real-time coherent imaging at 591.4 GHz. By scanning a few detectors across the image plane, we synthesize a focal-plane array of 100×100 pixels with an active area of 20×20 mm2, which is applied to imaging in transmission and reflection geometries. Individual detector pixels exhibit a voltage conversion loss of 24 dB and a noise figure of 41 dB for 16 μW of the local oscillator (LO) drive. For object illumination, we use a radio-frequency (RF) source with 432 μW at 590 GHz. Coherent detection is realized by quasioptical superposition of the image and the LO beam with 247 μW. At an effective frame rate of 17 Hz, we achieve a maximum dynamic range of 30 dB in the center of the image and more than 20 dB within a disk of 18 mm diameter. The system has been used for surface reconstruction resolving a height difference in the μm range.

  18. Far infrared thermal detectors for laser radiometry using a carbon nanotube array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, John H.; Lee, Bob; Grossman, Erich N.

    2011-07-20

    We present a description of a 1.5 mm long, vertically aligned carbon nanotube array (VANTA) on a thermopile and separately on a pyroelectric detector. Three VANTA samples, having average lengths of 40 {mu}m, 150 {mu}m, and 1.5 mm were evaluated with respect to reflectance at a laser wavelength of 394 {mu}m(760 GHz), and we found that the reflectance decreases substantially with increasing tube length, ranging from 0.38 to 0.23 to 0.01, respectively. The responsivity of the thermopile by electrical heating (98.4 mA/W) was equal to that by optical heating (98.0 mA/W) within the uncertainty of the measurement. We analyzed the frequency response and temporal response and found a thermal decay period of 500 ms, which is consistent with the specific heat of comparable VANTAs in the literature. The extremely low (0.01) reflectance of the 1.5 mm VANTAs and the fact that the array is readily transferable to the detector's surface is, to our knowledge, unprecedented.

  19. Spectrum measurement with the Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE) fluorescence detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zundel, Zachary James

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment is the largest Ultra High Energy cosmic ray observatory in the northern hemisphere and is designed to be sensitive to cosmic ray air showers above 1018eV. Despite the substantial measurements made by TA and AUGER (the largest cosmic ray observatory in the southern hemisphere), there remains uncertainty about whether the highest energy cosmic rays are galactic or extragalactic in origin. Locating features in the cosmic ray energy spectrum below 1018eV that indicate a transition from galactic to extragalactic sources would clarify the interpretation of measurements made at the highest energies. The Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE) is designed to extend the energy threshold of the TA observatory down to 1016.5eV in order to make such measurements. This dissertation details the construction, calibration, and operation of the TALE flu- orescence detector. A measurement of the flux of cosmic rays in the energy range of 1016.5 -- 1018.5eV is made using the monocular data set taken between September 2013 and January 2014. The TALE fluorescence detector observes evidence for a softening of the cosmic spectrum at 1017.25+/-0.5eV. The evidence of a change in the spectrum motivates continued study of 1016.5 -- 1018.5eV cosmic rays.

  20. Superconducting Thin-Film Interconnects for Cryogenic Photon Detector Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Next generation astrophysical observatories need improvements in readout electronics and associated high density interconnects. In particular, advanced imaging...

  1. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S{sub c,p}) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S{sub c,p} within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone

  2. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for Near-Earth Object Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Meghan L.; Pipher, Judith L.; McMurtry, Craig; Hartman, Spencer; Mainzer, Amy; McKelvey, Mark; McMurray, Robert; Chevara, David; Rosser, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ˜10 μm intended for the Near-Earth Object Camera (NEOCam) space mission were subjected to proton-beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested-one with 800-μm substrate intact, one with 30-μm substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes an elevated signal in nonhit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in nonhit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30-μm substrate. The detector array with full 800-μm substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm2 s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (˜750 e-/s) and 34.4 MeV (˜65 e-/s). For the integrated space-like ambient proton flux level measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope, the luminescence would be well below the NEOCam dark current requirement of <200 e-/s, but the pattern of luminescence could be problematic, possibly complicating calibration.

  3. A dynamic resistance nonuniformity compensation circuit for uncooled microbolometer detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Omer Ozgur; Akin, Tayfun

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for compensating resistance nonuniformity of uncooled microbolometers by adjusting the bias currents of both detector and reference pixels. Contrary to conventional nonuniformity compensation circuits, this approach eliminates the need for digital-to-analog converters (DACs), which usually occupy a large area, dissipate high power, and require complicated external circuitry with high frequency data transfer to the microbolometer chip. The proposed circuit uses a feedback structure that dynamically changes the bias currents of the reference and detector pixels and does not need complicated external circuitry. A special feature of the circuit is that it provides continuous compensation for the detector and reference resistances due to temperature changes over time. The circuit is implemented in a 0.6μm 5V CMOS process and occupies an area of only 160μm × 630μm. Test results of the prototype circuit show that the circuit reduces the offset current due to resistance nonuniformity about 2.35% of its uncompensated value, i.e., an improvement of about 42.5 times is achieved, independent of the nonuniformity amount. The circuit achieves this compensation in 12μsec. Considering its simplicity and low cost, this approach is suitable for large array commercial infrared imaging systems.

  4. A Deuterated Neutron Detector Array For Nuclear (Astro)Physics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaraz-Calderon, Sergio; Asher, B. W.; Barber, P.; Hanselman, K.; Perello, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    The properties of neutron-rich nuclei are at the forefront of research in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics. The advent of intense rare isotope beams (RIBs) has opened a new door for studies of systems with very short half-lives and possible fascinating properties. Neutron spectroscopic techniques become increasingly relevant when these neutron rich nuclei are used in a variety of experiments. At Florida State University, we are developing a neutron detector array that will allow us to perform high-resolution neutron spectroscopic studies with stable and radioactive beams. The neutron detection system consists of 16 deuterated organic liquid scintillation detectors with fast response and pulse-shape discrimination capabilities. In addition to these properties, there is the potential to use the structure in the pulse-height spectra to extract the energy of the neutrons and thus produce directly excitation spectra. This type of detector uses deuterated benzene (C6D6) as the liquid scintillation medium. The asymmetric nature of the scattering between a neutron and a deuterium in the center of mass produces a pulse-height spectrum from the deuterated scintillator which contains useful information on the initial energy of the neutron. Work supported in part by the State of Florida and NSF Grant No. 1401574.

  5. Non-local means-based nonuniformity correction for infrared focal-plane array detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-jie; Chen, Fu-sheng; Wang, Chen-sheng

    2014-11-01

    The infrared imaging systems are normally based on the infrared focal-plane array (IRFPA) which can be considered as an array of independent detectors aligned at the focal plane of the imaging system. Unfortunately, every detector on the IRFPA may have a different response to the same input infrared signal which is known as the nonuniformity problem. Then we can observe the fixed pattern noise (FPN) from the resulting images. Standard nonuniformity correction (NUC) methods need to be recalibrated after a short period of time due the temporal drift of the FPN. Scene-based nonuniformity correction (NUC) techniques eliminate the need for calibration by correction coefficients based on the scene being viewed. However, in the scene-based NUC method the problem of ghosting artifacts widely seriously decreases the image quality, which can degrade the performance of many applications such as target detection and track. This paper proposed an improved scene-based method based on the retina-like neural network approach. The method incorporates the use of non-local means (NLM) method into the estimation of the gain and the offset of each detector. This method can not only estimates the accurate correction coefficient but also restrict the ghosting artifacts efficiently. The proposed method relies on the use of NLM method which is a very successful image denoising method. And then the NLM used here can preserve the image edges efficiently and obtain a reliable spatial estimation. We tested the proposed NUC method by applying it to an IR sequence of frames. The performance of the proposed method was compared the other well-established adaptive NUC techniques.

  6. Superconducting X-ray detectors based on Nb absorbers and Nb/Al tunnel junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamster, Arnout Willem

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the research and development of STJs based on Nb/Al technology for application as X-ray detectors in astrophysics conducted by the Low Temperature division of the University of Twente in collaboration with the Stichting Ruimteonderzoek Nederland (SRON). Three topics have been i

  7. Superconducting X-ray detectors based on Nb absorbers and Nb/Al tunnel junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamster, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the research and development of STJs based on Nb/Al technology for application as X-ray detectors in astrophysics conducted by the Low Temperature division of the University of Twente in collaboration with the Stichting Ruimteonderzoek Nederland (SRON). Three topics have been

  8. Kilopixel Pop-Up Bolometer Arrays for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Wollack, E.; Henry, R.; Moseley, S. H.; Niemack, M.; Staggs, S.; Page, L.; Doriese, R.; Hilton, G. c.; Irwin, K. D.

    2007-01-01

    The recently deployed Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) anticipates first light on its kilopixel array of close-packed transition-edge-sensor bolometers in November of 2007. The instrument will represent a full implementation of the next-generation, large format arrays for millimeter wave astronomy that use superconducting electronics and detectors. Achieving the practical construction of such an array is a significant step toward producing advanced detector arrays for future SOFIA instruments. We review the design considerations for the detector array produced for the ACT instrument. The first light imager consists of 32 separately instrumented 32-channel pop-up bolometer arrays (to create a 32x32 filled array of mm-wave sensors). Each array is instrumented with a 32-channel bias resistor array, Nyquist filter array, and time-division SQUID multiplexer. Each component needed to be produced in relatively large quantities with suitable uniformity to meet tolerances for array operation. An optical design was chosen to maximize absorption at the focal plane while mitigating reflections and stray light. The pop-up geometry (previously implemented with semiconducting detectors and readout on the SHARC II and HAWC instruments) enabled straightforward interface of the superconducting bias and readout circuit with the 2D array of superconducting bolometers. The array construction program balanced fabrication challenges with assembly challenges to deliver the instrument in a timely fashion. We present some of the results of the array build and characterization of its performance.

  9. A new DOI detector design using discrete crystal array with depth-dependent reflector patterns and single-ended readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Chaeyeong; Kang, Jihoon; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We developed a depth of interaction (DOI) positron emission tomography (PET) detector using depth-dependent reflector patterns in a discrete crystal array. Due to the different reflector patterns at depth, light distribution was changed relative to depth. As a preliminary experiment, we measured DOI detector module crystal identification performance. The crystal consisted of a 9×9 array of 2 mmx2 mmx20 mm lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals. The crystal array was optically coupled to a 64-channel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with a 2 mmx2 mm anode size and an 18.1 mmx18.1 mm effective area. We obtained the flood image with an Anger-type calculation. DOI layers and 9×9 pixels were well distinguished in the obtained images. Preclinical PET scanners based on this detector design offer the prospect of high and uniform spatial resolution.

  10. A 2×2 array of EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed a new solid-state x-ray imaging system that consists of a 2×2 array of electron multiplying charge coupled devices (EMCCDs). This system is intended for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The key components are the four 1024 × 1024 pixel EMCCDs with a pixel size of 13 × 13 µm(2). Each EMCCD is bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 µm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a 3.22∶1 fiber optic taper (FOT). The detector provides x-ray images of 9 line pairs/mm resolution at 15 frames/sec and real-time live video at 30 frames/sec with binning at a lower resolution, independent of the electronic gain applied to the EMCCD. The total field of view (FOV) of the array is 8.45 cm × 8.45 cm. The system is designed to also provide the ability to do region-of- interest imaging (ROI) by selectively enabling individual modules of the array.

  11. High-performance SPAD array detectors for parallel photon timing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, I.; Cuccato, A.; Antonioli, S.; Cammi, C.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.

    2012-02-01

    Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in monolithic arrays of single photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) for spatially resolved detection of faint ultrafast optical signals. SPADs implemented in planar technologies offer the typical advantages of microelectronic devices (small size, ruggedness, low voltage, low power, etc.). Furthermore, they have inherently higher photon detection efficiency than PMTs and are able to provide, beside sensitivities down to single-photons, very high acquisition speeds. In order to make SPAD array more and more competitive in time-resolved application it is necessary to face problems like electrical crosstalk between adjacent pixel, moreover all the singlephoton timing electronics with picosecond resolution has to be developed. In this paper we present a new instrument suitable for single-photon imaging applications and made up of 32 timeresolved parallel channels. The 32x1 pixel array that includes SPAD detectors represents the system core, and an embedded data elaboration unit performs on-board data processing for single-photon counting applications. Photontiming information is exported through a custom parallel cable that can be connected to an external multichannel TCSPC system.

  12. Performance of new 8-inch photomultiplier tube used for the Tibet muon-detector array

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Ying Zhangm Jing; Zhai, Liu-Ming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Feng, Cun-Feng; Jia, Huan-Yu; Zhou, Xun-Xiu; Dan-Zen, Luo-bu; Chen, Tian-Lu; Laba, Ci-Ren; Mao-Yuan,; Gao, Qi; Zha-xi, Ci-ren

    2016-01-01

    A new hybrid experiment has been constructed to measure the chemical composition of cosmic rays around the "knee" in the wide energy range by the Tibet AS$\\gamma$ collaboration at Tibet, China, since 2014. They consist of a high-energy air-shower-core array (YAC-II), a high-density air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector array (MD). In order to obtain the primary proton, helium and iron spectra and their "knee" positions in the energy range lower than $10^{16}$ eV, each of PMTs equipped to the MD cell is required to measure the number of photons capable of covering a wide dynamic range of 100 - $10^{6}$ photoelectrons (PEs) according to Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we firstly compare the characteristic features between R5912-PMT made by Japan Hamamatsu and CR365-PMT made by Beijing Hamamatsu. This is the first comparison between R5912-PMT and CR365-PMT. If there exists no serious difference, we will then add two 8-inch-in-diameter PMTs to meet our requirem...

  13. Proximitized NbN/NiCu nanostripes as new promising superconducting single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Giampiero; Parlato, Loredana; Bonavolontà, Carmela; Valentino, Massimo; De Lisio, Corrado; Cristiano, Roberto; Ejrnaes, Mikkel; Myoren, Horoshi; Sobolewski, Roman

    2013-05-01

    Transport properties of NbN/NiCu superconductor/ferromagnet (S/F) nanostripes fabricated in both in single-wire and series-parallel, meander-type configurations are presented down to T = 4.2 K. In particular, the enhancement of the superconducting critical current has been observed at smaller widths, apparently, due to an extra pinning mechanism, arising from clustering of ferromagnetic atoms inside the thin S layer. Moreover, we observed a number of characteristic voltage steps on the nanostripe current-voltage characteristics and their nature was investigated as a function of temperature. An explanation in terms of active phase-slip phenomena has been proposed based of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory and led to an estimation of the inelastic electron-phonon relaxation time τe-ph ~ 1 ps, in agreement with the τopt = 1.2+/-0.3 ps value, measured by the femtosecond transient optical reflectivity spectroscopy method on the same bilayer. Transient optical properties of our superconducting S/F nano-bilayers have been also investigated and compared to those obtained for pure NbN nanostripe reference samples. Finally, electrical photoresponse signals of S/F heterostructures exposed to ultraweak pulsed (width 400 ps, repetition rate ~100 MHz) laser radiation at 850 nm wavelength exhibited the falling time of voltage responses directly dependent on the NiCu overlayer. We have also noticed that the presence of the top F layer and the resulting proximity effect reduced frequency of dark counts in our samples.

  14. Fabrication of Silicon Backshort Assembly for Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, E.; Bennett, C. L.; Chuss, D. T.; Denis, K. L.; Eimer, J.; Lourie, N.; Marriage, T.; Moseley, S. H.; Rostem, K.; Stevenson, T. R.; Towner, D.; U-Yen, K.; Wollack, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a ground-based instrument that will measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background to search for gravitational waves from a posited epoch of inflation early in the universe s history. We are currently developing detectors that address the challenges of this measurement by combining the excellent beam-forming attributes of feedhorns with the low-noise performance of Transition-Edge sensors. These detectors utilize a planar orthomode transducer that maps the horizontal and vertical linear polarized components in a dual-mode waveguide to separate microstrip lines. On-chip filters define the bandpass in each channel, and the signals are terminated in resistors that are thermally coupled to the transition-edge sensors operating at 150 mK.

  15. Calibration scheme for large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays based on Readout Frequency Response

    CERN Document Server

    Bisigello, L; Murugesan, V; Baselmans, J J A; Baryshev, A M

    2016-01-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal with respect to the KID resonant circle. Fundamentally, this phase change is due to a shift in the KID resonance frequency, in turn due to a radiation induced change in the quasiparticle number in the superconducting resonator. We show that shift in resonant frequency can be determined from the phase shift by using KID phase versus frequency dependence using a previously measured resonant frequency. Working in this calculated resonant frequency, we gain near linearity and constant calibration to a constant optical signal ap...

  16. Signal-Conditioning Block of a 1 × 200 CMOS Detector Array for a Terahertz Real-Time Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ryul Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A signal conditioning block of a 1 × 200 Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS detector array is proposed to be employed with a real-time 0.2 THz imaging system for inspecting large areas. The plasmonic CMOS detector array whose pixel size including an integrated antenna is comparable to the wavelength of the THz wave for the imaging system, inevitably carries wide pixel-to-pixel variation. To make the variant outputs from the array uniform, the proposed signal conditioning block calibrates the responsivity of each pixel by controlling the gate bias of each detector and the voltage gain of the lock-in amplifiers in the block. The gate bias of each detector is modulated to 1 MHz to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the imaging system via the electrical modulation by the conditioning block. In addition, direct current (DC offsets of the detectors in the array are cancelled by initializing the output voltage level from the block. Real-time imaging using the proposed signal conditioning block is demonstrated by obtaining images at the rate of 19.2 frame-per-sec of an object moving on the conveyor belt with a scan width of 20 cm and a scan speed of 25 cm/s.

  17. Signal-Conditioning Block of a 1 × 200 CMOS Detector Array for a Terahertz Real-Time Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Han, Seong-Tae

    2016-03-02

    A signal conditioning block of a 1 × 200 Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) detector array is proposed to be employed with a real-time 0.2 THz imaging system for inspecting large areas. The plasmonic CMOS detector array whose pixel size including an integrated antenna is comparable to the wavelength of the THz wave for the imaging system, inevitably carries wide pixel-to-pixel variation. To make the variant outputs from the array uniform, the proposed signal conditioning block calibrates the responsivity of each pixel by controlling the gate bias of each detector and the voltage gain of the lock-in amplifiers in the block. The gate bias of each detector is modulated to 1 MHz to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the imaging system via the electrical modulation by the conditioning block. In addition, direct current (DC) offsets of the detectors in the array are cancelled by initializing the output voltage level from the block. Real-time imaging using the proposed signal conditioning block is demonstrated by obtaining images at the rate of 19.2 frame-per-sec of an object moving on the conveyor belt with a scan width of 20 cm and a scan speed of 25 cm/s.

  18. Electronics and data acquisition system of the extensive air shower detector array at the University of Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.; Martinez, O.; Conde, R.; Murrieta, T.

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are playing an increasing role in DAQ systems in cosmic ray experiments due to their high speed and integration and their low cost and low power comsumption. In this paper we describe in detail the new electronics and data acquisition system based on FPGA boards of the extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla. The purpose of this detector array is to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 10 liquid scintillator detectors and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (of 1.86 m2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. The electronics described also makes use of analog to digital converters with a resolution of 10 bits and sampling speeds of 100 MS/s to digitize the PMT signals. We also discuss the advantages of discriminating the PMT signals inside the FPGAs with respect to the conventional use of dedicated discrimination circuits.

  19. Development of microwave-multiplexed superconductive detectors for the HOLMES experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Giachero, A; Bennett, D A; Faverzani, M; Ferri, E; Fowler, J W; Gard, J D; Hays-Wehle, J P; Hilton, G C; Maino, M; Mates, J A B; Puiu, A; Nucciotti, A; Reintsema, C D; Schmidt, D R; Swetz, D S; Ullom, J N; Vale, L R

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the progress on low temperature detector technologies has allowed design of large scale experiments aiming at pushing down the sensitivity on the neutrino mass below 1\\,eV. Even with outstanding performances in both energy ($\\sim$eV on keV) and time resolution ($\\sim 1\\,\\mu$s) on the single channel, a large number of detectors working in parallel is required to reach a sub-eV sensitivity. HOLMES is a new experiment to directly measure the neutrino mass with a sensitivity as low as 2\\,eV. HOLMES will perform a calorimetric measurement of the energy released in the electron capture (EC) decay of 163Ho. In its final configuration, HOLMES will deploy 1000 detectors of low temperature microcalorimeters with implanted 163Ho nuclei. The baseline sensors for HOLMES are Mo/Cu TESs (Transition Edge Sensors) on SiN\\textsubscript{x} membrane with gold absorbers. The readout is based on the use of rf-SQUIDs as input devices with flux ramp modulation for linearization purposes; the rf-SQUID is then coupled...

  20. Silicon PIN diode hybrid arrays for charged particle detection: Building blocks for vertex detectors at the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, G.; Gaalema, S.; Shapiro, S.L.; Dunwoodie, W.M.; Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G.

    1989-05-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of solid state detectors have long been used in visible and infrared systems. Hybrid arrays with separately optimized detector and readout substrates have been extensively developed for infrared sensors. The characteristics and use of these infrared readout chips with silicon PIN diode arrays produced by MICRON SEMICONDUCTOR for detecting high-energy particles are reported. Some of these arrays have been produced in formats as large as 512 /times/ 512 pixels; others have been radiation hardened to total dose levels beyond 1 Mrad. Data generation rates of 380 megasamples/second have been achieved. Analog and digital signal transmission and processing techniques have also been developed to accept and reduce these high data rates. 9 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. SiPM detectors for the ASTRI project in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billotta, Sergio; Marano, Davide; Bonanno, Giovanni; Belluso, Massimiliano; Grillo, Alessandro; Garozzo, Salvatore; Romeo, Giuseppe; Timpanaro, Maria Cristina; Maccarone, Maria Concetta C.; Catalano, Osvaldo; La Rosa, Giovanni; Sottile, Giuseppe; Impiombato, Domenico; Gargano, Carmelo; Giarrusso, Salavtore

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a worldwide new generation project aimed at realizing an array of a hundred ground based gamma-ray telescopes. ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is the Italian project whose primary target is the development of an end-to-end prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, of the CTA small size class of telescopes devoted to investigation of the highest energy region, from 1 to 100 TeV. Next target is the implementation of an ASTRI/CTA mini-array based on seven identical telescopes. Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are the semiconductor photosensor devices designated to constitute the camera detection system at the focal plane of the ASTRI telescopes. SiPM photosensors are suitable for the detection of the Cherenkov flashes, since they are very fast and sensitive to the light in the 300-700nm wavelength spectrum. Their drawbacks compared to the traditional photomultiplier tubes are high dark count rates, after-pulsing and optical cross-talk contributions, and intrinsic gains strongly dependent on temperature. Nonetheless, for a single pixel, the dark count rate is well below the Night Sky Background, the effects of cross-talk and afterpulses are typically lower than 20%, and the gain can be kept stable against temperature variations by means of adequate bias voltage compensation strategies. This work presents and discusses some experimental results from a large set of measurements performed on the SiPM sensors to be used for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype camera and on recently developed detectors demonstrating outstanding performance for the future evolution of the project in the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  2. Large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic TES detectors for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Anderson, Adam J.; Avva, Jessica; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Arnold, Kam S.; Austermann, Jason; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Byrum, Karen; Carlstrom, John E.; Carter, Faustin W.; Chang, Clarence; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Cukierman, Ari; Czaplewski, David A.; Ding, Junjia; Divan, Ralu N. S.; de Haan, Tijmen; Dobbs, Matt; Dutcher, Daniel; Everett, Wenderline; Gannon, Renae N.; Guyser, Robert J.; Halverson, Nils W.; Harrington, Nicholas L.; Hattori, Kaori; Henning, Jason W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Holzapfel, William L.; Huang, Nicholas; Irwin, Kent D.; Jeong, Oliver; Khaire, Trupti; Korman, Milo; Kubik, Donna L.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lee, Adrian T.; Leitch, Erik M.; Lendinez Escudero, Sergi; Meyer, Stephan S.; Miller, Christina S.; Montgomery, Joshua; Nadolski, Andrew; Natoli, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Hogan; Novosad, Valentyn; Padin, Stephen; Pan, Zhaodi; Pearson, John E.; Rahlin, Alexandra; Reichardt, Christian L.; Ruhl, John E.; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Shirley, Ian; Sayre, James T.; Shariff, Jamil A.; Shirokoff, Erik D.; Stan, Liliana; Stark, Antony A.; Sobrin, Joshua; Story, Kyle; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tang, Qing Yang; Thakur, Ritoban B.; Thompson, Keith L.; Tucker, Carole E.; Vanderlinde, Keith; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Wang, Gensheng; Whitehorn, Nathan; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Yoon, Ki Won

    2016-07-01

    Detectors for cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments are now essentially background limited, so a straightforward alternative to improve sensitivity is to increase the number of detectors. Large arrays of multichroic pixels constitute an economical approach to increasing the number of detectors within a given focal plane area. Here, we present the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic transition-edge-sensor (TES) bolometers for the South Pole Telescope third-generation CMB receiver (SPT-3G). The complete SPT-3G receiver will have 2690 pixels, each with six detectors, allowing for individual measurement of three spectral bands (centered at 95 GHz, 150 GHz and 220 GHz) in two orthogonal polarizations. In total, the SPT-3G focal plane will have 16140 detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a niobium microstrip transmission line. In-line filters are used to define the different band-passes before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES sensors. Detectors are read out using a 64x frequency domain multiplexing (fMux) scheme. The microfabrication of the SPT-3G detector arrays involves a total of 18 processes, including 13 lithography steps. Together with the fabrication process, the effect of processing on the Ti/Au TES's Tc is discussed. In addition, detectors fabricated with Ti/Au TES films with Tc between 400 mK 560 mK are presented and their thermal characteristics are evaluated. Optical characterization of the arrays is presented as well, indicating that the response of the detectors is in good agreement with the design values for all three spectral bands (95 GHz, 150 GHz, and 220 GHz). The measured optical efficiency of the detectors is between 0.3 and 0.8. Results discussed here are extracted from a batch of research of development wafers used to develop the baseline process for the fabrication of the arrays of detectors to be deployed with the SPT-3G receiver. Results from

  3. On the estimation of target depth using the single transmit multiple receive metal detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K. C.; Gader, P. D.

    2012-06-01

    This paper investigates the use of the Single Transmit Multiple Receive (STMR) metal detector (MD) array to estimate the depth of metal targets, such as 155mm shells. The depth estimation problem using MD has been investigated by a number of researchers and the processing was performed along the down-track. The proposed method takes a different approach by exploring the MD responses in cross-track to achieve the depth estimation. It is found that the normalized energy spread of the MD output is narrower for shallow targets and wider for deeper targets. Based on this observation, a method is derived to estimate the depth of a target. Experimental results from the data collected at an U.S. Army test site validate the performance of the proposed depth estimator.

  4. Application of multiparameter coincidence spectrometry using a Ge detectors array to neutron activation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hatsukawa, Y; Hayakawa, T; Toh, Y; Shinohara, N

    2002-01-01

    The method of multiparameter coincidence spectrometry based on gamma-gamma coincidence is widely used for the nuclear structure studies, because of its high sensitivity to gamma-rays. In this study, feasibility of the method of multiparameter coincidence spectrometry for analytical chemistry was examined. Two reference igneous rock samples (JP-1, JB-1a) issued by the Geological Survey of Japan were irradiated at a research reactor, and the gamma-rays from the radioisotopes produced via neutron capture reactions were measured using an array of 12 Ge detectors with BGO Compton suppressors, GEMINI. Simultaneously 24 elements were analyzed without chemical separation. The observed smallest component was Eu contained in JP-1 with abundance of 4 ppb.

  5. Few-photon imaging at 1550 nm using a low-timing-jitter superconducting nanowire single-photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, H; You, L; Chen, S; Zhang, W; Wu, J; Wang, Z; Xie, X

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a laser depth imaging system based on the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, which was incorporated with a low-jitter superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD), operated at the wavelength of 1550 nm. A sub-picosecond time-bin width was chosen for photon counting, resulting in a discrete noise of less than one/two counts for each time bin under indoor/outdoor daylight conditions, with a collection time of 50 ms. Because of the low-jitter SNSPD, the target signal histogram was significantly distinguishable, even for a fairly low retro-reflected photon flux. The depth information was determined directly by the highest bin counts, instead of using any data fitting combined with complex algorithms. Millimeter resolution depth imaging of a low-signature object was obtained, and more accurate data than that produced by the traditional Gaussian fitting method was generated. Combined with the intensity of the return photons, three-dimensional reconstruction overlaid with re...

  6. Study and characterization of arrays of detectors for dosimetric verification of radiotherapy, analysis of business solutions; Estudio y caracterizacion de materiales de detectores para verificacion dosimetrica de radioterapia, analisis de las soluciones comerciales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago Arias, A.; Brualla Gonzalez, L.; Gomez Rodriguez, F.; Gonzalez Castano, D. M.; Pardo Montero, J.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Sueiro, J.; Sanchez Garcia, M.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the detector arrays developed by different business houses to the demand for devices that speed up the verification process. Will analyze the effect of spatial response of individual detectors in the measurement of dose distributions, modeling the same and analyzing the ability of the arrays to detect variations in a treatment yield.

  7. Continuous Tera-Hertz wave transmission spectroscopy of Nb double superconducting split-ring resonator array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, JunWei; Liu, RuiYuan; Zhou, YuRong; Li, YanRong; Wang, YunPing

    2012-02-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of two Nb double superconducting split-ring samples with different thicknesses on MgO substrates was measured by a continuous Tera-Hertz spectrometer. The transmission curves of two different samples with the thicknesses of 50 and 150 nm at 7.5 K show dips at 480, 545 GHz, respectively, which origin from the different capacities and inductances of the samples. For the sample of 50 nm, the dip shifts to lower frequency, also decreases in depth and increases in width with temperature or field increasing below T c of Nb film, while the sample of 150 nm does not show such a phenomenon. This thickness-dependent transmission behavior is due to the kinetic inductance and conductivity change of superfluid electrons in Nb film and may suggest a practical tunable THz filter based on the thinner samples.

  8. The high dynamic range pixel array detector (HDR-PAD): Concept and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanks, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Weiss, Joel T.; Becker, Julian; Tate, Mark W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Experiments at storage ring light sources as well as at next-generation light sources increasingly require detectors capable of high dynamic range operation, combining low-noise detection of single photons with large pixel well depth. XFEL sources in particular provide pulse intensities sufficiently high that a purely photon-counting approach is impractical. The High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector (HDR-PAD) project aims to provide a dynamic range extending from single-photon sensitivity to 10{sup 6} photons/pixel in a single XFEL pulse while maintaining the ability to tolerate a sustained flux of 10{sup 11} ph/s/pixel at a storage ring source. Achieving these goals involves the development of fast pixel front-end electronics as well as, in the XFEL case, leveraging the delayed charge collection due to plasma effects in the sensor. A first prototype of essential electronic components of the HDR-PAD readout ASIC, exploring different options for the pixel front-end, has been fabricated. Here, the HDR-PAD concept and preliminary design will be described.

  9. Study on the energy response to neutrons for a new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Qi; Wang Qun; Xie Zhong Shen

    2003-01-01

    The energy response of a new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector to neutrons in the energy range 0.01 MeV<=E sub n<=14 MeV was modeled by combining a simplified Monte Carlo model and the MCNP 4b code. In order to test the model and get the absolute sensitivity of the detector to neutrons, one experiment was carried out for 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons from T(p,n) sup 3 He and T(d,n) sup 4 He reactions at the Neutron Generator Laboratory at the Institute of Modern Physics, the Chinese Academy of Science. The absolute neutron fluence was obtained with a relative standard uncertainty 4.5% or 2.0% by monitoring the associated protons or sup 4 He particles, respectively. Another experiment was carried out for 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 MeV neutrons from T(p,n) sup 3 He reaction, and for 3.28, 3.50, 4.83, 5.74 MeV neutrons from D(d,n) sup 3 He reaction on the Model 5SDH-2 accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy. The absolute neutron fluence was obtained with a relative standard uncertainty 5.0% by usin...

  10. Digital pulse-timing technique for the neutron detector array NEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modamio, V., E-mail: victor.modamio@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Hüyük, T. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Triossi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Egea, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat de València, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Söderström, P.-A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Agramunt Ros, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Angelis, G. de [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, F-14076 Caen (France); Erduran, M.N. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, 34303 Istanbul (Turkey); and others

    2015-03-01

    A new digital pulse-timing algorithm, to be used with the future neutron detector array NEDA, has been developed and tested. The time resolution of four 5 in. diameter photomultiplier tubes (XP4512, R4144, R11833-100, and ET9390-kb), coupled to a cylindrical 5 in. by 5 in. BC501A liquid scintillator detector was measured by employing digital sampling electronics and a constant fraction discriminator (CFD) algorithm. The zero crossing of the CFD algorithm was obtained with a cubic spline interpolation, which was continuous up to the second derivative. The performance of the algorithm was studied at sampling rates of 500 MS/s and 200 MS/s. The time resolution obtained with the digital electronics was compared to the values acquired with a standard analog CFD. The result of this comparison shows that the time resolution from the analog and the digital measurements at 500 MS/s and at 200 MS/s are within 15% for all the tested photomultiplier tubes.

  11. Mid-infrared Laser-Induced Fluorescence with Nanosecond Time Resolution Using a Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detector: New Technology for Molecular Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Schwarzer, Dirk; Verma, Varun B; Stevens, Martin J; Marsili, Francesco; Mirin, Richard P; Nam, Sae Woo; Wodtke, Alec M

    2017-06-20

    In contrast to UV photomultiplier tubes that are widely used in physical chemistry, mid-infrared detectors are notorious for poor sensitivity and slow time response. This helps explain why, despite the importance of infrared spectroscopy in molecular science, mid-infrared fluorescence is not more widely used. In recent years, several new technologies have been developed that open new experimental possibilities for research in the mid-infrared. In this Account, we present one of the more promising technologies, superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) by sharing our experience with its use in a typical experiment carried out by physical chemists (laser-induced fluorescence) and comparing the SNSPD to a detector commonly used by physical chemists (InSb at LN Temperature). SNSPDs are fabricated from a thin film of superconducting metal, patterned into a meandering nanowire. The nanowire is cooled below its superconducting temperature, Tc, and held in a constant current circuit below the critical current necessary to destroy superconductivity, Ic. Upon absorption of a photon, the resulting heat is sufficient to destroy superconductivity across the entire width of the nanowire, an event that can be detected as a voltage pulse. In contrast to semiconductor-based detectors, which have a long wavelength cutoff determined by the band gap, the SNSPD exhibits single-photon sensitivity across the entire mid-IR spectrum. As these devices have not been used extensively outside the field of light detection technology research, one important goal of this Account is to provide practical details for the implementation of these devices in a physical chemistry laboratory. We provide extensive Supporting Information describing what is needed. This includes information on a liquid nitrogen cooled monochromator, the optical collection system including mid-infrared fibers, as well as a closed-cycle cryogenic cooler that reaches 0.3 K. We demonstrate the advantages of

  12. Effect of scattered electrons on the ‘Magic Plate’ transmission array detector response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrowaili, Z. A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Carolan, M.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2017-02-01

    Transmission type detectors can provide a measure of the energy fluence and if they are real-time systems that do not significantly attenuate the radiation beam have a distinct advantage over the current method as Quality Assurance (QA) could in principle be done during the actual patient treatment. The use of diode arrays in QA holds much promise due to real-time operation and feedback when compared to other methods e.g. films which are not real-time. The goal of this work is to describe the characterization of the radiation response of a silicon diode array called the Magic Plate (MP) when operated in transmission mode (MPTM). The response linearity of MPTM was excellent (R2=1). When the MP was placed in linac block tray position; the change in PDD at phantom surface (SSD 100 cm) for a 10 × 10 cm2 was -0.037 %, -0.178 % and -0.949 % for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams. Therefore, MP does not provide a significant increase in skin dose to the patient and the percentage depth doses showed an excellent agreement with and without MPTM for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams.

  13. Examination of cotton fibers and common contaminants using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical imaging of cotton fibers and common contaminants in fibers is presented. Chemical imaging was performed with an infrared microscope equipped with a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In a...

  14. Performance of new 8-inch photomultiplier tube used for the Tibet muon-detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, D.; Zhai, L.-M.; Chen, X.; Hu, X.-B.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jin, H.-B.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Feng, C.-F.; Jia, H.-Y.; Zhou, X.-X.; Danzengluobu; Chen, T.-L.; Labaciren; Liu, M.-Y.; Gao, Q.; Zhaxiciren

    2016-06-01

    Since 2014, a new hybrid experiment consisting of a high-energy air-shower-core array (YAC-II), a high-density air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector array (MD) has been continued by the Tibet ASγ collaboration to measure the chemical composition of cosmic rays in the wide energy range including the ``knee''. In this experiment, YAC-II is used to select high energy core events induced by cosmic rays in the above energy region, while MD is used to estimate the type of nucleus of primary particles by measuring the number of muons contained in the air showers. However, the dynamic range of each MD cell is only 5 to 2000 photoelectrons (PEs) which is mainly designed for observation of high-energy celestial gamma rays. In order to obtain the primary proton, helium and iron spectra and their ``knee'' positions with energy up to 1016 eV, each of PMTs equipped to the MD cell is required to measure the number of photons capable of covering a wide dynamic range of 100-106 PEs according to Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we firstly compare the characteristic features between R5912-PMT made by Japan Hamamatsu and CR365-PMT made by Beijing Hamamatsu. If there exists no serious difference, we will then add two 8-inch-in-diameter PMTs to meet our requirements in each MD cell, which are responsible for the range of 100-10000 PEs and 2000-1000000 PEs, respectively. That is, MD cell is expected to be able to measure the number of muons over 6 orders of magnitudes.

  15. Dosimetric Characteristics of a Two-Dimensional Diode Array Detector Irradiated with Passively Scattered Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liengsawangwong, Praimakorn; Sahoo, Nanayan; Ding, Xiaoning; Lii, MingFwu; Gillin, Michale T.; Zhu, Xiaorong Ronald, E-mail: xrzhu@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) diode array detector irradiated with passively scattered proton beams. Materials and Methods: A diode array detector, MapCHECK (Model 1175, Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL, USA) was characterized in passive-scattered proton beams. The relative sensitivity of the diodes and absolute dose calibration were determined using a 250 MeV beam. The pristine Bragg curves (PBCs) measured by MapCHECK diodes were compared with those of an ion chamber using a range shift method. The water-equivalent thickness (WET) of the diode array detector’s intrinsic buildup also was determined. The inverse square dependence, linearity, and other proton dosimetric quantities measured by MapCHECK were also compared with those of the ion chambers. The change in the absolute dose response of the MapCHECK as a function of accumulated radiation dose was used as an indicator of radiation damage to the diodes. 2D dose distribution with and without the compensator were measured and compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Results: The WET of the MapCHECK diode’s buildup was determined to be 1.7 cm. The MapCHECK-measured PBC were virtually identical to those measured by a parallel-plate ion chamber for 160, 180, and 250 MeV proton beams. The inverse square results of the MapCHECK were within ±0.4% of the ion chamber results. The linearity of MapCHECK results was within 1% of those from the ion chamber as measured in the range between 10 and 300 MU. All other dosimetric quantities were within 1.3% of the ion chamber results. The 2D dose distributions for non-clinical fields without compensator and the patient treatment fields with the compensator were consistent with the TPS results. The absolute dose response of the MapCHECK was changed by 7.4% after an accumulated dose increased by 170 Gy. Conclusions: The MapCHECK is a convenient and useful tool for 2D dose distribution measurements using passively

  16. Design, fabrication and testing of 17um pitch 640x480 uncooled infrared focal plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijun; Liu, Haitao; Chi, Jiguang; Qian, Liangshan; Pan, Feng; Liu, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane array (UIRFPA) detectors are widely used in industrial thermography cameras, night vision goggles, thermal weapon sights, as well as automotive night vision systems. To meet the market requirement for smaller pixel pitch and higher resolution, we have developed a 17um pitch 640x480 UIRFPA detector. The detector is based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) microbolometer technology, the readout integrated circuit (ROIC) is designed and manufactured with 0.35um standard CMOS technology on 8 inch wafer, the microbolometer is fabricated monolithically on the ROIC using an unique surface micromachining process developed inside the company, the fabricated detector is vacuum packaged with hermetic metal package and tested. In this paper we present the design, fabrication and testing of the 17um 640x480 detector. The design trade-off of the detector ROIC and pixel micro-bridge structure will be discussed, by comparison the calculation and simulation to the testing results. The novel surface micromachining process using silicon sacrificial layer will be presented, which is more compatible with the CMOS process than the traditional process with polyimide sacrificial layer, and resulted in good processing stability and high fabrication yield. The performance of the detector is tested, with temperature equivalent temperature difference (NETD) less than 60mK at F/1 aperture, operability better than 99.5%. The results demonstrate that the detector can meet the requirements of most thermography and night vision applications.

  17. Performance evaluation of a PET detector consisting of an LYSO array coupled to a 4 x 4 array of large-size GAPD for MR compatible imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Key Jo; Choi, Yong; Kang, Jihoon; Hu, Wei; Jung, Jin Ho; Min, Byung Jun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Hyun [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, College of Health Science, 234 Meaji, Heungup Wonju, Kangwon-Do, 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jackson, Carl, E-mail: ychoi@sogang.ac.kr [SensL, Blackrock, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-05-01

    We examined a PET detector consisting of an LYSO array coupled to a 4 x 4 array of large-size Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD). The GAPD coupled to 3 mm x 3 mm x 20 mm LYSO pixel crystal has been investigated for possible use as an MR-compatible PET photosensor. Primary characteristics of a PET detector, such as energy resolution and coincidence timing resolution were measured. Gain variation, count uniformity, and count estimation error of 4 x 4 array of LYSO-GAPD were measured to evaluate the performance parameters relevant for PET imaging. The energy resolution and coincidence timing resolution with 511 keV gamma rays were 18.5 {+-} 0.7% and 1.6 ns, respectively. The gain variation, count uniformity for all 16 channels were 1.3:1 and 1.3:1, respectively. The count estimation error between adjacent channels measured with an LYSO connected to a GAPD pixel was negligible (0.24 {+-} 0.04%). Long-term stability results show that there was no significant change in the photopeak position, energy resolution and count rate for 20 days. Cable lengths up to 300 cm, used between the GAPD and preamplifier, did not affect photopeak position and energy resolution. The performance of the LYSO-GAPD detector inside the MRI exhibited no significant change compared to that measured outside the MRI. The MR images acquired with and without the operating LYSO-GAPD detector located on top of the RF coil showed no considerable degradation in image quality. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using the LYSO-GAPD detector as PET photosensors, which could be used for MR compatible PET development.

  18. Development of megapixel HgCdTe detector arrays with 15 micron cutoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Dorn, Meghan; Pipher, Judith; Cabrera, Mario S.

    2016-10-01

    I. HistoryHgCdTe is a versatile II-VI semiconductor with a direct-bandgap tunable via the Hg:Cd ratio. Hg:Cd ratio = 53:47 (2.5 micron cutoff) was used on the NICMOS instrument on HST and the 2MASS. Increasing Hg:Cd ratio to 70:30 leads to a 5.4 micron cutoff, utilized in NEOWISE and many JWST instruments. Bailey, Wu et al. (1998) motivated extending this technology to 10 microns and beyond. Bacon, McMurtry et al. (2003, 2004) indicated significant progress toward this longwave (LW) goal.Warm-Spitzer has pioneered passive cooling to below 30 K in space, enabling the JWST mission.II. CurrentNASA's proposed NEOcam mission selected HgCdTe with a 10.6 micron cutoff because it promises natural Zodiacal background limited sensitivity with modest cooling (40 K). Teledyne Imaging Systems (TIS) is producing megapixel arrays with excellent performance (McMurtry, Lee, Dorn et al. (2013)) for this mission.III. FutureModest cooling requirements (circa 30 K) coupled with megapixel arrays and LW sensitivity in the thermal IR make HgCdTe attractive for many infrared instruments. For instance, the spectral signature of a terrestrial planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a nearby star will be the deep and wide absorption by CO_2 centered at 15 microns (Seager and Deming, 2010). LW instruments can enhance Solar System missions, such as exploration of the Enceladus geysers (Spencer, Buratti et al. 2006). Passive cooling will be adequate for these missions. Modern ground-based observatories will benefit from infrared capability out to the N band (7.5-13.6 microns). The required detector temperatures (30-40 K) are easily achievable using commercially available mechanical cryo-coolers (refrigerators).IV. Progress to dateTIS is developing megapixel HgCdTe arrays sensitive out to 15 microns under the direction of the University of Rochester. As a first step, we have produced arrays with a 13 micron cutoff. The initial measurements indicate very promising performance. We will present the

  19. The design, implementation, and performance of the Atro-H SXS calorimeter array and anti-coincidence detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Brekosky, Regis P.; Chervenak, James A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Eckart, Megan E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Grein, Christoph; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; Porter, F. S.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Zhao, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV, enabling essential plasma diagnostics. The SXS has a square array of 36 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing x-ray absorbers. These devices have demonstrated a resolution of better than 4.5 eV at 6 keV when operated at a heat-sink temperature of 50 mK. We will discuss the basic physical parameters of this array, including the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, resistance function, absorber details, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistorbearing element. We will also present the thermal characterization of the whole array, including thermal conductance and crosstalk measurements and the results of pulsing the frame temperature via alpha particles, heat pulses, and the environmental background. A silicon ionization detector is located behind the calorimeter array and serves to reject events due to cosmic rays. We will briefly describe this anti-coincidence detector and its performance.

  20. The Design, Implementation, and Performance of the Astro-H SXS Calorimeter Array and Anti-Coincidence Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Brekosky, Regis P.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Galeazzi, Masimilliano; Grein, Christoph; Jhabvala, Christine A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV, enabling essential plasma diagnostics. The SXS has a square array of 36 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing x-ray absorbers. These devices have demonstrated a resolution of better than 4.5 eV at 6 keV when operated at a heat-sink temperature of 50 mK. We will discuss the basic physical parameters of this array, including the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, resistance function, absorber details, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor-bearing element. We will also present the thermal characterization of the whole array, including thermal conductance and crosstalk measurements and the results of pulsing the frame temperature via alpha particles, heat pulses, and the environmental background. A silicon ionization detector is located behind the calorimeter array and serves to reject events due to cosmic rays. We will briefly describe this anti-coincidence detector and its performance.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of cubic SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillators for use in array detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazoe, K., E-mail: shimazoe@bioeng.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Koyama, A.; Takahashi, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Sakuragi, S. [Union Materials Inc., Tone-machi, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamasaki, Y. [Leading Edge Algorithm Co. Ltd., Hikaridai, Seikacho, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-02-21

    Strontium iodide (SrI{sub 2}(Eu)) is a promising spectroscopic detector for use in both nuclear security and medical imaging owing to its excellent energy resolution and low internal background radiation. A cubic form is preferable when coupling with a silicon-based photosensor in order to build an array detector for use in applications such as Compton cameras. Here, cubic SrI{sub 2}(Eu) crystals with 10 mm sides were fabricated and evaluated. The cubic SrI{sub 2}(Eu) samples coupled to an avalanche photodiode exhibited an energy resolution of approximately 3.6% at 662 keV when using a shaping time of 3 µs. An increase in light output and an improvement of energy resolution were also observed at lower temperatures. The excellent energy resolution of these devices indicates that these crystals are promising potential detectors for use in Compton cameras and other imaging detectors.

  2. Optical theory of partially coherent thin-film energy-absorbing structures for power detectors and imaging arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withington, Stafford; Thomas, Christopher N

    2009-06-01

    Free-space power detectors often have energy absorbing structures comprising multilayer systems of patterned thin films. We show that for any system of interacting resistive films, the expectation value of the absorbed power is given by the contraction of two tensor fields: one describes the spatial state of coherence of the incoming radiation, the other the state of coherence to which the detector is sensitive. Equivalently, the natural modes of the optical field scatter power into the natural modes of the detector. We describe a procedure for determining the amplitude, phase, and polarization patterns of a detector's optical modes and their relative responsivities. The procedure gives the state of coherence of the currents flowing in the system and leads to important conceptual insights into the way the pixels of an imaging array interact and extract information from an optical field.

  3. A liquid core waveguide fluorescence detector for multicapillary electrophoresis applied to DNA sequencing in a 91-capillary array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, A; Westberg, J; Roeraade, J

    2000-09-01

    A new laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector for multicapillary electrophoresis is presented. The detection principle is based on waveguiding of the emitted fluorescence from the point of illumination to the capillary ends by total internal reflection (TIR) and imaging of the capillary ends. The capillaries themselves thus act as liquid core waveguides (LCWs). At the illumination point, the capillaries are arranged in a planar array, which allows clean and efficient illumination with a line-focused laser beam. The capillary ends are rearranged into a small, densely packed two-dimensional array, which is imaged end-on with high light collection efficiency and excellent image quality. Wavelength dispersion is obtained with a single prism. Intercapillary optical crosstalk is less than 0.5%, and rejection of stray light is very efficient. The detector is applied to four-color DNA sequencing by gel electrophoresis in a 91-capillary array, with simple fluorescein and rhodamine dyes as fluorophores. Since the imaged two-dimensional array is so compact, the detector has a high potential for very large-scale multiplexing.

  4. Core-shell diode array for high performance particle detectors and imaging sensors: status of the development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, G.; Hübner, U.; Dellith, J.; Dellith, A.; Stolz, R.; Plentz, J.; Andrä, G.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a novel high performance radiation detector and imaging sensor by a ground-breaking core-shell diode array design. This novel core-shell diode array are expected to have superior performance respect to ultrahigh radiation hardness, high sensitivity, low power consumption, fast signal response and high spatial resolution simultaneously. These properties are highly desired in fundamental research such as high energy physics (HEP) at CERN, astronomy and future x-ray based protein crystallography at x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) etc.. This kind of detectors will provide solutions for these fundamental research fields currently limited by instrumentations. In this work, we report our progress on the development of core-shell diode array for the applications as high performance imaging sensors and particle detectors. We mainly present our results in the preparation of high aspect ratio regular silicon rods by metal assisted wet chemical etching technique. Nearly 200 μm deep and 2 μm width channels with high aspect ratio have been etched into silicon. This result will open many applications not only for the core-shell diode array, but also for a high density integration of 3D microelectronics devices.

  5. Design and Initial Performance of the Askaryan Radio Array Prototype EeV Neutrino Detector at the South Pole

    OpenAIRE

    Allison, P; Auffenberg, J.; Bard, R; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D.Z.; Boeser, S.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Connolly, A.; Davies, J; DuVernois, M.; Fox, B.; Gorham, P. W.; Grashorn, E. W.; Hanson, K.

    2011-01-01

    We report on studies of the viability and sensitivity of the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA), a new initiative to develop a Teraton-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detector in deep, radio-transparent ice near Amundsen-Scott station at the South Pole. An initial prototype ARA detector system was installed in January 2011, and has been operating continuously since then. We report on studies of the background radio noise levels, the radio clarity of the ice, and the estimated sensitivity of the plan...

  6. Nuclear structure studies at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics using gamma detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Banerjee

    2001-07-01

    In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy, carried out at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics in the recent past, using heavy-ion projectiles from the pelletron accelerator centres in the country and multi-detector arrays have yielded significant data on the structure of a large number of nuclei spanning different mass regions. The experiments included the study of two-fold -coincidence events for establishing decay schemes, directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) for help in spin assignments and Doppler shift attenuation for lifetime information. The studies have led to the observation of rotational sequences of states in nuclei near closed shell in the mass = 110 region, vibrational spectra in nuclei with ∼ 60, interplay between single-particle and collective modes of excitation in the doubly-odd bromine isotopes, decoupled bands with large quadrupole deformation in 77Br, shape transition with rotational frequency within a band in 138Pm and octupole collectivity in 153Eu. Particle-rotor-model and cranked-shell-model calculations have been carried out to provide an understanding of the underlying nuclear structure

  7. Validated HPLC-Diode Array Detector Method for Simultaneous Evaluation of Six Quality Markers in Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gant, Anastasia; Leyva, Vanessa E; Gonzalez, Ana E; Maruenda, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid, N-methylpyridinium ion, and trigonelline are well studied nutritional biomarkers present in coffee, and they are indicators of thermal decomposition during roasting. However, no method is yet available for their simultaneous determination. This paper describes a rapid and validated HPLC-diode array detector method for the simultaneous quantitation of caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid, N-methylpyridinium ion, 5-caffeoylquinic acid, and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural that is applicable to three coffee matrixes: green, roasted, and instant. Baseline separation among all compounds was achieved in 30 min using a phenyl-hexyl RP column (250×4.6 mm, 5 μm particle size), 0.3% aqueous formic buffer (pH 2.4)-methanol mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 mL/min, and a column temperature at 30°C. The method showed good linear correlation (r2>0.9985), precision (less than 3.9%), sensitivity (LOD=0.023-0.237 μg/mL; LOQ=0.069-0.711 μg/mL), and recovery (84-102%) for all compounds. This simplified method is amenable for a more complete routine evaluation of coffee in industry.

  8. JOINT SPACE-FREQUENCY MULTIUSER SYMBOL DETECTOR FOR MC-CDMA SYSTEM WITH UNIFORM LINEAR ARRAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The MultiCarrier COde Division Multiple Access (MC-CDMA) scheme is promising for relieving capacity limit problems of Direct Sequence(DS-CDMA systems due to serious InterCip Interference(ICI) and MultiUser Interference(MUI)in high-data-rate wireless communication systems.In this paper the Uniform Linear Array(ULA) is applied to the base station of macrocellular MC-CDMA systems in a frequency-selective fading channel environment.A joint space-frequency multiuser symblo sequence detector is developed for all active users within one macrocell without space-frequency channel estimation.Simultaneously,Directions-of -Arrivals (ODAs)of all active users can also be estimated.By dividing the ULA into two identical overlapping subarrays,a specific auxiliary matrix is constructed,which includes both symbol sequence and DOA information of all active users,Then,based on the subspace method,performing the eigen decomposition on such auxiliary matrix,the closed-form solution of symbol sequences and DOAs for all active users can be obtained.In comparison with schemes based on channel estimation,our algorithm need not explicitly estimate the space-frequency channel for each active user,so it has lower computation complexity,Extensive computer simulations demonstrate the overall performance of this novel scheme.

  9. JOINT SPACE-FREQUENCY MULTIUSER SYMBOL DETECTOR FOR MC-CDMA SYSTEM WITH UNIFORM LINEAR ARRAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xiaojun; Yin Qinye; Feng Aigang; Zhao Zheng; Zhang Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    The MultiCarrier Code Division Multiple Access (MC-CDMA) scheme is promising for relieving capacity limit problems of Direct Sequence (DS-) CDMA systems due to serious InterChip Interference (ICI) and MultiUser Interference (MUI) in high-data-rate wireless communication systems. In this paper, the Uniform Linear Array (ULA) is applied to the base station of macrocellular MC-CDMA systems in a frequency-selective fading channel environment. A joint space-frequency multiuser symbol sequence detector is developed for all active users within one macrocell without space-frequency channel estimation. Simultaneously, Directions-Of-Arrivals (DOAs) of all active users can also be estimated. By dividing the ULA into two identical overlapping subarrays, a specific auxiliary matrix is constructed, which includes both symbol sequence and DOA information of all active users. Then, based on the subspace method, performing the eigen decomposition on such auxiliary matrix, the closed-form solution of symbol sequences and DOAs for all active users can be obtained. In comparison with schemes based on channel estimation, our algorithm need not explicitly estimate the space-frequency channel for each active user,so it has lower computation complexity. Extensive computer simulations demonstrate the overall performance of this novel scheme.

  10. Standard practice for digital detector array performance evaluation and long-term stability

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the evaluation of DDA systems for industrial radiology. It is intended to ensure that the evaluation of image quality, as far as this is influenced by the DDA system, meets the needs of users, and their customers, and enables process control and long term stability of the DDA system. 1.2 This practice specifies the fundamental parameters of Digital Detector Array (DDA) systems to be measured to determine baseline performance, and to track the long term stability of the DDA system. 1.3 The DDA system performance tests specified in this practice shall be completed upon acceptance of the system from the manufacturer and at intervals specified in this practice to monitor long term stability of the system. The intent of these tests is to monitor the system performance for degradation and to identify when an action needs to be taken when the system degrades by a certain level. 1.4 The use of the gages provided in this standard is mandatory for each test. In the event these tests or ga...

  11. Digital Radiography Using Digital Detector Arrays Fulfills Critical Applications for Offshore Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes RicardoTadeu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital radiography in the inspection of welded pipes to be installed under deep water offshore gas and oil pipelines, like a presalt in Brazil, in the paper has been investigated. The aim is to use digital radiography for nondestructive testing of welds as it is already in use in the medical, aerospace, security, automotive, and petrochemical sectors. Among the current options, the DDA (Digital Detector Array is considered as one of the best solutions to replace industrial films, as well as to increase the sensitivity to reduce the inspection cycle time. This paper shows the results of this new technique, comparing it to radiography with industrial films systems. In this paper, 20 test specimens of longitudinal welded pipe joints, specially prepared with artificial defects like cracks, lack of fusion, lack of penetration, and porosities and slag inclusions with varying dimensions and in 06 different base metal wall thicknesses, were tested and a comparison of the techniques was made. These experiments verified the purposed rules for parameter definitions and selections to control the required digital radiographic image quality as described in the draft international standard ISO/DIS 10893-7. This draft is first standard establishing the parameters for digital radiography on weld seam of welded steel pipes for pressure purposes to be used on gas and oil pipelines.

  12. A Sub-pixel Image Processing Algorithm of a Detector Based on Staring Focal Plane Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ya-qiong; JIN Wei-qi; XU Chao; WANG Xia

    2008-01-01

    Optical micro-scanning technology can be used to increase spatial resolution of many optical imaging systems, especially thermal imaging system. One of its key issues is relevant image processing algorithm. A fast reconstruction algo-rithm is proposed for two dimensional 2×2 micro-scanning based on the sub-pixel imaging and reconstruction principle of two-dimensional stating focal plane arrays (FPA). Specifically, three initialization methods are presented and implemented with the simulated data, their performances are compared according to image quality index . Experiment results show that, by the first initialization approach, tirnely over-sampled image can be accurately recovered, although special field diaphragm is needed. In the second initialization, the extrapolation approximation in obtaining reconstruction results is better than either bilinear interpolation or over-sampling reconstruction, without requiting any special process on system. The proposed algorithm has simple structure, low computational cost and can be realized in real-time. A high-resolution image can be obtained by low-resolution detectors. So, the algorithm has potential applications in visible light and infrared imaging area.

  13. Design of Multi-unit Control System of High Voltage Power Supply for LASCAR Scintillator Detector Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuLijie; WangJinchuan; XiaoGuoqing; GuoZhongyan; ZhanWenlong; QiHuirong; XuZhiguo; ZhangLi; DingXianli; XuHushan; SunZhiyu; LiJiaxing; LiChen; WangMeng; ChenLixin; HuZhengguo; MaoRuishi; ZhaoTiecheng

    2003-01-01

    The power voltages of Photomultipliers (PMTs) at RIBLL LASCAR scintillator detector array are distributed between 900 V and 1 800 V irregularly. 392 CC123 modules are employed to supply high voltage for the PMT array. The CC123 module serves as PMT interface groupware package, and it can transform +12 V DC input voltage to ranges of 0~-2200 V for the PMT power supply corresponding to 0~+5 V output voltage from the control board crate. The relation of PMT power supply with the output voltage of the control crate is shown in Fig.1.

  14. Saturation effects in heterodyne detection with Geiger-mode InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Jane X; Jiang, Leaf A

    2006-06-01

    We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of heterodyne detection of a glint target using an InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector (APD) array in the Geiger mode. Due to the finite number of pixels, all such photon-counting arrays necessarily suffer from saturation effects. At large photon fluxes, saturation of the APD degrades the Doppler frequency resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We derive analytical expressions for the Doppler resolution and SNR, taking saturation effects into account. The optimal local oscillator power can be obtained numerically from the SNR expression.

  15. Effect of the wire geometry and an externally applied magnetic field on the detection efficiency of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusche, Robert; Semenov, Alexey; Huebers, Heinz-Willhelm [DLR, Institut fuer Planetenforschung, Berlin (Germany); Ilin, Konstantin; Siegel, Michael [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Korneeva, Yuliya; Trifonov, Andrey; Korneev, Alexander; Goltsman, Gregory [Moscow State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The interest in single-photon detectors in the near-infrared wavelength regime for applications, e.g. in quantum cryptography has immensely increased in the last years. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPD) already show quite reasonable detection efficiencies in the NIR which can even be further improved. Novel theoretical approaches including vortex-assisted photon counting state that the detection efficiency in the long wavelength region can be enhanced by the detector geometry and an applied magnetic field. We present spectral measurements in the wavelength range from 350-2500 nm of the detection efficiency of meander-type TaN and NbN SNSPD with varying nanowire line width from 80 to 250 nm. Due to the used experimental setup we can accurately normalize the measured spectra and are able to extract the intrinsic detection efficiency (IDE) of our detectors. The results clearly indicate an improvement of the IDE depending on the wire width according to the theoretic models. Furthermore we experimentally found that the smallest detectable photon-flux can be increased by applying a small magnetic field to the detectors.

  16. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, R; Imai, T; Kariya, T; Numakura, T; Eguchi, T; Kawarasaki, R; Nakazawa, K; Kato, T; Sato, F; Nanzai, H; Uehara, M; Endo, Y; Ichimura, M

    2014-11-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  17. DALI2: A NaI(Tl) detector array for measurements of $\\gamma$ rays from fast nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, S; Togano, Y; Matsushita, M; Aoi, N; Demichi, K; Hasegawa, H; Murakami, H

    2014-01-01

    A NaI(Tl) detector array called DALI2 (Detector Array for Low Intensity radiation 2) has been constructed for in-beam $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy experiments with fast radioactive isotope (RI) beams. It consists typically of 186 NaI(Tl) scintillators covering polar angles from $\\sim$15$^{\\circ}$ to $\\sim$160$^{\\circ}$ with an average angular resolution of 6$^{\\circ}$ in full width at half maximum. Its high granularity (good angular resolution) enables Doppler-shift corrections that result in, for example, 10% energy resolution and 20% full-energy photopeak efficiency for 1-MeV $\\gamma$ rays emitted from fast-moving nuclei (velocities of $v/c \\simeq 0.6$). DALI2 has been employed successfully in numerous experiments using fast RI beams with velocities of $v/c = 0.3 - 0.6$ provided by the RIKEN RI Beam Factory.

  18. Simultaneous determination of 20 food additives by high performance liquid chromatography with photo-diode array detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang Ma; Ya Nan Yang; Xiao Xiong Jiang; Min Zhao; Ye Qiang Cai

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and accurate analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 20 synthetic food additives,including three sweeteners,seven food colorants,nine synthetic preservatives and caffeine,by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with photodiode array detector (PDA).This method permits the detection of food additives at very low concentrations (0.005-0.150 μg/mL).The applicability was verified by the determination of food additives present in various foodstuffs.

  19. Amplitude distributions of dark counts and photon counts in NbN superconducting single-photon detectors integrated with the HEMT readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaygorsky, J.; Słysz, W.; Shouten, R.; Dorenbos, S.; Reiger, E.; Zwiller, V.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2017-01-01

    We present a new operation regime of NbN superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) by integrating them with a low-noise cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor and a high-load resistor. The integrated sensors are designed to get a better understanding of the origin of dark counts triggered by the detector, as our scheme allows us to distinguish the origin of dark pulses from the actual photon pulses in SSPDs. The presented approach is based on a statistical analysis of amplitude distributions of recorded trains of the SSPD photoresponse transients. It also enables to obtain information on energy of the incident photons, as well as demonstrates some photon-number-resolving capability of meander-type SSPDs.

  20. Development of high-resolution gamma detector using sub-mm GAGG crystals coupled to TSV-MPPC array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovec, A.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this study a high-resolution gamma detector based on an array of sub-millimeter Ce:GAGG (Cerium doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount type of TSV-MPPC was developed. MPPC sensor from Hamamatsu which has a 26 by 26 mm2 detector area with 64 channels was used. One channel has a 3 by 3 mm2 photosensitive area with 50 μ m pitch micro cells. MPPC sensor provides 576 mm2 sensing area and was used to decode 48 by 48 array with 0.4 by 0.4 by 20 mm3 Ce:GAGG crystals of 500 μ m pitch. The base of the detector with the crystal module was mounted to a read out board which consists of charge division circuit, thus allowing for a read out of four channels to identify the position of the incident event on the board. The read out signals were amplified using charge sensitive amplifiers. The four amplified signals were digitized and analyzed to produce a position sensitive event. For the performance analysis a 137Cs source was used. The produced events were used for flood histogram and energy analysis. The effects of the glass thickness between the Ce:GAGG and MPPC were analyzed using the experimental flood diagrams and Geant4 simulations. The glass between the scintillator and the detector allows the spread of the light over different channels and is necessary if the channel's sensitive area is bigger than the scintillator's area. The initial results demonstrate that this detector module is promising and could be used for applications requiring compact and high-resolution detectors. Experimental results show that the detectors precision increases using glass guide thickness of 1.35 mm and 1.85 mm; however the precision using 2.5 mm are practically the same as if using 0.8 mm or 1.0 mm glass guide thicknesses. In addition, simulations using Geant4 indicate that the light becomes scarcer if thicker glass is used, thus reducing the ability to indicate which crystal was targeted. When 2.5 mm glass thickness is used, the scarce light effect becomes

  1. MEDEA: a multi element detector array for gamma ray and light charged particle detection at the LNS-Catania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Raia, G.; Sapienza, P.

    1992-04-01

    A 4 π highly granular Mutli Element DEtector Array (MEDEA) for γ-rays and light charged particles is described. Its basic configuration consists of 180 barium fluoride scintillator crystals, arranged in the shape of a ball, plus a forward angle wall of 120 phoswich detectors. The inner radius of the ball (22 cm) and the distance of the wall from the target (55 cm) allow the placement of other detectors.in the inner volume. The whole detection system operates under vacuum inside a large scattering chamber. Dedicated electronics has been designed and realized. It includes a powerful hardware second level trigger and preanalysis system, which allows on-line event selection, and a modular VME-bus based data acquisition system. In-beam performances of the system are also described.

  2. State of the art of AIM LWIR and VLWIR MCT 2D focal plane detector arrays for higher operating temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figgemeier, H.; Hanna, S.; Eich, D.; Mahlein, K.-M.; Fick, W.; Schirmacher, W.; Thöt, R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper AIM presents its latest results on both n-on-p and p-on-n low dark current planar MCT photodiode technology LWIR and VLWIR two-dimensional focal plane detector arrays with a cut-off wavelength >11μm at 80K and a 640x512 pixel format at a 20μm pitch. Thermal dark currents significantly reduced as compared to `Tennant's Rule 07' at a yet good detection efficiency >60% as well as results from NETD and photo response performance characterization are presented. The demonstrated detector performance paces the way for a new generation of higher operating temperature LWIR MCT FPAs with a <30mK NETD up to a 110K detector operating temperature and with good operability.

  3. Cross-sectional TEM study of the microstructure of superconducting X-ray detectors based on thin W-Al layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safran, G. E-mail: safran@mfa.kfki.hu; Loidl, M.; Meier, O.; Seidel, W.; Proebst, F

    2002-06-01

    The relation between structural and morphological properties and the performance of X-ray detectors have been studied by means of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and low temperature electrical measurements. The detectors consist of a strip of an aluminium thin film in contact with superconducting phase transition thermometers based on tungsten films at its both ends. Soft X-ray photons are absorbed in the sapphire substrate underneath the Al film and create high energy phonons. These phonons enter the superconducting film and break up Cooper-pairs into quasiparticles which then diffuse into the W films and create correlated thermal signals in both thermometers. XTEM investigations revealed a polycrystalline structure of the Al films above both the bare sapphire and chemically etched areas of the highly oriented W films, while the Al is single crystalline above the intact W film surface showing an orientational relationship: (2 0 0)Al parallel (0 2 0)W parallel (0 1 1-bar 2)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and [0 2-bar 2]Al parallel [2 0 0]W parallel [1 0 1-bar 2-bar]Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. No remarkable difference in morphology and structure of the layers of the two detector sides was observed. On the other hand, irregular saw-tooth-like interfaces of different profiles of low slope were found between the chemically etched regions of the W sensor films and the overlapping Al diffusion film. The observed strong asymmetry of the correlated signals is attributed to the disturbed quasiparticle propagation through the observed different interface structures of the two detector sides.

  4. Design of a linear detector array unit for high energy x-ray helical computed tomography and linear scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Tae; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Gi Yoon [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Geun [Medical Imaging Department, ASTEL Inc., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Shin Woong; Yi, Yun [Dept. of Electronics and Information Eng, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Duk [Research Center, Luvantix ADM Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    A linear detector array unit (LdAu) was proposed and designed for the high energy X-ray 2-d and 3-d imaging systems for industrial non-destructive test. Specially for 3-d imaging, a helical CT with a 15 MeV linear accelerator and a curved detector is proposed. the arc-shape detector can be formed by many LdAus all of which are arranged to face the focal spot when the source-to-detector distance is fixed depending on the application. An LdAu is composed of 10 modules and each module has 48 channels of CdWO{sub 4} (CWO) blocks and Si PIn photodiodes with 0.4 mm pitch. this modular design was made for easy manufacturing and maintenance. through the Monte carlo simulation, the CWO detector thickness of 17 mm was optimally determined. the silicon PIn photodiodes were designed as 48 channel arrays and fabricated with NTD (neutron transmutation doping) wafers of high resistivity and showed excellent leakage current properties below 1 nA at 10 V reverse bias. to minimize the low-voltage breakdown, the edges of the active layer and the guard ring were designed as a curved shape. the data acquisition system was also designed and fabricated as three independent functional boards; a sensor board, a capture board and a communication board to a Pc. this paper describes the design of the detectors (CWO blocks and Si PIn photodiodes) and the 3-board data acquisition system with their simulation results.

  5. Superconducting nanowire single-photon imager

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Qing-Yuan; Calandri, Niccolò; Dane, Andrew E; McCaughan, Adam N; Bellei, Francesco; Wang, Hao-Zhu; Santavicca, Daniel F; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-01-01

    Detecting spatial and temporal information of individual photons is a crucial technology in today's quantum information science. Among the existing single-photon detectors, superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) have been demonstrated with a sub-50 ps timing jitter, near unity detection efficiency1, wide response spectrum from visible to infrared and ~10 ns reset time. However, to gain spatial sensitivity, multiple SNSPDs have to be integrated into an array, whose spatial and temporal resolutions are limited by the multiplexing circuit. Here, we add spatial sensitivity to a single nanowire while preserving the temporal resolution from an SNSPD, thereby turning an SNSPD into a superconducting nanowire single-photon imager (SNSPI). To achieve an SNSPI, we modify a nanowire's electrical behavior from a lumped inductor to a transmission line, where the signal velocity is slowed down to 0.02c (where c is the speed of light). Consequently, we are able to simultaneously read out the landing locati...

  6. Study of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Composition Using Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and Surface Array in Hybrid Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Chae, M J; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, W R; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, H S; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzawa, T; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshiia, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2014-01-01

    Previous measurements of the composition of Ultra-High energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) made by the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) and Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) are seemingly contradictory but utilize different detection methods, as HiRes was a stereo detector and PAO is a hybrid detector. The five year Telescope Array (TA) Middle Drum hybrid composition measurement is similar in methodology to PAO, and good agreement is evident between data and a light, largely protonic composition using simulations from a variety of hadronic models for the comparison of both elongation rate and shower fluctuations. This is in good agreement with the HiRes results. This analysis is presented using two methods: data cuts using simple geometrical variables and a new pattern recognition technique.

  7. The MINDView brain PET detector, feasibility study based on SiPM arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Antonio J.; Majewski, Stan; Sánchez, Filomeno; Aussenhofer, Sebastian; Aguilar, Albert; Conde, Pablo; Hernández, Liczandro; Vidal, Luis F.; Pani, Roberto; Bettiol, Marco; Fabbri, Andrea; Bert, Julien; Visvikis, Dimitris; Jackson, Carl; Murphy, John; O'Neill, Kevin; Benlloch, Jose M.

    2016-05-01

    The Multimodal Imaging of Neurological Disorders (MINDView) project aims to develop a dedicated brain Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner with sufficient resolution and sensitivity to visualize neurotransmitter pathways and their disruptions in mental disorders for diagnosis and follow-up treatment. The PET system should be compact and fully compatible with a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) device in order to allow its operation as a PET brain insert in a hybrid imaging setup with most MRI scanners. The proposed design will enable the currently-installed MRI base to be easily upgraded to PET/MRI systems. The current design for the PET insert consists of a 3-ring configuration with 20 modules per ring and an axial field of view of ~15 cm and a geometrical aperture of ~33 cm in diameter. When coupled to the new head Radio Frequency (RF) coil, the inner usable diameter of the complete PET-RF coil insert is reduced to 26 cm. Two scintillator configurations have been tested, namely a 3-layer staggered array of LYSO with 1.5 mm pixel size, with 35×35 elements (6 mm thickness each) and a black-painted monolithic LYSO block also covering about 50×50 mm2 active area with 20 mm thickness. Laboratory test results associated with the current MINDView PET module concept are presented in terms of key parameters' optimization, such as spatial and energy resolution, sensitivity and Depth of Interaction (DOI) capability. It was possible to resolve all pixel elements from the three scintillator layers with energy resolutions as good as 10%. The monolithic scintillator showed average detector resolutions varying from 3.5 mm in the entrance layer to better than 1.5 mm near the photosensor, with average energy resolutions of about 17%.

  8. The MINDView brain PET detector, feasibility study based on SiPM arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Antonio J., E-mail: agonzalez@i3m.upv.es [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Majewski, Stan [Radiology Research, Department of Radiology, University of Virginia, VA 22903 (United States); Sánchez, Filomeno [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Aussenhofer, Sebastian [NORAS MRI products GmbH, Hochberg (Germany); Aguilar, Albert; Conde, Pablo; Hernández, Liczandro; Vidal, Luis F. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Pani, Roberto; Bettiol, Marco; Fabbri, Andrea [Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Bert, Julien; Visvikis, Dimitris [Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Jackson, Carl; Murphy, John; O’Neill, Kevin [SensL Technologies, Cork (Ireland); Benlloch, Jose M. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2016-05-11

    The Multimodal Imaging of Neurological Disorders (MINDView) project aims to develop a dedicated brain Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner with sufficient resolution and sensitivity to visualize neurotransmitter pathways and their disruptions in mental disorders for diagnosis and follow-up treatment. The PET system should be compact and fully compatible with a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) device in order to allow its operation as a PET brain insert in a hybrid imaging setup with most MRI scanners. The proposed design will enable the currently-installed MRI base to be easily upgraded to PET/MRI systems. The current design for the PET insert consists of a 3-ring configuration with 20 modules per ring and an axial field of view of ~15 cm and a geometrical aperture of ~33 cm in diameter. When coupled to the new head Radio Frequency (RF) coil, the inner usable diameter of the complete PET-RF coil insert is reduced to 26 cm. Two scintillator configurations have been tested, namely a 3-layer staggered array of LYSO with 1.5 mm pixel size, with 35×35 elements (6 mm thickness each) and a black-painted monolithic LYSO block also covering about 50×50 mm{sup 2} active area with 20 mm thickness. Laboratory test results associated with the current MINDView PET module concept are presented in terms of key parameters' optimization, such as spatial and energy resolution, sensitivity and Depth of Interaction (DOI) capability. It was possible to resolve all pixel elements from the three scintillator layers with energy resolutions as good as 10%. The monolithic scintillator showed average detector resolutions varying from 3.5 mm in the entrance layer to better than 1.5 mm near the photosensor, with average energy resolutions of about 17%.

  9. Infrared microspectroscopic imaging using a large radius germanium internal reflection element and a focal plane array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brian M; Havrilla, George J; Marcott, Curtis; Story, Gloria M

    2007-11-01

    Previously, we established the ability to collect infrared microspectroscopic images of large areas using a large radius hemisphere internal reflection element (IRE) with both a single point and a linear array detector. In this paper, preliminary work in applying this same method to a focal plane array (FPA) infrared imaging system is demonstrated. Mosaic tile imaging using a large radius germanium hemispherical IRE on a FPA Fourier transform infrared microscope imaging system can be used to image samples nearly 1.5 mm x 2 mm in size. A polymer film with a metal mask is imaged using this method for comparison to previous work. Images of hair and skin samples are presented, highlighting the complexity of this method. Comparisons are made between the linear array and FPA methods.

  10. Development of a silicon detector monitor for the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting upgrade of the REX-ISOLDE heavy-ion linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zocca, F; Bravin, E; Pasini, M; Voulot, D; Wenander, F

    2012-01-01

    A silicon detector monitor has been developed and tested in the framework of the beam diagnostics development program for the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting upgrade of the REX-ISOLDE heavy-ion linac at CERN. The monitor is intended for beam energy and timing measurements aimed at the phase tuning of the superconducting cavities. Tests were performed with a stable ion beam, composed of carbon, oxygen and neon ions accelerated to energies from 300keV/u to 2.82MeV/u. The energy measurements performed allowed for beam spectroscopy and ion identification with a resolution of 1.4%-0.5% rms in the measured energy range. The achieved resolution is suited for a fast phase tuning of the cavities, which was demonstrated with the third REX 7-gap resonator. The time structure of the beam, characterised by a bunch period of 9.87ns, was measured with a resolution better than 200ps rms. This paper describes the results from all these tests and provides details of the detector set-up.

  11. Multispectral Superconducting Quantum Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Molybdenum 894 SS316 2770 Iron Fe 1890 SS304 2790 Beryllium 1300 Titanium 1700 Aluminum 3910 Poly-Alumina 791 Table 3.6. Total thermal contraction...is the electron two spin density of states and p is the density of the material. This constant describes coupling of electrons with thermal phonons...antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations . Due to the presence of node lines, the low temperature behavior of a superconductor is quite sensitive to the

  12. A 65 nm CMOS broadband self-calibrated power detector for the square kilometre array radio telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 65 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS broadband self-calibrated high-sensitivity power detector for use in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA, the next-generation high-sensitivity radio telescope, is presented. The power detector calibration is performed by adjusting voltages at the bulk terminals of the input transistors to compensate for mismatches in the output voltages because of process, voltage and temperature variations. Measurements show that the power detector, preceded by an input power-match circuit with 6 dB gain, has an input signal range from −48 to −11 dBm over which a 0.95 dB maximum error in the detected power is observed when the calibration rate is 20 kHz. The proposed broadband power detector has a 3 dB upper band edge of 1.8 GHz, which adequately covers the midband SKA frequency range from 0.7 to 1.4 GHz. The settling time and the calibration time are both <5 μs. The circuit consumes 1.2 mW from a 1.2 V power supply and the input-match circuit consumes another 5.8 mW. The presented power detector achieves the best combination of the detection range and sensitivity of previously published circuits.

  13. Study of a new design of p-N semiconductor detector array for nuclear medicine imaging by monte carlo simulation codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh-Safar, M; Ghorbani, M; Khoshkharam, S; Ashrafi, Z

    2014-07-01

    Gamma camera is an important apparatus in nuclear medicine imaging. Its detection part is consists of a scintillation detector with a heavy collimator. Substitution of semiconductor detectors instead of scintillator in these cameras has been effectively studied. In this study, it is aimed to introduce a new design of P-N semiconductor detector array for nuclear medicine imaging. A P-N semiconductor detector composed of N-SnO2 :F, and P-NiO:Li, has been introduced through simulating with MCNPX monte carlo codes. Its sensitivity with different factors such as thickness, dimension, and direction of emission photons were investigated. It is then used to configure a new design of an array in one-dimension and study its spatial resolution for nuclear medicine imaging. One-dimension array with 39 detectors was simulated to measure a predefined linear distribution of Tc(99_m) activity and its spatial resolution. The activity distribution was calculated from detector responses through mathematical linear optimization using LINPROG code on MATLAB software. Three different configurations of one-dimension detector array, horizontal, vertical one sided, and vertical double-sided were simulated. In all of these configurations, the energy windows of the photopeak were ± 1%. The results show that the detector response increases with an increase of dimension and thickness of the detector with the highest sensitivity for emission photons 15-30° above the surface. Horizontal configuration array of detectors is not suitable for imaging of line activity sources. The measured activity distribution with vertical configuration array, double-side detectors, has no similarity with emission sources and hence is not suitable for imaging purposes. Measured activity distribution using vertical configuration array, single side detectors has a good similarity with sources. Therefore, it could be introduced as a suitable configuration for nuclear medicine imaging. It has been shown that using

  14. Backshort-Under-Grid arrays for infrared astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, C.A. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)]. E-mail: christine.allen@nasa.gov; Benford, D.J. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Chervenak, J.A. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Chuss, D.T. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Miller, T.M. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); QSS Group, Inc., 4500 Forbes Blvd. Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Moseley, S.H. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Staguhn, J.G. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Wollack, E.J. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    We are developing a kilopixel, filled bolometer array for space infrared astronomy. The array consists of three individual components, to be merged into a single, working unit; (1) a transition edge sensor bolometer array, operating in the milliKelvin regime (2) a quarter-wave backshort grid, and (3) superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer readout. The detector array is designed as a filled, square grid of suspended, silicon bolometers with superconducting sensors. The backshort arrays are fabricated separately and will be positioned in the cavities created behind each detector during fabrication. The grids have a unique interlocking feature machined into the walls for positioning and mechanical stability. The spacing of the backshort beneath the detector grid can be set from {approx}30-300 {mu}m, by independently adjusting two process parameters during fabrication. The ultimate goal is to develop a large-format array architecture with background-limited sensitivity, suitable for a wide range of wavelengths and applications, to be directly bump bonded to a multiplexer circuit. We have produced prototype two-dimensional arrays having 8x8 detector elements. We present detector design, fabrication overview, and assembly technologies.

  15. [Simultaneous determination of five groups of components in qingkailing injection by high performance liquid chromatography with photo diode array detector and evaporative light scattering detector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shikai; Xin, Wenfeng; Luo, Guoan; Wang, Yiming; Cheng, Yiyu

    2005-09-01

    A method was established for the simultaneous quantification of nine components of five different structural types in Qingkailing injection. High performance liquid chromatography coupled with a photo diode array detector and an evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-DAD-ELSD) was employed in the determination. Four monitoring wavelengths of 240, 254, 280 and 330 nm were set to determine nucleosides (uridine and adenosine), iridoid glucoside (geniposide), flavone glycoside (baicalin) and organic acids (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid) respectively, and a combined evaporative light scattering detector was used to detect three steroid compounds (cholic acid, ursodesoxycholic acid and hyodeoxycholic acid). The proposed method permitted the simultaneous separation and determination of five groups of compounds in Qingkailing injection, and acceptable validation results of the precision, repeatability, stability and accuracy tests were achieved. The method was applied to the analysis of 19 Qingkailing injection samples from three different plants, and the results indicated that the method could be used as a convenient and reliable method in the multi-component determination and quality control of traditional Chinese medicines.

  16. Design and Initial Performance of the Askaryan Radio Array Prototype EeV Neutrino Detector at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, P; Bard, R; Beatty, J J; Besson, D Z; Boeser, S; Chen, C; Chen, P; Connolly, A; Davies, J; DuVernois, M; Fox, B; Gorham, P W; Grashorn, E W; Hanson, K; Haugen, J; Helbing, K; Hill, B; Hoffman, K D; Huang, M; Huang, M H A; Ishihara, A; Karle, A; Kennedy, D; Landsman, H; Laundrie, A; Liu, T -C; Macchiarulo, L; Mase, K; Meures, T; Meyhandan, R; Miki, C; Morse, R; Newcomb, M; Nichol, R J; Ratzlaff, K; Richman, M; Ritter, L; Rotter, B; Sandstrom, P; Seckel, D; Touart, J; Varner, G S; Wang, Y; Weaver, C; Wendorff, A; Yoshida, S; Young, R

    2011-01-01

    We report on studies of the viability and sensitivity of the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA), a new initiative to develop a Teraton-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detector in deep, radio-transparent ice near Amundsen-Scott station at the South Pole. An initial prototype ARA detector system was installed in January 2011, and has been operating continuously since then. We report on studies of the background radio noise levels, the radio clarity of the ice, and the estimated sensitivity of the planned ARA array given these results, based on the first five months of operation. Anthropogenic radio interference in the vicinity of the South Pole currently leads to a few-percent loss of data, but no overall effect on the background noise levels, which are dominated by the thermal noise floor of the cold polar ice, and galactic noise at lower frequencies. We have also successfully detected signals originating from a 2.5 km deep impulse generator at a distance of over 3 km from our prototype detector, confirming prior est...

  17. Correction of complex nonlinear signal response from a pixel array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, Tim Brandt; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Lemke, Henrik Till

    2015-05-01

    The pulsed free-electron laser light sources represent a new challenge to photon area detectors due to the intrinsic spontaneous X-ray photon generation process that makes single-pulse detection necessary. Intensity fluctuations up to 100% between individual pulses lead to high linearity requirements in order to distinguish small signal changes. In real detectors, signal distortions as a function of the intensity distribution on the entire detector can occur. Here a robust method to correct this nonlinear response in an area detector is presented for the case of exposures to similar signals. The method is tested for the case of diffuse scattering from liquids where relevant sub-1% signal changes appear on the same order as artifacts induced by the detector electronics.

  18. Neutron detection and multiplicity counting using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.C.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron detection and multiplicity counting has been investigated using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array. Boron-loaded plastic combines neutron moderation (H) and detection ({sup 10}B) at the molecular level, thereby physically coupling increasing detection efficiency and decreasing die-away time with detector volume. Both of these characteristics address a fundamental limitation of thermal-neutron multiplicity counters, where {sup 3}He proportional counters are embedded in a polyethylene matrix. Separation of the phoswich response into its plastic scintillator and bismuth germanate components was accomplished on a pulse-by-pulse basis using custom integrator and timing circuits. In addition, a custom time-tag module was used to provide a time for each detector event. Analysis of the combined energy and time event stream was performed by calibrating each detector`s response and filtering based on the presence of a simultaneous energy deposition corresponding to the {sup 10}B(n,alpha) reaction products in the plastic scintillator (93 keV{sub ee}) and the accompanying neutron-capture gamma ray in the bismuth germanate (478 keV). Time-correlation analysis was subsequently performed on the filtered event stream to obtain shift-register-type singles and doubles count rates. Proof-of-principle measurements were conducted with a variety of gamma-ray and neutron sources including {sup 137}Cs, {sup 54}Mn, AmLi, and {sup 252}Cf. Results of this study indicate that a neutron-capture probability of {approximately}10% and a die-away time of {approximately}10 {micro}s are possible with a 4-detector array with a detector volume of 1600 cm{sup 3}. Simulations were performed that indicate neutron-capture probabilities on the order of 50% and die-away times of less than 4 {micro}s are realistically achievable. While further study will be required for practical application of such a detection system, the results obtained in this

  19. Wide field-of-view Cherenkov telescope for the detection of cosmic rays in coincidence with the surface detectors of the extensive air shower array

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, A A; Krasilnikov, A D; Petrov, Z E; Pravdin, M I; Sleptsov, I Ye; Timofeev, L V

    2014-01-01

    The Yakutsk array group is developing the wide FOV Cherenkov telescope to be operated in coincidence with the surface detectors of the extensive air shower array. Currently, the engineering prototype of the reflecting telescope with the front-end electronics is designed and assembled to demonstrate the feasibility of a conceived instrument. The status and specifications of the prototype telescope are presented, as well as the modernization program of the Cherenkov light detectors subset of the array measuring ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  20. Correction of dead-time and pile-up in a detector array for constant and rapidly varying counting rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, C. [Centro de Investigaciones Medioambientales, Energéticas y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Medioambientales, Energéticas y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Wright, T. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-21

    The effect of dead-time and pile-up in counting experiments may become a significant source of uncertainty if not properly taken into account. Although analytical solutions to this problem have been proposed for simple set-ups with one or two detectors, these are limited when it comes to arrays where time correlation between the detector modules is used, and also in situations of variable counting rates. In this paper we describe the dead-time and pile-up corrections applied to the n-TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC), a 4π γ-ray detector made of 40 BaF{sub 2} modules operating at the CERN n-TOF facility. Our method is based on the simulation of the complete signal detection and event reconstruction processes and can be applied as well in the case of rapidly varying counting rates. The method is discussed in detail and then we present its successful application to the particular case of the measurement of {sup 238}U(n, γ) reactions with the TAC detector.

  1. GEM400: A front-end chip based on capacitor-switch array for pixel-based GEM detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. S.; Jiang, X. S.; Liu, G.; Wang, N.; Sheng, H. Y.; Zhuang, B. A.; Zhao, J. W.

    2012-03-01

    The upgrade of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) needs two-dimensional position-sensitive detection equipment to improve the experimental performance. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector, in particular, pixel-based GEM detector has good application prospects in the domain of synchrotron radiation. The read-out of larger scale pixel-based GEM detector is difficult for the high density of the pixels (PAD for collecting electrons). In order to reduce the number of cables, this paper presents a read-out scheme for pixel-based GEM detector, which is based on System-in-Package technology and ASIC technology. We proposed a circuit structure based on capacitor switch array circuit, and design a chip GEM400, which is a 400 channels ASIC. The proposed circuit can achieve good stability and low power dissipation. The chip is implemented in a 0.35μm CMOS process. The basic functional circuitry in ths chip includes analog switch, analog buffer, voltage amplifier, bandgap and control logic block, and the layout of this chip takes 5mm × 5mm area. The simulation results show that the chip can allow the maximum amount of input charge 70pC on the condition of 100pF external integrator capacitor. Besides, the chip has good channel uniformity (INL is better than 0.1%) and lower power dissipation.

  2. The Energy Spectrum of Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays Measured by the Telescope Array FADC Fluorescence Detectors in Monocular Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, S; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays performed by the Telescope Array experiment using monocular observations from its two new FADC-based fluorescence detectors. After a short description of the experiment, we describe the data analysis and event reconstruction procedures. Since the aperture of the experiment must be calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, we describe this calculation and the comparisons of simulated and real data used to verify the validity of the aperture calculation. Finally, we present the energy spectrum calculated from the merged monocular data sets of the two FADC-based detectors, and also the combination of this merged spectrum with an independent, previously published monocular spectrum measurement performed by Telescope Array's third fluorescence detector (Abu-Zayyad {\\it et al.}, {Astropart. Phys.} 39 (2012), 109). This combined spectrum corroborates the recently published Telescope Array surface detector spectrum (Abu-Zayyad {\\it et al.}, ...

  3. The I{sub c}(H)-T{sub c}(H) phase boundary of superconducting Nb thin films with periodic and quasiperiodic antidot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothner, D.; Kemmler, M.; Cozma, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D. [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Misko, V.; Peeters, F. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen (Belgium); Nori, F. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    The magnetic field dependent critical current I{sub c}(H) of superconducting thin films with artificial defects strongly depends on the symmetry of the defect arrangement. Likewise the critical temperature T{sub c}(H) of superconducting wire networks is heavily influenced by the symmetry of the system. Here we present experimental data on the I{sub c}(H)-T{sub c}(H) phase boundary of Nb thin films with artificial defect lattices of different symmetries. For this purpose we fabricated 60 nm thick Nb films with antidots in periodic (triangular) and five different quasiperiodic arrangements. The parameters of the antidot arrays were varied to investigate the influence of antidot diameter and array density. Experiments were performed with high temperature stability ({delta}T<1 mK) at 0.5{<=}T/T{sub c}{<=}1. From the I-V-characteristics at variable H and T we extract I{sub c}(H) and T{sub c}(H) for different voltage and resistance criteria. The experimental data for the critical current density are compared with results from numerical molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. Array of virtual Frisch-grid CZT detectors with common cathode readout and pulse-height correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, E.U.; Fochuk, P.M.; Fuerstnau, M.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Jones, F.; Kim, K.; Kopach, O.V.; Taggart, R.; Yang, G.; Ye, Z.; Xu, L.; and James, R.B.

    2010-08-01

    We present our new results from testing 15-mm-long virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors with a common-cathode readout for correcting pulse-height distortions. The array employs parallelepiped-shaped CdZnTe (CZT) detectors of a large geometrical aspect ratio, with two planar contacts on the top and bottom surfaces (anode and cathode) and an additional shielding electrode on the crystal's sides to create the virtual Frisch-grid effect. We optimized the geometry of the device and improved its spectral response. We found that reducing to 5 mm the length of the shielding electrode placed next to the anode had no adverse effects on the device's performance. At the same time, this allowed corrections for electron loss by reading the cathode signals to obtain depth information.

  5. Frequency and sensitivity tunable microresonator array for high-speed quantum processor readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Emile; Whittaker, J. D.; Swenson, L. J.; Volkmann, M. H.; Spear, P.; Altomare, F.; Berkley, A. J.; Bumble, B.; Bunyk, P.; Day, P. K.; Eom, B. H.; Harris, R.; Hilton, J. P.; Johnson, M. W.; Kleinsasser, A.; Ladizinsky, E.; Lanting, T.; Oh, T.; Perminov, I.; Tolkacheva, E.; Yao, J.

    Frequency multiplexed arrays of superconducting microresonators have been used as detectors in a variety of applications. The degree of multiplexing achievable is limited by fabrication variation causing non-uniform shifts in resonator frequencies. We have designed, implemented and characterized a superconducting microresonator readout that incorporates two tunable inductances per detector, allowing independent control of each detector frequency and sensitivity. The tunable inductances are adjusted using on-chip programmable digital-to-analog flux converters, which are programmed with a scalable addressing scheme that requires few external lines.

  6. Self-aligned multi-channel superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetector

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Risheng; Ma, Xiaosong; Fan, Linran; Fong, King Y; Poot, Menno; Tang, Hong X

    2016-01-01

    We describe a micromachining process to allow the coupling of an array of single-mode telecommunication fibers to individual superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs). As proof of principle, we show the integration of four detectors on the same silicon chip, including two standard single-section nanowire detectors and two superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) with modified series structure without external inductor, and their performances are compared. The SNAP shows saturated system detection efficiency of 16% while the dark count rate is less than 20 Hz, without the use of photon-recycling reflectors. The SNAP also demonstrates doubled signal-to-noise ratio, reduced reset time (~ 4.9 ns decay time) and improved timing jitter (62 ps FWHM) compared to standard SNSPDs.

  7. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  8. The Mass Composition of Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays Measured by New Fluorescence Detectors in the Telescope Array Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshihiro

    The longitudinal development of an extensive air shower reaches its maximum at a depth, Xmax, that depends on the species of the primary cosmic ray. Using a technique based on Xmax, we measure the cosmic-ray mass composition from analyses of 3.7 years of monocular mode operations with the newly constructed fluorescence detectors of the Telescope Array experiment. The Xmax analysis shows our data to be consistent with a proton dominant composition at energies above 1018.0 eV.

  9. Short wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays detector: the performance optimization of photosensitive element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-jiang; Tang, Zun-lie; Zhang, Xiu-chuan; Chen, Yang; Jiang, Li-qun; Cheng, Hong-bing

    2009-07-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in technology of the InGaAs focal plane arrays (FPA) detector operating in short wave infrared (SWIR) last two decades. The no cryogenic cooling, low manufacturing cost, low power, high sensitivity and maneuverability features inherent of InGaAs FPA make it as a mainstream SWIR FPA in a variety of critical military, national security, aerospace, telecommunications and industrial applications. These various types of passive image sensing or active illumination image detecting systems included range-gated imaging, 3-Dimensional Ladar, covert surveillance, pulsed laser beam profiling, machine vision, semiconductor inspection, free space optical communications beam tracker, hyperspectroscopy imaging and many others. In this paper the status and perspectives of hybrid InGaAs FPA which is composed of detector array (PDA) and CMOS readout integrate circuit (ROIC) are reviewed briefly. For various low light levels applications such as starlight or night sky illumination, we have made use of the interface circuit of capacitive feedback transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) in which the integration capacitor was adjustable, therefore implements of the physical and electrical characteristics matches between detector arrays and readout intergrate circuit was achieved excellently. Taking into account the influences of InGaAs detector arrays' optoelectronic characteristics on performance of the FPA, we discussed the key parameters of the photodiode in detailed, and the tradeoff between the responsivity, dark current, impedance at zero bias and junction capacitance of photosensitive element has been made to root out the impact factors. As a result of the educed approach of the photodiode's characteristics optimizing which involve with InGaAs PDA design and process, a high performance InGaAs FPA of 30um pixel pitch and 320×256 format has been developed of which the response spectrum range over 0.9um to 1.7um, the mean peak detectivity (λ=1.55

  10. The Energy Spectrum of Cosmic Rays above 10$^{17.2}$ eV Measured by the Fluorescence Detectors of the Telescope Array Experiment in Seven Years

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment is the largest detector to observe ultra-high-energy cosmic rays in the northern hemisphere. The fluorescence detectors at southern two stations of TA are newly constructed and have now completed seven years of steady operation. One advantage of monocular analysis of the fluorescence detectors is a lower energy threshold for cosmic rays than that of other techniques like stereoscopic observations or coincidences with the surface detector array, allowing the measurement of an energy spectrum covering three orders of magnitude in energy. Analyzing data collected during those seven years, we report the energy spectrum of cosmic rays covering a broad range of energies above 10$^{17.2}$ eV measured by the fluorescence detectors and a comparison with previously published results.

  11. Evaluation of a SiPM array detector coupled to a LFS-3 pixellated scintillator for PET/MR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Stratos; Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Georgiou, Maria [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    SiPM arrays are insensitive to magnetic fields and thus good candidates for hybrid PET/MR imaging systems. Moreover, due to their small size and flexibility can be used in dedicated small field of view small animal imaging detectors and especially in head PET/MR studies in mice. Co-doped LFS-3 scintillator crystals have higher light yield and slightly faster response than that of LSO:Ce mainly due to the co-doped activation of emission centers with varying materials such as Ce, Gd, Sc, Y, La, Tb, or Ca distributed at the molecular scale through the lutetium silicate crystal host. The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of the SensL ArraySL-4 (4x4 element array of 3x3 mm{sup 2} silicon photomultipliers) optical detector coupled to a 6x6 LFS-3 scintillator array, with 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} crystal size elements, for possible applications in small field of view PET/MR imaging detectors. We have designed a symmetric resistive charge division circuit to read out the signal outputs of 4x4 pixel SiPM array reducing the 16 pixel outputs of the photodetector to 4 position signals. The 4 position signals were digitized using free running Analog to Digital Converters. The ADCs sampling rate was 50 MHz. An FPGA (Spartan 6 LX150T) was used for triggering and digital signal processing of the pulses. Experimental evaluation was carried out with {sup 22}Na radioactive source and the parameters studied where energy resolution and peak to valley ratio. The first preliminary results of the evaluation shows a clear visualization of the discrete 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} LFS-3 scintillator elements. The mean peak to valley ratio of the horizontal profiles on the raw image was measured equal to 11 while the energy resolution was calculated equal to 30% at the central pixels.

  12. Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors fabricated from an amorphous Mo{sub 0.75}Ge{sub 0.25} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, V. B.; Lita, A. E.; Vissers, M. R.; Marsili, F.; Pappas, D. P.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    We present the characteristics of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) fabricated from amorphous Mo{sub 0.75}Ge{sub 0.25} thin-films. Fabricated devices show a saturation of the internal detection efficiency at temperatures below 1 K, with system dark count rates below 500 cps. Operation in a closed-cycle cryocooler at 2.5 K is possible with system detection efficiencies exceeding 20% for SNSPDs which have not been optimized for high detection efficiency. Jitter is observed to vary between 69 ps at 250 mK and 187 ps at 2.5 K using room temperature amplifiers.

  13. NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detector with efficiency over 90% at 1550 nm wavelength operational at compact cryocooler temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, W J; Li, H; Huang, J; Lv, C L; Zhang, L; Liu, X Y; Wu, J J; Wang, Z; Xie, X M

    2016-01-01

    The fast development of superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) in the past decade has enabled many advances in quantum information technology. The best system detection efficiency (SDE) record at 1550 nm wavelength was 93% obtained from SNSPD made of amorphous WSi which usually operated at sub-kelvin temperatures. We first demonstrate SNSPD made of polycrystalline NbN with SDE of 90.2% for 1550 nm wavelength at 2.1K, accessible with a compact cryocooler. The SDE saturated to 92.1% when the temperature was lowered to 1.8K. The results lighten the practical and high performance SNSPD to quantum information and other high-end applications.

  14. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.karellas@umassmed.edu; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pisa 56127, Italy and Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l., L. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. Methods: A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. Results: At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54

  15. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer.

  16. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  17. Integration of Si-CMOS embedded photo detector array and mixed signal processing system with embedded optical waveguide input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeik D.; Thomas, Mikkel A.; Brooke, Martin A.; Jokerst, Nan M.

    2004-06-01

    Arrays of embedded bipolar junction transistor (BJT) photo detectors (PD) and a parallel mixed-signal processing system were fabricated as a silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (Si-CMOS) circuit for the integration optical sensors on the surface of the chip. The circuit was fabricated with AMI 1.5um n-well CMOS process and the embedded PNP BJT PD has a pixel size of 8um by 8um. BJT PD was chosen to take advantage of its higher gain amplification of photo current than that of PiN type detectors since the target application is a low-speed and high-sensitivity sensor. The photo current generated by BJT PD is manipulated by mixed-signal processing system, which consists of parallel first order low-pass delta-sigma oversampling analog-to-digital converters (ADC). There are 8 parallel ADCs on the chip and a group of 8 BJT PDs are selected with CMOS switches. An array of PD is composed of three or six groups of PDs depending on the number of rows.

  18. Radiation-Hardened, Substrate-Removed, Metamorphic InGaAs Detector Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-performance radiation-hardened metamorphic InGaAs imaging arrays sensitive from the ultraviolet (UV) through the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) will be...

  19. Practical implications for the quality assurance of modulated radiation therapy techniques using point detector arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantz, Steffi; Troeller McDermott, Almut; Söhn, Matthias; Reinhardt, Sabine; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia; Reiner, Michael

    2017-08-30

    Linac parameters potentially influencing the delivery quality of IMRT and VMAT plans are investigated with respect to threshold ranges, consequently to be considered in a linac based quality assurance procedure. Three commercially available 2D arrays are used to further investigate the influence of the measurement device. Using three commercially available 2D arrays (Mx: MatriXX(evolution) , Oc: Octavius(1500) , Mc: MapCHECK2), simple static measurements, measurements for MLC characterization and dynamic interplay of gantry movement, MLC movement and variable dose rate were performed. The results were evaluated with respect to each single array as well as among each other. Simple static measurements showed different array responses to dose, dose rate and profile homogeneity and revealed instabilities in dose delivery and profile shape during linac ramp up. Using the sweeping gap test, all arrays were able to detect small leaf misalignments down to ±0.1 mm, but this test also demonstrated up to 15% dose deviation due to profile instabilities and fast accelerating leaves during linac ramp up. Tests including gantry rotation showed different stability of gantry mounts for each array. Including gantry movement and dose rate variability, differences compared to static delivery were smaller compared to dose differences when simultaneously controling interplay of gantry movement, leaf movement and dose rate variability. Linac based QA is feasible with the tested commercially available 2D arrays. Limitations of each array and the linac ramp up characteristics should be carefully considered during individual plan generation and regularly checked in linac QA. Especially the dose and dose profile during linac ramp up should be checked regularly, as well as MLC positioning accuracy using a sweeping gap test. Additionally, dynamic interplay tests including various gantry rotation speeds and angles, various leaf speeds and various dose rates should be included. © 2017 The

  20. MT3250BA: a 320×256-50µm snapshot microbolometer ROIC for high-resistance detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Akin, Tayfun

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a new microbolometer readout integrated circuit (MT3250BA) designed for high-resistance detector arrays. MT3250BA is the first microbolometer readout integrated circuit (ROIC) product from Mikro-Tasarim Ltd., which is a fabless IC design house specialized in the development of monolithic CMOS imaging sensors and ROICs for hybrid photonic imaging sensors and microbolometers. MT3250BA has a format of 320 × 256 and a pixel pitch of 50 µm, developed with a system-on-chip architecture in mind, where all the timing and biasing for this ROIC are generated on-chip without requiring any external inputs. MT3250BA is a highly configurable ROIC, where many of its features can be programmed through a 3-wire serial interface allowing on-the-fly configuration of many ROIC features. MT3250BA has 2 analog video outputs and 1 analog reference output for pseudo-differential operation, and the ROIC can be programmed to operate in the 1 or 2-output modes. A unique feature of MT3250BA is that it performs snapshot readout operation; therefore, the image quality will only be limited by the thermal time constant of the detector pixels, but not by the scanning speed of the ROIC, as commonly found in the conventional microbolometer ROICs performing line-by-line (rolling-line) readout operation. The signal integration is performed at the pixel level in parallel for the whole array, and signal integration time can be programmed from 0.1 µs up to 100 ms in steps of 0.1 µs. The ROIC is designed to work with high-resistance detector arrays with pixel resistance values higher than 250 kΩ. The detector bias voltage can be programmed on-chip over a 2 V range with a resolution of 1 mV. The ROIC has a measured input referred noise of 260 µV rms at 300 K. The ROIC can be used to build a microbolometer infrared sensor with an NETD value below 100 mK using a microbolometer detector array fabrication technology with a high detector resistance value (≥ 250 K

  1. (55)Fe X-ray Response of HgCdTe NIR Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ori; Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    Conversion gain is a fundamental parameter in detector characteristics that is used to measure many identifying detector properties, including read noise, dark current, and quantum efficiency (QE). Charge coupling effects, such as inter-pixel capacitance, attenuate photon shot noise and result in an overestimation of of conversion gain when implementing the photon transfer technique. The (55)Fe X-ray technique is a direct and simple method by which to measure the conversion gain by comparing the observed instrumental counts (ADU) to the known charge (e-) liberated by a single X-ray photon. Here we present the calibrated pair production energy for 1.7 micron HgCdTe infrared detectors.

  2. AIDA: A 16-channel amplifier ASIC to read out the advanced implantation detector array for experiments in nuclear decay spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, D. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P. J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Davinson, T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Page, R. D. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Thomas, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    We have designed a read-out ASIC for nuclear decay spectroscopy as part of the AIDA project - the Advanced Implantation Detector Array. AIDA will be installed in experiments at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in GSI, Darmstadt. The AIDA ASIC will measure the signals when unstable nuclei are implanted into the detector, followed by the much smaller signals when the nuclei subsequently decay. Implant energies can be as high as 20 GeV; decay products need to be measured down to 25 keV within just a few microseconds of the initial implants. The ASIC uses two amplifiers per detector channel, one covering the 20 GeV dynamic range, the other selectable over a 20 MeV or 1 GeV range. The amplifiers are linked together by bypass transistors which are normally switched off. The arrival of a large signal causes saturation of the low-energy amplifier and a fluctuation of the input voltage, which activates the link to the high-energy amplifier. The bypass transistors switch on and the input charge is integrated by the high-energy amplifier. The signal is shaped and stored by a peak-hold, then read out on a multiplexed output. Control logic resets the amplifiers and bypass circuit, allowing the low-energy amplifier to measure the subsequent decay signal. We present simulations and test results, demonstrating the AIDA ASIC operation over a wide range of input signals. (authors)

  3. Test of digital neutron–gamma discrimination with four different photomultiplier tubes for the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, X.L., E-mail: luo.xiaoliang@physics.uu.se [Department of Instrument Science and Technology, College of Mechatronics and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Modamio, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Nyberg, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Nishada, Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Angelis, G. de [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Agramunt, J. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Egea, F.J. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, Istanbul (Turkey); Erduran, M.N.; Ertürk, S. [Nigde Universitesi, Fen-Edebiyat Falkültesi, Fizik Bölümü, Nigde (Turkey); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Gadea, A. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); González, V. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Hüyük, T. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Moszyński, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, PL 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); and others

    2014-12-11

    A comparative study of the neutron–γ discrimination performance of a liquid scintillator detector BC501A coupled to four different 5 in. photomultiplier tubes (ET9390kb, R11833-100, XP4512 and R4144) was carried out. Both the Charge Comparison method and the Integrated Rise-Time method were implemented digitally to discriminate between neutrons and γ rays emitted by a {sup 252}Cf source. In both methods, the neutron–γ discrimination capabilities of the four photomultiplier tubes were quantitatively compared by evaluating their figure-of-merit values at different energy regions between 50 keVee and 1000 keVee. Additionally, the results were further verified qualitatively using time-of-flight to distinguish γ rays and neutrons. The results consistently show that photomultiplier tubes R11833-100 and ET9390kb generally perform best regarding neutron–γ discrimination with only slight differences in figure-of-merit values. This superiority can be explained by their relatively higher photoelectron yield, which indicates that a scintillator detector coupled to a photomultiplier tube with higher photoelectron yield tends to result in better neutron–γ discrimination performance. The results of this work will provide reference for the choice of photomultiplier tubes for future neutron detector arrays like NEDA.

  4. The BABAR Detector

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e+e- B Factory operating at the upsilon 4S resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagentic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by dE/dx measurements in the tracking detectors and in a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  5. The BABAR Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luth, Vera G

    2001-05-18

    BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} B Factory operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagentic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by dE/dx measurements in the tracking detectors and in a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  6. Development of microwave superconducting microresonators for neutrino mass measurement in the HOLMES framework

    CERN Document Server

    Giachero, A; Falferi, P; Faverzani, M; Ferri, E; Giordano, C; Maino, M; Margesin, B; Mezzena, R; Nizzolo, R; Nucciotti, A; Puiu, A; Zanetti, L

    2015-01-01

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a project with the aim of performing a calorimetric measurement of the electron neutrino mass measuring the energy released in the electron capture decay of \\textsuperscript{163}Ho. The baseline for HOLMES are microcalorimeters coupled to Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) read out with rf-SQUIDs, for microwave multiplexing purposes. A promising alternative solution is based on superconducting microwave resonators, that have undergone rapid development in the last decade. These detectors, called MKIDs (Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors), are inherently multiplexed in the frequency domain and suitable for even larger-scale pixel arrays, with theoretical high energy resolution and fast response. The aim of our activity is to develop arrays of microresonator detectors for X-ray spectroscopy and suitable for the calorimetric measurement of the energy spectra of \\textsuperscript{163}Ho. Superconductive multilayer films composed by a sequence of pure Titani...

  7. Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction for large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in soccer-ball and castle geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anil Kumar, G., E-mail: anilg@tifr.res.i [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Mazumdar, I.; Gothe, D.A. [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2009-11-21

    Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction have been performed for two large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in two different configurations. They are, a compact array of 32 conical detectors of pentagonal and hexagonal shapes in soccer-ball geometry and an array of 14 straight hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors in castle geometry. Both of these arrays provide a large solid angle of detection, leading to considerable coincidence summing of gamma rays. The present work aims to understand the effect of coincidence summing of gamma rays while determining the energy dependence of efficiencies of these two arrays. We have carried out extensive GEANT4 simulations with radio-nuclides that decay with a two-step cascade, considering both arrays in their realistic geometries. The absolute efficiencies have been simulated for gamma energies from 700 to 2800 keV using four different double-photon emitters, namely, {sup 60}Co, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 94}Nb and {sup 24}Na. The efficiencies so obtained have been corrected for coincidence summing using the method proposed by Vidmar et al. . The simulations have also been carried out for the same energies assuming mono-energetic point sources, for comparison. Experimental measurements have also been carried out using calibrated point sources of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co. The simulated and the experimental results are found to be in good agreement. This demonstrates the reliability of the correction method for efficiency calibration of two large arrays in very different configurations.

  8. The Energy Spectrum of Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and the Direct Comparison to the High Resolution Fly's Eye Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array's Middle Drum fluorescence detector was instrumented with telescopes refurbished from the High Resolution Fly's Eye's HiRes-1 site. The data observed by Middle Drum in monocular mode was analyzed via the HiRes-1 profile-constrained geometry reconstruction technique and utilized the same calibration techniques enabling a direct comparison of the energy spectra and energy scales between the two experiments. The spectrum measured using the Middle Drum telescopes is based on a three-year exposure collected between December 16, 2007 and December 16, 2010. The calculated difference between the spectrum of the Middle Drum observations and the published spectrum obtained by the data collected by the HiRes-1 site allows the HiRes-1 energy scale to be transferred to Middle Drum. The HiRes energy scale is applied to the entire Telescope Array by making a comparison between Middle Drum monocular events and hybrid events that triggered both Middle Drum and the Telescope Array's scintillator Ground Arra...

  9. An Array of One-Dimensional Porous Silicon Photonic Crystal Reflector Islands for a Far-Infrared Image Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Feng-Juan; ZHANG Jie; XU Shao-Hui; WANG Lian-Wei; CHU Jun-Hao; CAO Zhi-Shen; ZHAN Peng; WANG Zhen-Lin

    2009-01-01

    @@ With the aid of photolithography, an array of one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal reflector islands for a far infrared image detector ranging from 10μm to 14μm is successfully fabricated. Silicon nitride formed by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) was used as the masking layer for the island array formation. After etching, the microstructures were examined by a scanning electron microscope and the optical properties were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the result indicates that the multilayer structure could be obtained in the perpendicular direction via periodically alternative etching current in each pre-patteru. At the same time, the island array has a well-proportioned lateral etching effect, which is very useful for the thermal isolation in lateral orientation of the application in devices. It is concluded that regardless of the absorption of the deposition layer on the substrate, the localized photonic crystalline islands have higher reflectivity. The designed islands structure not only prevents the cracking of the porous silicon layers but is also useful for the application in the cold part for the sensor devices and the interconnection of each pixel.

  10. Low dark current MCT-based focal plane detector arrays for the LWIR and VLWIR developed at AIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Kai Uwe; Eich, Detlef; Fick, Wolfgang; Figgemeier, Heinrich; Hanna, Stefan; Thöt, Richard

    2015-10-01

    For nearly 40 years AIM develops, manufactures and delivers photo-voltaic and photo-conductive infrared sensors and associated cryogenic coolers which are mainly used for military applications like pilotage, weapon sights, UAVs or vehicle platforms. In 2005 AIM started to provide the competences also for space applications like IR detector units for the SLSTR instrument on board of the Sentinel 3 satellite, the hyperspectral SWIR Imager for EnMAP or pushbroom detectors for high resolution Earth observation satellites. Meanwhile AIM delivered more than 25 Flight Models for several customers. The first European pulse-tube cooler ever operating on-board of a satellite is made by AIM. AIM homes the required infrared core capabilities such as design and manufacturing of focal plane assemblies, detector housing technologies, development and manufacturing of cryocoolers and also data processing for thermal IR cameras under one roof which enables high flexibility to react to customer needs and assures economical solutions. Cryogenically cooled Hg(1-x)CdxTe (MCT) quantum detectors are unequalled for applications requiring high imaging as well as high radiometric performance in the infrared spectral range. Compared with other technologies, they provide several advantages, such as the highest quantum efficiency, lower power dissipation compared to photoconductive devices and fast response times, hence outperforming micro-bolometer arrays. However, achieving an excellent MCT detector performance at long (LWIR) and very long (VLWIR) infrared wavelengths is challenging due to the exponential increase in the thermally generated photodiode dark current with increasing cut-off wavelength and / or operating temperature. Dark current is a critical design driver, especially for LWIR / VLWIR multi-spectral imagers with moderate signal levels or hyper-spectral Fourier spectrometers operating deep into the VLWIR spectral region. Consequently, low dark current (LDC) technologies are the

  11. Correction of complex nonlinear signal response from a pixel array detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The pulsed free-electron laser light sources represent a new challenge to photon area detectors due to the intrinsic spontaneous X-ray photon generation process that makes single-pulse detection necessary. Intensity fluctuations up to 100% between individual pulses lead to high linearity requirem...

  12. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, D.R.; Van Dam, H.T.; Seifert, S.; Vinke, R.; Dendooven, P.; Löhner, H.; Beekman, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e.g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanche

  13. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Dennis R.; van Dam, Herman T.; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Beekman, Freek J.; Löhner, H.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e. g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as

  14. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Dennis R.; van Dam, Herman T.; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Beekman, Freek J.; Löhner, H.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e. g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanch

  15. Organic non-volatile resistive photo-switches for flexible image detector arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Sebastian; Wolf, Christoph; Sax, Stefan; List-Kratochvil, Emil J W

    2015-02-01

    A unique implementation of an organic image detector using resistive photo-switchable pixels is presented. This resistive photo-switch comprises the vertical integration of an organic photodiode and an organic resistive switching memory element. The photodiodes act as a photosensitive element while the resistive switching elements simultaneously store the detected light information.

  16. Effect of the wire width on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusche, R., E-mail: robert.lusche@dlr.de; Semenov, A. [Institute of Planetary Research, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Ilin, K.; Siegel, M. [Institute of Micro- und Nano-electronic Systems (IMS), KIT, Hertzstrasse 16, 76187 Karlsruhe (Germany); Korneeva, Y.; Trifonov, A. [Department of Physics, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1 Malaya Pirogovskaya, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Korneev, A. [Department of Physics, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1 Malaya Pirogovskaya, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, 20 Myasnitskaya Ulitsa, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), 9 Institutskiy pereulok, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region 141700 (Russian Federation); Goltsman, G. [Department of Physics, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1 Malaya Pirogovskaya, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, 20 Myasnitskaya Ulitsa, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Vodolazov, D. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin Avenue, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Hübers, H.-W. [Institute of Planetary Research, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-28

    A thorough spectral study of the intrinsic single-photon detection efficiency in superconducting TaN and NbN nanowires with different widths has been performed. The experiment shows that the cut-off of the intrinsic detection efficiency at near-infrared wavelengths is most likely controlled by the local suppression of the barrier for vortex nucleation around the absorption site. Beyond the cut-off quasi-particle diffusion in combination with spontaneous, thermally activated vortex crossing explains the detection process. For both materials, the reciprocal cut-off wavelength scales linearly with the wire width where the scaling factor agrees with the hot-spot detection model.

  17. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution PET detector module using a digital silicon photomultiplier coupled LGSO array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Hyun Tae; Choi, Yong; Kim, Kyu Bom; Lee, Sangwon; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Yeom, Jung-Yeol

    2017-02-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) for breast, brain and small animal imaging, the spatial resolution of a PET detector is crucial to obtain high quality PET images. In this study, a PET detector for sub-millimeter spatial resolution imaging purpose was assembled using 4×4 pixels of a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM, DPC-3200-22-44, Philips) coupled with a 15×15 LGSO array with BaSO4 reflector, and a 1 mm thick acrylic light guide for light distribution between the dSiPM pixels. The active area of each dSiPM pixel was 3.2×3.9 mm2 and the size of each LGSO scintillator element was 0.7×0.7×6 mm3. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated the performance of the PET detector by measuring the energy resolution, 2D flood map, peak to valley (P/V) ratio, and coincidence resolving time (CRT). All measurements were performed at a temperature of 10±1 ℃. The average energy resolution was 15.6% (without correcting for saturation effects) at 511 keV and the best CRT was 242±5 ps. The 2D flood map obtained with an energy window of 400-600 keV demonstrated clear identification of all pixels, and the average P/V ratio of the X- and Y-directions were 7.31 and 7.81, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PET detector could be suitable for application in high resolution PET while achieving good timing resolution.

  18. Operation of an array of field-change detectors to provide ground truth for FORTE data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, R.S.; Eack, K.B.; Eberle, M.H.; Shao, X.M.; Smith, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Space and Atmospheric Sciences Group; Wiens, K.C. [New Mexico Inst. of Tech., Socorro, NM (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The authors have deployed an array of fast electric-field-change sensors around the state of New Mexico to help identify the lightning processes responsible for the VHF RF signals detected by the FORTE satellite`s wide-band transient radio emission receivers. The array provides them with locations and electric-field waveforms for events within New Mexico and into surrounding states, and operates continuously. They are particularly interested in events for which there are coincident FORTE observations. For these events, they can correct both the array and FORTE waveforms for time of flight, and can plot the two waveforms on a common time axis. Most of the coincident events are from cloud-go-ground discharges, but the most powerful are from a little-studied class of events variously called narrow bipolar events and compact intra-cloud discharges. They have therefore focused their attention on these events whether or not FORTE was in position to observe them.

  19. Low SWaP MWIR detector based on XBn focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Gross, Y.; Aronov, D.; ben Ezra, M.; Berkowicz, E.; Cohen, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Grossman, S.; Klin, O.; Lukomsky, I.; Marlowitz, T.; Shkedy, L.; Shtrichman, I.; Snapi, N.; Tuito, A.; Yassen, M.; Weiss, E.

    2013-06-01

    Over the past few years, a new type of High Operating Temperature (HOT) photon detector has been developed at SCD, which operates in the blue part of the MWIR window of the atmosphere (3.4-4.2 μm). This window is generally more transparent than the red part of the MWIR window (4.4-4.9 μm), especially for mid and long range applications. The detector has an InAsSb active layer, and is based on the new "XBn" device concept. We have analyzed various electrooptical systems at different atmospheric temperatures, based on XBn-InAsSb operating at 150K and epi-InSb at 95K, respectively, and find that the typical recognition ranges of both detector technologies are similar. Therefore, for very many applications there is no disadvantage to using XBn-InAsSb instead of InSb. On the other hand XBn technology confers many advantages, particularly in low Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) and in the high reliability of the cooler and Integrated Detector Cooler Assembly (IDCA). In this work we present a new IDCA, designed for 150K operation. The 15 μm pitch 640×512 digital FPA is housed in a robust, light-weight, miniaturised Dewar, attached to Ricor's K562S Stirling cycle cooler. The complete IDCA has a diameter of 28 mm, length of 80 mm and weight of < 300 gm. The total IDCA power consumption is ~ 3W at a 60Hz frame rate, including an external miniature proximity card attached to the outside of the Dewar. We describe some of the key performance parameters of the new detector, including its NETD, RNU and operability, pixel cross-talk, and early stage yield results from our production line.

  20. Basic performance evaluation of a Si-PM array-based LGSO phoswich DOI block detector for a high-resolution small animal PET system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2013-07-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for PET. However, it remains unclear whether Si-PM can be used for a depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector based on the decay time differences of the scintillator where pulse shape analysis is used. For clarification, we tested the Hamamatsu 4 × 4 Si-PM array (S11065-025P) combined with scintillators that used different decay times to develop DOI block detectors using the pulse shape analysis. First, Ce-doped Gd(2)SiO(5) (GSO) scintillators of 0.5 mol% Ce were arranged in a 4 × 4 matrix and were optically coupled to the center of each pixel of the Si-PM array for measurement of the energy resolution as well as its gain variations according to the temperature. Then two types of Ce-doped Lu(1.9)Gd(0.1)Si0(5) (LGSO) scintillators, 0.025 mol% Ce (decay time: ~31 ns) and 0.75 mol% Ce (decay time: ~46 ns), were optically coupled in the DOI direction, arranged in a 11 × 7 matrix, and optically coupled to a Si-PM array for testing of the possibility of a high-resolution DOI detector. The energy resolution of the Si-PM array-based GSO block detector was 18 ± 4.4 % FWHM for a Cs-137 gamma source (662 keV). Less than 1 mm crystals were clearly resolved in the position map of the LGSO DOI block detector. The peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) derived from the pulse shape spectra of the LGSO DOI block detector was 2.2. These results confirmed that Si-PM array-based DOI block detectors are promising for high-resolution small animal PET systems.