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Sample records for superconducting cavity stabilized

  1. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  2. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Posen, Sam; Transtrum, Mark K.; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P.

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-T c materials such as Nb3Sn, NbN, and MgB2. Indeed, beyond the so-called superheating field {H}{sh}, flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We present intuitive arguments and simple estimates for {H}{sh}, and combine them with our previous rigorous calculations, which we summarize. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and the danger of disorder in nucleating vortex entry. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB2? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. Flux entering a laminate can lead to so-called pancake vortices; we consider the physics of the dislocation motion and potential re-annihilation or stabilization of these vortices after their entry.

  3. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  4. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  5. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: Stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    CERN Document Server

    Liarte, Danilo B; Transtrum, Mark K; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P

    2016-01-01

    We review our work on theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces. These limits are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-$T_c$ materials such as Nb$_3$Sn, NbN, and MgB$_2$. We summarize our calculations of the so-called superheating field $H_{\\mathrm{sh}}$, beyond which flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and disorder. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB$_2$? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. T...

  6. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  7. Encoding quantum information in a stabilized manifold of a superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzard, S.; Leghtas, Z.; Mundhada, S. O.; Axline, C.; Reagor, M.; Chou, K.; Blumoff, J.; Sliwa, K. M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    In a superconducting Josephson circuit architecture, we activate a multi-photon process between two modes by applying microwave drives at specific frequencies. This creates a pairwise exchange of photons between a high-Q cavity and the environment. The resulting open dynamical system develops a two-dimensional quasi-energy ground state manifold. Can we encode, protect and manipulate quantum information in this manifold? We experimentally investigate the convergence and escape rates in and out of this confined subspace. Finally, using quantum Zeno dynamics, we aim to perform gates which maintain the state in the protected manifold at all times. Work supported by: ARO, ONR, AFOSR and YINQE.

  8. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  9. Analysis of superconducting cavity quench events at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hong-Tao; LI Zheng; LIU Jian-Fei; ZHAO Yu-Bin; ZHAO Shen-jie; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; LUO Chen; FENG Zi-Qiang; MAO Dong-Qing; ZHENG Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Quench is important and dangerous to superconducting RF cavities. This paper illustrates the mechanism of quench and how a quench detector works, and analyzes the quench events happening during beam operations and cavity conditioning. We find that the quench protection is mostly triggered by some reasons such as fluctuation of cavity voltage, multipacting or arc, rather than a real cavity thermal breakdown. The results will be beneficial to optimize the operation parameters of superconducting cavities, to discover the real reasons for beam trip by quench interlock, and to improve the operation stability of superconducting RF systems.

  10. Stability and Resolution Studies of HOMBPMs for the 1.3 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Liangliang; Jones, Roger

    2015-01-01

    HOMBPMs (HOM based Beam Position Monitors) are installed at the FLASH facility at DESY, Hamburg. These are aimed at aligning the beam and monitoring the beam position. Over time, the accuracy of beam position prediction is degraded. This is due to instability issues in the 1.3 GHz and 3.9 GHz superconducting cavities and associated electronics. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a measurement technique which is stable and can be relied upon over a period of three months with unprecedented resolution (below 4 μm horizontally and 2 μm vertically). We attribute this improvement in stability to a focused campaign on various signal processing and analysis techniques. These techniques include SVD (Singular Value Decomposition), ANN (Artificial Neural Network) and PLS (Partial Least Square). We found the best resolution and computational power using the latter method, PLS. These techniques are directly applicable to the HOMBPM system at the European XFEL that is currently under construction. However,...

  11. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  12. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); TESLA Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.).

  13. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  14. The Test of LLRF control system on superconducting cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhenglong; Wen, Lianghua; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Gao, Zheng; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The first generation Low-Level radio frequency(LLRF) control system independently developed by IMPCAS, the operating frequency is 162.5MHz for China ADS, which consists of superconducting cavity amplitude stability control, phase stability control and the cavity resonance frequency control. The LLRF control system is based on four samples IQ quadrature demodulation technique consisting an all-digital closed-loop feedback control. This paper completed the first generation of ADS LLRF control system in the low-temperature superconducting cavities LLRF stability and performance online tests. Through testing, to verify the performance of LLRF control system, to analysis on emerging issues, and in accordance with the experimental data, to summarize LLRF control system performance to accumulate experience for the future control of superconducting cavities.

  15. First prototype Copper-Niobium RF Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is the first RF superconducting cavity made of copper with a very thin layer of pure niobium deposited on the inner wall by sputtering. This new developpment lead to a considerable increase of performance and stability of superconducting cavities and to non-negligible economy. The work was carried out in the ISR workshop. This technique was adopted for the LEP II accelerating cavities. At the centre is Cristoforo Benvenuti, inventor of this important technology, with his assistants, Nadia Circelli and Max Hauer, carrying the sputtering electrode. See also 8209255, 8312339.

  16. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  17. Niobium films for superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Circelli, N.; Hauer, M.

    1984-09-01

    Superconducting accelerating cavities made of Nb-coated copper were produced. Niobium films of a thickness ranging from 1.4 to 4 ..mu..m were deposited onto the inside of 3-GHz cavities and 500-MHz frequency by bias diode sputtering. A maximum accelerating field of 8.6 MV m/sup -1/ was reached without quench which is attributed to the large thermal conductivity of copper at liquid helium temperatures.

  18. CERN Developments for 704 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Aviles Santillana, I; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Bonomi, R; Calatroni, S; Chambrillon, J; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Guinchard, M; Junginger, T; Malabaila, M; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Mikulas, S; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Renaglia, T; Schirm, K; Tardy, T; Therasse, M; Vacca, A; Valverde Alonso, N; Vande Craen, A

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort coordinated by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories. It is aiming at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art RF superconducting technology, which would serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB). Amongst the main objectives of this R&D effort, is the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities, operating at 2 K with a maximum accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m, and the testing of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryomodule. The cavity together with its helium tank had to be carefully designed in coherence with the innovative design of the cryomodule. New fabrication methods have also been explored. Five such niobium cavities and two copper cavities are in fabrication. The key design aspects are discussed, the results of the alternative fabrication methods presented and the stat...

  19. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Z. A.; Ge, M.; Iwashita, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  20. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  1. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Physics Division; Ge, M. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2017-01-12

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  2. Study of multipacting effect in superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng; ZHAO Ming-Hua

    2008-01-01

    A number of superconducting cavities of axis-symmetric geometry have been considered to study the effect in order to achieve the desired performance.It is shown that the multipacting effect is strongly dependent on the condition of the RF surface and can be suppressed with reconsideration of the geometry.The simulation result is compared with the result of the semi-analytical model in the end.

  3. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  4. New Method to Improve the Accelerating Gradient of Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zhenchao

    2013-01-01

    Quench is a common phenomenon in a superconducting cavity and often limits the accelerating gradient of the cavity. Accurate location of the quench site can be located by second sound detection. For multi-cell superconducting cavity, one defect may cause the cell with defect quenches and then the whole cavity quenches. Now we proposed a new method to eliminate the bad influence of the quench cell to the whole cavity.

  5. LEP superconducting accelerating cavity module

    CERN Multimedia

    With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was – and still is – the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. The excavation of the LEP tunnel was Europe’s largest civil-engineering project prior to the Channel Tunnel. Three tunnel-boring machines started excavating the tunnel in February 1985 and the ring was completed three years later. In its first phase of operation, LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions. LEP was commissioned in July 1989 and the first beam circulated in the collider on 14 July. The collider's initial energy was chosen to be around 91 GeV, so that Z bosons could be produced. The Z boson and its charged partner the W boson, both discovered at CERN in 1983, are responsible for the weak force, which drives the Sun, for example. Observing the creation and decay of the short-lived Z boson w...

  6. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  7. Wave Dynamical Chaos in Superconducting Microwave Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Rehfeld, H; Dembowski, C; Gräf, H D; Hofferbert, R; Richter, A; Lengeler, Herbert

    1997-01-01

    During the last few years we have studied the chaotic behavior of special Euclidian geometries, so-called billiards, from the quantum or in more general sense "wave dynamical" point of view. Due to the equivalence between the stationary Schroedinger equation and the classical Helmholtz equation in the two-dimensional case (plain billiards), it is possible to simulate "quantum chaos" with the help of macroscopic, superconducting microwave cavities. Using this technique we investigated spectra of three billiards from the family of Pascal's Snails (Robnik-Billiards) with a different chaoticity in each case in order to test predictions of standard stochastical models for classical chaotic systems.

  8. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)∼ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3–2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  9. Study of the mechanical stability of superconducting cavities and stiffening of these cavities by copper coating performed with thermal spray techniques; Etudes de la stabilite mecanique des cavites supraconductrices et de la methode de rigidification par projection thermique de cuivre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassot, H

    2001-12-01

    Today's research in nuclear physics and in particle physics needs high energy or high intensity accelerators; the use of superconducting cavities constitutes a very important technological advance for the design of such facilities, allowing high accelerating gradient with few dissipation. One of the major problems is the frequency shift under Lorentz forces: since the quality factor of the superconducting cavities is much higher than the external factor depending on the beam charge, their bandwidths are very narrow (several Hertz). Even very small mechanical deformations under Lorentz forces could induce a frequency shift which exceeds the bandwidth when the accelerating gradient becomes very high. The contribution of this thesis consists at first in a numerical analysis of this problem, then in a mechanical study of a new method for stiffening superconducting cavities: a copper coating over their external surface by thermal spray techniques. As it was a new experiment, the choice of the process and the optimization of the parameters have been carried out. An important part of this thesis has been dedicated to the systematic mechanical characterizations of the copper coatings since they are indispensable for the evaluation of the stiffening efficiency, some links between copper coating properties and thermal projection parameters have been established. The mechanical calculations are a prerequisite to obtain an effective reduction of mechanical deformations under Lorentz forces: they permit to localize the maximum deformations, to find the ideal position and the optimised shape of the stiffener. The methods implemented in this thesis allow to compare the different kinds of coating design and then to propose an interesting solution. Finally, an original approach concerning the frequency shift in pulsed mode has been developed recently, allowing to interpret some experimental observations. (author)

  10. Multipacting Analysis of the Superconducting Parallel-bar Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

    2011-03-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is being considered for a number of applications. Multipacting can be a limiting factor to the performance of in any superconducting structure. In the parallel-bar cavity the main contribution to the deflection is due to the transverse deflecting voltage, between the parallel bars, making the design potentially prone to multipacting. This paper presents the results of analytical calculations and numerical simulations of multipacting in the parallel-bar cavity with resonant voltage, impact energies and corresponding particle trajectories.

  11. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  12. Aging of residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, M.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics......Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics...

  13. Superconducting RF cavity R&D for future accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, C M

    2009-01-01

    High-beta superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) elliptical cavities are being developed for several accelerator projects including Project X, the European XFEL, and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Fermilab has recently established an extensive infrastructure for SRF cavity R&D for future accelerators, including cavity surface processing and testing and cavity assembly into cryomodules. Some highlights of the global effort in SRF R&D toward improving cavity performance, and Fermilab SRF cavity R&D in the context of global projects are reviewed.

  14. Updating of Optical Inspection System for 6 GHz Superconducting Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Guo-long

    2013-01-01

    As a validation tool for the material properties and the surface treatment process,6 GHz superconducting cavity needs complex surface treatment process during its manufacture.It is verynecessary to record and monitor the statues of the internal surface of the cavity after each surface treatment,such as ultrasonic washing,mechanical polishing,electronic polishing(EP),buffered chemical

  15. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  16. 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities with a massively parallel simulation suite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksiy Kononenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency cavities based on superconducting technology are widely used in particle accelerators for various applications. The cavities usually have high quality factors and hence narrow bandwidths, so the field stability is sensitive to detuning from the Lorentz force and external loads, including vibrations and helium pressure variations. If not properly controlled, the detuning can result in a serious performance degradation of a superconducting accelerator, so an understanding of the underlying detuning mechanisms can be very helpful. Recent advances in the simulation suite ace3p have enabled realistic multiphysics characterization of such complex accelerator systems on supercomputers. In this paper, we present the new capabilities in ace3p for large-scale 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities, in particular, a parallel eigensolver for determining mechanical resonances, a parallel harmonic response solver to calculate the response of a cavity to external vibrations, and a numerical procedure to decompose mechanical loads, such as from the Lorentz force or piezoactuators, into the corresponding mechanical modes. These capabilities have been used to do an extensive rf-mechanical analysis of dressed TESLA-type superconducting cavities. The simulation results and their implications for the operational stability of the Linac Coherent Light Source-II are discussed.

  17. Characterization of a superconducting Pb photocathode in a superconducting rf photoinjector cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Kamps, T; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A; Neumann, A; Schmeißer, M; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Schubert S; Smedley J; Sekutowicz, J; Will, I

    2014-01-01

    Photocathodes are a limiting factor for the next generation of ultrahigh brightness photoinjectors. We studied the behavior of a superconducting Pb cathode in the cryogenic environment of a superconducting rf gun cavity to measure the quantum efficiency, its spatial distribution, and the work function. We will also discuss how the cathode surface contaminants modify the performance of the photocathode as well as the gun cavity and we discuss the possibilities to remove these contaminants.

  18. Complex envelope control of pulsed accelerating fields in superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Czarski, T

    2010-01-01

    A digital control system for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented in this work. FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) based controller, managed by MATLAB, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The LLRF - Low Level Radio Frequency system for FLASH project in DESY is introduced. Essential modeling of a cavity resonator with signal and power analysis is considered as a key approach to the control methods. An electrical model is represented by the non-stationary state space equation for the complex envelope of the cavity voltage driven by the current generator and the beam loading. The electromechanical model of the superconducting cavity resonator including the Lorentz force detuning has been developed for a simulation purpose. The digital signal processing is proposed for the field vector detection. The field vector sum control is considered for multiple cavities driven by one klystron. An algebraic, complex domain model is proposed for the system analysis. The c...

  19. An RF input coupler for a superconducting single cell cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechner, B.; Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Mukugi, Ken [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Krawczyk, F.

    1999-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposes a high intensity proton accelerator for the Neutron Science Project. A superconducting linac is a main option for the high energy part of the accelerator. Design and development work for the superconducting accelerating cavities (resonant frequency of 600 MHz) is in progress. Superconducting cavities have an advantage of very high accelerating efficiency because RF wall loss is very small and much of the RF power fed to the cavity is consumed for the beam acceleration. On the other hand, an RF input coupler for the superconducting cavity has to be matched to the beam loading. Therefore, estimation of coupling coefficient or external quality factor (Qext) of the RF input coupler is important for the design of the couplers. In this work, Qext`s were calculated by the electromagnetic analysis code (MAFIA) and were compared with those by the measurements. A {beta} (ratio of the particle velocity to the light velocity) = 0.5 single-cell cavity with either axial coupler or side coupler was used in this work. In the experiments, a model cavity made by copper is applied. Both 2- and 3-dimensional calculations were performed in the axial coupler geometry and the results were compared. The agreements between calculated and measured values are good and this method for calculation of Qext is confirmed to be proper for the design of the RF input couplers. (author)

  20. Improved surface treatment of the superconducting TESLA cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilje, L. E-mail: lutz.lilje@desy.de; Antoine, C.; Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Charrier, J.-P.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferreira, L.; Losito, R.; Matheisen, A.; Preis, H.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schmueser, P.; Trines, D.; Visentin, B.; Wenninger, H

    2004-01-11

    The proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities for particle acceleration. For a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is required which is reliably achieved with a niobium surface preparation by chemical etching. An upgrade of the collider to 800 GeV requires an improved cavity preparation technique. In this paper, results are presented on single-cell cavities which demonstrate that fields of up to 40 MV/m are accessible by electrolytic polishing of the inner surface of the cavity.

  1. Improved surface treatment of the superconducting TESLA cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilje, L.; Antoine, C.; Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Charrier, J.-P.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferreira, L.; Losito, R.; Matheisen, A.; Preis, H.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schmüser, P.; Trines, D.; Visentin, B.; Wenninger, H.

    2004-01-01

    The proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities for particle acceleration. For a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is required which is reliably achieved with a niobium surface preparation by chemical etching. An upgrade of the collider to 800 GeV requires an improved cavity preparation technique. In this paper, results are presented on single-cell cavities which demonstrate that fields of up to 40 MV/m are accessible by electrolytic polishing of the inner surface of the cavity.

  2. Improved surface treatment of the superconducting TESLA cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Trines, D.; Antoine, C.; Charrier, J.P.; Safa, H.; Visentin, B. [CEA Saclay, DAPHNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferreira, L.; Losito, R.; Preis, H.; Wenninger, H. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Schmueser, P. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    The proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities for particle acceleration. For a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is required which is reliably achieved with a niobium surface preparation by chemical etching. An upgrade of the collider to 800 GeV requires an improved cavity preparation technique. In this paper results are presented on single-cell cavities which demonstrate that fields of up to 40 MV/m are accessible by electrolytic polishing of the inner surface of the cavity. (orig.)

  3. Mechanical Design and Fabrication Studies for SPL Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; Aviles Santillana, I; Capatina, O; Renaglia, T; Tardy, T; Valverde Alonso, N; Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s R&D programme on the Superconducting Proton Linac’s (SPL) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) elliptical cavities made from niobium sheets explores new mechanical design and consequently new fabrication methods, where several opportunities for improved optimization were identified. A stainless steel helium vessel is under design rather than a titanium helium vessel using an integrated brazed transition between Nb and the SS helium vessel. Different design and fabrication aspects were proposed and the results are discussed hereafter.

  4. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  5. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. Additional measurements of mechanical stability under RF operation (frequency variation with He pressure, Lorentz detuning) and cryogenic and electric measurements of power dissipation are presented. (author). 3 refs.

  6. Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

  7. Mechanically Amplified Piezoelectric Tunable 3D Microwave Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, N C; Tobar, M E

    2016-01-01

    In the context of hybrid quantum systems, there is a demand for superconducting tunable devices able to operate in the single-photon regime. In this work, we developed a 3D microwave reentrant cavity with such characteristics ready to provide a very fine-tuning of a high-Q resonant mode over a large dynamic range. This system has an electronic tuning mechanism based on a mechanically amplified piezoelectric actuator, which can set the cavity resonance with a large dynamic range of order 1 GHz at 10 mK. At elevated microwave power, nonlinear thermal e effects were observed to destroy the superconductivity of the cavity due to the large electric fields generated in the small gap of the reentrant cavity.

  8. Mechanical stability study of capture cavity II at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M.W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Problematic resonant conditions at both 18 Hz and 180 Hz were encountered and identified early during the commissioning of Capture Cavity II (CC2) at Fermilab. CC2 consists of an external vacuum vessel and a superconducting high gradient (close to 25 MV/m) 9-cell 1.3 GHz niobium cavity, transported from DESY for use in the A0 Photoinjector at Fermilab. An ANSYS modal finite element analysis (FEA) was performed in order to isolate the source of the resonance and directed the effort towards stabilization. Using a fast piezoelectric tuner to excite (or shake) the cavity at different frequencies (from 5 Hz to 250 Hz) at a low-range sweep for analysis purposes. Both warm (300 K) and cold (1.8 K) accelerometer measurements at the cavity were taken as the resonant ''fix'' was applied. FEA results, cultural and technical noise investigation, and stabilization techniques are discussed.

  9. Superconducting accelerating four-cell cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A close view of the four-cell cavity. This was a prototype designed for LEP2 (LEP1 had warm copper cavities as accelerating elements). The first successful tests were made in December 1980 - reaching a Q = 10^6. (see photo 8012650X)

  10. The ``Q disease'' in Superconducting Niobium RF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, J.

    2003-07-01

    Superconducting niobium cavities can achieve quality (Q0) factors of 1010-1011, more than six orders of magnitude higher than conventional copper cavities. However, to maintain this performance at high accelerating gradient (20 MV/m) the radio-frequency (rf) surface must be damage and dust free. Cavity preparation techniques therefore routinely include a chemical etch or electropolishing. Under certain conditions, these (and other) treatments can contaminate the niobium with hydrogen. Hydrides may then form when the cavity is cooled through 150 K, even if only a few atomic percent hydrogen are present. If hydrides are formed, the cavity quality can degrade substantially (Q disease). A rapid cooldown often inhibits the hydride formation. Other "cures" include degassing cavities at 900 °C to eliminate the hydrogen. A historical review of the Q disease is provided here, with the emphasis being placed on its discovery, symptoms, mechanism, and cures.

  11. A 3D printed superconducting aluminium microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Goryachev, Maxim; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals, in particular, has found a number of applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Although many techniques are used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a microwave cavity (resonant frequencies 9.9 and 11.2 GHz) 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable with the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. The result is achieved even with a very large concentration of non-superconducting silicon in the alloy of 12.18%, compared with Al-6061, which has between 0.4% and 0.8%. Our results may pave the way for the possibility of 3D printing superconducting cavity configurations that are otherwise impossible to machine.

  12. Multimode Strong Coupling in Superconducting Cavity Piezo-electromechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Xu; Tang, Hong X

    2016-01-01

    High frequency mechanical resonators subjected to low thermal phonon occupancy are easier to be prepared to the ground state by direct cryogenic cooling. Their extreme stiffness, however, poses a significant challenge for external interrogations. Here we demonstrate a superconducting cavity piezo-electromechanical system in which multiple modes of a bulk acoustic resonator oscillating at $10\\,\\textrm{GHz}$ are coupled to a planar microwave superconducting resonator with a cooperativity exceeding $2\\times10^{3}$, deep in the strong coupling regime. By implementation of the non-contact coupling scheme to reduce mechanical dissipation, the system exhibits excellent coherence characterized by a frequency-quality factor product of $7.5\\times10^{15}\\,\\textrm{Hz}$. Interesting dynamics of temporal oscillations of the microwave energy is observed, implying the coherent conversion between phonons and photons. The demonstrated high frequency cavity piezo-electromechanics is compatible with superconducting qubits, repre...

  13. Early prototype of a superconducting RF cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    As early as 1979, before LEP became an approved project, studies were located in the ISR Division. Although Cu-cavities were foreseen, certainly for the 1st energy-stage, superconducting cavities were explored as a possible alternative for the 2nd energy-stage. This began with very basic studies of manufacture and properties of Nb-cavities. This one, held by Mr.Girel, was made from bulk Nb-sheet, 2.5 mm thick. It was dimensioned for tests at 500 MHz (LEP accelerating RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 8004204, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  14. R&D of BEPCII 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) adopts two 500 MHz superconducting cavities (SCCs) in each ring for higher accelerated gradient, higher Q and lower impedance (Wang et al. The proceedings of SRF’07). There’s no spare cavity due to the limited time and funding during BEPCII construction. If any serious trouble happened on either one of the two cavities and could not be recovered in a short time, the operation of BEPCII facility will be affected. Therefore, since 2009 three spare cavities have been fabricated in China to ensure reliable operation, and two of them have been successfully vertically tested in January and July 2011. This paper will briefly present the manufacture, post-process and vertical test performance of the 500 MHz spare cavities.

  15. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  16. Fundamental Research in Superconducting RF Cavity Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg Hoffstaetter

    2012-11-13

    This is a 3-year SRF R&D proposal with two main goals: 1) to benefit near term high gradient SRF applications by understanding the causes of quench at high fields in present-day niobium cavities 2) to open the long-range prospects for SRF applications by experimentally verifying the recent exciting theoretical predication for new cavity materials such as Nb3Sn and MgB2. These predictions shwo that ultimately gradients of 100Mv/m to 200MV/m may become possible as material imperfections are overcome.

  17. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna, E-mail: anirban.bhattacharyya@physics.uu.se; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-21

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  18. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  19. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  20. Characterization of Superconducting Cavities for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, Martina

    2013-01-01

    In this report the radiofrequency measurements done for the superconducting cavities developed at CERN for the HIE-ISOLDE project are analyzed. The purpose of this project is improve the energy of the REX-ISOLDE facility by means of a superconducting LINAC. In this way it will be possible to reach higher accelerating gradients, and so higher particle energies (up to 10MeV/u). At this purpose the Niobium thin film technology was preferred to the Niobium bulk technology because of the technical advantages like the higher thermal conductivity of Copper and the higher stiffness of the cavities which are less sentitive to mechanical vibrations. The Niobium coating is being optimized on test prototypes which are qualified by RF measurements at cold.

  1. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  2. Sensitivity of Niobium Superconducting RF Cavities to Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Gonnella, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) require hundreds of superconducting RF (SRF) cavities operating in continuous wave (CW) mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0). In order to reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping has been proposed as a cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1x10^10, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here we show that the sensitivity that a cavity has to ambient magnetic field is highly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120C baked cavities show a sensitivity of ~0.8 and ~0.6 nOhm/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a sensitivity of ~2 to 5 nOhm/mG trapped. Less doping results in weaker sensitivity. This difference in sensitivities is ...

  3. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2–4 mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single- or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies on real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and ‘nitrogen doping’ of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.

  4. The ESS Superconducting RF Cavity and Cryomodule Cryogenic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, C.; Elias, N.; Molloy, S.; Bosland, P.; Renard, B.; Bousson, S.; Olivier, G.; Reynet, D.; Thermeau, J. P.

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is one of Europe's largest research infrastructures, tobring new insights to the grand challenges of science and innovation in fields as diverse as material and life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage,solid-state and fundamental physics by the end of the decade. The collaborative project is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. A 5 MW, long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms and the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4% duty cycle). The choice of SRF technology is a key element in the development of the ESS linear accelerator (linac). The superconducting linacis composed of one section of spoke cavity cryomodules(352.21 MHz) and two sections of elliptical cavity cryomodules (704.42 MHz). These cryomodules contain niobium SRF cavities operating at 2 K, cooled by the accelerator cryoplantthrough the cryogenic distribution system. This paper presents the superconducting RF cavity and cryomodule cryogenic processes, which are developed for the technology demonstrators and to be ultimately integrated for the ESS tunnel operation.

  5. A vertical test system for China-ADS project injector II superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; He, Yuan; Wen, Liang-Hua; Li, Chun-Long; Xue, Zong-Heng; Song, Yu-Kun; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Zheng-Long; Gao, Zheng; Zhang, Cong; Sun, Lie-Peng; Yue, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; You, Zhi-Ming; Thomas, Joseph Powers(Tom Powers

    2014-05-01

    To test superconducting cavities, a vertical test system has been designed and set up at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The system design is based on VCO-PLL hardware and the NI Labview software. The test of the HWR010#2 superconducting cavity shows that the function of this test system is satisfactory for testing the low frequency cavity.

  6. Analysis and active compensation of microphonics in continuous wave narrow-bandwidth superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-08-01

    Many proposals for next generation light sources based on single pass free electron lasers or energy recovery linac facilities require a continuous wave (cw) driven superconducting linac. The effective beam loading in such machines is very small and in principle the cavities can be operated at a bandwidth of a few Hz and with less than a few kW of rf power. However, a power reserve is required to ensure field stability. A major error source is the mechanical microphonics detuning of the niobium cavities. To understand the influence of cavity detuning on longitudinal beam stability, a measurement program has been started at the horizontal cavity test facility HoBiCaT at HZB to study TESLA-type cavities. The microphonics detuning spectral content, peak detuning values, and the driving terms for these mechanical oscillations have been analyzed. In combination with the characterization of cw-adapted fast tuning systems based on the piezoelectric effect this information has been used to design a detuning compensation algorithm. It has been shown that a compensation factor between 2-7 is achievable, reducing the typical detuning of 2-3 Hz rms to below 0.5 Hz rms. These results were included in rf-control simulations of the cavities, and it was demonstrated that a phase stability below 0.02° can be achieved.

  7. RF cavity design for KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Su, E-mail: jis@kirams.re.kr [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joonsun; Kim, Hyun Wook; Kim, Chang Hyeuk [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Key Ho [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Natural Sciences Campus, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-21

    The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) has developed a superconducting cyclotron for the carbon therapy, which is called KIRAMS-430. The cyclotron is designed to accelerate only {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions up to the energy of 430 MeV/u. It uses two normal conducting RF cavities. The RF frequency is about 70.76 MHz. The nominal dee voltage is 70 kV at the center and 160 kV at the extraction. The RF cavity was designed with 4 stems by using CST microwave studio (MWS). In this paper, we represent the simulation results and the optimized design of the RF cavity for the KIRAMS-430.

  8. RF Processing of the Couplers for the SNS Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.Kang; I.E. Campisi; D. Stout; A. Vassioutchenko; M. Stirbet; M. Drury; T. Powers

    2005-07-10

    All eighty-one fundamental power couplers for the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the SNS linac have been RF conditioned and installed in the cryomodules successfully. The couplers were RF processed at JLAB or at the SNS in ORNL: more than forty couplers have been RF conditioned in the SNS RF Test Facility (RFTF) after the first forty couplers were conditioned at JLAB. The couplers were conditioned up to 650 kW forward power at 8% duty cycle in traveling and standing waves. They were installed on the cavities in the cryomodules and then assembled with the airside waveguide transitions. The couplers have been high power RF tested with satisfactory accelerating field gradients in the cooled cavities.

  9. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, Jean [ODU, JLAB; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini [ODU, JLAB

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  10. Temperature stabilization of optofluidic photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamutsch, Christian; Smith, Cameron L.C.; Graham, Alexandra;

    2009-01-01

    We present a principle for the temperature stabilization of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities based on optofluidics. We introduce an analytic method enabling a specific mode of a cavity to be made wavelength insensitive to changes in ambient temperature. Using this analysis, we experimentally demon...

  11. Nonlinear RF spurious in a cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, Jordi; Collado, Carlos; Shaw, Timothy J.; O'Callaghan, Juan M.

    2002-08-01

    We have developed a method to calculate the distribution of fundamental and spurious fields in a metallic cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates in which signals at two different frequencies are injected. The nonlinearity in the superconductor produces the typical intermodulation effects if the frequencies of the injected signals are sufficiently close to each other and near a resonant mode. Our method uses harmonic balance to match the fields in the cavity with the currents on the endplates. The method can be used for a variety of nonlinear models of the superconducting endplate, and could be the base for a nondestructive procedure to extract the nonlinear parameters of an HTS sample from RF measurements. Our analysis is restricted to the TE0 1 1 mode, but the method can be applied to any propagating mode in the cylindrical cavity. Closed-form equations for the case of square-law nonlinearities in the superconductor are derived and used to check the validity of the harmonic balance calculation.

  12. A 3D Printed Superconducting Aluminium Microwave Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Creedon, Daniel L; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Tim; Tobar, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals in particular has found a number of novel applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Whilst many techniques can be used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a resonant microwave cavity 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable to the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum...

  13. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis and Stiffening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodnizki, J [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Ben Aliz, Y [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Grin, A [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Horvitz, Z [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Perry, A [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Weissman, L [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Davis, G Kirk [JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion Universtiy

    2014-12-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) design is based on a 40 MeV 5 mA light ions superconducting RF linac. Phase-I of SARAF delivers up to 2 mA CW proton beams in an energy range of 1.5 - 4.0 MeV. The maximum beam power that we have reached is 5.7 kW. Today, the main limiting factor to reach higher ion energy and beam power is related to the HWR sensitivity to the liquid helium coolant pressure fluctuations. The HWR sensitivity to helium pressure is about 60 Hz/mbar. The cavities had been designed, a decade ago, to be soft in order to enable tuning of their novel shape. However, the cavities turned out to be too soft. In this work we found that increasing the rigidity of the cavities in the vicinity of the external drift tubes may reduce the cavity sensitivity by a factor of three. A preliminary design to increase the cavity rigidity is presented.

  14. Design Topics for Superconducting RF Cavities and Ancillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Padamsee, H

    2014-01-01

    RF superconductivity has become a major subfield of accelerator science. There has been an explosion in the number of accelerator applications and in the number of laboratories engaged. The first lecture at this meeting of the CAS presented a review of fundamental design principles to develop cavity geometries to accelerate velocity-of-light particles (β = v/c ~ 1), moving on to the corresponding design principles for medium-velocity (medium-β) and low-velocity (low-β) structures. The lecture included mechanical design topics. The second lecture dealt with input couplers, higher-order mode extraction couplers with absorbers, and tuners of both the slow and fast varieties.

  15. Cryostat for Testing HIE-Isolde Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Cuccuru, G; Pasini, M; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M; Vullierme, B

    2011-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities at CERN [1], with the objective of increasing the energy and intensity of the delivered radioactive ion beams (RIB). This project aims to fill the request for a more energetic post-accelerated beam by means of a new superconducting (SC) linac based on Quarter Wave Resonators (QWR). A research and development (R&D) programme looking at all the different aspects of the SC linac started in 2008 and continued throughout 2010. The R&D effort has particularly focused on the development of the high β cavities (β = 10.3%) for which the Nb sputtered on Cu substrate technology has been adopted. Two prototype cavities were manufactured and are undergoing RF cold tests. The pre-series cavity manufacturing is under way using 3D forged Cu billets. A single vacuum cryostat was designed and built to test these cavities at liquid helium temperatures. This paper details the main design concep...

  16. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  17. InSb nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Deacon, R. S.; Car, D.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Ishibashi, K.

    2016-05-01

    By employing a micrometer precision mechanical transfer technique, we embed individual InSb nanowires into a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the characteristics of a double quantum dot formed in an InSb nanowire interacting with a single mode microwave field. The charge stability diagram can be obtained from the amplitude and phase response of the resonator independently from the dc transport measurement. As the charge transits between dot-dot, or dot-lead, the change of resonator transmission is compared and the charge-cavity coupling strength is extracted to be in the magnitude of several MHz.

  18. InSb nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Deacon, R. S., E-mail: russell@riken.jp; Ishibashi, K. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Car, D. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bakkers, E. P. A. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kavli Institute, Quantum Transport Group, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-05-16

    By employing a micrometer precision mechanical transfer technique, we embed individual InSb nanowires into a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the characteristics of a double quantum dot formed in an InSb nanowire interacting with a single mode microwave field. The charge stability diagram can be obtained from the amplitude and phase response of the resonator independently from the dc transport measurement. As the charge transits between dot-dot, or dot-lead, the change of resonator transmission is compared and the charge-cavity coupling strength is extracted to be in the magnitude of several MHz.

  19. Fluid phase thermodynamics : I) nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically enhanced gravity and II) superconducting cavity resonators for high-stability frequency references and precision density measurements of helium-4 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcovilos, Theodore Allen

    Although fluids are typically the first systems studied in undergraduate thermodynamics classes, we still have only a rudimentary phenomenological understanding of these systems outside of the classical and equilibrium regimes. Two experiments will be presented. First, we present progress on precise measurements of helium-4 gas at low temperatures (1 K-5 K). We study helium because at low densities it is an approximately ideal gas but at high densities the thermodynamic properties can be predicted by numerical solutions of Schroedinger's equation. By utilizing the high resolution and stability in frequency of a superconducting microwave cavity resonator we can measure the dielectric constant of helium-4 to parts in 109, corresponding to an equivalent resolution in density. These data will be used to calculate the virial coefficients of the helium gas so that we may compare with numerical predictions from the literature. Additionally, our data may allow us to measure Boltzmann's constant to parts in 108, a factor of 100 improvement over previous measurements. This work contains a description of the nearly-completed apparatus and the methods of operation and data analysis for this experiment. Data will be taken by future researchers.The second experiment discussed is a study of nucleate pool boiling. To date, no adequate quantitative model exists of this everyday phenomenon. In our experiment, we vary one parameter inaccessible to most researchers, gravity, by applying a magnetic force to our test fluid, oxygen. Using this technique, we may apply effective gravities of 0-80 times Earth's gravitational acceleration (g). In this work we present heat transfer data for the boiling of oxygen at one atmosphere ambient pressure for effective gravity values between 1g and 16g . Our data describe two relationships between applied heat flux and temperature differential: at low heat flux the system obeys a power law and at high heat flux the behavior is linear. We find that the

  20. A general approach for the calculation of intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, J.; Collado, C.; Menéndez, O.; O'Callaghan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a general procedure to calculate intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates that is applicable to the dielectric-loaded cavities currently used for measurement of surface resistance in high-temperature superconductors. The procedure would enable the use such cavities for intermodulation characterization of unpatterned superconducting films, and would remove the uncertainty of measuring intermodulation on patterned devices, in which the effect of patterning damage might influence the outcome of the measurements. We have verified the calculation method by combining superconducting and copper endplates in a rutile-loaded cavity.

  1. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  2. Design and Development of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payagalage Subashini Uddi De Silva, Jean Delayen

    2012-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties that is being considered for a number of applications. We present the designs of a 499 MHz deflecting cavity developed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade and a 400 MHz crabbing cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. Prototypes of these two cavities are now under development and fabrication.

  3. Generation of an Entangled State of Two Three-Level Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating a maximally entangled state of two three-level superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classical microwave pluses in cavity. In this scheme, no quantum information will be transferred from the SQUIDs to the cavity since the cavity field is only virtually excited. Thus, the cavity decay is suppressed during the entanglement generation.

  4. Application of FPGA technology for control of superconducting TESLA cavities in free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2006-10-01

    Contemporary fundamental research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other uses frequently methods basing on collision of high energy particles or penetration of matter with ultra-short electromagnetic waves. Kinetic energy of involved particles, considerably greater than GeV, is generated in accelerators of unique construction. The paper presents a digest of working principles of accelerators. There are characterized research methods which use accelerators. A method to stabilize the accelerating EM field in superconducting (SC) resonant cavity was presented. An example was given of usage of TESLA cavities in linear accelerator propelling the FLASH free electron laser (FEL) in DESY, Hamburg. Electronic and photonic control system was debated. The system bases on advanced FPGA circuits and cooperating fast DSP microprocessor chips. Examples of practical solutions were described. Test results of the debated systems in the real-time conditions were given.

  5. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  6. Observation of light emissions in superconducting cavities; Observation d`emissions lumineuses dans une cavite supraconductrice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruette, A.; Fouaidy, M.; Hammoudi, N.; Junquera, T.; Le Goff, A.; Lesrel, J.; Maissa, S. [Services Techniques, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    In order to investigate the light emissions associated to the electron emission in a superconducting RF cavity, an optical observation system is mounted on the `mushroom` cavity. After an intentional contamination of the cavity with alumina particles, stable luminous spots are observed around the contaminated area. (authors) 3 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Application of superconducting magnesium diboride (MGB2) in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teng

    The superconductivity in magnesium diboride (MgB2) was discovered in 2001. As a BCS superconductor, MgB2 has a record-high Tc of 39 K, high Jc of > 107 A/cm2 and no weak link behavior across the grain boundary. All these superior properties endorsed that MgB2 would have great potential in both power applications and electronic devices. In the past 15 years, MgB2 based power cables, microwave devices, and commercial MRI machines emerged and the next frontier are superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. SRF cavities are one of the leading accelerator technologies. In SRF cavities, applied microwave power generates electrical fields that accelerate particle beams. Compared with other accelerator techniques, SRF cavity accelerators feature low loss, high acceleration gradients and the ability to accelerate continuous particle beams. However, current SRF cavities are made from high-purity bulk niobium and work at 2 K in superfluid helium. The construction and operational cost of SRF cavity accelerators are very expensive. The demand for SRF cavity accelerators has been growing rapidly in the past decade. Therefore, a lot of effort has been devoted to the enhancement of the performance and the reduction of cost of SRF cavities. In 2010, an acceleration gradient of over 50 MV/m has been reported for a Nb-based SRF cavity. The magnetic field at the inner surface of such a cavity is ~ 1700 Oe, which is close to the thermodynamic critical field of Nb. Therefore, new materials and technologies are required to raise the acceleration gradient of future SRF cavity accelerators. Among all the proposed approaches, using MgB2 thin films to coat the inner surface of SRF cavities is one of the promising tactics with the potential to raise both the acceleration gradient and the operation temperature of SRF cavity accelerators. In this work, I present my study on MgB2 thin films for their application in SRF cavities. C-epitaxial MgB2 thin films grown on SiC(0001) substrates

  8. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben Carcagno et al.

    2003-10-20

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented.

  9. Study of Cavity Imperfection Impact on RF-Parameters and Multipole Components in a Superconducting RF-Dipole Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Olave, R G; Delayen, Jean Roger; De Silva, S U; Li, Z

    2014-01-01

    The ODU/SLAC superconducting rf-dipole cavity is under consideration for the crab-crossing system in the upcoming LHC luminosity upgrade. While the proposed cavity complies well within the rf-parameters and multipolar component restrictions for the LHC system, cavity imperfections arising from cavity fabrication, welding and frequency tuning may have a significant effect in these parameters. We report on an initial study of the impact of deviation from the ideal shape on the cavity’s performance in terms of rf-parameters and multipolar components.

  10. MEASUREMENT OF THE TRANSVERSE BEAM DYNAMICS IN A TESLA-TYPE SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Eddy, N. [Fermilab; Edstrom, D. [Fermilab; Lunin, A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Ruan, J. [Fermilab; Solyak, N. [Fermilab

    2016-09-26

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, ultra-stable, high-quality electron beams that have widespread applications in Science and Industry. Many project are based on the 1.3-GHz TESLA-type superconducting cavity. In this paper we provide an update on a recent experiment aimed at measuring the transfer matrix of a TESLA cavity at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The results are discussed and compared with analytical and numerical simulations.

  11. Introduction of DC line structures into a superconducting microwave 3D cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Wei-Cheng; Deng, Guang-Wei; Li, Shu-Xiao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guo-Ping, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230026, China and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-02-15

    We report a technique that can noninvasively add multiple DC wires into a 3D superconducting microwave cavity for electronic devices that require DC electrical terminals. We studied the influence of our DC lines on the cavity performance systematically. We found that the quality factor of the cavity is reduced if any of the components of the electrical wires cross the cavity equipotential planes. Using this technique, we were able to incorporate a quantum dot (QD) device into a 3D cavity. We then controlled and measured the QD transport signal using the DC lines. We have also studied the heating effects of the QD by the microwave photons in the cavity.

  12. Qualification of niobium materials for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications: View of a condensed matter physicist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S. B., E-mail: sbroy@rrcat.gov.in [Magnetic & Superconducting Materials Section, Materials & Advanced Accelerator Sciences Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Myneni, G. R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia (United States)

    2015-12-04

    We address the issue of qualifications of the niobium materials to be used for superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity fabrications, from the point of view of a condensed matter physicist/materials scientist. We focus on the particular materials properties of niobium required for the functioning a SCRF cavity, and how to optimize the same properties for the best SCRF cavity performance in a reproducible manner. In this way the niobium materials will not necessarily be characterized by their purity alone, but in terms of those materials properties, which will define the limit of the SCRF cavity performance and also other related material properties, which will help to sustain this best SCRF cavity performance. Furthermore we point out the need of standardization of the post fabrication processing of the niobium-SCRF cavities, which does not impair the optimized superconducting and thermal properties of the starting niobium-materials required for the reproducible performance of the SCRF cavities according to the design values.

  13. Multiphysics Analysis of Frequency Detuning in Superconducting RF Cavities for Proton Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awida, M. H. [Fermilab; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab; Sukanov, A. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2016-01-22

    Multiphysics analyses for superconducting cavities are essential in the course of cavity design to meet stringent requirements on cavity frequency detuning. Superconducting RF cavities are the core accelerating elements in modern particle accelerators whether it is proton or electron machine, as they offer extremely high quality factors thus reducing the RF losses per cavity. However, the superior quality factor comes with the challenge of controlling the resonance frequency of the cavity within few tens of hertz bandwidth. In this paper, we investigate how the multiphysics analysis plays a major role in proactively minimizing sources of frequency detuning, specifically; microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) in the stage of RF design of the cavity and mechanical design of the niobium shell and the helium vessel.

  14. Technical training: RF superconductivity and accelerator cavity applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training

    2016-01-01

    We are happy to announce a new training course organised by the TE-VSC group in the field of the physics and applications of superconductors. The course provides an overview and update of the theory of radiofrequency and superconductors:   RF Superconductivity and Accelerator Cavity Applications https://cern.ch/course/?164VAC19 One timetable only:  Tuesday, 8 March 2016: from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, 9 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 10 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Monday, 14 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Tuesday, 15 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Wednesday, 16 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 17 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Target audience: Experts in radiofrequency or solid state physics (PhD level). Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of quantum physics and superc...

  15. Development of superconducting crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dziuba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The crossbar-H-mode (CH structure is the first superconducting multicell drift tube cavity for the low and medium energy range operated in the H_{21} mode. Because of the large energy gain per cavity, which leads to high real estate gradients, it is an excellent candidate for the efficient acceleration in high power proton and ion accelerators with fixed velocity profile. A prototype cavity has been developed and tested successfully with a gradient of 7  MV/m. A few new superconducting CH cavities with improved geometries for different high power applications are under development at present. One cavity (f=325  MHz, β=0.16, seven cells is currently under construction and studied with respect to a possible upgrade option for the GSI UNILAC. Another cavity (f=217  MHz, β=0.059, 15 cells is designed for a cw operated energy variable heavy ion linac application. Furthermore, the EUROTRANS project (European research program for the transmutation of high level nuclear waste in an accelerator driven system, 600 MeV protons, 352 MHz is one of many possible applications for this kind of superconducting rf cavity. In this context a layout of the 17 MeV EUROTRANS injector containing four superconducting CH cavities was proposed by the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. The status of the cavity development related to the EUROTRANS injector is presented.

  16. One Innovation of Mechanical Polishing Apparatus for Surface Treatment of 6 GHz TESLA Superconducting Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Guo-long; A.A.Rossi; R.K.Thakur; V.Palmieri

    2013-01-01

    6 GHz spinning seamless superconducting radio frequency(SRF)cavities are a very useful tool for testing alternative surface treatments in the fabrication of TESLA cavity.However,the surface is damaged in internal part for the using of the collapsible mandrel during spinning.The first important step of the

  17. Generation of Entangled States of Multiple Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating the maximally entangled states of many superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classicalmicrowave pulses in cavity. In the scheme,the maximally entangled states can be generated without requiring the measurement and individual addressing of the SQUIDs.

  18. A coaxial HOM coupler for a superconducting RF cavity and its low-power measurement results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN An; TANG Ya-Zhe; ZHANG Li-Ping; LI Ying-Min; Han-Sung Kim

    2011-01-01

    A resonant buildup of beam-induced fields in a superconducting radio frequency(RF)cavity may make a beam unstable or a superconducting RF cavity quench. Higher-order mode(HOM)couplers are used for damping higher-order modes to avoid such a resonant buildup. A coaxial HOM coupler based on the TTF (TESLA Test Facility)HOM coupler has been designed for the superconducting RF cavities at the Proton Engineering Frontier Project(PEFP)in order to overcome notch frequency shift and feed-through tip melting issues. In order to confirm the HOM coupler design and finalize its structural dimensions, two prototype HOM couplers have been fabricated and tested. Low-power testing and measurement of the HOM couplers has shown that the HOM coupler has good filter properties and can fully meet the damping requirements of the PEFP low-beta superconducting RF linac.

  19. Design and development progress of a LLRF control system for a 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. S.; Kim, H. W.; Song, H. S.; Lee, J. H.; Park, K. H.; Yu, I. H.; Chai, J. S.

    2012-07-01

    The LLRF (low-level radio-frequency) control system which regulates the amplitude and the phase of the accelerating voltage inside a RF cavity is essential to ensure the stable operation of charged particle accelerators. Recent advances in digital signal processors and data acquisition systems have allowed the LLRF control system to be implemented in digitally and have made it possible to meet the higher demands associated with the performance of LLRF control systems, such as stability, accuracy, etc. For this reason, many accelerator laboratories have completed or are completing the developments of digital LLRF control systems. The digital LLRF control system has advantages related with flexibility and fast reconfiguration. This paper describes the design of the FPGA (field programmable gate array) based LLRF control system and the status of development for this system. The proposed LLRF control system includes an analog front-end, a digital board (ADC (analog to digital converter), DAC (digital to analog converter), FPGA, etc.) and a RF & clock generation system. The control algorithms will be implemented by using the VHDL (VHSIC (very high speed integrated circuits) hardware description language), and the EPICS (experiment physics and industrial control system) will be ported to the host computer for the communication. In addition, the purpose of this system is to control a 500 MHz RF cavity, so the system will be applied to the superconducting cavity to be installed in the PLS storage ring, and its performance will be tested.

  20. Operation of the 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity in RHIC during run 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-11

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). It is the first superconducting quarter wave resonator (QWR) operating in a high-energy storage ring. We discuss herein the cavity operation with Au+Au collisions, and with asymmetrical Au+He3 collisions. The cavity is a storage cavity, meaning that it becomes active only at the energy of experiment, after the acceleration cycle is completed. With the cavity at 300 kV, an improvement in luminosity was detected from direct measurements, and the bunch length has been reduced. The uniqueness of the QWR demands an innovative design of the higher order mode dampers with high-pass filters, and a distinctive fundamental mode damper that enables the cavity to be bypassed during the acceleration stage.

  1. Cryogenic Test of a Proof-of-Principle Superconducting RF-Dipole Deflecting and Crabbing Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2013-01-01

    Recent applications in need of compact low-frequency deflecting and crabbing cavities have initiated the design and development of new superconducting structures operating at high gradients with low losses. Previously, TM$_{110}$ -type deflecting and crabbing cavities were developed and have also been operated successfully. However, these geometries are not favorable designs for low operating frequencies. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is the first compact deflecting and crabbing geometry that has demonstrated high gradients and high shunt impedance. Since the fundamental operating mode is the lowest mode and is widely separated from the nearest higher order mode, the rf-dipole design is an attractive geometry for effective damping of the higher order modes in high current applications. A 400 MHz rf-dipole cavity was designed, fabricated, and tested as a proof-of-principle cavity. The cavity achieved high operating gradients, and the multipacting levels were easily processed and did not reoccur.

  2. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-04-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. (author). 3 refs.

  3. Great progress in developing 500 MHz single cell superconducting cavity in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting cavities have been adopted in many kinds of accelerator facilities such as synchrotron radiation light source, hard X-ray free electron laser linac, colliders and energy recovery linacs (ERL). The 500 MHz superconducting cavities will be a candidate to be installed in the high current accelerators and high current ERLs for their large beam aperture, low higher order modes impedance and high current threshold value. This paper presents great progress in the whole sequence of developing 500 MHz superconducting cavity in China. It describes the first in-house successful development of 500 MHz single cell superconducting cavity including the deep-drawing of niobium half cells, electron beam wielding of cavity, surface preparations and vertical testing. The highest accelerating gradient of the fabricated cavity #SCD-02 higher than 10 MV/m was obtained while the quality factor was better than 4×108 at 4.2 K, which has reached the world level of the same kind of cavities.

  4. Fast 704 MHz Ferroelectric Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-12

    The Omega-P SBIR project described in this Report has as its goal the development, test, and evaluation of a fast electrically-controlled L-band tuner for BNL Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the Electron Ion Collider (EIC) upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner, that employs an electrically-controlled ferroelectric component, is to allow fast compensation to cavity resonance changes. In ERLs, there are several factors which significantly affect the amount of power required from the wall-plug to provide the RF-power level necessary for the operation. When beam loading is small, the power requirements are determined by (i) ohmic losses in cavity walls, (ii) fluctuations in amplitude and/or phase for beam currents, and (iii) microphonics. These factors typically require a substantial change in the coupling between the cavity and the feeding line, which results in an intentional broadening of the cavity bandwidth, which in turn demands a significant amount of additional RF power. If beam loading is not small, there is a variety of beam-drive phase instabilities to be managed, and microphonics will still remain an issue, so there remain requirements for additional power. Moreover ERL performance is sensitive to changes in beam arrival time, since any such change is equivalent to phase instability with its vigorous demands for additional power. In this Report, we describe the new modular coaxial tuner, with specifications suitable for the 704 MHz ERL application. The device would allow changing the RF-coupling during the cavity filling process in order to effect significant RF power savings, and also will provide rapid compensation for beam imbalance and allow for fast stabilization against phase fluctuations caused by microphonics, beam-driven instabilities, etc. The tuner is predicted to allow a reduction of about ten times in the required power from the RF source, as compared to a compensation system

  5. Defect Detection in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity Surface Using C + + and OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Samantha; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) uses superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities to accelerate an electron beam. If theses cavities have a small particle or defect, it can degrade the performance of the cavity. The problem at hand is inspecting the cavity for defects, little bubbles of niobium on the surface of the cavity. Thousands of pictures have to be taken of a single cavity and then looked through to see how many defects were found. A C + + program with Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) was constructed to reduce the number of hours searching through the images and finds all the defects. Using this code, the SRF group is now able to use the code to identify defects in on-going tests of SRF cavities. Real time detection is the next step so that instead of taking pictures when looking at the cavity, the camera will detect all the defects.

  6. Development of the superconducting 3.9-GHz accelerating cavity at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkan, T.; Bauer, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Boffo, C.; Borissov, E.; Carter, H.; Edwards, H.; Foley, M.; Gonin, I.; Khabibouline, T.; Mishra, S.; Mitchell, D.; Polubotko, V.; Rowe, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    A superconducting third harmonic 3.9 GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam quality in the TTF-like photoinjector [1]. Fermilab has developed, built and tested several prototypes, including two copper 9-cell cavities, one niobium 3-cell cavity, and one 9-cell cavity. The helium vessel and frequency tuner for the 9-cell cavity was built and tested as well. In cold tests, we achieved a peak surface magnetic field of {approx}100mT, well above the 70mT specification. The accelerating gradient was likely limited by thermal breakdown. Studies of the higher order modes in the cavity revealed that the existing cavity design with two HOM couplers will provide sufficient damping of these modes. In this paper we discuss the cavity design, results of the studies and plans for further development.

  7. Autonomously stabilized entanglement between two superconducting quantum bits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, S; Hatridge, M; Leghtas, Z; Sliwa, K M; Narla, A; Vool, U; Girvin, S M; Frunzio, L; Mirrahimi, M; Devoret, M H

    2013-12-19

    Quantum error correction codes are designed to protect an arbitrary state of a multi-qubit register from decoherence-induced errors, but their implementation is an outstanding challenge in the development of large-scale quantum computers. The first step is to stabilize a non-equilibrium state of a simple quantum system, such as a quantum bit (qubit) or a cavity mode, in the presence of decoherence. This has recently been accomplished using measurement-based feedback schemes. The next step is to prepare and stabilize a state of a composite system. Here we demonstrate the stabilization of an entangled Bell state of a quantum register of two superconducting qubits for an arbitrary time. Our result is achieved using an autonomous feedback scheme that combines continuous drives along with a specifically engineered coupling between the two-qubit register and a dissipative reservoir. Similar autonomous feedback techniques have been used for qubit reset, single-qubit state stabilization, and the creation and stabilization of states of multipartite quantum systems. Unlike conventional, measurement-based schemes, the autonomous approach uses engineered dissipation to counteract decoherence, obviating the need for a complicated external feedback loop to correct errors. Instead, the feedback loop is built into the Hamiltonian such that the steady state of the system in the presence of drives and dissipation is a Bell state, an essential building block for quantum information processing. Such autonomous schemes, which are broadly applicable to a variety of physical systems, as demonstrated by the accompanying paper on trapped ion qubits, will be an essential tool for the implementation of quantum error correction.

  8. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-01

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  9. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan)

    2014-01-29

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  10. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  11. Analysis of HOM Properties of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications due to improved properties and compact design geometries. The 499 MHz deflecting cavity proposed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and the 400 MHz crab cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade are two of the major applications. For high current applications the higher order modes must be damped to acceptable levels to eliminate any beam instabilities. The frequencies and R/Q of the HOMs and mode separation are evaluated and compared for different parallel-bar cavity designs.

  12. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Robert

    2008-03-11

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  13. The Rise of Ingot Niobium as a Material for Superconducting Radiofrequency Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kneisel, P; Dhakal, P; Saito, K; Singer, W; Singer, X; Myneni, G R

    2013-01-01

    As a result of a collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer CBMM, ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This pioneering work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large grain niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this material. Most of the original expectations for this material of being less costly and allowing less expensive fabrication and treatment procedures at the same performance levels in cavities have been met. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown the performances comparable to the best cavities made from...

  14. Development of Infrastructure Facilities for Superconducting RF Cavity Fabrication, Processing and 2 K Characterization at RRCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S. C.; Raghavendra, S.; Jain, V. K.; Puntambekar, A.; Khare, P.; Dwivedi, J.; Mundra, G.; Kush, P. K.; Shrivastava, P.; Lad, M.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-02-01

    An extensive infrastructure facility is being established at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) for a proposed 1 GeV, high intensity superconducting proton linac for Indian Spallation Neutron Source. The proton linac will comprise of a large number of superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities ranging from low beta spoke resonators to medium and high beta multi-cell elliptical cavities at different RF frequencies. Infrastructure facilities for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and performance characterization at 2 K are setup to take-up manufacturing of large number of cavities required for future projects of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). RRCAT is also participating in a DAE’s approved mega project on “Physics and Advanced technology for High intensity Proton Accelerators” under Indian Institutions-Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC). In the R&D phase of IIFC program, a number of high beta, fully dressed multi-cell elliptical SCRF cavities will be developed in collaboration with Fermilab. A dedicated facility for SCRF cavity fabrication, tuning and processing is set up. SCRF cavities developed will be characterized at 2K using a vertical test stand facility, which is already commissioned. A Horizontal Test Stand facility has also been designed and under development for testing a dressed multi-cell SCRF cavity at 2K. The paper presents the infrastructure facilities setup at RRCAT for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and testing at 2K.

  15. Ultimate Gradient Limitation in Niobium Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The present study is addressed to the theoretical description of the ultimate gradient limitation in SRF cavities. Our intent is to exploit experimental data to confirm models which provide feed-backs on how to improve the current state-of-art. New theoretical insight on the cavities limiting factor can be suitable to improve the quench field of N-doped cavities, and therefore to take advantage of high Q0 at high gradients.

  16. Ultimate Gradient Limitation in Niobium Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [IIT, Chicago; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Martinello, Martina [Fermilab; Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Zasadzinski, John [IIT, Chicago (main)

    2016-06-01

    The present study is addressed to the theoretical description of the ultimate gradient limitation in SRF cavities. Our intent is to exploit experimental data to confirm models which provide feed-backs on how to improve the current state-of-art. New theoretical insight on the cavities limiting factor can be suitable to improve the quench field of N-doped cavities, and therefore to take advantage of high Q0 at high gradients.

  17. Higher Order Mode Properties of Superconducting Two-Spoke Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, C. S.; Delayen, J. R.; Olave, R. G.

    2011-07-01

    Multi-Spoke cavities lack the cylindrical symmetry that many other cavity types have, which leads to a more complex Higher Order Mode (HOM) spectrum. In addition, spoke cavities offer a large velocity acceptance which means we must perform a detailed analysis of the particle velocity dependence for each mode's R/Q. We present here a study of the HOM properties of two-spoke cavities designed for high-velocity applications. Frequencies, R/Q and field profiles of HOMs have been calculated and are reported.

  18. On active disturbance rejection based control design for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, John; Morris, Dan; Usher, Nathan; Gao, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Shen; Nicoletti, Achille; Zheng, Qinling

    2011-07-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are key components of modern linear particle accelerators. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is building a 3 MeV/u re-accelerator (ReA3) using SRF cavities. Lightly loaded SRF cavities have very small bandwidths (high Q) making them very sensitive to mechanical perturbations whether external or self-induced. Additionally, some cavity types exhibit mechanical responses to perturbations that lead to high-order non-stationary transfer functions resulting in very complex control problems. A control system that can adapt to the changing perturbing conditions and transfer functions of these systems would be ideal. This paper describes the application of a control technique known as "Active Disturbance Rejection Control" (ARDC) to this problem.

  19. Coupling erbium spins to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity at zero magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Longdell, Jevon J

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the coupling of an erbium doped crystal to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity of a $10^5$ $Q$-factor at zero magnetic field. A tunable loop-gap resonator is used to match the cavity frequency to the hyperfine transitions of an erbium sample. The observed spectrum differs from what predicted by the published spin Hamiltonian parameters. The narrow cavity linewidth also enables the observations of asymmetric lineshapes of these hyperfine transitions, which are understood as the super-hyperfine interactions between the erbium ions and their adjacent yttrium ions. Such a broadly tunable superconducting cavity architecture, from 1.6 GHz to 4.0 GHz in the current design, is promising in building hybrid quantum systems.

  20. On the Field Dependent Surface Resistance Observed in Superconducting Niobium Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative description is presented of the non-linear current-voltage response in superconducting niobium cavities for accelerator application. It is based on a fit for a large sample of data from cavity tests of different kind. Trial functions for the surface resistance describing this non-linear relation are established by a least square data fit. Those trial functions yielding the best fit are quantitatively explained by basic physics.

  1. Quantum search via superconducting quantum interference devices in a cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yan; Dong Ping; Xue Zheng-Yuan; Cao Zhuo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for implementing the Grover search algorithm with two superconducing quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a cavity. Our scheme only requires single resonant interaction of the SQUID-cavity system and the required interaction time is very short. The simplicity of the process and the reduction of the interaction time are important for restraining decoherence.

  2. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  3. Design, prototyping and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Binping; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdú-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    A novel design of superconducting Crab Cavity was proposed and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new cavity shape is a Double Quarter Wave or DQWCC. After fabrication and surface treatments, the niobium proof-of-principle cavity was cryogenically tested in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also well matched for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the requirement for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC of 3.34 MV. In this paper we present the design, prototyping and test results of the DQWCC.

  4. Gain and Efficiency of a Superconducting Microwave Compressor with a Switching Cavity in an Interference Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, S. N.; Samoylenko, G. M.

    2016-11-01

    We study the processes of radiation output from a microwave storage cavity through a superconducting interference switch, which is based on a H-junction with a superconducting switching cavity connected to the side branch of the junction for various ways of controlling the parameters of the switching cavity. It is shown that efficient control over radiation output in such a switch can be achieved by varying the resonance frequency or Q-factor of the switching cavity, as well as by varying these parameters simultaneously. It is found that in the case of controlling the resonance frequency of the switching cavity, there exists an optimal interval of the frequency variation, within which the total efficiency and extraction efficiency are maximum. When the Q-factor of the switching cavity changes, the dependence of the total efficiency and extraction efficiency on the Q-factor has the monotonic character. The mixed regime of radiation output control is also studied. The envelopes of the output compressor pulses are plotted on the basis of recurrent relationships between the amplitudes of the waves in the system for three regimes of switch operation. It is shown that pulses with an almost rectangular shape of the envelope can be formed in the regime of controlling the switching cavity by varying the Q-factor. An example of possible realization of the switching cavity is considered.

  5. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chet Nieter

    2010-12-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  6. Wakefield calculation for superconducting TM110 cavity without azimuthal symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab; Burt, Graeme; /Lancaster U.

    2006-08-01

    The 3.9GHz TM{sub 110} mode deflecting cavity developed at FNAL has many applications, including use as a longitudinal bunch profile diagnostic, and as a crab cavity candidate for the ILC. These applications involve beams with substantial time structure. For the 13-cell version intended for the bunch profile application, long-range wakes have been evaluated in the frequency domain and short-range wakes have been evaluated in the time domain. Higher-order interactions of the main field in the cavity with the beam have also been parameterized. Pedagogic derivations are included as appendices.

  7. The secondary electron emission coefficient of the material for the superconducting cavity input coupler

    CERN Document Server

    Kijima, Y; Furuya, T; Michizono, S I; Mitsunobu, S; Noer, R J

    2002-01-01

    The secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficients have been measured, for materials used in the coupler for KEKB superconducting cavities, i.e. Copper, Stainless steel plated with Copper, Niobium and Ceramic. We show that the electron bombardment is effective in decreasing the SEE coefficient of the metal surfaces, and the TiN coating and window fabrication processes influence the secondary electron yield. (author)

  8. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion Linac.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-11-18

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2< v/c <0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of light ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive beam facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed.

  9. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K W; Kedzie, M; Delayen, J R; Piller, C

    1998-08-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed.

  10. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  11. Comparison of high order modes damping techniques for 800 MHz single cell superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Shashkov, Ya V; Zobov, M M

    2014-01-01

    Currently, applications of 800 MHz harmonic cavities in both bunch lengthening and shortening regimes are under consideration and discussion in the framework of the High Luminosity LHC project. In this paper we study electromagnetic characteristics of high order modes (HOM) for a single cell 800 MHz superconducting cavity and arrays of such cavities connected by drifts tubes. Different techniques for the HOM damping such as beam pipe grooves, coaxial-notch loads, fluted beam pipes etc. are investigated and compared. The influence of the sizes and geometry of the drift tubes on the HOM damping is analyzed.

  12. Investigation on the fabrication of the 3rd harmonic superconducting cavity for the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhen-Yu; MA Guang-Ming; YU Hai-Bo; MAO Dong-Qing; FENG Zi-Qiang; HOU Hong-Tao; LIU Jian-Fei

    2009-01-01

    A third harmonic superconducting niobium cavity has been proposed for installation in the Shang-hai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring to improve the Touschek lifetime. In order to investigate the feasibility of the superconducting cavity fabrication indigenously and the possibility to master the fabrica-tion techniques, cavities were fabricated from copper and niobium sheets by deep drawing and electron-beam welding, and a series of measurements, such as resonant frequency, shape dimensions and wall thickness, were carried out during this process. After analysis of various problems existing in the fabrication process, tech-nique improvements were proposed, and finally the precise shape as designed and resonant frequency within 1.2 MHz were achieved for the new completed cavities. In addition, full annealing was finally proved to be a good cure for niobium sheets' tearing up during deep drawing. By fabricating niobium cavities successfully, some problems to the next step were cleared. This paper introduces the process of cavity fabrication and its technique improvements towards forming, and the initial vertical test result of niobium cavity is also presented.

  13. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, P., E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Saito, K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Singer, W.; Singer, X. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Myneni, G.R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of E{sub acc}=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  14. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  15. Coupling erbium spins to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity at zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Fernandez-Gonzalvo, Xavier; Longdell, Jevon J.

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the coupling at zero magnetic field of an isotopically pure erbium-doped yttrium orthosilicate crystal (167Er:YSO ) to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity with a Q factor of 105. A tunable loop-gap resonator is used and its resonance frequency is tuned to observe the hyperfine transitions of the erbium sample. The observed spectrum differs from what is predicted by the published spin Hamiltonian parameters. The narrow cavity linewidth also enables the observation of asymmetric line shapes for these hyperfine transitions. Such a broadly tunable superconducting cavity (from 1.6 to 4.0 GHz in the current design) is a promising device for building hybrid quantum systems.

  16. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  17. Nanostructural features affecting superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed using TEM and EELS

    CERN Document Server

    Trenikhina, Y; Kwon, J; Zuo, J -M; Zasadzinski, J F

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ~100nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120C bake.

  18. Pulsed, High Power Microwave Processing of Field Emission in Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I.E. Campisi

    1992-08-03

    The phenomenon of field emission is very well known: electrons are extracted from within the solid state potential well of a metal and are emitted from the metal's surface under the presence of an accelerating potential. In many accelerators, electromagnetic energy is delivered to charged particles by means of microwave cavities excited in modes with electric field components aligned along the particles trajectory. If the mode used is of the TM type (most accelerators operate in the TM{sub 010} mode), then a surface electric field inside the cavities exists which can produce field emitted electrons when allowed by the phase of the fields. These field emitted currents can cause considerable current loading and bremsstrahlung radiation in normal conducting cavities (mostly copper), but in superconducting cavities they have the additional effect of locally heating the superconducting material above its transition temperature and causing performance degradation of the cavities and eventually quenches (transition to the normal conducting state). At present this phenomenon constitutes the limiting factor in superconducting cavity performance, and is receiving a great deal of attention. Several diagnostic methods have been developed to detect, locate and characterize the sources of field-emitted electrons. Methods have also been proposed and tested which decrease the incidence of field emission sites on metal surfaces, but the most effective method to date requires high temperature firing of the superconducting structures in an ultra high vacuum. This can be done only if the cavities are completely removed from their cryostat, a lengthy and costly process. In this paper the properties and advantages are examined of a different method for field emission processing, which does not require a cavity disassembly and which can be performed in situ. The method described makes use of short, high peak power RF pulses to reach high electric fields for a short time. At the same

  19. Multipacting phenomenon at high electric fields of superconducting cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Feng; D.Proch; Hao Jian-Kui

    2005-01-01

    Recently multipacting(MP) recalculation of the TeV Energy Superconductiong Linear Accelerator (TESLA)resonator was performed. In addition to the normal MP which occurs at a peak electric field of around 40MV/m for the TESLA cavity, another type of multipacting with resonant electron trajectory that is far from the equator is also seen.It occurs at a gradient around 60MV/m to 70MV/m. This result seems to explain some experimental observations.

  20. Microscopic Investigation of Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2017-08-04

    Our overall goal is to contribute to the understanding of defects that limit the high accelerating gradient performance of Nb SRF cavities. Our approach is to develop a microscopic connection between materials defects and SRF performance. We developed a near-field microwave microscope to establish this connection. The microscope is based on magnetic hard drive write heads, which are designed to create very strong rf magnetic fields in very small volumes on a surface.

  1. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  2. Application of International Linear Collider superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on π-mode to provide a maximum accelerating gradient. A significant research and development effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its rf system which resulted in excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above ∼1.2  GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for β_{G}=0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H^{-} from ∼420  MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new β_{G}=0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9π-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  3. Field Stabilization of Alvarez-Type Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Xiaonan; Mickat, Sascha; Seibel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Alvarez-type cavities are commonly used to reliably accelerate high quality hadron beams. Optimization of their longitudinal field homogeneity is usually accomplished by post-couplers, i.e. additional rods being integrated into the cavity. This paper instead proposes to use the stems that keep the drift tubes for that purpose. As their individual azimuthal orientations do not change the cavity's undisturbed operational mode, they comprise a set of free parameters that can be used to modify higher mode field patterns. The latter have significant impact on the robustness of the operational mode w.r.t. eventual perturbations. Several optimized stem configurations are presented and benchmarked against each other. The path to obtain these configurations is paved analytically and worked out in detail through simulations. It is shown that the method provides for flat field distributions and very low field tilt sensitivities without insertion of post-couplers.

  4. Design and simulation of a new type of 500 MHz single-cell superconducting RF cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chang-Wang; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; ZHENG Xiang; WEI Ye-Long; YU Hai-Bo; LI Zheng; XU Kai; LIU Jian-Fei; HOU Hong-Tao; MA Zhen-Yu; MAO Dong-Qing; FENG Zi-Qiang; ZHAO Shen-Jie; LUO Chen; ZHAO Yu-Bin

    2012-01-01

    This paper illustrates the design and simulation of a unique 500 MHz single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a fluted beam pipe and a coaxial-type fundamental power coupler.The simulation results show that the cavity has a high r/Q value,a low peak surface field and a large beam aperture,so it can be a candidate cavity for high current accelerators.With the help of a fluted beam tube,almost all the higher order modes can propagate out of the cavity,especially the first two dipole modes,TE111 and TM110,and the first higher monopole mode,TM011.The external quality factor of the coaxial fundamental power coupler is optimized to 1.2× 105,which will be useful when it is applied in the light source storage ring.

  5. Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities: fabrication, results, properties, and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, S.; Hall, D. L.

    2017-03-01

    A microns-thick film of Nb3Sn on the inner surface of a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity has been demonstrated to substantially improve cryogenic efficiency compared to the standard niobium material, and its predicted superheating field is approximately twice as high. We review in detail the advantages of Nb3Sn coatings for SRF cavities. We describe the vapor diffusion process used to fabricate this material in the most successful experiments, and we compare the differences in the process used at different labs. We overview results of Nb3Sn SRF coatings, including CW and pulsed measurements of cavities as well as microscopic measurements. We discuss special considerations that must be practised when using Nb3Sn cavities in applications. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the state-of-the-art and describing the outlook for this alternative SRF material.

  6. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  7. Stability analysis for bad cavity lasers with inhomogeneously broadened gain

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Georgy A

    2016-01-01

    Bad cavity lasers are experiencing renewed interest in the context of active optical frequency standards, due to their enhanced robustness against fluctuations of the laser cavity. The gain medium would consist of narrow-linewidth atoms, either trapped inside the cavity or intersecting the cavity mode dynamically. A finite velocity distribution, atomic interactions, or interactions of realistic multilevel atoms with external field leads to an inhomogeneous broadening of the atomic gain profile. This can bring the bad cavity laser to operate in unstable regimes characterized by complex temporal patterns of the field amplitude. We present a new and efficient method for the stability analysis of bad cavity lasers with inhomogeneously broadened gain. We apply this method to identify the steady-state solutions for the metrology-relevant case of spin-1/2 atoms interacting with an external magnetic field.

  8. A new 2 Kelvin Superconducting Half-Wave Cavity Cryomodule for PIP-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Z. A.; Barcikowski, A.; Cherry, G. L.; Fischer, R. L.; Gerbick, S. M.; Jansma, W. G.; Kedzie, M. J.; Kelly, M. P.; Kim, S.-h.; Lebedev, V. A.; MacDonald, S. W. T.; Nicol, T. H.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Reid, T. C.; Shepard, K. W.; White, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed and is implementing a novel 2 K superconducting cavity cryomodule operating at 162.5 MHz. This cryomodule is designed for the acceleration of 2 mA H-/proton beams from 2.1 to 10 MeV as part of the Fermilab Proton Improvement Project-II (PIP-II). This work is an evolution of techniques recently implemented in two previous heavy-ion accelerator cryomodules now operating at Argonne National Laboratory. The 2 K cryomodule is comprised of 8 half-wave cavities operated in the continuous wave mode with 8 superconducting magnets, one in front of each cavity. All of the solenoids and cavities operate off of a single gravity fed 2 K helium cryogenic system expected to provide up to 50 W of 2 K cooling. Here we review the mechanical design of the cavities and cryomodule which were developed using methods similar to those required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This will include an overview of the cryomodule layout, the alignment of the accelerator components via modifications of the cryomodule vacuum vessel and provide a status report on the cryomodule assembly.

  9. Superconducting, energy variable heavy ion linac with constant β, multicell cavities of CH-type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Minaev

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An energy variable ion linac consisting of multigap, constant-β cavities was developed. The effect of phase sliding, unavoidable in any constant-β section, is leading to a coherent rf phase motion, which fits well to the H-type structures with their long π-mode sections and separated lenses. The exact periodicity of the cell lengths within each cavity results in technical advantages, such as higher calculation accuracy when only one single period can be simulated, simpler manufacturing, and tuning. This is most important in the case of superconducting cavities. By using this concept, an improved design for a 217 MHz cw superconducting heavy ion linac with energy variation has been worked out. The small output energy spread of ±3  AkeV is provided over the whole range of energy variation from 3.5 to 7.3 AMeV. These capabilities would allow for a competitive research in the field of radiochemistry and for a production of super heavy elements (SHE, especially. A first 19-cell cavity of that type was designed, built, and rf tested successfully at the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. A 325.224 MHz, seven-cell cavity with constant β=0.16 is under development and will be operated in a frequency controlled mode. It will be equipped with a power coupler and beam tests with Unilac beams at GSI are foreseen.

  10. A technique for monitoring fast tuner piezoactuator preload forces for superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Branlard, J.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Edwards, H.; Orris, D.; Makulski, A.; McGee, M.; Nehring, R.; Poloubotko, V.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technology for mechanically compensating Lorentz Force detuning in superconducting RF cavities has already been developed at DESY. One technique is based on commercial piezoelectric actuators and was successfully demonstrated on TESLA cavities [1]. Piezo actuators for fast tuners can operate in a frequency range up to several kHz; however, it is very important to maintain a constant static force (preload) on the piezo actuator in the range of 10 to 50% of its specified blocking force. Determining the preload force during cool-down, warm-up, or re-tuning of the cavity is difficult without instrumentation, and exceeding the specified range can permanently damage the piezo stack. A technique based on strain gauge technology for superconducting magnets has been applied to fast tuners for monitoring the preload on the piezoelectric assembly. The design and testing of piezo actuator preload sensor technology is discussed. Results from measurements of preload sensors installed on the tuner of the Capture Cavity II (CCII)[2] tested at FNAL are presented. These results include measurements during cool-down, warmup, and cavity tuning along with dynamic Lorentz force compensation.

  11. Coherent-state storage and retrieval between superconducting cavities using parametric frequency conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirois, A. J. [National Institute of Standard and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); University of Colorado - Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; DeFeo, M. P.; Ranzani, L.; Lecocq, F.; Simmonds, R. W.; Teufel, J. D.; Aumentado, J. [National Institute of Standard and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    In superconducting quantum information, machined aluminum superconducting cavities have proven to be a well-controlled, low-dissipation electromagnetic environment for quantum circuits such as qubits. They can possess large internal quality factors, Q{sub int} > 10{sup 8}, and present the possibility of storing quantum information for times far exceeding those of microfabricated circuits. However, in order to be useful as a storage element, these cavities require a fast “read/write” mechanism—in other words, they require tunable coupling between other systems of interest such as other cavity modes and qubits, as well as any associated readout hardware. In this work, we demonstrate these qualities in a simple dual cavity architecture in which a low-Q “readout” mode is parametrically coupled to a high-Q “storage” mode, allowing us to store and retrieve classical information. Specifically, we employ a flux-driven Josephson junction-based coupling scheme to controllably swap coherent states between two cavities, demonstrating full, sequenced control over the coupling rates between modes.

  12. Quantum Gate Operations in Decoherence-Free Subspace with Superconducting Charge Qubits inside a Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi-Min; ZHOU Yan-Li; LIANG Lin-Mei; LI Cheng-Zu

    2009-01-01

    We propose a feasible scheme to achieve universal quantum gate operations in decoherence-free subspace with superconducting charge qubits placed in a microwave cavity.Single-logic-qubit gates can be realized with cavity assisted interaction, which possesses the advantages of unconventional geometric gate operation.The two-logic-qubit controlled-phase gate between subsystems can be constructed with the help of a variable electrostatic transformer, The collective decoherence can be successfully avoided in our well-designed system.Moreover, GHZ state for logical qubits can also be easily produced in this system.

  13. SQUID based cryogenic current comparator for measurements of the dark current of superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W.; Nietzsche, S.; Neubert, R.; Nawrodt, R. [Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany); Peters, A. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Knaack, K.; Wendt, M.; Wittenburg, K. [DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The linear accelerator technology, based on super-conducting L-band (1.3 GHz) is currently under study at DESY (Hamburg, Germany). The two 10 km long main Linacs will be equipped with a total of nearly 20.000 cavities. The dark current due to the emission of electrons in these high gradient field super-conducting cavities is an unwanted particle source. A newly high performance SQUID based measurement system for detecting dark currents is proposed. It makes use of the Cryogenic Current Comparator principle and senses dark currents in the pA range with a measurement bandwidth of up to 70 kHz. The use of a cryogenic current comparator as dark current sensor has some important advantages: -) the measurement of the absolute value of the dark current, -) the non-dependence on the electron trajectories, -) the accurate absolute calibration with an additional wire loop, and -) extremely high resolution.

  14. Modifications of Superconducting Properties of Niobium Caused by Nitrogen Doping Recipes for High Q Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, Alexander [Fermilab; Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee [U. Chicago (main); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    A study is presented on the superconducting properties of niobium used for the fabrication of the SRF cavities after treating by recently discovered nitrogen doping methods. Cylindrical niobium samples have been subjected to the standard surface treatments applied to the cavities (electro-polishing, l 20°C bake) and compared with samples treated by additional nitrogen doping recipes routinely used to reach ultra-high quality factor values (>3· 1010 at 2 K, 16 MV/m). The DC magnetization curves and the complex magnetic AC susceptibility have been measured. Evidence for the lowered field of first flux penetration after nitrogen doping is found suggesting a correlation with the lowered quench fields. Superconducting critical temperatures Tc = 9.25 K are found to be in agreement with previous measurements, and no strong effect on the critical surface field (Bd) from nitrogen doping was found.

  15. Development of superconducting Klystron cavity for the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liccardo, Vincenzo; de França, Enrique Klai

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting reentrant cavities can be used in parametric transducers for Gravitational Wave antennas. The Mario Schenberg detector, which is being built by the GRAVITON group at Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), basically consists of a resonant mass (ball) and a set of parametric transducers in order to monitor the fundamental modes of vibration. When coupled to the antenna, the transducer-sphere system will work as a mass-spring system. In this work the main task is the development of parametric transducers consisting of reentrant superconducting cavity with high performance to be implemented in the Mario Schenberg detector. Many geometries, materials and designs have been tested and compared to optimize parameters such as electric and mechanical Q-factor. The aim is the construction of a complete set of nine parametric transducers that, attached to the spherical antenna, will possibly reach the sensitivity $h$ $\\sim$ 10$^{-22}$ $Hz$$^{-1/2}$ in the near future.

  16. Isogeometric Simulation of Lorentz Detuning in Superconducting Accelerator Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Corno, Jacopo; De Gersem, Herbert; Schöps, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Cavities in linear accelerators suffer from eigenfrequency shifts due to mechanical deformation caused by the electromagnetic radiation pressure, a phenomenon known as Lorentz detuning. Estimating the frequency shift up to the needed accuracy by means of standard Finite Element Methods, is a complex task due to the non exact representation of the geometry and due to the necessity for mesh refinement when using low order basis functions. In this paper, we use Isogeometric Analysis for discretising both mechanical deformations and electromagnetic fields in a coupled multiphysics simulation approach. The combined high-order approximation of both leads to high accuracies at a substantially lower computational cost.

  17. Influence of a superconducting lead on orbital entanglement production in chaotic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Perez, Sergio [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Novaes, Marcel, E-mail: sergio.rodriguez@ect.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-10-15

    We study orbital entanglement production in a chaotic cavity connected to four single-channel normal metal leads and one superconducting lead, assuming the presence of time-reversal symmetry and within a random matrix theory approach. The scattered state of two incident electrons is written as the superposition of several two-outgoing quasi-particle components, four of which are orbitally entangled in a left-right bipartition. We calculate numerically the mean value of the squared norm of each entangled component, as functions of the number of channels in the superconducting lead. Its behavior is explained as resulting from the proximity effect. We also study statistically the amount of entanglement carried by each pair of outgoing quasi-particles. When the influence of the superconductor is more intense, the device works as an entangler of electron-hole pairs, and the average entanglement is found to be considerably larger than that obtained without the superconducting lead. (author)

  18. Development of the superconducting rf 2-cell cavity for cERL injector at KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Noguchi, S.; Kako, E.; Umemori, K.; Shishido, T.

    2013-06-01

    An injector cryomodule for the compact energy recovery linac (cERL) is under development at KEK. This injector cryomodule has 3 L-band 2-cell superconducting rf cavities. The cERL is required to accelerate a 10-mA CW electron beam to 5 MeV. The required accelerating gradient per cavity is 7.5-12.5 MV/m at ˜30 kW input power to the cavity and the beam. The operational frequency is 1300 MHz at 2 K and the mode of operation is CW. In this application, the critical hardware components are not the cavities, but the rf input couplers and higher-order-mode (HOM) dampers. Initially, a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler was chosen for HOM damping of the injector cavities. However, this HOM coupler had a heating problem at low gradients (a few MV/m) in CW operation. The components heated in the accelerating mode were the HOM body and the feedthrough that extracts HOM power from the cavity. To control the heating problem, a new HOM coupler was designed based on a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler, and the feedthrough was also modified based on a Kyocera N-R type connector to have better thermal conductivity. A prototype 2-cell cavity and 3 other 2-cell cavities with 5 new HOM couplers for actual operation were fabricated through May 2011. Vertical tests of these cavities were carried out after standard surface preparation at the KEK Superconducting Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-STF) through March 2012. The accelerating gradient achieved exceeded 50 MV/m without quenching during the vertical test using the prototype 2-cell cavity and feedthroughs. The magnetic field at the cell equator was 2127 Oe. Three 2-cell cavities passing the criteria of the High Pressure Gas Safety Institute of Japan exceeded 25 MV/m without field emissions. The cavities with the best performance were prepared in March 2012 for the cERL injector. The designs of the HOM couplers and feedthroughs and the results of the vertical tests to evaluate their performance are reported here.

  19. Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Coatings for Large Scale Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namhoon; Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Wolak, Matthaeus; Xi, Xiaoxing

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered to be a great candidate for next generation superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities due to its higher critical temperature Tc (40 K) and increased thermodynamic critical field Hc compared to other conventional superconductors. These properties significantly reduce the BCS surface resistance (RsBCS)and residual resistance (Rres) according to theoretical studies and suggest the possibility of an enhanced accelerating field (Eacc) . We have investigated the possibility of coating the inner surface of a 3 GHz SRF cavity with MgB2 by using a hybrid physical-vapor deposition (HPCVD) system which was modified for this purpose. To simulate a real 3 GHz SRF cavity, a stainless steel mock cavity has been employed for the study. The film quality was characterized on small substrates that were placed at selected locations within the cavity. MgB2 films on stainless steel foils, niobium pieces and SiC substrates showed transition temperatures of above 36 K. Dielectric resonance measurements resulted in promising Q values as obtained for the MgB2 films grown on the various substrates. By employing the HPCVD technique, a uniform film was achieved across the cavity interior, demonstrating the feasibility of HPCVD for MgB2 coatings for SRF cavities.

  20. Niobium Coatings for the HIE-ISOLDE QWR Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jecklin, N; Delaup, B; Ferreira, L; Mondino, I; Sublet, A; Therasse, M; Venturini Desolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy at ISOLDE) project is the upgrade of the existing ISOLDE (Isotope Separator On Line DEvice) facility at CERN, which is dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics experiments. A new linear accelerator made of 20 ȕ=10.3% and 12 ȕ=6.3% quarter-wave resonators (QWR) superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities at 101 MHz will be built, and in a first phase two cryomodules of 5 high-ȕ cavities each are scheduled to accelerate first beams in 2015. The cavities are made of a copper substrate, with a sputter-coated superconductive niobium (Nb) layer, operated at 4.5 K with an accelerating field of 6 MV/m at 10W Radio-Frequency (RF) losses (Q=4.5· 108). In this paper we will discuss the baseline surface treatment and coating procedure which allows obtaining the required performance, as well as the steps undertaken in order to prepare series production of the required number of cavities guaranteeing their quality and functional...

  1. Progress on the Development of a Superconducting Connection for Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel, Gianluigi Ciovati, Jacek Sekutowicz ,Larry Turlington

    2009-06-01

    The availability of a superconducting connection between adjacent niobium radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the capability to carry up to 30 mT of the magnetic flux would be particularly of great benefit to layouts of long accelerators like the International Linear Collider (ILC). It would shorten the distances between structures and therefore the total length of an accelerator with the associated cost reductions. In addition, the superconducting connection would be ideal for a superstructure – two multi-cell cavities connected through a half wavelength long beam pipe providing the coupling. Two single-cell niobium cavities have been designed with Nb-1Zr flanges welded to one of the irises to allow a connection between them with a niobium gasket. A transition to the normal-conducting state of the connection due to the applied RF field causes a reduction of the cavities’ quality factor. The cavity design will be presented in this contribution along with possible choices of materials for the joint.

  2. Analysis and Measurement of the Transfer Matrix of a 9-cell 1.3-GHz Superconducting Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Fermilab; Eddy, N. [Fermilab; Edstrom, D. [Fermilab; Harms, E. [Fermilab; Lunin, A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Romanov, A. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab; Solyak, N. [Fermilab; Shiltsev, V. [Fermilab

    2017-01-27

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, stable, high-quality electron beams that have found widespread applications in science and industry. The 9-cell 1.3-GHz superconducting standing-wave accelerating RF cavity originally developed for $e^+/e^-$ linear-collider applications [B. Aunes, {\\em et al.} Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams {\\bf 3}, 092001 (2000)] has been broadly employed in various superconducting-linac designs. In this paper we discuss the transfer matrix of such a cavity and present its measurement performed at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The experimental results are found to be in agreement with analytical calculations and numerical simulations.

  3. Studies of the superconducting traveling wave cavity for high gradient LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P

    2015-01-01

    Use of a traveling wave (TW) accelerating structure with a small phase advance per cell instead of standing wave may provide a significant increase of accelerating gradient in a superconducting linear accelerator. The TW section achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 larger than TESLA-shaped standing wave cavities for the same surface electric and magnetic fields. Recent tests of an L-band single-cell cavity with a waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient in a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer. This article presents the next stage of the 3- cell TW resonance ring development which will be tested in the traveling wave regime. The main simulation results of the microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) are also considered.

  4. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi, E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org; Dhakal, Pashupati, E-mail: dhakal@jlab.org; Kneisel, Peter, E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org; Myneni, Ganapati R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ∼1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR∼260 and RRR∼100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material.

  5. Cryogenic Test of a 750 MHz Superconducting RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [ODU; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-07-01

    A superconducting rf dipole cavity has been designed to address the challenges of a high repetition rate (750 MHz), high current for both electron/ion species (0.5/3 A per bunch), and large crossing angle (50 mrad) at the interaction points (IPs) crabbing system for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The cavity prototype built at Niowave, Inc. has been tested at the Jefferson Lab facilities. In this work we present a detailed analysis of the prototype cavity performance at 4 K and 2 K, corroborating the absence of hard multipacting barriers that could limit the desired transverse fields, along with the surface resistance (Rs) temperature dependency.

  6. Cavity-assisted dynamical quantum phase transition in superconducting quantum simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin

    Coupling a quantum many-body system to a cavity can create bifurcation points in the phase diagram, where the many-body system switches between different phases. Here I will discuss the dynamical quantum phase transitions at the bifurcation points of a one-dimensional transverse field Ising model coupled to a cavity. The Ising model can be emulated with various types of superconducting qubits connected in a chain. With a time-dependent Bogoliubov method, we show that an infinitesimal quench of the driving field can cause gradual evolution of the transverse field on the Ising spins to pass through the quantum critical point. Our calculation shows that the cavity-induced nonlinearity plays an important role in the dynamics of this system. Quasiparticles can be excited in the Ising chain during this process, which results in the deviation of the system from its adiabatic ground state. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Award Number 0956064.

  7. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Wayne Rigby, John Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 deg C) and high ({approx}800 deg C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 deg C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 x 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 deg C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 deg C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  8. Plasma cleaning: A new possible treatment for niobium superconducting cavity after nitrogen doping

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Ziqin; Xie, Datao; Lin, Lin; Zhou, Kui; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Tan, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen doping treatment with the subsequent electropolishing (EP) of the niobium superconducting cavity can significantly increase the cavity's quality factor up to a factor of 3. But the process of the EP removal may reintroduce hydrogen in the cavity surface, which may influence the cavity's radio frequency performance. Plasma cleaning study on niobium samples with gas mixtures of argon and oxgen intended to remove contaminations (hydrocarbons and micronicdust particles) from cavity surface to avoid field emission, was performed in Peking University. The niobium samples have been analyzed using the time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to measure the depth profiles of H, C, O, F, P and Nb. The measuring results show that the plasma cleaning with gas mixtures of argon and oxgen and conditions of about 20Pa and 100W can remarkably reduce the contents of impurity elements in the depth of about 30 nm without introducing hydrogen in the cavity surface. So plasma cleaning has been proposed t...

  9. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y. M. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, Kexin [Peking University, Beijing (China); Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6-1.6 MV/m, 21-34 MV/m, 32-35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6-13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP's predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  10. Laser stabilization using saturated absorption in a cavity QED system

    CERN Document Server

    Tieri, D A; Christensen, Bjarke T R; Thomsen, J W; Holland, M J

    2015-01-01

    We consider the phase stability of a local oscillator (or laser) locked to a cavity QED system comprised of atoms with an ultra-narrow optical transition. The atoms are cooled to millikelvin temperatures and then released into the optical cavity. Although the atomic motion introduces Doppler broadening, the standing wave nature of the cavity causes saturated absorption features to appear, which are much narrower than the Doppler width. These features can be used to achieve an extremely high degree of phase stabilization, competitive with the current state-of-the-art. Furthermore, the inhomogeneity introduced by finite atomic velocities can cause optical bistability to disappear, resulting in no regions of dynamic instability and thus enabling a new regime accessible to experiments where optimum stabilization may be achieved.

  11. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S-I-S hetero-structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  12. Raising gradient limitations in 2.1 GHz superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya I., E-mail: smirnova@lanl.gov; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Suvorova, Natalya A.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L. [Niowave, Inc., 1012 North Walnut Street, Lansing, Michigan 48906 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    We report results from recent 2.1 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) photonic band gap (PBG) resonator experiments at Los Alamos. Two 2.1 GHz PBG cells with elliptical rods were fabricated and tested at high power in a liquid helium bath at the temperatures of 4 K and below 2 K. The described SRF PBG cells were designed with a particular emphasis on changing the shape of the PBG rods to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and at the same time to preserve its effectiveness at damping higher-order-modes. The superconducting PBG cavities have great potential for damping long-range wakefields in SRF accelerator structures without affecting the fundamental accelerating mode. The cells performed in accordance with simulation's predictions and the maximum achieved accelerating gradient was 18.3 MV/m. This represents a 30% increase over gradients previously demonstrated in superconducting PBG cavities with round rods.

  13. Resistivity changes in superconducting-cavity-grade Nb following high-energy proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Hanson, A.; Greene, G.A. [and others

    1997-12-01

    Niobium superconducting rf cavities are proposed for use in the proton LINAC accelerators for spallation-neutron applications. Because of accidental beam loss and continual halo losses along the accelerator path, concern for the degradation of the superconducting properties of the cavities with accumulating damage arises. Residual-resistivity-ratio (RRR) specimens of Nb, with a range of initial RRR`s were irradiated at room temperature with protons at energies from 200 to 2000 MeV. Four-probe resistance measurements were made at room temperature and at 4.2 K both prior to and after irradiation. Nonlinear increases in resistivity simulate expected behavior in cavity material after extended irradiation, followed by periodic anneals to room temperature: For RRR = 316 material, irradiations to (2 - 3) x 10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2} produce degradations up to the 10% level, a change that is deemed operationally acceptable. Without. periodic warming to room temperature, the accumulated damage energy would be up to a factor of ten greater, resulting in unacceptable degradations. Likewise, should higher-RRR material be used, for the same damage energy imparted, relatively larger percentage changes in the RRR will result.

  14. Analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Chaoyue [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Posen, Sam; Hall, Daniel Leslie [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Groll, Nickolas; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Cook, Russell [Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Liepe, Matthias [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Pellin, Michael [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    We present an analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb{sub 3}Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (T{sub c}) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ∼2 μm thick Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb{sub 3}Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low T{sub c} regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb{sub 3}Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators.

  15. SQUID Based Cryogenic Current Comparator for Measurements of the Dark Current of Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Vodel, W; Neubert, R; Nietzsche, S

    2005-01-01

    This contribution presents a LTS-SQUID based Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) for detecting dark currents, generated e.g. by superconducting cavities for the upcoming X-FEL project at DESY. To achieve the maximum possible energy the gradients of the superconducting RF cavities should be pushed close to the physical limit of 50 MV/m. The measurement of the undesired field emission of electrons (the so-called dark current) in correlation with the gradient will give a proper value to compare and classify the cavities. The main component of the CCC is a high performance LTS-DC SQUID system which is able to measure extremely low magnetic fields, e.g. caused by the extracted dark current. For this reason the input coil of the SQUID is connected across a special designed toroidal niobium pick-up coil (inner diameter: about 100 mm) for the passing electron beam. A noise limited current resolution of nearly 2 pA/√(Hz) with a measurement bandwidth of up to 70 kHz was achieved without the pick-up coil. Now, ...

  16. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Ribeill, Guilhem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Dept. of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Xu Chen [Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Kelley, Michael J., E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  17. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Guilhem Ribeill, Chen Xu, Charles E. Reece, Michael J. Kelley

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  18. Updating the CSNS injector linac to 250 MeV with superconducting double-spoke cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhi-Hui, LI

    2014-01-01

    In order to update the beam power from 100 kW to 250 kW in China spallation neutron source (CSNS) Phase II, one of the important measures is to replace the 80 meters long beam transport line between the present 80 MeV linac injector and the RCS to another kind of acceleration structure. In this paper, we proposed a scheme based on 324 MHz double-spoke superconducting cavities. Unlike the superconducting elliptical cavity and normal conducting CCL structure, the double-spoke cavity belongs to TE mode structure and has smaller transvers dimension compared with that of TH mode one. It can work at base frequency as the DTL section, so that the cost and complexity of the RF system will be much decreased, and the behaviors of the beam dynamics are also improved significantly because of the low charge density and larger longitudinal acceptance. Furthermore, because of the relatively longer interactive length between charged particle and the electromagnetic field per cell, it needs relatively less cell numbers and it...

  19. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Z. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hao, Z. K. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Liu, K. X. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zhao, H. Y. [OTIC, Ningxia (China); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high-efficiency high-gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  20. A preliminary quadrupole asymmetry study of a β=0.12 superconducting single spoke cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Qin; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Yang, Liu; Luo, Xing; Zhou, Kui; Quan, Sheng-Wen

    2014-10-01

    An Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been launched in China for nuclear waste transmutation. For the application of high intensity proton beam acceleration, the quadrupole asymmetry effect needs to be carefully evaluated for cavities. Single spoke cavities are the main accelerating structures in the low energy front-end. The single spoke cavity has small transverse electromagnetic field asymmetry, which may lead to transverse RF defocusing asymmetry and beam envelope asymmetry. A superconducting single spoke resonator (PKU-2 Spoke) of β=0.12 and f=325 MHz with a racetrack-shaped inner conductor has been designed at Peking university. The study of its RF field quadrupole asymmetry and its effect on transverse momentum change has been performed. The quadrupole asymmetry study has also been performed on a β=0.12 and f=325 MHz ring-shaped single spoke cavity. Our results show that the quadrupole asymmetry is very small for both the racetrack-shaped and the ring-shaped single spoke cavity.

  1. Automated optical inspection and image analysis of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-15

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. For an investigation of this inner surface of more than 100 cavities within the cavity fabrication for the European XFEL and the ILC HiGrade Research Project, an optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed. To analyze up to 2325 images per cavity, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. The accuracy of this code is up to 97% and the PPV 99% within the resolution of 15.63 μm. The optical obtained surface roughness is in agreement with standard profilometric methods. The image analysis algorithm identified and quantified vendor specific fabrication properties as the electron beam welding speed and the different surface roughness due to the different chemical treatments. In addition, a correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ between an obtained surface variable and the maximal accelerating field was found.

  2. Effect of non-uniform surface resistance on the quality factor of superconducting niobium cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Weiwei; Lu, Xiangyang; Yang, Ziqin; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yujia

    2016-08-01

    The formula Rs = G /Q0 is commonly used in the calculation of the surface resistance of radio frequency niobium superconducting cavities. The applying of such equation is under the assumption that surface resistance is consistent over the cavity. However, the distribution of the magnetic field varies over the cavity. The magnetic field in the equator is much higher than that in the iris. According to Thermal Feedback Theory, it leads non-uniform distribution of the density of heat flux, which results in a different temperature distribution along the cavity inter surface. The BCS surface resistance, which depends largely on the temperature, is different in each local inner surface. In this paper, the effect of surface non-uniform resistance on the quality factor has been studied, through the calculation of Q0 in the original definition of it. The results show that it is necessary to consider the non-uniform distribution of magnetic field when the accelerating field is above 20 MV/m for TESLA cavities. Also, the effect of inhomogeneity of residual resistance on the quality factor is discussed. Its distribution barely affects the quality factor.

  3. Frequency control in the process of a multicell superconducting cavity production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemelin, Valery; Carriere, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Modifications in the geometry of a superconducting RF cavity due to various processing procedures are presented in a convenient matrix formulation. Specifically, the effect of chemical etching, cooling down, and preloading are characterized, while the corresponding frequency shifts are calculated with a reliable software. This matrix method was used in the fabrication of the first cornell energy recovery linac (ERL) 7-cell cavity. Cavity fabrication can be broken down into three main stages: deep-drawing cups, welding the cups in pairs to obtain "dumbbells" and end groups, and, finally, welding the obtained components into a completed cavity. Frequency measurements and precise machining were implemented after the second stage. A custom RF fixture and data acquisition system were designed and validated for this purpose. The system comprised of a mechanical press with RF contacts, a network analyzer, a load cell and custom LABVIEW and MATLAB scripts. To extract the individual frequencies of the cups from these measurements, the established algorithm of calculations was analysed and corrected. Corrections for the ambient environment were also incorporated into the measurement protocol. Using the procedure presented, the frequency deviation of the completed 1.3 GHz 7-cell cavity was 360 kHz, corresponding to an average error about 75 μm in length for every cell.

  4. Steady-state thermal studies on the HIE-ISOLDE high-$\\beta$ superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Alberty, L

    2013-01-01

    The activity of the High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project aims to construct a superconducting linac based on 101.28 MHz niobium sputtered Quarter Wave Resonators (QWRs). For this, several prototypes of superconducting cavities are currently being developed at CERN using OFE copper as substrate material for Niobium film coating. Two main concepts are currently under development: one consists of rolled, machined, deepdrawed and welded parts; the other is based on machined parts which are put together using electron beam welding. This study presents the results of simulations carried out in order to assess the thermal performance of different designs. The interest for such analysis was raised up before launching the manufacture of the first industrial series, since both rolled and bulk approaches seemed possible.

  5. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise Christine [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  6. Electron Bunch Train Excited Higher-Order Modes in a Superconducting RF Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yongfeng; Wang, Fang; Feng, Liwen; Zhuang, Dehao; Lin, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Hao, Jiankui; Quan, Shengwen; Liu, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    Higher-order mode (HOM) based intra-cavity beam diagnostics has been proved effectively and conveniently in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators. Our recent research shows that the beam harmonics in the bunch train excited HOM spectrum, which have much higher signal-to-noise ratio than the intrinsic HOM peaks, may also be useful for beam diagnostics. In this paper, we will present our study on bunch train excited HOMs, including the theoretic model and recent experiments carried out based on the DC-SRF photoinjector and SRF linac at Peking University.

  7. High power conditioning of the input coupler for BEPCⅡ superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Wei-Min; HUANG Tong-Ming; MA Qiang; WANG Guang-Wei; SUN Yi; SHA Peng; LI Zhong-Quan; LIN Hai-Ying; XU Bo

    2008-01-01

    High power conditioning of the input coupler for BEPCⅡ supercOnducting cavity has been performed.After room temperature conditioning,the RF power of 150 kW with continuous wave at standing wave mode passed through the coupler without any problem.Meanwhile,a series of methods have also been studied to improve the performance of the coupler during the beam operation.Up to now,the input coupler can feed a RF power up to 100 kW stably with high current of 250 mA at 2.5 GeV.

  8. A Fast Switchyard for the TESLA FEL-Beam Using a Superconducting Transverse Mode Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Wanzenberg, R

    2000-01-01

    In the present design of the TESLA Linear Collider with integrated X-ray Laser Facility it is necessary that 1 ms long bunch trains with about 10000 bunches are generated and distributed to several free electron laser (FEL) beam lines. The different scientific applications of the X-ray FELs need specific filling patterns of the bunches in the bunch train. It is shown that a fast switch-yard based on a superconducting transverse mode cavity can be used to generate the required bunch pattern in a flexible way while keeping the beam loading in the main linear accelerator constant. The conceptual design of the beam optics and the transverse mode cavity are presented.

  9. Biased HiPIMS technology for superconducting rf accelerating cavities coating

    CERN Document Server

    G. Rosaz, G.; Sonato, D.; Calatroni, S.; Ehiasarian, A.; Junginger, T.; Taborelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. CERN already studied the possibility to use such a coating method for SRF accelerating cavities. Results are promising but not better from a RF point of view than dcMS coatings. Thanks to these results the next step is to go towards a biased HiPIMS approach. However the geometry of the cavities leads to complex changes in the coating setup in order to apply a bias voltage. Coating system tweaking and first superconducting properties of biased samples are presented.

  10. Performance analysis of superconducting rf cavities for the CERN rare isotope accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatroni, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Rosaz, G.; Sublet, A.; Venturini Delsolaro, W.; Vaglio, R.; Palmieri, V.

    2016-09-01

    The first cryomodule of the new HIE-ISOLDE rare isotope accelerator has recently been commissioned with beam at CERN, with the second cryomodule ready for installation. Each cryomodule contains five superconducting low-beta quarter wave cavities, produced with the technology of sputtering a thin niobium film onto the copper substrate (Nb /Cu ). This technology has several benefits compared to the bulk niobium solution, but also drawbacks among which the most relevant is the increase of surface resistance with accelerating field. Recent work has established the possible connection of this phenomenon to local defects in the Nb /Cu interface, which may lead to increased thermal impedance and thus local thermal runaway. We have analyzed the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE cavities series production, as well as of a few prototypes', in terms of this model, and found a strong correlation between the rf properties and one of the model characteristic quantities, namely the total surface having increased interface thermal impedance.

  11. Superconducting qubit in a nonstationary transmission line cavity: Parametric excitation, periodic pumping, and energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Shapiro, D. S.; Remizov, S. V.; Pogosov, W. V.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a superconducting qubit coupled to the nonstationary transmission line cavity with modulated frequency taking into account energy dissipation. Previously, it was demonstrated that in the case of a single nonadiabatical modulation of a cavity frequency there are two channels of a two-level system excitation which are due to the absorption of Casimir photons and due to the counterrotating wave processes responsible for the dynamical Lamb effect. We show that the parametric periodical modulation of the resonator frequency can increase dramatically the excitation probability. Remarkably, counterrotating wave processes under such a modulation start to play an important role even in the resonant regime. Our predictions can be used to control qubit-resonator quantum states as well as to study experimentally different channels of a parametric qubit excitation.

  12. Linear beam dynamics and ampere class superconducting RF cavities at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaga, Rama R.

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a hadron collider designed to collide a range of ions from protons to gold. RHIC operations began in 2000 and has successfully completed five physics runs with several species including gold, deuteron, copper, and polarized protons. Linear optics and coupling are fundamental issues affecting the collider performance. Measurement and correction of optics and coupling are important to maximize the luminosity and sustain stable operation. A numerical approach, first developed at SLAC, was implemented to measure linear optics from coherent betatron oscillations generated by ac dipoles and recorded at multiple beam position monitors (BPMs) distributed around the collider. The approach is extended to a fully coupled 2D case and equivalence relationships between Hamiltonian and matrix formalisms are derived. Detailed measurements of the transverse coupling terms are carried out at RHIC and correction strategies are applied to compensate coupling both locally and globally. A statistical approach to determine BPM reliability and performance over the past three runs and future improvements also discussed. Aiming at a ten-fold increase in the average heavy-ion luminosity, electron cooling is the enabling technology for the next luminosity upgrade (RHIC II). Cooling gold ion beams at 100 GeV/nucleon requires an electron beam of approximately 54 MeV and a high average current in the range of 50-200 mA. All existing e-Coolers are based on low energy DC accelerators. The only viable option to generate high current, high energy, low emittance CW electron beam is through a superconducting energy-recovery linac (SC-ERL). In this option, an electron beam from a superconducting injector gun is accelerated using a high gradient (˜ 20 MV/m) superconducting RF (SRF) cavity. The electrons are returned back to the cavity with a 180° phase shift to recover the energy back into the cavity before being dumped. A design and development of a half

  13. Effect of mild baking on superconducting niobium cavities investigated by sequential nanoremoval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romanenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface nanostructure of niobium determines the performance of superconducting microwave cavities. Subtle variations in surface nanostructure lead to yet unexplained phenomena such as the dependence of the quality factor of these resonating structures on the magnitude of rf fields—an effect known as the “Q slopes”. Understanding and controlling the Q slopes is of great practical importance for particle accelerators. Here we investigate the mild baking effect—120°C vacuum baking for 48 hours—which strongly affects the Q slopes. We used a hydrofluoric acid rinse alternating with oxidation in water as a tool for stepwise material removal of about 2  nanometers/step from the surface of superconducting niobium cavities. Applying removal cycles on mild baked cavities and measuring the quality factor dependence on the rf fields after one or several such cycles allowed us to explore the distribution of lossy layers within the first several tens of nanometers from the surface. We found that a single HF rinse results in the increase of the cavity quality factor. The low field Q slope was shown to be mostly controlled by the material structure within the first six nanometers from the surface. The medium field Q slope evolution was fitted using linear (∝B peak surface magnetic field and quadratic (∝B^{2} terms in the surface resistance and it was found that best fits do not require the quadratic term. We found that about 10 nanometers of material removal are required to bring back the high field Q slope and about 20–50 nanometers to restore the onset field to the prebaking value.

  14. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei

    2013-02-15

    various dipole modes on the oset of the excitation beam were subsequently studied using a spectrum analyzer. Various data analysis methods were used: modal identication, direct linear regression, singular value decomposition and k-means clustering. These studies lead to three modal options promising for beam position diagnostics, upon which a set of test electronics has been built. The experiments with these electronics suggest a resolution of 50 micron accuracy in predicting local beam position in the cavity and a global resolution of 20 micron over the complete module. This constitutes the first demonstration of HOM-based beam diagnostics in a third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity module. These studies have finalized the design of the online HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH.

  15. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  16. Superconducting 500 MHz accelerating copper cavities sputter-coated with niobium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Circelli, N.; Hauer, M.; Weingarten, W.

    1985-03-01

    Thermal breakdown induced either by electron loading or by local defects of enhanced RF losses limits the accelerating field of superconducting niobium cavities. Replacing niobium with a material of higher thermal conductivity would be highly desirable to increase the maximum field. Therefore, cavities made of OFHC copper were coated by D.C. bias sputtering with a thin niobium film (1.5 to 5 ..mu..). Accelerating fields up to 8.6 MVm/sup -1/ were obtained without observing any field breakdown, the limitation being due to the available rf power. The Q values achieved at 4.2 K and low field were similar to those of niobium sheet cavities (i.e. about 2 x 10/sup 9/), but a fast initial decrease of Q to about 10/sup 9/ was reproducibly experienced. Subsequent inspection of regions of enhanced rf losses revealed defects the origin of which is under study. The apparatus used for coating the cavities and the results obtained are presented and discussed.

  17. An Efficient Scheme for Implementing an N-Qubit Toffoli Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG An-Shou; LIU Ji-Bing; XIANG Dong; LIU Cui-Lan; YUAN Hong

    2007-01-01

    An alternative approach is proposed to realize an n-qubit Toffoli gate with superconducting quantum-interference devices (SQUIDs) in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). In the proposal, we represent two logical gates of a qubit with the two lowest levels of a SQUID while a higher-energy intermediate level of each SQUID is utilized for the gate manipulation. During the operating process, because the cavity field is always in vacuum state, the requirement on the cavity is greatly loosened and there is no transfer of quantum information between the cavity and SQUIDs.

  18. Microwave power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity for accelerator application and its testing procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianjian [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Superconducting cavity resonators offer the advantage of high field intensity for a given input power, making them an attractive contender for particle accelerator applications. Power coupling into a superconducting cavity employed in a particle accelerator requires unique provisions to maintain high vacuum and cryogenic temperature on the cavity side, while operating with ambient conditions on the source side. Components introduced to fulfill mechanical requirements must show negligible obstruction of the propagation of the microwave with absence of critical locations that may give rise to electron multipaction, leading to a multiple section design, instead of an aperture, a probe, or a loop structure as found in conventional cavities. A coaxial power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity at 3.9 GHz has been developed. The cavity is intended to be employed as an accelerator to provide enhanced electron beam quality in a free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) user facility. The design of the coupler called for two windows to sustain high vacuum in the cavity and two bellows to accommodate mechanical dimensional changes resulting from cryogenics. Suppression of multipacting was accomplished by the choice of conductor dimensions and materials with low second yield coefficients. Prior to integration with the cavity, the coupler was tested for intrinsic properties in a back-to-back configuration and conditioned for high-power operation with increasing power input. Maximum incident power was measured to be 61 kW. When integrated with the superconducting cavity, a loaded quality factor of 9 x 10 5 was measured by transient method. Coupler return loss and insertion loss were estimated to be around -21 dB and -0.2 dB, respectively.

  19. Compensating microphonics in SRF cavities to ensure beam stability for future free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Axel

    2008-07-21

    In seeded High-Gain-Harmonic-Generation free electron lasers or energy recovery linear accelerators the requirements for the bunch-to-bunch timing and energy jitter of the beam are in the femtosecond and per mill regime. This implies the ability to control the cavity radiofrequency (RF) field to an accuracy of 0.02 in phase and up to 1.10{sup -4} in amplitude. For the planned BESSY-FEL it is envisaged to operate 144 superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities of the 2.3 GeV driver linac in continuous wave mode and at a low beam current. The cavity resonance comprises a very narrow bandwidth of the order of tens of Hertz. Such cavities have been characterized under accelerator like conditions in the HoBiCaT test facility. It was possible to measure the error sources affecting the field stability in continuous wave (CW) operation. Microphonics, the main error source for a mechanical detuning of the cavities, lead to an average fluctuation of the cavity resonance of 1-5 Hz rms. Furthermore, the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning and the helium pressure dependance of the cavity resonance have been measured. Single cavity RF control and linac bunch-to-bunch longitudinal phase space modeling containing the measured properties showed, that it is advisable to find means to minimize the microphonics detuning by mechanical tuning. Thus, several fast tuning systems have been tested for CW operation. These tuners consist of a motor driven lever for slow and coarse tuning and a piezo that is integrated into the tuner support for fast and fine tuning. Regarding the analysis of the detuning spectrum an adaptive feedforward method based on the least-mean-square filter algorithm has been developed for fast cavity tuning. A detuning compensation between a factor of two and up to a factor of seven has been achieved. Modeling the complete system including the fast tuning scheme, showed that the requirements of the BESSY-FEL are attainable. (orig.)

  20. Characterization of Nb coating in HIE-ISOLDE QWR superconducting accelerating cavities by means of SEM-FIB and TEM

    CERN Document Server

    Bartova, Barbora; Taborelli, M; Aebersold, A B; Alexander, D T L; Cantoni, M; Calatroni, Sergio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The Quarter Wave Resonators (QWR) high-β cavities (0.3 m diameter and 0.9 m height) are made from OFE 3D-forged copper and are coated by DC-bias diode sputtering with a thin superconducting layer of niobium. The Nb film thickness, morphology, purity and quality are critical parameters for RF performances of the cavity. They have been investigated in a detailed material study.

  1. Stability of gravitating charged-scalar solitons in a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ponglertsakul, Supakchai; Dolan, Sam R

    2016-01-01

    We present new regular solutions of Einstein-charged scalar field theory in a cavity. The system is enclosed inside a reflecting mirror-like boundary, on which the scalar field vanishes. The mirror is placed at the zero of the scalar field closest to the origin, and inside this boundary our solutions are regular. We study the stability of these solitons under linear, spherically symmetric perturbations of the metric, scalar and electromagnetic fields. If the radius of the mirror is sufficiently large, we present numerical evidence for the stability of the solitons. For small mirror radius, some of the solitons are unstable. We discuss the physical interpretation of this instability.

  2. Extracting superconducting parameters from surface resistivity by using inside temperatures of SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, M; Padamsee, H; Shemelin, V

    2014-01-01

    The surface resistance of an RF superconductor depends on the surface temperature, the residual resistance and various superconductor parameters, e.g. the energy gap, and the electron mean free path. These parameters can be determined by measuring the quality factor Q0 of a SRF cavity in helium-baths of different temperatures. The surface resistance can be computed from Q0 for any cavity geometry, but it is not trivial to determine the temperature of the surface when only the temperature of the helium bath is known. Traditionally, it was approximated that the surface temperature on the inner surface of the cavity was the same as the temperature of the helium bath. This is a good approximation at small RF-fields on the surface, but to determine the field dependence of Rs, one cannot be restricted to small field losses. Here we show the following: (1) How computer simulations can be used to determine the inside temperature Tin so that Rs(Tin) can then be used to extract the superconducting parameters. The compu...

  3. Superconducting Cavity Cryomodule Designs for the Next Generation of CW Linacs: Challenges and Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, Thomas [Fermilab; Orlov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Peterson, Thomas [Fermilab; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    The designs of nearly all superconducting RF (SRF) linacs over the last several years, with one notable exception being CEBAF at Jefferson Lab, have assumed pulsed beam operation with relatively low duty factors. These include the XFEL at DESY, the ILC, the original configuration for Project X at Fermilab, as well as several others. Recently proposed projects, on the other hand, including the LCLS-II at SLAC, the newly configured low and medium energy sections for Project X, and FRIB at Michigan State, to name a few, assume continuous wave or CW operation on quite a large scale with ambitious gradients and cavity performance requirements. This has implications in the cavity design as well as in many parts of the overall cryomodule due to higher dynamic heat loads in the cavities themselves and higher heat loads in the input and high-order-mode (HOM) couplers. Piping internal to the cryomodule, the effectiveness of thermal intercepts, the size of integrated heat exchangers, and many other aspects of the overall design are also affected. This paper will describe some of these design considerations as we move toward the next generation of accelerator projects.

  4. Gifford McMahon Machine Used for Precooling of Two Superconducting Cavities at ESRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossat, M.; Bredy, P.; Jacob, J.; Torrecillas, F.; Boilot, D.; Bruas, E.

    2004-06-01

    A cryo-module housing two superconducting 352 MHz-cavities has been developed within the framework of the SOLEIL project design phase. In 2002, the prototype was installed on the ESRF storage ring and tested with beam in the accelerating regime at 4.5 K with the cavities cooled by liquid helium from Dewars. Four such tests have been carried out at the end of scheduled shutdowns. In order not to disturb the ESRF machine performance during the user mode of operation, the cavities were maintained detuned at room temperature in a passive regime, where they remained transparent to the beam. Less than 100 W of heat generated by the beam had then to be evacuated by a helium gas flow. The week of shut down before each test period was used to pre-cool the module by means of helium gas at a flow rate of 12.5 Nm3/h, the helium being cooled by a Gifford McMahon machine AL300 built by Cryomech (USA). The aim of this poster is to show the special design of the cold head and the way of cooling down the system.

  5. Physical Properties of Niobium and Specifications for Fabrication of Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine, C.; Foley, M.; Dhanaraj, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    It is important to distinguish among the properties of niobium, the ones that are related to the cavity's SRF performances, the formability of the material, and the mechanical behavior of the formed cavity. In general, the properties that dictate each of the above mentioned characteristics have a detrimental effect on one another and in order to preserve the superconducting properties without subduing the mechanical behavior, a balance has to be established. Depending on the applications, some parameters become less important and an understanding of the physical origin of the requirements might help in this optimization. SRF applications require high purity niobium (high RRR), but pure niobium is very soft from fabrication viewpoint. Moreover conventional fabrication techniques tend to override the effects of any metallurgical process meant to strengthen it. As those treatments dramatically affect the forming of the material they should be avoided. These unfavorable mechanical properties have to be accounted for in the design of the cavities rather than in the material specification. The aim of this paper is to review the significance of the important mechanical properties used to characterize niobium and to present the optimal range of values. Most of the following information deals with the specification of sheets for cell forming unless otherwise noted.

  6. Thermal design studies in superconducting rf cavities: Phonon peak and Kapitza conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aizaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design studies of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities involve two thermal parameters, namely the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Nb at low temperatures and the heat transfer coefficient at the Nb-He II interface, commonly known as the Kapitza conductance. During the fabrication process of the SRF cavities, Nb sheet is plastically deformed through a deep drawing process to obtain the desired shape. The effect of plastic deformation on low temperature thermal conductivity as well as Kapitza conductance has been studied experimentally. Strain induced during the plastic deformation process reduces the thermal conductivity in its phonon transmission regime (disappearance of phonon peak by 80%, which may explain the performance limitations of the defect-free SRF cavities during their high field operations. Low temperature annealing of the deformed Nb sample could not recover the phonon peak. However, moderate temperature annealing during the titanification process recovered the phonon peak in the thermal conductivity curve. Kapitza conductance measurements for the Nb-He II interface for various surface topologies have also been carried out before and after the annealing. These measurements reveal consistently increased Kapitza conductance after the annealing process was carried out in the two temperature regimes.

  7. Multilayer coating for higher accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities: a review of theoretical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    The theory of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) multilayer structure for application in superconducting accelerating cavities is reviewed. The theoretical field limit, optimum layer thicknesses and material combination, and surface resistance are discussed for the SIS structure and are also reviewed for the superconductor-superconductor bilayer structure.

  8. First demonstration and performance of an injection locked continuous wave magnetron to phase control a superconducting cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.C. Dexter, G. Burt, R.G. Carter, I. Tahir, H. Wang, K. Davis, R. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    The applications of magnetrons to high power proton and cw electron linacs are discussed. An experiment is described where a 2.45 GHz magnetron has been used to drive a single cell superconducting cavity. With the magnetron injection locked, a modest phase control accuracy of 0.95° rms has been demonstrated. Factors limiting performance have been identified.

  9. Analysis and measurement of the transfer matrix of a 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halavanau, A.; Eddy, N.; Edstrom, D.; Harms, E.; Lunin, A.; Piot, P.; Romanov, A.; Ruan, J.; Solyak, N.; Shiltsev, V.

    2017-04-01

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, stable, high-quality electron beams that have found widespread applications in science and industry. The 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting standing-wave accelerating rf cavity originally developed for e+/e- linear-collider applications [B. Aunes, et al. Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 3, 092001 (2000), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.3.092001] has been broadly employed in various superconducting-linac designs. In this paper we discuss the transfer matrix of such a cavity and present its measurement performed at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The experimental results are found to be in agreement with analytical calculations and numerical simulations.

  10. One-Step Realization of SWAP Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices and Atoms in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2008-01-01

    We put forward a simple scheme for one-step realization of a two-qubit SWAP gate with SQUIDs (super-conducting quantum-interference devices) in cavity QED via Raman transition. In this scheme, the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed. The SWAP gate is realized by using only two lower flux states of the SQUID system and the excited state would not be excited. Therefore, the effect of decoherence caused from the levels of the SQUID system is possibly minimized. The scheme can also be used to implement the SWAP gate with atoms.

  11. Characterization of Nb Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities Based On In-Situ STEM And EELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Runzhe

    Niobium, a 4d transition metal, has the highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc=9.2K) of any elemental superconductor as type II superconductor with coherent length, sigma approximately that of the penetration length, lambda. Pure niobium is grey in color and very soft, which makes this metal easily fabricable into different shapes for superconducting radio- frequency (SRF) cavities. Such cavities are used in some modern accelerators (SNS, CEBAF, XFEL), and are intended for usage in the next generation of particle accelerators, such as ILC. Since the crucial part of the cavities is top 100 nm of Nb near the inner cavity surface, considering the penetration depth is around 40 nm, it has attracted more and more attention in improving the surface process for optimizing the performance of the cavities. Nowadays, the main treatment of the Nb surface includes electro polishing (EP), buffered chemical polishing (BCP), high temperature baking (800 °C, 1000 °C and 1200 °C) and mild baking (120 °C). Firstly, the two half cells are welded together and the weld line is quite rough; there exists a lot of visible pits and defects on the inner shell of cavities. In this Ph.D. thesis, novel techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that can be used to analyze the atomic scale structure-property relationship, both at room tem- perature and high/LN 2 temperature, are explored. Specifically, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS), the structure, composition and bonding can be characterized directly on the atomic scale, also, light atoms, like H, O and C, are visible in ABF images. For the examining the defect behavior on the cavity surface, heating and cold stages are involved to simulate the baking treatment and low-temperature environments. These studies will serve as an important reference for qualifying different surface treatments to further improve SRF cavities' performance. The experimental results

  12. Fabrication of the high power input coupler for BEPCⅡ superconducting cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The BEPCII storage ring adopts two 500 MHz superconducting cavities (SCC). Each one is equipped with a 500 MHz input power coupler. The coupler is to feed 150 kW power in continuous wave (CW) mode with both standing and traveling wave modes. Due to high power feeding and high frequency of the coupler, its fabrication is a big challenge. The fabrication started with two key components, the window and the antenna. Up to now, two sets including windows and antennas have beam made by IHEP. And a 270 kW RF power in CW has passed through the coupler during the high power test. The fabrication details are presented in this paper.

  13. Influence of Intrinsic Decoherence on Entanglement of Superconducting Charge Qubit in a Resonant Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Nan; SHAO Bin; ZOU Jian

    2005-01-01

    @@ Taking the intrinsic decoherence effect into account, we investigate the entanglement dynamics of a superconducting charge qubit in a single-mode optical cavity. Concurrence, as the measure of entanglement of the coupled field-junction system, is calculated. In comparison, we also consider the entanglement of the system by using the entanglement parameter based on the ratio between mutual entropy and partial Von-Neumann entropy to investigate how the intrinsic decoherence affects the entanglement of the coupling system. Our results show that the evolution of the entanglement parameter has the behaviour similar to the concurrence and it is thus the well measure of entanglement for the mixed state in such a coupling system.

  14. Reclamation of niobium compounds from ionic liquid electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wixtrom, Alex I. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Buhler, Jessica E. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride (vitamin B4)-based solutions can be used as a greener alternative to acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. This study demonstrated a successful method for electrochemical deposition of niobium compounds onto the surface of copper substrates using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. Niobium ions present in the ionic liquid solution were dissolved into the solution prior to deposition via electrochemical polishing of solid niobium. A black coating was clearly visible on the surface of the Cu following deposition. This coating was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). This ionic liquid-based electrochemical deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities.

  15. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, G; Anlage, Steven M; Baldwin, C; Cheng, G; Flood, R; Jordan, K; Kneisel, P; Morrone, M; Nemes, G; Turlington, L; Wang, H; Wilson, K; Zhang, S

    2012-03-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about 2.4 mm and surface resistance resolution of ~1 μΩ at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in detail in this contribution.

  16. On stability of odd-frequency superconducting state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenov, Bmitry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Ivar [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mozyrsky, Dima [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Odd-frequency pairing mechanism has been investigated for several decades. Nevertheless the properties of such superconducting phase as well as its thermodynamic stability have remained unclear. In particular it has been argued by numerous authors that the odd-frequency state is thermodynamically unstable, has an unphysical Meissner effect (at least within the mean-field approximation), and therefore can not exist as a homogeneous phase in equilibrium physical systems. We argue that such a conclusion is incorrect because it relies on an inappropriate assumption that the odd-frequency superconductor can be described by an effective Hamiltonian that breaks the U(l) symmetry. We show that the odd-frequency state can be appropriately formulated within the functional integral representation by using the effective action to describe such a superconducting state within the mean field approximation. We find that the odd-frequency superconductor is thermodynamically stable and exhibits ordinary Meissner effect, and therefore, in principle, it can be realized in equilibrium solid state systems.

  17. Defect detection inside superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities by means of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, M.; Michelato, P.; Moretti, M.; Navitski, A.; Pagani, C.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence probe for detection of foreign material inclusions on the inner surface of superconducting cavities has been developed and tested. The setup detects trace element content such as a few micrograms of impurities responsible for thermal breakdown phenomena limiting the cavity performance. The setup has been customized for the geometry of 1.3 GHz TESLA-type niobium cavities and focuses on the surface of equator area at around 103 mm from the centre axis of the cavities with around 20 mm detection spot. More precise localization of inclusions can be reconstructed by means of angular or lateral displacement of the cavity. Preliminary tests confirmed a very low detection limit for elements laying in the high efficiency spectrum zone (from 5 to 10 keV), and a high angular resolution allowing an accurate localization of defects within the equator surface.

  18. Nitrogen oxides under pressure: stability, ionization, polymerization, and superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongxu; Oganov, Artem R; Dong, Xiao; Zhou, Xiang-Feng; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guangrui; Dong, Huafeng

    2015-11-17

    Nitrogen oxides are textbook class of molecular compounds, with extensive industrial applications. Nitrogen and oxygen are also among the most abundant elements in the universe. We explore the N-O system at 0 K and up to 500 GPa though ab initio evolutionary simulations. Results show that two phase transformations of stable molecular NO2 occur at 7 and 64 GPa, and followed by decomposition of NO2 at 91 GPa. All of the NO(+)NO3(-) structures are found to be metastable at T = 0 K, so experimentally reported ionic NO(+)NO3(-) is either metastable or stabilized by temperature. N2O5 becomes stable at 9 GPa, and transforms from P-1 to C2/c structure at 51 GPa. NO becomes thermodynamically stable at 198 GPa. This polymeric phase is superconducting (Tc = 2.0 K) and contains a -N-N- backbone.

  19. Note on the cryostatic stability of superconducting composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauster, W. F.

    1978-02-01

    A careful discussion is given of the ''equal area condition'' developed by Maddock et al. In order to make the essential points as clear as possible, analytical solutions are derived under simplifying assumptions (simple model for heat transfer by nucleate and film boiling liquid helium; constant heat conduction and specific heat) instead of using more realistic but less controllable computer calculations. A quantitative definition of the concept of a long wire is given. Numerical examples for the Maddock transition characterized by the equal area condition are given for a long superconducting composite with linear cooling and for a liquid helium-cooled resistance wire of finite length. In addition, cases are shown where instead of applying the equal area stability condition, time-dependent solutions should be considered.

  20. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  1. Dynamic compensation of an rf cavity failure in a superconducting linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Biarrotte

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator driven system (ADS for transmutation of nuclear waste typically requires a 600 MeV–1 GeV accelerator delivering a proton flux of a few mA for demonstrators, and of a few tens of mA for large industrial systems. Such a machine belongs to the category of the high-power proton accelerators, with an additional requirement for exceptional “reliability”: because of the induced thermal stress to the subcritical core, the number of unwanted “beam trips” should not exceed a few per year, a specification that is several orders of magnitude above usual performance. In order to meet this extremely high reliability, the accelerator needs to implement, to the maximum possible extent, a fault-tolerance strategy that would allow beam operation in the presence of most of the envisaged faults that could occur in its beam line components, and in particular rf systems’ failures. This document describes the results of the simulations performed for the analysis of the fault-tolerance capability of the XT-ADS superconducting linac in the case of an rf cavity failure. A new simulation tool, mixing transient rf behavior of the accelerating cavities with full 6D description of the beam dynamics, has been developed for this purpose. Fast fault-recovery scenarios are proposed, and required research and development is identified.

  2. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengzhan; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328-0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328-0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation.

  3. Flux trapping in superconducting accelerating cavities during cooling down with a spatial temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    During the cool-down of a superconducting accelerating cavity, a magnetic flux is trapped as quantized vortices, which yield additional dissipation and contribute to the residual resistance. Recently, cooling down with a large spatial temperature gradient attracts much attention for successful reductions of trapped vortices. The purpose of the present paper is to propose a model to explain the observed efficient flux expulsions and the role of spatial temperature gradient during the cool-down of cavity. In the vicinity of a region with a temperature close to the critical temperature Tc,the critical fields are strongly suppressed and can be smaller than the ambient magnetic field. A region with a lower critical field smaller than the ambient field is in the vortex state. As a material is cooled down, a region with a temperature close Tc associating the vortex state domain sweeps and passes through the material. In this process, vortices contained in the vortex state domain are trapped by pinning centers that r...

  4. On the quantum (in)stability in cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V

    2005-01-01

    The stability and instability of quantum motion is studied in the context of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is shown that the Jaynes-Cummings dynamics can be unstable in the regime of chaotic walking of an atom in the quantized field of a standing wave in the absence of any other interaction with environment. This quantum instability manifests itself in strong variations of quantum purity and entropy and in exponential sensitivity of fidelity of quantum states to small variations in the atom-field detuning. It is quantified in terms of the respective classical maximal Lyapunov exponent that can be estimated in appropriate in-out experiments.

  5. Highly Sensitive Measurements of the Dark Current of Superconducting Cavities for TESLA Using a SQUID Based Cryogenic Current Comparator

    CERN Document Server

    Vodel, W; Nietzsche, S

    2004-01-01

    This contribution presents a Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) as an excellent tool for detecting dark currents generated, e.g. by superconducting cavities for the upcoming TESLA project (X-FEL) at DESY. To achieve the maximum possible energy the gradient of the superconducting RF cavities should be pushed close to the physical limit of 50 MV/m. The undesired field emission of electrons (so-called dark current) of the superconducting RF cavities at strong fields may limit the maximum gradient. The absolute measurement of the dark current in correlation with the gradient will give a proper value to compare and classify the cavities. The main component of the CCC is a highly sensitive LTS-DC SQUID system which is able to measure extremely low magnetic fields, e.g. caused by the dark current. For this reason the input coil of the SQUID is connected across a special designed toroidal niobium pick-up coil for the passing electron beam. A noise limited current resolution of nearly 2 pA/√(Hz) with a measu...

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  7. Development of an aluminium stabilized reinforced superconducting conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, D. [PTR Praezisionstechnik GmbH Maintal (Germany); Horvath, I.L. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zuerich (Switzerland); Harzenmoser, M.; Neuenschwander, J. [Swiss Federal Labs. for Materials Testing and Research, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Wittgenstein, F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-07-01

    For high performance superconducting magnets as used in large detectors for the High Energy Physics or for magnets of magnetic storage devices (SMES) the mechanical stresses on the conductor go beyond the yield stress level of the high purity matrix stabilizer, specially if aluminium is used. Therefore, a novel method is proposed to join high strength aluminium strips to high purity aluminium stabilizer by using the electron beam (EB) welding. The proposed EB-welding, combined with roll-pressing under vacuum, provides the minimum heat input on the conductor in comparison with other welding techniques. This method provides the advantage to allow the production of very long conductor lengths and includes the potentiality of repairing without losing expensive material. As this process has to be adapted to the high purity aluminium on the one side and to the high strength material on the other, the authors started in a first step with investigation and development of the process, using standard laboratory machines together with laboratory-size tooling. In this report the development program is described and first results of the quality control measurements are presented.

  8. Surface polishing of niobium for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Niobium cavities are important components in modern particle accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology. The interior of SRF cavities are cleaned and polished in order to produce high accelerating field and low power dissipation on the cavity wall. Current polishing methods, buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electro-polishing (EP), have their advantages and limitations. We seek to improve current methods and explore laser polishing (LP) as a greener alternative of chemical methods. The topography and removal rate of BCP at different conditions (duration, temperature, sample orientation, flow rate) was studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Differential etching on different crystal orientations is the main contributor to fine grain niobium BCP topography, with gas evolution playing a secondary role. The surface of single crystal and bi-crystal niobium is smooth even after heavy BCP. The topography of fine grain niobium depends on total removal. The removal rate increases with temperature and surface acid flow rate within the rage of 0~20 °C, with chemical reaction being the possible dominate rate control mechanism. Surface flow helps to regulate temperature and avoid gas accumulation on the surface. The effect of surface flow rate on niobium EP was studied with optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and power spectral density (PSD) analysis. Within the range of 0~3.7 cm/s, no significant difference was found on the removal rate and the macro roughness. Possible improvement on the micro roughness with increased surface flow rate was observed. The effect of fluence and pulse accumulation on niobium topography during LP was studied with optical microscopy, SEM, AFM, and PSD analysis. Polishing on micro scale was achieved within fluence range of 0.57~0.90 J/cm2, with pulse accumulation adjusted accordingly. Larger area treatment was proved possible by

  9. Multipartite entanglement in the interaction system between a single-mode microwave cavity field and superconducting charge qubits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Zhen-Gang; Chen Xiong-Wen; Zhu Xi-Xiang; Song Ke-Hui

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a method of generating multipartite entanglement through using d. c. superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) inside a standing wave cavity. In this scheme, the d. c. SQUID works in the charge region. It is shown that, a large number of important multipartite entangled states can be generated by a controllable interaction between a cavity field and qubits. It is even possible to produce entangled states involving different cavity modes based on the measurement of charge qubits states. After such superpositions states are created, the interaction can be switched off by the classical magnetic field through the SQUID, and there is no information transfer between the cavity field and the charge qubits.

  10. Unconventional Geometric Phase-Shift Gates Based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Coupled to a Single-Mode Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ke-Hui; ZHOU Zheng-Wei; GUO Guang-Can

    2006-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize geometric phase-shift gate for two superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits coupled to a single-mode microwave field. The geometric phase-shift gate operation is performed transitions during the gate operation. Thus, the docoherence due to energy spontaneous emission based on the levels of SQUIDs are suppressed. The gate is insensitive to the cavity decay throughout the operation since the cavity mode is displaced along a circle in the phase space, acquiring a phase conditional upon the two lower flux states of the SQUID qubits, and the cavity mode is still in the original vacuum state. Based on the SQUID qubits interacting with the cavity mode, our proposed approach may open promising prospects for quantum logic in SQUID-system.

  11. HF power couplers for pulsed superconducting cavity resonators; Coupleurs de puissance HF pour cavites supraconductrices en mode pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenhani, Hassen [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite de Paris-Sud, BP 34, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    Recent years have seen an impressive improvement in the accelerating gradients obtained in superconducting cavities. Consequently, such cavities have become attractive candidates for large superconducting linear accelerator projects such as the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider (ILC). As a result, there is a strong interest in reducing RF conditioning time and improving the performance of the input power couplers for these cavities. The so-called TTF-III input power coupler, adopted for the XFEL superconducting RF cavities are complex components. In order to better understand the behavior of this component we have performed a series of experiments on a number of such couplers. Initially, we developed a fully automated RF high power test stand for coupler conditioning procedure. Following this, we performed a series of coupler conditioning tests. This has allowed the study of the coupler behavior during processing. A number of experiments were carried out to evaluate the in-situ baking effect on the conditioning time. Some of the conditioned couplers were sent to DESY in order to be tested on 9-cells TESLA cavities under cryogenic conditions. These tests have shown that the couplers in no way limit the cavity performance, even up to gradients of 35 MV/m. The main objective of our coupler studies was the reduction of their conditioning time, which represents one of the most important criteria in the choice of coupler for high energy linacs. Excellent progress in reducing the conditioning time has been demonstrated by making appropriate modifications to the conditioning procedure. Furthermore, special attention was paid to electron generation processes in the couplers, via multipacting. Simulations of this process were made on both the TTF-III coupler and on a new coupler prototype, TTF-V. Experiments aimed at suppressing multipacting were also successfully achieved by using a DC bias on the inner conductor of the co-axial coupler. (author)

  12. Final Report - Development of a Multi-Spoke Superconducting Cavity for Nuclear Physics, Light Sources, and Driven Systems Applications (ODU Contribution)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, Jean [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This report summarizes the work done by Old Dominion University, in collaboration with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility toward the development of high-velocity superconducting spoke cavities.

  13. Study of quality and field limitation of superconducting 1.3 GHz 9-Cell RF-cavities at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlander, Felix

    2013-01-15

    The European XFEL and the International Linear Collider are based on superconducting rf cavities made of niobium. Their advantages are low ohmic losses which allow high duty cycles and the possibility to use a large beam aperture which is substantial to prevent wake fields at high current accelerators. To reach the theoretical limits of superconducting cavities, it is required to understand the present performance limitations. These are field emission, thermal breakdown (quench) and the ohmic losses dependent on the accelerating field, which are expressed in the quality factor. As the limiting mechanisms themselves are understood in general, the origin of the quench is often unclear. To determine the quench locations, a localisation tool for thermal breakdown using the second sound in superfluid helium has been installed at the cavity test facility at DESY and the results for a sample of about 30 cavities have been examined. The features of the distribution of the quench locations have been analysed and it has been found that the quench locations are in the area of the highest surface magnetic field and not necessarily at the equator of the cells. The data sample has been extended in an attempt to characterise the average behaviour of the quality factor related to the accelerating field. An analysis of the surface resistance of individual cavities shows that a recently developed model for the surface resistance of niobium is not able to describe the measurement in all detail, but the application of an additional mechanism showed promising results.

  14. A scanning Auger electron spectrometer for internal surface analysis of Large Electron Positron 2 superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Cosso, R.; Genest, J.; Hauer, M.; Lacarrere, D.; Rijllart, A.; Saban, R. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    1996-08-01

    A computer-controlled surface analysis instrument, incorporating static Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning Auger mapping, and secondary electron imaging, has been designed and built at CERN to study and characterize the inner surface of superconducting radio-frequency cavities to be installed in the Large Electron Positron collider. A detailed description of the instrument, including the analytical head, the control system, and the vacuum system is presented. Some recent results obtained from the cavities provide examples of the instrument{close_quote}s capabilities. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Preparation of Schrödinger cat states of a cavity field via coupling to a superconducting charge qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Dagoberto S.; Nemes, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    We extend the approach in Ref. 5 [Y.-X. Liu, L. F. Wei and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. A 71 (2005) 063820] for preparing superposition states of a cavity field interacting with a superconducting charge qubit. We study effects of the nonlinearity on the creation of such states. We show that the main contribution of nonlinear effects is to shorten the time necessary to build the superposition.

  16. The Path to High Q-Factors in Superconducting Accelerating Cavities: Flux Expulsion and Surface Resistance Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Accelerating cavities are devices resonating in the radio-frequency (RF) range used to accelerate charged particles in accelerators. Superconducting accelerating cavities are made out of niobium and operate at the liquid helium temperature. Even if superconducting, these resonating structures have some RF driven surface resistance that causes power dissipation. In order to decrease as much as possible the power losses, the cavity quality factor must be increased by decreasing the surface resistance. In this dissertation, the RF surface resistance is analyzed for a large variety of cavities made with different state-of-the-art surface treatments, with the goal of finding the surface treatment capable to return the highest Q-factor values in a cryomodule-like environment. This study analyzes not only the superconducting properties described by the BCS surface resistance, which is the contribution that takes into account dissipation due to quasi-particle excitations, but also the increasing of the surface resistance due to trapped flux. When cavities are cooled down below their critical temperature inside a cryomodule, there is always some remnant magnetic field that may be trapped increasing the global RF surface resistance. This thesis also analyzes how the fraction of external magnetic field, which is actually trapped in the cavity during the cooldown, can be minimized. This study is performed on an elliptical single-cell horizontally cooled cavity, resembling the geometry of cavities cooled in accelerator cryomodules. The horizontal cooldown study reveals that, as in case of the vertical cooldown, when the cooling is performed fast, large thermal gradients are created along the cavity helping magnetic flux expulsion. However, for this geometry the complete magnetic flux expulsion from the cavity equator is more difficult to achieve. This becomes even more challenging in presence of orthogonal magnetic field, that is easily trapped on top of the cavity equator

  17. The interaction between a beam and a superconducting cavity module: Measurements in CESR and CESR-Phase 3 goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S.; Flynn, G.; Hartung, W.; Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Pisharody, M.; Veshcherevich, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Nuclear Studies

    1996-08-01

    Plans for the next generation of electron-positron colliders (B-factories and B-factory-like machines) call for high beam currents to produce luminosities of the order of 10 (exp 33). To store these high currents in a machine, special attention must be paied to the interaction of the beam with discontinuities in the surrounding vacuum chamber. RF cavities are among the biggest perturbations in accelerator vacuum chambers and are therefore among the biggest sources of beam instabilities. Accelerating structures of new machines are being designed to have smaller impedance to reduce the beam-cavity interaction. Prototypes for the cavity, input coupler, cryostat, and higher-order mode (HOM) loads were subjected and are tested in CESR. A superconducting (SRF) cavity was installed in addition to the four five-cell normal conducting cavities. As a result, the calorimetry and RF power results agree with predictions up to their respective uncertainties. The results of wake potential sampling suggested that the wake fields of the SRF cavity will not limit the performance of CESR in bunch train operation. No beam instabilities or dangerous HOMs were encountered while sweeping the HOM frequencies using the cavity tuner or while exciting multipole HOMs by displacing the beam off axis. (G.K.)

  18. Atom-probe tomography analyses of niobium superconducting RF cavity materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, J.T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States); Seidman, D.N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States); Yoon, K.E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States)]. E-mail: megabass@northwestern.edu; Bauer, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Reid, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Boffo, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Norem, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    We present the first atom-probe tomographic (APT) measurements of niobium superconducting RF (SCRF) cavity materials. APT involves the atom-by-atom dissection of sharply pointed niobium tips, along with their niobium oxide coatings, via the application of a high-pulsed electric field and the measurement of each ion's mass-to-charge state ratio (m/n) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The resulting atomic reconstructions, typically containing at least 10{sup 5} atoms and with typical dimensions of 10{sup 5} nm{sup 3} (or less), show the detailed, nanoscale chemistry of the niobium oxide coatings, and of the underlying high-purity niobium metal. Our initial results show a nanochemically smooth transition through the oxide layer from near-stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} at the surface to near-stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O as the underlying metal is approached (after {approx}10 nm of surface oxide). The underlying metal, in the near-oxide region, contains a significant amount of interstitially dissolved oxygen ({approx}5-10 at.%), as well as a considerable amount of dissolved hydrogen. The experimental results are interpreted in light of current models of oxide and sub-oxide formation in the Nb-O system.

  19. Surface studies of niobium chemically polished under conditions for superconducting radiofrequency cavity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian; Michael Kelley; Charles Reece

    2005-11-14

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant data sets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (100), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3 - 1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is ?? 30% and that of the surface composition is ?? 5%.

  20. Surface studies of niobium chemically polished under conditions for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States)]. E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org; Wang Shancai [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Plucinski, Lukasz [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Smith, Kevin E. [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Nowell, Matthew M. [EDAX TSL (United States)

    2006-11-30

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially as influenced by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant datasets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (1 0 0), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3-1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is {+-}30% and that of the surface composition is {+-}5%.

  1. Suppression of multipacting in high power RF couplers operating with superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kazakov, S.; Morris, D.; Larter, T.; Plastun, A. S.; Popielarski, J.; Wei, J.; Xu, T.

    2017-06-01

    Capacitive input couplers based on a 50 Ω coaxial transmission line are frequently used to transmit RF power to superconducting (SC) resonators operating in CW mode. It is well known that coaxial transmission lines are prone to multipacting phenomenon in a wide range of RF power level and operating frequency. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University includes two types of quarter wave SC resonators (QWR) operating at 80.5 MHz and two types of half wave SC resonators (HWR) operating at 322 MHz. As was reported in ref. [1] a capacitive input coupler used with HWRs was experiencing strong multipacting that resulted in a long conditioning time prior the cavity testing at design levels of accelerating fields. We have developed an insert into 50 Ω coaxial transmission line that provides opportunity to bias the RF coupler antenna and protect the amplifier from the bias potential in the case of breakdown in DC isolation. Two of such devices have been built and are currently used for the off-line testing of 8 HWRs installed in the cryomodule.

  2. A Two-stage injection-locked magnetron for accelerators with superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, Grigory; Flanagan, Gene; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Mike; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Chase, Brian; Nagaitsev, Sergey; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Solyak, Nikolay; Tupikov, Vitali; Wolff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A concept for a two-stage injection-locked CW magnetron intended to drive Superconducting Cavities (SC) for intensity-frontier accelerators has been proposed. The concept considers two magnetrons in which the output power differs by 15-20 dB and the lower power magnetron being frequency-locked from an external source locks the higher power magnetron. The injection-locked two-stage CW magnetron can be used as an RF power source for Fermilab's Project-X to feed separately each of the 1.3 GHz SC of the 8 GeV pulsed linac. We expect output/locking power ratio of about 30-40 dB assuming operation in a pulsed mode with pulse duration of ~ 8 ms and repetition rate of 10 Hz. The experimental setup of a two-stage magnetron utilising CW, S-band, 1 kW tubes operating at pulse duration of 1-10 ms, and the obtained results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  3. Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardan Upadhyay, Larry Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente

    2011-09-01

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

  4. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q0 applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, S.; Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-01

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb3Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb3Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q0 out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q0 at quench of 8 × 109. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above Hc1, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q0 values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb3Sn cavities in future applications.

  5. Status of Higher Order Mode Beam Position Monitors in 3.9 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Flisgen, T; van Rienen, U; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  6. Status of higher order mode beam position monitors in 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Flisgen, T; Van Rienen, U; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  7. Development of a Solid State RF Amplifier in the kW Regime for Application with Low Beta Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Christian; Borisov, A; Kolesov, Sergej; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Projects based on the use of low beta superconducting cavities for ions are under operation or development at several labs worldwide. Often these cavities are individually driven by RF power sources in the kW regime. For an ongoing project a modular 2 kW, 176 MHz unconditionally stable RF amplifier for CW and pulsed operation was designed, built, and tested. Extended thermal analysis was used to develop a water cooling system in order to optimize the performance of the power transistors and other thermally loaded components. The paper will outline the design concept of the amplifier and present first results on the test of the amplifier with a superconducting cavity.

  8. Impact of nitrogen doping of niobium superconducting cavities on the sensitivity of surface resistance to trapped magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, Dan; Kaufman, John; Liepe, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac require hundreds of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium cavities operating in continuous wave mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0) to keep cryogenic losses within feasible limits. To reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping of niobium cavities has been selected as the cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1 × 1010, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here, we show that the sensitivity to RF losses from trapped magnetic field in a cavity's walls is strongly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120 °C baked cavities show a sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜0.6 and ˜0.8 nΩ/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a higher sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜1 to 5 nΩ/mG trapped. We show that this difference in sensitivities is directly related to the mean free path of the RF surface layer of the niobium: shorter mean free paths lead to less sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the dirty limit (ℓ ≪ ξ0), while longer mean free paths lead to lower sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the clean limit (ℓ ≫ ξ0). These experimental results are also shown to have good agreement with recent theoretical predictions for pinned vortex lines oscillating in RF fields.

  9. High Finesse Fiber Fabry-Perot Cavities: Stabilization and Mode Matching Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gallego, Jose; Alavi, Seyed Khalil; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Meschede, Dieter; Ratschbacher, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications, where they typically require precise stabilization of their optical resonances. Here, we study two different approaches to construct fiber Fabry-Perot resonators and stabilize their length for experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics with neutral atoms. A piezo-mechanically actuated cavity with feedback based on the Pound-Drever-Hall locking technique is compared to a novel rigid cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal self-locking and external temperature tuning. Furthermore, we present a general analysis of the mode matching problem in fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, which explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes and has important implications for the optimal alignment of the fiber resonators. Finally, we discuss the issue of fiber-generated background ph...

  10. A Study of Dynamic Lorentz Force Detuning of 650 MHz {\\beta}g= 0.9 Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    The small bandwidth of superconducting cavities makes the study of dynamic Lorentz force detuning and its compensation indispensable in case of pulsed mode operation of high gradient accelerators. In this paper, we present the study of this detuning and also propose an optimized design for five cell 650 MHz {\\beta}g= 0.9 elliptic superconducting cavities, which will be used in the high energy section of the 1 GeV H-LINAC for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source project, by suitably inserting the inter-cell stiffeners. The paper presents a sequential design methodology which starts with study of static Lorentz force detuning and tunability; and progresses to find out the structural modes and related dynamic detuning values by performing transient calculations. The developed methodology is general in nature and can be used for a three dimensional model of any geometry. The work will be useful for optimizing the design against dynamic Lorentz force detuning of SRF cavities of any shape.

  11. Magnetic and mechanical properties of a finite-thickness superconducting strip with a cavity in oblique magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Guang; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mechanical response of a finite-thickness superconducting strip containing an elliptical cavity in oblique magnetic fields. After the Bean critical state model and the minimum magnetic energy variation procedure are employed, the dependency of the magnetic and mechanical properties on the aspect ratio of the strip and the tilt angles of the applied field and elliptical cavity is discussed. The results show that for a strip in an oblique magnetic field, the current front penetrates non-monotonically from the surface inwards in the initial stage. The magnetization of the strip and the applied field are not collinear, and the angle between them becomes smaller with increasing field. Simultaneously, the strip suffers from a torque produced by the electromagnetic force and then has a tendency to rotate. Compared with the defect-free case, the appearance of the elliptical cavity affects the magnetic property of the strip and further causes significant stress concentration. If the tilt angle of the elliptical cavity is small, a position of stable mechanical equilibrium will exist for the strip. It is interesting that due to the elliptical cavity effect, an oblique magnetization and a non-zero torque are generated even if the applied field is perpendicular or parallel to the strip.

  12. A new measurement tool for characterization of superconducting rf accelerator cavities using high-performance LTS SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Neubert, R [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Knaack, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Wittenburg, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Peters, A [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a new system to measure very low currents in an accelerator environment, using a cryogenic current comparator (CCC). In principle a CCC is a conventional current transformer using the high-performance SQUID technology to sense the magnetic fields caused by the beam current. Since the system is sensitive on a pA level, it is an optimum device to detect dark currents of superconducting cavities. The system presented here is designed for the test facilities of the superconducting accelerator modules for the European XFEL at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg. Measurements in a quiet environment showed that an intrinsic noise level of the CCC of 40 pA Hz{sup -1/2} could be achieved.

  13. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Reece, Hui Tian, Michael Kelley, Chen Xu

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  14. Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on the Performance of a Superconducting Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer

    2005-05-01

    A special two-cell cavity was designed to obtain surface field distributions suitable for investigation of electric and magnetic field effects on cavity performance. The cavity design and preliminary results were presented in a previous contribution. The bulk niobium cavity was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace at 1250 C to improve thermal conductivity. Three seamless hydroformed Nb/Cu cavities of the same design were fabricated to investigate the role of the electron beam welds located in high field areas. This paper will present RF test results at 2 K for the bulk niobium and one of the seamless cavities.

  15. Cold RF test and associated mechanical features correlation of a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity built in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAIJing; JIN Song; WANG Fang; LIU Ke-Xin; R. L.Geng; ZHAO Kui; LU Xiang-Yang; QUAN Sheng-Wen; ZHANG Bao-Cheng; LIN Lin; HAO Jian-Kui; ZHU Feng; XU Wen-Can; HE Fei-Si

    2012-01-01

    The RF performance of a 1.3 G Hz 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity was evaluated at cryogenic temperatures following surface processing by using the standard ILC-style recipe.The cavity is a TESLA-style 9-ccll superconducting niobium cavity,with complete end group components including a higher order mode coupler,built in China for practical applications.An accelerating gradient of 28.6 MV/m was achieved at an unloaded quality factor of 4 × 109.The morphological property of mechanical features on the RF surface of this cavity was characterized through optical inspection.Correlation between the observed mechanical features and the RF performance of the cavity is attempted.

  16. Thermal Stability of Large Al-stabilized Superconducting Magnets Theoritical Analysis of CMS Solenoid.

    CERN Document Server

    Juster, F P

    1998-01-01

    The CMS detector magnet presently under design for the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN is an epoxy-impregnated structure, indirectly cooled by two-phase flow liquid helium. This magnet, based on aluminum-stabilized, mechanically reinforced conductor, is not cryostable : the heat generated by a thermal disturbance can be removed only by thermal diffusivity through the windings. In order to study the thermal stability of the magnet, we have developed numerical codes able to predict the thermal behaviour of an anisotropic and non-homogeneous medium against thermal perturbations due to friction or epoxy cracking. Our 3D finite element codes can calculate the propagation or the recovery of a normal zone in a superconducting magnet, taking into account the current diffusion effect, which strongly affects the heat generated by a transition in the case of large Al-stabilized conductors. Two different codes, CASTEM 2000 and HEATING are described in this paper. We present the results of the CMS Solenoid magnet sta...

  17. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  18. Power system stabilization by superconducting magnetic energy storage with solid-state phase shifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitani, Y.; Uranaka, T.; Tsuji, K. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1995-08-01

    In this paper, a new configuration of power system controller with a combination of superconducting magnetic energy storage and phase shifter, is proposed to improve the stability of a long distance bulk power transmission system. A power system stabilizing control scheme is also proposed. A related simulation shows that the proposed controller is effective for enhancement of power system stability independent of the location of controller in a long distance bulk power transmission system.

  19. Planar-waveguide external cavity laser stabilization for an optical link with 10(-19) frequency stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clivati, Cecilia; Mura, Alberto; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Calosso, Claudio E; Godone, Aldo

    2011-12-01

    We stabilized the frequency of a compact planar-waveguide external cavity laser (ECL) on a Fabry-Perot cavity (FPC) through a Pound-Drever-Hall scheme. The residual frequency stability of the ECL is 10(-14), comparable to the stability achievable with a fiber laser (FL) locked to an FPC through the same scheme. We set up an optical link of 100 km, based on fiber spools, that reaches 10(-19) relative stability, and we show that its performances using the ECL or FL are comparable. Thus ECLs could serve as an excellent replacement for FLs in optical links where cost-effectiveness and robustness are important considerations.

  20. Cryopol: a superconducting magnetostatic cavity for a sup 3 He neutron spin filter

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, J; Bourgeat-Lami, E; Lelievre-Berna, E; Pujol, S; Thomas, F; Thomas, M; Tasset, F

    2000-01-01

    We present a device called 'Cryopol' that provides a clean magnetic environment for a sup 3 He spin filter cell, even in the presence of strong magnetic stray fields like those of a superconducting magnet.

  1. A high gradient test of a single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a feedback waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, Roman; Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Kazakov, Sergey; Wu, Genfa; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Rowe, Allan; Rathke, John

    2015-09-01

    The most severe problem of the international linear collider (ILC-type) is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the collider. In current technology, the maximum acceleration gradient in superconducting (SC) structures is determined mainly by the value of the surface RF magnetic field. In order to increase the gradient, a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure is suggested. Utilization of STWA structure with small phase advance per cell for future high energy linear colliders such as ILCs may provide an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 times larger [1] than a standing wave structure. However, STWA structure requires a feedback waveguide for power redirecting from the end of the structure back to the front end of accelerating structure. Recent tests of a 1.3 GHz model of a single-cell cavity with waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient of a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer [2]. In the present paper, high gradient test results are presented.

  2. A two-fluid model description of the Q-slope and Q-drop as observed in niobium superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting cavities made from niobium allow accelerating gradients of about 50 MV/m close to the theoretical limit. Quite often, however, the RF losses increase with the gradient faster than quadratic. This observation is equivalent with a decrease of the quality factor Q with the gradient, called “Q-slope” for intermediate gradients, and “Q-drop” for larger ones. The paper provides an explanation by an elementary model based on the London two fluid theory of RF superconductivity and compares the model with experimental data for a large variety of cavity tests.

  3. Eigenmode simulations of third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities for FLASH and the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The third harmonic nine-cell cavity (3.9 GHz) for FLASH and the European XFEL has been investigated using simulations performed with the computer code CST Microwave Studio registered. The band structure of monopole, dipole, quadrupole and sextupole modes for an ideal cavity has been studied. The higher order modes for the nine-cell structure are compared with that of the cavity mid-cell. The R/Q of these eigenmodes are calculated.

  4. Stabilization of nonclassical states of the radiation field in a cavity by reservoir engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlette, A; Raimond, J M; Brune, M; Rouchon, P

    2011-07-01

    We propose an engineered reservoir inducing the relaxation of a cavity field towards nonclassical states. It is made up of two-level atoms crossing the cavity one at a time. Each atom-cavity interaction is first dispersive, then resonant, then dispersive again. The reservoir pointer states are those produced by an effective Kerr Hamiltonian acting on a coherent field. We thereby stabilize squeezed states and quantum superpositions of multiple coherent components in a cavity having a finite damping time. This robust decoherence protection method could be implemented in state-of-the-art experiments.

  5. Study of thermal phenomena in niobium superconducting cavities when stiffened by thermal spray coating; Etude des phenomenes thermiques dans les cavites acceleratrices supraconductrices en niobium rigidifiees par projection thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousson, S

    2000-02-01

    The first objective of this thesis is to study a new superconducting cavity stiffening method based on thermal spraying. The principle is to add on the cavity external walls a copper layer using the thermal spraying process. Several tests on samples allowed to measure the thermal and mechanical properties of the layers deposited by several different processes. Measurements performed on 3 and 1.3 GHz niobium cavities, before and after copper deposition, proved the interest and feasibility of the method. The study showed the need to have very dense layers (porosity reduced to the minimum in order to have good mechanical characteristics), and not oxidised (to reduce the coating thermal resistance). As a conclusion, the spraying process performed under controlled atmosphere seems to be the most suited for superconducting cavity stiffening. The tools and analysing methods which have been developed for this study allowed to investigate other phenomena involved in the cavity thermal stability, and particularly the quench, a phenomenon often studied but not in its dynamic. A model is proposed in this thesis to analyse the quench dynamic behaviour using only the fast RF signal measurement during a quench. It has been shown that the quench propagation velocity depends essentially on the accelerating field and the niobium thermal conductivity. A study on the thermometer response time used as diagnostics on cavities proved that the transients during a quench are not efficiently measured with Allen-Bradley sensors: for this application Cernox thermometers are to be preferred due to their lower time response. The development of a thermometer acquisition device for the 3 GHz cavities, used for the study on cavity stiffening, has been adapted for anomalous heating measurements on high gradient 1.3 GHz cavities. It has been possible to prove that anomalous RF losses are responsible of the quality factor degradation, that they are not localised in a small of the cavity, but

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  7. Engineering of a Superconducting 400 MHz Crabbing Cavity for the LHC HiLumi Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, D; De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed new simplified design for the 400 MHz LHC crabbing cavity presents attractive properties compared to conventional designs. The proposed approach can be equally compact in both transverse dimensions and allows horizontal as well as vertical deflection of the beam in the collider. The significant modification of the parallel-bar design with the bars merged to the side walls of the cavity gives improved properties, such as better mode separation and reduced surface fields*. A transverse deflecting voltage of 3 to 5 MV in a single cavity can be expected with the peak surface electric field lower then 50 MV/m and peak magnetic field below 100 mT. This paper presents engineering issues of the proof-of-concept crabbing cavity d esign and discusses the manufacturing techniques. The paper discusses present status of the project including fabrication of the niobium cavity, as well as room temperature and cryogenic testing.

  8. Production of Seamless Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities from Ultra-fine Grained Niobium, Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy Crooks, Ph.D., P.E.

    2009-10-31

    The positron and electron linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) will require over 14,000, nine-cell, one meter length, superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities [ILC Reference Design Report, 2007]. Manufacturing on this scale will benefit from more efficient fabrication methods. The current methods of fabricating SRF cavities involve deep drawing of the halves of each of the elliptical cells and joining them by high-vacuum, electron beam welding, with at least 19 circumferential welds per cavity. The welding is costly and has undesirable effects on the cavity surfaces, including grain-scale surface roughening at the weld seams. Hydroforming of seamless tubes avoids welding, but hydroforming of coarse-grained seamless tubes results in strain-induced surface roughening. Surface roughness limits accelerating fields, because asperities prematurely exceed the critical magnetic field and become normal conducting. This project explored the technical and economic feasibility of an improved processing method for seamless tubes for hydroforming. Severe deformation of bulk material was first used to produce a fine structure, followed by extrusion and flow-forming methods of tube making. Extrusion of the randomly oriented, fine-grained bulk material proceeded under largely steady-state conditions, and resulted in a uniform structure, which was found to be finer and more crystallographically random than standard (high purity) RRR niobium sheet metal. A 165 mm diameter billet of RRR grade niobium was processed into five, 150 mm I.D. tubes, each over 1.8 m in length, to meet the dimensions used by the DESY ILC hydroforming machine. Mechanical properties met specifications. Costs of prototype tube production were approximately twice the price of RRR niobium sheet, and are expected to be comparable with economies of scale. Hydroforming and superconducting testing will be pursued in subsequent collaborations with DESY and Fermilab. SRF Cavities are used to construct

  9. Large-Grain Superconducting Gun Cavity Testing Program Phase One Closing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cullen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dai, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Degen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hahn, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Masi, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schultheiss, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seda, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kellerman, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tallerico, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Todd, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-10-31

    This report details the experimental configuration and RF testing results for the first phase of a large-grained niobium electron gun cavity testing program being conducted in the Small Vertical Testing Facility in the Collider-Accelerator Department. This testing is meant to explore multi-pacting in the cavity and shed light on the behavior of a counterpart cavity of identical geometry installed in the Energy Recovery LINAC being constructed in the Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This test found that the Q of the large-grained cavity at 4 K reached ~6.5 × 108 and at 2 K reached a value of ~6 × 109. Both of these values are about a factor of 10 lower than would be expected for this type of cavity given the calculated surface resistance and the estimated geometry factor for this half-cell cavity. In addition, the cavity reached a peak voltage of 0.6 MV before there was sig-nificant decline in the Q value and a substantial increase in field emission. This relatively low volt-age, coupled with the low Q and considerable field emission suggest contamination of the cavity interior, possibly during experimental assembly. The results may also suggest that additional chemical etching of the interior surface of the cavity may be beneficial. Throughout the course of testing, various challenges arose including slow helium transfer to the cryostat and cable difficulties. These difficulties and others were eventually resolved, and the re-port discusses the operating experience of the experiment thus far and the plans for future work aimed at exploring the nature of multipacting with a copper cathode inserted into the cavity.

  10. Workshop on stability in superconducting magnets, Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 25--29, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Rogers, J.D. (comps.)

    1978-06-01

    The week-long Workshop on Stability in Superconducting Magnets sponsored by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory was a delightful technical success. Experts in theory and practice from all areas of the superconducting community met to discuss the intricacies of the stability problem. Detailed theory, recent data, computer interpretations of both, and engineering or design solutions to assure stability were presented. Emphasis of the workshop was mostly on the aspects of heat transfer necessary to promote stability and recovery. For the use of the attendees we have compiled Martin Wilson's talk of July 31; several summaries of the main sessions, as presented by rapporteurs on August 4; brief synopses of some of the working group sessions; a conference review by Wilson; and a list of attendees.

  11. Implementation of a Controlled-Phase Gate and Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm with Superconducting Charge Qubits in a Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ke-Hui; ZHOU Zheng-Wei; GUO Guang-Can

    2007-01-01

    Based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to a cavity, we propose a scheme for implementing a quantum controlled-phase gate (QPG) and Deutsch-Jozsa (DJ) algorithm by a controllable interaction. In the present scheme, the SQUID works in the charge regime, and the cavity field is ultilized as quantum data-bus, which is sequentially coupled to only one qubit at a time. The interaction between the selected qubit and the data bus, such as resonant and dispersive interaction, can be realized by turning the gate capacitance of each SQUID.Especially, the busis not excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed during the implementation of DJ algorithm.For the QPG operation, the mode of the bus is unchanged in the end of the operation, although its mode is really excited during the operations. Finally, for typical experiment data, we analyze simply the experimental feasibility of the proposed scheme. Based on the simple operation, our scheme may be realized in this solid-state system, and our idea may be realized in other systems.

  12. Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rašković

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7  μm/min⁡ using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

  13. Development of Fundamental Power Coupler for C-ADS Superconducting Elliptical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Kui-Xiang; Pan, Wei-Min; Huang, Tong-Ming; Ma, Qiang; Meng, Fan-Bo

    2016-01-01

    5-cell elliptical cavities are chosen for the main linac of China Accelerator Driven sub-critical System in the medium energy section. Each cavity is driven by one fundamental power coupler delivering RF power up to 150 kW. A single window, coaxial type coupler satisfying high power requirements, class 10 clean room assembly with cavity and low heat load simultaneously was designed. This paper gives the details of RF design, external Q calculation and thermal analysis as well as multipacting simulations of the coupler.

  14. Nitrogen heat treatments of superconducting niobium radio frequency cavities: a pathway to highly efficient accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Grassellino, A; Melnychuk, O; Trenikhina, Y; Crawford, A; Rowe, A; Wong, M; Sergatskov, D; Khabiboulline, T; Barkov, F

    2013-01-01

    We report the experimental finding of a new surface treatment that systematically improves the quality factor of niobium radio frequency cavities for particle acceleration. A combination of annealing in a partial pressure of nitrogen and subsequent electropolishing of the niobium cavity surface leads to extremely low values of the cavities microwave surface resistance, and an improvement in the efficiency of these accelerating structures up to a factor of 3 compared to standard surface treatments, significantly reducing the cryogenic load of SRF cavities for both pulsed and continuous duty cycles. The field dependence of the Mattis-Bardeen/BCS surface resistance RBCS is reversed compared to that of standard chemically polished niobium with dRBCS/dB < 0 in the full range of investigated fields. This treatment can lead to even larger efficiency gains at increasing operating frequencies, and potentially to even larger cost savings by reducing the size of the accelerating structures.

  15. Preparation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled states with multiple superconducting quantum-interference device qubits or atoms in cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chui-Ping; Han, Siyuan

    2004-12-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states of multiple superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) qubits by the use of a microwave cavity. The scheme operates essentially by creating a single photon through an auxiliary SQUID built in the cavity and performing a joint multiqubit phase shift with assistance of the cavity photon. It is shown that entanglement can be generated using this method, deterministic and independent of the number of SQUID qubits. In addition, we show that the present method can be applied to preparing many atoms in a GHZ entangled state, with tolerance to energy relaxation during the operation.

  16. Stability of a laser cavity with non-parabolic phase transformation elements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a general approach to determine the stability of a laser cavity which can include non-conventional phase transformation elements. We consider two pertinent examples of the detailed investigation of the stability of a laser...

  17. Influence of higher order modes on the beam stability in the high power superconducting proton linac

    CERN Document Server

    Schuh, M; Gerigk, F; Tuckmantel, J

    2011-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOMs) can severely limit the operation of superconducting cavities in a linear accelerator with high beam current, high duty factor, and complex pulse structure. The full HOM spectrum has to be analyzed in order to identify potentially dangerous modes already during the design phase and to define their damping requirements. For this purpose a dedicated beam simulation code simulation of higher order mode dynamics (SMD) focused on beam-HOM interaction was developed, taking into account important effects like the HOM frequency spread, beam input jitter, different chopping patterns, as well as klystron and alignment errors. Here, SMD is used to investigate the influence of HOMs in detail in the superconducting proton linac at CERN and their potential to drive beam instabilities in the longitudinal and transverse plane.

  18. Influence of higher order modes on the beam stability in the high power superconducting proton linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Schuh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Higher order modes (HOMs can severely limit the operation of superconducting cavities in a linear accelerator with high beam current, high duty factor, and complex pulse structure. The full HOM spectrum has to be analyzed in order to identify potentially dangerous modes already during the design phase and to define their damping requirements. For this purpose a dedicated beam simulation code simulation of higher order mode dynamics (SMD focused on beam-HOM interaction was developed, taking into account important effects like the HOM frequency spread, beam input jitter, different chopping patterns, as well as klystron and alignment errors. Here, SMD is used to investigate the influence of HOMs in detail in the superconducting proton linac at CERN and their potential to drive beam instabilities in the longitudinal and transverse plane.

  19. Relaxation oscillations, stability, and cavity feedback in a superradiant Raman laser

    CERN Document Server

    Bohnet, Justin G; Weiner, Joshua M; Cox, Kevin C; Thompson, James K

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the relaxation oscillations and amplitude stability properties of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime using a laser-cooled $^{87}$Rb Raman laser. By combining measurements of the laser light field with non-demolition measurements of the atomic populations, we infer the response of the the gain medium represented by a collective atomic Bloch vector. The results are qualitatively explained with a simple model. Measurements and theory are extended to include the effect of intermediate repumping states on the closed-loop stability of the oscillator and the role of cavity-feedback on stabilizing or enhancing relaxation oscillations. This experimental study of the stability of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime will guide future development of superradiant lasers with ultranarrow linewidths.

  20. Relaxation oscillations, stability, and cavity feedback in a superradiant Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet, Justin G; Chen, Zilong; Weiner, Joshua M; Cox, Kevin C; Thompson, James K

    2012-12-21

    We experimentally study the relaxation oscillations and amplitude stability properties of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime using a laser-cooled ^{87}Rb Raman laser. By combining measurements of the laser light field with nondemolition measurements of the atomic populations, we infer the response of the gain medium represented by a collective atomic Bloch vector. The results are qualitatively explained with a simple model. Measurements and theory are extended to include the effect of intermediate repumping states on the closed-loop stability of the oscillator and the role of cavity feedback on stabilizing or enhancing relaxation oscillations. This experimental study of the stability of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime will guide future development of superradiant lasers with ultranarrow linewidths.

  1. Spatio-temporal stability of 1D Kerr cavity solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelens, L.; Parra-Rivas, P.; Leo, F.; Gomila, D.; Matias, Manuel A.; Coen, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Lugiato-Lefever equation (LLE) has been extensively studied since its derivation in 1987, when this meanfield model was introduced to describe nonlinear optical cavities. The LLE was originally derived to describe a ring cavity or a Fabry-Perot resonator with a transverse spatial extension and partially filled with a nonlinear medium but it has also been shown to be applicable to other types of cavities, such as fiber resonators and microresonators. Depending on the parameters used, the LLE can present a monostable or bistable input-output response curve. A large number of theoretical studies have been done in the monostable regime, but the bistable regime has remained widely unexplored. One of the reasons for this was that previous experimental setups were not able to works in such regimes of the parameter space. Nowadays the possibility of reaching such parameter regimes experimentally has renewed the interest in the LLE. In this contribution, we present an in-depth theoretical study of the different dynamical regimes that can appear in parameter space, focusing on the dynamics of localized solutions, also known as cavity solitons (CSs). We show that time-periodic oscillations of a 1D CS appear naturally in a broad region of parameter space. More than this oscillatory regime, which has been recently demonstrated experimentally,1 we theoretically report on several kinds of chaotic dynamics. We show that the existence of CSs and their dynamics is related with the spatial dynamics of the system and with the presence of a codimension-2 point known as a Fold-Hopf bifurcation point. These dynamical regimes can become accessible by using devices such as microresonators, for instance widely used for creating optical frequency combs.

  2. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may pass these bacteria to a child through kissing, sampling the child's food, or sharing eating utensils. ... pass decay-causing bacteria to their children through kissing or sharing eating utensils. Symptoms of Cavities Whether ...

  3. High finesse optical fiber cavities: optimal alignment and robust stabilization (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Gallego, Jose; Ghosh, Sutapa; Alavi, Seyed; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications. Some of the most promising areas of application of these optical micro-resonators with high finesse and small mode volume are in the field of quantum communication and information. The resonator-enhanced light-matter interaction, for instance, provide basis for the realization of efficient optical interfaces between stationary matter-based quantum nodes and flying single-photon qubits. To date fiber Fabry-Perot cavities have been successfully applied in experiments interfacing single photons with a wide range of quantum systems, including cold atoms, ions and solid state emitters as well as quantum optomechanical experiments. Here we address some important practical questions that arise during the experimental implementation of high finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: How can optimal fiber cavity alignment be achieved and how can the efficiency of coupling light from the optical fibers to the cavity mode and vice versa be characterized? How should optical fiber cavities be constructed and stabilized to fulfill their potential for miniaturization and integration into robust scientific and technological devices that can operate outside of dedicated laboratory environments in the future? The first two questions we answer with an analytic mode matching calculation that relates the alignment dependent fiber-to-cavity mode-matching efficiency to the easily measurable dip in the reflected light power at the cavity resonance. Our general analysis provides a simple recipe for the optimal alignment of fiber Fabry-Perot cavities and moreover for the first time explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes. The latter question we explore by investigating a novel, intrinsically rigid fiber cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal

  4. A cavity-stabilized laser with acceleration sensitivity below $10^{-12}$/g

    CERN Document Server

    Leibrandt, David R; Rosenband, Till

    2013-01-01

    We characterize the frequency-sensitivity of a cavity-stabilized laser to inertial forces and temperature fluctuations, and perform real-time feed-forward to correct for these sources of noise. We measure the sensitivity of the cavity to linear accelerations, rotational accelerations, and rotational velocities by rotating it about three axes with accelerometers and gyroscopes positioned around the cavity. The worst-direction linear acceleration sensitivity of the cavity is $2(1) \\times 10^{-11}$/g measured over 0-50 Hz, which is reduced by a factor of 50 to below $10^{-12}$/g for low-frequency accelerations by real-time feed-forward corrections of all of the aforementioned inertial forces. A similar idea is demonstrated in which laser frequency drift due to temperature fluctuations is reduced by a factor of 70 via real-time feed-forward from a temperature sensor located on the outer wall of the cavity vacuum chamber.

  5. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trenikhina, Y., E-mail: yuliatr@fnal.gov [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Romanenko, A., E-mail: aroman@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Zasadzinski, J. F. [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ∼100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120 °C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800 °C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120 °C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120 °C bake.

  6. Uniqueness and local stability for the inverse scattering problem of determining the cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; Lixin; MA; Fuming

    2005-01-01

    Considering a time-harmonic electromagnetic plane wave incident on an arbitrarily shaped open cavity embedded in infinite ground plane, the physical process is modelled by Maxwell's equations. We investigate the inverse problem of determining the shape of the open cavity from the information of the measured scattered field. Results on the uniqueness and the local stability of the inverse problem in the 2-dimensional TM (transverse magnetic) polarization are proved in this paper.

  7. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  8. Oxygen stabilization induced enhancement in superconducting characteristics of high-Tc oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. K.; Chen, J. T.; Huang, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to enhance the electrical and mechanical properties of the high temperature superconducting oxides, high T(sub c) composites were prepared composed of the 123 compounds and AgO. The presence of extra oxygen due to the decomposition of AgO at high temperature is found to stabilize the superconducting 123 phase. Ag is found to serve as clean flux for grain growth and precipitates as pinning center. Consequently, almost two orders of magnitude enhancement in critical current densities were also observed in these composites. In addition, these composites also show much improvement in workability and shape formation. On the other hand, proper oxygen treatment of Y5Ba6Cu11Oy was found to possibly stabilize superconducting phase with T(sub c) near 250 K. I-V, ac susceptibility, and electrical resistivity measurements indicate the existence of this ultra high T(sub c) phase in this compound. Detailed structure, microstructure, electrical, magnetic and thermal studies of the superconducting composites and the ultra high T(sub c) compound are presented and discussed.

  9. Field limit and nano-scale surface topography of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of extreme type II superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The field limit of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of type II superconductor with a large Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied with taking effects of nano-scale surface topography into account. If the surface is ideally flat, the field limit is imposed by the superheating field. On the surface of cavity, however, nano-defects almost continuously distribute and suppress the superheating field everywhere. The field limit is imposed by an effective superheating field given by the product of the superheating field for ideal flat surface and a suppression factor that contains effects of nano-defects. A nano-defect is modeled by a triangular groove with a depth smaller than the penetration depth. An analytical formula for the suppression factor of bulk and multilayer superconductors are derived in the framework of the London theory. As an immediate application, the suppression factor of the dirty Nb processed by the electropolishing is evaluated by using results of surface topographic study. The estimat...

  10. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  11. Epitaxy-stabilized n-type superconducting cuprates

    CERN Document Server

    Naito, M; Tsukada, A

    2002-01-01

    We report the growth of n-type superconducting T'-(La,Ce) sub 2 CuO sub 4 and infinite-layer (IL) (Sr,La)CuO sub 2 thin films by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The bulk synthesis of T'-(La,Ce) sub 2 CuO sub 4 and IL-(Sr,La)CuO sub 2 requires complicated techniques: synthesis at low temperatures below 600 deg C for the former and at high pressures above 3 GPa for the latter. This makes it difficult to grow bulk single crystals. We have found, however, that high-quality single-crystalline films of both compounds can be rather easily prepared by thin-film processes. Single-phase T'-(La,Ce) sub 2 CuO sub 4 films can be obtained for a wide range of x (0.0 <= x <= approx 0.4). The best T sub c sup e sup n sup d is over 30 K, which is the highest in the T' family. For IL-(Sr,La)CuO sub 2 , by using KTaO sub 3 substrates, high T sub c sup e sup n sup d over 39 K and also metallic resistivity were achieved for the first time to our knowledge. We describe the key parameters in the growth and the propertie...

  12. The Importance of the Electron Mean Free Path for Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Maniscalco, J T; Liepe, M

    2016-01-01

    Impurity-doping is an exciting new technology in the field of SRF, producing cavities with record-high quality factor $Q_0$ and BCS surface resistance that decreases with increasing RF field. Recent theoretical work has offered a promising explanation for this anti-Q-slope, but the link between the decreasing surface resistance and the short mean free path of doped cavities has remained elusive. In this work we investigate this link, finding that the magnitude of this decrease varies directly with the mean free path: shorter mean free paths correspond with stronger anti-Q-slopes. We draw a theoretical connection between the mean free path and the overheating of the quasiparticles, which leads to the reduction of the anti-Q-slope towards the normal Q-slope of long-mean-free-path cavities. We also investigate the sensitivity of the residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux, a property which is greatly enhanced for doped cavities, and calculate an optimal doping regime for a given amount of trapped flux. We f...

  13. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Baboi, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrum...

  14. Power system stabilization by superconducting magnetic energystorage connected to rotating exciter

    OpenAIRE

    Mitani, Yasunori; Tsuji, K.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a combination of a rotating exciter and a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system for efficient power system stabilization. A SMES system connected to an exciter rotating with a turbine-rotor shaft is proposed. The exciter is installed exclusively to supply current for the SMES. Since electrical power output from the SMES is converted into a mechanical torque of the generator directly by the exciter, it is expected that power swings of the generator will be ...

  15. Holonomic quantum computation with superconducting charge-phase qubits in a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Zhibo [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China) and Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)], E-mail: zbfeng010@163.com; Zhang Xinding [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2008-03-03

    We theoretically propose a feasible scheme to realize holonomic quantum computation with charge-phase qubits placed in a microwave cavity. By appropriately adjusting the controllable parameters, each charge-phase qubit is set as an effective four-level subsystem, based on which a universal set of holonomic quantum gates can be realized. Further analysis shows that our system is robust to the first-order fluctuation of the gate charges, and the intrinsic leakages between energy levels can be ignored.

  16. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Bjarke T R; Schäffer, Stefan A; Westergaard, Philip G; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynami...

  17. Stability Analysis of The Twisted Superconducting Semilocal Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Garaud, Julien

    2007-01-01

    We study the stability properties of the twisted vortex solutions in the semilocal Abelian Higgs model with a global $\\mathbf{SU}(2)$ invariance. This model can be viewed as the Weinberg-Salam theory in the limit where the non-Abelian gauge field decouples, or as a two component Ginzburg-Landau theory. The twisted vortices are characterized by a constant global current ${\\cal I}$, and for ${\\cal I}\\to 0$ they reduce to the semilocal strings, that is to the Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen vortices embedded into the semilocal model. Solutions with ${\\cal I}\

  18. Quantum Popov robust stability analysis of an optical cavity containing a saturated Kerr medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ian R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper applies results of the robust stability of nonlinear quantum systems to a system consisting of an optical cavity containing a saturated Kerr medium. The system is characterised by a Hamiltonian operator that contains a non-quadratic term involving a quartic function of the annihilation and creation operators. A saturated version of the Kerr nonlinearity leads to a sector-bounded nonlinearity that enables a quantum small gain theorem to be applied to this system in order to analyse its stability. Also, a non-quadratic version of a quantum Popov stability criterion is presented and applied to analyse the stability of this system.

  19. Stabilizing Entanglement via Symmetry-Selective Bath Engineering in Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimchi-Schwartz, M. E.; Martin, L.; Flurin, E.; Aron, C.; Kulkarni, M.; Tureci, H. E.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-06-01

    Bath engineering, which utilizes coupling to lossy modes in a quantum system to generate nontrivial steady states, is a tantalizing alternative to gate- and measurement-based quantum science. Here, we demonstrate dissipative stabilization of entanglement between two superconducting transmon qubits in a symmetry-selective manner. We utilize the engineered symmetries of the dissipative environment to stabilize a target Bell state; we further demonstrate suppression of the Bell state of opposite symmetry due to parity selection rules. This implementation is resource efficient, achieves a steady-state fidelity F =0.70 , and is scalable to multiple qubits.

  20. Non-linear classical dynamics in a superconducting circuit containing a cavity and a Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meister, Selina; Kubala, Bjoern; Gramich, Vera; Mecklenburg, Michael; Stockburger, Juergen T.; Ankerhold, Joachim [Institute for Complex Quantum Systems, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments a superconducting hybrid circuit consisting of a voltage biased Josephson junction in series with a resonator is studied. For strong driving the dynamics of the system can be very complex, even in the classical regime. Studying the dissipative dynamics within a Langevin-type description, we obtain well-defined dynamical steady states. In contrast to the well-known case of anharmonic potentials, like the Duffing or parametric oscillator, in our case the non-linearity stems from the peculiar way the external drive couples to the system [2]. We investigate the resonance behaviour of this non-linear hybrid system, in particular when driving at higher- or subharmonics. The resulting down- and up-conversions can be observed both, as resonances in the I-V curve, and in the emitted microwave radiation, which yields additional spectral information.

  1. Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gurevich, Alexander V. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-03-03

    Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by {approx_equal} 10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to {approx} 15-20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to {approx_equal} 50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

  2. Study of field-limiting defects in superconducting RF cavities for electron-accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderhold, Sebastian

    2015-02-15

    Superconducting radio-frequency resonators made from niobium are an integral part of many accelerator projects. Their main advantage are the low ohmic losses resulting in the possibility for a long pulse structure and high duty cycles up to continous wave (cw) operation. The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) are based on this technology. In some cases the resonators reach accelerating electric fields close to the theoretical limit of bulk niobium. Yet most resonators are limited at lower fields and mass production for large scale accelerator projects suffers from the spread in the achievable gradient per resonator. The main limitations are field emission and the breakdown of superconductivity (quench). While field emission is mostly attributed to the overall surface cleanliness of the resonator, quench is usually associated with local defects. Optical inspection of the inner surface of the resonators with unprecedented resolution, accuracy and a special illumination has been established at DESY and used to study such local surface defects. More than 30 resonators have been inspected. Distinctive features from these inspections have been catalogued and assessed for their potential risk for the performance of the resonator. Several confirmed quenching defects could be extracted for further analysis and could be traced back to likely origins in the production process. A new, automated set-up for optical inspection of large series of resonators, named OBACHT, has been developed and successfully commissioned. Its design includes the minimal need for operator interference, reproducibility, robustness and versatility, in order to fit the requirements for application both in a laboratory and in a production environment. To facilitate the comparison of the results obtained during the global R and D effort on resonators for the ILC, the ILC global yield database has been established. The yield and selection rules for the

  3. Developments of electrical joints for aluminum-stabilized superconducting cables

    CERN Document Server

    Curé, B

    1999-01-01

    Electrical joints for the aluminum-stabilized conductors of the LHC experiment magnets have been studied. Two techniques have been tested: electron beam welding and MIG welding. The joint resistance was measured as a function of the magnetic field on ring shaped samples using the MA.RI.S.A. test facility, wherein current is induced in the test conductor by a varying magnetic field. The resistance is obtained by measuring either the voltage drop or the decay time. Calculation and finite-element simulation have been performed in order to separate the effect of both the copper-aluminum contact resistivity and the aluminum resistivity from the effect due to the joint technique (joint configuration, resistivity of the filler material, increasing of aluminum resistivity in the welding zone). The copper-aluminum contact resistivity and the current transfer length were obtained by measurements of the joint resistance of butt welded samples. (2 refs).

  4. Developments of electrical joints for aluminium stabilized superconducting tables

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Horváth, I; Musenich, R; Prian, C

    1999-01-01

    Electrical joints for the aluminum stabilized conductors of the LHC experiment magnets have been studied. Two techniques have been tested: electron beam welding and MIG welding. The joint resistance was measured as a function of the magnetic field on ring shaped samples using the MA.RI.S.A. test facility: varying the magnet field, current is induced in the sample. The resistance is obtained by measuring either the voltage drop or the decay time. Calculation and FE simulation have been performed in order to separate the effect of both the copper-aluminum contact resistivity and the aluminum resistivity from the effect due to the joint technique ( joint configuration, resistivity of the filler material, increasing of aluminum resistivity in the welding zone). The copper-aluminum contact resistivity and the current transfer length were obtained by measurements of the joint resistance of butt welded samples

  5. Realization of the Greenberg-Horne (ghz) State and Swap Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices in a Cavity via Adiabatic Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, An-Shou; Cheng, Yong-Jin; Liu, Ji-Bing; Li, Tie-Ping

    We propose an alternative scheme to prepare the Greenberg-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state and realize a SWAP gate by using Superconducting Quantum-interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to a cavity. The present scheme, based on the adiabatic evolution of dark state, constitutes a decoherence-free method in the sense that spontaneous emission and cavity damping are avoided. Besides, the standard GHZ state can be directly obtained without measurement or any auxiliary SQUIDs and the construction of the SWAP gate does not require a composition of elementary gates from a universal set. Thus the procedure is simplified and decoherence is greatly suppressed.

  6. Conceptual Design Of An Ideal Variable Coupler For Superconducting Radiofrequency 1.3GHz Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the development of over-moded RF component as an undulator, we explored another over-moded structure that could serve the variable coupling for SRF purpose. This application is to fulfill variation of S11 from 0 to -20db with CW power of 7 KW. The static heat loss in the coupler is trivial from calculation. An advantage of this coupler is that the thermal isolation between the 2K and 300K section is considerable by vacuum separation. Within this coupler, only a single propagation mode is allowed at each section, and thus, the fact that no energy is converted to high order mode bring almost full match without loss. The analytical and numerical calculation for a two window variable coupler is designed and optimized. A RF power variation is illustrated in the scattering matrix and coupling to cavity is also discussed.

  7. Wirebond crosstalk and cavity modes in large chip mounts for superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenner, J; Neeley, M; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lenander, M; Lucero, Erik; O' Connell, A D; Sank, D; Wang, H; Weides, M; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M, E-mail: martinis@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We analyze the performance of a microwave chip mount that uses wirebonds to connect the chip and mount grounds. A simple impedance ladder model predicts that transmission crosstalk between two feedlines falls off exponentially with distance at low frequencies, but rises to near unity above a resonance frequency set by the chip to ground capacitance. Using SPICE simulations and experimental measurements of a scale model, the basic predictions of the ladder model were verified. In particular, by decreasing the capacitance between the chip and box grounds, the resonance frequency increased and transmission decreased. This model then influenced the design of a new mount that improved the isolation to - 65 dB at 6 GHz, even though the chip dimensions were increased to 1 cm x 1 cm, three times as large as our previous devices. We measured a coplanar resonator in this mount as preparation for larger qubit chips, and were able to identify cavity, slotline, and resonator modes.

  8. Measures of maximum magnetic field in 3 GHz radio frequency superconducting cavities; Mesures du gradient accelerateur maximum dans des cavites supraconductrices en regime impulsionnel a 3 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Catherine [Paris-11 Univ., 91 Orsay (France)

    2000-01-19

    Theoretical models have shown that the maximum magnetic field in radio frequency superconducting cavities is the superheating field H{sub sh}. For niobium, H{sub sh} is 25 - 30% higher than the thermodynamical H{sub c} field: H{sub sh} within (240 - 274) mT. However, the maximum magnetic field observed so far is in the range H{sub c,max} = 152 mT for the best 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. This field is lower than the critical field H{sub c1} above which the superconductor breaks up into divided normal and superconducting zones (H{sub c1}{<=}H{sub c}). Thermal instabilities are responsible for this low value. In order to reach H{sub sh} before thermal breakdown, high power short pulses are used. The cavity needs then to be strongly over-coupled. The dedicated test bed has been built from the collaboration between Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) - Sezione di Genoa, and the Service d'Etudes et Realisation d'Accelerateurs (SERA) of Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL). The maximum magnetic field, H{sub rf,max}, measurements on INFN cavities give lower results than the theoretical speculations and are in agreement with previous results. The superheating magnetic fields is linked to the magnetic penetration depth. This superconducting characteristic length can be used to determine the quality of niobium through the ratio between the resistivity measured at 300 K and 4.2 K in the normal conducting state (RRR). Results have been compared to previous ones and agree pretty well. They show that the RRR measured on cavities is superficial and lower than the RRR measured on samples which concerns the volume. (author)

  9. Frequency stabilization in FBG external cavity semiconductor laser based on acetylene absorption method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-quan; Su Feng-yan; Kang Li-li

    2008-01-01

    A frequency-stabilized 1.53 μm FBG external-cavity semiconductor laser by using acetylene absorption is presented and its basic principles are introduced. Graded refractive index fiber and pigtailed fiber are used in the absorption air chamber to enhance the coupling stability. The impact of the background power is eliminated by using the third-harmonic modelocking technique. A lock-in amplifier is utilized to ensure that the output laser wavelength is locked at the C2H2 absorption line of 1530.37 nm. The frequency stability reaches 10-8 within 24 h.

  10. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R; Flisgen, T; Glock, H W

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using Higher Order Mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR) and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  11. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Pei [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M.; Shinton, Ian R. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter [Institut fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  12. A digital frequency stabilization system of external cavity diode laser based on LabVIEW FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuohuan; Hu, Zhaohui; Qi, Lu; Wang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Frequency stabilization for external cavity diode laser has played an important role in physics research. Many laser frequency locking solutions have been proposed by researchers. Traditionally, the locking process was accomplished by analog system, which has fast feedback control response speed. However, analog system is susceptible to the effects of environment. In order to improve the automation level and reliability of the frequency stabilization system, we take a grating-feedback external cavity diode laser as the laser source and set up a digital frequency stabilization system based on National Instrument's FPGA (NI FPGA). The system consists of a saturated absorption frequency stabilization of beam path, a differential photoelectric detector, a NI FPGA board and a host computer. Many functions, such as piezoelectric transducer (PZT) sweeping, atomic saturation absorption signal acquisition, signal peak identification, error signal obtaining and laser PZT voltage feedback controlling, are totally completed by LabVIEW FPGA program. Compared with the analog system, the system built by the logic gate circuits, performs stable and reliable. User interface programmed by LabVIEW is friendly. Besides, benefited from the characteristics of reconfiguration, the LabVIEW program is good at transplanting in other NI FPGA boards. Most of all, the system periodically checks the error signal. Once the abnormal error signal is detected, FPGA will restart frequency stabilization process without manual control. Through detecting the fluctuation of error signal of the atomic saturation absorption spectrum line in the frequency locking state, we can infer that the laser frequency stability can reach 1MHz.

  13. Measurement of groove features and dimensions of the vertical test cathode and the choke joint of the superconducting electron gun cavity of the Energy Recovery LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, L.; Ke, M.

    2011-10-13

    A testing program for the superconducting electron gun cavity that has been designed for the Energy Recovery LINAC is being planned. The goal of the testing program is to characterize the RF properties of the gun cavity at superconducting temperatures and, in particular, to study multipacting that is suspected to be occurring in the choke joint of the cavity where the vertical test cathode is inserted. The testing program will seek to understand the nature and cause of this multipacting and attempt to eliminate it, if possible, by supplying sufficient voltage to the cavity. These efforts are motivated by the multipacting issues that have been observed in the processing of the fine-grain niobium gun cavity. This cavity, which is being processed at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory for Brookhaven, has encountered multipacting at a gradient of approximately 3 MV/m and, to date, has resisted efforts at elimination. Because of this problem, a testing program is being established here in C-AD that will use the large-grain niobium gun cavity that currently resides at Brookhaven and has been used for room-temperature measurements. The large-grain and fine-cavities are identical in every aspect of construction and only differ in niobium grain size. Thus, it is believed that testing and conditioning of the large-grain cavity should yield important insights about the fine-grain cavity. One element of this testing program involves characterizing the physical features of the choke joint of the cavity where the multipacting is believed to be occurring and, in particular the grooves of the joint. The configuration of the cavity and the vertical test cathode is shown in Figure 1. In addition, it is important to characterize the groove of the vertical test cathode. The grooved nature of these two components was specifically designed to prevent multipacting. However, it is suspected that, because of the chemical processing that the fine-grain gun cavity underwent along with the

  14. Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

    CERN Document Server

    Le Duff, J; Thomas, C

    2000-01-01

    Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

  15. Frequency comb generation beyond the Lugiato-Lefever equation: multi-stability and super cavity solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The generation of optical frequency combs in microresonators is considered without resorting to the mean-field approximation. New dynamical regimes are found to appear for high intracavity power that cannot be modeled using the Lugiato-Lefever equation. Using the Ikeda map we show the existence of multi-valued stationary states and analyse their stability. Period doubled patterns are considered and a novel type of super cavity soliton associated with the multi-stable states is predicted.

  16. Frequency comb generation beyond the Lugiato-Lefever equation: multi-stability and super cavity solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The generation of optical frequency combs in microresonators is considered without resorting to the mean-field approximation. New dynamical regimes are found to appear for high intracavity power that cannot be modeled using the Lugiato-Lefever equation. Using the Ikeda map we show the existence of multi-valued stationary states and analyse their stability. Period doubled patterns are considered and a novel type of super cavity soliton associated with the multi-stable states is predicted.

  17. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Cavity-Stabilized Ethylene/Air Premixed Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jacqueline; Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Rauch, Andreas; Chelliah, Harsha

    2016-11-01

    Cavity flame holders have been shown to be important for flame stabilization in scramjet combustors. In the present study the stabilization of a lean premixed ethylene/air flame in a rectangular cavity at thermo-chemical conditions relevant to scramjet combustors is simulated using a compressible reacting multi-block direct numerical simulation solver, S3D, incorporating a 22 species ethylene-air reduced chemical model. The fuel is premixed with air to an equivalence ratio of 0.4 and enters the computational domain at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 0.6. An auxiliary inert channel flow simulation is used to provide the turbulent velocity profile at the inlet for the reacting flow simulation. The detailed interaction between intense turbulence, nonequilibrium concentrations of radical species formed in the cavity and mixing with the premixed main stream under density variations due to heat release rate and compressibility effects is quantified. The mechanism for flame stabilization is quantified in terms of relevant non-dimensional parameters, and detailed analysis of the flame and turbulence structure will be presented. We acknowledge the sponsorship of the AFOSR-NSF Joint Effort on Turbulent Combustion Model Assumptions and the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  18. Current distribution and stability of LTS/HTS hybrid superconducting conductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Current distribution and stability of a hybrid LTS/HTS superconductor, consisting of multifilamentary NbTi/Cu and Bi2223/Ag tapes, were numerically analyzed according to power-law models. The results showed that most of current passed through the LTS and the current increased in the HTS with temperature rise when the transport current was below the critical current of the hybrid conductor. The quench propagation velocity of the hybrid conductor was smaller but its minimum quench energy was larger than those of LTS conductors, indicating that the stability of the hybrid superconducting conductor was effectively improved and a high engineering current density was simultaneously achieved. Finally, a hybrid sample, made by soldering Bi2223/Ag tape onto NbTi/Cu conductor, was prepared and tested successfully at helium temperature. The experimental results qualitatively agreed with the simulated ones.

  19. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  20. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-06-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  1. Investigations of repetition rate stability of a mode-locked quantum dot semiconductor laser in an auxiliary optical fiber cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breuer, Stefan; Elsässer, Wolfgang; McInerney, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated experimentally the pulse train (mode beating) stability of a monolithic mode-locked multi-section quantum-dot laser with an added passive auxiliary optical fiber cavity. Addition of the weakly coupled (¿ -24dB) cavity reduces the current-induced shift d¿/dI of the principal...

  2. CHECHIA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Technical Univ. Warsaw (Poland). ELHEP Laboratory, ISE; Simrock, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). TESLA

    2005-07-01

    The initial control of the superconductive cavity has recently been performed by applying the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system in DESY Hamburg. This first experiment turned attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the cavity is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The cavity parameters identification is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  3. The stability of motion of satellites with cavities partially filled with liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Meirovitch, L.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to determine rigorously the effect of viscous dissipation on the stability and time-dependent motion of a spinning rigid body with a spherical cavity partially filled with liquid. The cavity is such that its center does not lie on the body axis of rotation. The work includes the problem formulation, consisting of the boundary-value problem for the liquid and moment equations for the entire system. Because of large Reynold's numbers involved, viscosity effects are negligible everywhere except for a thin boundary layer near the wetted surface. Using a boundary-layer analysis, the liquid problem is reduced to the solution of the inviscid equations subject to modified boundary conditions.

  4. Stabilizing and controlling domain walls and dark-ring cavity solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Arjona, Isabel; Silva, Fernando; Roldán, Eugenio; de Valcárcel, Germán

    2004-05-17

    We demonstrate two alternative techniques for controlling and stabilizing domain walls (DW) in phase-sensitive, nonlinear optical resonators. The first of them uses input pumps with spatially modulated phase and can be applied also to dark-ring cavity solitons. An optical memory based on the latter is demonstrated. Here the physical mechanism of control relies on the advection caused to any feature by the phase gradients. The second technique uses a plane wave input pump with holes of null intensity across its transverse plane, which are able to capture DWs. Here the physical mechanism of control is of topological nature. When distributed as a regular array, these holes delimit spatial optical bits which constitute an optical memory. These techniques are illustrated in a degenerate optical parametric oscillator model, but can be applied to any phase-sensitive nonlinear optical cavity.

  5. Stability analysis of a C-band 500-kW klystron with a multi-cell output cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jihyun; Park, Sung-Ju; Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun

    2016-09-01

    A prototype 5-GHz 500-kW CW klystron (model E3762 provided by Toshiba Electron Tubes & Devices Co. Ltd.) has been operating as the RF source for the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system in the KSTAR tokamak. A cavity design study is being carried out with a simulation code based on the main klystron's operation parameters in order to investigate how the efficiency of the 5-GHz 500-kW CW klystron prototype can be enhanced. This is being done by simulating the klystron's performances for various cavity parameters, including the number of cavities, the inter-cavity distance, and the cavity's tuning frequencies. The simulation has been done with the FCI (field charge interaction) code aided by a matlab script for scanning input parameters. The initial set of scan parameters was obtained by benchmarking the E3762 klystron, and we are able to obtain optimized design parameters for a cavity system with better efficiency by adopting a multi-cell output cavity. However, the multi-cell output cavity is prone to self-oscillations due to the prolonged (several half RF periods) beam-field interaction along its multiple gaps. We have checked the feasibility of the optimization by evaluating the stability of the output cavity system. The stability is given by the ratio of a beam-loading conductance to the circuit conductance.

  6. Numerical analysis for the evaluation of the stability of underground cavities in calcarenite interacting with buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanza, Riccardo; Lollino, Piernicola; Oryem Ciantia, Matteo; di Prisco, Claudio; Crosta, Giovanni; Frigerio, Gabriele

    2013-04-01

    Soft and highly porous rocks such as tuffs and calcarenites are very common rocks. Due to their porous calcareous structure they are quite prone to water induced weathering mechanisms. Onshore and inland natural underground cavities are evident signs of these phenomena and of the effects in terms of failure. These materials have been largely employed in the past as building and ornamental stones and as sites to excavate underground cavities for different uses. The world famous Unesco site of "Sassi di Matera", the underground cavities in Canosa di Puglia and Gravina di Puglia , or the calcarenite cliff and natural caves of Polignano a Mare are the most representative cases. Nowadays, many of these are deteriorating because of weathering due to humidity, water infiltration, environmental pollution, and direct exposure to marine aerosols and meteoric water precipitations. In all these cases, a careful assessment of the safety of the built environment and a conscious identification of the safety measures cannot be separated from the analysis of the interaction between the cavities and the overlying buildings, and of the evolution and spatial distribution of the weathering processes. This contribute summarizes the authors' experience on the subject and suggests a methodological approach to quantitatively assess the stability of underground cavities. Starting from experimental evidences at micro and macroscale, the main debonding mechanisms have been taken into account in numerical models. The time-evolution scenarios of the weathering processes is introduced in three-dimensional numerical modelling. The intention is to provide a potentially useful tool for risk assessment in similar complex geomechanical situations.

  7. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  8. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nageshwar [Magnetic and Superconducting Materials Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, M.P. (India); Deo, M.N. [High Pressure & Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Roy, S.B. [Magnetic and Superconducting Materials Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, M.P. (India)

    2016-09-11

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  9. Long Term Stability of the LHC Superconducting Cryodipoles after Outdoor Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Seyvet, F; Bertarelli, A; Denis, O; El-Kallassi, P; Fernández-Cano, E D; Fessia, P; Ilie, S D; Jeanneret, J B; Letant, D; Poncet, A; Pugnat, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, Stefano; Siemko, A; Todesco, E; Tommasini, D; Veness, R; Vullierme, B; Wildner, E

    2006-01-01

    The main superconducting dipoles for the LHC are being stored outdoors for periods from a few weeks to several years after conditioning with dry nitrogen gas. Such a storage before installation in the 27 km circumference tunnel may affect not only the mechanical and cryogenic functionality of the cryodipoles but also their quench and field performance. A dedicated task force was established to study all aspects of long term behaviour of the stored cryodipoles, with particular emphasis on electrical and vacuum integrity, quench training behaviour, magnetic field quality, performance of the thermal insulation, mechanical stability of magnet shape and of the interface between cold mass and cryostat, degradation ofmaterials and welds. In particular, one specifically selected cryodipole stored outdoors for more than one year, was retested at cold. In addition, various tests have been carried out on the cryodipole assembly and on the most critical subcomponents to study aspects such as the hygrothermal behaviour of...

  10. THELMA code electromagnetic model of ITER superconducting cables and application to the ENEA stability experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotti, M.; Nijhuis, A.; Ribani, P. L.; Savoldi Richard, L.; Zanino, R.

    2006-10-01

    The new THELMA code, including a thermal-hydraulic (TH) and an electro-magnetic (EM) model of a cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC), has been developed. The TH model is at this stage relatively conventional, with two fluid components (He flowing in the annular cable region and He flowing in the central channel) being particular to the CICC of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and two solid components (superconducting strands and jacket/conduit). In contrast, the EM model is novel and will be presented here in full detail. The results obtained from this first version of the code are compared with experimental results from pulsed tests of the ENEA stability experiment (ESE), showing good agreement between computed and measured deposited energy and subsequent temperature increase.

  11. Load frequency stabilization of four area hydro thermal system using Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Ruby meena

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Automatic generation control in electric power system design is a major concern nowadays due to its rising size, varying structure, integration of renewable-energy sources and distributed generators to meet the growing demand. In this paper, automatic generation control of an interconnected four area hydro thermal system examined. Each area equipped with reheat turbine for thermal system and hydro turbine with electric governor for hydro system. Load frequency stabilization gained by including Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system (SMES in all areas. A comparative analysis made between Proportional and Integral (PI controller with Fuzzy Logic controller with and without including SMES in the four area power system. The designed Fuzzy Logic Controller can generate best dynamic performance for step load perturbations given in all areas. The system simulation realized by using MATLAB software.

  12. Cryogenic testing of the 2.1 GHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A., E-mail: arsenyev@mit.edu; Temkin, Richard J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terrence L.; Rogacki, Adam R. [Niowave, Inc., 1012 North Walnut Street, Lansing, Michigan 48906 (United States)

    2016-05-30

    We present results from cryogenic tests of the multi-cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving high average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery-linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam break-up instability, caused by parasitic higher order modes (HOMs) interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The multi-cell cavity was designed and fabricated of niobium. Two cryogenic (vertical) tests were conducted. The high unloaded Q-factor was demonstrated at a temperature of 4.2 K at accelerating gradients up to 3 MV/m. The measured value of the unloaded Q-factor was 1.55 × 10{sup 8}, in agreement with prediction.

  13. Mechanism Analysis and Experimental Validation of Employing Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage to Enhance Power System Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mechanism analysis and the experimental validation of employing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES to enhance power system stability. The models of the SMES device and the single-machine infinite-bus (SMIB system with SMES are deduced. Based on the model of the SMIB system with SMES, the action mechanism of SMES on a generator is analyzed. The analysis takes the impact of SMES location and the system operating point into consideration, as well. Based on the mechanism analysis, the P-controller and Q-controller are designed utilizing the phase compensation method to improve the damping of the SMIB system. The influence of factors, such as SMES location, transmission system reactance, the dynamic characteristics of SMES and the system operating point, on the damping improvement of SMES, is investigated through root locus analysis. The simulation results of the SMIB test system verify the analysis conclusions and controller design method. The laboratory results of the 150-kJ/100-kW high-temperature SMES (HT-SMES device validate that the SMES device can effectively enhance the damping, as well as the transient stability of the power system.

  14. Ultra-high quality factors in superconducting niobium cavities in ambient magnetic fields up to 190 mG

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, A; Crawford, A C; Sergatskov, D A; Melnychuk, O

    2014-01-01

    Ambient magnetic field, if trapped in the penetration depth, leads to the residual resistance and therefore sets the limit for the achievable quality factors in superconducting niobium resonators for particle accelerators. Here we show that a complete expulsion of the magnetic flux can be performed and leads to: 1) record quality factors $Q > 2\\times10^{11}$ up to accelerating gradient of 22 MV/m; 2) $Q\\sim3\\times10^{10}$ at 2 K and 16 MV/m in up to 190 mG magnetic fields. This is achieved by large thermal gradients at the normal/superconducting phase front during the cooldown. Our findings open up a way to ultra-high quality factors at low temperatures and show an alternative to the sophisticated magnetic shielding implemented in modern superconducting accelerators.

  15. Influences of Resistor-Type Superconducting Fault Current Limiter on Power System Transient Stability with Asymmetrical Short-Circuit Faults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ping Gu; Zhi-Long Yang

    2008-01-01

    The transient stability of a single machine to infinite-busbar power system with resistor- type superconducting fault current limiters (SFCL) is analyzed under asymmetrical short-circuit fault conditions. The SFCL is considered to introduce a resistance into the three-phase circuits when faults occur. Based on the power-angle curves for different short-circuit conditions of the single-line to ground, double-line to ground and line to line short-circuit faults, the influences of the SFCLs on transient stability are analyzed in detail. The time-domain simulation of transient stability is carried out to verify the analytical results.

  16. The effect of the wire design parameters on the stability of MgB{sub 2} superconducting coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majkic, G; Salama, K [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4006 (United States); Alessandrini, M; Laskaris, E T [General Electric Company, Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States)], E-mail: gmajkic@uh.edu

    2009-03-15

    The thermal stability of superconducting wires is one of the important issues for wire applications. We present a numerical study on the effect of the wire design parameters on the quench behavior of superconducting MgB{sub 2} wire employed in coils. The model considers a stack of MgB{sub 2} wires of rectangular cross section separated by insulation layers and subjected to a thermal disturbance. The problem is solved on a two-dimensional domain and employs the current sharing concept in the transition between superconducting and normal states. The effects of three design parameters in wire manufacturing are investigated. Quench behavior is compared for wires having different filling factor of superconducting filaments, different volume of copper stabilizer, and different residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values for copper. The results indicate that the quench propagation velocity (QPV) at 1.5 T is weakly affected by changes in the volume and electrical properties of copper, whereas the minimum quench energy (MQE) is strongly dependent on the RRR value of copper and can increase by a factor of nearly 2 with the RRR varying from 30 to 150. Both the MQE and QPV change remarkably by varying the MgB{sub 2} filling factor. The MQE drops by a factor of 6 and the QPV increases by a factor of 2 with the filling factor varying from 10.5% to 25%.

  17. Study of recovery characteristics of 2nd generation HTS tapes with different stabilizers for resistive type superconducting fault current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Jie, E-mail: 1988725sheng@163.com; Zeng, Weina; Ma, Jun; Yao, Zhihao; Li, Zhuyong; Jin, Zhijian; Hong, Zhiyong

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Three methods of measuring the recovery time of HTS tapes are compared. • Four tapes with different stabilizers were tested to compare their recovery characteristics. • The HTS tapes with thinner stabilizers have better recovery characteristics. • Encapsulation makes the recovery characteristics of HTS tapes worse. • The results can be reference of the re-reclosed operation time interval. - Abstract: The resistive type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is one of the most important superconducting power applications nowadays. As known, this type of SFCL is settled directly in the power transmission line. When a short fault happens, the temperature of the superconductors in the SFCL will increase sharply due to the huge generated heat. This means the superconductors need time to recover the superconducting properties and be ready for the next short fault. So the recovery characteristics become one of the most crucial features of the resistive type SFCL. In this paper, several different kinds of measuring methods are presented to calculate the recovery time of the HTS tapes, and comparison of these methods is also carried out by a standard test. On basis of this, samples with different kinds of stabilizers are used to explore the influence of stabilizer on their recovery characteristics. In addition, the influence of the encapsulation technology is also discussed in this paper.

  18. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator; Etude et developpement d'un coupleur de puissance pour les cavites supraconductrices destinees aux accelerateurs de protons de haute intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souli, M

    2007-07-15

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q{sub c} in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  19. On the spatial stability of a liquid jet in the presence of vapor cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lü, Ming; Ning, Zhi, E-mail: zhining@bjtu.edu.cn; Lu, Mei; Yan, Kai; Fu, Juan; Sun, Chunhua [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2013-11-15

    A dispersion equation describing the effect of temperature differences on the stability of three-dimensional cylindrical liquid jets in the presence of vapor cavities is presented by the use of linear stability analysis. The mathematical model and its solving method are verified by comparing them with the data in the literature, and then the effect of temperature differences between jet and surrounding gas on the spatial stability of liquid jet is investigated. Some conclusions can be drawn from the results of this investigation: (1) the temperature difference destabilizes the liquid jet when the jet liquid is cooler than the surrounding gas, (2) the smallest atomized droplet without taking into account the effect of temperature differences is significantly larger than that when the effect of temperature differences is taken into account, (3) the effect of temperature differences on the stability of liquid jet has little relationship with azimuthal wave modes, (4) cavitation destabilizes the liquid jet when the value of the bubble volume fraction is not greater than 0.1 (0 ≤ α ≤ 0.1), and the temperature difference can weaken this effect of cavitation on the stability of liquid jet, and (5) cavitation is responsible for generating smaller droplets, the effect of cavitation on the critical wave number with and without taking into account the effect of temperature differences is quite different, and temperature difference is likely to fully restrain the effect of cavitation on the critical wave number; however, cavitation is again responsible for generating smaller droplets despite the effect of temperature differences when the bubble volume fraction α = 0.1. These findings may explain some observations of practical atomizer performance.

  20. Stability and bifurcation analysis of spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nianqiang; Susanto, H.; Cemlyn, B. R.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.

    2017-07-01

    A detailed stability and bifurcation analysis of spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) is presented. We consider both steady-state and dynamical regimes. In the case of steady-state operation, we carry out a small-signal (asymptotic) stability analysis of the steady-state solutions for a representative set of spin-VCSEL parameters. Compared with full numerical simulation, we show this produces surprisingly accurate results over the whole range of pump ellipticity, and spin-VCSEL bias up to 1.5 times the threshold. We then combine direct numerical integration of the extended spin-flip model and standard continuation technique to examine the underlying dynamics. We find that the spin VCSEL undergoes a period-doubling or quasiperiodic route to chaos as either the pump magnitude or polarization ellipticity is varied. Moreover, we find that different dynamical states can coexist in a finite interval of pump intensity, and observe a hysteresis loop whose width is tunable via the pump polarization. Finally we report a comparison of stability maps in the plane of the pump polarization against pump magnitude produced by categorizing the dynamic output of a spin VCSEL from time-domain simulations, against supercritical bifurcation curves obtained by the standard continuation package auto. This helps us better understand the underlying dynamics of the spin VCSELs.

  1. From linear stability analysis to three-dimensional organisation in an incompressible open cavity flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pastur, L R; Lusseyran, F; Basley, J

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an incompressible open square cavity flow are conducted. Features of the permanent (non-linear) regime together with the linear stability analysis of a two-dimensional steady base flow are discussed. Spanwise boundary conditions are periodic and control parameters set such that the shear layer is stable against Kelvin-Helmholtz modes. Three branches of destabilising modes are found. The most destabilising branch is associated with steady modes, over a finite range of spanwise wavenumbers. The two other branches provide unsteady modes. Features of each branches are recovered in the permanent regime: wavelength of the most powerful spanwise Fourier mode, swaying phenomenon, angular frequencies, indicating that modes of each branches are selected and interact in the permanent flow.

  2. Statistical methods for transverse beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M

    2014-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) can be used to provide beam diagnostics. Here we focus on 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities. In particular we study dipole mode excitation and its application to beam position determinations. In order to extract beam position information, linear regression can be used. Due to a large number of sampling points in the waveforms, statistical methods are used to effectively reduce the dimension of the system, such as singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering. These are compared with the direct linear regression (DLR) on the entire waveforms. A cross-validation technique is used to study the sample independent precisions of the position predictions given by these three methods. A RMS prediction error in the beam position of approximately 50 micron can be achieved by DLR and SVD, while k-means clustering suggests 70 micron.

  3. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  4. Optimizing the configuration of a superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavity to increase the maximum achievable gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.

    2014-02-01

    We present a design of a superconducting rf photonic band gap (SRF PBG) accelerator cell with specially shaped rods in order to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and improve the effectiveness of the PBG structure for suppression of higher order modes (HOMs). The ability of PBG structures to suppress long-range wakefields is especially beneficial for superconducting electron accelerators for high power free-electron lasers (FELs), which are designed to provide high current continuous duty electron beams. Using PBG structures to reduce the prominent beam-breakup phenomena due to HOMs will allow significantly increased beam-breakup thresholds. As a result, there will be possibilities for increasing the operation frequency of SRF accelerators and for the development of novel compact high-current accelerator modules for the FELs.

  5. High-gradient near-quench-limit operation of superconducting Tesla-type cavities in scope of the International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Omet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful demonstration of an ILC-like high-gradient near-quench-limit operation at the Superconducting RF Test Facility at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK in Japan. Preparation procedures necessary for the accelerator operation were conducted, such as rf phase calibration, beam-based gradient calibration, and automated beam compensation. Test runs were performed successfully for nominal operation, high-loaded Q (Q_{L} operation, and automated P_{k}Q_{L} operation. The results are described in terms of the achieved precision and stabilities of gradients and phases.

  6. A Weakly Non Linear Stability Analysis of Heat Transport in Anisotropic Porous Cavity Under Time PeriodicTemperature Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit kumar Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have analyzed the effect of time periodic temperature modulation on convective stability in anisotropic porous cavity. The cavity is heated from below and cooled from above. A weakly non-linear stability analysis is done to find Nusselt number governing the heat transport. The infinitely small disturbances are expanded in terms of power series of amplitude of modulation. Analytically the nonautonomous Ginzburg- landau amplitude equation is obtained for the stationary mode of convection. The effects of various parameters like Vadasz number, mechanical and thermal anisotropic parameters, amplitude of oscillations, frequency of modulation and aspect ratio of the cavity on heat transport is studied and plotted graphically. It is observed that the heat transport can also be controlled by suitably adjusting the external and internal parameters of the system.

  7. Comment on the "Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field"

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, A

    2014-01-01

    In a recent publication [Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 092601 (2014)] Ciovati et al. claim that: 1) thermal effects were disregarded in our original work [*]; 2) increase of $Q$ at $T=2$ K up to about $B\\sim$100 mT in nitrogen doped cavities is just an extended low field $Q$ slope observed in non-doped cavities, which is furthermore attributed to the decrease of the "BCS" component of surface resistance. Here we show that both claims are wrong and the conclusions of Ciovati et al. are incorrect. [*] A. Romanenko and A. Grassellino, Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 252603 (2013)

  8. Structural Stability Driven by the Spin-Orbit Coupling and the Superconductivity in simple-cubic Polonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-Jong; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B. I.

    2013-03-01

    Polonium is the only element which has the simple-cubic (SC) structure in the periodic table. We have studied its structural stability based on the phonon dispersion calculations using the first-principles all-electron full-potential band method. We have demonstrated that the strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in SC-Po suppresses the Peierls instability and makes the SC structure stable. We have also discussed the structural chirality realized in beta-Po, as a consequence of the phonon instability. Further, we have investigated the possible superconductivity in SC-Po, and predicted that it becomes a superconductor with Tc ~ 4 K at ambient pressure. The transverse soft phonon mode at q ~ 2/3 R, which is greatly affected by the SOC, plays an important role both in the structural stability and the superconductivity in SC-Po. We have explored effects of the SOC and the volume variation on the phonon dispersions and superconducting properties of SC-Po.

  9. Digital base-band rf control system for the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Konrad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The accelerating field in superconducting cavities has to be stabilized in amplitude and phase by a radio-frequency (rf control system. Because of their high loaded quality factor superconducting cavities are very susceptible for microphonics. To meet the increased requirements with respect to accuracy, availability, and diagnostics, the previous analog rf control system of the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC has been replaced by a digital rf control system. The new hardware consists of two components: An rf module that converts the signal from the cavity down to the base-band and a field-programmable gate array board including a soft CPU that carries out the signal processing steps of the control algorithm. Different algorithms are used for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities. To improve the availability of the control system, techniques for automatic firmware and software deployment have been implemented. Extensive diagnostic features provide the operator with additional information. The architecture of the rf control system as well as the functionality of its components will be presented along with measurements that characterize the performance of the system, yielding, e.g., an amplitude stabilization down to (ΔA/A_{rms}=7×10^{-5} and a phase stabilization of (Δϕ_{rms}=0.8° for superconducting cavities.

  10. Comparison of coaxial higher order mode couplers for the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac study

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085329; Gerigk, Frank; Van Rienen, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the Superconducting Proton Linac, which is studied at CERN. Under certain conditions beam-induced HOMs can accumulate sufficient energy to destabilize the beam or quench the superconducting cavities. In order to limit these effects, CERN considers the use of coaxial HOM couplers on the cutoff tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to potentially dangerous modes while sufficiently rejecting the fundamental mode. In this paper, the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various designs for the high-beta SPL cavities, which operate at 704.4 MHz. The rf and thermal behavior as well as mechanical aspects are discussed. In order to verify the designs, a rapid prototype for the favored coupler was fabricated and characterized on a low-power test-stand.

  11. European infrastructures for R&D and test of superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryo-modules

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    The volume is copyright CERN and can be distributed under CC-BY license. The need for a European facility to build and test superconducting RF accelerating structures and cryo‐modules (SRF test facility) was extensively discussed during the preparation of EuCARD [1,2]. It comprised a distributed network of equipment across Europe to be assessed and, if needed, completed by hardware. It also addressed the quest for a deeper basic understanding, a better control and optimisation of the manufacture of superconducting RF structures with the aim of a substantial improvement of the accelerating gradient, a reduction of its spread and a cost minimisation. However, consequent to EU budget restrictions, the proposal was not maintained. Instead, a more detailed analysis was requested by a sub‐task inside the EuCARD Network [3] AccNet ‐ RFTech [4]. The main objective of this “SRF sub‐task” consists of intensifying a collaborative effort between European accelerator labs. The aim focused on planning and later...

  12. Sub-kHz linewidth narrowing of a mid-infrared OPO idler frequency by direct cavity stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Ricciardi, I; Parisi, M; Maddaloni, P; Santamaria, L; De Natale, P; De Rosa, M

    2015-01-01

    We stabilize the idler frequency of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator directly to the resonance of a mid-infrared Fabry-P\\'erot reference cavity. This is accomplished by the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, controlling either the pump laser or the resonant signal frequency. A residual relative frequency noise power spectral density below 10$^3$ Hz$^2$/Hz is reached, with a Gaussian linewidth of 920 Hz over 100 ms, which demonstrates the potential for reaching spectral purity down to the Hz level by locking the optical parametric oscillator against a mid-infrared cavity with state-of-the-art superior performance.

  13. Precise NMR measurement and stabilization system of magnetic field of a superconducting 7 T wave length shifter

    CERN Document Server

    Borovikov, V M; Karpov, G V; Korshunov, D A; Kuper, E A; Kuzin, M V; Mamkin, V R; Medvedko, A S; Mezentsev, N A; Repkov, V V; Shkaruba, V A; Shubin, E I; Veremeenko, V F

    2001-01-01

    The system of measurement and stabilization of the magnetic field in the superconducting 7 T wave length shifter (WLS), designed at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics are described. The measurements are performed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnetometer at two points of the WLS magnetic field. Stabilization of the field is provided by the current pumping system. The stabilization system is based on precise NMR measurement of magnetic field as a feedback signal for computer code which control currents inside the superconducting coils. The problem of the magnetic field measurements with NMR method consists in wide spread of field in the measured area (up to 50 Gs/mm), wide temperature range of WLS operating, small space for probe and influence of iron hysteresis. Special solid-state probes were designed to satisfy this requirements. The accuracy of magnetic field measurements at probe locations is not worse than 20 ppm. For the WLS field of 7 T the reproducibility of the magnetic field of 30 ppm has be...

  14. Development of Control System for Fast Frequency Tuners of Superconducting Resonant Cavities for FLASH and XFEL Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Przygoda, K

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation covers the recent research and development (R&D) activities of control systems for the fast frequency tuners of TESLA cavities and predicts the implications foreseen for large scale machines such as the FLASH and the planned XFEL. In particular, the framework of the presented activities is the effort toward the: 1. R&D of the driving circuit, 2. R&D of the control algorithm, 3. R&D of the control system. The main result of these activities is the permanent installation of the target piezo control system and its commissioning for 40 cavities divided into 5 accelerating modules at the DESY FLASH facility. The author’s contribution was the study of possible designs of high-voltage, high-current power amplifiers, used for driving the fast frequency tuners, shows that several parameters of such a device needs to be considered. The most important parameter is the input and output power estimation. This arises from the fact that the estimation is the most crucial issue for both po...

  15. Optical Fiber Link with 1E-19 frequency stability using a Planar-Waveguide External Cavity Laser Diode

    CERN Document Server

    Clivati, Cecilia; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Calosso, Claudio E; Godone, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    We compare the performances of a compact planar-waveguide external cavity laser (ECL) and a traditional fiber laser (FL) frequency locked to a Fabry-P\\'erot cavity and demonstrate the possibility to use such ECL in an optical link for ultra stable frequency dissemination. A relative stability of the ECL of 1E-14 is obtained and an optical link of 100 km based on fiber spools has been realized, that reaches 2E-19 relative stability, limited by the system noise floor. The performances of ECL and FL are shown to be comparable. Thus, ECLs could be a better choice than FLs in longer optical links with amplification and regenerating stations, thanks to their cost-effectiveness, robustness and small size.

  16. The first operation of 56 MHz SRF cavity in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); DeSanto, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Goldberg, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harvey, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Orfin, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The cavity operates at 4.4 K with a “quiet helium source” to isolate the cavity from environmental acoustic noise. The cavity is a beam driven quarter wave resonator. It is detuned and damped during injection and acceleration cycles and is brought to operation only at store energy. For a first test operation, the cavity voltage was stabilized at 300 kV with full beam current. Within both Au + Au and asymmetrical Au + He3 collisions, luminosity improvement was detected from direct measurement, and the hourglass effect was reduced. One higher order mode (HOM) coupler was installed on the cavity. We report in this paper on our measurement of a broadband HOM spectrum excited by the Au beam.

  17. Reduction of helium loss from a superconducting accelerating cavity during initial cool-down and cryostat exchange by pre-cooling the re-condensing cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, B. E.; Minehara, E. J.; Hayashizaki, N.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.

    2015-03-01

    A Zero-Boil-Off (ZBO) cryostat is designed to realize a compact, stand-alone cryogenic system for the AIST superconducting accelerator (SCA). Under normal operation there is no evaporative helium loss from the cryomodule and therefore operating costs associated with the supply of liquid helium can be eliminated. The only significant loss of helium from the module occurs during the initial cavity cool-down procedure or when the re-condensing cryostat is replaced. It takes about 3 h to cool down the cryostat head from room temperature (300 K) to 4 K. During this time around 100 L of liquid helium is lost due to evaporation. By pre-cooling the cryostat inside a low heat load vacuum tube before transfer to the cryomodule, this evaporative loss could be essentially eliminated, significantly reducing the volume of liquid helium required for the initial cryomodule cool-down. The pre-cooling system also provides an efficient method to test the cryostat prior to use.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of cavity creating mutations in an engineered leucine zipper and energetics of glycerol-induced coiled coil stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, E; Jelesarov, I

    2000-04-18

    Protein stability in vitro can be influenced either by introduction of mutations or by changes in the chemical composition of the solvent. Recently, we have characterized the thermodynamic stability and the rate of folding of the engineered dimeric leucine zipper A(2), which has a strengthened hydrophobic core [Dürr, E., Jelesarov, I., and Bosshard, H. R. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 870-880]. Here we report on the energetic consequences of a cavity introduced by Leu/Ala substitution at the tightly packed dimeric interface and how addition of 30% glycerol affects the folding thermodynamics of A(2) and the cavity mutants. Folding could be described by a two-state transition from two unfolded monomers to a coiled coil dimer. Removal of six methylene groups by Leu/Ala substitutions destabilized the dimeric coiled coil by 25 kJ mol(-1) at pH 3.5 and 25 degrees C in aqueous buffer. Destabilization was purely entropic at around room temperature and became increasingly enthalpic at elevated temperatures. Mutations were accompanied by a decrease of the unfolding heat capacity by 0.5 kJ K(-1) mol(-1). Addition of 30% glycerol increased the free energy of folding of A(2) and the cavity mutants by 5-10 kJ mol(-1) and lowered the unfolding heat capacity by 25% for A(2) and by 50% for the Leu/Ala mutants. The origin of the stabilizing effect of glycerol varied with temperature. Stabilization of the parent leucine zipper A(2) was enthalpic with an unfavorable entropic component between 0 and 100 degrees C. In the case of cavity mutants, glycerol induced enthalpic stabilization below 50 degrees C and entropic stabilization above 50 degrees C. The effect of glycerol could not be accounted for solely by the enthalpy and entropy of transfer or protein surface from water to glycerol/water mixture. We propose that in the presence of glycerol the folded coiled coil dimer is better packed and displays less intramolecular fluctuations, leading to enhanced enthalpic interactions and to an

  19. Autonomous frequency stabilization of two extended cavity diode lasers at the potassium wavelength on a sounding rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Dinkelaker, Aline N; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Kenyon, Andrew; Lampmann, Kai; Wenzlawski, André; Windpassinger, Patrick; Hellmig, Ortwin; Wendrich, Thijs; Rasel, Ernst M; Giunta, Michele; Deutsch, Christian; Kürbis, Christian; Smol, Robert; Wicht, Andreas; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2016-01-01

    We have developed, assembled, and flight-proven a stable, compact, and autonomous extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) system designed for atomic physics experiments in space. To that end, two micro-integrated ECDLs at 766.7 nm were frequency stabilized during a sounding rocket flight by means of frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) of 39^K and offset locking techniques based on the beat note of the two ECDLs. The frequency stabilization as well as additional hard- and software to test hot redundancy mechanisms were implemented as part of a state-machine, which controlled the experiment completely autonomously throughout the entire flight mission.

  20. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  1. Electrodynamic stabilization conditions for high-temperature superconducting composites with different types of current-voltage characteristic nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkharov, A. M.; Lavrov, N. A.; Romanovskii, V. R.

    2014-06-01

    The current instability is studied in high-temperature superconducting current-carrying elements with I- V characteristics described by power or exponential equations. Stability analysis of the macroscopic states is carried out in terms of a stationary zero-dimensional model. In linear temperature approximation criteria are derived that allow one to find the maximum allowable values of the induced current, induced electric field intensity, and overheating of the superconductor. A condition is formulated for the complete thermal stabilization of the superconducting composite with regard to the nonlinearity of its I- V characteristic. It is shown that both subcritical and supercritical stable states may arise. In the latter case, the current and electric field intensity are higher than the preset critical parameters of the superconductor. Conditions for these states depending on the properties of the matrix, superconductor's critical current, fill factor, and nonlinearity of the I- V characteristic are discussed. The obtained results considerably augment the class of allowable states for high-temperature superconductors: it is demonstrated that there exist stable resistive conditions from which superconductors cannot pass to the normal state even if the parameters of these conditions are supercritical.

  2. Single photon delayed feedback: a way to stabilize intrinsic quantum cavity electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmele, Alexander; Kabuss, Julia; Schulze, Franz; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Knorr, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We propose a scheme to control cavity quantum electrodynamics in the single photon limit by delayed feedback. In our approach a single emitter-cavity system, operating in the weak coupling limit, can be driven into the strong coupling-type regime by an external mirror: The external loop produces Rabi oscillations directly connected to the electron-photon coupling strength. As an expansion of typical cavity quantum electrodynamics, we treat the quantum correlation of external and internal light modes dynamically and demonstrate a possible way to implement a fully quantum mechanical time-delayed feedback. Our theoretical approach proposes a way to experimentally feedback control quantum correlations in the single photon limit.

  3. HOM Couplers for CERN SPL Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Papke, Kai; Van Rienen, U

    2013-01-01

    Higher-Order-Modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the SPL, which is studied at CERN as the driver for future neutrino facilities. In order to limit beam-induced HOM effects, CERN considers the use of HOM couplers on the cut-off tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to modes of a specific frequency range. In this paper the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various design options for the medium and high-beta SPL cavities, both operating at 704.4 MHz. The RF characteristics and thermal behaviour of the various designs are discussed.

  4. Study of a spoke-type superconducting cavity for high power proton accelerators; Etude d'une cavite acceleratrice supraconductrice Spoke pour les accelerateurs de protons de forte intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olry, G

    2003-04-01

    Since a few years, a lot of projects (especially dedicated to transmutation, radioactive beams production, spallation neutron sources or neutrinos factories) are based on high power proton linear accelerators. It has been demonstrated, thanks to their excellent RF performances, that superconducting elliptical cavities represent the best technological solution for the high energy part of these linacs (proton energy from typically 100 MeV). On the contrary, between 5 and 100 MeV, nothing is clearly settled and intensive studies on low-beta cavities are under progress. The main objective of this thesis is the study of a new low-beta cavity, called 'spoke', which could be used in the low energy part of European XADS (experimental accelerator driven system) and EURISOL (European isotope separation on-line) accelerators projects. A complete study of a beta 0.35 spoke cavity has been done: from its electromagnetic and mechanical optimization to warm and, above all, cold experimental tests: an accelerating field of 12.2 MV/m has been reached at T=4.2 K, that is to say one of the best value among the spoke cavities performances in the world. It has been shown that the specific ratio of a third, between the spoke bar diameter and the cavity length, led to optimize the surface electromagnetic fields. Moreover, spoke cavities can be used without any trouble, in the low energy part, due to their good rigidity. The experimental measurements performed on the cavity have confirmed the theoretical calculations, especially, concerning the expected frequency and mechanical behavior. Another study, performed on elliptical cavities, gave an explanation of the discrepancies between the measured and calculated frequencies thanks to a precise 3-dimensional geometrical control. (author)

  5. Dynamic model and stability analysis of a laser using a nonlinear Fabry-Perot etalon as a cavity mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, S.; Pons, R. (Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Fisica); Zhang, Y. (Chongqing Inst. of Posts and Telecommunications, Sichuan (China). Telecommunications Engineering Dept.)

    1994-08-01

    In this paper, the authors study a laser using a nonlinear Fabry-Perot etalon as a cavity mirror. First, using the semiclassical laser theory and the differential equation for the lossy nonlinear Fabry-Perot etalon, they develop dynamic equations describing this system for single-mode operation. In this model, the frequency-pulling effect, a finite response time of the nonlinear medium, and a finite-cavity round-trip time of the Fabry-Perot etalon are included. Second, based on this model, they analyze the stability of this laser and give some numerical results. The results show that (1) this system can exist in the stable state and in the unstable state; (2) there are not only saddle-node bifurcations but also Hopf bifurcations; (3) the detuning parameter will effect the characteristics of the bistability and the number and distribution of Hopf bifurcation points.

  6. Application of modern time series analysis to high stability oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B. F.; Mattison, W. M.; Vessot, R. F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques of modern time series analysis useful for investigating the characteristics of high-stability oscillators and identifying systematic perturbations are discussed with reference to an experiment in which the frequencies of superconducting cavity-stabilized oscillators and hydrogen masers were compared. The techniques examined include transformation to stationarity, autocorrelation and cross-correlation, superresolution, and transfer function determination.

  7. Reduction of RF accelerating voltage of Pohang Light Source-II superconducting RF cavity for stable top-up mode operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Y.; Yu, I.; Park, I.; Chun, M. H.; Sohn, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) is currently providing a top-up mode user-service operation with maximum available beam current of 400 mA and a beam emittance of below 10 nm-rad. The dimension of the beam bunch shortened to accomplish a low beam emittance of below 10 nm-rad from a high beam current of 400 mA increases the bunch charge density. As a result, the electron beam lifetime is significantly degraded and a high gradient of power is lost in the vacuum components of the storage ring. A study on how to reduce the bunch charge density without degrading beam emittance found that reducing the RF accelerating voltage (Vacc) can lower the bunch charge density by lengthening the bunch in the longitudinal direction. In addition, the Vacc required for stable operation with beam current of 400 mA can be reduced by lowering the external cavity quality factors (Qext values) of the superconducting cavities (SCs). To control the Qext values of SCs gradually without accessing the accelerator tunnel, a remote control motorized three-probe-tuner was installed in the transmission line of each SC. The optimum installation position of the three-probe-tuner was determined by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation and by experimenting on various installation positions of the three-probe-tuner. The Qext values of all the SCs were lowered to 1.40 × 105, and then, the Vacc required to store the beam current of 400 mA was decreased from 4.8 MV to 4.2 MV, which corresponds to 10% lengthening of the beam bunches. The stable operation with the reduced Vacc was confirmed during a 400 mA ten-day top-up mode user-service. Currently, the RF system of the PLS-II storage ring delivers the user-service operation with lowered Qext values to reduce the power loss at the vacuum components as well as the cryogenic heat load of SCs, and no significant problems have been found. This method of reducing the Vacc may also be applied in other synchrotron facilities.

  8. Data Acquisition System of Superconducting Cavity Test Based on Labview%基于 Labview 的超导腔测试数据采集系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娟; 戴建枰; 黄泓; 徐波; 林海英; 孙毅; 潘卫民

    2013-01-01

    设计了基于Labview的超导腔测试数据采集系统,该系统应用于超导腔垂直和水平测试的数据采集,实现了测量仪器、本地机及远程机的数据通讯,于国内首次实现了Q0~Eacc曲线及辐射剂量曲线的实时显示,并使得Labview采集的数据与EPICS之间互相连通。该数据采集系统根据被测数据带宽及精度的不同,灵活选择不同的传输接口,采集功率计、频率计、温度计、辐射剂量探测器等仪器的信号,实时地传输、处理并存储所有数据。 Spoke012超导腔垂直测试实验结果表明,该系统运行稳定可靠,易于维护,界面友好,同时具有很好的可移植性,可在其他类型的超导腔测试中获得广泛应用。%The data acquisition system based on Labview is designed .The system is applied to the vertical and horizontal test experiment .It is in charge of communications of the measuring instruments , the local machine and the remote machine .It realizes the real-time display of Q0 ~Eacc and radiation dose curve for the first time in China.The data connection between Labview and EPICS is also implemented .The DAQ system chooses dif-ferent transmission interfaces according to the different bandwidths and precisions of the measured data .It col-lects data of instruments such as power meter , frequency counter , thermometer and radiation dosimeter .All of these data should be acquired , transmitted, processed and stored synchronously and in real time .The result for Spoke012 cavity vertical test has shown that the DAQ system in operation performs stably and reliably as expec -ted.It also has a friendly interface and can be transplanted to other superconducting cavity tests easily and con -veniently .

  9. Novel Approach to Linear Accelerator Superconducting Magnet System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2011-11-28

    Superconducting Linear Accelerators include a superconducting magnet system for particle beam transportation that provides the beam focusing and steering. This system consists of a large number of quadrupole magnets and dipole correctors mounted inside or between cryomodules with SCRF cavities. Each magnet has current leads and powered from its own power supply. The paper proposes a novel approach to magnet powering based on using superconducting persistent current switches. A group of magnets is powered from the same power supply through the common, for the group of cryomodules, electrical bus and pair of current leads. Superconducting switches direct the current to the chosen magnet and close the circuit providing the magnet operation in a persistent current mode. Two persistent current switches were fabricated and tested. In the paper also presented the results of magnetic field simulations, decay time constants analysis, and a way of improving quadrupole magnetic center stability. Such approach substantially reduces the magnet system cost and increases the reliability.

  10. Stability study of the higher order mode beam position monitors at the Accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, L; Jones., R M

    2014-01-01

    erating cavities at FLASH linac, DESY, are equipped with electronics for beam position monitoring, which are based on HOM signals from special couplers. These monitors provide the beam position without additional vacuum components and at low cost. Moreover, they can be used to align the beam in the cavities to reduce the HOM effects on the beam. However, the HOMBPM (Higher Order Mode based Beam Position Monitor) shows an instability problem over time. In this paper, we will present the status of studies on this issue. Several methods are utilized to calibrate the HOMBPMs. These methods include DLR (Direct Linear Regression), and SVD (Singular Value Decomposition). We found that SVD generally is more suitable for HOMBPM calibration. We focus on the HOMBPMs at 1.3 GHz cavities. Techniques developed here are applicable to 3.9 ...

  11. Simple vibration insensitive cavity for laser stabilization at the 10^{-16} level

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Jonas; Webster, Stephen A; Mehlstäubler, Tanja E

    2013-01-01

    We present the design and realization of two reference cavities for ultra-stable lasers addressing narrow transitions in mixed-species (In+ / Yb+) Coulomb crystals. With a simple setup, we achieve a fractional frequency instability close to the thermal noise limit of a 12 cm long cavity, reaching 4.7*10^{-16} at 10 s with a linear drift of 53 mHz/s. We discuss the individual instability contributions and show that in a setup with a lower thermal noise floor and vibration sensitivity, an instability of 1*10^{-16} can be reached. To achieve this, we implement a vibration insensitive design for a 30 cm long cavity mounted horizontally and conduct first tests that show a sensitivity of 1.8*10^{-11} / ms^{-2} to vertical accelerations. Mechanical tolerances and ways to further reduce the sensitivity are discussed.

  12. Corrigendum to ``Time stability of spring and superconducting gravimeters through the analysis of very long gravity record'' [J. Geodyn. 80, (2014) 20-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M.; Hinderer, J.; Rosat, S.; Legros, H.; Boy, J.-P.; Ducarme, B.; Zürn, W.

    2017-05-01

    In the paper ;Time stability of spring and superconducting gravimeters through the analysis of very long gravity record; by M. Calvo et al. (J. Geodyn. Vol. 80, pp. 20-33, doi:10.1016/j.jog.2014.04.009), Figs. 13 and 16 are incorrect.

  13. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  14. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  15. Design of a Normal Conducting Cavity for Arrival Time Stabilization at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Fakhari, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Schlarb, H.; Rossbach, J.

    2016-01-01

    The long range longitudinal wakefield calculation results are reported to investigate the cavity performance for multibeam operation up to 3 MHz bunch repetition rate. The results declare that the influence of the long range wakefield on the arrival time jitter is less than 1 fs.

  16. A Parametric Study of Stability of Geotextile-Reinforced Soil Above an Underground Cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    poor, Abbas Tahmasebi; Noorzad, R.; Shooshpasha, E.;

    2012-01-01

    A study based on two-dimensional finite element analyses under plane strain condition was performed by PLAXIS code to investigate the behavior of geotextilereinforced soil above an underground cavity. The effects of depth of single layer, tensile stiffness, number and length of reinforcement laye...

  17. Stabilization and Shift of Frequency in an External Cavity Diode Laser with Solenoid-Assisted Saturated Absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Shun-Li; CHENG Bing; ZHANG Jing-Fang; XU Yun-Fei; WANG Zhao-Ying; LIN Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A simple method to realize both stabilization and shift of the frequency in an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) is reported.Due to the Zeeman effect,the saturated absorption spectrum of Rb atoms in a magnetic field is shifted.This shift can be used to detune the frequency of the ECDL,which is locked to the saturated absorption spectrum.The frequency shift amount can be controlled by changing the magnetic field for a specific polarization state of the laser beam.The advantages of this tunable frequency lock include low laser power requirement,without additional power loss,cheapness,and so on.

  18. Low cost low phase noise PLL controlled push-push VCOs in k- and ka- bands, stabilized by cavity resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Tsvelykh, I. S.; B. A. Kotserzhynskyi

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates push-push VCOs in K-band (with second harmonic output at 24 GHz) and in Ka-band (with third harmonic output at 36 GHz), and PLL synthesizers on their basis. Oscillators are stabilized by a rectangular resonant metallic cavity. Output signal power within the frequency tuning range changes in the limits of -11,5 -7,6 dBm and -11,8 -10,9 dBm for 24 GHz and 36 GHz oscillators respectively. Single sideband (SSB) phase noise spectral densities of -91 dBc/Hz for 24 GHz oscilla...

  19. A feasibility study of full-bridge type superconducting fault current controller on electric machine power stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J. Y.; Hwang, Y. J.; Lee, J.; Ko, T. K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, because of the advent of Smart Grid and integration of distributed generations, electrical power grids are facing uncountable challenges. Increase of fault current is one of such serious challenges and there are some fault current limiters (FCLs) that can limit the fault current. Existing grid protection FCLs, however, simply limit the fault current passively and can allow the existing protection coordination schemes to fail. This phenomenon leads to catastrophic failure in the complex system and may cause unpredictable power grid operation. Unlike a FCL, a superconducting fault current controller (SFCC) employs a full-bridge thyristor rectifier, a high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor, and an embedded control unit to maintain the fault current level at a proper value by adjusting the phase angle of thyristors. This paper contains experimental and numerical analysis to design and fabricate a SFCC system for protection and stability improvement in power grids. At first, fundamental characteristics of a SFCC system were introduced. System circuit diagram and operational principles were proposed. Secondly, the developed small-scale SFCC system was introduced and verified. A 40 Vrms/30 Arms class prototype SFCC employing HTS DC reactor was fabricated and short circuit tests that simulate various fault conditions were implemented to verify the control performance of the fault current. Finally, the practical feasibility of application of the SFCC system to the power system was studied. The problems caused by three-phase faults from the power grid were surveyed and transient stability analysis of the power system was conducted by simulations. From the experimental and simulation results, we can verify the feasibility of the SFCC in power system.

  20. Cavity-induced phase stability to decelerate a fast molecular beam via feedback-controlled time-varying optical pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Zhihao

    2014-01-01

    We have identified a novel phase stability mechanism from the intracavity field-induced self-organization of a fast-moving molecular beam into travelling molecular packets in the bad cavity regime, which is then used to decelerate the molecular packets by feedback-controlled time-varying laser pumps to the cavity. We first applied the linear stability analysis to derive an expression for this self-organization in the adiabatic limit and show that the self-organization of the beam leads to the formation of travelling molecular packets, which in turn function as a dynamic Bragg grating, thus modulating periodically the intracavity field by superradiant scattering of the pump photons. The modulation encodes the position information of the molecular packets into the output of the intracavity field instantaneously. We then applied time-varying laser pumps that are automatically switched by the output of the intracavity field to slow down the molecular packets via a feedback mechanism and found that most of the mol...

  1. Global 2D stability analysis of the cross lid-driven cavity flow with a streamfunction-vorticity approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Bidyut B.

    2016-07-01

    We have recently analyzed the global two-dimensional (2D) stability of the staggered lid-driven cavity (LDC) flow with a higher order compact (HOC) approach. In the analysis, critical parameters are determined for both the parallel and anti-parallel motion of the lids and a detailed analysis has been carried out on either side of the critical values. In this article, we carry out an investigation of flow stabilities inside a two-sided cross lid-driven cavity with a pair of opposite lids moving in both parallel and anti-parallel directions. On discretization, the governing 2D Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations describing the steady flow and flow perturbations results in a generalized eigenvalue problem which is solved for determining the critical parameters on four different grids. Elaborate computation is performed for a wide range of Reynolds numbers (Re) on either side of the critical values in the range 200 ⩽ Re ⩽ 10000. For flows below the critical Reynolds number Rec, our numerical results are compared with established steady-state results and excellent agreement is obtained in all the cases. For Reynolds numbers above Rec, phase plane and spectral density analysis confirmed the existence of periodic, quasi-periodic, and stable flow patterns.

  2. Spectral investigation of hot-spot and cavity resonance effects on the terahertz radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystal mesa structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Kazuo; Watanabe, Chiharu; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Klemm, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ mesa structures in the case of single mesa and series-connected mesas is investigated by the FTIR spectroscopic technique while observing its temperature distribution simultaneously by a SiC photoluminescence technique. Changing the bias level, sudden jumps of the hot-spot position were clearly observed. Although the radiation intensity changes drastically associated with the jump of the hot spot position, the frequency is unaffected as long as the voltage per junction is kept constant. Since the frequency of the intense radiation satisfies the cavity resonance condition, we confirmed that the cavity resonance is of primarily importance for the synchronization of whole intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa for high power radiation. This work was supported in part by the Grant-in-Aid for challenging Exploratory Research, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  3. Mode stability analysis in the beam-wave interaction process for a three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Ji-Run; Cui Jian; Zhu Min; Guo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Based on space-charge wave theory,the formulae of the beam-wave coupling coefficient and the beam-loaded conductance are given for the beam-wave interaction in an N-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain.The ratio of the nonbeam-loaded quality factor of the coupled cavity chain to the beam quality factor is used to determine the stability of the beam-wave interaction.As an example,the stabilities of the beam-wave interaction in a three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain are discussed with the formulae and the CST code for the operations of the 2π,π,and π/2 modes,respectively.The results show that stable operation of the 2π,π,and π/2 modes may all be realized in an extended-interaction klystron with the three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain.

  4. Stability of superconducting La Sr cuprate in hydrothermal NaF solutions at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korytkova, E.N.; Nesterchuk, N.I.; Pivovarova, L.N. [and others

    1992-04-20

    The successful application of hydrothermal treatment for raising the stability of the superconducting (SC) oxide of the composition La{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CuO{sub 4-{delta}} (LSCO), demonstrated earlier, stimulates further development of studies in this field. Selection of chemical reagents the action of which on the crystal structure of the oxide strengthens it is most significant. The literature contains information on the stabilizing action of fluoride ions on the structure of HTSC compounds inserted in oxygen positions of crystal lattices during annealing of Sc cuprates in gaseous NF{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}F, NH{sub 5}F{sub 2}. The possibility of replacing oxygen ions by fluoride ions exists owing to the same electron configuration of their external layers and almost the same ionic radii. Since their electronegativities and degrees of oxidation are different, it may be inferred that even partial replacement of oxygen by fluorine would have a significant influence on the state of the structure of the SC oxide and possibly on the SC properties. In the light of this, hydrothermal treatment of SC oxide with solutions of fluorides, and in particular with NaF solution at an elevated temperature and especially at a high pressure, i.e., under conditions favorable for insertion of fluoride ions into the crystal structure of the cuprate, seemed to be appropriate. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  5. 基于SQUIDs和腔场相互作用传送量子信息的方案%Quantum information transfer with superconducting quantum interference device qubits in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴韬; 何娟; 倪致祥

    2009-01-01

    本文提出了一个基于SQUIDs和腔场的大失谐相互作用传送量子信息的方案,此方案可以直接地、百分之百地实现量子信息的传送.该方案中腔场和SQUIDs系统之间没有量子信息的传递,腔场只是虚激发,这样对腔的品质因子的要求大大的降低了.同时也可以在SQUIDs之间建立传送量子信息的量子网络.%We propose a scheme for transferring Quantum information via superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits and cavity field interaction with a large detuning.In the scheme,no quantum information is transferred between the SQUIDs and the cavities,the cavity-fields are only virtually excited,thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavities is greatly relaxed.In addition,in the scheme the quantum information can be directly transferred with a successful probability of 100% in a simple manner.And meanwhile we can establish a network for transferring quantum information between SQUID qubits.

  6. Stability of black holes in Einstein-charged scalar field theory in a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Sam R; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Can a black hole that suffers a superradiant instability evolve towards a 'hairy' configuration which is stable? We address this question in the context of Einstein-charged scalar field theory. First, we describe a family of static black hole solutions which possess charged scalar-field hair confined within a mirror-like boundary. Next, we derive a set of equations which govern the linear, spherically symmetric perturbations of these hairy solutions. We present numerical evidence which suggests that, unlike the vacuum solutions, the (single-node) hairy solutions are stable under linear perturbations. Thus, it is plausible that stable hairy black holes represent the end-point of the superradiant instability of electrically-charged Reissner-Nordstrom black holes in a cavity; we outline ways to explore this hypothesis.

  7. Power coupler kick of the TRIUMF ICM capture cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fang; E. Laxdal, R.; Zvyagintsev, V.; Yu., Chao; C., Gong; Koscielniak, S.

    2011-06-01

    The TRIUMF Injector CryoModule (ICM) adapted two superconducting single cavities as the capture section for the low injecting energy of 100 keV electrons. Coupler kick induced beam deflection and projected emittance growth are one of the prime concerns of the beam stability, especially at low energies. In low energy applications, the electron velocity changes rapidly inside the cavity, which makes the numerical analysis much more complicated. The commonly used theoretical formulas of the direct integral or the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is not suitable for the kick calculation of β < 1 electrons. Despite that, the above mentioned kick calculation method doesn't consider injecting electron energy, the beam offset due to the coupler kick may not be negligible because of the low injection energy even if the kick is optimized. Thus the beam dynamics code TRACK is used here for the simulation of the power coupler kick perturbation. The coupler kick can be compensated for by a judicious choice of the coupler position in successive cavities from upstream to downstream. The simulation shows that because of the adiabatic damping by the following superconducting 9-cell cavity, even for the worst orbit distortion case after two capture cavities, the kick is still acceptable at the exit of the ICM after reaching 10 MeV. This paper presents the analysis of the transverse kick and the projected emittance growth induced by the coupler for β < 1 electrons. The simulated results of the TRIUMF ICM capture cavities are described and presented.

  8. Power coupler kick of the TRIUMF ICM capture cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Fang; R.E. Laxdal; V. Zvyagintsev; Yu. Chao; C. Gong; S. Koscielniak

    2011-01-01

    The TRIUMF Injector CryoModule (ICM) adapted two superconducting single cavities as the capture section for the low injecting energy of 100 keV electrons. Coupler kick induced beam deflection and projected emittance growth are one of the prime concerns of the beam stability, especially at low energies. In low energy applications, the electron velocity changes rapidly inside the cavity, which makes the numerical analysis much more complicated. The commonly used theoretical formulas of the direct integral or the Panofsky- Wenzel theorem is not suitable for the kick calculation of β <1 electrons. Despite that, the above mentioned kick calculation method doesn't consider injecting electron energy, the beam offset due to the coupler kick may not be negligible because of the low injection energy even if the kick is optimized. Thus the beam dynamics code TRACK is used here for the simulation of the power coupler kick perturbation. The coupler kick can be compensated for by a judicious choice of the coupler position in successive cavities from upstream to downstream. The simulation shows that because of the adiabatic damping by the following superconducting 9-cell cavity, even for the worst orbit distortion case after two capture cavities, the kick is still acceptable at the exit of the ICM after reaching 10 MeV. This paper presents the analysis of the transverse kick and the projected emittance growth induced by the coupler for β <1 electrons. The simulated results of the TRIUMF ICM capture cavities are described and presented.

  9. Activities on RF superconductivity at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheisen, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    At DESY the HERA electron storage ring is supplied with normal and superconducting cavities. The superconducting system transfers up to 1 MW klystron power to the beam. Experiences are reported on luminosity and machine study runs. Since 1993 one major activity in the field of RF superconducting cavities is the installation of the TESLA Test Facility. Set-up of hardware and first tests of s.c. resonators are presented. (R.P.). 11 refs.

  10. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  11. Test up to 80 kA of an Al-Stabilized NbTi Cable With the Upgraded Saclay Superconducting Transformer

    CERN Document Server

    Berriaud, C; Donati, A; Gharib, A; Peiro, G; Willering, G

    2014-01-01

    An ATLAS Barrel Toroid conductor was tested in the Saclay High Current Test Facility. The conductor is a Nb-Ti Rutherford cable imbedded in a high purity aluminum stabilizer. The conductor's width was reduced from 57 mm to 30 mm in order to be able to use an existing sample holder. We tried to measure the critical current in background fields of up to 3 T. The field was produced by a 0.8 m long superconducting dipole magnet. The test station was equipped with a superconducting transformer transferring maximum primary and secondary currents of respectively 174 A and 80 kA. The secondary current was measured with flux coils and with a superconducting Direct Control Current Transducer (DCCT), a modified version of the ``Macc+{''} 600 A commercial DCCT from Hitec, which was operated at currents of up to 57 kA. This paper reports on the performance of the test station, on the results of the quench current measurements performed on the stabilized ATLAS conductor and on the difficulties to measure the critical curre...

  12. Absolute calibration of an ultraviolet spectrometer using a stabilized laser and a cryogenic cavity radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauniskis, L.; Foukal, P.; Kochling, H.

    1992-01-01

    We carry out the calibration of an ultraviolet spectrometer by using a cryogenic electrical-substitution radiometer and intensity-stabilized laser sources. A comparison of the error budgets for the laser-based calibration described here and for a calibration using a type-FEL tungsten spectral-irradiance standard indicates that this technique could provide an improvement of a factor of about three in the uncertainty of the spectrometer calibration, resulting in an absolute accuracy (standard deviation of three) of about 1 percent at 257 nm. The technique described here might significantly improve the accuracy of calibrations on NASA ozone-monitoring and solar ultraviolet-monitoring spectrophotometers when used to complement present procedures that employ lamps and the SURF II synchrotron ultraviolet radiation facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  13. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  14. Testing of super conducting low-beta 704 Mhz cavities at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate in view of SPL- first results

    CERN Document Server

    Höfle, W; Lollierou, J; Valuch, D; Chel, S; Devanz, G; Desmons, M; Piquet, O; Paparella, R; Pierini, P

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the preparatory phase for the luminosity upgrade of the LHC (SLHC-PP ) it is foreseen to characterize two superconducting RF cavities and demonstrate compliance of the required SPL field stability in amplitude and phase using a prototype LLRF system. We report on the preparation for testing of two superconducting low-beta cavities at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate including the setting-up of the low level RF control system to evaluate the performance of the piezo-tuning system and cavity field stability in amplitude and phase. Results from tests with 50 Hz pulse repetition rate are presented. Simulations of the RF system will be used to predict the necessary specifications for power and bandwidth to control the cavity field and derive specifications for the RF system and its control. Exemplary results of the simulation are presented.

  15. Superconducting optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  16. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  17. Higher order mode spectra and the dependence of localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position in third harmonic superconducting cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M. [The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    An electron beam entering an accelerating cavity excites a wakefield. This wakefield can be decomposed into a series of multi-poles or modes. The dominant component of the transverse wakefield is dipole. This report summarizes the higher order mode (HOM) signals of the third harmonic cavities of FLASH measured at various stages: transmission measurements in the single cavity test stand at Fermilab, at CMTB (Cryo- Module Test Bench) and at FLASH, and beam-excited measurements at FLASH. Modes in the first two dipole bands and the fifth dipole band have been identified using a global Lorentzian fit technique. The beam-pipe modes at approximately 4 GHz and some modes in the fifth dipole band have been observed as localized modes, while the first two dipole bands, containing some strong coupling cavity modes, propagate. This report also presents the dependence of the localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position. Linear dependence for various modes has been observed. This makes them suitable for beam position diagnostics. These modes, together with some propagating, strong coupling modes, have been considered in the design of a dedicated electronics for beam diagnostics with HOMs for the third harmonic cavities.

  18. Impact of Lorentz forces on a Spoke cavity with {beta} 0.15 and on a Spiral-2 cavity with {beta} 0.12; Etudes des effets des forces de lorentz sur la cavite Spoke {beta} 0,15 et sur la cavite spiral 2 {beta} 0,12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassot, H

    2007-07-01

    Mono-spoke superconducting cavities have been proposed for the acceleration of radioactive ion beams. The interaction of the electromagnetic field with the surface electrical current generates Lorentz forces that operate on the intern wall of the cavity, the distribution of these forces is highly non-linear and varying. The stability of a superconducting cavity is directly linked to the frequency variation due to Lorentz forces and as a consequence the optimized design of a cavity must take into account these forces. In order to optimize the design of a cavity, 3 complementary software have been developed: Catia, a computer-aided-design software, Soprano for electromagnetic modeling and Cast3m for mechanical modeling. Preliminary results show a good agreement between predicted values and experimental data. (A.C.)

  19. Stability Analysis of C-band 500-kW Klystron with Multi-cell Output cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Jihyun; Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun

    2016-01-01

    A progogype 5-GHz 500-kW CW klystron (model E3762 provided by Toshiba Electron Tubes & Devices Co. Ltd.) has been operating as the RF source for the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system in the KSTAR tokamak. In order to investigate how the efficiency of the 5-GHz 500-kW CW klystron prototype could be enhanced, the cavity design study is being carried out with simulation code based on the main klystron operation parameters. This is being done by simulating klystron performances for various cavity parameters including the number of cavities, inter-cavity distance, and cavity tuning frequencies. The simulation has been done with the FCI (field charge interaction) code aided by a matlab script for scanning input parameters. Initial set of scan parameters was obtained by benchmarking the E3762 klystron. It was possible to obtain optimized design parameters with better efficiency for a cavity system adopting a multi-cell output cavity. However, the multi-cell output cavity is prone to produce a self-oscilla...

  20. Sputtering System for QWR Cavity in BRIF Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>1 Introduction Four superconducting QWR cavities will be used in HI-13 tandem accelerator upgrade project (BRIF). These niobium coated cavities will be produced by CIAE. Up to now, a niobium sputtering

  1. Purification and switching protocols for dissipatively stabilized entangled qubit states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sven M.; Aron, Camille; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2016-06-01

    Pure dephasing processes limit the fidelities achievable in driven-dissipative schemes for stabilization of entangled states of qubits. We propose a scheme which, combined with already existing entangling methods, purifies the desired entangled state by driving out of equilibrium auxiliary dissipative cavity modes coupled to the qubits. We lay out the specifics of our scheme and compute its efficiency in the particular context of two superconducting qubits in a cavity-QED architecture, where the strongly coupled auxiliary modes provided by collective cavity excitations can drive and sustain the qubits in maximally entangled Bell states with fidelities reaching 90% for experimentally accessible parameters.

  2. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  3. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  4. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  5. State of the Art SRF Cavity Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Lilje, L

    2004-01-01

    The paper will review superconducting RF cavity performance for β=1 cavities used in both linear and circular accelerators. These superconducting cavities are used in two kinds of applications: High current storage rings and efficient high duty cycle linacs. In recent years the performance of those cavities has been improving steadily. High accelerating gradients have been achieved using advanced surface preparation techniques like electropolishing and surface cleaning methods like high pressure water rinsing. High intensity beams can be handled with advanced higher-order-mode damping schemes.

  6. A long-term frequency-stabilized erbium-fiber-laser-based optical frequency comb with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y; Zhao, W; Meng, S; Fan, S; Zhang, L; Guo, G; Zhang, S; Jiang, H

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a home-made optical frequency comb based on an erbium-doped-fiber femtosecond laser with a ring cavity. The repetition rate of the laser is about 209 MHz determined by optical length of the laser cavity. By controlling an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator and a Piezo-transducer, the repetition rate can be stabilized with megahertz bandwidth in a range of 3 kilohertz, enabling long-term repetition rate phase-locking. The in-loop frequency instability of the repetition rate, limited by measurement system, is 1.3E-13 at 1 second integration time and inversely proportional to integration time for short terms. Using a common path f-2f interferometer, the carrier envelope offset (CEO) frequency of the frequency comb is obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 40 dB for 3 megahertz resolution spectrum. Stabilized CEO frequency exhibits a deviation of 0.6 milihertz at 1 second integration time.

  7. Penalty-Finite Element Analysis of the Eddy Current Loss in a Fully-Stabilized Multifilamentary Superconducting Wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The paper is mainly concerned with the penalty incurred in finiteelement analysis of the eddy-current loss problem in a fully established multi-filamentary superconducting wire. A finite element model with 4-node quadrilateral isoparametric elements is formulated for the present problem. Unlike the conventional vector potential scheme in use for electromagnetic field problem, the present work features a direct computational approach to eddy current loss. Simplicity and remarkable enhancement in computational accuracy can be obtained with the proposed method.

  8. Comparison of coaxial higher order mode couplers for the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Papke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher order modes (HOMs may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the Superconducting Proton Linac, which is studied at CERN. Under certain conditions beam-induced HOMs can accumulate sufficient energy to destabilize the beam or quench the superconducting cavities. In order to limit these effects, CERN considers the use of coaxial HOM couplers on the cutoff tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to potentially dangerous modes while sufficiently rejecting the fundamental mode. In this paper, the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various designs for the high-beta SPL cavities, which operate at 704.4 MHz. The rf and thermal behavior as well as mechanical aspects are discussed. In order to verify the designs, a rapid prototype for the favored coupler was fabricated and characterized on a low-power test-stand.

  9. Power system stabilizing control by superconducting magnetic energy storage using neural network; Newral network wo mochiita chodendo energy chozo sochi ni yoru keito anteika seigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osawa, Y.; Kanemitsu, T.; Kawakami, T.; Shintaku, M.; Arai, K. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan)

    1993-10-20

    In order to solve the difficulty of realizing power system stabilization using non-linear optimal control, this paper discusses a power system stabilization control by superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) using a neural network. This system consists of a kind of feedback control system that derives an optimal stabilizing control on various initial system operating conditions and failure conditions applied with the maximum principles, and learns the best stabilization using the control as tutorial signals and using the neural network. The object model system is a one-unit infinite busbar system, whose generator terminal is installed with the SMES. With respect to the system learning using the neural network, the network output to the learned failure patterns has agreed with the tutorial signals nearly completely. As a result of simulating example systems, it was confirmed that the operating conditions within a reasonable range and failure conditions were learned well, control effects close to the optimal control were shown, and the oscillation suppressing effect of the SMES can be utilized effectively. 11 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  11. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  12. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  13. All Metal Organic Deposited High-Tc Superconducting Transition Edge Bolometer on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohajeri, Roya; Opata, Yuri Aparecido; Wulff, Anders Christian;

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results of a YBa2Cu3O7−x (YBCO) superconductive transition edge bolometer (TEB) fabricated on a Ce0.9La0.1O2−7 (CLO) buffered single crystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate. Metal organic deposition was used for the fabrication of both the YBCO thin film as well...... as CLO buffer layer, while standard photolithography was applied for TEB preparation. YBCO thin film properties were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), AC susceptibility and resistance versus temperature measurements. Optical response of the TEB in terms...... of voltage amplitude and phase was analysed and measured through four-probe technique in a liquid nitrogen cooling system. An increase in voltage amplitude response was observed for the fabricated YBCO/CLO/YSZ bolometer compared to previously reported TEBs with similarly deposited YBCO thin film on a SrTiO3...

  14. Study on the stability and 3-dimensional character for natural convection in a rectangular cavity heated from below

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Natural convection of air is numerically simulated in a 3-dimensional rectangular cavity heated from below using SIMPLE algorithm with a QUICK scheme.The results suggest that when all lateral walls are adiabatic,the fluid rolls occur along the long axis.When the Rayleigh number is smaller,the flow is of 2-dimensional character,and the rolls shapes are similar.The average Nusselt numbers in the central part of the cavity are similar.The average Nusselt numbers in the part near by the cavity are different.According to the comparison of 3-dimensional results with 2-dimensional results,the flow patterns and heat transfer in the central part of the cavity can be assumed as a 2-dimensional flow,While those in the part near by the cavity can not.With increasing Rayleigh number,the flow is 3-dimensional characteristic.The 3-dimensional result accords with the experimental result.When all lateral walls are adiabatic,the ten rolls occur along the long axis.But when lateral walls are heated or cooled,the rolls disappear along the long axis and two rolls occur along the short axis.The rotation direction of the rolls is reversed.When Rayleigh number is over some critical value,flow and heat transfer will be asymmetry,indicating unsteady oscillation occurs.By nonlinear analyses,it is shown that with increasing Rayleigh number,flow and heat transfer will change from steady state to unsteady state through HOPF bifurcation,and transition to chaos will occur through multi-periodical oscillation.

  15. Methods of Phase and Power Control in Magnetron Transmitters for Superconducting Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazadevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Lebedev, V. [Fermilab; Schappert, W. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Various methods of phase and power control in magnetron RF sources of superconducting accelerators intended for ADS-class projects were recently developed and studied with conventional 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons operating in pulsed and CW regimes. Magnetron transmitters excited by a resonant (injection-locking) phasemodulated signal can provide phase and power control with the rates required for precise stabilization of phase and amplitude of the accelerating field in Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of the intensity-frontier accelerators. An innovative technique that can significantly increase the magnetron transmitter efficiency at the widerange power control required for superconducting accelerators was developed and verified with the 2.45 GHz magnetrons operating in CW and pulsed regimes. High efficiency magnetron transmitters of this type can significantly reduce the capital and operation costs of the ADSclass accelerator projects.

  16. A single-mode external cavity diode laser using an intra-cavity atomic Faraday filter with short-term linewidth <400 kHz and long-term stability of <1 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaveney, James; Hamlyn, William J.; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development of a diode laser system - the "Faraday laser" - using an atomic Faraday filter as the frequency-selective element. In contrast to typical external-cavity diode laser systems which offer tunable output frequency but require additional control systems in order to achieve a stable output frequency, our system only lases at a single frequency, set by the peak transmission frequency of the internal atomic Faraday filter. Our system has both short-term and long-term stability of less than 1 MHz, which is less than the natural linewidth of alkali-atomic D-lines, making similar systems suitable for use as a "turn-key" solution for laser-cooling experiments.

  17. A single-mode external cavity diode laser using an intra-cavity atomic Faraday filter with short-term linewidth $<400$ kHz and long-term stability of $<1$ MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Hughes, Ifan G

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development of a diode laser system - the `Faraday laser' - using an atomic Faraday filter as the frequency-selective element. In contrast to typical external-cavity diode laser systems which offer tunable output frequency but require additional control systems in order to achieve a stable output frequency, our system only lases at a single frequency, set by the peak transmission frequency of the internal atomic Farady filter. Our system has both short-term and long-term stability of less than 1~MHz, which is less than the natural linewidth of alkali-atomic D-lines, making similar systems suitable for use as a `turn-key' solution for laser cooling experiments.

  18. A single-mode external cavity diode laser using an intra-cavity atomic Faraday filter with short-term linewidth <400 kHz and long-term stability of <1 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaveney, James; Hamlyn, William J; Adams, Charles S; Hughes, Ifan G

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development of a diode laser system - the "Faraday laser" - using an atomic Faraday filter as the frequency-selective element. In contrast to typical external-cavity diode laser systems which offer tunable output frequency but require additional control systems in order to achieve a stable output frequency, our system only lases at a single frequency, set by the peak transmission frequency of the internal atomic Faraday filter. Our system has both short-term and long-term stability of less than 1 MHz, which is less than the natural linewidth of alkali-atomic D-lines, making similar systems suitable for use as a "turn-key" solution for laser-cooling experiments.

  19. Superconducting Radio Frequency Technology: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting RF cavities are becoming more often the choice for larger scale particle accelerator projects such as linear colliders, energy recovery linacs, free electron lasers or storage rings. Among the many advantages compared to normal conducting copper structures, the superconducting devices dissipate less rf power, permit higher accelerating gradients in CW operation and provide better quality particle beams. In most cases these accelerating cavities are fabricated from high purity bulk niobium, which has superior superconducting properties such as critical temperature and critical magnetic field when compared to other superconducting materials. Research during the last decade has shown, that the metallurgical properties--purity, grain structure, mechanical properties and oxidation behavior--have significant influence on the performance of these accelerating devices. This contribution attempts to give a short overview of the superconducting RF technology with emphasis on the importance of the material properties of the high purity niobium.

  20. AC stabilities in superconducting magnetic shielding body with shorted low AC loss Nb{sub 3}Sn coil; Nb{sub 3}Sn kansen jiki shaheitai no koryu anteisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizawa, N.; Nii, A.; Ito, Y.; Onishi, T. [Hokkaido Univ., Hokkaido (Japan); Shibuya, M. [Engineering Research Association for Superconductive Genertion Equipment and Materials, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-06-07

    In this study, the superconducting magnetic shielding body conductively cooled by the small refrigerating machine at the intermediate temperature (10K-14K) was examined with the aim of a magnetic shielding type superconducting current limiter as closed as maintenance-free. Nb{sub 3}Sn coil closed the two ends was an object as a magnetic shielding body. In case of such a cooling system, the research of the stability was indispensable because of possible normal conduction transition in addition of disturbance into tapes. Then, the method to use the thyristor bypass circuit was examined in order to establish the stabilization method. As for the simulation, the normal conduction transition of the low AC loss Nb{sub 3}Sn coil which AC transferred in the constant-voltage power source, and the recovery characteristics of superconductivity were analyzed in the liquid helium. As a result of evaluating the stability in the constant-voltage power source, it was shown that the current attenuated by the resistance, and the exothermic reaction was controlled even if the disturbance happened and quenched. From these results, it was clarified that the stabilization method to establish the thyristor bypass circuit was effective for improvement on the stability of the superconductor. (NEDO)

  1. Superconductivity basics and applications to magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, R G

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and applications of superconducting magnets. It explains the phenomenon of superconductivity, theories of superconductivity, type II superconductors and high-temperature cuprate superconductors. The main focus of the book is on the application to superconducting magnets to accelerators and fusion reactors and other applications of superconducting magnets. The thermal and electromagnetic stability criteria of the conductors and the present status of the fabrication techniques for future magnet applications are addressed. The book is based on the long experience of the author in studying superconducting materials, building magnets and numerous lectures delivered to scholars. A researcher and graduate student will enjoy reading the book to learn various aspects of magnet applications of superconductivity. The book provides the knowledge in the field of applied superconductivity in a comprehensive way.

  2. Ultra-Stable Rubidium-Stabilized External-Cavity Diode Laser Based on the Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xiang-Hui; CHEN Wen-Lan; YI Lin; ZHOU Da-Wei; ZHOU Tong; XIAO Qin; DUAN Jun; ZHOU Xiao-Ji; CHEN Xu-Zong

    2009-01-01

    @@ We construct an ultra-stable external-cavity diode laser via modulation transfer spectroscopy referencing on a hyperfine component of the 87Rb D2 lines at 780 hm. The Doppler-free dispersion-like modulation transfer signal is obtained with high signal-to-noise-ratio. The instability of the laser frequency is measured by beating with an optical frequency comb which is phase-locked to an ultra-stable oven controlled crystal oscillator. The Allan deviation is 3.9×10-13 at 1s averaging time and 9.8×10-14 at 90s averaging time.

  3. RRR Characteristics for SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Yoochul; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-01-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes were fabricated such as a quarter wave resonator (QWR), a half wave resonator (HWR) and a single spoke resonator (SSR). One of the critical factors determining performances of the superconducting cavities is a residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how much niobium is pure and how fast niobium can transmit heat as well. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to the impurity incorporation. Thus it is important to maintain RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level will be discussed.

  4. High-Spatial-Resolution OH PLIF Visualization in a Cavity-Stabilized Ethylene-Air Turbulent Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geipel, Clayton M.; Rockwell, Robert D.; Chelliah, Harsha K.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Spelker, Christopher A.; Hashem, Zeid; Danehy, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution OH planar laser-induced fluorescence was measured for a premixed ethylene-air turbulent flame in an electrically-heated Mach 2 continuous-flow facility (University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility, Configuration E.) The facility comprised a Mach 2 nozzle, an isolator with flush-wall fuel injectors, a combustor with optical access, and an extender. The flame was anchored at a cavity flameholder with a backward-facing step of height 9 mm. The temperature-insensitive Q1(8) transition of OH was excited using laser light of wavelength 283.55 nm. A spatial filter was used to create a laser sheet approximately 25 microns thick based on full-width at half maximum (FWHM). Extension tubes increased the magnification of an intensified camera system, achieving in-plane resolution of 40 microns based on a 50% modulation transfer function (MTF). The facility was tested with total temperature 1200 K, total pressure 300 kPa, local fuel/air equivalence ratios of approximately 0.4, and local Mach number of approximately 0.73 in the combustor. A test case with reduced total temperature and another with reduced equivalence ratio were also tested. PLIF images were acquired along a streamwise plane bisecting the cavity flameholder, from the backward facing step to 120 mm downstream of the step. The smallest observed features in the flow had width of approximately 110 microns. Flame surface density was calculated for OH PLIF images.

  5. Dynamic neutronic and stability analysis of a burst mode, single cavity gas core reactor Brayton cycle space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Edward T.; Kutikkad, Kiratadas

    The conceptual, burst-mode gaseous-core reactor (GCR) space nuclear power system presently subjected to reactor-dynamics and system stability studies operates on a closed Brayton cycle, via disk MHD generator for energy conversion. While the gaseous fuel density power coefficient of reactivity is found to be capable of rapidly stabilizing the GCR system, the power of this feedback renders standard external reactivity insertions inadequate for significant power-level changes during normal operation.

  6. The Influence of Tuners and Temperature on the Higher Order Mode Spectrum for 1.3 GHz SCRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ainsworth, R; Zhang, P; Grecki, M; Baboi, N; Wamsat, T; Eddy, N

    2013-01-01

    Higher Order Modes (HOMs) are of concern for superconducting cavities as they can drive instabilities and so are usually damped and monitored. With special dedicated electronics, HOMs can provide information on the position on the beam. It has been proposed that piezo tuners used to keep the cavities operating at 1.3 GHz could alter the HOM spectrum altering the calibration constants used to read out the beam position affecting long term stability of the system. Also, of interest is how the cavity reacts to the slow tuner. Detuning and the retuning the cavity may alter the HOM spectrum. This is of particular interest for future machines not planning to use dedicated HOM damping as the tuning procedure may shift the frequency of HOMs onto dangerous resonances. The effect of temperature on the HOM spectrum is also investigated. An investigation of these effects has been performed at FLASH and the results are presented.

  7. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  8. ASC 84: applied superconductivity conference. Final program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations covering: superconducting device fabrication; applications of rf superconductivity; conductor stability and losses; detectors and signal processing; fusion magnets; A15 and Nb-Ti conductors; stability, losses, and various conductors; SQUID applications; new applications of superconductivity; advanced conductor materials; high energy physics applications of superconductivity; electronic materials and characterization; general superconducting electronics; ac machinery and new applications; digital devices; fusion and other large scale applications; in-situ and powder process conductors; ac applications; synthesis, properties, and characterization of conductors; superconducting microelectronics. (LEW)

  9. JLEIC SRF cavity RF Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The initial design of a low higher order modes (HOM) impedance superconducting RF (SRF) cavity is presented in this paper. The design of this SRF cavity is for the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC). The electron ring of JLEIC will operate with electrons of 3 to 10 GeV energy. The ion ring of JLEIC will operate with protons of up to 100 GeV energy. The bunch lengths in both rings are ~12 mm (RMS). In order to maintain the short bunch length in the ion ring, SRF cavities are adopted to provide large enough gradient. In the first phase of JLEIC, the PEP II RF cavities will be reused in the electron ring to lower the initial cost. The frequency of the SRF cavities is chosen to be the second harmonic of PEP II cavities, 952.6 MHz. In the second phase of JLEIC, the same frequency SRF cavities may replace the normal conducting PEP II cavities to achieve higher luminosity at high energy. At low energies, the synchro-tron radiation damping effect is quite weak, to avoid the coupled bunch instability caused by the intense closely-spaced electron bunches, low HOM impedance of the SRF cavities combined with longitudinal feedback sys-tem will be necessary.

  10. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  11. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  12. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  13. Load frequency stabilization by coordinated control of Thyristor Controlled Phase Shifters and superconducting magnetic energy storage for three types of interconnected two-area power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, Praghnesh [Department of Electrical Engineering, Charotar Institute of Technology, Changa 388 421, Gujarat (India); Ghoshal, S.P. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur 713 209, West Bengal (India); Roy, Ranjit [Department of Electrical Engineering, S.V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India)

    2010-12-15

    In this paper, automatic generation control with interconnected two-area multi-unit all-hydro power system and two more test systems as all-thermal and thermal-hydro mixed haves been investigated. The transfer function of hydro turbine having non-minimum phase characteristics makes it different from the steam turbine. Upon application of small load perturbation to such all-hydro system, the frequency is severely disturbed and the system eventually becomes unstable. To stabilize the system for such load disturbance, comparative transient performance of two cases as (a) Thyristor Controlled Phase Shifter (TCPS) installed in series with the tie-line in coordination with Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and (b) SMES located at each terminal of both areas are analyzed. It is observed that the case (b) i.e. SMES located at each terminal of both areas suppresses the frequency oscillations more effectively in integral controller assisted AGC of two-area multi-unit all-hydro system and the other two systems as well. In addition, the effectiveness of proposed frequency stabilizers is guaranteed by analyzing the transient responses of the system with different system parameters, various load patterns and in the event of temporary and permanent tie-line outage. Gains of the integral controller in AGC loop and parameters of TCPS and SMES are optimized with the help of a relatively novel particle swarm optimization, developed by the authors, called as craziness-based particle swarm optimization (CRPSO). The optimizing performance has been compared to that of real-coded genetic algorithm (RGA) to establish its superiority. (author)

  14. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  15. f=325 MHz,β=0.52双柱超导Sp oke腔电磁设计%EM Design of a f=325 MHz, β=0.52 Double Spoke Superconducting Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋天才; 何源; 张生虎; 鲁向阳

    2015-01-01

    The EM design of a 325 MHz β =0.52 superconducting double Spoke cavity has been finished at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences(CAS). In this paper, the optimization of the Spoke base is described in detail. The goal is to minimize the peak surface field and maximize the shunt impedance. The common cylinder is replaced by the racetrack shape for the Spoke base. The transverse racetrack Spoke base can offer a better RF property than the longitudinal racetrack Spoke base, which meet the requirement of the C-ADS. The simulation of multipactor finished by CST Particle Studio is also presented, which gives a promising result that there is no multipactor around working voltage.%中国科学院近代物理研究所设计的工作频率为325 MHz、最优β为0.52的双柱超导Spoke腔的电磁已经完成。详细地描述了Spoke基部横截面形状和大小对腔体射频性能的影响,采用了跑道形来取代通常的圆形Spoke基部截面。从归一化峰值电磁场和分路阻抗两方面出发,比较了横截面为横向跑道和纵向跑道的Spoke基部。Spoke基部横截面的形状为横向跑道时能得到较好的射频参数,满足中国ADS(C-ADS)的工程需求。最后利用CST粒子工作室对得到的腔体进行了二次电子倍增分析,在工作电压附近不存在二次电子倍增,验证了该腔体形状的可行性。

  16. A study on the effects of Lorentz forces in {beta} 0. 15 SPOKE and {beta} 0.12 SPIRAL 2 cavities; Etudes des effets des forces de Lorentz sur la cavite SPOKE {beta}0, 15 et sur la cavite SPIRAL 2 {beta}0.12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassot, H. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire (IPN) - 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay - UMR 8608 (France)

    2007-07-01

    Designing future accelerator resorts increasingly since several years to superconductor cavities as accelerating structures due to their high efficiency in accelerator gradient and especially to their capabilities of functioning in continuous regime. Thus, superconducting cavities of mono-SPOKE type were proposed for the low energy sector of the accelerators in the European projects EURISOL for production of radioactive ion beams and EUROTRANS for transmutation of the long-lived radioactive waste. One of the major tasks in designing superconducting cavities is taking into account the variation of the resonance frequency induced by the deformation of metallic walls under Lorentz forces. To get mechanical and electromagnetic simulation and their coupling as well the knowledge of the surface electromagnetic fields is needed. Recently, within the SPIRAL 2 project a 88 MHz of {beta} 0.12 superconducting cavity was proposed for the new deuteron injector at GANIL. This cavity has a very narrow passband (60 Hz). In this report 3 D studies of stability in superconducting cavities are presented as directly related to the Lorentz forces entailing frequency variations. A preliminary work was done for developing codes interfacing three different domains, i.e. Catia for CAO, SOPRANO for electromagnetic simulations and CAST3M for mechanical simulations. The results for mono-SPOKE cavity are compared well with the experimental data. The simulations were thus shown to be valid. The first results for 88 MHz wave-quarter superconducting cavities at {beta} 0.12 are also presented and compared with those obtained by using other codes.

  17. LLRF Control of High Loaded-Q Cavities for the LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Carlos [LBNL, Berkeley; Babel, Sandeep [SLAC; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna [Jefferson Lab; Boyes, Matt [SLAC; Chase, Brian [Fermilab; Cullerton, Ed [Fermilab; Doolittle, Lawrence [LBNL, Berkeley; Einstein, Joshua [Fermilab; Hong, Bo [SLAC; Hovater, Curt [Jefferson Lab; Huang, Gang [LBNL, Berkeley; Ratti, Alessandro [LBNL, Berkeley

    2016-06-01

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is planning an upgrade (LCLS-II) to the Linear Coherent Light Source with a 4 GeV CW Superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) linac. The nature of the machine places stringent requirements in the Low-Level RF (LLRF) system, expected to control the cavity fields within 0.01 degrees in phase and 0.01% in amplitude, which is equivalent to a longitudinal motion of the cavity structure in the nanometer range. This stability has been achieved in the past but never for hundreds of superconducting cavities in Continuous-Wave (CW) operation. The difficulty resides in providing the ability to reject disturbances from the cryomodule, which is incompletely known as it depends on the cryomodule structure itself (currently under development at JLab and Fermilab) and the harsh accelerator environment. Previous experience in the field and an extrapolation to the cavity design parameters (relatively high Q_{L}c≈ 4×10⁷ , implying a half-bandwidth of around 16 Hz) suggest the use of strong RF feedback to reject the projected noise disturbances, which in turn demands careful engineering of the entire system.

  18. The First Nine-Cell TESLA Cavity Made in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiang-Yang; JIN Song; XIN Tian-Mu; YAO Zhong-Yuan; CHEN Jia-Er; ZHAO Kui; QUAN Sheng-Wen; ZHANG Bao-Cheng; HAO Jian-Kui; ZHU Feng; LIN Lin; XU Wen-Can; WANG Er-Dong; WANG Fang

    2008-01-01

    A totally home-made 9-cell TESLA type superconducting cavity is made at Peking University. The cavity fabrication is according to DESY specification. The cavity is made of high purity niobium from OTIC, Ningxia.The electron beam welding is carried out at Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin. By the cooperation, the cavity is tested at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, USA. The preliminary result shows the acceleration gradient Eacc is 23 MV/m without quench and has potential for improvement.

  19. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  20. Engineering topological materials in microwave cavity arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Brandon M; Owens, Clai; Schuster, David I; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present a scalable architecture for the exploration of interacting topological phases of photons in arrays of microwave cavities, using established techniques from cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics. A time-reversal symmetry breaking (non-reciprocal) flux is induced by coupling the microwave cavities to ferrites, allowing for the production of a variety of topological band structures including the $\\alpha=1/4$ Hofstadter model. Effective photon-photon interactions are included by coupling the cavities to superconducting qubits, and are sufficient to produce a $\

  1. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  2. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  3. Superconducting Electronic Film Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-14

    cubic, yttria stabilized, zirconia (YSZ) single crystals with (100) orientation and ao = 0.512 to 0.516 nm. Films were magnetron-sputtered... Crown by Solid-State and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy," IEEE Trans. Uagn. 25(2), 2538 (1989). 6. J. H. Kang, R. T. Kampwirth, and K. E. Gray, "Superconductivity...summarized in Fig. 1, are too high for SrTiO3 or yttria- stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to be used in rf applications. MgO, LaAIO 3 , and LaGaO3 have a tan 6

  4. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  5. Development and testing of a 50 KA, pulsed superconducting cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollan; DeClerc, J.; Hamilton, W.; Zeitlin, B.

    1983-05-01

    Prototype cables for 7.5 T, pulsed field application in tokamak poloidal field coils have been designed, fabricated, and evaluated. Successful fabrication of a 10 m superconducting sample represents the largest superconducting cable ever made. Details of the fabrication, the problems expected and encountered, and the solutions to those problems are discussed. Results of stability measurements on the superconducting prototype also are presented.

  6. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Edwar; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present design considerations for the 3D microwave cavity as well as the superconducting transmon qubit. Moreover, we show experimental data of a high purity aluminum cavity demonstrating quality factors above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. Our experiments also demonstrate that the quality factor is less dependent on the power compared to planar resonator geometries. Furthermore, we present strategies for tuning both the cavity and the qubit individually.

  7. Simultaneous frequency stabilization and high-power dense wavelength division multiplexing (HP-DWDM) using an external cavity based on volume Bragg gratings (VBGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengesbach, Stefan; Klein, Sarah; Holly, Carlo; Witte, Ulrich; Traub, Martin; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Multiplexing technologies enable the development of high-brightness diode lasers for direct industrial applications. We present a High-Power Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexer (HP-DWDM) with an average channel spacing of 1.7 (1.5) nm and a subsequent external cavity mirror to provide feedback for frequency stabilization and multiplexing in one step. The "self-optimizing" multiplexing unit consists of four reflective Volume Bragg Gratings (VBGs) with 99% diffraction efficiency and seven dielectric mirrors to overlay the radiation of five input channels with an adjustable channel spacing of 1-2 nm. In detail, we focus on the analysis of the overall optical efficiency, the change of the beam parameter product and the spectral width. The performance is demonstrated using five 90 μm multimode 9xx single emitters with M2angular intensity distribution changes strongly and the beam parameter product decreases by a factor of 1.2 to 1.9. Thereby the angular intensity distribution is more affected than the width of the beam waist. The spectral width per emitter decreases to 3-200 pm (FWHM) depending on the injection current and the reflectance of the feedback mirror (0.75%, 1.5%, 4%, 6% or 8%). The overall optical multiplexing efficiency ranges between 77% and 86%. With some modifications (e.g. enhanced AR-coatings) we expect 90-95%.

  8. Quantum Dynamics of Nonlinear Cavity Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nation, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of three different configurations of nonlinear cavity systems. To begin, we carry out a quantum analysis of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) mechanical displacement detector comprised of a SQUID with a mechanically compliant loop segment. The SQUID is approximated by a nonlinear current-dependent inductor, inducing a flux tunable nonlinear Duffing term in the cavity equation of motion. Expressions are derived for the detector signal ...

  9. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  10. Superconductivity an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiner, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this proven text has been developed further in both scope and scale to reflect the potential for superconductivity in power engineering to increase efficiency in electricity transmission or engines. The landmark reference remains a comprehensive introduction to the field, covering every aspect from fundamentals to applications, and presenting the latest developments in organic superconductors, superconducting interfaces, quantum coherence, and applications in medicine and industry. Due to its precise language and numerous explanatory illustrations, it is suitable as an introductory textbook, with the level rising smoothly from chapter to chapter, such that readers can build on their newly acquired knowledge. The authors cover basic properties of superconductors and discuss stability and different material groups with reference to the latest and most promising applications, devoting the last third of the book to applications in power engineering, medicine, and low temperature physics. An e...

  11. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  12. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  13. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, B. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Smith, J. D.A. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Rimmer, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Delayen, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Calaga, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  14. Electride and superconductivity behaviors in Mn5Si3-type intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaoqing; Wang, Bosen; Xiao, Zewen; Lu, Yangfan; Kamiya, Toshio; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    Electrides are unique in the sense that they contain localized anionic electrons in the interstitial regions. Yet they exist with a diversity of chemical compositions, especially under extreme conditions, implying generalized underlying principles for their existence. What is rarely observed is the combination of electride state and superconductivity within the same material, but such behavior would open up a new category of superconductors. Here, we report a hexagonal Nb5Ir3 phase of Mn5Si3-type structure that falls into this category and extends the electride concept into intermetallics. The confined electrons in the one-dimensional cavities are reflected by the characteristic channel bands in the electronic structure. Filling these free spaces with foreign oxygen atoms serves to engineer the band topology and increase the superconducting transition temperature to 10.5 K in Nb5Ir3O. Specific heat analysis indicates the appearance of low-lying phonons and two-gap s-wave superconductivity. Strong electron-phonon coupling is revealed to be the pairing glue with an anomalously large ratio between the superconducting gap Δ0 and Tc, 2Δ0/kBTc = 6.12. The general rule governing the formation of electrides concerns the structural stability against the cation filling/extraction in the channel site.

  15. Single-cell LEP-type cavity on measurement stand

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    A single-cell cavity, made of copper, with tapered connectors for impedance measurements. It was used as a model of LEP-type superconducting cavities, to investigate impedance and higher-order modes and operated at around 600 MHz (the LEP acceleration frequency was 352.2 MHz). See 8202500.

  16. RF Coupler Design for the TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, R L; Harmer, P; Laxdal, R E; Mitra, A K; Sekatchev, I; Waraich, B; Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    An RF Coupler for the ISAC-II medium beta (β=0.058 and 0.071) superconducting quarter wave resonators was designed and tested at TRIUMF. The main goal of this development was to achieve stable operation of superconducting cavities at high acceleration gradients and low thermal load to the helium refrigeration system. The cavities will operate at 6 MV/m acceleration gradient in overcoupled mode at a forward power 200 W at 106 MHz. The overcoupling provides ±20 Hz cavity bandwidth, which improves the stability of the RF control system for fast helium pressure fluctuations, microphonics and environmental noise. Choice of materials, cooling with liquid nitrogen, aluminum nitride RF window and thermal shields insure a small thermal load on the helium refrigeration system by the Coupler. An RF finger contact which causedμdust in the coupler housing was eliminated without any degradation of the coupler performance. RF and thermal calculations, design and test results on the coupler are p...

  17. Implementation of Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices via Raman Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical scheme is proposed to implement the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm with SQUIDs (superconducting quantum-interference devices) in cavity via Raman transition. The scheme only requires a quantized cavity field and classical microwave pulses. In this scheme, no transfer of quantum information between the SQUIDs and the cavity is required, the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed.

  18. Electrodeposition and characterisation of lead tin superconducting films for application in heavy ion booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R., E-mail: Nikolai.Lobanov@anu.edu.au

    2015-12-15

    The ANU has developed experimental systems and procedures for lead–tin (PbSn) film deposition and characterisation. The 12 split loop resonators have been electroplated with 96%Pb4%Sn film to the final thickness of 1.5 micron using methanesulfonic acid (MSA) chemistry. As a result, an average acceleration field of 3.6 MV/m off-line at 6 W rf power was achieved at extremely low technological cost. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Heavy Ion Elastic Detection Analyses (HIERDA), Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Electron Backscattering Diffraction (EBSD) revealed correlation between the substrate and film structure, morphology and the rf performance of the cavity. The PbSn plating, exercised on the existing split loop resonators (SLR), has been extended to the two stub quarter wave resonator (QWR) as a straightforward step to quickly explore the superconducting performance of the new geometry. The oxygen free copper (OHFC) substrate for two stub QWR was prepared by reverse pulse electropolishing. The ultimate superconducting properties and long-term stability of the coatings have been assessed by operation of the ANU superconducting linac over the last few years. - Highlights: • PbSn alloy is investigated as a material for superconducting low and medium velocity rf resonators. • It is easily electrodeposited with MSA chemistry at very low cost, has high T{sub c}, and good performance at high fields. • The optimum substrate preparation and coating conditions are established based on examination of the properties of substrate and superconducting films. • A long term stability of the electroplated resonators has been showing no evidence of degradation of the rf properties over the last decade. • The resonators high field performance limiting factors and their possible elimination have been evaluated.

  19. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  20. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  2. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-10

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests.

  3. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John M.

    2012-06-01

    Holes doped into the CuO2 planes of cuprate parent compounds frustrate the antiferromagnetic order. The development of spin and charge stripes provides a compromise between the competing magnetic and kinetic energies. Static stripe order has been observed only in certain particular compounds, but there are signatures which suggest that dynamic stripe correlations are common in the cuprates. Though stripe order is bad for superconducting phase coherence, stripes are compatible with strong pairing. Ironically, magnetic-field-induced stripe order appears to enhance the stability of superconducting order within the planes.

  4. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, John M., E-mail: jtran@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Dept., Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Holes doped into the CuO{sub 2} planes of cuprate parent compounds frustrate the antiferromagnetic order. The development of spin and charge stripes provides a compromise between the competing magnetic and kinetic energies. Static stripe order has been observed only in certain particular compounds, but there are signatures which suggest that dynamic stripe correlations are common in the cuprates. Though stripe order is bad for superconducting phase coherence, stripes are compatible with strong pairing. Ironically, magnetic-field-induced stripe order appears to enhance the stability of superconducting order within the planes.

  5. Characterization of superconducting multilayers samples

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, C Z; Berry, S; Bouat, S; Jacquot, J F; Villegier, J C; Lamura, G; Gurevich, A

    2009-01-01

    Best RF bulk niobium accelerating cavities have nearly reached their ultimate limits at rf equatorial magnetic field H  200 mT close to the thermodynamic critical field Hc. In 2006 Gurevich proposed to use nanoscale layers of superconducting materials with high values of Hc > HcNb for magnetic shielding of bulk niobium to increase the breakdown magnetic field inside SC RF cavities [1]. Depositing good quality layers inside a whole cavity is rather difficult but we have sputtered high quality samples by applying the technique used for the preparation of superconducting electronics circuits and characterized these samples by X-ray reflectivity, dc resistivity (PPMS) and dc magnetization (SQUID). Dc magnetization curves of a 250 nm thick Nb film have been measured, with and without a magnetron sputtered coating of a single or multiple stack of 15 nm MgO and 25 nm NbN layers. The Nb samples with/without the coating clearly exhibit different behaviors. Because SQUID measurements are influenced by edge an...

  6. Niobium Cavity Electropolishing Modelling and Optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, L M A; Forel, S; Shirra, J A

    2013-01-01

    It’s widely accepted that electropolishing (EP) is the most suitable surface finishing process to achieve high performance bulk Nb accelerating cavities. At CERN and in preparation for the processing of the 704 MHz high-beta Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cavities a new vertical electropolishing facility has been assembled and a study is on-going for the modelling of electropolishing on cavities with COMSOL® software. In a first phase, the electrochemical parameters were taken into account for a fixed process temperature and flow rate, and are presented in this poster as well as the results obtained on a real SPL single cell cavity. The procedure to acquire the data used as input for the simulation is presented. The modelling procedure adopted to optimise the cathode geometry, aimed at a uniform current density distribution in the cavity cell for the minimum working potential and total current is explained. Some preliminary results on fluid dynamics is also briefly described.

  7. New Methods for Thin Film Deposition and First Investigations of the use of High Temperature Superconductors for Thin Film Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafsson, Anna; Vollenberg, Wilhelmus; Seviour, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Niobium thin film cavities have shown good and reliable performance for LEP and LHC, although there are limitations to overcome if this technique should be used for new accelerators such as the ILC. New coating techniques like High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) has shown very promising results and we will report on its possible improvements for Nb thin film cavity performance. Current materials used in accelerator Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) technologies operate at temperatures below 4 K, which require complex cryogenic systems. Researchers have investigated the use of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) to form RF cavities, with limited success. We propose a new approach to achieve a high-temperature SRF cavity based on the superconducting ’proximity effect’. The superconducting proximity effect is the effect through which a superconducting material in close proximity to a non-superconducting material induces a superconducting condensate in the latter. Using this effect we hope...

  8. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Olivier, Gilles; Renard, Bertrand; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  9. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousson, Sebastien; Darve, Christine; Duthil, Patxi; Elias, Nuno; Molloy, Steve; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  10. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e⁺/e⁻ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Matalevich, Joseph R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  12. A study of beam position diagnostics with beam-excited dipole higher order modes using a downconverter test electronics in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, N.; Lorbeer, B.; Wamsat, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Jones, R.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to de ne a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 m accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth dipole band, and a global resolution of 20 m over the complete module. Based on these results we decided to build a HOM electronics for the second dipole band and the fifth dipole band, so that we will have both high resolution measurements for the whole module, and localized measurements for individual cavity. The prototype electronics is being built by Fermilab and planned to be tested in FLASH by the end of 2012.

  13. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Möhle, Katharina; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-01-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1 x 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (> 1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  14. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  15. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to cw acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008<β=v/c<0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication, and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3–4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  16. Topological superconductivity induced by ferromagnetic metal chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, A.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; MacDonald, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent experiments have provided evidence that one-dimensional (1D) topological superconductivity can be realized experimentally by placing transition-metal atoms that form a ferromagnetic chain on a superconducting substrate. We address some properties of this type of system by using a Slater-Koster tight-binding model to account for important features of the electronic structure of the transition-metal chains on the superconducting substrate. We predict that topological superconductivity is nearly universal when ferromagnetic transition-metal chains form straight lines on superconducting substrates and that it is possible for more complex chain structures. When the chain is weakly coupled to the substrate and is longer than superconducting coherence lengths, its proximity-induced superconducting gap is ˜Δ ESO/J where Δ is the s -wave pair potential on the chain, ESO is the spin-orbit splitting energy induced in the normal chain state bands by hybridization with the superconducting substrate, and J is the exchange splitting of the ferromagnetic chain d bands. Because of the topological character of the 1D superconducting state, Majorana end modes appear within the gaps of finite length chains. We find, in agreement with the experiment, that when the chain and substrate orbitals are strongly hybridized, Majorana end modes are substantially reduced in amplitude when separated from the chain end by less than the coherence length defined by the p -wave superconducting gap. We conclude that Pb is a particularly favorable substrate material for ferromagnetic chain topological superconductivity because it provides both strong s -wave pairing and strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling, but that there is an opportunity to optimize properties by varying the atomic composition and structure of the chain. Finally, we note that in the absence of disorder, a new chain magnetic symmetry, one that is also present in the crystalline topological insulators, can stabilize multiple

  17. Itinerant Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karchev, Naoum

    2004-01-01

    Superconductivity has again become a challenge following the discovery of unconventional superconductivity. Resistance-free currents have been observed in heavy-fermion materials, organic conductors and copper oxides. The discovery of superconductivity in a single crystal of $UGe_2$, $ZrZn_2$ and $URhGe$ revived the interest in the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The experiments indicate that: i)The superconductivity is confined to the ferromagnetic phase. ii)The ferromag...

  18. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  19. Cooling Dynamics Trough Transition Temperature of Niobium SRF Cavities Captured by Temperature Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, M; Checchin, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, A; Sergatskov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Cool-down dynamics of superconducting accelerating cavities became particularly important for obtaining very high quality factors in SRF cavities. Previous studies proved that when cavity is cooled fast, the quality factor is higher than when cavity is cooled slowly. This has been discovered to derive from the fact that a fast cool-down allows better magnetic field expulsion during the superconducting transition. In this paper we describe the first experiment where the temperature all around the cavity was mapped during the cavity cool-down through transition temperature, proving the existence of two different transition dynamics: a sharp superconducting-normal conducting transition during fast cool-down which favors flux expulsion and nucleation phase transition during slow cool-down, which leads to full flux trapping.

  20. Study of a superconducting spoke-type cavity and of its associated power coupler; Etude d'une cavite acceleratrice supraconductrice de type spoke et de son coupleur de puissance associe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielot, Ch

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the study of a spoke-type cavity and its associated power coupler. The results of this study are used in the framework of the high power proton linear accelerator of the experimental accelerator-driven system project (XADS). The cavity (F=352 MHz, {beta}=0.35) was tested at 4 K and 2 K. The results at 4 K gave good margins toward XADS requirements that increase the reliability of a spoke based driver. At 2 K the accelerating field reached is the highest in the world for spoke cavities: 16 MV/M. The position and diameter of the coupling have been optimized in order to decrease the HF losses and avoid multi-factor risk. In order to decrease HF losses (taking into account the 20 kW power fed into the cavity) the electric coupling mode has been chosen. Different types of ceramic windows have been studied in order to make this critical point of the coupler reliable: coaxial disk with or without chokes or empty coaxial cylinder. The optimization process focused on the reflected power, the losses in the ceramic and the surface electric field. The risk with chokes has been modeled and studied with the propagation lines theory. A systematic study of the different windows has been done regarding the geometrical parameters. The disk without chokes seems to be a good solution for our application. The power source will be a solid state amplifier (for reliability and modularity reasons). An all over coaxial coupler can be designed and will be fabricated and tested soon. (author)

  1. Report on Superconducting RF Activities at CERN from 2001 to 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Losito, R; Chiaveri, Enrico; Montesinos, E; Tückmantel, Joachim; Valuch, D; 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity

    2003-01-01

    The main project on superconducting RF at CERN in the period from 2001 to 2003 has been the 400 MHz SC system for the LHC. Five modules, each containing four single-cell niobium (Nb) sputtered cavities, have been assembled and low-power tested at room temperature and at 4.5 K. Production of the first four power couplers has been delayed but high-power tests should start on the first module this autumn. A small program of R&D is maintained on the SPL. Both the beta = 0.7 and beta = 0.8 cavities have been high-power tested up to nominal field without particular problems. A detailed characterization of the cavity mechanical resonances is going on and some preliminary results are presented. A computer code has been written to predict the effects of Lorentz detuning and microphonics on the stability of the RF feedback loops in SC linacs where several cavities are driven by a single high power source. Fast ferrite phase shifters are being developed to allow the decoupling of the feedback loops of individual cav...

  2. The ADMX Microwave Cavity: Present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollett, Nathan; ADMX Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX), a direct-detection axion search, uses a tunable resonant cavity to enhance axion to photon conversion rates to a detectable level when the cavity resonance matches the mass of the axion. It has successfully taken data in the 460 - 890 MHz frequency range and is now probing a similar range with much higher sensitivity. However the axion mass is unknown and may be at higher frequencies than the currently operating system. In anticipation of future runs with an increased mass range, ADMX is conducting extensive research and development of microwave cavities. These developments include photonic band-gap cavities, multi-vane cavities, partitioned cavities, in-phase coupled cavities, and superconducting hybrid cavities. Many of these projects are in different stages between simulations and testing of physical prototypes. The status and current objectives of these projects will be presented. Supported by DOE Grants DE-SC0010280, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, the Heising-Simons Foundation and the LLNL, FNAL and PNNL LDRD program.

  3. HOMs Simulation and Measurement Results of IHEP02 Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Hongjuan; Zhao, Tongxian; Gao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In cavities, there exists not only the fundamental mode which is used to accelerate the beam but also higher order modes (HOMs). The higher order modes excited by beam can seriously affect beam quality, especially for the higher R/Q modes. This paper reports on measured results of higher order modes in the IHEP02 1.3GHz low-loss 9-cell superconducting cavity. Using different methods, Qe of the dangerous modes passbands have been got. The results are compared with TESLA cavity results. R/Q of the first three passbands have also been got by simulation and compared with the results of TESLA cavity.

  4. High Gradient Tests of the Fermilab SSR1 Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Khabiboulline, T; Gonin, I; Madrak, R; Melnychuk, O; Ozelis, J; Pischalnikov, Y; Ristori, L; Rowe, A; Sergatskov, D A; Sukhanov, A; Terechkine, I; Wagner, R; Webber, R; Yakovlev, V

    2013-01-01

    In Fermilab we are build and tested several superconducting Single Spoke Resonators (SSR1, \\beta=0.22) which can be used for acceleration of low beta ions. Fist two cavities performed very well during cold test in Vertical Test Station at FNAL. One dressed cavity was also tested successfully in Horizontal Test Station. Currently we are building 8 cavity cryomodule for PIXIE project. Additional 10 cavities were manufactured in the industry and on-going cold test results will be presented in this poster.

  5. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  6. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  7. Superconducting rf development at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Clifft, B.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India); Givens, J.; Potter, J.; Crandall, K. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Added, N. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    The ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linac began operation in 1978 and has operated nearly continuously since that time, while undergoing a series of upgrades and expansions, the most recent being the ``uranium upgrade`` completed earlier this year and described below. In its present configuration the ATLAS linac consists of an array of 64 resonant cavities operating from 48 to 145 MHz, which match a range of particle velocities .007 < {beta} = v/c < .2. The linac provides approximately 50 MV of effective accelerating potential for ions of q/m > 1/10 over the entire periodic table. Delivered beams include 5 {minus} 7 pnA of {sup 238}U{sup 39+} at 1535 MeV. At present more than 10{sup 6} cavity-hours of operation at surface electric fields of 15 MV/m have been accumulated. Superconducting structure development at ATLAS is aimed at improving the cost/performance of existing low velocity structures both for possible future ATLAS upgrades, and also for heavy-ion linacs at other institutions. An application of particular current interest is to develop structures suitable for accelerating radioactive ion beams. Such structures must accelerate very low charge to mass ratio beams and must also have very large transverse acceptance.

  8. Cryogenic rf test of the first plasma etched SRF cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Im, D; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2016-01-01

    Plasma etching has a potential to be an alternative processing technology for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. An apparatus and a method are developed for plasma etching of the inner surfaces of SRF cavities. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity is used. The single cell cavity is mechanically polished, buffer chemically etched afterwards and rf tested at cryogenic temperatures for a baseline test. This cavity is then plasma processed. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish segmented plasma processing. The cavity is rf tested afterwards at cryogenic temperatures. The rf test and surface condition results are presented.

  9. Superconducting magnets for MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Three types of magnets are currently used to provide the background field required for magnet resonance imaging (MRI). (i) Permanent magnets produce fields of up to 0.3 T in volumes sufficient for imaging the head or up to 0.15 T for whole body imaging. Cost and simplicity of operation are advantages, but relatively low field, weight (up to 100 tonnes) and, to a small extent, instability are limitations. (ii) Water-cooled magnets provide fields of up to 0.25 T in volumes suitable for whole body imaging, but at the expense of power (up to 150 kW for 0.25 T) and water-cooling. Thermal stability of the field requires the maintenance of constant temperature through periods both of use and of quiescence. (iii) Because of the limitations imposed by permanent and resistive magnets, particularly on field strength, the superconducting magnet is now most widely used to provide background fields of up to 2 T for whole body MRI. It requires very low operating power and that only for refrigeration. Because of the constant low temperature, 4.2 K, at which its stressed structure operates, its field is stable. The following review deals principally with superconducting magnets for MRI. However, the sections on field analysis apply to all types of magnet and the description of the source terms of circular coils and of the principals of design of solenoids apply equally to resistive solenoidal magnets.

  10. High field rf superconductivity: to pulse or not to pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campisi, I.E.

    1984-10-01

    Experimental data on the behavior of superconductors under the application of rf fields of amplitude comparable to their critical fields are sporadic and not always consistent. In many cases the field level at which breakdown in superconducting rf cavities should be expected has not been clearly established. Tests conducted with very short (approx. 1 ..mu..s) rf pulses indicate that in this mode of operation fields close to the critical values can be consistently reached in superconducting cavities without breakdown. The advantages and disadvantages of the pulsed method are discussed compared to those of the more standard continuous wave (cw) systems. 60 references.

  11. Superconducting travelling wave ring with high gradient accelerating section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrakhov, P.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure instead of a standing wave cavity has major advantages in increasing the accelerating gradient in the ILC. In contrast with standing wave cavity STWA requires feedback loop, which sends wave from the structure output to input, making a superconducting traveling wave ring (STWR). One or few input couplers need to excite STWR and compensate power dissipations due to beam loading. To control traveling wave regime in the structure two independent knobs can be used for tuning both resonant ring frequency and backward wave. We discuss two variants of the STWR with one and two feed couplers.

  12. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  13. Subwavelength rectangular cavity partially filled with left-handed materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Tian; Chen Yan; Feng Yi-Jun

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the electromagnetic analysis of a rectangular cavity partially filled with a left-handed material slab. Our theoretical investigation shows that there exist novel resonant modes in the cavity, and such a cavity becomes a subwavelength cavity. The eigenvalue equation of the cavity is derived and the resonant frequencies of the novel modes are calculated by using numerical simulation. We also discuss the stability of the novel resonant modes and show the best condition under which a useful rectangular cavity of subwavelength dimensions with tolerable stability is obtained.

  14. Theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Crisan, Mircea

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up t

  15. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati, E-mail: dhakal@jlab.org; Ciovati, Gianluigi, E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org; Myneni, Ganapati R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications.

  16. PROGRESS ON LEAD PHOTOCATHODES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING INJECTORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; SEKUTOWICZ, J.; KNEISEL, P.; LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERTS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-05-16

    We present the results of our investigation of bulk lead, along with various types of lead films, as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. The quantum efficiency of each sample is presented as a function of the photon energy of the incident light, from 3.9 eV to 6.5 eV. Quantum efficiencies of 0.5% have been obtained. Production of a niobium cavity with a lead-plated cathode is underway.

  17. Progress on lead photocathodes for superconducting injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley, John; Rao, Triveni; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Kneisel, Peter; Langner, J; Strzyzewski, P; Lefferts, Richard; Lipski, Andrzej

    2005-05-16

    We present the results of our investigation of bulk lead, along with various types of lead films, as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. The quantum efficiency of each sample is presented as a function of the photon energy of the incident light, from 3.9 eV to 6.5 eV. Quantum efficiencies of 0.5% have been obtained. Production of a niobium cavity with a lead plated cathode is underway.

  18. Study of Thermocurrents in ILC cavities via measurements of the Seebeck Effect in niobium, titanium, and stainless steel thermocouples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, Victoria [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The goals of Fermilab’s Superconductivity and Radio Frequency Development Department are to engineer, fabricate, and improve superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities in the interest of advancing accelerator technology. Improvement includes exploring possible limitations on cavity performance and mitigating such impediments. This report focuses on investigating and measuring the Seebeck Effect observed in cavity constituents titanium, niobium, and stainless steel arranged in thermocouples. These junctions exist between cavities, helium jackets, and bellows, and their connection can produce a loop of electrical current and magnetic flux spontaneously during cooling. The experimental procedure and results are described and analyzed. Implications relating the results to cavity performance are discussed.

  19. Laser frequency stabilization and control of optical cavities with suspended mirrors for the VIRGO interferometric detector of gravitational waves; Stabilisation en frequence du laser et controle de cavites optiques a miroirs suspendus pour le detecteur interferometrique d'ondes gravitationnelles VIRGO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsuglia, Matteo [Paris-11 Univ., 91 Orsay (France)

    1999-05-17

    The VIRGO detector is an interferometer with 3 km Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms. It is aimed at the detection of gravitational radiation emitted by astrophysical sources. This thesis comprises two independent parts. The first part is devoted to the laser frequency stabilization. In the second one we present a study of a suspended cavity. We determine the impact of laser frequency fluctuations on the overall VIRGO sensitivity. We study the frequency stabilization of the interferometer considered as an ultra-stable standard and we evaluate the noise pertaining to different signals taken into consideration. A strategy of control is discussed. We then study the VIRGO mode-cleaner prototype, a 30 m suspended triangular cavity, for which we have developed a control in order to keep it locked. Finally, we characterize this cavity in terms of mode spectra, finesse and mechanical transfer functions. (author)

  20. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.