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Sample records for superconducting adiabatic quantum

  1. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  2. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Adiabatic Invariants for Time-Dependent Superconducting Qubit-Oscillators and Resonators in Quantum Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Ryeol Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic invariant, which is a conserved quantity, is useful for studying quantum and classical properties of dynamical systems. Adiabatic invariants for time-dependent superconducting qubit-oscillator systems and resonators are investigated using the Liouville-von Neumann equation. At first, we derive an invariant for a simple superconducting qubit-oscillator through the introduction of its reduced Hamiltonian. Afterwards, an adiabatic invariant for a nanomechanical resonator linearly interfaced with a superconducting circuit, via a coupling with a time-dependent strength, is evaluated using the technique of unitary transformation. The accuracy of conservation for such invariant quantities is represented in detail. Based on the results of our developments in this paper, perturbation theory is applicable to the research of quantum characteristics of more complicated qubit systems that are described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian involving nonlinear terms.

  3. Adiabatic Quantum Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Bacon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a many-body quantum system that can be made to quantum compute by the adiabatic application of a large applied field to the system. Prior to the application of the field, quantum information is localized on one boundary of the device, and after the application of the field, this information propagates to the other side of the device, with a quantum circuit applied to the information. The applied circuit depends on the many-body Hamiltonian of the material, and the computation takes place in a degenerate ground space with symmetry-protected topological order. Such “adiabatic quantum transistors” are universal adiabatic quantum computing devices that have the added benefit of being modular. Here, we describe this model, provide arguments for why it is an efficient model of quantum computing, and examine these many-body systems in the presence of a noisy environment.

  4. Quantum Adiabatic Brachistochrone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezakhani, A. T.; Kuo, W.-J.; Hamma, A.; Lidar, D. A.; Zanardi, P.

    2009-08-01

    We formulate a time-optimal approach to adiabatic quantum computation (AQC). A corresponding natural Riemannian metric is also derived, through which AQC can be understood as the problem of finding a geodesic on the manifold of control parameters. This geometrization of AQC is demonstrated through two examples, where we show that it leads to improved performance of AQC, and sheds light on the roles of entanglement and curvature of the control manifold in algorithmic performance.

  5. Adiabatic quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) started as an approach to solving optimization problems and has evolved into an important universal alternative to the standard circuit model of quantum computing, with deep connections to both classical and quantum complexity theory and condensed matter physics. This review gives an account of the major theoretical developments in the field, while focusing on the closed-system setting. The review is organized around a series of topics that are essential to an understanding of the underlying principles of AQC, its algorithmic accomplishments and limitations, and its scope in the more general setting of computational complexity theory. Several variants are presented of the adiabatic theorem, the cornerstone of AQC, and examples are given of explicit AQC algorithms that exhibit a quantum speedup. An overview of several proofs of the universality of AQC and related Hamiltonian quantum complexity theory is given. Considerable space is devoted to stoquastic AQC, the setting of most AQC work to date, where obstructions to success and their possible resolutions are discussed.

  6. Adiabatic quantum simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Biamonte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In his famous 1981 talk, Feynman proposed that unlike classical computers, which would presumably experience an exponential slowdown when simulating quantum phenomena, a universal quantum simulator would not. An ideal quantum simulator would be controllable, and built using existing technology. In some cases, moving away from gate-model-based implementations of quantum computing may offer a more feasible solution for particular experimental implementations. Here we consider an adiabatic quantum simulator which simulates the ground state properties of sparse Hamiltonians consisting of one- and two-local interaction terms, using sparse Hamiltonians with at most three-local interactions. Properties of such Hamiltonians can be well approximated with Hamiltonians containing only two-local terms. The register holding the simulated ground state is brought adiabatically into interaction with a probe qubit, followed by a single diabatic gate operation on the probe which then undergoes free evolution until measured. This allows one to recover e.g. the ground state energy of the Hamiltonian being simulated. Given a ground state, this scheme can be used to verify the QMA-complete problem LOCAL HAMILTONIAN, and is therefore likely more powerful than classical computing.

  7. Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landahl, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Quantum computers promise to exploit counterintuitive quantum physics principles like superposition, entanglement, and uncertainty to solve problems using fundamentally fewer steps than any conventional computer ever could. The mere possibility of such a device has sharpened our understanding of quantum coherent information, just as lasers did for our understanding of coherent light. The chief obstacle to developing quantum computer technology is decoherence--one of the fastest phenomena in all of physics. In principle, decoherence can be overcome by using clever entangled redundancies in a process called fault-tolerant quantum error correction. However, the quality and scale of technology required to realize this solution appears distant. An exciting alternative is a proposal called ``adiabatic'' quantum computing (AQC), in which adiabatic quantum physics keeps the computer in its lowest-energy configuration throughout its operation, rendering it immune to many decoherence sources. The Adiabatic Quantum Architectures In Ultracold Systems (AQUARIUS) Grand Challenge Project at Sandia seeks to demonstrate this robustness in the laboratory and point a path forward for future hardware development. We are building devices in AQUARIUS that realize the AQC architecture on up to three quantum bits (``qubits'') in two platforms: Cs atoms laser-cooled to below 5 microkelvin and Si quantum dots cryo-cooled to below 100 millikelvin. We are also expanding theoretical frontiers by developing methods for scalable universal AQC in these platforms. We have successfully demonstrated operational qubits in both platforms and have even run modest one-qubit calculations using our Cs device. In the course of reaching our primary proof-of-principle demonstrations, we have developed multiple spinoff technologies including nanofabricated diffractive optical elements that define optical-tweezer trap arrays and atomic-scale Si lithography commensurate with placing individual donor atoms with

  8. Simulating a topological transition in a superconducting phase qubit by fast adiabatic trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tenghui; Zhang, Zhenxing; Xiang, Liang; Gong, Zhihao; Wu, Jianlan; Yin, Yi

    2018-04-01

    The significance of topological phases has been widely recognized in the community of condensed matter physics. The well controllable quantum systems provide an artificial platform to probe and engineer various topological phases. The adiabatic trajectory of a quantum state describes the change of the bulk Bloch eigenstates with the momentum, and this adiabatic simulation method is however practically limited due to quantum dissipation. Here we apply the "shortcut to adiabaticity" (STA) protocol to realize fast adiabatic evolutions in the system of a superconducting phase qubit. The resulting fast adiabatic trajectories illustrate the change of the bulk Bloch eigenstates in the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model. A sharp transition is experimentally determined for the topological invariant of a winding number. Our experiment helps identify the topological Chern number of a two-dimensional toy model, suggesting the applicability of the fast adiabatic simulation method for topological systems.

  9. Quantum entangling power of adiabatically connected Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamma, Alioscia; Zanardi, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The space of quantum Hamiltonians has a natural partition in classes of operators that can be adiabatically deformed into each other. We consider parametric families of Hamiltonians acting on a bipartite quantum state space. When the different Hamiltonians in the family fall in the same adiabatic class, one can manipulate entanglement by moving through energy eigenstates corresponding to different values of the control parameters. We introduce an associated notion of adiabatic entangling power. This novel measure is analyzed for general dxd quantum systems, and specific two-qubit examples are studied

  10. Adiabatic superconducting cells for ultra-low-power artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey E. Schegolev

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose the concept of using superconducting quantum interferometers for the implementation of neural network algorithms with extremely low power dissipation. These adiabatic elements are Josephson cells with sigmoid- and Gaussian-like activation functions. We optimize their parameters for application in three-layer perceptron and radial basis function networks.

  11. Adiabatic quantum search algorithm for structured problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, Jeremie; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2003-01-01

    The study of quantum computation has been motivated by the hope of finding efficient quantum algorithms for solving classically hard problems. In this context, quantum algorithms by local adiabatic evolution have been shown to solve an unstructured search problem with a quadratic speedup over a classical search, just as Grover's algorithm. In this paper, we study how the structure of the search problem may be exploited to further improve the efficiency of these quantum adiabatic algorithms. We show that by nesting a partial search over a reduced set of variables into a global search, it is possible to devise quantum adiabatic algorithms with a complexity that, although still exponential, grows with a reduced order in the problem size

  12. Quantum adiabatic protocols using emergent local Hamiltonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Ranjan; Vidmar, Lev; Rigol, Marcos

    2017-10-01

    We present two applications of emergent local Hamiltonians to speed up quantum adiabatic protocols for isolated noninteracting and weakly interacting fermionic systems in one-dimensional lattices. We demonstrate how to extract maximal work from initial band-insulating states, and how to adiabatically transfer systems from linear and harmonic traps into box traps. Our protocols consist of two stages. The first one involves a free expansion followed by a quench to an emergent local Hamiltonian. In the second stage, the emergent local Hamiltonian is "turned off" quasistatically. For the adiabatic transfer from a harmonic trap, we consider both zero- and nonzero-temperature initial states.

  13. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  14. Adiabatic Theorem for Quantum Spin Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, S.; De Roeck, W.; Fraas, M.

    2017-08-01

    The first proof of the quantum adiabatic theorem was given as early as 1928. Today, this theorem is increasingly applied in a many-body context, e.g., in quantum annealing and in studies of topological properties of matter. In this setup, the rate of variation ɛ of local terms is indeed small compared to the gap, but the rate of variation of the total, extensive Hamiltonian, is not. Therefore, applications to many-body systems are not covered by the proofs and arguments in the literature. In this Letter, we prove a version of the adiabatic theorem for gapped ground states of interacting quantum spin systems, under assumptions that remain valid in the thermodynamic limit. As an application, we give a mathematical proof of Kubo's linear response formula for a broad class of gapped interacting systems. We predict that the density of nonadiabatic excitations is exponentially small in the driving rate and the scaling of the exponent depends on the dimension.

  15. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadayat eSeddiqi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO. Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  16. Adiabatic quantum optimization with the wrong Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kevin C.; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2013-12-01

    Analog models of quantum information processing, such as adiabatic quantum computation and analog quantum simulation, require the ability to subject a system to precisely specified Hamiltonians. Unfortunately, the hardware used to implement these Hamiltonians will be imperfect and limited in its precision. Even small perturbations and imprecisions can have profound effects on the nature of the ground state. Here we consider an imperfect implementation of adiabatic quantum optimization and show that, for a widely applicable random control noise model, quantum stabilizer encodings are able to reduce the effective noise magnitude and thus improve the likelihood of a successful computation or simulation. This reduction builds upon two design principles: summation of equivalent logical operators to increase the energy scale of the encoded optimization problem, and the inclusion of a penalty term comprising the sum of the code stabilizer elements. We illustrate our findings with an Ising ladder and show that classical repetition coding drastically increases the probability that the ground state of a perturbed model is decodable to that of the unperturbed model, while using only realistic two-body interaction. Finally, we note that the repetition encoding is a special case of quantum stabilizer encodings, and show that this in principle allows us to generalize our results to many types of analog quantum information processing, albeit at the expense of many-body interactions.

  17. Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio, B; Anders, J; Markham, D

    2014-01-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of H-dot as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated. (paper)

  18. How fast and robust is the quantum adiabatic passage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2013-08-01

    We study the assisted adiabatic passage, and equivalently the transitionless quantum driving, as a quantum brachistochrone trajectory. The optimal Hamiltonian for given constraints is constructed from the quantum brachistochrone equation. We discuss how the adiabatic passage is realized as the solution of the equation. The formulation of the quantum brachistochrone is based on the principle of least action. We utilize it to discuss the stability of the adiabatic passage.

  19. How fast and robust is the quantum adiabatic passage?

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2013-01-01

    We study the assisted adiabatic passage, and equivalently the transitionless quantum driving, as a quantum brachistochrone trajectory. The optimal Hamiltonian for given constraints is constructed from the quantum brachistochrone equation. We discuss how the adiabatic passage is realized as the solution of the equation. The formulation of the quantum brachistochrone is based on the principle of least action. We utilize it to discuss the stability of the adiabatic passage.

  20. Adiabatic quantum pumping in normal-metal–insulator–superconductor junctions in a monolayer of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alos-Palop, M.; Blaauboer, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate adiabatic quantum pumping through a normal-metal–“insulator”–superconductor (NIS) junction in a monolayer of graphene. The pumped current is generated by periodic modulation of two gate voltages, applied to the insulating and superconducting regions, respectively. In the bilinear

  1. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-01-01

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size

  2. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  3. Adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    McGeoch, Catherine C

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is an alternative to the better-known gate model of quantum computation. The two models are polynomially equivalent, but otherwise quite dissimilar: one property that distinguishes AQC from the gate model is its analog nature. Quantum annealing (QA) describes a type of heuristic search algorithm that can be implemented to run in the ``native instruction set'''' of an AQC platform. D-Wave Systems Inc. manufactures {quantum annealing processor chips} that exploit quantum properties to realize QA computations in hardware. The chips form the centerpiece of a nov

  4. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  5. Computational Bottlenecks of Quantum Adiabatic Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knysh, Sergey

    2015-03-01

    Quantum annealing in a transverse field with rate dΓ / dt inversely proportional to the system size N suppresses non-adiabatic transitions for fully connected spin glass such as the Sherrington-Kirpatrick (SK) model at the quantum critical point. This alone is not sufficient to ensure that the problem is solvable in polynomial time. I conjecture the appearance of small gaps associated with macroscopic tunneling events deep in the spin glass phase. This effect is demonstrated rigorously for the annealing of a toy model that shares a set of crtical exponents with SK model: Hopfield network with two Gaussian patterns. It presents with 0 . 15 lnN additional bottlenecks with gaps that scale as a stretched exponential exp[-c (NΓ) 3 / 4]. Further, I extend the analysis to the ρ-landscapes model (random energy model with correlations) which more faithfully represents real spin glasses.

  6. An integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S Humble, T; J McCaskey, A; S Bennink, R; J Billings, J; F D'Azevedo, E; D Sullivan, B; F Klymko, C; Seddiqi, H

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for AQO called Jade Adiabatic Development Environment (JADE) that provides control over all the steps taken during program synthesis. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously specify the AQO algorithm while allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its potential use for benchmarking AQO programs by the quantum computer science community. (paper)

  7. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  8. Optimization using quantum mechanics: quantum annealing through adiabatic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Giuseppe E; Tosatti, Erio

    2006-01-01

    We review here some recent work in the field of quantum annealing, alias adiabatic quantum computation. The idea of quantum annealing is to perform optimization by a quantum adiabatic evolution which tracks the ground state of a suitable time-dependent Hamiltonian, where 'ℎ' is slowly switched off. We illustrate several applications of quantum annealing strategies, starting from textbook toy-models-double-well potentials and other one-dimensional examples, with and without disorder. These examples display in a clear way the crucial differences between classical and quantum annealing. We then discuss applications of quantum annealing to challenging hard optimization problems, such as the random Ising model, the travelling salesman problem and Boolean satisfiability problems. The techniques used to implement quantum annealing are either deterministic Schroedinger's evolutions, for the toy models, or path-integral Monte Carlo and Green's function Monte Carlo approaches, for the hard optimization problems. The crucial role played by disorder and the associated non-trivial Landau-Zener tunnelling phenomena is discussed and emphasized. (topical review)

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant

    2013-03-01

    We are implementing a new platform for adiabatic quantum computation (AQC)[2] based on trapped neutral atoms whose coupling is mediated by the dipole-dipole interactions of Rydberg states. Ground state cesium atoms are dressed by laser fields in a manner conditional on the Rydberg blockade mechanism,[3,4] thereby providing the requisite entangling interactions. As a benchmark we study a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem whose solution is found in the ground state spin configuration of an Ising-like model. In collaboration with Lambert Parazzoli, Sandia National Laboratories; Aaron Hankin, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; James Chin-Wen Chou, Yuan-Yu Jau, Peter Schwindt, Cort Johnson, and George Burns, Sandia National Laboratories; Tyler Keating, Krittika Goyal, and Ivan Deutsch, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; and Andrew Landahl, Sandia National Laboratories. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  10. Accuracy versus run time in an adiabatic quantum search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezakhani, A. T.; Pimachev, A. K.; Lidar, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms are characterized by their run time and accuracy. The relation between the two is essential for quantifying adiabatic algorithmic performance yet is often poorly understood. We study the dynamics of a continuous time, adiabatic quantum search algorithm and find rigorous results relating the accuracy and the run time. Proceeding with estimates, we show that under fairly general circumstances the adiabatic algorithmic error exhibits a behavior with two discernible regimes: The error decreases exponentially for short times and then decreases polynomially for longer times. We show that the well-known quadratic speedup over classical search is associated only with the exponential error regime. We illustrate the results through examples of evolution paths derived by minimization of the adiabatic error. We also discuss specific strategies for controlling the adiabatic error and run time.

  11. Approximability of optimization problems through adiabatic quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Santos, William

    2014-01-01

    The adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is based on the adiabatic theorem to approximate solutions of the Schrödinger equation. The design of an AQC algorithm involves the construction of a Hamiltonian that describes the behavior of the quantum system. This Hamiltonian is expressed as a linear interpolation of an initial Hamiltonian whose ground state is easy to compute, and a final Hamiltonian whose ground state corresponds to the solution of a given combinatorial optimization problem. The adiabatic theorem asserts that if the time evolution of a quantum system described by a Hamiltonian is l

  12. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR's), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators(ADR's) for space it is desirable to have very light weight, small diameter, high current density superconducting wires...

  13. Adiabatically steered open quantum systems: Master equation and optimal phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmilehto, J.; Solinas, P.; Ankerhold, J.; Moettoenen, M.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an alternative way to derive the generalized form of the master equation recently presented by J. P. Pekola et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 030401 (2010)] for an adiabatically steered two-level quantum system interacting with a Markovian environment. The original derivation employed the effective Hamiltonian in the adiabatic basis with the standard interaction picture approach but without the usual secular approximation. Our approach is based on utilizing a master equation for a nonsteered system in the first superadiabatic basis. It is potentially efficient in obtaining higher-order equations. Furthermore, we show how to select the phases of the adiabatic eigenstates to minimize the local adiabatic parameter and how this selection leads to states which are invariant under a local gauge change. We also discuss the effects of the adiabatic noncyclic geometric phase on the master equation.

  14. Quantum acoustics with superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiwen

    2017-04-01

    The ability to engineer and manipulate different types of quantum mechanical objects allows us to take advantage of their unique properties and create useful hybrid technologies. Thus far, complex quantum states and exquisite quantum control have been demonstrated in systems ranging from trapped ions to superconducting resonators. Recently, there have been many efforts to extend these demonstrations to the motion of complex, macroscopic objects. These mechanical objects have important applications as quantum memories or transducers for measuring and connecting different types of quantum systems. In particular, there have been a few experiments that couple motion to nonlinear quantum objects such as superconducting qubits. This opens up the possibility of creating, storing, and manipulating non-Gaussian quantum states in mechanical degrees of freedom. However, before sophisticated quantum control of mechanical motion can be achieved, we must realize systems with long coherence times while maintaining a sufficient interaction strength. These systems should be implemented in a simple and robust manner that allows for increasing complexity and scalability in the future. In this talk, I will describe our recent experiments demonstrating a high frequency bulk acoustic wave resonator that is strongly coupled to a superconducting qubit using piezoelectric transduction. In contrast to previous experiments with qubit-mechanical systems, our device requires only simple fabrication methods, extends coherence times to many microseconds, and provides controllable access to a multitude of phonon modes. We use this system to demonstrate basic quantum operations on the coupled qubit-phonon system. Straightforward improvements to the current device will allow for advanced protocols analogous to what has been shown in optical and microwave resonators, resulting in a novel resource for implementing hybrid quantum technologies.

  15. Superconducting Qubits and Quantum Resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forn-Díaz, P.

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting qubits are fabricated "loss-free" electrical circuits on a chip with size features of tens of nanometers. If cooled to cryogenic temperatures below -273 °C they behave as quantum elements, similar to atoms and molecules. Such a qubit can be manipulated by fast-oscillating magnetic

  16. Quantum Theory of Conducting Matter Superconductivity and Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Shigeji; Godoy, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    Explains major superconducting properties including zero resistance, Meissner effect, sharp phase change, flux quantization, excitation energy gap, and Josephson effects using quantum statistical mechanical calculations. This book covers the 2D superconductivity and the quantum Hall effects

  17. Quantum trajectories for time-dependent adiabatic master equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ka Wa; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2018-02-01

    We describe a quantum trajectories technique for the unraveling of the quantum adiabatic master equation in Lindblad form. By evolving a complex state vector of dimension N instead of a complex density matrix of dimension N2, simulations of larger system sizes become feasible. The cost of running many trajectories, which is required to recover the master equation evolution, can be minimized by running the trajectories in parallel, making this method suitable for high performance computing clusters. In general, the trajectories method can provide up to a factor N advantage over directly solving the master equation. In special cases where only the expectation values of certain observables are desired, an advantage of up to a factor N2 is possible. We test the method by demonstrating agreement with direct solution of the quantum adiabatic master equation for 8-qubit quantum annealing examples. We also apply the quantum trajectories method to a 16-qubit example originally introduced to demonstrate the role of tunneling in quantum annealing, which is significantly more time consuming to solve directly using the master equation. The quantum trajectories method provides insight into individual quantum jump trajectories and their statistics, thus shedding light on open system quantum adiabatic evolution beyond the master equation.

  18. Quantum state transfer in spin chains via shortcuts to adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bi-Hua; Kang, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ye-Hong; Shi, Zhi-Cheng; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2018-01-01

    Based on shortcuts to adiabaticity and quantum Zeno dynamics, we present a protocol to implement quantum state transfer (QST) in a quantum spin-1/2 chain. In the protocol, the complex Hamiltonian of an N -site system is simplified, and a simple effective Hamiltonian is present. It is shown that only the control of the coupling strengths between the boundary spins and the bulk spins are required for QST. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the protocol possesses high efficiency and is robust against the decay and the fluctuations of the control fields. The protocol might provide an alternative choice for transferring quantum states via spin chain systems.

  19. Analysis of adiabatic transfer in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A three-level atom in a configuration trapped in an optical cavity forms a basic unit in a number of proposed protocols for quantum information processing. This system allows for efficient storage of cavity photons into long-lived atomic excitations, and their retrieval with high fidelity, in an adiabatic transfer process through ...

  20. Analysis of adiabatic transfer in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    study the full quantum mechanics of this transfer process with a view to examine the non-adiabatic effects arising from inevitable excitations of the system to states involving the upper level of , which is radiative. We find that the fidelity of storage is better, the stronger the control field and the slower the rate of its switching off.

  1. Analysis of adiabatic transfer in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These results lend themselves to experimental tests. Our exact computations, when applied to slow variations of the control intensity for strong atom–photon couplings, are in very good agreement with Berry's superadiabatic transfer results without dissipation. Keywords. Cavity quantum electrodynamics; adiabatic transfer; ...

  2. Fast-forward of quantum adiabatic dynamics in electro-magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2010-01-01

    We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wavefunctions under electro-magnetic field by developing the previous theory (Masuda & Nakamura 2008 and 2010). Firstly we investigate the orbital dynamics of a charged particle. We derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states except for the spatially uniform phase such as the adiabatic phase in any desired short time. Fast-forward of adiabatic squeezing and tran...

  3. Experimental Adiabatic Quantum Factorization under Ambient Conditions Based on a Solid-State Single Spin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kebiao; Xie, Tianyu; Li, Zhaokai; Xu, Xiangkun; Wang, Mengqi; Ye, Xiangyu; Kong, Fei; Geng, Jianpei; Duan, Changkui; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-03-31

    The adiabatic quantum computation is a universal and robust method of quantum computing. In this architecture, the problem can be solved by adiabatically evolving the quantum processor from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to that of a final one, which encodes the solution of the problem. Adiabatic quantum computation has been proved to be a compatible candidate for scalable quantum computation. In this Letter, we report on the experimental realization of an adiabatic quantum algorithm on a single solid spin system under ambient conditions. All elements of adiabatic quantum computation, including initial state preparation, adiabatic evolution (simulated by optimal control), and final state read-out, are realized experimentally. As an example, we found the ground state of the problem Hamiltonian S_{z}I_{z} on our adiabatic quantum processor, which can be mapped to the factorization of 35 into its prime factors 5 and 7.

  4. Quantum tunneling, adiabatic invariance and black hole spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Ping; Pu, Jin; Jiang, Qing-Quan; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2017-05-01

    In the tunneling framework, one of us, Jiang, together with Han has studied the black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance, where the adiabatic invariant quantity has been intriguingly obtained by investigating the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. In this paper, we attempt to improve Jiang-Han's proposal in two ways. Firstly, we once again examine the fact that, in different types (Schwarzschild and Painlevé) of coordinates as well as in different gravity frames, the adiabatic invariant I_adia = \\oint p_i dq_i introduced by Jiang and Han is canonically invariant. Secondly, we attempt to confirm Jiang-Han's proposal reasonably in more general gravity frames (including Einstein's gravity, EGB gravity and HL gravity). Concurrently, for improving this proposal, we interestingly find in more general gravity theories that the entropy of the black hole is an adiabatic invariant action variable, but the horizon area is only an adiabatic invariant. In this sense, we emphasize the concept that the quantum of the black hole entropy is more natural than that of the horizon area.

  5. Quantum tunneling, adiabatic invariance and black hole spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guo-Ping; Zu, Xiao-Tao [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, School of Physical Electronics, Chengdu (China); Pu, Jin [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, School of Physical Electronics, Chengdu (China); China West Normal University, College of Physics and Space Science, Nanchong (China); Jiang, Qing-Quan [China West Normal University, College of Physics and Space Science, Nanchong (China)

    2017-05-15

    In the tunneling framework, one of us, Jiang, together with Han has studied the black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance, where the adiabatic invariant quantity has been intriguingly obtained by investigating the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. In this paper, we attempt to improve Jiang-Han's proposal in two ways. Firstly, we once again examine the fact that, in different types (Schwarzschild and Painleve) of coordinates as well as in different gravity frames, the adiabatic invariant I{sub adia} = circular integral p{sub i}dq{sub i} introduced by Jiang and Han is canonically invariant. Secondly, we attempt to confirm Jiang-Han's proposal reasonably in more general gravity frames (including Einstein's gravity, EGB gravity and HL gravity). Concurrently, for improving this proposal, we interestingly find in more general gravity theories that the entropy of the black hole is an adiabatic invariant action variable, but the horizon area is only an adiabatic invariant. In this sense, we emphasize the concept that the quantum of the black hole entropy is more natural than that of the horizon area. (orig.)

  6. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  7. Superconducting detectors for semiconductor quantum photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reithmaier, Guenther M.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we present the first successful on-chip detection of quantum light, thereby demonstrating the monolithic integration of superconducting single photon detectors with individually addressable semiconductor quantum dots in a prototypical quantum photonic circuit. Therefore, we optimized both the deposition of high quality superconducting NbN thin films on GaAs substrates and the fabrication of superconducting detectors and successfully integrated these novel devices with GaAs/AlGaAs ridge waveguides loaded with self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots.

  8. Probing the energy reactance with adiabatically driven quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Arrachea, Liliana; Moskalets, Michael; Sánchez, David

    2018-02-01

    The tunneling Hamiltonian describes a particle transfer from one region to another. Although there is no particle storage in the tunneling region itself, it has an associated amount of energy. The corresponding energy flux was named reactance since, such as an electrical reactance, it manifests itself in time-dependent transport only. We show here that the existence of the energy reactance leads to the universal response of a mesoscopic thermometer, a floating contact coupled to an adiabatically driven quantum dot.

  9. Designing single-qutrit quantum gates via tripod adiabatic passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amniat-Talab

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique to implement single-qutrit quantum gates in tripod systems. It is shown by using the Morris-Shore (MS transformation, the six-state problem with 5 pulsed fields can be reduced to a basis that decouples two states from the others. This imposes three pulses not connected to the initial condition with have the same shape. Using this method, the six-state penta-pod system is reduced to a tripod system. We can design single-qutrit quantum gates by ignoring the fragile dynamical phase, and by suitable design of Rabi frequencies of the effective Hamiltonian

  10. Feedback control of superconducting quantum circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristè, D.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting circuits have recently risen to the forefront of the solid-state prototypes for quantum computing. Reaching the stage of robust quantum computing requires closing the loop between measurement and control of quantum bits (qubits). This thesis presents the realization of feedback

  11. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-03-04

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5.

  12. Adiabatic pipelining: a key to ternary computing with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecar, P; Zimic, N; Mraz, M; Lebar Bajec, I; Ramsak, A

    2008-01-01

    The quantum-dot cellular automaton (QCA), a processing platform based on interacting quantum dots, was introduced by Lent in the mid-1990s. What followed was an exhilarating period with the development of the line, the functionally complete set of logic functions, as well as more complex processing structures, however all in the realm of binary logic. Regardless of these achievements, it has to be acknowledged that the use of binary logic is in computing systems mainly the end result of the technological limitations, which the designers had to cope with in the early days of their design. The first advancement of QCAs to multi-valued (ternary) processing was performed by Lebar Bajec et al, with the argument that processing platforms of the future should not disregard the clear advantages of multi-valued logic. Some of the elementary ternary QCAs, necessary for the construction of more complex processing entities, however, lead to a remarkable increase in size when compared to their binary counterparts. This somewhat negates the advantages gained by entering the ternary computing domain. As it turned out, even the binary QCA had its initial hiccups, which have been solved by the introduction of adiabatic switching and the application of adiabatic pipeline approaches. We present here a study that introduces adiabatic switching into the ternary QCA and employs the adiabatic pipeline approach to successfully solve the issues of elementary ternary QCAs. What is more, the ternary QCAs presented here are sizewise comparable to binary QCAs. This in our view might serve towards their faster adoption.

  13. Adiabatic pipelining: a key to ternary computing with quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar, P.; Ramšak, A.; Zimic, N.; Mraz, M.; Lebar Bajec, I.

    2008-12-01

    The quantum-dot cellular automaton (QCA), a processing platform based on interacting quantum dots, was introduced by Lent in the mid-1990s. What followed was an exhilarating period with the development of the line, the functionally complete set of logic functions, as well as more complex processing structures, however all in the realm of binary logic. Regardless of these achievements, it has to be acknowledged that the use of binary logic is in computing systems mainly the end result of the technological limitations, which the designers had to cope with in the early days of their design. The first advancement of QCAs to multi-valued (ternary) processing was performed by Lebar Bajec et al, with the argument that processing platforms of the future should not disregard the clear advantages of multi-valued logic. Some of the elementary ternary QCAs, necessary for the construction of more complex processing entities, however, lead to a remarkable increase in size when compared to their binary counterparts. This somewhat negates the advantages gained by entering the ternary computing domain. As it turned out, even the binary QCA had its initial hiccups, which have been solved by the introduction of adiabatic switching and the application of adiabatic pipeline approaches. We present here a study that introduces adiabatic switching into the ternary QCA and employs the adiabatic pipeline approach to successfully solve the issues of elementary ternary QCAs. What is more, the ternary QCAs presented here are sizewise comparable to binary QCAs. This in our view might serve towards their faster adoption.

  14. Non-adiabatic quantum reactive scattering in hyperspherical coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Brian K.

    2018-01-01

    A new electronically non-adiabatic quantum reactive scattering methodology is presented based on a time-independent coupled channel formalism and the adiabatically adjusting principal axis hyperspherical coordinates of Pack and Parker [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 3888 (1987)]. The methodology computes the full state-to-state scattering matrix for A + B2(v , j) ↔ AB(v ', j') + B and A + AB(v , j) → A + AB(v ', j') reactions that involve two coupled electronic states which exhibit a conical intersection. The methodology accurately treats all six degrees of freedom relative to the center-of-mass which includes non-zero total angular momentum J and identical particle exchange symmetry. The new methodology is applied to the ultracold hydrogen exchange reaction for which large geometric phase effects have been recently reported [B. K. Kendrick et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 153201 (2015)]. Rate coefficients for the H/D + HD(v = 4, j = 0) → H/D + HD(v ', j') reactions are reported for collision energies between 1 μK and 100 K (total energy ≈1.9 eV). A new diabatic potential energy matrix is developed based on the Boothroyd, Keogh, Martin, and Peterson (BKMP2) and double many body expansion plus single-polynomial (DSP) adiabatic potential energy surfaces for the ground and first excited electronic states of H3, respectively. The rate coefficients computed using the new non-adiabatic methodology and diabatic potential matrix reproduce the recently reported rates that include the geometric phase and are computed using a single adiabatic ground electronic state potential energy surface (BKMP2). The dramatic enhancement and suppression of the ultracold rates due to the geometric phase are confirmed as well as its effects on several shape resonances near 1 K. The results reported here represent the first fully non-adiabatic quantum reactive scattering calculation for an ultracold reaction and validate the importance of the geometric phase on the Wigner threshold behavior.

  15. Hybrid quantum systems: Outsourcing superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Andrew

    Superconducting qubits offer excellent prospects for manipulating quantum information, with good qubit lifetimes, high fidelity single- and two-qubit gates, and straightforward scalability (admittedly with multi-dimensional interconnect challenges). One interesting route for experimental development is the exploration of hybrid systems, i.e. coupling superconducting qubits to other systems. I will report on our group's efforts to develop approaches that will allow interfacing superconducting qubits in a quantum-coherent fashion to spin defects in solids, to optomechanical devices, and to resonant nanomechanical structures. The longer term goals of these efforts include transferring quantum states between different qubit systems; generating and receiving ``flying'' acoustic phonon-based as well as optical photon-based qubits; and ultimately developing systems that can be used for quantum memory, quantum computation and quantum communication, the last in both the microwave and fiber telecommunications bands. Work is supported by Grants from AFOSR, ARO, DOE and NSF.

  16. Adiabatic response and quantum thermoelectrics for ac-driven quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Battista, Francesca; von Oppen, Felix; Arrachea, Liliana

    2016-02-01

    We generalize the theory of thermoelectrics to include coherent electron systems under adiabatic ac driving, accounting for quantum pumping of charge and heat, as well as for the work exchanged between the electron system and driving potentials. We derive the relevant response coefficients in the adiabatic regime and show that they obey generalized Onsager reciprocity relations. We analyze the consequences of our generalized thermoelectric framework for quantum motors, generators, heat engines, and heat pumps, characterizing them in terms of efficiencies and figures of merit. We illustrate these concepts in a model for a quantum pump.

  17. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-02-22

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  18. Toward a superconducting quantum computer. Harnessing macroscopic quantum coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers.

  19. Rabi model as a quantum coherent heat engine: From quantum biology to superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ferdi; Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2015-02-01

    We propose a multilevel quantum heat engine with a working medium described by a generalized Rabi model which consists of a two-level system coupled to a single-mode bosonic field. The model is constructed to be a continuum limit of a quantum biological description of light-harvesting complexes so that it can amplify quantum coherence by a mechanism which is a quantum analog of classical Huygens clocks. The engine operates in a quantum Otto cycle where the working medium is coupled to classical heat baths in the isochoric processes of the four-stroke cycle, while either the coupling strength or the resonance frequency is changed in the adiabatic stages. We found that such an engine can produce work with an efficiency close to the Carnot bound when it operates at low temperatures and in the ultrastrong-coupling regime. The interplay of the effects of quantum coherence and quantum correlations on the engine performance is discussed in terms of second-order coherence, quantum mutual information, and the logarithmic negativity of entanglement. We point out that the proposed quantum Otto engine can be implemented experimentally with modern circuit quantum electrodynamic systems where flux qubits can be coupled ultrastrongly to superconducting transmission-line resonators.

  20. Geneva University - Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 29 janvier 2007 COLLOQUE DE LA SECTION DE PHYSIQUE 17 heures - Auditoire Stueckelberg Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects Prof. Hans Mooij / Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology The quantum conjugate variables of a superconductor are the charge or number of Cooper pairs, and the phase of the order parameter. In circuits that contain small Josephson junctions, these quantum properties can be brought forward. In Delft we study so-called flux qubits, superconducting rings that contain three small Josephson junctions. When a magnetic flux of half a flux quantum is applied to the loop, there are two states with opposite circulating current. For suitable junction parameters, a quantum superposition of those macroscopic states is possible. Transitions can be driven with resonant microwaves. These quantum ...

  1. Towards generic adiabatic elimination for bipartite open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azouit, R.; Chittaro, F.; Sarlette, A.; Rouchon, P.

    2017-12-01

    We consider a composite open quantum system consisting of a fast subsystem coupled to a slow one. Using the time scale separation, we develop an adiabatic elimination technique to derive at any order the reduced model describing the slow subsystem. The method, based on an asymptotic expansion and geometric singular perturbation theory, ensures the physical interpretation of the reduced second-order model by giving the reduced dynamics in a Lindblad form and the state reduction in Kraus map form. We give explicit second-order formulas for Hamiltonian or cascade coupling between the two subsystems. These formulas can be used to engineer, via a careful choice of the fast subsystem, the Hamiltonian and Lindbald operators governing the dissipative dynamics of the slow subsystem.

  2. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits

  3. Effect of Poisson noise on adiabatic quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, A.; Muga, J. G.; Ruschhaupt, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the master equation describing a general time-dependent quantum system with classical Poisson white noise and outline its various properties. We discuss the limiting cases of Poisson white noise and provide approximations for the different noise strength regimes. We show that using the eigenstates of the noise superoperator as a basis can be a useful way of expressing the master equation. Using this, we simulate various settings to illustrate different effects of Poisson noise. In particular, we show a dip in the fidelity as a function of noise strength where high fidelity can occur in the strong-noise regime for some cases. We also investigate recent claims [J. Jing et al., Phys. Rev. A 89, 032110 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.032110] that this type of noise may improve rather than destroy adiabaticity.

  4. Quantum Statistical Approach to Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Eunsoo

    The Frohlich Hamiltonian representing an interaction between electron and phonon is derived. By exchanging a virtual phonon, a system of two electrons can lower the system's total energy if the difference of their kinetic energies is less than the energy of the phonon exchanged. This is shown by using quantum mechanical perturbation theory, which is fully developed. A general theory of superconductivity is developed, starting with a BCS Hamiltonian in which the interaction strengths (V_{11}, V_{22 }, V_{12}) among and between "electron" (1) and "hole" (2) Cooper pairs are differentiated. The supercondensate is shown to be composed of equal numbers of "electron" and "hole" ground (zero-momentum) Cooper pairs with charges mp 2e.. Based on the Hamiltonian, the normal-to-super phase transition is investigated, approaching the critical temperature T_{c} from the high temperature side. Non zero momentum Cooper pairs, that is, pairs of electrons (holes) with antiparallel spins and nearly opposite momenta above T_{c } in the bulk limit, are shown to move like independent bosons with the energy momentum relation varepsilon = (1/2)upsilon_ {F}p, where upsilon_ {F} represents the Fermi velocity. We have investigated the Bose-Einstein condensation of pairons. The system of free Cooper pairs in a 3D superconductors undergoes a phase transition of the second order with the critical temperature T_{c} given byk_{B}T_{c } = (1/2)(pi^2hbar^3v_sp {F}{3}n/1.20257)^{1over3 }where n is the number density of Cooper pairs. We calculate various properties associated with superconductivity at finite temperature. We derive general expressions for the energy gaps for both quasi electrons and pairons. Based on the independent pairon model, we explain the flux quantization, London's equation and the Josephson effects, stressing the importance of the macroscopic wave -function which represents the supercondensate in motion. We derived the basic equations governing the behavior of the

  5. On the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide at 200 GPa: Transition into superconducting anti-adiabatic state in coupling to H-vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Baňacký

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the adiabatic electronic structure of the superconducting phase of sulfur hydride at 200 GPa is unstable toward the vibration motion of H-atoms. A theoretical study indicates that in coupling to H-vibrations, the system undergoes a transition from adiabatic into a stabilized anti-adiabatic multi-gap superconducting state at a temperature that can reach 203 K. Keywords: Superconductivity of sulfur hydride, Electron–phonon coupling in superconductors, Anti-adiabatic theory of superconductivity

  6. Strongly correlated superconductivity and quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    Doped Mott insulators and doped charge-transfer insulators describe classes of materials that can exhibit unconventional superconducting ground states. Examples include the cuprates and the layered organic superconductors of the BEDT family. I present results obtained from plaquette cellular dynamical mean-field theory. Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo evaluation of the hybridization expansion allows one to study the models in the large interaction limit where quasiparticles can disappear. The normal state which is unstable to the superconducting state exhibits a first-order transition between a pseudogap and a correlated metal phase. That transition is the finite-doping extension of the metal-insulator transition obtained at half-filling. This transition serves as an organizing principle for the normal and superconducting states of both cuprates and doped organic superconductors. In the less strongly correlated limit, these methods also describe the more conventional case where the superconducting dome surrounds an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. Sponsored by NSERC RGPIN-2014-04584, CIFAR, Research Chair in the Theory of Quantum Materials.

  7. Rapid adiabatic passage in quantum dots: Influence of scattering and dephasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuh, K.; Jahnke, F.; Lorke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical investigations for the realization of population inversion of semiconductor quantum dot ground-state transitions by means of adiabatic passage with chirped optical pulses are presented. While the inversion due to Rabi oscillations depends sensitively on the resonance condition...

  8. Non-adiabatic effect on Laughlin's argument of the quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, I; Hatsugai, Y

    2009-01-01

    We have numerically studied a non-adiabatic charge transport in the quantum Hall system pumped by a magnetic flux, as one of the simplest theoretical realizations of non-adiabatic Thouless pumping. In the adiabatic limit, a pumped charge is quantized, known as Laughlin's argument in a cylindrical lattice. In a uniform electric field, we obtained a formula connecting quantized pumping in the adiabatic limit and no-pumping in the sudden limit. The intermediate region between the two limits is determined by the Landau gap. A randomness or impurity effect is also discussed.

  9. Advances in superconducting quantum electronic microcircuit fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschman, R.K.; Notarys, H.A.; Mercereau, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Standard microelectronic fabrication techniques were utilized to produce batch quantities of superconducting quantum electronic devices and circuits. The over-all goal is a fabrication technology yielding circuits that are rugged, stable, and capable of being fabricated controllably and reproducibly in sizeable quantities. Progress toward this goal is presented, with primary emphasis on the most recent work, which includes the use of electron-beam lithography and techniques of hybrid microelectronics. Several prototype microcircuits were successfully fabricated. These microcircuits are formed in a thin-film parent material consisting of layers of superconducting and normal metals, and use proximity effect structures as the active circuit elements

  10. Quantum heat engine with coupled superconducting resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardal, Ali Ümit Cemal; Aslan, Nur; Wilson, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    the differences between the quantum and classical descriptions of our system by solving the quantum master equation and classical Langevin equations. Specifically, we calculate the mean number of excitations, second-order coherence, as well as the entropy, temperature, power, and mean energy to reveal......We propose a quantum heat engine composed of two superconducting transmission line resonators interacting with each other via an optomechanical-like coupling. One resonator is periodically excited by a thermal pump. The incoherently driven resonator induces coherent oscillations in the other one...... the signatures of quantum behavior in the statistical and thermodynamic properties of the system. We find evidence of a quantum enhancement in the power output of the engine at low temperatures....

  11. From superconductivity near a quantum phase transition to superconducting graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Saxena

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   The collapse of antiferromagnetic order as a function of some quantum tuning parameter such as carrier density or hydrostatic pressure is often accompanied by a region of superconductivity. The corresponding phenomenon in the potentially simpler case of itinerant-electron ferromagnetism, however, remains more illusive. In this paper we consider the reasons why this may be so and summaries evidence suggesting that the obstacles to observing the phenomenon are apparently overcome in a few metallic ferromagnets. A new twist to the problem presented by the recent discoveries in ferroelectric symmetric systems and new graphite intercalate superconductors will also be discussed.

  12. Universal fault-tolerant adiabatic quantum computing with quantum dots or donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landahl, Andrew

    I will present a conceptual design for an adiabatic quantum computer that can achieve arbitrarily accurate universal fault-tolerant quantum computations with a constant energy gap and nearest-neighbor interactions. This machine can run any quantum algorithm known today or discovered in the future, in principle. The key theoretical idea is adiabatic deformation of degenerate ground spaces formed by topological quantum error-correcting codes. An open problem with the design is making the four-body interactions and measurements it uses more technologically accessible. I will present some partial solutions, including one in which interactions between quantum dots or donors in a two-dimensional array can emulate the desired interactions in second-order perturbation theory. I will conclude with some open problems, including the challenge of reformulating Kitaev's gadget perturbation theory technique so that it preserves fault tolerance. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Superconducting Quantum Interferometers for Nondestructive Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Faley, M. I.; Kostyurina, E. A.; Kalashnikov, K. V.; Maslennikov, Yu. V.; Koshelets, V. P.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    We review stationary and mobile systems that are used for the nondestructive evaluation of room temperature objects and are based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The systems are optimized for samples whose dimensions are between 10 micrometers and several meters. Stray magnetic fields from small samples (10 µm–10 cm) are studied using a SQUID microscope equipped with a magnetic flux antenna, which is fed through the walls of liquid nitrogen cryostat and a hole in the...

  14. Adiabatic approximation with exponential accuracy for many-body systems and quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Rezakhani, Ali T.; Hamma, Alioscia

    2009-01-01

    We derive a version of the adiabatic theorem that is especially suited for applications in adiabatic quantum computation, where it is reasonable to assume that the adiabatic interpolation between the initial and final Hamiltonians is controllable. Assuming that the Hamiltonian is analytic in a finite strip around the real-time axis, that some number of its time derivatives vanish at the initial and final times, and that the target adiabatic eigenstate is nondegenerate and separated by a gap from the rest of the spectrum, we show that one can obtain an error between the final adiabatic eigenstate and the actual time-evolved state which is exponentially small in the evolution time, where this time itself scales as the square of the norm of the time derivative of the Hamiltonian divided by the cube of the minimal gap.

  15. Bang-bang shortcut to adiabaticity in trapped-ion quantum simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Han, Shuyang; Yoshimura, B. T.; Freericks, J. K.

    2018-02-01

    We model the bang-bang optimization protocol as a shortcut to adiabaticity in the ground-state preparation of a trapped-ion quantum simulator. Compared to a locally adiabatic evolution, the bang-bang protocol typically produces a lower ground-state probability, but its implementation is so much simpler than the locally adiabatic approach, that it can become a competitive choice to use for maximizing ground-state preparation in systems that cannot be solved with conventional computers. We describe how one can optimize the shortcut and provide specific details for how it can be implemented with current trapped-ion quantum simulators. However, when frustration is strong enough, no method appears to work well for adiabatic state preparation within the experimental time frames, and one must confront the issue of dealing with diabatic excitations within the simulation.

  16. Adiabatic many-body state preparation and information transfer in quantum dot arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Umer; Bayat, Abolfazl; Mancini, Stefano; Bose, Sougato

    2015-04-01

    Quantum simulation of many-body systems are one of the most interesting tasks of quantum technology. Among them is the preparation of a many-body system in its ground state when the vanishing energy gap makes the cooling mechanisms ineffective. Adiabatic theorem, as an alternative to cooling, can be exploited for driving the many-body system to its ground state. In this paper, we study two most common disorders in quantum dot arrays, namely exchange coupling fluctuations and hyperfine interaction, in adiabatic preparation of ground state in such systems. We show that the adiabatic ground-state preparation is highly robust against those disorder effects making it a good analog simulator. Moreover, we also study the adiabatic quantum information transfer, using singlet-triplet states, across a spin chain. In contrast to ground-state preparation the transfer mechanism is highly affected by disorder and in particular, the hyperfine interaction is very destructive for the performance. This suggests that for communication tasks across such arrays adiabatic evolution is not as effective and quantum quenches could be preferable.

  17. Nanomagnet coupled to quantum spin Hall edge: An adiabatic quantum motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; von Oppen, Felix

    2015-11-01

    The precessing magnetization of a magnetic islands coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge pumps charge along the edge. Conversely, a bias voltage applied to the edge makes the magnetization precess. We point out that this device realizes an adiabatic quantum motor and discuss the efficiency of its operation based on a scattering matrix approach akin to Landauer-Büttiker theory. Scattering theory provides a microscopic derivation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the magnetization dynamics of the device, including spin-transfer torque, Gilbert damping, and Langevin torque. We find that the device can be viewed as a Thouless motor, attaining unit efficiency when the chemical potential of the edge states falls into the magnetization-induced gap. For more general parameters, we characterize the device by means of a figure of merit analogous to the ZT value in thermoelectrics.

  18. Reprint of : Nanomagnet coupled to quantum spin Hall edge: An adiabatic quantum motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    The precessing magnetization of a magnetic islands coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge pumps charge along the edge. Conversely, a bias voltage applied to the edge makes the magnetization precess. We point out that this device realizes an adiabatic quantum motor and discuss the efficiency of its operation based on a scattering matrix approach akin to Landauer-Büttiker theory. Scattering theory provides a microscopic derivation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the magnetization dynamics of the device, including spin-transfer torque, Gilbert damping, and Langevin torque. We find that the device can be viewed as a Thouless motor, attaining unit efficiency when the chemical potential of the edge states falls into the magnetization-induced gap. For more general parameters, we characterize the device by means of a figure of merit analogous to the ZT value in thermoelectrics.

  19. Optimal control and quantum simulations in superconducting quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel J.

    2014-10-31

    Quantum optimal control theory is the science of steering quantum systems. In this thesis we show how to overcome the obstacles in implementing optimal control for superconducting quantum bits, a promising candidate for the creation of a quantum computer. Building such a device will require the tools of optimal control. We develop pulse shapes to solve a frequency crowding problem and create controlled-Z gates. A methodology is developed for the optimisation towards a target non-unitary process. We show how to tune-up control pulses for a generic quantum system in an automated way using a combination of open- and closed-loop optimal control. This will help scaling of quantum technologies since algorithms can calibrate control pulses far more efficiently than humans. Additionally we show how circuit QED can be brought to the novel regime of multi-mode ultrastrong coupling using a left-handed transmission line coupled to a right-handed one. We then propose to use this system as an analogue quantum simulator for the Spin-Boson model to show how dissipation arises in quantum systems.

  20. Quantum heat engine with coupled superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Aslan, Nur; Wilson, C. M.; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2017-12-01

    We propose a quantum heat engine composed of two superconducting transmission line resonators interacting with each other via an optomechanical-like coupling. One resonator is periodically excited by a thermal pump. The incoherently driven resonator induces coherent oscillations in the other one due to the coupling. A limit cycle, indicating finite power output, emerges in the thermodynamical phase space. The system implements an all-electrical analog of a photonic piston. Instead of mechanical motion, the power output is obtained as a coherent electrical charging in our case. We explore the differences between the quantum and classical descriptions of our system by solving the quantum master equation and classical Langevin equations. Specifically, we calculate the mean number of excitations, second-order coherence, as well as the entropy, temperature, power, and mean energy to reveal the signatures of quantum behavior in the statistical and thermodynamic properties of the system. We find evidence of a quantum enhancement in the power output of the engine at low temperatures.

  1. Accuracy of the adiabatic-impulse approximation for closed and open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomka, Michael; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    We study the adiabatic-impulse approximation (AIA) as a tool to approximate the time evolution of quantum states when driven through a region of small gap. Such small-gap regions are a common situation in adiabatic quantum computing and having reliable approximations is important in this context. The AIA originates from the Kibble-Zurek theory applied to continuous quantum phase transitions. The Kibble-Zurek mechanism was developed to predict the power-law scaling of the defect density across a continuous quantum phase transition. Instead, here we quantify the accuracy of the AIA via the trace norm distance with respect to the exact evolved state. As expected, we find that for short times or fast protocols, the AIA outperforms the simple adiabatic approximation. However, for large times or slow protocols, the situation is actually reversed and the AIA provides a worse approximation. Nevertheless, we found a variation of the AIA that can perform better than the adiabatic one. This counterintuitive modification consists in crossing the region of small gap twice. Our findings are illustrated by several examples of driven closed and open quantum systems.

  2. Quantum Devices Bonded Beneath a Superconducting Shield: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Corey Rae; Abdallah, Adel; Bejanin, Jeremy; Earnest, Carolyn; McConkey, Thomas; Pagel, Zachary; Mariantoni, Matteo

    The next-generation quantum computer will rely on physical quantum bits (qubits) organized into arrays to form error-robust logical qubits. In the superconducting quantum circuit implementation, this architecture will require the use of larger and larger chip sizes. In order for on-chip superconducting quantum computers to be scalable, various issues found in large chips must be addressed, including the suppression of box modes (due to the sample holder) and the suppression of slot modes (due to fractured ground planes). By bonding a metallized shield layer over a superconducting circuit using thin-film indium as a bonding agent, we have demonstrated proof of concept of an extensible circuit architecture that holds the key to the suppression of spurious modes. Microwave characterization of shielded transmission lines and measurement of superconducting resonators were compared to identical unshielded devices. The elimination of box modes was investigated, as well as bond characteristics including bond homogeneity and the presence of a superconducting connection.

  3. Inhomogeneous quasi-adiabatic driving of quantum critical dynamics in weakly disordered spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rams, Marek M; Mohseni, Masoud; Campo, Adolfo del

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an inhomogeneous protocol to drive a weakly disordered quantum spin chain quasi-adiabatically across a quantum phase transition and minimize the residual energy of the final state. The number of spins that simultaneously reach the critical point is controlled by the length scale in which the magnetic field is modulated, introducing an effective size that favors adiabatic dynamics. The dependence of the residual energy on this length scale and the velocity at which the magnetic field sweeps out the chain is shown to be nonmonotonic. We determine the conditions for an optimal suppression of the residual energy of the final state and show that inhomogeneous driving can outperform conventional adiabatic schemes based on homogeneous control fields by several orders of magnitude. (paper)

  4. Quantum state engineering with flux-biased Josephson phase qubits by rapid adiabatic passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, W.; Huang, J. S.; Shi, X.; Wei, L. F.

    2010-09-01

    In this article, the scheme of quantum computing based on the Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) technique [L. F. Wei, J. R. Johansson, L. X. Cen, S. Ashhab, and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.113601 100, 113601 (2008)] is extensively applied to implement quantum state manipulations in flux-biased Josephson phase qubits. The broken-parity symmetries of bound states in flux-biased Josephson junctions are utilized to conveniently generate the desirable Stark shifts. Then, assisted by various transition pulses, universal quantum logic gates as well as arbitrary quantum state preparations can be implemented. Compared with the usual π-pulse operations widely used in experiments, the adiabatic population passages proposed here are insensitive to the details of the applied pulses and thus the desirable population transfers can be satisfyingly implemented. The experimental feasibility of the proposal is also discussed.

  5. Quantum state engineering with flux-biased Josephson phase qubits by rapid adiabatic passages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, W.; Huang, J. S.; Shi, X.; Wei, L. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the scheme of quantum computing based on the Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) technique [L. F. Wei, J. R. Johansson, L. X. Cen, S. Ashhab, and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 113601 (2008)] is extensively applied to implement quantum state manipulations in flux-biased Josephson phase qubits. The broken-parity symmetries of bound states in flux-biased Josephson junctions are utilized to conveniently generate the desirable Stark shifts. Then, assisted by various transition pulses, universal quantum logic gates as well as arbitrary quantum state preparations can be implemented. Compared with the usual π-pulse operations widely used in experiments, the adiabatic population passages proposed here are insensitive to the details of the applied pulses and thus the desirable population transfers can be satisfyingly implemented. The experimental feasibility of the proposal is also discussed.

  6. Solving Systems of Linear Equations with a Superconducting Quantum Processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yarui; Song, Chao; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Xia, Benxiang; Liu, Wuxin; Guo, Qiujiang; Zhang, Libo; Xu, Da; Deng, Hui; Huang, Keqiang; Wu, Yulin; Yan, Zhiguang; Zheng, Dongning; Lu, Li; Pan, Jian-Wei; Wang, H; Lu, Chao-Yang; Zhu, Xiaobo

    2017-05-26

    Superconducting quantum circuits are a promising candidate for building scalable quantum computers. Here, we use a four-qubit superconducting quantum processor to solve a two-dimensional system of linear equations based on a quantum algorithm proposed by Harrow, Hassidim, and Lloyd [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 150502 (2009)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.150502], which promises an exponential speedup over classical algorithms under certain circumstances. We benchmark the solver with quantum inputs and outputs, and characterize it by nontrace-preserving quantum process tomography, which yields a process fidelity of 0.837±0.006. Our results highlight the potential of superconducting quantum circuits for applications in solving large-scale linear systems, a ubiquitous task in science and engineering.

  7. Non-adiabatic quantum state preparation and quantum state transport in chains of Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostmann, Maike; Minář, Jiří; Marcuzzi, Matteo; Levi, Emanuele; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by recent progress in the experimental manipulation of cold atoms in optical lattices, we study three different protocols for non-adiabatic quantum state preparation and state transport in chains of Rydberg atoms. The protocols we discuss are based on the blockade mechanism between atoms which, when excited to a Rydberg state, interact through a van der Waals potential, and rely on single-site addressing. Specifically, we discuss protocols for efficient creation of an antiferromagnetic GHZ state, a class of matrix product states including a so-called Rydberg crystal and for the state transport of a single-qubit quantum state between two ends of a chain of atoms. We identify system parameters allowing for the operation of the protocols on timescales shorter than the lifetime of the Rydberg states while yielding high fidelity output states. We discuss the effect of positional disorder on the resulting states and comment on limitations due to other sources of noise such as radiative decay of the Rydberg states. The proposed protocols provide a testbed for benchmarking the performance of quantum information processing platforms based on Rydberg atoms.

  8. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM

  9. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR's), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs) in space applications, it is desirable to have very light weight, small diameter, high current density...

  10. Digital quantum Rabi and Dicke models in superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Pedernales, J S; DiCarlo, L; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2014-12-15

    We propose the analog-digital quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi and Dicke models using circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). We find that all physical regimes, in particular those which are impossible to realize in typical cavity QED setups, can be simulated via unitary decomposition into digital steps. Furthermore, we show the emergence of the Dirac equation dynamics from the quantum Rabi model when the mode frequency vanishes. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of this proposal under realistic superconducting circuit scenarios.

  11. Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Quantum information science seeks to take advantage of the properties of quantum mechanics to manipulate information in ways that are not otherwise possible. Quantum computation, for example, promises to solve certain problems in days that would take a conventional supercomputer the age of the universe to decipher. This power does not come without a cost however, as quantum bits are inherently more susceptible to errors than their classical counterparts. Fortunately, it is possible to redundantly encode information in several entangled qubits, making it robust to decoherence and control imprecision with quantum error correction. I studied one possible physical implementation for quantum computing, employing the ground and first excited quantum states of a superconducting electrical circuit as a quantum bit. These ``transmon'' qubits are dispersively coupled to a superconducting resonator used for readout, control, and qubit-qubit coupling in the cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture. In this talk I will give an general introduction to quantum computation and the superconducting technology that seeks to achieve it before explaining some of the specific results reported in my thesis. One major component is that of the first realization of three-qubit quantum error correction in a solid state device, where we encode one logical quantum bit in three entangled physical qubits and detect and correct phase- or bit-flip errors using a three-qubit Toffoli gate. My thesis is available at arXiv:1311.6759.

  12. Adapting the traveling salesman problem to an adiabatic quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Richard H.

    2013-04-01

    We show how to guide a quantum computer to select an optimal tour for the traveling salesman. This is significant because it opens a rapid solution method for the wide range of applications of the traveling salesman problem, which include vehicle routing, job sequencing and data clustering.

  13. Physics of Non-Adiabatic Transport and Field-Domain Effect in Quantum-Well Infrared Photodetectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Danhong; Cardimona, David A

    2003-01-01

    A previous theory for studying the distribution of non-uniform fields in multiple-quantum-well photodetectors under an ac voltage is generalized by including non-adiabatic space-charge-field effects...

  14. DSP control of superconducting quantum interference devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracht, R.R.; Kung, Pang-Jen; Lewis, P.S.; Flynn, E.R.

    1994-08-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS) are used to defect very law level magnetic fields. Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in developing digital signal processing (DSP) based instrumentation for these devices in conjunction with detecting magnetic flux from the human brain. This field of application is known as magnetoencephalography (MEG). The magnetic signals generated by the brain are on the order of a billion times smaller than the earth`s magnetic field, yet they can readily be detected with these highly ,sensitive magnetic detectors. Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented DSP control of the SQUID system. This has been accomplished by using an AT&T DSP32C DSP in conjunction with dual 18 bit a-to-d and d-to-a converters. The DSP performs the signal demodulation by synchronously sampling the recovered signal and applying the appropriate full wave rectification. The signal is then integrated and filtered and applied to the output. Also, the modulation signal is generated with the DSP system. All of the flux lock loop electronics are replaced except for the low noise analog preamplifier at the front of the recovery components. The system has been tested with both an electronic SQUID simulator and a low temperature thin film SQUID from Conductus. A number of experiments have been performed to allow evaluation of the system improvement made possible by use of DSP control.

  15. Superconducting Quantum Interferometers for Nondestructive Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Faley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We review stationary and mobile systems that are used for the nondestructive evaluation of room temperature objects and are based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs. The systems are optimized for samples whose dimensions are between 10 micrometers and several meters. Stray magnetic fields from small samples (10 µm–10 cm are studied using a SQUID microscope equipped with a magnetic flux antenna, which is fed through the walls of liquid nitrogen cryostat and a hole in the SQUID’s pick-up loop and returned sidewards from the SQUID back to the sample. The SQUID microscope does not disturb the magnetization of the sample during image recording due to the decoupling of the magnetic flux antenna from the modulation and feedback coil. For larger samples, we use a hand-held mobile liquid nitrogen minicryostat with a first order planar gradiometric SQUID sensor. Low-Tc DC SQUID systems that are designed for NDE measurements of bio-objects are able to operate with sufficient resolution in a magnetically unshielded environment. High-Tc DC SQUID magnetometers that are operated in a magnetic shield demonstrate a magnetic field resolution of ~4 fT/√Hz at 77 K. This sensitivity is improved to ~2 fT/√Hz at 77 K by using a soft magnetic flux antenna.

  16. One-way quantum computing in superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarrán-Arriagada, F.; Alvarado Barrios, G.; Sanz, M.; Romero, G.; Lamata, L.; Retamal, J. C.; Solano, E.

    2018-03-01

    We propose a method for the implementation of one-way quantum computing in superconducting circuits. Measurement-based quantum computing is a universal quantum computation paradigm in which an initial cluster state provides the quantum resource, while the iteration of sequential measurements and local rotations encodes the quantum algorithm. Up to now, technical constraints have limited a scalable approach to this quantum computing alternative. The initial cluster state can be generated with available controlled-phase gates, while the quantum algorithm makes use of high-fidelity readout and coherent feedforward. With current technology, we estimate that quantum algorithms with above 20 qubits may be implemented in the path toward quantum supremacy. Moreover, we propose an alternative initial state with properties of maximal persistence and maximal connectedness, reducing the required resources of one-way quantum computing protocols.

  17. Type II Quantum Computing With Superconductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orlando, Terry

    2004-01-01

    ... for adiabatic quantum computing using these qubits. The major experimental results on single superconducting persistent current qubits have been the observation of the quantum energy level crossings in niobium qubits, and the microwave measurements...

  18. Recall Performance for Content-Addressable Memory Using Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imam, Neena [ORNL; Humble, Travis S. [ORNL; McCaskey, Alex [ORNL; Schrock, Jonathan [ORNL; Hamilton, Kathleen E. [ORNL

    2017-09-01

    A content-addressable memory (CAM) stores key-value associations such that the key is recalled by providing its associated value. While CAM recall is traditionally performed using recurrent neural network models, we show how to solve this problem using adiabatic quantum optimization. Our approach maps the recurrent neural network to a commercially available quantum processing unit by taking advantage of the common underlying Ising spin model. We then assess the accuracy of the quantum processor to store key-value associations by quantifying recall performance against an ensemble of problem sets. We observe that different learning rules from the neural network community influence recall accuracy but performance appears to be limited by potential noise in the processor. The strong connection established between quantum processors and neural network problems supports the growing intersection of these two ideas.

  19. On-chip quantum interference of a superconducting microsphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, H.; Prat-Camps, J.; Sinha, K.; Prasanna Venkatesh, B.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2018-04-01

    We propose and analyze an all-magnetic scheme to perform a Young’s double slit experiment with a micron-sized superconducting sphere of mass ≳ {10}13 amu. We show that its center of mass could be prepared in a spatial quantum superposition state with an extent of the order of half a micrometer. The scheme is based on magnetically levitating the sphere above a superconducting chip and letting it skate through a static magnetic potential landscape where it interacts for short intervals with quantum circuits. In this way, a protocol for fast quantum interferometry using quantum magnetomechanics is passively implemented. Such a table-top earth-based quantum experiment would operate in a parameter regime where gravitational energy scales become relevant. In particular, we show that the faint parameter-free gravitationally-induced decoherence collapse model, proposed by Diósi and Penrose, could be unambiguously falsified.

  20. Path-integral isomorphic Hamiltonian for including nuclear quantum effects in non-adiabatic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xuecheng; Shushkov, Philip; Miller, Thomas F.

    2018-03-01

    We describe a path-integral approach for including nuclear quantum effects in non-adiabatic chemical dynamics simulations. For a general physical system with multiple electronic energy levels, a corresponding isomorphic Hamiltonian is introduced such that Boltzmann sampling of the isomorphic Hamiltonian with classical nuclear degrees of freedom yields the exact quantum Boltzmann distribution for the original physical system. In the limit of a single electronic energy level, the isomorphic Hamiltonian reduces to the familiar cases of either ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) or centroid molecular dynamics Hamiltonians, depending on the implementation. An advantage of the isomorphic Hamiltonian is that it can easily be combined with existing mixed quantum-classical dynamics methods, such as surface hopping or Ehrenfest dynamics, to enable the simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes with nuclear quantum effects. We present numerical applications of the isomorphic Hamiltonian to model two- and three-level systems, with encouraging results that include improvement upon a previously reported combination of RPMD with surface hopping in the deep-tunneling regime.

  1. Nano-patterned superconducting surface for high quantum efficiency cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannon, Fay; Musumeci, Pietro

    2017-03-07

    A method for providing a superconducting surface on a laser-driven niobium cathode in order to increase the effective quantum efficiency. The enhanced surface increases the effective quantum efficiency by improving the laser absorption of the surface and enhancing the local electric field. The surface preparation method makes feasible the construction of superconducting radio frequency injectors with niobium as the photocathode. An array of nano-structures are provided on a flat surface of niobium. The nano-structures are dimensionally tailored to interact with a laser of specific wavelength to thereby increase the electron yield of the surface.

  2. Fraunhofer regime of operation for superconducting quantum interference filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadrin, A.V.; Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Series arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with incommensurate loop areas, so-called superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIFs), are investigated in the kilohertz and the gigahertz frequency range. In SQIFs made of high-T-c bicrystal junctions the flux...... range of more than 60 dB in the kilohertz range. In the 1-2 GHz range the estimated power gain is 20 dB and the magnetic flux noise level is as low as 10(-4)Phi(0)....

  3. The origins of macroscopic quantum coherence in high temperature superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Philip, E-mail: ph.turner@napier.ac.uk [Edinburgh Napier University, 10 Colinton Road, Edinburgh EH10 5DT (United Kingdom); Nottale, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.nottale@obspm.fr [CNRS, LUTH, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 Place Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We propose a new theoretical approach to superconductivity in p-type cuprates. • Electron pairing mechanisms in the superconducting and pseudogap phases are proposed. • A scale free network of dopants is key to macroscopic quantum coherence. - Abstract: A new, theoretical approach to macroscopic quantum coherence and superconductivity in the p-type (hole doped) cuprates is proposed. The theory includes mechanisms to account for e-pair coupling in the superconducting and pseudogap phases and their inter relations observed in these materials. Electron pair coupling in the superconducting phase is facilitated by local quantum potentials created by static dopants in a mechanism which explains experimentally observed optimal doping levels and the associated peak in critical temperature. By contrast, evidence suggests that electrons contributing to the pseudogap are predominantly coupled by fractal spin waves (fractons) induced by the fractal arrangement of dopants. On another level, the theory offers new insights into the emergence of a macroscopic quantum potential generated by a fractal distribution of dopants. This, in turn, leads to the emergence of coherent, macroscopic spin waves and a second associated macroscopic quantum potential, possibly supported by charge order. These quantum potentials play two key roles. The first involves the transition of an expected diffusive process (normally associated with Anderson localization) in fractal networks, into e-pair coherence. The second involves the facilitation of tunnelling between localized e-pairs. These combined effects lead to the merger of the super conducting and pseudo gap phases into a single coherent condensate at optimal doping. The underlying theory relating to the diffusion to quantum transition is supported by Coherent Random Lasing, which can be explained using an analogous approach. As a final step, an experimental program is outlined to validate the theory and suggests a new

  4. Nonlinear charge and energy dynamics of an adiabatically driven interacting quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Javier I.; Roura-Bas, Pablo; Aligia, Armando A.; Arrachea, Liliana

    2017-06-01

    We formulate a general theory to study the time-dependent charge and energy transport of an adiabatically driven interacting quantum dot in contact with a reservoir for arbitrary amplitudes of the driving potential. We study within this framework the Anderson impurity model with a local ac gate voltage. We show that the exact adiabatic quantum dynamics of this system is fully determined by the behavior of the charge susceptibility of the frozen problem. At T =0 , we evaluate the dynamic response functions with the numerical renormalization group (NRG). The time-resolved heat production exhibits a pronounced feature described by an instantaneous Joule law characterized by a universal Büttiker resistance quantum R0=h /(2 e2) for each spin channel. We show that this law holds in the noninteracting as well as in the interacting system and also when the system is spin polarized. In addition, in the presence of a static magnetic field, the interplay between many-body interactions and spin polarization leads to a nontrivial energy exchange between electrons with different spin components.

  5. On-chip quantum optics with quantum dots and superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Guang-Wei; Guo, Guo-Ping; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-11-01

    Benefit from the recent nanotechnology process, people can integrate different nanostructures on a single chip. Particularly, quantum dots (QD), which behave as artificial atoms, have been shown to couple with a superconducting resonator, indicating that quantum-dot based quantum chip has a highly scalable possibility. Here we show a quantum chip architecture by combining graphene quantum dots and superconducting resonators together. A double quantum dot (DQD) and a microwave hybrid system can be described by the Jaynes-Cummings model, while a multi-quantum-dots system is conformed to the Tavis-Cummings model. These simple quantum optics models are experimentally realized in our device, providing a compelling platform for both graphene study and potential applications.

  6. Controlling electronic and adiabatic isolation of quantum dots from the substrate: An ionization-energy theoretic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arulsamy, Andrew Das; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2010-01-01

    Recent controversy on the quantum dots dephasing mechanisms (between pure and inelastic) is re-examined by isolating the quantum dots from their substrate by using the appropriate limits of the ionization energy theory and the quantum adiabatic theorem. When the phonons in the quantum dots are isolated adiabatically from the phonons in the substrate, the elastic or pure dephasing becomes the dominant mechanism. On the other hand, for the case where the phonons from the substrate are non-adiabatically coupled to the quantum dots, the inelastic dephasing process takes over. This switch-over is due to different elemental composition in quantum dots as compared to its substrate. We also provide unambiguous analysis as to understand why GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots may only have pure dephasing while InAs/GaAs quantum dots give rise to the inelastic dephasing as the dominant mechanism. It is shown that the elemental composition plays an important role (of both quantum dots and substrate) in evaluating the dephasing mechanisms of quantum dots.

  7. A Blueprint for Demonstrating Quantum Supremacy with Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kechedzhi, Kostyantyn

    2018-01-01

    Long coherence times and high fidelity control recently achieved in scalable superconducting circuits paved the way for the growing number of experimental studies of many-qubit quantum coherent phenomena in these devices. Albeit full implementation of quantum error correction and fault tolerant quantum computation remains a challenge the near term pre-error correction devices could allow new fundamental experiments despite inevitable accumulation of errors. One such open question foundational for quantum computing is achieving the so called quantum supremacy, an experimental demonstration of a computational task that takes polynomial time on the quantum computer whereas the best classical algorithm would require exponential time and/or resources. It is possible to formulate such a task for a quantum computer consisting of less than a 100 qubits. The computational task we consider is to provide approximate samples from a non-trivial quantum distribution. This is a generalization for the case of superconducting circuits of ideas behind boson sampling protocol for quantum optics introduced by Arkhipov and Aaronson. In this presentation we discuss a proof-of-principle demonstration of such a sampling task on a 9-qubit chain of superconducting gmon qubits developed by Google. We discuss theoretical analysis of the driven evolution of the device resulting in output approximating samples from a uniform distribution in the Hilbert space, a quantum chaotic state. We analyze quantum chaotic characteristics of the output of the circuit and the time required to generate a sufficiently complex quantum distribution. We demonstrate that the classical simulation of the sampling output requires exponential resources by connecting the task of calculating the output amplitudes to the sign problem of the Quantum Monte Carlo method. We also discuss the detailed theoretical modeling required to achieve high fidelity control and calibration of the multi-qubit unitary evolution in the

  8. Solving the Ternary Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Logic Gate Problem by Means of Adiabatic Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecar, Primoz; Mraz, Miha; Zimic, Nikolaj; Janez, Miha; Lebar Bajec, Iztok

    2008-06-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) are one of the most promising alternative platforms of the future. Recent years have witnessed the development of basic logic structures as well as more complex processing structures, however most in the realm of binary logic. On the grounds that future platforms should not disregard the advantages of multi-valued logic, Lebar Bajec et al. were the first to show that quantum-dot cellular automata can be used for the implementation of ternary logic as well. In their study the ternary AND and OR logic functions proved to be the most troublesome primitive to implement. This research presents a revised solution that is based on adiabatic switching.

  9. Quantum Charge Transfer Study of Triply Charged Ions in the Adiabatic Representation: the (BHe3+ System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Castillo A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Full quantum charge transfer study of the process B3+ + He -> B2+ + He+ has been investigated in the collision energy range 1-102 eV using an ab-initio interaction potential. A new method to solve the Schrödinger equation in an adiabatic basis was used, where the radial and rotational coupling were taken into account, and the importance of the coupling between states of different symmetry was discussed. Moreover, by using the well known Landau-Zener model, it was concluded that the two state model cannot be applied for the present system, and this might indicate that such a model should be applied carefully for other systems when a charge transfer process is considered. Finally, the quantum total cross sections were compared with the previous published work of Gargaud and co-workers and a fair agreement was achieved.

  10. Dissipation in adiabatic quantum computers: lessons from an exactly solvable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Maximilian; Montangero, Simone; Santoro, Giuseppe E.; Fazio, Rosario; Rossini, Davide

    2017-11-01

    We introduce and study the adiabatic dynamics of free-fermion models subject to a local Lindblad bath and in the presence of a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The merit of these models is that they can be solved exactly, and will help us to study the interplay between nonadiabatic transitions and dissipation in many-body quantum systems. After the adiabatic evolution, we evaluate the excess energy (the average value of the Hamiltonian) as a measure of the deviation from reaching the final target ground state. We compute the excess energy in a variety of different situations, where the nature of the bath and the Hamiltonian is modified. We find robust evidence of the fact that an optimal working time for the quantum annealing protocol emerges as a result of the competition between the nonadiabatic effects and the dissipative processes. We compare these results with the matrix-product-operator simulations of an Ising system and show that the phenomenology we found also applies for this more realistic case.

  11. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  12. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-03-17

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions.

  13. Phenomenological realism, superconductivity and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shomar, T.L.E.

    1998-01-01

    The central aim of this thesis is to present a new kind of realism that is driven not from the traditional realism/anti-realism debate but from the practice of physicists. The usual debate focuses on discussions about the truth of theories and their fit with nature, while the real practices of the scientists are forgotten. The position I shall defend is called 'phenomenological realism': theories are merely tools to construct other theories and models, including phenomenological models; phenomenological models are the vehicles of representation. The realist doctrine was recently undermined by the argument from the pessimistic meta-induction, also known as the argument from scientific revolutions. I argue that phenomenological realism is a new kind of scientific realism which can overcome the problem generated by the argument from scientific revolutions, and which depend on the scientific practice. The realist tried to overcome this problem by suggesting various types of theory dichotomy. I claim that different types of dichotomy presented by realists did not overcome the problem, these dichotomies cut through theory vertically. I argue for a different kind of dichotomy between high level theoretical abstractions and low-level theoretical representations. I claim that theoretical work in physics have two distinct types depending on the way they are built these are: theoretical models which built depending on a top-down approach and phenomenological models which are built depending on a bottom-up approach, this dichotomy cuts the division along a horizontal line between low and high level theory. I present two case studies. One from superconductivity where I contrast the BCS theory of superconductivity with the phenomenological model of Landau and Ginzburg. I show how in that field of physics the historical developments favoured phenomenological models over high-level theoretical abstraction. I show how the BCS theory of superconductivity was constructed, and why it

  14. Superconducting loop quantum gravity and the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Stephon H.S. [Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Physics, Haverford College, 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States)], E-mail: stephonalexander@mac.com; Calcagni, Gianluca [Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)], E-mail: gianluca@gravity.psu.edu

    2009-03-02

    We argue that the cosmological constant is exponentially suppressed in a candidate ground state of loop quantum gravity as a nonperturbative effect of a holographic Fermi-liquid theory living on a two-dimensional spacetime. Ashtekar connection components, corresponding to degenerate gravitational configurations breaking large gauge invariance and CP symmetry, behave as composite fermions that condense as in Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity. Cooper pairs admit a description as wormholes on a de Sitter boundary.

  15. Non-adiabatic quantum evolution: The S matrix as a geometrical phase factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadi, Y.; Maamache, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a complete derivation of the exact evolution of quantum mechanics for the case when the underlying spectrum is continuous. We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. We show that a quantum system being in an eigenstate of an invariant will remain in the subspace generated by the eigenstates of the invariant, thereby acquiring a generalized non-adiabatic or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase linked to the diagonal element of the S matrix. The modified Pöschl–Teller potential and the time-dependent linear potential are worked out as illustrations. -- Highlights: ► In this Letter we study the exact quantum evolution for continuous spectra problems. ► We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. ► We give a generalized Lewis and Riesenfeld phase for continuous spectra. ► This generalized phase or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase is linked to the S matrix. ► The modified Pöschl–Teller and the linear potential are worked out as illustrations.

  16. Quantum-classical dynamics of scattering processes in adiabatic and diabatic representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puzari, Panchanan; Sarkar, Biplab; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the workability of a TDDVR based [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5302 (2003)], novel quantum-classical approach, for simulating scattering processes on a quasi-Jahn-Teller model [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 9141 (1996)] surface. The formulation introduces a set of DVR grid points defined by the Hermite part of the basis set in each dimension and allows the movement of grid points around the central trajectory. With enough trajectories (grid points), the method converges to the exact quantum formulation whereas with only one grid point, we recover the conventional molecular dynamics approach. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation and classical equations of motion are solved self-consistently and electronic transitions are allowed anywhere in the configuration space among any number of coupled states. Quantum-classical calculations are performed on diabatic surfaces (two and three) to reveal the effects of symmetry on inelastic and reactive state-to-state transition probabilities, along with calculations on an adiabatic surface with ordinary Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Excellent agreement between TDDVR and DVR results is obtained in both the representations

  17. Non-adiabatic quantum evolution: The S matrix as a geometrical phase factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadi, Y., E-mail: S_yahiadz@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systèmes Dynamiques, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ferhat Abbas de Sétif, Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Maamache, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systèmes Dynamiques, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ferhat Abbas de Sétif, Sétif 19000 (Algeria)

    2012-03-19

    We present a complete derivation of the exact evolution of quantum mechanics for the case when the underlying spectrum is continuous. We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. We show that a quantum system being in an eigenstate of an invariant will remain in the subspace generated by the eigenstates of the invariant, thereby acquiring a generalized non-adiabatic or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase linked to the diagonal element of the S matrix. The modified Pöschl–Teller potential and the time-dependent linear potential are worked out as illustrations. -- Highlights: ► In this Letter we study the exact quantum evolution for continuous spectra problems. ► We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. ► We give a generalized Lewis and Riesenfeld phase for continuous spectra. ► This generalized phase or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase is linked to the S matrix. ► The modified Pöschl–Teller and the linear potential are worked out as illustrations.

  18. Towards a spin-ensemble quantum memory for superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezes, Cécile; Kubo, Yuimaru; Julsgaard, Brian; Umeda, Takahide; Isoya, Junichi; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Diniz, Igor; Auffeves, Alexia; Jacques, Vincent; Roch, Jean-François; Vion, Denis; Esteve, Daniel; Moelmer, Klaus; Bertet, Patrice

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews efforts to build a new type of quantum device, which combines an ensemble of electronic spins with long coherence times, and a small-scale superconducting quantum processor. The goal is to store over long times arbitrary qubit states in orthogonal collective modes of the spin-ensemble, and to retrieve them on-demand. We first present the protocol devised for such a multi-mode quantum memory. We then describe a series of experimental results using NV (as in nitrogen vacancy) center spins in diamond, which demonstrate its main building blocks: the transfer of arbitrary quantum states from a qubit into the spin ensemble, and the multi-mode retrieval of classical microwave pulses down to the single-photon level with a Hahn-echo like sequence. A reset of the spin memory is implemented in-between two successive sequences using optical repumping of the spins. xml:lang="fr"

  19. Emulating Many-Body Localization with a Superconducting Quantum Processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Chen, Jin-Jun; Zeng, Yu; Zhang, Yu-Ran; Song, Chao; Liu, Wuxin; Guo, Qiujiang; Zhang, Pengfei; Xu, Da; Deng, Hui; Huang, Keqiang; Wang, H; Zhu, Xiaobo; Zheng, Dongning; Fan, Heng

    2018-02-02

    The law of statistical physics dictates that generic closed quantum many-body systems initialized in nonequilibrium will thermalize under their own dynamics. However, the emergence of many-body localization (MBL) owing to the interplay between interaction and disorder, which is in stark contrast to Anderson localization, which only addresses noninteracting particles in the presence of disorder, greatly challenges this concept, because it prevents the systems from evolving to the ergodic thermalized state. One critical evidence of MBL is the long-time logarithmic growth of entanglement entropy, and a direct observation of it is still elusive due to the experimental challenges in multiqubit single-shot measurement and quantum state tomography. Here we present an experiment fully emulating the MBL dynamics with a 10-qubit superconducting quantum processor, which represents a spin-1/2 XY model featuring programmable disorder and long-range spin-spin interactions. We provide essential signatures of MBL, such as the imbalance due to the initial nonequilibrium, the violation of eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, and, more importantly, the direct evidence of the long-time logarithmic growth of entanglement entropy. Our results lay solid foundations for precisely simulating the intriguing physics of quantum many-body systems on the platform of large-scale multiqubit superconducting quantum processors.

  20. Superconductivity versus quantum criticality: Effects of thermal fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huajia; Wang, Yuxuan; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2018-02-01

    We study the interplay between superconductivity and non-Fermi liquid behavior of a Fermi surface coupled to a massless SU(N ) matrix boson near the quantum critical point. The presence of thermal infrared singularities in both the fermionic self-energy and the gap equation invalidates the Eliashberg approximation, and makes the quantum-critical pairing problem qualitatively different from that at zero temperature. Taking the large N limit, we solve the gap equation beyond the Eliashberg approximation, and obtain the superconducting temperature Tc as a function of N . Our results show an anomalous scaling between the zero-temperature gap and Tc. For N greater than a critical value, we find that Tc vanishes with a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless scaling behavior, and the system retains non-Fermi liquid behavior down to zero temperature. This confirms and extends previous renormalization-group analyses done at T =0 , and provides a controlled example of a naked quantum critical point. We discuss the crucial role of thermal fluctuations in relating our results with earlier work where superconductivity always develops due to the special role of the first Matsubara frequency.

  1. Integrated digital superconducting logic circuits for the quantum synthesizer. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, F.I.; Kohlmann, J.; Khabipov, M.; Brandt, C.M.; Hagedorn, D.; Balashov, D.; Maibaum, F.; Tolkacheva, E.; Niemeyer, J.

    2006-11-01

    This report presents the results, which were reached in the framework of the BMBF cooperative plan ''Quantum Synthesizer'' in the partial plan ''Integrated Digital Superconducting Logic Circuits''. As essential goal of the plan a novel instrument on the base of quantum-coherent superconducting circuits should be developed. which allows to generate praxis-relevant wave forms with quantum accuracy, the quantum synthesizer. The main topics of development of the reported partial plan lied at the one hand in the development of integrated, digital, superconducting circuit in rapid-single-flux (RSFQ) quantum logics for the pattern generator of the quantum synthesizer, at the other hand in the further development of the fabrication technology for the aiming of high circuit complexity. In order to fulfil these requirements at the PTB a new design system was implemented, based on the software of Cadence. Together with the required RSFQ extensions for the design of digital superconducting circuits was a platform generated, on which the reachable circuit complexity is exclusively limited by the technology parameters of the available fabrication technology: Physical simulations are with PSCAN up to a complexity of more than 1000 circuit elements possible; furthermore VHDL allows the verification of arbitrarily large circuit architectures. In accordance for this the production line at the PTB was brought to a level, which allows in Nb/Al-Al x O y /Nb SIS technology implementation the fabrication of highly integrable RSFQ circuit architectures. The developed and fabricated basic circuits of the pattern generator have proved correct functionality and reliability in the measuring operation. Thereby for the circular RSFQ shift registers a key role as local memories in the construction of the pattern generator is devolved upon. The registers were realized with the aimed bit lengths up to 128 bit and with reachable signal-processing speeds of above 10 GHz. At the interface RSFQ

  2. Far-field nanoscopy on a semiconductor quantum dot via a rapid-adiabatic-passage-based switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldewey, Timo; Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Valentin, Sascha R.; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2018-02-01

    The diffraction limit prevents a conventional optical microscope from imaging at the nanoscale. However, nanoscale imaging of molecules is possible by exploiting an intensity-dependent molecular switch1-3. This switch is translated into a microscopy scheme, stimulated emission depletion microscopy4-7. Variants on this scheme exist3,8-13, yet all exploit an incoherent response to the lasers. We present a scheme that relies on a coherent response to a laser. Quantum control of a two-level system proceeds via rapid adiabatic passage, an ideal molecular switch. We implement this scheme on an ensemble of quantum dots. Each quantum dot results in a bright spot in the image with extent down to 30 nm (λ/31). There is no significant loss of intensity with respect to confocal microscopy, resulting in a factor of 10 improvement in emitter position determination. The experiments establish rapid adiabatic passage as a versatile tool in the super-resolution toolbox.

  3. Coherent state mapping ring polymer molecular dynamics for non-adiabatic quantum propagations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sutirtha N.; Huo, Pengfei

    2017-12-01

    We introduce the coherent-state mapping ring polymer molecular dynamics (CS-RPMD), a new method that accurately describes electronic non-adiabatic dynamics with explicit nuclear quantization. This new approach is derived by using coherent-state mapping representation for the electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) and the ring-polymer path-integral representation for the nuclear DOF. The CS-RPMD Hamiltonian does not contain any inter-bead coupling term in the state-dependent potential and correctly describes electronic Rabi oscillations. A classical equation of motion is used to sample initial configurations and propagate the trajectories from the CS-RPMD Hamiltonian. At the time equivalent to zero, the quantum Boltzmann distribution (QBD) is recovered by reweighting the sampled distribution with an additional phase factor. In a special limit that there is one bead for mapping variables and multiple beads for nuclei, CS-RPMD satisfies detailed balance and preserves an approximate QBD. Numerical tests of this method with a two-state model system show very good agreement with exact quantum results over a broad range of electronic couplings.

  4. Adiabatic Perturbation Theory: From Landau-Zener Problem to Quenching Through a Quantum Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grandi, C.; Polkovnikov, A.

    Dynamics in closed systems recently attracted a lot of theoretical interest largely following experimental developments in cold atom systems (see e.g., [1] for a review). Several spectacular experiments already explored different aspects of non-equilibrium dynamics in interacting many-particle systems [2-8]. Recent theoretical works in this context focused on various topics, for instance: connection of dynamics and thermodynamics [9-11 M. Rigol, unpublished], dynamics following a sudden quench in low dimensional systems [11-23, L. Mathey and A. Polkovnikov, unpublished; A. Iucci and M.A. Cazalilla,unpublished], adiabatic dynamics near quantum critical points [24-37, D. Chowdhury et al., unpublished; K. Sengupta and D. Sen, unpublished; A.P. Itin and P. Törmä, unpublished; F. Pollmann et al., unpublished] and others. Though there is still very limited understanding of the generic aspects of non-equilibrium quantum dynamics, it has been recognized that such issues as integrability, dimensionality, universality (near critical points) can be explored to understand the non-equilibrium behavior of many-particle systems in various specific situations.

  5. Superconducting Analogue of the Parafermion Fractional Quantum Hall States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassan Vaezi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Read-Rezayi Z_{k} parafermion wave functions describe ν=2+(k/kM+2 fractional quantum Hall (FQH states. These states support non-Abelian excitations from which protected quantum gates can be designed. However, there is no experimental evidence for these non-Abelian anyons to date. In this paper, we study the ν=2/k FQH-superconductor heterostructure and find the superconducting analogue of the Z_{k} parafermion FQH state. Our main tool is the mapping of the FQH into coupled one-dimensional chains, each with a pair of counterpropagating modes. We show that by inducing intrachain pairing and charge preserving backscattering with identical couplings, the one-dimensional chains flow into gapless Z_{k} parafermions when k<4. By studying the effect of interchain coupling, we show that every parafermion mode becomes massive except for the two outermost ones. Thus, we achieve a fractional topological superconductor whose chiral edge state is described by a Z_{k} parafermion conformal field theory. For instance, we find that a ν=2/3 FQH in proximity to a superconductor produces a Z_{3} parafermion superconducting state. This state is topologically indistinguishable from the non-Abelian part of the ν=12/5 Read-Rezayi state. Both of these systems can host Fibonacci anyons capable of performing universal quantum computation through braiding operations.

  6. Autonomously stabilized entanglement between two superconducting quantum bits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, S.; Hatridge, M.; Leghtas, Z.; Sliwa, K. M.; Narla, A.; Vool, U.; Girvin, S. M.; Frunzio, L.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum error correction codes are designed to protect an arbitrary state of a multi-qubit register from decoherence-induced errors, but their implementation is an outstanding challenge in the development of large-scale quantum computers. The first step is to stabilize a non-equilibrium state of a simple quantum system, such as a quantum bit (qubit) or a cavity mode, in the presence of decoherence. This has recently been accomplished using measurement-based feedback schemes. The next step is to prepare and stabilize a state of a composite system. Here we demonstrate the stabilization of an entangled Bell state of a quantum register of two superconducting qubits for an arbitrary time. Our result is achieved using an autonomous feedback scheme that combines continuous drives along with a specifically engineered coupling between the two-qubit register and a dissipative reservoir. Similar autonomous feedback techniques have been used for qubit reset, single-qubit state stabilization, and the creation and stabilization of states of multipartite quantum systems. Unlike conventional, measurement-based schemes, the autonomous approach uses engineered dissipation to counteract decoherence, obviating the need for a complicated external feedback loop to correct errors. Instead, the feedback loop is built into the Hamiltonian such that the steady state of the system in the presence of drives and dissipation is a Bell state, an essential building block for quantum information processing. Such autonomous schemes, which are broadly applicable to a variety of physical systems, as demonstrated by the accompanying paper on trapped ion qubits, will be an essential tool for the implementation of quantum error correction.

  7. Quantum state sensitivity of an autoresonant superconducting circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murch, K. W.; Ginossar, E.; Weber, S. J.; Vijay, R.; Girvin, S. M.; Siddiqi, I.

    2012-12-01

    When a frequency chirped excitation is applied to a classical high-Q nonlinear oscillator, its motion becomes dynamically synchronized to the drive and large oscillation amplitude is observed, provided the drive strength exceeds the critical threshold for autoresonance. We demonstrate that when such an oscillator is strongly coupled to a quantized superconducting qubit, both the effective nonlinearity and the threshold become a nontrivial function of the qubit-oscillator detuning. Moreover, the autoresonant threshold is dependent on the quantum state of the qubit and may be used to realize a high-fidelity, latching readout whose speed is not limited by the oscillator Q.

  8. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Michael G; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H

    2014-03-24

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  9. Single-flux-quantum circuit technology for superconducting radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimaki, Akira; Onogi, Masashi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Sekiya, Akito; Hayakawa, Hisao; Yorozu, Shinichi; Terai, Hirotaka; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the application of the single-flux-quantum (SFQ) logic circuits to multi superconducting radiation detectors system. The SFQ-based analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) have the advantage in current sensitivity, which can reach less than 10 nA in a well-tuned ADC. We have also developed the design technology of the SFQ circuits. We demonstrate high-speed operation of large-scale integrated circuits such as a 2x2 cross/bar switch, arithmetic logic unit, indicating that our present SFQ technology is applicable to the multi radiation detectors system. (author)

  10. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Michael G.; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  11. Superconducting quantum interference monitor of charged particle beam current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertsev, K.F.; Mikheev, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Description and test results of the monitor of charged particle beam current on the base of the high-frequency superconducting quantum interference detector with lead slotted shield are presented. The toroidal superconducting coil, which covers the measured beam has 16 turns wound by the lead belt of 7 mm width with 0.5 mm gaps between the turns. A superconducting low-coupling monitor having two holes and point oxidated niobium contact has been used in the mode of quanta counting of magnetic flux. The lead point shield was 2 mm thick and it had 30 mm aperture. The coefficient of background shielding within 0-200 Hz frequency range constituted more than 10 8 . The threshold current resolution of the monitor had the value less than 01 μA √Hz. The suggested monitor requires helium cooling. The proposed design of the monitor is applicable for mounting on the vacuum chamber when it is surrounded by helium conductor. In other cases mounting of low-powerful autonomic system or cryostat of helium storage up to several weeks is possible [ru

  12. Towards realizing a quantum memory for a superconducting qubit: storage and retrieval of quantum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shiro; Zhu, Xiaobo; Amsüss, Robert; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Shimo-Oka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J; Semba, Kouichi

    2013-09-06

    We have built a hybrid system composed of a superconducting flux qubit (the processor) and an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond (the memory) that can be directly coupled to one another, and demonstrated how information can be transferred from the flux qubit to the memory, stored, and subsequently retrieved. We have established the coherence properties of the memory and succeeded in creating an entangled state between the processor and memory, demonstrating how the entangled state's coherence is preserved. Our results are a significant step towards using an electron spin ensemble as a quantum memory for superconducting qubits.

  13. Nonlinearities in the quantum measurement process of superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serban, Ioana

    2008-05-15

    The work described in this thesis focuses on the investigation of decoherence and measurement backaction, on the theoretical description of measurement schemes and their improvement. The study presented here is centered around quantum computing implementations using superconducting devices and most important, the Josephson effect. The measured system is invariantly a qubit, i. e. a two-level system. The objective is to study detectors with increasing nonlinearity, e. g. coupling of the qubit to the frequency a driven oscillator, or to the bifurcation amplifier, to determine the performance and backaction of the detector on the measured system and to investigate the importance of a strong qubit-detector coupling for the achievement of a quantum non-demolition type of detection. The first part gives a very basic introduction to quantum information, briefly reviews some of the most promising physical implementations of a quantum computer before focusing on the superconducting devices. The second part presents a series of studies of different qubit measurements, describing the backaction of the measurement onto the measured system and the internal dynamics of the detector. Methodology adapted from quantum optics and chemical physics (master equations, phase-space analysis etc.) combined with the representation of a complex environment yielded a tool capable of describing a nonlinear, non-Markovian environment, which couples arbitrarily strongly to the measured system. This is described in chapter 3. Chapter 4 focuses on the backaction on the qubit and presents novel insights into the qubit dephasing in the strong coupling regime. Chapter 5 uses basically the same system and technical tools to explore the potential of a fast, strong, indirect measurement, and determine how close such a detection would ideally come to the quantum non-demolition regime. Chapter 6 focuses on the internal dynamics of a strongly driven Josephson junction. The analytical results are based on

  14. Nonlinearities in the quantum measurement process of superconducting qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serban, Ioana

    2008-05-01

    The work described in this thesis focuses on the investigation of decoherence and measurement backaction, on the theoretical description of measurement schemes and their improvement. The study presented here is centered around quantum computing implementations using superconducting devices and most important, the Josephson effect. The measured system is invariantly a qubit, i. e. a two-level system. The objective is to study detectors with increasing nonlinearity, e. g. coupling of the qubit to the frequency a driven oscillator, or to the bifurcation amplifier, to determine the performance and backaction of the detector on the measured system and to investigate the importance of a strong qubit-detector coupling for the achievement of a quantum non-demolition type of detection. The first part gives a very basic introduction to quantum information, briefly reviews some of the most promising physical implementations of a quantum computer before focusing on the superconducting devices. The second part presents a series of studies of different qubit measurements, describing the backaction of the measurement onto the measured system and the internal dynamics of the detector. Methodology adapted from quantum optics and chemical physics (master equations, phase-space analysis etc.) combined with the representation of a complex environment yielded a tool capable of describing a nonlinear, non-Markovian environment, which couples arbitrarily strongly to the measured system. This is described in chapter 3. Chapter 4 focuses on the backaction on the qubit and presents novel insights into the qubit dephasing in the strong coupling regime. Chapter 5 uses basically the same system and technical tools to explore the potential of a fast, strong, indirect measurement, and determine how close such a detection would ideally come to the quantum non-demolition regime. Chapter 6 focuses on the internal dynamics of a strongly driven Josephson junction. The analytical results are based on

  15. First-Order 0-π Quantum Phase Transition in the Kondo Regime of a Superconducting Carbon-Nanotube Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Maurand

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study a carbon-nanotube quantum dot embedded in a superconducting-quantum-interference-device loop in order to investigate the competition of strong electron correlations with a proximity effect. Depending on whether local pairing or local magnetism prevails, a superconducting quantum dot will exhibit a positive or a negative supercurrent, referred to as a 0 or π Josephson junction, respectively. In the regime of a strong Coulomb blockade, the 0-to-π transition is typically controlled by a change in the discrete charge state of the dot, from even to odd. In contrast, at a larger tunneling amplitude, the Kondo effect develops for an odd-charge (magnetic dot in the normal state, and quenches magnetism. In this situation, we find that a first-order 0-to-π quantum phase transition can be triggered at a fixed valence when superconductivity is brought in, due to the competition of the superconducting gap and the Kondo temperature. The superconducting-quantum-interference-device geometry together with the tunability of our device allows the exploration of the associated phase diagram predicted by recent theories. We also report on the observation of anharmonic behavior of the current-phase relation in the transition regime, which we associate with the two accessible superconducting states. Our results finally demonstrate that the spin-singlet nature of the Kondo state helps to enhance the stability of the 0 phase far from the mixed-valence regime in odd-charge superconducting quantum dots.

  16. Two-photon quantum Rabi model with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, S.; Rossatto, D. Z.; Rico, E.; Solano, E.; Forn-Díaz, P.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a superconducting circuit to implement a two-photon quantum Rabi model in a solid-state device, where a qubit and a resonator are coupled by a two-photon interaction. We analyze the input-output relations for this circuit in the strong-coupling regime and find that fundamental quantum-optical phenomena are qualitatively modified. For instance, two-photon interactions are shown to yield a single- or two-photon blockade when a pumping field is either applied to the cavity mode or to the qubit, respectively. In addition, we derive an effective Hamiltonian for perturbative ultrastrong two-photon couplings in the dispersive regime, where two-photon interactions introduce a qubit-state-dependent Kerr term. Finally, we analyze the spectral collapse of the multiqubit two-photon quantum Rabi model and find a scaling of the critical coupling with the number of qubits. Using realistic parameters with the circuit proposed, three qubits are sufficient to reach the collapse point.

  17. Theoretical/Computational Studies of High-Temperature Superconductivity from Quantum Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0204 Theoretical/Computational Studies of High-Temperature Superconductivity from Quantum Magnetism Jose Rodriguez CALIFORNIA...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Theoretical/Computational Studies of High-Temperature Superconductivity from Quantum Magnetism 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT...SUBJECT TERMS quantum magnetism , HTS, superconductivity 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION OF       ABSTRACT UU 18.  NUMBER        OF

  18. A counterexample and a modification to the adiabatic approximation theorem in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingold, H.

    1991-01-01

    A counterexample to the adiabatic approximation theorem is given when degeneracies are present. A formulation of an alternative version is proposed. A complete asymptotic decomposition for n dimensional self-adjoint Hamiltonian systems is restated and used.

  19. Nonequilibrium Transport through a Spinful Quantum Dot with Superconducting Leads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Brian Møller; Flensberg, Karsten; Koerting, Verena

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonlinear cotunneling current through a spinful quantum dot contacted by two superconducting leads. Applying a general nonequilibrium Green function formalism to an effective Kondo model, we study the rich variation in the IV characteristics with varying asymmetry in the tunnel...... coupling to source and drain electrodes. The current is found to be carried, respectively, by multiple Andreev reflections in the symmetric limit, and by spin-induced Yu-Shiba-Rusinov bound states in the strongly asymmetric limit. The interplay between these two mechanisms leads to qualitatively different...... IV characteristics in the crossover regime of intermediate symmetry, consistent with recent experimental observations of negative differential conductance and repositioned conductance peaks in subgap cotunneling spectroscopy....

  20. Double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference devices with gradiometric layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Duuren, M.J.; Brons, G.C.; Adelerhof, D.J.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.

    1997-01-01

    Double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference devices (DROSs) with a gradiometric signal SQUID and either a reference SQUID or a reference junction will be presented in this article. The devices are user friendly, particularly those with a reference junction. Because of the large flux-to-voltage transfer of ∂V/∂Φ=0.7 endash 1mV/Φ 0 , the devices can be operated in a flux locked loop based on direct voltage readout without loss of sensitivity. The typical white flux noise of the DROSs amounts to √S Φ =5 endash 6μΦ 0 /√Hz, which corresponds to an energy resolution ε=S Φ /2L sq ≅200h. Coupled to an external planar first-order gradiometer, a white magnetic field sensitivity of √S B <2fT/√Hz was measured inside a magnetically shielded room. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. Collective Quantum Phase-Slip Dynamics in Superconducting Nanowire Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skacel, Sebastian T.; Voss, Jan N.; Bier, Tobias; Radke, Lucas; Weides, Martin; Rotzinger, Hannes; Mooij, Hans E.; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting nanowire arrays exhibit quantum phase-slip (QPS) phenomenon if the superconductor has a very high normal-state sheet resistance. We experimentally study QPS effects in arrays of nanowires embedded in a resonant circuit at GHz frequencies. We probe this circuit at ultra-low microwave power, applied flux and mK temperatures. The nanowires are fabricated utilizing aluminium grown in a precisely-controlled oxygen atmosphere. In this way, we aim to control the QPS rate for a given wire width. The wires are defined with conventional electron beam lithography down to a width of 20 nm. We will present the fabrication of the nanowire arrays and first microwave measurements at mK temperatures. Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany.

  2. Experiments on two-resonator circuit quantum electrodynamics. A superconducting quantum switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Elisabeth Christiane Maria

    2013-05-29

    The field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) studies the interaction between light and matter on a fundamental level. In typical experiments individual natural atoms are interacting with individual photons trapped in three-dimensional cavities. Within the last decade the prospering new field of circuit QED has been developed. Here, the natural atoms are replaced by artificial solid state quantum circuits offering large dipole moments which are coupled to quasi-onedimensional cavities providing a small mode volume and hence a large vacuum field strength. In our experiments Josephson junction based superconducting quantum bits are coupled to superconducting microwave resonators. In circuit QED the number of parameters that can be varied is increased and regimes that are not accessible using natural atoms can be entered and investigated. Apart from design flexibility and tunability of system parameters a particular advantage of circuit QED is the scalability to larger system size enabled by well developed micro- and nanofabrication tools. When scaling up the resonator-qubit systems beyond a few coupled circuits, the rapidly increasing number of interacting subsystems requires an active control and directed transmission of quantum signals. This can, for example, be achieved by implementing switchable coupling between two microwave resonators. To this end, a superconducting flux qubit is used to realize a suitable coupling between two microwave resonators, all working in the Gigahertz regime. The resulting device is called quantum switch. The flux qubit mediates a second order tunable and switchable coupling between the resonators. Depending on the qubit state, this coupling can compensate for the direct geometric coupling of the two resonators. As the qubit may also be in a quantum superposition state, the switch itself can be ''quantum'': it can be a superposition of ''on'' and ''off''. This work

  3. Influence of Superconducting Leads Energy Gap on Electron Transport Through Double Quantum Dot by Markovian Quantum Master Equation Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afsaneh, E.; Yavari, H.

    2014-01-01

    The superconducting reservoir effect on the current carrying transport of a double quantum dot in Markovian regime is investigated. For this purpose, a quantum master equation at finite temperature is derived for the many-body density matrix of an open quantum system. The dynamics and the steady-state properties of the double quantum dot system for arbitrary bias are studied. We will show that how the populations and coherencies of the system states are affected by superconducting leads. The energy parameter of system contains essentially four contributions due to dots system-electrodes coupling, intra dot coupling, two quantum dots inter coupling and superconducting gap. The coupling effect of each energy contribution is applied to currents and coherencies results. In addition, the effect of energy gap is studied by considering the amplitude and lifetime of coherencies to get more current through the system. (author)

  4. Implementation of quantum partial search with superconducting quantum interference device qudits in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong-Yi; Wu Chun-Wang; Chen Yu-Bo; Lin Yuan-Gen; Chen Ping-Xing; Li Cheng-Zu

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to implement the quantum partial search of the database separated into any number of blocks with qudits, D-level quantum systems. Compared with the partial search using qubits, our method needs fewer iteration steps and uses the carriers of the information more economically. To illustrate how to realize the idea with concrete physical systems, we propose a scheme to carry out a twelve-dimensional partial search of the database partitioned into three blocks with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in cavity QED. Through the appropriate modulation of the amplitudes of the microwave pulses, the scheme can overcome the non-identity of the cavity—SQUID coupling strengths due to the parameter variations resulting from the fabrication processes. Numerical simulation under the influence of the cavity and SQUID decays shows that the scheme could be achieved efficiently within current state-of-the-art technology

  5. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well. PMID:26907366

  6. Phase-controlled coherent population trapping in superconducting quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Guang-Ling; Wang Yi-Ping; Chen Ai-Xi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influences of the-applied-field phases and amplitudes on the coherent population trapping behavior in superconducting quantum circuits. Based on the interactions of the microwave fields with a single Δ-type three-level fluxonium qubit, the coherent population trapping could be obtainable and it is very sensitive to the relative phase and amplitudes of the applied fields. When the relative phase is tuned to 0 or π, the maximal atomic coherence is present and coherent population trapping occurs. While for the choice of π/2, the atomic coherence becomes weak. Meanwhile, for the fixed relative phase π/2, the value of coherence would decrease with the increase of Rabi frequency of the external field coupled with two lower levels. The responsible physical mechanism is quantum interference induced by the control fields, which is indicated in the dressed-state representation. The microwave coherent phenomenon is present in our scheme, which will have potential applications in optical communication and nonlinear optics in solid-state devices. (paper)

  7. Phase-controlled coherent population trapping in superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yi-Ping; Chen, Ai-Xi

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the influences of the-applied-field phases and amplitudes on the coherent population trapping behavior in superconducting quantum circuits. Based on the interactions of the microwave fields with a single Δ-type three-level fluxonium qubit, the coherent population trapping could be obtainable and it is very sensitive to the relative phase and amplitudes of the applied fields. When the relative phase is tuned to 0 or π, the maximal atomic coherence is present and coherent population trapping occurs. While for the choice of π/2, the atomic coherence becomes weak. Meanwhile, for the fixed relative phase π/2, the value of coherence would decrease with the increase of Rabi frequency of the external field coupled with two lower levels. The responsible physical mechanism is quantum interference induced by the control fields, which is indicated in the dressed-state representation. The microwave coherent phenomenon is present in our scheme, which will have potential applications in optical communication and nonlinear optics in solid-state devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11165008 and 11365009), the Foundation of Young Scientist of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20142BCB23011), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Jiangxi Provincial Department of Education (Grant No. GJJ13348).

  8. Quantum Critical Origin of the Superconducting Dome in SrTiO_{3}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Jonathan M; Kedem, Yaron; Aschauer, Ulrich; Spaldin, Nicola A; Balatsky, Alexander V

    2015-12-11

    We expand the well-known notion that quantum criticality can induce superconductivity by proposing a concrete mechanism for superconductivity due to quantum ferroelectric fluctuations. To this end, we investigate the origin of superconductivity in doped SrTiO_{3} using a combination of density functional and strong coupling theories within the framework of quantum criticality. Our density functional calculations of the ferroelectric soft mode frequency as a function of doping reveal a crossover related to quantum paraelectricity at a doping level coincident with the experimentally observed top of the superconducting dome. Thus, we suggest a model in which the soft mode fluctuations provide the pairing interaction for superconductivity carriers. Within our model, the low doping limit of the superconducting dome is explained by the emergence of the Fermi surface, and the high doping limit by departure from the quantum critical regime. We predict that the highest critical temperature will increase and shift to lower carrier doping with increasing ^{18}O isotope substitution, a scenario that is experimentally verifiable. Our model is applicable to other quantum paraelectrics, such as KTaO_{3}.

  9. Quantum Critical Origin of the Superconducting Dome in SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Jonathan M.; Kedem, Yaron; Aschauer, Ulrich; Spaldin, Nicola A.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2015-12-01

    We expand the well-known notion that quantum criticality can induce superconductivity by proposing a concrete mechanism for superconductivity due to quantum ferroelectric fluctuations. To this end, we investigate the origin of superconductivity in doped SrTiO3 using a combination of density functional and strong coupling theories within the framework of quantum criticality. Our density functional calculations of the ferroelectric soft mode frequency as a function of doping reveal a crossover related to quantum paraelectricity at a doping level coincident with the experimentally observed top of the superconducting dome. Thus, we suggest a model in which the soft mode fluctuations provide the pairing interaction for superconductivity carriers. Within our model, the low doping limit of the superconducting dome is explained by the emergence of the Fermi surface, and the high doping limit by departure from the quantum critical regime. We predict that the highest critical temperature will increase and shift to lower carrier doping with increasing 18O isotope substitution, a scenario that is experimentally verifiable. Our model is applicable to other quantum paraelectrics, such as KTaO3 .

  10. A quantum galvanometer with high-energy resolution based on a superconducting interferometer circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtin, P.A.; Makhov, V.I.; Masalov, V.V.; Sretenskii, V.N.; Tyablikov, A.V.; Vasenkov, A.A.

    1985-07-01

    The authors make a comprehensive analysis of principles of constructing measurement systems based on the superconducting quantum interferometer (SQUID) implemented in integrated form. They note trends of promising applications for galvanometric measurement systems. They describe the two types of SQUID, one-junction and two junction. They analyze the processing and formation of superconducting ion chemical signals and structures. And they present their results in a series of charts and diagrams. They conclude that quantum galvanometry using superconducting microcircuits allows one to propose new experimental studies in microelectronics, the techniques of high-precision measurements, and equipment for metrological work.

  11. Quantum crystal growing: adiabatic preparation of a bosonic antiferromagnet in the presence of a parabolic inhomogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Eckardt, André

    2013-01-01

    felt by the two species. Using numerical simulations we predict that a finite parabolic potential can assist the adiabatic preparation of the antiferromagnet. The optimal strength of the parabolic inhomogeneity depends sensitively on the number imbalance between the two species. We also find...

  12. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa. PMID:27922087

  13. Quantum transport in superconducting hybrids : Molecular devices and layered materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Island, J.O.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate superconducting hybrids made from two material systems, namely, molecules and layered materials. For studies of superconducting phenomena in molecular junctions we develop two platforms which rely on the superconducting proximity effect to preserve pre-existing nano-gap

  14. Perturbation theory of a superconducting 0−π impurity quantum phase transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žonda, M.; Pokorný, Vladislav; Janiš, Václav; Novotný, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, Mar (2015), s. 8821 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP204/11/J042 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum dot * superconductivity * Josephson current * quantum phase transition * perturbation expansion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  15. A voltage biased superconducting quantum interference device bootstrap circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Xiaoming; Wang Huiwu; Wang Yongliang; Dong Hui; Jiang Mianheng; Zhang Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I; Offenhaeusser, Andreas; Mueck, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We present a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) readout circuit operating in the voltage bias mode and called a SQUID bootstrap circuit (SBC). The SBC is an alternative implementation of two existing methods for suppression of room-temperature amplifier noise: additional voltage feedback and current feedback. Two circuit branches are connected in parallel. In the dc SQUID branch, an inductively coupled coil connected in series provides the bias current feedback for enhancing the flux-to-current coefficient. The circuit branch parallel to the dc SQUID branch contains an inductively coupled voltage feedback coil with a shunt resistor in series for suppressing the preamplifier noise current by increasing the dynamic resistance. We show that the SBC effectively reduces the preamplifier noise to below the SQUID intrinsic noise. For a helium-cooled planar SQUID magnetometer with a SQUID inductance of 350 pH, a flux noise of about 3 μΦ 0 Hz -1/2 and a magnetic field resolution of less than 3 fT Hz -1/2 were obtained. The SBC leads to a convenient direct readout electronics for a dc SQUID with a wider adjustment tolerance than other feedback schemes.

  16. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  17. Superconductivity mediated by quantum critical antiferromagnetic fluctuations: The rise and fall of hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Schattner, Yoni; Berg, Erez; Fernandes, Rafael M.

    2017-05-01

    In several unconventional superconductors, the highest superconducting transition temperature Tc is found in a region of the phase diagram where the antiferromagnetic transition temperature extrapolates to zero, signaling a putative quantum critical point. The elucidation of the interplay between these two phenomena—high-Tc superconductivity and magnetic quantum criticality—remains an important piece of the complex puzzle of unconventional superconductivity. In this paper, we combine sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo simulations and field-theoretical analytical calculations to unveil the microscopic mechanism responsible for the superconducting instability of a general low-energy model, called the spin-fermion model. In this approach, low-energy electronic states interact with each other via the exchange of quantum critical magnetic fluctuations. We find that even in the regime of moderately strong interactions, both the superconducting transition temperature and the pairing susceptibility are governed not by the properties of the entire Fermi surface, but instead by the properties of small portions of the Fermi surface called hot spots. Moreover, Tc increases with increasing interaction strength, until it starts to saturate at the crossover from hot-spots-dominated to Fermi-surface-dominated pairing. Our work provides not only invaluable insights into the system parameters that most strongly affect Tc, but also important benchmarks to assess the origin of superconductivity in both microscopic models and actual materials.

  18. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  19. Fermion-fermion scattering in quantum field theory with superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, L; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; Egusquiza, I L; Lamata, L; Romero, G; Solano, E

    2015-02-20

    We propose an analog-digital quantum simulation of fermion-fermion scattering mediated by a continuum of bosonic modes within a circuit quantum electrodynamics scenario. This quantum technology naturally provides strong coupling of superconducting qubits with a continuum of electromagnetic modes in an open transmission line. In this way, we propose qubits to efficiently simulate fermionic modes via digital techniques, while we consider the continuum complexity of an open transmission line to simulate the continuum complexity of bosonic modes in quantum field theories. Therefore, we believe that the complexity-simulating-complexity concept should become a leading paradigm in any effort towards scalable quantum simulations.

  20. Non-adiabatic quantized charge pumping with tunable-barrier quantum dots: a review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Bernd; Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs

    2015-10-01

    Precise manipulation of individual charge carriers in nanoelectronic circuits underpins practical applications of their most basic quantum property--the universality and invariance of the elementary charge. A charge pump generates a net current from periodic external modulation of parameters controlling a nanostructure connected to source and drain leads; in the regime of quantized pumping the current varies in steps of [Formula: see text] as function of control parameters, where [Formula: see text] is the electron charge and f is the frequency of modulation. In recent years, robust and accurate quantized charge pumps have been developed based on semiconductor quantum dots with tunable tunnel barriers. These devices allow modulation of charge exchange rates between the dot and the leads over many orders of magnitude and enable trapping of a precise number of electrons far away from equilibrium with the leads. The corresponding non-adiabatic pumping protocols focus on understanding of separate parts of the pumping cycle associated with charge loading, capture and release. In this report we review realizations, models and metrology applications of quantized charge pumps based on tunable-barrier quantum dots.

  1. A Superconducting 180{\\deg} Hybrid Ring Coupler for circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, E.; Deppe, F.; Niemczyk, T.; Wirth, T.; Menzel, E. P.; Wild, G.; Huebl, H.; Mariantoni, M.; Weißl, T.; Lukashenko, A.; Zhuravel, A. P.; Ustinov, A. V.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments with propagating microwaves require devices acting as beam splitters. Using niobium thin films on silicon and sapphire substrates, we fabricated superconducting 180{\\deg} microstrip hybrid ring couplers, acting as beam splitters with center frequencies of about 6GHz. For the magnitude of the coupling and isolation we find -3.5+/-0.5dB and at least -15dB, respectively, in a bandwidth of 2GHz. We also investigate the effect of reflecti...

  2. Microtesla magnetic resonance imaging with a superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, Robert; Lee, SeungKyun; ten Haken, Bennie; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2004-03-15

    We have constructed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner based on a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) configured as a second-derivative gradiometer. The magnetic field sensitivity of the detector is independent of frequency; it is therefore possible to obtain high-resolution images by prepolarizing the nuclear spins in a field of 300 mT and detecting the signal at 132 fYT, corresponding to a proton Larmor frequency of 5.6 kHz. The reduction in the measurement field by a factor of 10,000 compared with conventional scanners eliminates inhomogeneous broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines, even in fields with relatively poor homogeneity. The narrow linewidths result in enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution for a fixed strength of the magnetic field gradients used to encode the image. We present two-dimensional images of phantoms and pepper slices, obtained in typical magnetic field gradients of 100 fYT/m, with a spatial resolution of about 1mm. We further demonstrate a slice-selected image of an intact pepper. By varying the time delay between removal of the polarizing field and initiation of the spin echo sequence we acquire T1-weighted contrast images of water phantoms, some of which are doped with a paramagnetic salt; here, T1 is the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time. The techniques presented here could readily be adapted to existing multichannel SQUID systems used for magnetic source imaging of brain signals. Further potential applications include low-cost systems for tumor screening and imaging peripheral regions of the body.

  3. Universal holonomic quantum gates in decoherence-free subspace on superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Z. D.

    2015-08-01

    To implement a set of universal quantum logic gates based on non-Abelian geometric phases, it is conventional wisdom that quantum systems beyond two levels are required, which is extremely difficult to fulfill for superconducting qubits and appears to be a main reason why only single-qubit gates were implemented in a recent experiment [A. A. Abdumalikov, Jr. et al., Nature (London) 496, 482 (2013), 10.1038/nature12010]. Here we propose to realize nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspace on circuit QED, where one can use only the two levels in transmon qubits, a usual interaction, and a minimal resource for the decoherence-free subspace encoding. In particular, our scheme not only overcomes the difficulties encountered in previous studies but also can still achieve considerably large effective coupling strength, such that high-fidelity quantum gates can be achieved. Therefore, the present scheme makes realizing robust holonomic quantum computation with superconducting circuits very promising.

  4. Hybrid quantum circuit with a superconducting qubit coupled to a spin ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yuimaru; Grezes, Cecile; Dewes, Andreas; Vion, Denis; Isoya, Junichi; Jacques, Vincent; Dreau, Anais; Roch, Jean-Francois; Diniz, Igor; Auffeves, Alexia; Esteve, Daniel; Bertet, Patrice

    2012-02-01

    We report the experimental realization of a hybrid quantum circuit combining a superconducting qubit and an ensemble of electronic spins. The qubit, of the transmon type, is coherently coupled to the spin ensemble consisting of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in a diamond crystal via a frequency-tunable superconducting resonator acting as a quantum bus [1,2]. Using this circuit, we prepare arbitrary superpositions of the qubit states that we store into collective excitations of the spin ensemble and retrieve back later on into the qubit [3]. These results constitute a first proof of concept of spin-ensemble based quantum memory for superconducting qubits.[4pt] [1] Y. Kubo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 140502 (2010).[0pt] [2] Y. Kubo et al., arXiv: 1109.3960.[0pt] [3] Y. Kubo et al., arXiv: 1110.2978.

  5. Cooperative biexciton generation and destructive interference in coupled quantum dots using adiabatic rapid passage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renaud, N.; Grozema, F.C.

    2014-01-01

    We report numerical simulations of biexciton generation in coupled quantum dots (CQDs) placed in a static electric field and excited by a chirped laser pulse. Our simulations explicitly account for exciton-phonon interactions at finite temperature using a non-Markovian quantum jump approach to solve

  6. Adiabatically modeling quantum gates with two-site Heisenberg spins chain: Noise vs interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jipdi, M. N.; Tchoffo, M.; Fai, L. C.

    2018-02-01

    We study the Landau Zener (LZ) dynamics of a two-site Heisenberg spin chain assisted with noise and focus on the implementation of logic gates via the resulting quantum interference. We present the evidence of the quantum interference phenomenon in triplet spin states and confirm that, three-level systems mimic Landau-Zener-Stückelberg (LZS) interferometers with occupancies dependent on the effective phase. It emerges that, the critical parameters tailoring the system are obtained for constructive interferences where the two sets of the chain are found to be maximally entangled. Our findings demonstrate that the enhancement of the magnetic field strength suppresses noise effects; consequently, the noise severely impacts the occurrence of quantum interference for weak magnetic fields while for strong fields, quantum interference subsists and allows the modeling of universal sets of quantum gates.

  7. Quasiparticle transport and induced superconductivity in InAs-AlSb quantum wells with Nb electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroemer, H.; Nguyen, C.; Hu, E.L.; Yuh, E.L.; Thomas, M.; Wong, K.C.

    1994-01-01

    Current transport through InAs-AlSb quantum wells contacted with superconducting Nb electrodes shows strong evidence for the presence of multiple Andreev reflections (AR's). The efficiency of the multiple AR process is greatly enhanced by the specular normal reflection of electrons at the backplane of the quantum well, thereby permitting multiple AR attempts. Superconductivity observed for sufficiently narrow inter-electrode gaps is interpreted as the result of phase-coherent multiple AR's.Series-connected multi-junction InAs-Nb arrays have been constructed by contacting the InAs-AlSb quantum well with a periodic grating of superconducting Nb electrodes with sub-micrometer spacings. They showed superconductivity at sufficiently low temperatures, in one case as high as 4.2 K. Above the transition temperatures, strong precursors of the superconductivity were observed, in the form of dramatically enhanced zero-bias conductances, decreasing with increasing temperature, but larger by about a factor on the order 10 4 than the fluctuation-induced precursors of thin BCS films. Weak magnetic fields restored non-zero resistance values; the increase in resistance with increasing magnetic field contained a component periodic in the magnetic field, with a period corresponding to a flux per grating cell of only a fraction (∼(1)/(5)-(1)/(2)) of a conventional flux quantum. The observations are interpreted in terms of the formation of a flux cell superlattice. ((orig.))

  8. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Helen; Hundt, P. Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  9. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Mortensen, K.

    1988-12-01

    This report contains lecture notes of the basic lectures presented at the 1st Topsoee Summer School on Superconductivity held at Risoe National Laboratory, June 20-24, 1988. The following lecture notes are included: L.M. Falicov: 'Superconductivity: Phenomenology', A. Bohr and O. Ulfbeck: 'Quantal structure of superconductivity. Gauge angle', G. Aeppli: 'Muons, neutrons and superconductivity', N.F. Pedersen: 'The Josephson junction', C. Michel: 'Physicochemistry of high-T c superconductors', C. Laverick and J.K. Hulm: 'Manufacturing and application of superconducting wires', J. Clarke: 'SQUID concepts and systems'. (orig.) With 10 tabs., 128 figs., 219 refs

  10. Conference: Superconductivity, theory and practical challenges of a quantum phenonemon | 25 August | Uni Dufour

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    On Tuesday, 25 August, J. Georg Bednorz (Nobel prize in physics 1987, IBM Research Zurich) and Louis Taillefer (physicist and professor at the University of Sherbrooke, Canada, and at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) will give a conference on the fascinating theme of superconductivity. "Superconductivity: theory and practical challenges of a quantum phenonemon" Uni Dufour Tuesday, 25 August at 7 p.m. This conference is organized by the Faculty of science of the University of Geneva, as part of the International Congress Materials and Mechanisms of Superconductivity (M2S - 2015). Discovered more than 100 years ago, superconductivity remains one of the most fascinating manifestations of the laws of physics, observable only at low temperatures. This phenomenon, which allows the transport of electricity without any loss of energy, leads to various technological applications, for example in magnetically levitated vehicles, in MRI and in ...

  11. Quantum criticality and nodal superconductivity in the FeAs-based superconductor KFe2As2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J K; Zhou, S Y; Guan, T Y; Zhang, H; Dai, Y F; Qiu, X; Wang, X F; He, Y; Chen, X H; Li, S Y

    2010-02-26

    The in-plane resistivity rho and thermal conductivity kappa of the FeAs-based superconductor KFe2As2 single crystal were measured down to 50 mK. We observe non-Fermi-liquid behavior rho(T) approximately T{1.5} at H{c{2}}=5 T, and the development of a Fermi liquid state with rho(T) approximately T{2} when further increasing the field. This suggests a field-induced quantum critical point, occurring at the superconducting upper critical field H{c{2}}. In zero field, there is a large residual linear term kappa{0}/T, and the field dependence of kappa_{0}/T mimics that in d-wave cuprate superconductors. This indicates that the superconducting gaps in KFe2As2 have nodes, likely d-wave symmetry. Such a nodal superconductivity is attributed to the antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations near the quantum critical point.

  12. Fluctuations in a superconducting quantum critical point of multi-band metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramires, A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Campus da Praia Vermelha, Niteroi, RJ, 24.210-340 (Brazil); Continentino, M A, E-mail: mucio@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-03-30

    In multi-band metals quasi-particles arising from different atomic orbitals coexist at a common Fermi surface. Superconductivity in these materials may appear due to interactions within a band (intra-band) or among the distinct metallic bands (inter-band). Here we consider the suppression of superconductivity in the intra-band case due to hybridization. The fluctuations at the superconducting quantum critical point (SQCP) are obtained by calculating the response of the system to a fictitious space- and time-dependent field, which couples to the superconducting order parameter. The appearance of superconductivity is related to the divergence of a generalized susceptibility. For a single-band superconductor this coincides with the Thouless criterion. For fixed chemical potential and large hybridization, the superconducting state has many features in common with breached pair superconductivity with unpaired electrons at the Fermi surface. The T = 0 phase transition from the superconductor to the normal state is in the universality class of the density-driven Bose-Einstein condensation. For a fixed number of particles and in the strong coupling limit, the system still has an instability to the normal state with increasing hybridization.

  13. Multiple quantum phase transitions and superconductivity in Ce-based heavy fermions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Z F; Smidman, M; Jiao, L; Lu, Xin; Yuan, H Q

    2016-09-01

    Heavy fermions have served as prototype examples of strongly-correlated electron systems. The occurrence of unconventional superconductivity in close proximity to the electronic instabilities associated with various degrees of freedom points to an intricate relationship between superconductivity and other electronic states, which is unique but also shares some common features with high temperature superconductivity. The magnetic order in heavy fermion compounds can be continuously suppressed by tuning external parameters to a quantum critical point, and the role of quantum criticality in determining the properties of heavy fermion systems is an important unresolved issue. Here we review the recent progress of studies on Ce based heavy fermion superconductors, with an emphasis on the superconductivity emerging on the edge of magnetic and charge instabilities as well as the quantum phase transitions which occur by tuning different parameters, such as pressure, magnetic field and doping. We discuss systems where multiple quantum critical points occur and whether they can be classified in a unified manner, in particular in terms of the evolution of the Fermi surface topology.

  14. Experimental determination of the quasiparticle decay length ξqp in a diffusive superconducting quantum well

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnée, P.H.C.; Hartog, S.G. den; Wees, B.J. van; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the electronic transport properties of an AlSb/InAs/AlSb quantum well, where part of the AlSb top layer has been replaced with a superconducting Nb strip. By doing a transmission experiment underneath the Nb strip and comparing the results with a model based on

  15. Two-terminal transport along a proximity-induced superconducting quantum Hall edge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamayun, O.; Hutasoit, J.A.; Cheianov, V.V.

    2017-01-01

    We study electric transport along an integer quantum Hall edge where the proximity effect is induced due to a coupling to a superconductor. Such an edge exhibits two Majorana-Weyl fermions with different group velocities set by the induced superconducting pairing. We show that this structure of the

  16. Digital quantum Rabi and Dicke models in superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mezzacapo, A.; Las Heras, U.; Pedernales, J.S.; Di Carlo, L.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2014-01-01

    We propose the analog-digital quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi and Dicke models using circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). We find that all physical regimes, in particular those which are impossible to realize in typical cavity QED setups, can be simulated via unitary decomposition into

  17. Single qudit realization of the Deutsch algorithm using superconducting many-level quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiktenko, E. O.; Fedorov, A. K.; Strakhov, A. A.; Man'ko, V. I.

    2015-07-01

    Design of a large-scale quantum computer has paramount importance for science and technologies. We investigate a scheme for realization of quantum algorithms using noncomposite quantum systems, i.e., systems without subsystems. In this framework, n artificially allocated "subsystems" play a role of qubits in n-qubits quantum algorithms. With focus on two-qubit quantum algorithms, we demonstrate a realization of the universal set of gates using a d = 5 single qudit state. Manipulation with an ancillary level in the systems allows effective implementation of operators from U(4) group via operators from SU(5) group. Using a possible experimental realization of such systems through anharmonic superconducting many-level quantum circuits, we present a blueprint for a single qudit realization of the Deutsch algorithm, which generalizes previously studied realization based on the virtual spin representation (Kessel et al., 2002 [9]).

  18. Strong coupling of a single photon to a superconducting qubit using circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, A; Schuster, D I; Blais, A; Frunzio, L; Huang, R- S; Majer, J; Kumar, S; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2004-09-09

    The interaction of matter and light is one of the fundamental processes occurring in nature, and its most elementary form is realized when a single atom interacts with a single photon. Reaching this regime has been a major focus of research in atomic physics and quantum optics for several decades and has generated the field of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we perform an experiment in which a superconducting two-level system, playing the role of an artificial atom, is coupled to an on-chip cavity consisting of a superconducting transmission line resonator. We show that the strong coupling regime can be attained in a solid-state system, and we experimentally observe the coherent interaction of a superconducting two-level system with a single microwave photon. The concept of circuit quantum electrodynamics opens many new possibilities for studying the strong interaction of light and matter. This system can also be exploited for quantum information processing and quantum communication and may lead to new approaches for single photon generation and detection.

  19. Quantum solid state mechanisms of biological effects of electromagnetic radiation with emphasis on local superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achimowicz, J.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to review quantum solid state mechanisms of nonthermal (specific) bioeffects of nonionizing radiation and to present the author's own hypothesis concerning mechanisms based on biological superconductivity. Classical and quantum mechanisms of bioeffects are compared stressing the necessity of not only considering quantum absorption, transfer, and conversion of radiation energy in biological systems, but also of appropriate systems modeling. The need is stressed for developing quantum models of the biological solid state on the supramolecular level to fill the gap between molecular and cell biology. The supramolecular models of macromolecules and enzyme complexes will be reviewed. The high-temperature superconductivity problem in organic systems will be discussed with stress on the importance of system structure and the excitation quasi-particle (phonon and electron) spectra relationship. New mechanisms of enzymatic activity assuming enzyme-substrate complex electron spectrum instability induced by electron- and phonon-mediated electron-electron interaction are proposed. Since this quantum cooperative phenomenon is the possible origin of specificity and efficiency of enzyme action it is extremely sensitive to system-generated electromagnetic fields, which gives the possibility of enzymatic regulation and also may explain some nonthermal resonant bioeffects. Local superconductivity (coherent electron states) and Josephson effects as the possible mechanisms of bioeffects are discussed.

  20. Spin Ensembles Coupled to Superconducting Resonators: A Scalable Architecture for Solid-State Quantum Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chang-Yong; Li Shao-Hua; Hou Qi-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    A design is proposed for scalable solid-state quantum computing, which is based on collectively enhanced magnetic coupling between nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles and superconducting transmission line resonators interconnected by current-biased Josephson junction superconducting phase qubit. In this hybrid system, we realize distant multi-qubit controlled phase gate operations and generate distant multi-qubit entangled W-like states, being indispensable resource to quantum computation. Our proposed architecture consists of solid-state spin ensembles and circuit QED, and could achieve quantum computing in a solid-state environment with high-fidelity and scalable way. The experimental feasibility is discussed, and the implementation efficiency is demonstrated numerically. (general)

  1. A new quantum interferometer effect in superconducting oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela Flores, J.; Shehata, L.N.

    1987-08-01

    On the basis of a phenomenological approach to type II high T c superconductivity, we suggest that in the lanthanum compounds the Mercereau effect for a coupled junction pair should display and ex-dependent shift in the period of modulation of the tunnelling current. (author). 14 refs

  2. Propagation of superconducting coherence via chiral quantum-Hall edge channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geon-Hyoung; Kim, Minsoo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2017-09-08

    Recently, there has been significant interest in superconducting coherence via chiral quantum-Hall (QH) edge channels at an interface between a two-dimensional normal conductor and a superconductor (N-S) in a strong transverse magnetic field. In the field range where the superconductivity and the QH state coexist, the coherent confinement of electron- and hole-like quasiparticles by the interplay of Andreev reflection and the QH effect leads to the formation of Andreev edge states (AES) along the N-S interface. Here, we report the electrical conductance characteristics via the AES formed in graphene-superconductor hybrid systems in a three-terminal configuration. This measurement configuration, involving the QH edge states outside a graphene-S interface, allows the detection of the longitudinal and QH conductance separately, excluding the bulk contribution. Convincing evidence for the superconducting coherence and its propagation via the chiral QH edge channels is provided by the conductance enhancement on both the upstream and the downstream sides of the superconducting electrode as well as in bias spectroscopy results below the superconducting critical temperature. Propagation of superconducting coherence via QH edge states was more evident as more edge channels participate in the Andreev process for high filling factors with reduced valley-mixing scattering.

  3. Single superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer for arrays of low-temperature sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J. M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M. J.; Richards, P. L.; Skidmore, J. T.

    2001-01-01

    We present the design and experimental evaluation of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer for an array of low-temperature sensors. Each sensor is inductively coupled to a superconducting summing loop which, in turn, is inductively coupled to the readout SQUID. The flux-locked loop of the SQUID is used to null the current in the summing loop and thus cancel crosstalk. The sensors are biased with an alternating current, each with a separate frequency, and the individual sensor signals are separated by lock-in detection at the SQUID output. We have fabricated a prototype 8 channel multiplexer and discuss the application to a larger array

  4. Stabilizer Quantum Error Correction Toolbox for Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Simon E.; Girvin, S. M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a general protocol for stabilizer operator measurements in a system of N superconducting qubits. Using the dispersive coupling between the qubits and the field of a resonator as well as single qubit rotations, we show how to encode the parity of an arbitrary subset of M≤N qubits, onto two quasiorthogonal coherent states of the resonator. Together with a fast cavity readout, this enables the efficient measurement of arbitrary stabilizer operators without locality constraints.

  5. Ising Superconductivity and Quantum Phase Transition in Macro-Size Monolayer NbSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ying; Zhao, Kun; Shan, Pujia; Zheng, Feipeng; Zhang, Yangwei; Fu, Hailong; Liu, Yi; Tian, Mingliang; Xi, Chuanying; Liu, Haiwen; Feng, Ji; Lin, Xi; Ji, Shuaihua; Chen, Xi; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Jian

    2017-11-08

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have a range of unique physics properties and could be used in the development of electronics, photonics, spintronics, and quantum computing devices. The mechanical exfoliation technique of microsize TMD flakes has attracted particular interest due to its simplicity and cost effectiveness. However, for most applications, large-area and high-quality films are preferred. Furthermore, when the thickness of crystalline films is down to the 2D limit (monolayer), exotic properties can be expected due to the quantum confinement and symmetry breaking. In this paper, we have successfully prepared macro-size atomically flat monolayer NbSe 2 films on bilayer graphene terminated surface of 6H-SiC(0001) substrates by a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) method. The films exhibit an onset superconducting critical transition temperature (T c onset ) above 6 K and the zero resistance superconducting critical transition temperature (T c zero ) up to 2.40 K. Simultaneously, the transport measurements at high magnetic fields and low temperatures reveal that the parallel characteristic field B c// (T = 0) is above 5 times of the paramagnetic limiting field, consistent with Zeeman-protected Ising superconductivity mechanism. Besides, by ultralow temperature electrical transport measurements, the monolayer NbSe 2 film shows the signature of quantum Griffiths singularity (QGS) when approaching the zero-temperature quantum critical point.

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  7. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems

  8. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  9. Direct observation of quantum superconducting fluctuations across the 2D superconductor-insulator transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armitage, N.P.; Crane, R.W.; Sambandamurthy, G.; Johansson, A.; Shahar, D.; Zaretskey, V.; Gruener, G.

    2008-01-01

    We review our recent measurements of the complex AC conductivity of thin InO x films studied as a function of magnetic field through the nominal 2D superconductor-insulator transition. These measurements-the first to probe anything other than the ω=0 response of these archetypical systems-reveal a significant finite frequency superfluid stiffness well into the insulating regime. Unlike conventional fluctuation superconductivity in which thermal fluctuations can give a superconducting response in regions of parameter space that do not exhibit long range order, these fluctuations are temperature independent as T→0 and are exhibited in samples where the resistance is large (greater than 10 6 Ω/□) and strongly diverging. We interpret this as the first direct observation of quantum superconducting fluctuations around an insulating ground state. This system serves as a prototype for other insulating states of matter that derive from superconductors

  10. Quantum phase transition in a multiconnected superconducting Jaynes-Cummings lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kangjun; Tian, Lin

    2015-05-01

    The connectivity and tunability of superconducting qubits and resonators provide us with an appealing platform to study the many-body physics of microwave excitations. Here we present a multiconnected Jaynes-Cummings lattice model which is symmetric with respect to the nonlocal qubit-resonator couplings. Our calculation shows that this model exhibits a Mott insulator-superfluid-Mott insulator phase transition at commensurate fillings, featured by symmetric quantum critical points. Phase diagrams in the grand canonical ensemble are also derived, which confirm the incompressibility of the Mott insulator phase. Different from a general-purposed quantum computer, it only requires two operations to demonstrate this phase transition: the preparation and the detection of commensurate many-body ground state. We discuss the realization of these operations in a superconducting circuit.

  11. Automatic adjustment of bias current for direct current superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makie-Fukuda, K.; Hotta, M.; Okajima, K.; Kado, H.

    1993-01-01

    A new method of adjusting the bias current of dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is described. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratio of a SQUID magnetometer connected in a flux-locked loop configuration is proportional to the second harmonic of the output signal from the SQUID. A circuit configuration that can automatically optimize a SQUID's bias current by measuring this second harmonic and adjusting the bias current accordingly is proposed

  12. Microstrip superconducting quantum interference device radio-frequency amplifier: Scattering parameters and input coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinion, D; Clarke, J

    2008-01-24

    The scattering parameters of an amplifier based on a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) are directly measured at 4.2 K. The results can be described using an equivalent circuit model of the fundamental resonance of the microstrip resonator which forms the input of the amplifier. The circuit model is used to determine the series capacitance required for critical coupling of the microstrip to the input circuit.

  13. Normal metal tunnel junction-based superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor: the N-SQUIPT

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ambrosio, S.; Meissner, M.; Blanc, C.; Ronzani, A.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of an alternative design for a superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor (SQUIPT) based on a normal metal (N) probe. The absence of direct Josephson coupling between the proximized metal nanowire and the N probe allows us to observe the full modulation of the wire density of states around zero voltage and current \\textit{via} the application of an external magnetic field. This results into a drastic suppression of power dissipatio...

  14. Superconducting Qubit with Integrated Single Flux Quantum Controller Part I: Theory and Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Matthew; Leonard, Edward, Jr.; Thorbeck, Ted; Zhu, Shaojiang; Howington, Caleb; Nelson, Jj; Plourde, Britton; McDermott, Robert

    As the size of quantum processors grow, so do the classical control requirements. The single flux quantum (SFQ) Josephson digital logic family offers an attractive route to proximal classical control of multi-qubit processors. Here we describe coherent control of qubits via trains of SFQ pulses. We discuss the fabrication of an SFQ-based pulse generator and a superconducting transmon qubit on a single chip. Sources of excess microwave loss stemming from the complex multilayer fabrication of the SFQ circuit are discussed. We show how to mitigate this loss through judicious choice of process workflow and appropriate use of sacrificial protection layers. Present address: IBM T.J. Watson Research Center.

  15. Superconducting Qubit with Integrated Single Flux Quantum Controller Part II: Experimental Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Edward, Jr.; Beck, Matthew; Thorbeck, Ted; Zhu, Shaojiang; Howington, Caleb; Nelson, Jj; Plourde, Britton; McDermott, Robert

    We describe the characterization of a single flux quantum (SFQ) pulse generator cofabricated with a superconducting quantum circuit on a single chip. Resonant trains of SFQ pulses are used to induce coherent qubit rotations on the Bloch sphere. We describe the SFQ drive characteristics of the qubit at the fundamental transition frequency and at subharmonics (ω01 / n , n = 2 , 3 , 4 , ⋯). We address the issue of quasiparticle poisoning due to the proximal SFQ pulse generator, and we characterize the fidelity of SFQ-based rotations using randomized benchmarking. Present address: IBM T.J. Watson Research Center.

  16. Superconducting quantum interference device microscopy of fluxoids in superconducting rings and artificially layered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirtley, J R; Tsuei, C C; Tafuri, F; Medaglia, P G; Orgiani, P; Balestrino, G

    2004-01-01

    The SQUID microscope has the advantages of excellent field sensitivity, small interaction between the sensor and the sample, and a linear, easily calibrated response. It has the disadvantages of modest spatial resolution and the requirement of a cooled sensor. In this paper we will present results from two applications of the SQUID microscope, chosen with these advantages and disadvantages in mind. First, we have found that the distribution of final fluxoid states of quenched superconducting rings can be accounted for by using a mechanism of the freeze-out of thermally activated fluxoids. This mechanism is complementary to one proposed by Kibble and Zurek in connection with tests of models of the generation of topological singularities in the early development of the universe, and which relies only on causality to produce a freeze-out of the order of parameter fluctuations. Second, we have studied Pearl vortices in [BaCuO x ] n /[CaCuO 2 ] m (CBCO) artificial superlattice structures, with as few as three superconducting CuO 2 layers. The Pearl penetration depths of vortices trapped in these films, which should be inversely proportional to the areal superfluid density, are very long (up to ∼1 mm), as expected. In both cases it would be difficult to image fluxoids that generate such weak magnetic fields using any other technique

  17. Realization of three-qubit quantum error correction with superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M D; DiCarlo, L; Nigg, S E; Sun, L; Frunzio, L; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2012-02-01

    Quantum computers could be used to solve certain problems exponentially faster than classical computers, but are challenging to build because of their increased susceptibility to errors. However, it is possible to detect and correct errors without destroying coherence, by using quantum error correcting codes. The simplest of these are three-quantum-bit (three-qubit) codes, which map a one-qubit state to an entangled three-qubit state; they can correct any single phase-flip or bit-flip error on one of the three qubits, depending on the code used. Here we demonstrate such phase- and bit-flip error correcting codes in a superconducting circuit. We encode a quantum state, induce errors on the qubits and decode the error syndrome--a quantum state indicating which error has occurred--by reversing the encoding process. This syndrome is then used as the input to a three-qubit gate that corrects the primary qubit if it was flipped. As the code can recover from a single error on any qubit, the fidelity of this process should decrease only quadratically with error probability. We implement the correcting three-qubit gate (known as a conditional-conditional NOT, or Toffoli, gate) in 63 nanoseconds, using an interaction with the third excited state of a single qubit. We find 85 ± 1 per cent fidelity to the expected classical action of this gate, and 78 ± 1 per cent fidelity to the ideal quantum process matrix. Using this gate, we perform a single pass of both quantum bit- and phase-flip error correction and demonstrate the predicted first-order insensitivity to errors. Concatenation of these two codes in a nine-qubit device would correct arbitrary single-qubit errors. In combination with recent advances in superconducting qubit coherence times, this could lead to scalable quantum technology.

  18. Adiabatic Theorem without a Gap Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avron, J.E.; Elgar, A.

    1999-01-01

    We prove the adiabatic theorem for quantum evolution without the traditional gap condition. All that this adiabatic theorem needs is a (piecewise) twice differentiable finite dimensional spectral projection. The result implies that the adiabatic theorem holds for the ground state of atoms in quantized radiation field. She general result we prove gives no information on the rate at which the adiabatic limit is approached. With additional spectral information one can also estimate this rate

  19. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  20. Superluminal pulse propagation and amplification without inversion of microwave radiation via four-wave mixing in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini Sabegh, Z; Vafafard, A; Maleki, M A; Mahmoudi, M

    2015-01-01

    We study the interaction of the microwave fields with an array of superconducting phase quantum circuits. It is shown that the different four-level configurations i.e. cascade, N-type, diamond, Y-type and inverted Y-type systems can be obtained in the superconducting phase quantum circuits by keeping the third order of the Josephson junction potential expansion whereas by dropping the third order term, just the cascade configuration can be established. We study the propagation and amplification of a microwave field in a four-level cascade quantum system, which is realized in an array of superconducting phase quantum circuits. We find that by increasing the microwave pump tones feeding the system, the normal dispersion switches to the anomalous and the gain-assisted superluminal microwave propagation is obtained in an array of many superconducting phase quantum circuits. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the stimulated microwave field is generated via four-wave mixing without any inversion population in the energy levels of the system (amplification without inversion) and the group velocity of the generated pulse can be controlled by the external oscillating magnetic fluxes. We also show that in some special set of parameters, the absorption-free superluminal generated microwave propagation is obtained in superconducting phase quantum circuit system. (letter)

  1. As-grown carbon nanotube quantum dots with superconducting contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Nau, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The progress in fabrication technology and the miniaturization of nanostructured devices in the recent past has attracted a lot of interest in the field of electronic circuits on the nanoscale where the system's spatial dimensions allow for the investigation of quantum phenomena. Since their first identification by S. Iijima in 1991, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been implemented in electronic junctions making use of their extraordinary electronic and mechanical properties. The investigation o...

  2. A twofold quantum delayed-choice experiment in a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Roy, Tanay; Kundu, Suman; Chand, Madhavi; Ranadive, Arpit; Vijay, Rajamani; Song, Yipu; Duan, Luming; Sun, Luyan

    2017-05-01

    Wave-particle complementarity lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. To illustrate this mysterious feature, Wheeler proposed the delayed-choice experiment, where a quantum system manifests the wave- or particle-like attribute, depending on the experimental arrangement, which is made after the system has entered the interferometer. In recent quantum delayed-choice experiments, these two complementary behaviors were simultaneously observed with a quantum interferometer in a superposition of being closed and open. We suggest and implement a conceptually different quantum delayed-choice experiment by introducing a which-path detector (WPD) that can simultaneously record and neglect the system's path information, but where the interferometer itself is classical. Our experiment is realized with a superconducting circuit, where a cavity acts as the WPD for an interfering qubit. Using this setup, we implement the first twofold delayed-choice experiment, which demonstrates that the system's behavior depends not only on the measuring device's configuration that can be chosen even after the system has been detected but also on whether we a posteriori erase or mark the which-path information, the latter of which cannot be revealed by previous quantum delayed-choice experiments. Our results represent the first demonstration of both counterintuitive features with the same experimental setup, significantly extending the concept of quantum delayed-choice experiment.

  3. Demonstration of two-qubit algorithms with a superconducting quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, L; Chow, J M; Gambetta, J M; Bishop, Lev S; Johnson, B R; Schuster, D I; Majer, J; Blais, A; Frunzio, L; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2009-07-09

    Quantum computers, which harness the superposition and entanglement of physical states, could outperform their classical counterparts in solving problems with technological impact-such as factoring large numbers and searching databases. A quantum processor executes algorithms by applying a programmable sequence of gates to an initialized register of qubits, which coherently evolves into a final state containing the result of the computation. Building a quantum processor is challenging because of the need to meet simultaneously requirements that are in conflict: state preparation, long coherence times, universal gate operations and qubit readout. Processors based on a few qubits have been demonstrated using nuclear magnetic resonance, cold ion trap and optical systems, but a solid-state realization has remained an outstanding challenge. Here we demonstrate a two-qubit superconducting processor and the implementation of the Grover search and Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithms. We use a two-qubit interaction, tunable in strength by two orders of magnitude on nanosecond timescales, which is mediated by a cavity bus in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. This interaction allows the generation of highly entangled states with concurrence up to 94 per cent. Although this processor constitutes an important step in quantum computing with integrated circuits, continuing efforts to increase qubit coherence times, gate performance and register size will be required to fulfil the promise of a scalable technology.

  4. Superconductive quantum interference magnetometer with high sensitivity achieved by an induced resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vettoliere, A.; Granata, C., E-mail: c.granata@cib.na.cnr.it [Istituto di Cibernetica “E. Caianiello” del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    A fully integrated low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in a magnetometer configuration is presented. An intrinsic high voltage responsivity as high as 500 μV/Φ{sub 0} has been obtained by introducing a resonance in the voltage – magnetic flux characteristic. This resonance is induced by an integrated superconducting coil surrounding the pick-up coil and connected to one end of the SQUID output. The SQUID magnetometer exhibits a spectral density of magnetic field noise as low as 3 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. In order to verify the suitability of the magnetometer, measurements of bandwidth and slew rate have been performed and compared with those of the same device without the resonance and with additional positive feedback. Due to their good characteristics such devices can be employed in a large number of applications including biomagnetism.

  5. Superconductive quantum interference magnetometer with high sensitivity achieved by an induced resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoliere, A.; Granata, C.

    2014-08-01

    A fully integrated low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in a magnetometer configuration is presented. An intrinsic high voltage responsivity as high as 500 μV/Φ0 has been obtained by introducing a resonance in the voltage - magnetic flux characteristic. This resonance is induced by an integrated superconducting coil surrounding the pick-up coil and connected to one end of the SQUID output. The SQUID magnetometer exhibits a spectral density of magnetic field noise as low as 3 fT/Hz1/2. In order to verify the suitability of the magnetometer, measurements of bandwidth and slew rate have been performed and compared with those of the same device without the resonance and with additional positive feedback. Due to their good characteristics such devices can be employed in a large number of applications including biomagnetism.

  6. Realization and Modeling of Metamaterials Made of rf Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trepanier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have prepared meta-atoms based on radio-frequency superconducting quantum-interference devices (rf SQUIDs and examined their tunability with dc magnetic field, rf current, and temperature. rf SQUIDs are superconducting split-ring resonators in which the usual capacitance is supplemented with a Josephson junction, which introduces strong nonlinearity in the rf properties. We find excellent agreement between the data and a model that regards the Josephson junction as the resistively and capacitively shunted junction. A magnetic field tunability of 80  THz/G at 12 GHz is observed, a total tunability of 56% is achieved, and a unique electromagnetically induced transparency feature at intermediate excitation powers is demonstrated for the first time. An rf SQUID metamaterial is shown to have qualitatively the same behavior as a single rf SQUID with regard to dc flux and temperature tuning.

  7. Scalable Quantum Circuit and Control for a Superconducting Surface Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, R.; Poletto, S.; Khammassi, N.; Tarasinski, B.; Haider, N.; Michalak, D. J.; Bruno, A.; Bertels, K.; DiCarlo, L.

    2017-09-01

    We present a scalable scheme for executing the error-correction cycle of a monolithic surface-code fabric composed of fast-flux-tunable transmon qubits with nearest-neighbor coupling. An eight-qubit unit cell forms the basis for repeating both the quantum hardware and coherent control, enabling spatial multiplexing. This control uses three fixed frequencies for all single-qubit gates and a unique frequency-detuning pattern for each qubit in the cell. By pipelining the interaction and readout steps of ancilla-based X - and Z -type stabilizer measurements, we can engineer detuning patterns that avoid all second-order transmon-transmon interactions except those exploited in controlled-phase gates, regardless of fabric size. Our scheme is applicable to defect-based and planar logical qubits, including lattice surgery.

  8. Rabi model as a quantum coherent heat engine: From quantum biology to superconducting circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Ferdi; Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a multilevel quantum heat engine with a working medium described by a generalized Rabi model which consists of a two-level system coupled to a single-mode bosonic field. The model is constructed to be a continuum limit of a quantum biological description of light-harvesting complexes so that it can amplify quantum coherence by a mechanism which is a quantum analog of classical Huygens clocks. The engine operates in a quantum Otto cycle where the working medium is coupled to classic...

  9. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    During 2007, a large amount of the work was centred on the ITER project and related tasks. The activities based on low-temperature superconducting (LTS) materials included the manufacture and qualification of ITER full-size conductors under relevant operating conditions, the design of conductors and magnets for the JT-60SA tokamak and the manufacture of the conductors for the European dipole facility. A preliminary study was also performed to develop a new test facility at ENEA in order to test long-length ITER or DEMO full-size conductors. Several studies on different superconducting materials were also started to create a more complete database of superconductor properties, and also for use in magnet design. In this context, an extensive measurement campaign on transport and magnetic properties was carried out on commercially available NbTi strands. Work was started on characterising MgB 2 wire and bulk samples to optimise their performance. In addition, an intense experimental study was started to clarify the effect of mechanical loads on the transport properties of multi-filamentary Nb 3 Sn strands with twisted or untwisted superconducting filaments. The experimental activity on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials was mainly focussed on the development and characterisation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-X (YBCO) based coated conductors. Several characteristics regarding YBCO deposition, current transport performance and tape manufacture were investigated. In the framework of chemical approaches for YBCO film growth, a new method, developed in collaboration with the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca (TUCN), Romania, was studied to obtain YBCO film via chemical solution deposition, which modifies the well-assessed metallic organic deposition trifluoroacetate (MOD-TFA) approach. The results are promising in terms of critical current and film thickness values. YBCO properties in films with artificially added pinning sites were characterised in collaboration with

  10. Rotation gate for a three-level superconducting quantum interference device qubit with resonant interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.-P.; Han Siyuan

    2006-01-01

    We show a way to realize an arbitrary rotation gate in a three-level superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubit using resonant interaction. In this approach, the two logical states of the qubit are represented by the two lowest levels of the SQUID and a higher-energy intermediate level is utilized for the gate manipulation. By considering spontaneous decay from the intermediate level during the gate operation, we present a formula for calculating average fidelity over all possible initial states. Finally, based on realistic system parameters, we show that an arbitrary rotation gate can be achieved with a high fidelity in a SQUID

  11. Charge Kondo effect in negative-U quantum dots with superconducting electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tie-Feng; Guo, Ai-Min; Lu, Han-Tao; Luo, Hong-Gang; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2017-08-01

    Recent experimental realization of superconducting quantum dot devices with intradot attraction U [Nature (London) 521, 196 (2015), 10.1038/nature14398; Phys. Rev. X 6, 041042 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.041042] offers unique opportunities to study the charge Kondo effect in a superconducting environment. In such devices pseudospin flips are caused by two tunneling processes. One is the cotunneling of normal electrons which generates near-gap Kondo resonances in the single-electron spectral density. This negative-U charge Kondo effect is more robust than the conventional spin Kondo effect against the suppression by the superconductivity. The other tunneling is the mean-field Cooper-pair tunneling which produces a zero-energy bound state in the pair spectral density. Interesting crossover physics from the strongly-correlated Kondo screening to the mean-field polarization of local pseudospin is demonstrated. Due to the interplay of these two tunnelings, the supercurrent is suppressed for intermediate couplings, but it can increase to the unitary limits both in the strong and weak coupling regimes. We obtain the magnetic field-dependent supercurrent which is consistent with the key experimental findings.

  12. Systematics of adiabatic modes: flat universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajer, E.; Jazayeri, S.

    2018-03-01

    Adiabatic modes are cosmological perturbations that are locally indistinguishable from a (large) change of coordinates. At the classical level, they provide model independent solutions. At the quantum level, they lead to soft theorems for cosmological correlators. We present a systematic derivation of adiabatic modes in spatially-flat cosmological backgrounds with asymptotically-perfect fluids. We find several new adiabatic modes including vector, time-dependent tensor and time-dependent scalar modes. The new vector and tensor modes decay with time in standard cosmologies but are the leading modes in contracting universes. We present a preliminary derivation of the related soft theorems. In passing, we discuss a distinction between classical and quantum adiabatic modes, we clarify the subtle nature of Weinberg's second adiabatic mode and point out that the adiabatic nature of a perturbation is a gauge dependent statement.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL-DETERMINATION OF THE QUASI-PARTICLE DECAY LENGTH XI(QP) IN A DIFFUSIVE SUPERCONDUCTING QUANTUM-WELL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnee, P.H.C.; den Hartog, S.G.; Wees, B.J.van; Klapwijk, T.M

    1995-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the electronic transport properties of an AlSb/InAs/AlSb quantum well, where part of the AlSb top layer has been replaced with a superconducting Nb strip. By doing a transmission experiment underneath the Nb strip and comparing the results with a model based on

  14. Normal-state conductance used to probe superconducting tunnel junctions for quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaparro, Carlos; Bavier, Richard; Kim, Yong-Seung; Kim, Eunyoung; Oh, Seongshik; Kline, Jeffrey S; Pappas, David P

    2010-01-01

    Here we report normal-state conductance measurements of three different types of superconducting tunnel junctions that are being used or proposed for quantum computing applications: p-Al/a-AlO/p-Al, e-Re/e-AlO/p-Al, and e-V/e-MgO/p-V, where p stands for polycrystalline, e for epitaxial, and a for amorphous. All three junctions exhibited significant deviations from the parabolic behavior predicted by the WKB approximation models. In the p-Al/a-AlO/p-Al junction, we observed enhancement of tunneling conductances at voltages matching harmonics of Al-O stretching modes. On the other hand, such Al-O vibration modes were missing in the epitaxial e-Re/e-AlO/p-Al junction. This suggests that absence or existence of the Al-O stretching mode might be related to the crystallinity of the AlO tunnel barrier and the interface between the electrode and the barrier. In the e-V/e-MgO/p-V junction, which is one of the candidate systems for future superconducting qubits, we observed suppression of the density of states at zero bias. This implies that the interface is electronically disordered, presumably due to oxidation of the vanadium surface underneath the MgO barrier, even if the interface was structurally well ordered, suggesting that the e-V/e-MgO/p-V junction will not be suitable for qubit applications in its present form. This also demonstrates that the normal-state conductance measurement can be effectively used to screen out low quality samples in the search for better superconducting tunnel junctions.

  15. Normal metal tunnel junction-based superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ambrosio, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.dambrosio@nano.cnr.it; Meissner, Martin; Blanc, Christophe; Ronzani, Alberto; Giazotto, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.giazotto@sns.it [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-09-14

    We report the fabrication and characterization of an alternative design for a superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor (SQUIPT) based on a normal metal (N) probe. The absence of direct Josephson coupling between the proximized metal nanowire and the N probe allows us to observe the full modulation of the wire density of states around zero voltage and current via the application of an external magnetic field. This results into a drastic suppression of power dissipation which can be as low as a few ∼10{sup −17} W. In this context, the interferometer allows an improvement of up to four orders of magnitude with respect to earlier SQUIPT designs and makes it ideal for extra-low power cryogenic applications. In addition, the N-SQUIPT has been recently predicted to be the enabling candidate for the implementation of coherent caloritronic devices based on proximity effect.

  16. Experimental validation of superconducting quantum interference device sensors for electromagnetic scattering in geologic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.; Ruminer, P. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has supported the collaborative development with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) of two critical components for a hand-held low-field magnetic sensor based on superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensor technology. The two components are a digital signal processing (DSP) algorithm for background noise rejection and a small hand-held dewar cooled by a cryocooler. A hand-held sensor has been designed and fabricated for detection of extremely weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments. The sensor is capable of measuring weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments and has multiple applications. We have chosen to pursue battlefield medicine as the highest probability near-term application because of stated needs of several agencies.

  17. Normal metal tunnel junction-based superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Meissner, Martin; Blanc, Christophe; Ronzani, Alberto; Giazotto, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of an alternative design for a superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor (SQUIPT) based on a normal metal (N) probe. The absence of direct Josephson coupling between the proximized metal nanowire and the N probe allows us to observe the full modulation of the wire density of states around zero voltage and current via the application of an external magnetic field. This results into a drastic suppression of power dissipation which can be as low as a few ˜10-17 W. In this context, the interferometer allows an improvement of up to four orders of magnitude with respect to earlier SQUIPT designs and makes it ideal for extra-low power cryogenic applications. In addition, the N-SQUIPT has been recently predicted to be the enabling candidate for the implementation of coherent caloritronic devices based on proximity effect.

  18. Quadripartite entanglement of microwave photons from separated resonators via concurrent parametric interactions in superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wen-Xue; Cheng, Guang-Ling; Chen, Ai-Xi

    2014-06-01

    We present an alternative scheme for generating quadripartite continuous variable entanglement using the dispersion interactions of four separated resonators with a single driven superconducting qubit. We show that the cluster and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states of four output microwave photons can be created at the presence of quantum relaxations. The physical mechanism is proposed in the dressed-state representation of driving interaction. With the proper choice of the physical parameters, the concurrent parametric down-conversion interactions occur among four microwave modes, which are responsible for the four-mode entanglement generation. In practice, our scheme provides a useful approach for the scalable information processing in the solid-state system.

  19. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu; Falferi, P. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  20. Flux-bias stabilization scheme for a radio-frequency amplifier based on a superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueck, Michael; Clarke, John

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic flux stabilization scheme involving a low-frequency flux-locked loop has been developed to regulate the gain of a radio-frequency amplifier based on a superconducting quantum inteference device (SQUID). The flux-locked loop largely eliminates drifts in the gain arising from drifts in the flux bias. Tests on a microstrip SQUID amplifier operating at 777 MHz inside a superconducting shield show that the peak-to-peak drift in the gain is no more than 0.3 dB/day

  1. Quantum cascade laser spectroscopy of OCS isotopologues in 4He nanodroplets: A test of adiabatic following for a heavy rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Ty; Miller, Isaac; Raston, Paul L.

    2018-01-01

    We report high-resolution infrared spectra of OCS isotopologues embedded in helium nanodroplets that were recorded with a newly built spectrometer. For the normal isotopologue, we observed the relatively weak third bending overtone band, in addition to new high J transitions in the C-O stretching fundamental, which has previously been investigated by diode laser spectroscopy [S. Grebenev et al., J. Chem. Phys. 112, 4485 (2000)]. Similar to the gas phase, the overtone band is (only) 45 cm-1 higher in energy than the fundamental, and this leads to additional broadening due to rapid vibrational relaxation that is accompanied by the creation of real/virtual phonon excitations. We also observed spectra in the C-O stretching fundamental for several minor isotopologues of OCS, including 18OCS, O13CS, and OC33S, in addition to some new peaks for OC34S. A rovibrational analysis allowed for determination of the moment of inertia of helium (ΔIHe) that couples to the rotation of OCS for each isotopologue. In the context of the adiabatic following approximation, the helium density structure that follows the rotation of OCS should essentially remain unchanged between the isotopologues, i.e., there should be no dependence of ΔIHe on the gas phase moment of inertia of OCS (IG). While this behavior was expected for the "heavy" OCS rotor investigated here, we instead found an approximately linear 1:1 relation between ΔIHe and IG, which suggests partial breakdown of the adiabatic following approximation, making OCS the heaviest molecule for which evidence for this effect has been obtained.

  2. Characterization of a fabrication process for the integration of superconducting qubits and rapid-single-flux-quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Groenberg, Leif; Carelli, Pasquale; Chiarello, Fabio; Cosmelli, Carlo; Leoni, Roberto; Poletto, Stefano; Torrioli, Guido; Hassel, Juha; Helistoe, Panu

    2006-01-01

    In order to integrate superconducting qubits with rapid-single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) control circuitry, it is necessary to develop a fabrication process that simultaneously fulfils the requirements of both elements: low critical current density, very low operating temperature (tens of millikelvin) and reduced dissipation on the qubit side; high operation frequency, large stability margins, low dissipated power on the RSFQ side. For this purpose, VTT has developed a fabrication process based on Nb trilayer technology, which allows the on-chip integration of superconducting qubits and RSFQ circuits even at very low temperature. Here we present the characterization (at 4.2 K) of the process from the point of view of the Josephson devices and show that they are suitable to build integrated superconducting qubits

  3. Theory of high-T sub c superconductivity based on the fermion-condensation quantum phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Amusia, M Ya; Shaginyan, V R

    2001-01-01

    A theory of high temperature superconductivity based on the combination of the fermion-condensation quantum phase transition and the conventional theory of superconductivity is presented. This theory describes maximum values of the superconducting gap which can be as big as DELTA sub 1 approx 0.1 epsilon sub F , with epsilon sub F being the Fermi level. It is shown that the critical temperature 2T sub c approx = DELTA sub 1. If there exists the pseudogap above T sub c then 2T* approx = DELTA sub 1 , and T* is the temperature at which the pseudogap vanished. A discontinuity in the specific heat at T sub c is calculated. The transition from conventional superconductors to high-T sub c ones as a function of the doping level is investigated

  4. Extending the lifetime of a quantum bit with error correction in superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Nissim; Petrenko, Andrei; Heeres, Reinier; Reinhold, Philip; Leghtas, Zaki; Vlastakis, Brian; Liu, Yehan; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, S. M.; Jiang, L.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum error correction (QEC) can overcome the errors experienced by qubits and is therefore an essential component of a future quantum computer. To implement QEC, a qubit is redundantly encoded in a higher-dimensional space using quantum states with carefully tailored symmetry properties. Projective measurements of these parity-type observables provide error syndrome information, with which errors can be corrected via simple operations. The ‘break-even’ point of QEC—at which the lifetime of a qubit exceeds the lifetime of the constituents of the system—has so far remained out of reach. Although previous works have demonstrated elements of QEC, they primarily illustrate the signatures or scaling properties of QEC codes rather than test the capacity of the system to preserve a qubit over time. Here we demonstrate a QEC system that reaches the break-even point by suppressing the natural errors due to energy loss for a qubit logically encoded in superpositions of Schrödinger-cat states of a superconducting resonator. We implement a full QEC protocol by using real-time feedback to encode, monitor naturally occurring errors, decode and correct. As measured by full process tomography, without any post-selection, the corrected qubit lifetime is 320 microseconds, which is longer than the lifetime of any of the parts of the system: 20 times longer than the lifetime of the transmon, about 2.2 times longer than the lifetime of an uncorrected logical encoding and about 1.1 longer than the lifetime of the best physical qubit (the |0>f and |1>f Fock states of the resonator). Our results illustrate the benefit of using hardware-efficient qubit encodings rather than traditional QEC schemes. Furthermore, they advance the field of experimental error correction from confirming basic concepts to exploring the metrics that drive system performance and the challenges in realizing a fault-tolerant system.

  5. Superconductivity in thallium double atomic layer and transition into an insulating phase intermediated by a quantum metal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinokura, S.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Gruznev, D. V.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.; Hasegawa, S.

    2017-06-01

    We report on the first observation of superconductivity in a double atomic layer of Tl on Si(1 1 1) using in situ electrical resistivity measurements in ultrahigh vacuum. The structure of the Tl bilayer was characterized by a set of techniques, including scanning tunneling microscopy, electron diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy, which confirmed the metastability and metallic nature of the Tl bilayer. The epitaxial growth of atomically thin ‘soft’ metallic film over the entire surface of substrate enabled us to find a macroscopic superconducting transition at 0.96 K, accompanied by thermal and quantum fluctuations of order parameter. The system also demonstrates a perpendicular-magnetic-field-induced superconductor-insulator transition, together with an intermediate metallic state. We have found that the magnetoresitivity at the lowest temperature is consistent with the Bose metal picture, which is a consequence of strong quantum fluctuations.

  6. Superconductivity revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    While the macroscopic phenomenon of superconductivity is well known and in practical use worldwide in many industries, including MRIs in medical diagnostics, the current theoretical paradigm for superconductivity (BCS theory) suffers from a number of limitations, not the least of which is an adequate explanation of high temperature superconductivity. This book reviews the current theory and its limitations and suggests new ideas and approaches in addressing these issues. The central objective of the book is to develop a new, coherent, understandable theory of superconductivity directly based on molecular quantum mechanics.

  7. An ultralow noise current amplifier based on superconducting quantum interference device for high sensitivity applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, C; Vettoliere, A; Russo, M

    2011-01-01

    An integrated ultrahigh sensitive current amplifier based on a niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed. The sensor design is based on a multiturn signal coil coupled to a suitable SQUID magnetometer. The signal coil consists of 60 square niobium turns tightly coupled to a superconducting flux transformer of a SQUID magnetometer. The primary coil (pick-up coil) of the flux transformer has been suitably designed in order to accommodate the multiturn input coil. It has a side length of 10 mm and a width of 2.4 mm. In such a way we have obtained a signal current to magnetic flux transfer coefficient (current sensitivity) as low as 62 nA∕Φ(0). The sensor has been characterized in liquid helium by using a direct coupling low noise readout electronic and a standard modulated electronic in flux locked loop configuration for the noise measurements. Beside the circuit complexity, the sensor has exhibited a smooth and free resonance voltage-flux characteristic guaranteeing a reliable and a stable working operation. Considering a SQUID magnetic flux noise of S(Φ)(1∕2) = 1.8 μΦ(0)∕Hz(1∕2) at T = 4.2 K, a current noise as low as 110 fA∕Hz(1∕2) is obtained. Such a value is about a factor two less than the noise of other SQUIDs of the same category. As an application, Nyquist noise measurements of integrated test resistors using the current sensing noise thermometer technique are reported. Due to its high performance such a sensor can be employed in all applications requiring an extremely current sensitivity like the readout of the gravitational wave detectors and the current sensing noise thermometry.

  8. Anomalous properties and coexistence of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity near a quantum critical point in rare-earth intermetallides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Val’kov, V. V.; Zlotnikov, A. O.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of the appearance of anomalous properties experimentally observed at the transition through the quantum critical point in rare-earth intermetallides have been studied. Quantum phase transitions are induced by the external pressure and are manifested as the destruction of the long-range antiferromagnetic order at zero temperature. The suppression of the long-range order is accompanied by an increase in the area of the Fermi surface, and the effective electron mass is strongly renormalized near the quantum critical point. It has been shown that such a renormalization is due to the reconstruction of the quasiparticle band, which is responsible for the formation of heavy fermions. It has been established that these features hold when the coexistence phase of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity is implemented near the quantum critical point.

  9. Pressure-induced superconductivity and topological quantum phase transitions in a quasi-one-dimensional topological insulator: Bi4I4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yanpeng; Shi, Wujun; Werner, Peter; Naumov, Pavel G.; Schnelle, Walter; Wang, Lei; Rana, Kumari Gaurav; Parkin, Stuart; Medvedev, Sergiy A.; Yan, Binghai; Felser, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    Superconductivity and topological quantum states are two frontier fields of research in modern condensed matter physics. The realization of superconductivity in topological materials is highly desired; however, superconductivity in such materials is typically limited to two-dimensional or three-dimensional materials and is far from being thoroughly investigated. In this work, we boost the electronic properties of the quasi-one-dimensional topological insulator bismuth iodide β-Bi4I4 by applying high pressure. Superconductivity is observed in β-Bi4I4 for pressures, where the temperature dependence of the resistivity changes from a semiconducting-like behavior to that of a normal metal. The superconducting transition temperature Tc increases with applied pressure and reaches a maximum value of 6 K at 23 GPa, followed by a slow decrease. Our theoretical calculations suggest the presence of multiple pressure-induced topological quantum phase transitions as well as a structural-electronic instability.

  10. High temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device system for detection of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzell, Alf

    2012-07-01

    This doctoral thesis was aimed at establishing a set-up with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) radio-frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technology for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and in particular for testing applications of magnetic nanoparticle immunoassays. It was part of the EU-project ''Biodiagnostics'' running from 2005 to 2008. The method of magnetic binding assays was developed as an alternative to other methods of concentration determination like enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or fluorescent immunoassay. The ELISA has sensitivities down to analyte-concentrations of pg/ml. Multiple incubation and washing steps have to be performed for these techniques, the analyte has to diffuse to the site of binding. The magnetic assay uses magnetic nanoparticles as markers for the substance to be detected. It is being explored by current research and shows similar sensitivity compared to ELISA but in contrast - does not need any washing and can be read out directly after binding - can be applied in solution with opaque media, e.g. blood or muddy water - additionally allows magnetic separation or concentration - in combination with small magnetoresistive or Hall sensors, allows detection of only a few particles or even single beads. For medical or environmental samples, maybe opaque and containing a multitude of substances, it would be advantageous to devise an instrument, which allows to be read out quickly and with high sensitivity. Due to the mentioned items the magnetic assay might be a possibility here.

  11. Advances in biomagnetic research using high- T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hong-Chang [Department of Physics/Institute of Applied Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, S Y [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Liao, Shu-Hsien, E-mail: hcyang@phys.ntu.edu.t [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2009-09-15

    This review reports the advances of biomagnetic research using high- T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). It especially focuses on SQUID-detected magnetocardiography (MCG), magnetically labeled immunoassays (MLIs) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance and imaging (NMR/MRI). The progress in MCG that scientists have made and the encountered challenges are discussed here. This study includes the early detection of the electromagnetic change in cardiac activity in animal studies of hypercholesterolemic rabbits, which suggests the possibility of early diagnosis of cardiac disease in clinical applications. The progress on MLIs using measurements of remanence, magnetic relaxation and magnetic susceptibility reduction is presented. The wash-free immunomagnetic reduction shows both high sensitivity and high specificity. NMR/MRI of high spectral resolution and of high signal-to-noise ratio are addressed and discussed. The proton-phosphate J-coupling of trimethyl phosphate ((CH{sub 3}){sub 3}PO{sub 4}) in one shot in microtesla fields is demonstrated. The prospects of biomagnetic applications are addressed. (topical review)

  12. Rotational population patterns and searches for the nuclear SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.J.; Farhan, A.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Ring, P.; Stoyer, M.A.

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents new theoretical results for rotational population patterns in the nuclear SQUID effect. (The term nuclear SQUID is in analogy to the solid-state Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices.) The SQUID effect is an interesting new twist to an old quest to understand Coriolis anti-pairing (CAP) effects in nuclear rotational bands. Two-neutron transfer reaction cross sections among high-spin states have long been touted as more specific CAP probes than other nuclear properties. Heavy projectiles like Sn or Pb generally are recommended to pump the deformed nucleus to as high spin as possible for transfer. The interference and sign reversal of 2n transfer amplitudes at high spin, as predicted in the early SQUID work imposes the difficult requirement of Coulomb pumping to near back-bending spins at closest approach. For Pb on rare earths we find a dramatic departure from sudden-approximation, so that the population depression occurs as low as final spin 10h. 14 refs., 8 figs

  13. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-06-09

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 6} L. monocytogenes for a 20 {micro}L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 {+-} 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria.

  14. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 ± 1.1) x 10 6 L. monocytogenes for a 20 (micro)L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 ± 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria

  15. High temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device system for detection of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzell, Alf

    2012-01-01

    This doctoral thesis was aimed at establishing a set-up with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) radio-frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technology for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and in particular for testing applications of magnetic nanoparticle immunoassays. It was part of the EU-project ''Biodiagnostics'' running from 2005 to 2008. The method of magnetic binding assays was developed as an alternative to other methods of concentration determination like enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or fluorescent immunoassay. The ELISA has sensitivities down to analyte-concentrations of pg/ml. Multiple incubation and washing steps have to be performed for these techniques, the analyte has to diffuse to the site of binding. The magnetic assay uses magnetic nanoparticles as markers for the substance to be detected. It is being explored by current research and shows similar sensitivity compared to ELISA but in contrast - does not need any washing and can be read out directly after binding - can be applied in solution with opaque media, e.g. blood or muddy water - additionally allows magnetic separation or concentration - in combination with small magnetoresistive or Hall sensors, allows detection of only a few particles or even single beads. For medical or environmental samples, maybe opaque and containing a multitude of substances, it would be advantageous to devise an instrument, which allows to be read out quickly and with high sensitivity. Due to the mentioned items the magnetic assay might be a possibility here.

  16. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  17. Adiabatic Motion of Fault Tolerant Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, David Edward

    This work proposes and analyzes the adiabatic motion of fault tolerant qubits in two systems as candidates for the building blocks of a quantum computer. The first proposal examines a pair of electron spins in double quantum dots, finding that the leading source of decoherence, hyperfine dephasing, can be suppressed by adiabatic rotation of the dots in real space. The additional spin-orbit effects introduced by this motion are analyzed, simulated, and found to result in an infidelity below the error-correction threshold. The second proposal examines topological qubits formed by Majorana zero modes theorized to exist at the ends of semiconductor nanowires coupled to conventional superconductors. A model is developed to design adiabatic movements of the Majorana bound states to produce entangled qubits. Analysis and simulations indicate that these adiabatic operations can also be used to demonstrate entanglement experimentally by testing Bell's theorem.

  18. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Guorong; Neville, Simon P.; Schalk, Oliver; Sekikawa, Taro; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Worth, Graham A.; Stolow, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B 1 (π3p y ) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH 3 dissociation coordinate

  19. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information & Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Worth, Graham A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-01-07

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B{sub 1}(π3p{sub y}) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH{sub 3} dissociation coordinate.

  20. Parallel interaction-free measurement using spatial adiabatic passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Charles D; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Greentree, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    Interaction-free measurement (IFM) is a surprising consequence of quantum interference, where the presence of objects can be sensed without any disturbance of the object being measured. Here, we show an extension of IFM using techniques from spatial adiabatic passage, specifically multiple recipient adiabatic passage. Due to subtle properties of the adiabatic passage, it is possible to image an object without interaction between the imaging photons and the sample. The technique can be used on multiple objects in parallel and is entirely deterministic in the adiabatic limit. Unlike more conventional IFM schemes, this adiabatic process is driven by the symmetry of the system, and not by more usual interference effects. As such it provides an interesting alternative quantum protocol that may be applicable to photonic implementations of spatial adiabatic passage. We also show that this scheme can be used to implement a collision-free quantum routing protocol. (paper)

  1. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  2. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 (micro)T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz -1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm 3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm 3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm 3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T 1 ) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T 1 of ex vivo normal and cancerous

  3. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of pyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P.; Worth, Graham A., E-mail: g.a.worth@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 109 61 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2015-02-21

    The dynamics of pyrrole excited at wavelengths in the range 242-217 nm are studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and wavepacket propagations performed using the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method. Excitation close to the origin of pyrrole’s electronic spectrum, at 242 and 236 nm, is found to result in an ultrafast decay of the system from the ionization window on a single timescale of less than 20 fs. This behaviour is explained fully by assuming the system to be excited to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in accord with previous experimental and theoretical studies. Excitation at shorter wavelengths has previously been assumed to result predominantly in population of the bright A{sub 1}(ππ{sup ∗}) and B{sub 2}(ππ{sup ∗}) states. We here present time-resolved photoelectron spectra at a pump wavelength of 217 nm alongside detailed quantum dynamics calculations that, together with a recent reinterpretation of pyrrole’s electronic spectrum [S. P. Neville and G. A. Worth, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034317 (2014)], suggest that population of the B{sub 1}(πσ{sup ∗}) state (hitherto assumed to be optically dark) may occur directly when pyrrole is excited at energies in the near UV part of its electronic spectrum. The B{sub 1}(πσ{sup ∗}) state is found to decay on a timescale of less than 20 fs by both N-H dissociation and internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state.

  4. Superconductivity: Phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falicov, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    This document discusses first the following topics: (a) The superconducting transition temperature; (b) Zero resistivity; (c) The Meissner effect; (d) The isotope effect; (e) Microwave and optical properties; and (f) The superconducting energy gap. Part II of this document investigates the Ginzburg-Landau equations by discussing: (a) The coherence length; (b) The penetration depth; (c) Flux quantization; (d) Magnetic-field dependence of the energy gap; (e) Quantum interference phenomena; and (f) The Josephson effect

  5. Systematic Magnus-Based Approach for Suppressing Leakage and Nonadiabatic Errors in Quantum Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Baksic, Alexandre; Clerk, Aashish A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic, perturbative method for correcting quantum gates to suppress errors that take the target system out of a chosen subspace. Our method addresses the generic problem of nonadiabatic errors in adiabatic evolution and state preparation, as well as general leakage errors due to spurious couplings to undesirable states. The method is based on the Magnus expansion: By correcting control pulses, we modify the Magnus expansion of an initially given, imperfect unitary in such a way that the desired evolution is obtained. Applications to adiabatic quantum state transfer, superconducting qubits, and generalized Landau-Zener problems are discussed.

  6. Inductance analysis of superconducting quantum interference devices with 3D nano-bridge junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ruoting; Li, Guanqun; Wu, Long; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Lei; Ren, Jie; Wang, Zhen

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with 3D nano-bridge junctions can be miniaturized into nano-SQUIDs that are able to sense a few spins in a large magnetic field. Among all device parameters, the inductance is key to the performance of SQUIDs with 3D nano-bridge junctions. Here, we measured the critical-current magnetic flux modulation curves of 12 devices with three design types using a current strip-line directly coupled to the SQUID loop. A best flux modulation depth of 71% was achieved for our 3D Nb SQUID. From the modulation curves, we extracted the inductance values of the current stripe-line in each design and compared them with the corresponding simulation results of InductEX. In this way, London penetration depths of 110 and 420 nm were determined for our Nb (niobium) and NbN (niobium nitride) films, respectively. Furthermore, we showed that inductances of 11 and 119 pH for Nb and NbN 3D nano-bridge junctions, respectively, dominated the total inductance of our SQUID loops which are 23 pH for Nb and 255 pH for NbN. A screening parameter being equal to one suggests optimal critical currents of 89.6 and 8.1 μA for Nb and NbN SQUIDs, respectively. Additionally, intrinsic flux noise of 110 ± 40 nΦ0/(Hz)1/2 is calculated for the Nb SQUIDs with 3D nano-bridge junctions by Langevin simulation.

  7. Flexible superconducting Nb transmission lines on thin film polyimide for quantum computing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, David B.; Hamilton, Michael C.; Reilly, David J.; Bai, Rujun; Hernandez, George A.; Hornibrook, John M.; Sellers, John A.; Ellis, Charles D.

    2016-08-01

    We describe progress and initial results achieved towards the goal of developing integrated multi-conductor arrays of shielded controlled-impedance flexible superconducting transmission lines with ultra-miniature cross sections and wide bandwidths (dc to >10 GHz) over meter-scale lengths. Intended primarily for use in future scaled-up quantum computing systems, such flexible thin-film niobium/polyimide ribbon cables could provide a physically compact and ultra-low thermal conductance alternative to the rapidly increasing number of discrete coaxial cables that are currently used by quantum computing experimentalists to transmit signals between the several low-temperature stages (from ˜4 K down to ˜20 mK) of a dilution refrigerator. We have concluded that these structures are technically feasible to fabricate, and so far they have exhibited acceptable thermo-mechanical reliability. S-parameter results are presented for individual 2-metal layer Nb microstrip structures having 50 Ω characteristic impedance; lengths ranging from 50 to 550 mm were successfully fabricated. Solderable pads at the end terminations allowed testing using conventional rf connectors. Weakly coupled open-circuit microstrip resonators provided a sensitive measure of the overall transmission line loss as a function of frequency, temperature, and power. Two common microelectronic-grade polyimide dielectrics, one conventional and the other photo-definable (PI-2611 and HD-4100, respectively) were compared. Our most striking result, not previously reported to our knowledge, was that the dielectric loss tangents of both polyimides, over frequencies from 1 to 20 GHz, are remarkably low at deep cryogenic temperatures, typically 100× smaller than corresponding room temperature values. This enables fairly long-distance (meter-scale) transmission of microwave signals without excessive attenuation, and also permits usefully high rf power levels to be transmitted without creating excessive dielectric

  8. High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device recordings of spontaneous brain activity: Towards high-Tc magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öisjöen, F.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Figueras, G. A.; Chukharkin, M. L.; Kalabukhov, A.; Hedström, A.; Elam, M.; Winkler, D.

    2012-03-01

    We have performed single- and two-channel high transition temperature (high-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of spontaneous brain activity in two healthy human subjects. We demonstrate modulation of two well-known brain rhythms: the occipital alpha rhythm and the mu rhythm found in the motor cortex. We further show that despite higher noise-levels compared to their low-Tc counterparts, high-Tc SQUIDs can be used to detect and record physiologically relevant brain rhythms with comparable signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate the utility of high-Tc technology in MEG recordings of a broader range of brain activity.

  9. 4. MESOSCOPIC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY: Some signatures of quantum chaos on dirty superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, F.

    2001-10-01

    The Anderson theory of dirty superconductivity was established a few years after the discovery of the BCS wave function. Disregarding the rich properties in the one-particle energy spectrum in dirty limit, the theory claimed that the ground state condensate is translationally invariant and free from Toulouse type of frustrations. This theory also set down the foundation of dirty superconductivity in the presence of external fields. In this talk, I demonstrate the failure of the Anderson theory in amorphous superconducting films in general and its connection with Wigner-Dyson surmise. I will discuss the Chandrasekar-Glogston limit in which the nodes in one-particle wave functions are shown to result in a novel superconducting glass phase. I will also discuss why nature has tolerated the failure.

  10. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  11. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  12. One-step implementation of a hybrid Fredkin gate with quantum memories and single superconducting qubit in circuit QED and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Guo, Bao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Shui; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2018-02-01

    In a recent remarkable experiment [R. B. Patel et al., Science advances 2, e1501531 (2016)], a 3-qubit quantum Fredkin (i.e., controlled-SWAP) gate was demonstrated by using linear optics. Here we propose a simple experimental scheme by utilizing the dispersive interaction in superconducting quantum circuit to implement a hybrid Fredkin gate with a superconducting flux qubit as the control qubit and two separated quantum memories as the target qudits. The quantum memories considered here are prepared by the superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators or nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles. In particular, it is shown that this Fredkin gate can be realized using a single-step operation and more importantly, each target qudit can be in an arbitrary state with arbitrary degrees of freedom. Furthermore, we show that this experimental scheme has many potential applications in quantum computation and quantum information processing such as generating arbitrary entangled states (discrete-variable states or continuous-variable states) of the two memories, measuring the fidelity and the entanglement between the two memories. With state-of-the-art circuit QED technology, the numerical simulation is performed to demonstrate that two-memory NOON states, entangled coherent states, and entangled cat states can be efficiently synthesized.

  13. Adiabatic passage of light in coupled optical waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Adiabatic passage of light in coupled optical waveguides with a curved axis is theoretically investigated and shown to bear a close connection with coherent population transfer among quantum states of atoms and molecules. In particular, the optical analog of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage can be realized in a three-waveguide optical directional coupler

  14. Circuit design for multi-body interactions in superconducting quantum annealing systems with applications to a scalable architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancellor, N.; Zohren, S.; Warburton, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    Quantum annealing provides a way of solving optimization problems by encoding them as Ising spin models which are implemented using physical qubits. The solution of the optimization problem then corresponds to the ground state of the system. Quantum tunneling is harnessed to enable the system to move to the ground state in a potentially high non-convex energy landscape. A major difficulty in encoding optimization problems in physical quantum annealing devices is the fact that many real world optimization problems require interactions of higher connectivity, as well as multi-body terms beyond the limitations of the physical hardware. In this work we address the question of how to implement multi-body interactions using hardware which natively only provides two-body interactions. The main result is an efficient circuit design of such multi-body terms using superconducting flux qubits in which effective N-body interactions are implemented using N ancilla qubits and only two inductive couplers. It is then shown how this circuit can be used as the unit cell of a scalable architecture by applying it to a recently proposed embedding technique for constructing an architecture of logical qubits with arbitrary connectivity using physical qubits which have nearest-neighbor four-body interactions. It is further shown that this design is robust to non-linear effects in the coupling loops, as well as mismatches in some of the circuit parameters.

  15. Abelian and non-Abelian anyons in integer quantum anomalous Hall effect and topological phase transitions via superconducting proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuele; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X. C.; Yu, Yue

    2011-03-01

    We study the quantum anomalous Hall effect described by a class of two-component Haldane models on square lattices. We show that the latter can be transformed into a pseudospin triplet p+ip-wave paired superfluid. In the long wavelength limit, the ground-state wave function is described by Halperin’s (1,1,-1) state of neutral fermions analogous to the double-layer quantum Hall effect. The vortex excitations are charge e/2 Abelian anyons which carry a neutral Dirac fermion zero mode. The superconducting proximity effect induces “tunneling” between “layers” which leads to topological phase transitions whereby the Dirac fermion zero mode fractionalizes and Majorana fermions emerge in the edge states. The charge e/2 vortex excitation carrying a Majorana zero mode is a non-Abelian anyon. The proximity effect can also drive a conventional insulator into a quantum anomalous Hall effect state with a Majorana edge mode and the non-Abelian vortex excitations.

  16. QUANTUM ELECTRONIC DEVICES: Superconducting Nb3Sn point contact in the submillimeter range of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenov, É. M.; Danileĭko, M. V.; Derkach, V. E.; Romanenko, V. I.; Uskov, A. V.

    1988-05-01

    An investigation was made of the influence of submillimeter radiation emitted by an HCN laser operating at a frequency νl = 891 GHz on a superconducting point contact made of Nb3Sn. Three steps of the electric current were recorded. The experimental results indicated that such a contact could be used for frequency multiplication up to 3 THz.

  17. Gate errors in solid-state quantum-computer architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xuedong; Das Sarma, S.

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically consider possible errors in solid-state quantum computation due to the interplay of the complex solid-state environment and gate imperfections. In particular, we study two examples of gate operations in the opposite ends of the gate speed spectrum, an adiabatic gate operation in electron-spin-based quantum dot quantum computation and a sudden gate operation in Cooper-pair-box superconducting quantum computation. We evaluate quantitatively the nonadiabatic operation of a two-qubit gate in a two-electron double quantum dot. We also analyze the nonsudden pulse gate in a Cooper-pair-box-based quantum-computer model. In both cases our numerical results show strong influences of the higher excited states of the system on the gate operation, clearly demonstrating the importance of a detailed understanding of the relevant Hilbert-space structure on the quantum-computer operations

  18. Adiabatic regularization for gauge fields and the conformal anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chong-Sun; Koyama, Yoji

    2017-03-01

    Adiabatic regularization for quantum field theory in conformally flat spacetime is known for scalar and Dirac fermion fields. In this paper, we complete the construction by establishing the adiabatic regularization scheme for the gauge field. We show that the adiabatic expansion for the mode functions and the adiabatic vacuum can be defined in a similar way using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-type (WKB-type) solutions as the scalar fields. As an application of the adiabatic method, we compute the trace of the energy momentum tensor and reproduce the known result for the conformal anomaly obtained by the other regularization methods. The availability of the adiabatic expansion scheme for the gauge field allows one to study various renormalized physical quantities of theories coupled to (non-Abelian) gauge fields in conformally flat spacetime, such as conformal supersymmetric Yang Mills, inflation, and cosmology.

  19. Quantum computation with superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Irastorza Gabilondo, Amaia

    2017-01-01

    Quantum computation using supercoducting qubits. Qubits are quantum bits used in quantum computers. Superconducting qubits are a strong option for building a quantum computer. But not just that, as they are macroscopic objects they question the limits of quantum physics.

  20. Superconducting Nonlinear Kinetic Inductance Devices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Superconducting quantum interference devices, or SQUIDs, are by far the most sensitive magnetometers available, but two issues limit their commercial potential:...

  1. Direct measurement of the quantum state of the electromagnetic field in a superconducting transmission line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, F. de; Aolita, L.; Davidovich, L.; Toscano, F.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an experimental procedure to directly measure the state of an electromagnetic field inside a resonator, corresponding to a superconducting transmission line, coupled to a Cooper-pair box (CPB). The measurement protocol is based on the use of a dispersive interaction between the field and the CPB, and the coupling to an external classical field that is tuned to resonance with either the field or the CPB. We present a numerical simulation that demonstrates the feasibility of this protocol, which is within reach of present technology

  2. Quantum Bayesian rule for weak measurements of qubits in superconducting circuit QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peiyue; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Compared with the quantum trajectory equation (QTE), the quantum Bayesian approach has the advantage of being more efficient to infer a quantum state under monitoring, based on the integrated output of measurements. For weak measurement of qubits in circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED), properly accounting for the measurement backaction effects within the Bayesian framework is an important problem of current interest. Elegant work towards this task was carried out by Korotkov in ‘bad-cavity’ and weak-response limits (Korotkov 2011 Quantum Bayesian approach to circuit QED measurement (arXiv:1111.4016)). In the present work, based on insights from the cavity-field states (dynamics) and the help of an effective QTE, we generalize the results of Korotkov to more general system parameters. The obtained Bayesian rule is in full agreement with Korotkov's result in limiting cases and as well holds satisfactory accuracy in non-limiting cases in comparison with the QTE simulations. We expect the proposed Bayesian rule to be useful for future cQED measurement and control experiments. (paper)

  3. Flux-periodic resistance oscillations in arrays of superconducting weak links based on InAs-AlSb quantum wells with Nb electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.; Blank, H.; Wong, K.C.; Nguyen, C.; Kroemer, H.; Hu, E.L.

    1996-01-01

    InAs-AlSb quantum wells contacted with periodic gratings of superconducting Nb electrodes show Josephson-junction characteristics at low temperatures. When a nonzero resistance is reestablished by a weak magnetic field, the resistance shows a strong component periodic in the magnetic field. At fields above ∼300μT, the oscillation period corresponds to one flux quantum per grating cell; but in wide arrays (≥40μm), a frequency doubling takes place at low fields, indicating the formation of a staggered vortex superlattice at twice the lithographic period. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Collapse and revival of entanglement of two-qubit in superconducting quantum dot lattice with magnetic flux and inhomogeneous gate voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sujit

    2013-04-01

    We study the entanglement of a two-qubit system in a superconducting quantum dot (SQD) lattice in the presence of magnetic flux and gate voltage. The ground state is always in a maximally entangled Bell state for homogeneous gate voltage. In the presence of inhomogeneous gate voltage, the half-integer magnetic flux quantum, completely washes out the entanglement of the system at zero temperature. The entanglement is much higher for the Mott insulating phase. At finite temperature, collapse of entanglement occurs for wider region of magnetic flux.

  5. Performance of an on-chip superconducting circulator for quantum microwave systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Benjamin; Rosenthal, Eric; Moores, Bradley; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Mates, J. A. B.; Hilton, G. C.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.; LalumíEre, Kevin; Blais, Alexandre; Lehnert, K. W.

    Microwave circulators enforce a single propagation direction for signals in an electrical network. Unfortunately, commercial circulators are bulky, lossy, and cannot be integrated close to superconducting circuits because they require strong ( kOe) magnetic fields produced by permanent magnets. Here we report on the performance of an on-chip, active circulator for superconducting microwave circuits, which uses no permanent magnets. Non-reciprocity is achieved by actively modulating reactive elements around 100 MHz, giving roughly a factor of 50 in the separation between signal and control frequencies, which facilitates filtering. The circulator's active components are dynamically tunable inductors constructed with arrays of dc-SQUIDs in series. Array inductance is tuned by varying the magnetic flux through the SQUIDs with fields weaker than 1 Oe. Although the instantaneous bandwidth of the device is narrow, the operation frequency is tunable between 4 and 8 GHz. This presentation will describe the device's theory of operation and compare its measured performance to design goals. This work is supported by the ARO under contract W911NF-14-1-0079 and the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1125844.

  6. Engineering squeezed states of microwave radiation with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Pengbo; Li Fuli

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a squeezed state source for microwave radiation with tunable parameters in circuit quantum electrodynamics. We show that when a superconducting artificial multilevel atom interacting with a transmission line resonator is suitably driven by external classical fields, two-mode squeezed states of the cavity modes can be engineered in a controllable fashion from the vacuum state via adiabatic following of the ground state of the system. This scheme appears to be robust against decoherence and is realizable with present techniques in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  7. Quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping of electron spins in superconducting hybrid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bubanja, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.bubanja@callaghaninnovation.govt.nz

    2015-06-15

    We present schemes for quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping of electronic spin states in hybrid superconductor–normal-metal systems. The proposed schemes employ subgap transport whereby the lowest order processes involve Cooper pair-electron and double Cooper-pair cotunneling in quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping protocols, respectively. The competition between elastic cotunneling and Cooper-pair splitting results in the success probability of 25% in both cases. Described implementations of these protocols are within reach of present-day experimental techniques.

  8. Analogous behavior in the quantum hall effect, anyon superconductivity, and the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, R.B.

    1991-07-01

    Similarities between physical behavior known to occur, or suspected of occurring, in simple condensed matter systems and behavior postulated by the standard model are identified and discussed. Particular emphasis is given to quantum number fractionalization, spontaneous occurrence of gauge forces, spontaneous violation of P and T, and anomaly cancellation. 46 refs

  9. Realization of Microwave Quantum Circuits Using Hybrid Superconducting Semiconducting Nanowire Josephson Elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, G.; Van Heck, B.; Bruno, A.; Van Woerkom, D.J.; Geresdi, A.; Plissard, S.R.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Akhmerov, A.R.; Di Carlo, L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the realization of quantum microwave circuits using hybrid superconductor-semiconductor Josephson elements comprised of InAs nanowires contacted by NbTiN. Capacitively shunted single elements behave as transmon circuits with electrically tunable transition frequencies. Two-element circuits

  10. Multi-photon dressing of an anharmonic superconducting many-level quantum circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braumueller, Jochen; Cramer, Joel; Schloer, Steffen; Rotzinger, Hannes; Radtke, Lucas; Lukashenko, Alexander; Yang, Ping; Skacel, Sebastian; Probst, Sebastian; Weides, Martin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Physikalisches Institut, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Marthaler, Michael; Guo, Lingzhen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ustinov, Alexey V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Physikalisches Institut, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    We report on the investigation of a superconducting anharmonic multi-level circuit that is coupled to a harmonic readout resonator. We observe multi-photon transitions via virtual energy levels of our system up to the fifth excited state. The back-action of these higher-order excitations on our readout device is analyzed quantitatively and demonstrated to be in accordance with theoretical expectation. By applying a strong microwave drive we achieve multi-photon dressing of our system which is dynamically coupled by a weak probe tone. The emerging higher-order Rabi sidebands and associated Autler-Townes splittings involving up to five levels of the investigated anharmonic circuit are observed. Experimental results are in good agreement with master equation simulations.

  11. Epitaxial Al2O3 capacitors for low microwave loss superconducting quantum circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Cho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized the microwave loss of high-Q parallel plate capacitors fabricated from thin-film Al/Al2O3/Re heterostructures on (0001 Al2O3 substrates. The superconductor-insulator-superconductor trilayers were grown in situ in a hybrid deposition system: the epitaxial Re base and polycrystalline Al counterelectrode layers were grown by sputtering, while the epitaxial Al2O3 layer was grown by pulsed laser deposition. Structural analysis indicates a highly crystalline epitaxial Al2O3 layer and sharp interfaces. The measured intrinsic (low-power, low-temperature quality factor of the resonators is as high as 3 × 104. These results indicate that low-loss grown Al2O3 is an attractive candidate dielectric for high-fidelity superconducting qubit circuits.

  12. Widely Tunable On-Chip Microwave Circulator for Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Chapman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the design and performance of an on-chip microwave circulator with a widely (GHz tunable operation frequency. Nonreciprocity is created with a combination of frequency conversion and delay, and requires neither permanent magnets nor microwave bias tones, allowing on-chip integration with other superconducting circuits without the need for high-bandwidth control lines. Isolation in the device exceeds 20 dB over a bandwidth of tens of MHz, and its insertion loss is small, reaching as low as 0.9 dB at select operation frequencies. Furthermore, the device is linear with respect to input power for signal powers up to hundreds of fW (≈10^{3} circulating photons, and the direction of circulation can be dynamically reconfigured. We demonstrate its operation at a selection of frequencies between 4 and 6 GHz.

  13. Autoresonant readout of a high Q resonator coupled to a superconducting quantum bit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murch, Kater; Weber, Steven; Vijay, R.; Ginossar, Eran; Girvin, Steven M.; Siddiqi, I.

    2012-02-01

    The frequency of a nonlinear oscillator changes with oscillation amplitude. When a high-Q, nonlinear oscillator is excited with a frequency chirped drive, the system can respond at either low or high oscillation amplitude depending on whether the drive excitation is below or above a critical value, respectively -- a phenomenon known as autoresonance. We exploit this nonlinear phenomenon to read out the state of a superconducting transmon qubit coupled to a high-Q nonlinear resonator. Because the excitation is non-equilibium, the resonator can be read out faster than its energy decay time. The fidelity for mapping the qubit state onto the oscillator can be as high as 80% and is limited by the T1 lifetime of the qubit, and readily achievable pulse parameters.

  14. Quantum fluctuations in the competition among spin glass, antiferromagnetism and local pairing superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, S.G.; Zimmer, F.M.; Kipper, C.J.; Calegari, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    The competition among spin glass (SG), antiferromagnetism (AF) and local pairing superconductivity (PAIR) is studied in a two-sublattice fermionic Ising SG model with a local BCS pairing interaction in the presence of a transverse magnetic field Γ. The spins in different sublattices interact with Gaussian random couplings with an antiferromagnetic mean. The problem is formulated in a Grassmann path integral formalism. The static ansatz and the replica symmetry are used to obtain the half-filling thermodynamic potential. The results are shown in phase diagrams that exhibit a complex transition line separating the PAIR phase from the others. This line is second order at high temperature which ends in a tricritical point. The presence of Γ affects deeply the transition lines

  15. Spatial non-adiabatic passage using geometric phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benseny, Albert; Busch, Thomas [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Quantum Systems Unit, Okinawa (Japan); Kiely, Anthony; Ruschhaupt, Andreas [University College Cork, Department of Physics, Cork (Ireland); Zhang, Yongping [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Quantum Systems Unit, Okinawa (Japan); Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China)

    2017-12-15

    Quantum technologies based on adiabatic techniques can be highly effective, but often at the cost of being very slow. Here we introduce a set of experimentally realistic, non-adiabatic protocols for spatial state preparation, which yield the same fidelity as their adiabatic counterparts, but on fast timescales. In particular, we consider a charged particle in a system of three tunnel-coupled quantum wells, where the presence of a magnetic field can induce a geometric phase during the tunnelling processes. We show that this leads to the appearance of complex tunnelling amplitudes and allows for the implementation of spatial non-adiabatic passage. We demonstrate the ability of such a system to transport a particle between two different wells and to generate a delocalised superposition between the three traps with high fidelity in short times. (orig.)

  16. Intermediate normal metal layers in superconducting circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.F.; Gershenson, M.; Fleming, D.L.; Barta, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a superconducting device comprising a first superconducting layer, a junction layer on the first superconducting layer, an insulating layer on the first superconducting layer, at least one superconducting area on the junction layer surrounded by the insulator layer, superconducting connector pad means disposed over the superconducting area, and superconducting wire means electrically connected to the superconducting connector pad means. The improvement comprising a first metal layer is disposed over the insulator layer and intermediate the superconducting area. The connector pad means and a second metal layer are disposed between the connector pad means and the superconductor wire means. The first metal layer covers the superconducting area and the first and second metal layers are sufficiently thin to allow quantum mechanical tunneling between the connector pad means and the superconducting area and the connector pad means and the superconducting wire means, respectively

  17. Advances in quantum control of three-level superconducting circuit architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falci, G.; Paladino, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); CNR-IMM UOS Universita (MATIS), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Di Stefano, P.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast(United Kingdom); Ridolfo, A.; D' Arrigo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); Paraoanu, G.S. [Low Temperature Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science (Finland)

    2017-06-15

    Advanced control in Lambda (Λ) scheme of a solid state architecture of artificial atoms and quantized modes would allow the translation to the solid-state realm of a whole class of phenomena from quantum optics, thus exploiting new physics emerging in larger integrated quantum networks and for stronger couplings. However control solid-state devices has constraints coming from selection rules, due to symmetries which on the other hand yield protection from decoherence, and from design issues, for instance that coupling to microwave cavities is not directly switchable. We present two new schemes for the Λ-STIRAP control problem with the constraint of one or two classical driving fields being always-on. We show how these protocols are converted to apply to circuit-QED architectures. We finally illustrate an application to coherent spectroscopy of the so called ultrastrong atom-cavity coupling regime. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Yong-Ho; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs.

  19. Measuring a Quantum Dot with an Impedance-Matching On-Chip Superconducting L C Resonator at Gigahertz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harabula, M.-C.; Hasler, T.; Fülöp, G.; Jung, M.; Ranjan, V.; Schönenberger, C.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the realization of a bonded-bridge on-chip superconducting coil and its use in impedance matching a highly ohmic quantum dot (QD) to a 3-GHz measurement setup. The coil, modeled as a lumped-element L C resonator, is more compact and has a wider bandwidth than resonators based on coplanar transmission lines (e.g., λ /4 impedance transformers and stub tuners), at potentially better signal-to-noise ratios. Specifically, for measurements of radiation emitted by the device, such as shot noise, the 50 ×-larger bandwidth reduces the time to acquire the spectral density. The resonance frequency, close to 3.25 GHz, is 3 times higher than that of the one previously reported, a wire-bonded coil. As a proof of principle, we fabricate an L C circuit that achieves impedance matching to an approximately 15 -k Ω load and validate it with a load defined by a carbon nanotube QD, whose shot noise we measure in the Coulomb-blockade regime.

  20. Effect of capacitive feedback on the characteristics of direct current superconducting quantum interference device coupled to a multiturn input coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minotani, T.; Enpuku, K.; Kuroki, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Distortion of voltage versus flux (V endash Φ) relation of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) coupled to a multiturn input coil is studied. First, resonant behavior of the coupled SQUID due to the so-called input coil resonance is clarified. It is shown that large rf noise flux is produced by the input coil resonance. This rf flux is added to the SQUID, and results in large rf voltage across the SQUID. In the case where parasitic capacitance exists between the input coil and the ground of the SQUID, this rf voltage produces the rf flux again, i.e., a feedback loop for the rf flux is formed. Taking into account this capacitive feedback, we study the V endash Φ relation of the coupled SQUID. Numerical simulation shows that the V endash Φ relation is distorted considerably by the feedback mechanism. The simulation result explains well the experimental V endash Φ relation of the coupled SQUID. The combination of the input coil resonance with the capacitive feedback is the most likely mechanism for the distorted V endash Φ curve of the coupled SQUID. The condition for occurrence of the distorted V endash Φ curve due to the capacitive feedback is also obtained, and methods to prevent degradation are discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. Adiabatic soliton laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednyakova, Anastasia; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2015-03-20

    The key to generating stable optical pulses is mastery of nonlinear light dynamics in laser resonators. Modern techniques to control the buildup of laser pulses are based on nonlinear science and include classical solitons, dissipative solitons, parabolic pulses (similaritons) and various modifications and blending of these methods. Fiber lasers offer remarkable opportunities to apply one-dimensional nonlinear science models for the design and optimization of very practical laser systems. Here, we propose a new concept of a laser based on the adiabatic amplification of a soliton pulse in the cavity-the adiabatic soliton laser. The adiabatic change of the soliton parameters during evolution in the resonator relaxes the restriction on the pulse energy inherent in traditional soliton lasers. Theoretical analysis is confirmed by extensive numerical modeling.

  2. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, K.Y.

    2012-01-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of ∼ ±22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than ∼ 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance ∼ 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance ∼ 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  3. Modeling non-adiabatic photoexcited reaction dynamics in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coker, D.F.

    2003-01-01

    Reactions of photoexcited molecules, ions, and radicals in condensed phase environments involve non-adiabatic dynamics over coupled electronic surfaces. We focus on how local environmental symmetries can effect non-adiabatic coupling between excited electronic states and thus influence, in a possibly controllable way, the outcome of photo-excited reactions. Semi-classical and mixed quantum-classical non-adiabatic molecular dynamics methods, together with semi-empirical excited state potentials are used to probe the dynamical mixing of electronic states in different environments from molecular clusters, to simple liquids and solids, and photo-excited reactions in complex reaction environments such as zeolites

  4. 'Speedy' superconducting circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holst, T.

    1994-01-01

    The most promising concept for realizing ultra-fast superconducting digital circuits is the Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) logic. The basic physical principle behind RSFQ logic, which include the storage and transfer of individual magnetic flux quanta in Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), is explained. A Set-Reset flip-flop is used as an example of the implementation of an RSFQ based circuit. Finally, the outlook for high-temperature superconducting materials in connection with RSFQ circuits is discussed in some details. (au)

  5. Role of quantum correlations in light-matter quantum heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, G. Alvarado; Albarrán-Arriagada, F.; Cárdenas-López, F. A.; Romero, G.; Retamal, J. C.

    2017-11-01

    We study a quantum Otto engine embedding a working substance composed of a two-level system interacting with a harmonic mode. The physical properties of the substance are described by a generalized quantum Rabi model arising in superconducting circuit realizations. We show that light-matter quantum correlation reduction during the hot bath stage and adiabatic stages act as an indicator for enhanced work extraction and efficiency, respectively. Also, we demonstrate that the anharmonic spectrum of the working substance has a direct impact on the transition from heat engine into refrigerator as the light-matter coupling is increased. These results shed light on the search for optimal conditions in the performance of quantum heat engines.

  6. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 ± 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs

  7. Interactions, Disorder and Dephasing in Superconducting Films and Quantum Hall Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, A.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that a large class of two dimensional Superconductor to Insulator (SC-I), and (Quantum Hall to Insulator (QH-I) transitions can be understood by assuming that the thermodynamic transition in the clean system is first order. The finite correlation lengths at that transition yield a natural separation of the disorder into short and long wavelengths which are then straightforward to incorporate perturbatively and semi classically respectively. This approach reduces problems of disorder+interactions to puddle network models, whose studies have already yielded insight into experiments of QH-I and SC-I. For the CQH-I, the difference between Landauer-Buttiker and Boltzman theories highlights effects of dephasing

  8. Inter-band phase fluctuations in macroscopic quantum tunneling of multi-gap superconducting Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Hidehiro, E-mail: hd-asai@aist.go.jp [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute (ESPRIT), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ota, Yukihiro [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8587 (Japan); Kawabata, Shiro [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute (ESPRIT), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nori, Franco [CEMS, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We study MQT in Josephson junctions composed of multi-gap superconductors. • We derive a formula of the MQT escape rate for multiple phase differences. • We investigate the effect of inter-band phase fluctuation on MQT. • The MQT escape rate is significantly enhanced by the inter-band phase fluctuation. - Abstract: We theoretically investigate macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in a hetero Josephson junction formed by a conventional single-gap superconductor and a multi-gap superconductor. In such Josephson junctions, phase differences for each tunneling channel are defined, and the fluctuation of the relative phase differences appear which is referred to as Josephson–Leggett’s mode. We take into account the effect of the fluctuation in the tunneling process and calculate the MQT escape rate for various junction parameters. We show that the fluctuation of relative phase differences drastically enhances the escape rate.

  9. Coherent oscillations in a superconducting flux qubit without microwave pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, Stefano; Lisenfeld, Juergen; Lukashenko, Alexander; Ustinov, Alexey V. [Physikalisches Institut III, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie del CNR, Roma (Italy); Cosmelli, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Universita' di Roma La Sapienza (Italy); Carelli, Pasquale [Universita' degli Studi dell' Acquila (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    We report on observation of coherent oscillations in a superconducting flux qubit by using no microwave excitation but only nanosecond-long dc flux pulses. The investigated circuit is a double-SQUID consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by a small dc-SQUID, which we control via two bias fluxes {phi}{sub c} and {phi}{sub x}. The potential energy profile of the qubit has the shape of a double well, where the flux {phi}{sub c} controls the height of the barrier between the two minima and the flux {phi}{sub x} changes the potential symmetry. The two computational states of the qubit are identified with the two energy minima and physically correspond to clockwise or anticlockwise circulating currents in the double-SQUID main loop. We observed coherent oscillations, in the frequency range between 8 and 20 GHz, induced by fast pulses of the control flux {phi}{sub c} modulating the barrier between the two potential wells. The quantum dynamics that leads to this kind of oscillations is composed of a non-adiabatic and adiabatic evolution of the two lowest energy states.

  10. Superconducting single flux quantum 20 Gb/s clock recovery circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplunenko, V.; Borzenets, V.; Dubash, N. [Conductus, 969 West Sunnyvale, California 94086 (United States); Van Duzer, T. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1997-07-01

    A clock recovery circuit has been successfully tested at frequencies up to 20 GHz. This cell is designed for a rapid-single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) telecommunication data switch. It serves to set the receiver clock in phase with the incoming digital signal. The circuit consists of a dc-to-SFQ converter, ring oscillator [(RO) is a closed-loop RSFQ Josephson transmission line], confluence buffer, and an 8-bit binary counter. The input signal transforms to SFQ pulses, and each pulse resets the phase of the ring oscillator, giving a locking time of 1 bit. Thus, the pull-in (capture) range and hold-in (tracking) range are the same, and strictly depend on the encoding of the input signal. This range is estimated to be about 1 GHz at frequency 20 GHz, if the sequence of consecutive ONEs or ZEROs does not exceed 20 bits. The quality factor Q{sub RO} of ring oscillator is about 2000, which gives a jitter of 50 fs for a 35-junction RO. A sampling technique was used to demonstrate phase recovery (phase locking) with only one incoming pulse per 512 clock periods. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Animal magnetocardiography using superconducting quantum interference device gradiometers assisted with magnetic nanoparticle injection: A sensitive method for early detecting electromagnetic changes induced by hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. C.; Hong, B. F.; Wu, B. H.; Yang, S. Y.; Horng, H. E.; Yang, H. C.; Tseng, W. Y. Isaac; Tseng, W. K.; Liu, Y. B.; Lin, L. C.; Lu, L. S.; Lee, Y. H.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the authors used a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetocardiography (MCG) system consisted of 64-channel low-transition-temperature SQUID gradiometers to detect the MCG signals of hepercholesterolemic rabbits. In addition, the MCG signals were recorded before and after the injection of magnetic nanoparticles into the rabbits' ear veins to investigate the effects of magnetic nanoparticles on the MCG signals. These MCG data were compared to those of normal rabbits to reveal the feasibility for early detection of the electromagnetic changes induced by hypercholesterolemia using MCG with the assistance of magnetic nanoparticle injection.

  12. Quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, S.; Giacobino, S.; Zinn-Justin, J.

    1997-01-01

    This course is dedicated to present in a pedagogical manner the recent developments in peculiar fields concerned by quantum fluctuations: quantum noise in optics, light propagation through dielectric media, sub-Poissonian light generated by lasers and masers, quantum non-demolition measurements, quantum electrodynamics applied to cavities and electrical circuits involving superconducting tunnel junctions. (A.C.)

  13. High fidelity all-microwave controlled-phase gate for superconducting qubits by cavity vacuum displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Hanhee; Zhou, D.; Reed, M. D.; Kirchmair, G.; Frunzio, L.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a new all-microwave controlled phase entangling gate for the superconducting qubits in the three-dimensional circuit QED (3D cQED) architecture. The gate exploits the strong coupling between qubits and a cavity, wherein the cavity frequency dispersively shifts depending on the qubit register state. We off-resonantly displace the cavity vacuum state; each computational state evolves a different phase due to the dispersive coupling, yielding a conditional phase. While designed to exploit the advantages of the 3D cQED architecture, the gate requires only dispersive coupling, making the gate applicable to a wide variety of superconducting qubit architectures. We demonstrate 98% gate fidelity evaluated by quantum process tomography, and will discuss how appropriate choices of system parameters could increase this number and how we could minimize the gate infidelity due to measurement induced dephasing and non-adiabatic gate procedure.

  14. Qubit compatible superconducting interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxen, B.; Mutus, J. Y.; Lucero, E.; Graff, R.; Megrant, A.; Chen, Yu; Quintana, C.; Burkett, B.; Kelly, J.; Jeffrey, E.; Yang, Yan; Yu, Anthony; Arya, K.; Barends, R.; Chen, Zijun; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A.; Gidney, C.; Giustina, M.; Huang, T.; Klimov, P.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Martinis, John M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a fabrication process for fully superconducting interconnects compatible with superconducting qubit technology. These interconnects allow for the three dimensional integration of quantum circuits without introducing lossy amorphous dielectrics. They are composed of indium bumps several microns tall separated from an aluminum base layer by titanium nitride which serves as a diffusion barrier. We measure the whole structure to be superconducting (transition temperature of 1.1 K), limited by the aluminum. These interconnects have an average critical current of 26.8 mA, and mechanical shear and thermal cycle testing indicate that these devices are mechanically robust. Our process provides a method that reliably yields superconducting interconnects suitable for use with superconducting qubits.

  15. Defects in Quantum Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Zurek, Wojciech H; Zwolak, Michael

    2018-03-14

    The shift of interest from general purpose quantum computers to adiabatic quantum computing or quantum annealing calls for a broadly applicable and easy to implement test to assess how quantum or adiabatic is a specific hardware. Here we propose such a test based on an exactly solvable many body system-the quantum Ising chain in transverse field-and implement it on the D-Wave machine. An ideal adiabatic quench of the quantum Ising chain should lead to an ordered broken symmetry ground state with all spins aligned in the same direction. An actual quench can be imperfect due to decoherence, noise, flaws in the implemented Hamiltonian, or simply too fast to be adiabatic. Imperfections result in topological defects: Spins change orientation, kinks punctuating ordered sections of the chain. The number of such defects quantifies the extent by which the quantum computer misses the ground state, and is, therefore, imperfect.

  16. Introduction to superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Darriulat, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The lecture series will address physicists, such as particle and nuclear physicists, familiar with non-relativistic quantum mechanics but not with solid state physics. The aim of this introduction to low temperature superconductivity is to give sufficient bases to the student for him/her to be able to access the scientific literature on this field. The five lectures will cover the following topics : 1. Normal metals, free electron gas, chambers equation. 2. Cooper pairs, the BCS ground state, quasi particle excitations. 3. DC superconductivity, Meissner state, dirty superconductors.4. Self consistent approach, Ginsburg Landau equations, Abrikosov fluxon lattice. 5. Josephson effects, high temperature superconductivity.

  17. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ''bad metals'', with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described

  18. Narrow Linewidth Laser Cooling via Adiabatic Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolotta, John; Holland, Murray; Norcia, Matthew; Thompson, James; Cline, Julia

    2017-04-01

    We simulate and provide a theoretical framework for a new cooling method applicable to particles with narrow-linewidth optical transitions. The particles are adiabatically transferred to lower momentum states upon interaction with counter-propagating laser beams that are repeatedly swept over the transition frequency. A reduced reliance on spontaneous emission (compared to Doppler cooling) allows for larger slowing forces. Cooling via a 7.6 kHz dipole forbidden transition in Strontium-88 is simulated using one-dimensional quantum jump and c-number Langevin equation methods. This ``sweep cooling'' mechanism also shows promise for application to systems lacking closed cycling transitions, such as molecules.

  19. Designing quantum-information-processing superconducting qubit circuits that exhibit lasing and other atomic-physics-like phenomena on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting (SC) circuits can behave like atoms making transitions between a few energy levels. Such circuits can test quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales and be used to conduct atomic-physics experiments on a silicon chip. This talk overviews a few of our theoretical studies on SC circuits and quantum information processing (QIP) including: SC qubits for single photon generation and for lasing; controllable couplings among qubits; how to increase the coherence time of qubits using a capacitor in parallel to one of the qubit junctions; hybrid circuits involving both charge and flux qubits; testing Bell's inequality in SC circuits; generation of GHZ states; quantum tomography in SC circuits; preparation of macroscopic quantum superposition states of a cavity field via coupling to a SC qubit; generation of nonclassical photon states using a SC qubit in a microcavity; scalable quantum computing with SC qubits; and information processing with SC qubits in a microwave field. Controllable couplings between qubits can be achieved either directly or indirectly. This can be done with and without coupler circuits, and with and without data-buses like EM fields in cavities (e.g., we will describe both the variable-frequency magnetic flux approach and also a generalized double-resonance approach that we introduced). It is also possible to ``turn a quantum bug into a feature'' by using microscopic defects as qubits, and the macroscopic junction as a controller of it. We have also studied ways to implement radically different approaches to QIP by using ``cluster states'' in SC circuits. For a general overview of this field, see, J.Q. You and F. Nori, Phys. Today 58 (11), 42 (2005)

  20. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in cutting a spin chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Feng-Hua [Department of Physics, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); School of Computer Engineering, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China); Wang, Zhao-Ming, E-mail: mingmoon78@126.com [Department of Physics, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Gu, Yong-Jian, E-mail: yjgu@ouc.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2017-01-15

    “Shortcuts to adiabaticity” represents a strategy for accelerating a quantum adiabatic process, is useful for preparing or manipulating a quantum state. In this paper, we investigate the adiabaticity in the dynamics of an XY spin chain. During the process of cutting one long chain into two short chains, a “shortcut” can be obtained by applying a sequence of external pulses. The fidelity which measures the adiabaticity can be dramatically enhanced by increasing the pulse strength or pulse duration time. This reliability can be kept for different types of pulses, such as random pulse time interval or random strength. The free choice of the pulse can be explained by the adiabatic representation of the Hamiltonian, and it shows that the control effects are determined by the integral of the control function in the time domain. - Highlights: • “Shortcuts to adiabaticity” is proposed by applying external pulses. • The adiabaticity can be accelerated by increasing pulse strength or duration time. • Control effects are determined by the integral of the control function with respect to time.

  1. Singularity of the time-energy uncertainty in adiabatic perturbation and cycloids on a Bloch sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco; Kais, Sabre

    2016-02-01

    Adiabatic perturbation is shown to be singular from the exact solution of a spin-1/2 particle in a uniformly rotating magnetic field. Due to a non-adiabatic effect, its quantum trajectory on a Bloch sphere is a cycloid traced by a circle rolling along an adiabatic path. As the magnetic field rotates more and more slowly, the time-energy uncertainty, proportional to the length of the quantum trajectory, calculated by the exact solution is entirely different from the one obtained by the adiabatic path traced by the instantaneous eigenstate. However, the non-adiabatic Aharonov- Anandan geometric phase, measured by the area enclosed by the exact path, approaches smoothly the adiabatic Berry phase, proportional to the area enclosed by the adiabatic path. The singular limit of the time-energy uncertainty and the regular limit of the geometric phase are associated with the arc length and arc area of the cycloid on a Bloch sphere, respectively. Prolate and curtate cycloids are also traced by different initial states outside and inside of the rolling circle, respectively. The axis trajectory of the rolling circle, parallel to the adiabatic path, is shown to be an example of transitionless driving. The non-adiabatic resonance is visualized by the number of cycloid arcs.

  2. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  3. Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer (SQOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-05

    has photon loss in the optical fibre would appear has an effective T1 process and destroy any entanglement. 2.2.3 TEMPORAL MODE FILTER FUNCTION To...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The SQOT (Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer) project proposes to build a novel electro- optic system which can...exchange quantum information between optical qubits at telecom frequencies and superconducting qubits. A direct quantum information transfer between

  4. On the adiabatic theorem when eigenvalues dive into the continuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Decebal Horia; Jensen, Arne; Knörr, Hans Konrad

    For a Wigner-Weisskopf model of an atom consisting of a quantum dot coupled to an energy reservoir described by a three-dimensional Laplacian we study the survival probability of a bound state when the dot energy varies smoothly and adiabatically in time. The initial state corresponds to a discrete...... eigenvalue which dives into the continuous spectrum and re-emerges from it as the dot energy is varied in time and finally returns to its initial value. Our main result is that for a large class of couplings, the survival probability of this bound state vanishes in the adiabatic limit....

  5. Field-Induced Quantum Critical Point and Nodal Superconductivity in the Heavy-Fermion Superconductor Ce_{2}PdIn_{8}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Dong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The in-plane resistivity ρ and thermal conductivity κ of the heavy-fermion superconductor Ce_{2}PdIn_{8} single crystals were measured down to 50 mK. A field-induced quantum critical point, occurring at the upper critical field H_{c2}, is demonstrated from the ρ(T∼T near H_{c2} and ρ(T∼T^{2} when further increasing the field. The large residual linear term κ_{0}/T at zero field and the rapid increase of κ(H/T at low field give evidence for nodal superconductivity in Ce_{2}PdIn_{8}. The jump of κ(H/T near H_{c2} suggests a first-order-like phase transition at low temperature. These results mimic the features of the famous CeCoIn_{5} superconductor, implying that Ce_{2}PdIn_{8} may be another interesting compound to investigate for the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity.

  6. Inducing Strong Non-Linearities in a Phonon Trapping Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator Coupled to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Goryachev

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is designed to coherently trap phonons in such a way that they are well confined and immune to suspension losses so they exhibit extremely high acoustic Q-factors at low temperature, with Q × f products of order 10 18 Hz. In this work we couple such a resonator to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID amplifier and investigate effects in the strong signal regime. Both parallel and series connection topologies of the system are investigated. The study reveals significant non-Duffing response that is associated with the nonlinear characteristics of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity provides quasi-periodic structure of the spectrum in both incident power and frequency. The result gives an insight into the open loop behaviour of a future Cryogenic Quartz Oscillator in the strong signal regime.

  7. High-temperature superconducting quantum interference device with cooled LC resonant circuit for measuring alternating magnetic fields with improved signal-to-noise ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Longqing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I; Usoskin, Alexander

    2007-05-01

    Certain applications of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) require a magnetic field measurement only in a very narrow frequency range. In order to selectively improve the alternating-current (ac) magnetic field sensitivity of a high-temperature superconductor SQUID for a distinct frequency, a single-coil LC resonant circuit has been used. Within the liquid nitrogen bath, the coil surrounds the SQUID and couples to it inductively. Copper coils with different numbers of windings were used to cover the frequency range from circuit, the signal-to-noise ratio of measurements could be improved typically by one order of magnitude or more in a narrow frequency band around the resonance frequency exceeding a few kilohertz. The best attained equivalent magnetic field resolution was 2.5 fT/radicalHz at 88 kHz. The experimental findings are in good agreement with mathematical analysis of the circuit with copper coil.

  8. High temperature superconductivity: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedell, K.S.; Coffey, D.; Meltzer, D.E.; Pines, D.; Schrieffer, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This book is the result of a symposium at Los Alamos in 1989 on High Temperature Superconductivity. The topics covered include: phenomenology, quantum spin liquids, spin space fluctuations in the insulating and metallic phases, normal state properties, and numerical studies and simulations. (JF)

  9. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The time of operation of an adiabatic quantum computer must be less than the decoherence time, otherwise the computer would be nonoperative. So far, the nonadiabatic corrections to an adiabatic quantum computer are merely theoretical considerations. By the above reason, we consider the particular case of a ...

  10. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The time of operation of an adiabatic quantum computer must be less than the decoherence time, otherwise the computer would be nonoperative. So far, the nonadiabatic corrections to an adiabatic quantum computer are merely theoretical considerations. By the above reason, we consider the particular case of a ...

  11. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... Abstract. The time of operation of an adiabatic quantum computer must be less than the decoherence time, otherwise the computer would be nonoperative. So far, the nonadiabatic cor- rections to an adiabatic quantum computer are merely theoretical considerations. By the above reason, we consider the ...

  12. Coherent tunneling adiabatic passage with the alternating coupling scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, L M; Greentree, A D; Conrad, V I; Hollenberg, L C L; Jamieson, D N

    2009-01-01

    The use of adiabatic passage techniques to mediate particle transport through real space, rather than phase space, is becoming an interesting possibility. We have investigated the properties of coherent tunneling adiabatic passage (CTAP) with alternating tunneling matrix elements. This coupling scheme, not previously considered in the donor in silicon paradigm, provides an interesting route to long-range quantum transport. We introduce simplified coupling protocols and transient eigenspectra as well as a realistic gate design for this transport protocol. Using a pairwise treatment of the tunnel couplings for a five-donor device with 30 nm donor spacings, 120 nm total chain length, we estimate the timescale required for adiabatic operation to be ∼70 ns, a time well within the measured electron spin and estimated charge relaxation times for phosphorus donors in silicon.

  13. Quantum statistical field theory an introduction to Schwinger's variational method with Green's function nanoapplications, graphene and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern Horing, Norman J

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the methods of coupled quantum statistical field theory and Green's functions. The methods of coupled quantum field theory have played a major role in the extensive development of nonrelativistic quantum many-particle theory and condensed matter physics. This introduction to the subject is intended to facilitate delivery of the material in an easily digestible form to advanced undergraduate physics majors at a relatively early stage of their scientific development. The main mechanism to accomplish this is the early introduction of variational calculus and the Schwinger Action Principle, accompanied by Green's functions. Important achievements of the theory in condensed matter and quantum statistical physics are reviewed in detail to help develop research capability. These include the derivation of coupled field Green's function equations-of-motion for a model electron-hole-phonon system, extensive discussions of retarded, thermodynamic and nonequilibrium Green's functions...

  14. Long-lasting quantum memories: Extending the coherence time of superconducting artificial atoms in the ultrastrong-coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassi, Roberto; Nori, Franco

    2018-03-01

    Quantum systems are affected by interactions with their environments, causing decoherence through two processes: pure dephasing and energy relaxation. For quantum information processing it is important to increase the coherence time of Josephson qubits and other artificial two-level atoms. We show theoretically that if the coupling between these qubits and a cavity field is longitudinal and in the ultrastrong-coupling regime, the system is strongly protected against relaxation. Vice versa, if the coupling is transverse and in the ultrastrong-coupling regime, the system is protected against pure dephasing. Taking advantage of the relaxation suppression, we show that it is possible to enhance their coherence time and use these qubits as quantum memories. Indeed, to preserve the coherence from pure dephasing, we prove that it is possible to apply dynamical decoupling. We also use an auxiliary atomic level to store and retrieve quantum information.

  15. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, L.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  16. Statistical mechanics of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kita, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical, step-by-step comprehensive explanation of superconductivity for undergraduate and graduate students who have completed elementary courses on thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. To this end, it adopts the unique approach of starting with the statistical mechanics of quantum ideal gases and successively adding and clarifying elements and techniques indispensible for understanding it. They include the spin-statistics theorem, second quantization, density matrices, the Bloch–De Dominicis theorem, the variational principle in statistical mechanics, attractive interaction, and bound states. Ample examples of their usage are also provided in terms of topics from advanced statistical mechanics such as two-particle correlations of quantum ideal gases, derivation of the Hartree–Fock equations, and Landau’s Fermi-liquid theory, among others. With these preliminaries, the fundamental mean-field equations of superconductivity are derived with maximum mathematical clarity based on ...

  17. Exploring Interacting Quantum Many-Body Systems by Experimentally Creating Continuous Matrix Product States in Superconducting Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Eichler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving the understanding of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems such as gases of interacting atoms or electrons is one of the most important challenges in modern condensed matter physics, materials research, and chemistry. Enormous progress has been made in the past decades in developing both classical and quantum approaches to calculate, simulate, and experimentally probe the properties of such systems. In this work, we use a combination of classical and quantum methods to experimentally explore the properties of an interacting quantum gas by creating experimental realizations of continuous matrix product states—a class of states that has proven extremely powerful as a variational ansatz for numerical simulations. By systematically preparing and probing these states using a circuit quantum electrodynamics system, we experimentally determine a good approximation to the ground-state wave function of the Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian, which describes an interacting Bose gas in one dimension. Since the simulated Hamiltonian is encoded in the measurement observable rather than the controlled quantum system, this approach has the potential to apply to a variety of models including those involving multicomponent interacting fields. Our findings also hint at the possibility of experimentally exploring general properties of matrix product states and entanglement theory. The scheme presented here is applicable to a broad range of systems exploiting strong and tunable light-matter interactions.

  18. Rf superconducting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, W.H.; Passow, C.

    1975-01-01

    Topics discussed include (1) the theory of superconductors in high-frequency fields (London surface impedance, anomalous normal surface resistance, pippard nonlocal theory, quantum mechanical model, superconductor parameters, quantum mechanical calculation techniques for the surface, impedance, and experimental verification of surface impedance theories); (2) residual resistance (separation of losses, magnetic field effects, surface resistance of imperfect and impure conductors, residual loss due to acoustic coupling, losses from nonideal surfaces, high magnetic field losses, field emission, and nonlinear effects); (3) design and performance of superconducting devices (design considerations, materials and fabrication techniques, measurement of performance, and frequency stability); (4) devices for particle acceleration and deflection (advantages and problems of using superconductors, accelerators for fast particles, accelerators for particles with slow velocities, beam optical devices separators, and applications and projects under way); (5) applications of low-power superconducting resonators (superconducting filters and tuners, oscillators and detectors, mixers and amplifiers, antennas and output tanks, superconducting resonators for materials research, and radiation detection with loaded superconducting resonators); and (6) transmission and delay lines

  19. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  20. Gambling with Superconducting Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, Marek; Zgirski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    Josephson junctions and superconducting nanowires, when biased close to superconducting critical current, can switch to a nonzero voltage state by thermal or quantum fluctuations. The process is understood as an escape of a Brownian particle from a metastable state. Since this effect is fully stochastic, we propose to use it for generating random numbers. We present protocol for obtaining random numbers and test the experimentally harvested data for their fidelity. Our work is prerequisite for using the Josephson junction as a tool for stochastic (probabilistic) determination of physical parameters such as magnetic flux, temperature, and current.

  1. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I.; Israelsson, U.; Lee, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics research program, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum fluid based sensor and modeling technology.

  2. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  3. The adiabatic approximation in multichannel scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    Using two-dimensional models, an attempt has been made to get an impression of the conditions of validity of the adiabatic approximation. For a nucleon bound to a rotating nucleus the Coriolis coupling is neglected and the relation between this nuclear Coriolis coupling and the classical Coriolis force has been examined. The approximation for particle scattering from an axially symmetric rotating nucleus based on a short duration of the collision, has been combined with an approximation based on the limitation of angular momentum transfer between particle and nucleus. Numerical calculations demonstrate the validity of the new combined method. The concept of time duration for quantum mechanical collisions has also been studied, as has the collective description of permanently deformed nuclei. (C.F.)

  4. An adiabatic focuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.; Oide, K.; Sessler, A.M.; Yu, S.S.

    1989-08-01

    Theoretical analysis is made of an intense relativistic electron beam, such as would be available from a linear collider, moving through a plasma of increasing density, but density always less than that of the beam (underdense). In this situation, the plasma electrons are expelled from the beam channel and the electrons are subject to an ever-increasing focusing force provided by the channel ions. Analysis is made on the beam radiation energy loss in the classical, the transition, and the quantum regimes. It is shown that the focuser is insensitive to the beam energy spread behaviors in the nonclassical regimes, the radiation limit on lenses (the Oide limit) can be exceeded. The sensitivity of the system to the topic mismatch and the nonlinearity is also analyzed. Examples are given with SLC-type and TLC-type parameters. 9 refs., 1 tab

  5. Analysis of Adiabatic Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erald Gjonaj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of acetic anhydride is reacted with excess water in an adiabatic batch reactor to form an exothermic reaction. The concentration of acetic anhydride and the temperature inside the adiabatic batch reactor are calculated with an initial temperature of 20°C, an initial temperature of 30°C, and with a cooling jacket maintaining the temperature at a constant of 20°C. The graphs of the three different scenarios show that the highest temperatures will cause the reaction to occur faster.

  6. Adiabatic temperature change from non-adiabatic measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carvalho, A.M.G.; Mejía, C.S.; Ponte, C.A.; Silva, L.E.L.; Kaštil, Jiří; Kamarád, Jiří; Gomes, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2016), s. 1-5, č. článku 246. ISSN 0947-8396 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetocaloric effect * adiabatic temperature change * calorimetric device * gadolinium Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.455, year: 2016

  7. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  8. Majorana modes and Kondo effect in a quantum dot attached to a topological superconducting wire (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernek, Edson; Ruiz-Tijerina, David; da Silva, Luis D.; Egues, José Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Quantum dot attached to topological wires has become an interesting setup to study Majorana bound state in condensed matter[1]. One of the major advantage of using a quantum dot for this purpose is that it provides a suitable manner to study the interplay between Majorana bound states and the Kondo effect. Recently we have shown that a non-interacting quantum dot side-connected to a 1D topological superconductor and to metallic normal leads can sustain a Majorana mode even when the dot is empty. This is due to the Majorana bound state of the wire leaking into the quantum dot. Now we investigate the system for the case in which the quantum dot is interacting[3]. We explore the signatures of a Majorana zero-mode leaking into the quantum dot, using a recursive Green's function approach. We then study the Kondo regime using numerical renormalization group calculations. In this regime, we show that a "0.5" contribution to the conductance appears in system due to the presence of the Majorana mode, and that it persists for a wide range of the dot parameters. In the particle-hole symmetric point, in which the Kondo effect is more robust, the total conductance reaches 3e^2/2h, clearly indicating the coexistence of a Majorana mode and the Kondo resonance in the dot. However, the Kondo effect is suppressed by a gate voltage that detunes the dot from its particle-hole symmetric point as well as by a Zeeman field. The Majorana mode, on the other hand, is almost insensitive to both of them. We show that the zero-bias conductance as a function of the magnetic field follows a well-known universal curve. This can be observed experimentally, and we propose that this universality followed by a persistent conductance of 0.5,e^2/h are evidence for the presence of Majorana-Kondo physics. This work is supported by the Brazilians agencies FAPESP, CNPq and FAPEMIG. [1] A. Y. Kitaev, Ann.Phys. {bf 303}, 2 (2003). [2] E. Vernek, P.H. Penteado, A. C. Seridonio, J. C. Egues, Phys. Rev. B {bf

  9. Nonmagnetic high pressure cell for magnetic remanence measurements up to 1.5 GPa in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Ravil A; Bezaeva, Natalia S; Kharkovskiy, Alexander I; Rochette, Pierre; Gattacceca, Jérome; Trukhin, Vladimir I

    2008-11-01

    We describe here a compact nonmagnetic composite high pressure cell of piston-cylinder type with inner diameter of 6 mm equipped with manganin pressure sensor. This cell was developed for room temperature measurements of magnetic remanence of relatively large rock samples (up to 5.8 mm in diameter and 15 mm long cylinders) under hydrostatic pressure up to 1.5 GPa (the operating pressure limit) in the 2G Enterprises superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. Its design was focused on minimizing the remanent magnetic moment m(r) of the cell (m(r)=3 x 10(-8) A m(2)) that allowed direct measurements of remanent magnetic moment M(r) under pressure for weakly magnetic materials-rock samples (M(r) epsilon[5 x 10(-7),10(-4)] A m(2)). The inner part of this composite cell is made of hard "Russian alloy" (Ni(57)Cr(40)Al(3)) whereas the envelope of the cell corps is made of less magnetic titanium alloy. This design solution permitted to reduce the total remanent magnetic moment of the whole cell and represents the main device feature. We describe here the choice of materials for pressure cell based on their magnetic and mechanical properties, the choice of the pressure transmitting medium (polyethilsiloxane liquid) providing perfectly hydrostatic conditions for the sample as well as the cell geometry. The cell performance is illustrated by results of pressure demagnetization experiments on rocks and minerals.

  10. Low-noise YBa2Cu3O7-x single layer dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer based on bicrystal junctions with 30° misorientation angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J.; Drung, D.; Ludwig, F.; Minotani, T.; Enpuku, K.

    1998-01-01

    We have fabricated and characterized a low-noise direct-coupled magnetometer based on a 100 pH YBa2Cu3O7-x dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) on a 10 mm×10 mm SrTiO3 bicrystal substrate with 30° misorientation angle. The thin films were deposited by hollow cathode discharge sputtering and patterned using conventional photolithography and Ar ion beam etching. The SQUID magnetometer was operated using direct-coupled flux-locked-loop electronics with bias reversal. The sensor had a usable voltage swing of 39 μV and a white magnetic field noise of 32 fTHz-1/2 with a 1/f corner at 2 Hz, including electronics and environmental noise. The voltage versus flux (V-Φ) characteristic showed a pronounced distortion on the negative slope. Numerical simulations were performed to explain the distorted V-Φ characteristic. Measurements of magnetocardiograms demonstrate the suitability of this sensor for biomagnetic applications.

  11. A Many Particle Adiabatic Invariant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    1999-01-01

    For a system of N charged particles moving in a homogeneous, sufficiently strong magnetic field, a many-particle adiabatic invariant constrains the collisional exchange of energy between the degrees of freedom perpendicular to and parallel to the magnetic field. A description of the phenomenon...

  12. Superconducting Ferromagnetic Nanodiamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gufei; Samuely, Tomas; Xu, Zheng; Jochum, Johanna K; Volodin, Alexander; Zhou, Shengqiang; May, Paul W; Onufriienko, Oleksandr; Kačmarčík, Jozef; Steele, Julian A; Li, Jun; Vanacken, Johan; Vacík, Jiri; Szabó, Pavol; Yuan, Haifeng; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Cerbu, Dorin; Samuely, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2017-06-27

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are two mutually antagonistic states in condensed matter. Research on the interplay between these two competing orderings sheds light not only on the cause of various quantum phenomena in strongly correlated systems but also on the general mechanism of superconductivity. Here we report on the observation of the electronic entanglement between superconducting and ferromagnetic states in hydrogenated boron-doped nanodiamond films, which have a superconducting transition temperature T c ∼ 3 K and a Curie temperature T Curie > 400 K. In spite of the high T Curie , our nanodiamond films demonstrate a decrease in the temperature dependence of magnetization below 100 K, in correspondence to an increase in the temperature dependence of resistivity. These anomalous magnetic and electrical transport properties reveal the presence of an intriguing precursor phase, in which spin fluctuations intervene as a result of the interplay between the two antagonistic states. Furthermore, the observations of high-temperature ferromagnetism, giant positive magnetoresistance, and anomalous Hall effect bring attention to the potential applications of our superconducting ferromagnetic nanodiamond films in magnetoelectronics, spintronics, and magnetic field sensing.

  13. Applied superconductivity. Handbook on devices and applications. Vol. 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Paul (ed.) [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik, AG Tieftemperaturphysik

    2015-07-01

    The both volumes contain the following 12 chapters: 1. Fundamentals; 2. Superconducting Materials; 3. Technology, Preparation, and Characterization (bulk materials, thin films, multilayers, wires, tapes; cooling); 4, Superconducting Magnets; 5. Power Applications (superconducting cables, superconducting current leads, fault current limiters, transformers, SMES and flywheels; rotating machines; SmartGrids); 6. Superconductive Passive Devices (superconducting microwave components; cavities for accelerators; superconducting pickup coils; magnetic shields); 7. Applications in Quantum Metrology (superconducting hot electron bolometers; transition edge sensors; SIS Mixers; superconducting photon detectors; applications at Terahertz frequency; detector readout); 8. Superconducting Radiation and Particle Detectors; 9. Superconducting Quantum Interference (SQUIDs); 10. Superconductor Digital Electronics; 11. Other Applications (Josephson arrays as radiation sources. Tunable microwave devices) and 12. Summary and Outlook (of the superconducting devices).

  14. On the adiabatic representation of Meyer-Miller electronic-nuclear dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Stephen J; Liang, Ruibin; Miller, William H

    2017-08-14

    The Meyer-Miller (MM) classical vibronic (electronic + nuclear) Hamiltonian for electronically non-adiabatic dynamics-as used, for example, with the recently developed symmetrical quasiclassical (SQC) windowing model-can be written in either a diabatic or an adiabatic representation of the electronic degrees of freedom, the two being a canonical transformation of each other, thus giving the same dynamics. Although most recent applications of this SQC/MM approach have been carried out in the diabatic representation-because most of the benchmark model problems that have exact quantum results available for comparison are typically defined in a diabatic representation-it will typically be much more convenient to work in the adiabatic representation, e.g., when using Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces (PESs) and derivative couplings that come from electronic structure calculations. The canonical equations of motion (EOMs) (i.e., Hamilton's equations) that come from the adiabatic MM Hamiltonian, however, in addition to the common first-derivative couplings, also involve second-derivative non-adiabatic coupling terms (as does the quantum Schrödinger equation), and the latter are considerably more difficult to calculate. This paper thus revisits the adiabatic version of the MM Hamiltonian and describes a modification of the classical adiabatic EOMs that are entirely equivalent to Hamilton's equations but that do not involve the second-derivative couplings. The second-derivative coupling terms have not been neglected; they simply do not appear in these modified adiabatic EOMs. This means that SQC/MM calculations can be carried out in the adiabatic representation, without approximation, needing only the PESs and the first-derivative coupling elements. The results of example SQC/MM calculations are presented, which illustrate this point, and also the fact that simply neglecting the second-derivative couplings in Hamilton's equations (and presumably also in the Schr

  15. Superconducting Coset Topological Fluids in Josephson Junction Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Diamantini, M C; Trugenberger, C A; Sodano, Pasquale; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2006-01-01

    We show that the superconducting ground state of planar Josephson junction arrays is a P- and T-invariant coset topological quantum fluid whose topological order is characterized by the degeneracy 2 on the torus. This new mechanism for planar superconductivity is the P- and T-invariant analogue of Laughlin's quantum Hall fluids. The T=0 insulator-superconductor quantum transition is a quantum critical point characterized by gauge fields and deconfined degrees of freedom. Experiments on toroidal Josephson junction arrays could provide the first direct evidence for topological order and superconducting quantum fluids.

  16. Quantum memristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  17. Plasma heating by adiabatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.A. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    These two lectures will cover the following three topics: (i) The application of adiabatic compression to toroidal devices is reviewed. The special case of adiabatic compression in tokamaks is considered in more detail, including a discussion of the equilibrium, scaling laws, and heating effects. (ii) The ATC (Adiabatic Toroidal Compressor) device which was completed in May 1972, is described in detail. Compression of a tokamak plasma across a static toroidal field is studied in this device. The device is designed to produce a pre-compression plasma with a major radius of 17 cm, toroidal field of 20 kG, and current of 90 kA. The compression leads to a plasma with major radius of 38 cm and minor radius of 10 cm. Scaling laws imply a density increase of a factor 6, temperature increase of a factor 3, and current increase of a factor 2.4. An additional feature of ATC is that it is a large tokamak which operates without a copper shell. (iii) Data which show that the expected MHD behavior is largely observed is presented and discussed. (U.S.)

  18. On the adiabatic theorem when eigenvalues dive into the continuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Decebal Horia; Jensen, Arne; Knörr, Hans Konrad

    2018-01-01

    We consider a reduced two-channel model of an atom consisting of a quantum dot coupled to an open scattering channel described by a three-dimensional Laplacian. We are interested in the survival probability of a bound state when the dot energy varies smoothly and adiabatically in time. The initia...... in the adiabatic limit. At the end of the paper, we present a short outlook on how our method may be extended to cover other classes of Hamiltonians; details will be given elsewhere....... state corresponds to a discrete eigenvalue which dives into the continuous spectrum and re-emerges from it as the dot energy is varied in time and finally returns to its initial value. Our main result is that for a large class of couplings, the survival probability of this bound state vanishes...

  19. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  20. Cooperative phenomena in superconducting atom-chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Kubala, Bjoern; Ankerhold, Joachim [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the physics of hybrid quantum systems, where a cloud of cold atoms is coupled to superconducting microstructures, so called superconducting atom-chips. Coherent enhancement, due to the large number of atoms in the cloud, opens a path to the study of strong coupling effects, like superradiance/Dicke-physics in a decohering environment. A structured environment can be designed by embedding a Cooper pair box within the cavity. Moreover, in such a system the transfer of quantum information between the atomic cloud and the superconducting solid state system can be studied.

  1. Superconductivity in all its states

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    Temporary exhibition at the Saint-Genis-Pouilly Tourist Office. For the 100th anniversary of its discovery, take a plunge into the amazing world of superconductivity. Some materials, when cooled down to extreme temperatures, acquire a remarkable property -  they become superconducting. Superconductivity is a rare example of a quantum effect that can be witnessed on the macroscopic scale and is today at the heart of much research. In laboratories, researchers try to gain a better understanding of its origins, study new superconducting materials, explore the phenomenon at the nanometric scale and pursue their indefatigable search for new applications. Monday to Friday: 09:00 a.m. to 12:00 and 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday: 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon » Open to all – Admission free For further information: +33 (0)4 50 42 29 37

  2. Exotic quantum holonomy and higher-order exceptional points in quantum kicked tops

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Atushi; Kim, Sang Wook; Cheon, Taksu

    2014-01-01

    The correspondence between exotic quantum holonomy that occurs in families of Hermitian cycles, and exceptional points (EPs) for non-Hermitian quantum theory is examined in quantum kicked tops. Under a suitable condition, an explicit expressions of the adiabatic parameter dependencies of quasienergies and stationary states, which exhibit anholonomies, are obtained. It is also shown that the quantum kicked tops with the complexified adiabatic parameter have a higher order EP, which is broken i...

  3. Towards Quantum Simulation with Circular Rydberg Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Nguyen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of quantum simulation is an in-depth understanding of many-body physics, which is important for fundamental issues (quantum phase transitions, transport, … and for the development of innovative materials. Analytic approaches to many-body systems are limited, and the huge size of their Hilbert space makes numerical simulations on classical computers intractable. A quantum simulator avoids these limitations by transcribing the system of interest into another, with the same dynamics but with interaction parameters under control and with experimental access to all relevant observables. Quantum simulation of spin systems is being explored with trapped ions, neutral atoms, and superconducting devices. We propose here a new paradigm for quantum simulation of spin-1/2 arrays, providing unprecedented flexibility and allowing one to explore domains beyond the reach of other platforms. It is based on laser-trapped circular Rydberg atoms. Their long intrinsic lifetimes, combined with the inhibition of their microwave spontaneous emission and their low sensitivity to collisions and photoionization, make trapping lifetimes in the minute range realistic with state-of-the-art techniques. Ultracold defect-free circular atom chains can be prepared by a variant of the evaporative cooling method. This method also leads to the detection of arbitrary spin observables with single-site resolution. The proposed simulator realizes an XXZ spin-1/2 Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings ranging from a few to tens of kilohertz. All the model parameters can be dynamically tuned at will, making a large range of simulations accessible. The system evolution can be followed over times in the range of seconds, long enough to be relevant for ground-state adiabatic preparation and for the study of thermalization, disorder, or Floquet time crystals. The proposed platform already presents unrivaled features for quantum simulation of regular spin chains. We

  4. Towards Quantum Simulation with Circular Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. L.; Raimond, J. M.; Sayrin, C.; Cortiñas, R.; Cantat-Moltrecht, T.; Assemat, F.; Dotsenko, I.; Gleyzes, S.; Haroche, S.; Roux, G.; Jolicoeur, Th.; Brune, M.

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of quantum simulation is an in-depth understanding of many-body physics, which is important for fundamental issues (quantum phase transitions, transport, …) and for the development of innovative materials. Analytic approaches to many-body systems are limited, and the huge size of their Hilbert space makes numerical simulations on classical computers intractable. A quantum simulator avoids these limitations by transcribing the system of interest into another, with the same dynamics but with interaction parameters under control and with experimental access to all relevant observables. Quantum simulation of spin systems is being explored with trapped ions, neutral atoms, and superconducting devices. We propose here a new paradigm for quantum simulation of spin-1 /2 arrays, providing unprecedented flexibility and allowing one to explore domains beyond the reach of other platforms. It is based on laser-trapped circular Rydberg atoms. Their long intrinsic lifetimes, combined with the inhibition of their microwave spontaneous emission and their low sensitivity to collisions and photoionization, make trapping lifetimes in the minute range realistic with state-of-the-art techniques. Ultracold defect-free circular atom chains can be prepared by a variant of the evaporative cooling method. This method also leads to the detection of arbitrary spin observables with single-site resolution. The proposed simulator realizes an X X Z spin-1 /2 Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings ranging from a few to tens of kilohertz. All the model parameters can be dynamically tuned at will, making a large range of simulations accessible. The system evolution can be followed over times in the range of seconds, long enough to be relevant for ground-state adiabatic preparation and for the study of thermalization, disorder, or Floquet time crystals. The proposed platform already presents unrivaled features for quantum simulation of regular spin chains. We discuss

  5. Laser cooling by adiabatic transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcia, Matthew; Cline, Julia; Bartolotta, John; Holland, Murray; Thompson, James

    2017-04-01

    We have demonstrated a new method of laser cooling applicable to particles with narrow linewidth optical transitions. This simple and robust cooling mechanism uses a frequency-swept laser to adiabatically transfer atoms between internal and motional states. The role of spontaneous emission is reduced (though is still critical) compared to Doppler cooling. This allows us to achieve greater slowing forces than would be possible with Doppler cooling, and may make this an appealing technique for cooling molecules. In this talk, I will present a demonstration of this technique in a cold strontium system. DARPA QUASAR, NIST, NSF PFC.

  6. A Phase Matching, Adiabatic Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [Hamburg U.; Flöttmann, Klaus [DESY; Kärtner, Franz [CFEL, Hamburg; Piot, Philippe [Northern Illinois U.

    2017-05-01

    Tabletop accelerators are a thing of the future. Reducing their size will require scaling down electromagnetic wavelengths; however, without correspondingly high field gradients, particles will be more susceptible to phase-slippage – especially at low energy. We investigate how an adiabatically-tapered dielectric-lined waveguide could maintain phase-matching between the accelerating mode and electron bunch. We benchmark our simple model with CST and implement it into ASTRA; finally we provide a first glimpse into the beam dynamics in a phase-matching accelerator.

  7. Organic superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, D.

    1980-01-01

    We present the experimental evidences for the existence of a superconducting state in the Quasi One Dimensional organic conductor (TMTSF) 2 PF 6 . Superconductivity occuring at 1 K under 12 kbar is characterized by a zero resistance diamagnetic state. The anistropy of the upper critical field of this type II superconductor is consistent with the band structure anistropy. We present evidences for the existence of large superconducting precursor effects giving rise to a dominant paraconductive contribution below 40 K. We also discuss the anomalously large pressure dependence of T sb(s), which drops to 0.19 K under 24 kbar in terms of the current theories. (author)

  8. Circuit QED and engineering charge-based superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girvin, S M; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208284, New Haven, CT 06520-8248 (United States)], E-mail: steven.girvin@yale.edu, E-mail: michel.devoret@yale.edu, E-mail: robert.schoelkopf@yale.edu

    2009-12-15

    The last two decades have seen tremendous advances in our ability to generate and manipulate quantum coherence in mesoscopic superconducting circuits. These advances have opened up the study of quantum optics of microwave photons in superconducting circuits as well as providing important hardware for the manipulation of quantum information. Focusing primarily on charge-based qubits, we provide a brief overview of these developments and discuss the present state of the art. We also survey the remarkable progress that has been made in realizing circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) in which superconducting artificial atoms are strongly coupled to individual microwave photons.

  9. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in Tm3+:YAG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A. L.; Lauro, R.; Louchet, A.; Chaneliere, T.; Le Goueet, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a Tm 3+ :YAG crystal. Tm 3+ :YAG is a promising material for use in quantum information processing applications, but as yet there are few experimental investigations of coherent Raman processes in this material. We investigate the effect of inhomogeneous broadening and Rabi frequency on the transfer efficiency and the width of the two-photon spectrum. Simulations of the complete Tm 3+ :YAG system are presented along with the corresponding experimental results

  10. Piecewise Adiabatic Passage with a Series of Femtosecond Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, E. A.; Milner, V.; Menzel-Jones, C.; Shapiro, M.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a method of executing complete population transfers between quantum states in a piecewise manner using a series of femtosecond laser pulses. The method can be applied to a large class of problems as it benefits from the high peak powers and large spectral bandwidths afforded by femtosecond pulses. The degree of population transfer is robust to a wide variation in the absolute and relative intensities, durations, and time ordering of the pulses. The method is studied in detail for atomic sodium where piecewise adiabatic population transfer, as well as the induction of Ramsey-type interferences, is demonstrated

  11. Superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Shepard, K.W.; Wangler, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    This project has two goals: to design, build, and test a small superconducting linac to serve as an energy booster for heavy ions from an FN tandem electrostatic accelerator, and to investigate various aspects of superconducting rf technology. The main design features of the booster are described, a status report on various components (resonators, rf control system, linac control system, cryostats, buncher) is given, and plans for the near future are outlined. Investigations of superconducting-linac technology concern studies on materials and fabrication techniques, resonator diagnostic techniques, rf-phase control, beam dynamics computer programs, asymmetry in accelerating field, and surface-treatment techniques. The overall layout of the to-be-proposed ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System, is shown; the ATLAS would use superconducting technology to produce beams of 5 to 25 MeV/A. 6 figures

  12. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormann, R.; Loiseau, R.; Marcilhac, B.

    1989-01-01

    The invention concerns superconducting ceramics containing essentially barium, calcium and copper fluorinated oxides with close offset and onset temperatures around 97 K and 100 K and containing neither Y nor rare earth [fr

  13. Phonon-mediated superconductivity in graphene by lithium deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profeta, Gianni; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is the physical realization of many fundamental concepts and phenomena in solid-state physics. However, in the list of graphene's many remarkable properties, superconductivity is notably absent. If it were possible to find a way to induce superconductivity, it could improve the performance and enable more efficient integration of a variety of promising device concepts including nanoscale superconducting quantum interference devices, single-electron superconductor-quantum dot devices, nanometre-scale superconducting transistors and cryogenic solid-state coolers. To this end, we explore the possibility of inducing superconductivity in a graphene sheet by doping its surface with alkaline metal adatoms, in a manner analogous to which superconductivity is induced in graphite intercalated compounds (GICs). As for GICs, we find that the electrical characteristics of graphene are sensitive to the species of adatom used. However, contrary to what happens in GICs, Li-covered graphene is superconducting at a much higher temperature with respect to Ca-covered graphene.

  14. Robust Concurrent Remote Entanglement Between Two Superconducting Qubits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Narla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Entangling two remote quantum systems that never interact directly is an essential primitive in quantum information science and forms the basis for the modular architecture of quantum computing. When protocols to generate these remote entangled pairs rely on using traveling single-photon states as carriers of quantum information, they can be made robust to photon losses, unlike schemes that rely on continuous variable states. However, efficiently detecting single photons is challenging in the domain of superconducting quantum circuits because of the low energy of microwave quanta. Here, we report the realization of a robust form of concurrent remote entanglement based on a novel microwave photon detector implemented in the superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics platform of quantum information. Remote entangled pairs with a fidelity of 0.57±0.01 are generated at 200 Hz. Our experiment opens the way for the implementation of the modular architecture of quantum computation with superconducting qubits.

  15. Quantum Knitting Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Matsuo, Shigemasa; Hatakenaka, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    We propose a fluxon-controlled quantum computer incorporated with three-qubit quantum error correction using special gate operations, i.e., joint-phase and SWAP gate operations, inherent in capacitively coupled superconducting flux qubits. The proposed quantum computer acts exactly like a knitting machine at home.

  16. Experimental studies of the NaCs 12(0+) [71Σ+] state: Spin-orbit and non-adiabatic interactions and quantum interference in the 12(0+) [71Σ+] and 11(0+) [53Π0] emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, C; Jones, J; Huennekens, J; Field, R W

    2017-03-14

    We present results from experimental studies of the 11(0 + ) and 12(0 + ) electronic states of the NaCs molecule. An optical-optical double resonance method is used to obtain Doppler-free excitation spectra. Selected data from the 11(0 + ) and 12(0 + ) high-lying electronic states are used to obtain Rydberg-Klein-Rees and Inverse Perturbation Approach potential energy curves. Interactions between these two electronic states are evident in the patterns observed in the bound-bound and bound-free fluorescence spectra. A model, based on two separate interaction mechanisms, is presented to describe how the wavefunctions of the two states mix. The electronic parts of the wavefunctions interact via spin-orbit coupling, while the individual rotation-vibration levels interact via a second mechanism, which is likely to be non-adiabatic coupling. A modified version of the BCONT program was used to simulate resolved fluorescence from both upper states. Parameters of the model that describe the two interaction mechanisms were varied until simulations were able to adequately reproduce experimental spectra.

  17. Introduction to superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rose-Innes, A C

    1978-01-01

    Introduction to Superconductivity differs from the first edition chiefly in Chapter 11, which has been almost completely rewritten to give a more physically-based picture of the effects arising from the long-range coherence of the electron-waves in superconductors and the operation of quantum interference devices. In this revised second edition, some further modifications have been made to the text and an extra chapter dealing with """"high-temperature"""" superconductors has been added. A vast amount of research has been carried out on these since their discovery in 1986 but the results, both

  18. Adiabatic limit in perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, H

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that, with correct mass and wave function renormalization, the time-ordered products for Wick polynomials T(L(y/sub 1/)...L(y/sub n/)) constructed by a method outlined in a previous paper (Epstein and Glaser, 1970) are such that the vectors of the form integral T(L(y/sub 1/)...L(y/sub n/)) g(y/sub 1/)...g(y/sub n/) psi dy/sub 1/...dy/sub n/ have limits when g tends to a constant, provided psi is chosen in a suitable dense domain. It follows that the S-matrix has unitary adiabatic limit as an operator-valued formal power series in Fock space. (4 refs).

  19. PhD thesis: Multipartite entanglement and quantum algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Alsina, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    PhD thesis dealing with various aspects of multipartite entanglement, such as entanglement measures, absolutely maximally entangled states, bell inequalities, entanglement spectrum and quantum frustration. Also some quantum algorithms run with the IBM quantum computer are covered, together with others applied to adiabatic quantum computation and quantum thermodynamics.

  20. Deviation from Berry's adiabatic geometric phase in a [sup 131]Xe nuclear gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelt, S.; Waeckerle, G.; Mehring, M. (2. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany))

    1994-06-20

    The concept of geometric phase is demonstrated in a nuclear gyroscope using [sup 131]Xe nuclear spins ([ital I]=3/2) as sensors for quantum-phase accumulation. By spatial rotation sub-Hertz splittings due to geometric phases are resolved in nuclear-quadrupole spectra. Deviations from Berry's adiabatic geometric phase appear in the regime of nonadiabatic rotation. The observed frequency splittings are no longer linear in the rotational frequency, as expected from adiabatic rotations, and all possible transitions, namely, six in this partially degenerate spin-3/3 system, are observed experimentally.

  1. Deviation from Berry's adiabatic geometric phase in a 131Xe nuclear gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelt, S.; Wäckerle, G.; Mehring, M.

    1994-06-01

    The concept of geometric phase is demonstrated in a nuclear gyroscope using 131Xe nuclear spins (I=3/2) as sensors for quantum-phase accumulation. By spatial rotation sub-Hertz splittings due to geometric phases are resolved in nuclear-quadrupole spectra. Deviations from Berry's adiabatic geometric phase appear in the regime of nonadiabatic rotation. The observed frequency splittings are no longer linear in the rotational frequency, as expected from adiabatic rotations, and all possible transitions, namely, six in this partially degenerate spin-3/3 system, are observed experimentally.

  2. Semiclassical Monte Carlo: A first principles approach to non-adiabatic molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Wang, Ruixi; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Modeling the dynamics of photophysical and (photo)chemical reactions in extended molecular systems is a new frontier for quantum chemistry. Many dynamical phenomena, such as intersystem crossing, non-radiative relaxation, and charge and energy transfer, require a non-adiabatic description which incorporate transitions between electronic states. Additionally, these dynamics are often highly sensitive to quantum coherences and interference effects. Several methods exist to simulate non-adiabatic dynamics; however, they are typically either too expensive to be applied to large molecular systems (10's-100's of atoms), or they are based on ad hoc schemes which may include severe approximations due to inconsistencies in classical and quantum mechanics. We present, in detail, an algorithm based on Monte Carlo sampling of the semiclassical time-dependent wavefunction that involves running simple surface hopping dynamics, followed by a post-processing step which adds little cost. The method requires only a few quantities from quantum chemistry calculations, can systematically be improved, and provides excellent agreement with exact quantum mechanical results. Here we show excellent agreement with exact solutions for scattering results of standard test problems. Additionally, we find that convergence of the wavefunction is controlled by complex valued phase factors, the size of the non-adiabatic coupling region, and the choice of sampling function. These results help in determining the range of applicability of the method, and provide a starting point for further improvement

  3. Quantum Computing Using Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    terahertz out-of-plane radiation using Josephson vortices in modulated layered superconductors ", Phys. Rev. B, in press (2005) 68. J.Q. You, J.S...Program Review, Florida, USA (2004) 95. F. Nor, " Terahertz generation and vortex motion control in superconductors ", 2005 APS March Meeting, Los Angeles...magnetic flux effects on superconductors . 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT b

  4. Superconducting inductive displacement detection of a microcantilever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-07-21

    We demonstrate a superconducting inductive technique to measure the displacement of a micromechanical resonator. In our scheme, a type I superconducting microsphere is attached to the free end of a microcantilever and approached to the loop of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometer. A local magnetic field as low as 100 μT, generated by a field coil concentric to the SQUID, enables detection of the cantilever thermomechanical noise at 4.2 K. The magnetomechanical coupling and the magnetic spring are in good agreement with image method calculations assuming pure Meissner effect. These measurements are relevant to recent proposals of quantum magnetomechanics experiments based on levitating superconducting microparticles.

  5. Topics in unconventional superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreto, Paul

    Disordered systems have been of continuing interest to condensed matter physicists. Disorder is associated with a wide range of interesting phenomena such as glassiness and localization. Superconductivity, the phase of matter in which materials conduct without dissipation, has similarly fascinated condensed matter physicists, as it is an outstanding example of the macroscopic effects of quantum mechanics. In this thesis, the interplay of superconductivity and disorder is discussed. The particular focus of this thesis is how a BCS d-wave superconductor in the quantum superconductor to metal transition can develop a global s-wave phase due to the existence of rare regions. The critical assumption of this work is that the metal is highly conducting. Though the calculations done in this thesis are all in the weak coupling framework, it is possible that this phase might be observed in the overdoped cuprates. Additionally, this thesis contains a discussion of the effect of critical nematic fluctuations on relativistic nodal quasiparticles. In this work, it is found that the nematic order increases the anisotropy in the velocity of the nodal quasiparticles and broadens the quasiparticle peaks except for a narrow wedge in momentum space near the Fermi surface where the quasiparticles remain sharp. The implications for the cuprates are discussed.

  6. Superconducting rotating electronic machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Hui Yeong

    1989-04-01

    This book is divided into ten chapters, which handles summary of superconducting electronic machine, aspect of using of superconductor, superconducting direct current : Homopolar D. C. Machines, Drum machines, segmented slip-ring principle and carbon fibre brushes, superconducting alternating current turbine generator, design of superconducting alternating current machine, performance of superconducting alternating current machine, superconducting turbo generator by new rotor design, basic design of superconducting current generator, generator and power model, design of rotor and information of material property.

  7. Superconducting transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    A three film superconducting tunneling device, analogous to a semiconductor transistor, is presented, including a theoretical description and experimental results showing a current gain of four. Much larger current gains are shown to be feasible. Such a development is particularly interesting because of its novelty and the striking analogies with the semiconductor junction transistor

  8. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruvalds, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermi liquid nesting in high temperature superconductors; optical properties of high temperature superconductors; Hall effect in superconducting La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 ; source of high transition temperatures; and prospects for new superconductors

  9. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-T c superconductor at low temperature

  10. Bipolar superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankratov, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    A model of bipolaron superconductivity suggested by Soviet scientist Alexandrov A.S. and French scientist Ranninger is presentes in a popular way. It is noted that the bipolaron theory gives a good explanation of certain properties of new superconductors, high critical temperature, in particular

  11. Thermoelectric Effects under Adiabatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Levy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates not fully explained voltage offsets observed by several researchers during the measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high Z materials. These offsets, traditionally attributed to faulty laboratory procedures, have proven to have an irreducible component that cannot be fully eliminated in spite of careful laboratory procedures. In fact, these offsets are commonly observed and routinely subtracted out of commercially available Seebeck measurement systems. This paper offers a possible explanation based on the spontaneous formation of an adiabatic temperature gradient in the presence of a force field. The diffusion-diffusion heat transport mechanism is formulated and applied to predict two new thermoelectric effects. The first is the existence of a temperature gradient across a potential barrier in a semiconductor and the second is the Onsager reciprocal of the first, that is, the presence of a measureable voltage that arises across a junction when the temperature gradient is forced to zero by a thermal clamp. Suggested future research includes strategies for utilizing the new thermoelectric effects.

  12. Geometry of quantal adiabatic evolution driven by a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhaoyan; Yu Ting; Zhou Hongwei

    1994-01-01

    It is shown by using a counter example, which is exactly solvable, that the quantal adiabatic theorem does not generally hold for a non-Hermitian driving Hamiltonian, even if it varies extremely slowly. The condition for the quantal adiabatic theorem to hold for non-Hermitian driving Hamiltonians is given. The adiabatic evolutions driven by a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian provide examples of a new geometric structure, that is the vector bundle in which the inner product of two parallelly transported vectors generally changes. A new geometric concept, the attenuation tensor, is naturally introduced to describe the decay or flourish of the open quantum system. It is constructed in terms of the spectral projector of the Hamiltonian. (orig.)

  13. Quantum channel construction with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Noh, Kyungjoo; Albert, Victor V.; Krastanov, Stefan; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Girvin, S. M.; Jiang, Liang

    2017-04-01

    Quantum channels can describe all transformations allowed by quantum mechanics. We adapt two existing works [S. Lloyd and L. Viola, Phys. Rev. A 65, 010101 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.010101 and E. Andersson and D. K. L. Oi, Phys. Rev. A 77, 052104 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.77.052104] to superconducting circuits, featuring a single qubit ancilla with quantum nondemolition readout and adaptive control. This construction is efficient in both ancilla dimension and circuit depth. We point out various applications of quantum channel construction, including system stabilization and quantum error correction, Markovian and exotic channel simulation, implementation of generalized quantum measurements, and more general quantum instruments. Efficient construction of arbitrary quantum channels opens up exciting new possibilities for quantum control, quantum sensing, and information processing tasks.

  14. Modern aspects of Josephson dynamics and superconductivity electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Askerzade, Iman; Cantürk, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    In this book new experimental investigations of properties of Josephson junctions and systems are explored with the help of recent developments in superconductivity. The theory of the Josephson effect is presented taking into account the influence of multiband and anisotropy effects in new superconducting compounds. Anharmonicity effects in current-phase relation on Josephson junctions dynamics are discussed. Recent studies in analogue and digital superconductivity electronics are presented. Topics of special interest include resistive single flux quantum logic in digital electronics. Application of Josephson junctions in quantum computing as superconducting quantum bits are analyzed. Particular attention is given to understanding chaotic behaviour of Josephson junctions and systems. The book is written for graduate students and researchers in the field of applied superconductivity.

  15. Adiabatic partial Siberian snake turn-on with no beam depolarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, R.A.; Anferov, V.A.; Chu, C.M.; Courant, E.D.; Crandell, D.A.; Derbenev, Y.S.; Kaufman, W.A.; Koulsha, A.V.; Krisch, A.D.; Nurushev, T.S.; Raczkowksi, D.B.; Sund, S.E.; Wong, V.K.; Caussyn, D.D.; Ellison, T.J.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E.J.; von Przewoski, B.; Baiod, R.; Khiari, F.Z.; Ratner, L.G.; Sato, H.

    1994-01-01

    A recent experiment in the IUCF cooler ring studied the adiabatic turn-on of a partial Siberian snake at 370 MeV, where the spin tune, ν s is 21/2 for all snake strengths. The snake consisted of two rampable warm solenoid magnets in series with a superconducting solenoid; this combination allowed varying the snake strength between about 0 and 25% at 370 MeV. We measured the beam polaraization after varying the snake either 1, 2, or 10 times; we found with good precision that no polarization was lost. This supports the conjecture that a Siberian snake can be ramped adiabatically at an energy where the spin tune is a half integer

  16. Magnetic interaction between spatially extended superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    2002-01-01

    A general description of magnetic interactions between superconducting tunnel junctions is given. The description covers a wide range of possible experimental systems, and we explicitly explore two experimentally relevant limits of coupled junctions. One is the limit of junctions with tunneling...... been considered through arrays of superconducting weak links based on semiconductor quantum wells with superconducting electrodes. We use the model to make direct interpretations of the published experiments and thereby propose that long-range magnetic interactions are responsible for the reported...

  17. Superconducting microtraps for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufnagel, C.

    2011-01-01

    Atom chips are integrated devices in which atoms and atomic clouds are stored and manipulated in miniaturized magnetic traps. State of the art fabrication technologies allow for a flexible design of the trapping potentials and consequently provide extraordinary control over atomic samples, which leads to a promising role of atom chips in the engineering and investigation of quantum mechanical systems. Naturally, for quantum mechanical applications, the atomic coherence has to be preserved. Using room temperature circuits, the coherence time of atoms close to the surface was found to be drastically limited by thermal current fluctuations in the conductors. Superconductors offer an elegant way to circumvent thermal noise and therefore present a promising option for the coherent manipulation of atomic quantum states. In this thesis trapping and manipulation of ultracold Rubidium atoms in superconducting microtraps is demonstrated. In this connection the unique properties of superconductors are used to build traps based on persistent currents, the Meissner effect and remanent magnetization. In experiment it is shown, that in superconducting atom chips, thermal magnetic field noise is significantly reduced. Furthermore it is demonstrated, that atomic samples can be employed to probe the properties of superconducting materials. (author) [de

  18. Quantum Transport in Mesoscopic Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A short introduction to the quantum transport in mesoscopic systems is given, and various regim- es of quantum transport such as diffusive, ballis- tic, and adiabatic are explained. The effect of interactions and inelastic scattering along with the characteristic coherent effects of mesoscopic systems give interesting new ...

  19. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  20. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  1. Signatures of topological superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yang

    2017-07-19

    The prediction and experimental discovery of topological insulators brought the importance of topology in condensed matter physics into the limelight. Topology hence acts as a new dimension along which more and more new states of matter start to emerge. One of these topological states of matter, namely topological superconductors, comes into the focus because of their gapless excitations. These gapless excitations, especially in one dimensional topological superconductors, are Majorana zero modes localized at the ends of the superconductor and exhibit exotic nonabelian statistics, which can be potentially applied to fault-tolerant quantum computation. Given their highly interesting physical properties and potential applications to quantum computation, both theorists and experimentalists spend great efforts to realize topological supercondoctors and to detect Majoranas. In two projects within this thesis, we investigate the properties of Majorana zero modes in realistic materials which are absent in simple theoretical models. We find that the superconducting proximity effect, an essential ingredient in all existing platforms for topological superconductors, plays a significant role in determining the localization property of the Majoranas. Strong proximity coupling between the normal system and the superconducting substrate can lead to strongly localized Majoranas, which can explain the observation in a recent experiment. Motivated by experiments in Molenkamp's group, we also look at realistic quantum spin Hall Josephson junctions, in which charge puddles acting as magnetic impurities are coupled to the helical edge states. We find that with this setup, the junction generically realizes an exotic 8π periodic Josephson effect, which is absent in a pristine Josephson junction. In another two projects, we propose more pronounced signatures of Majoranas that are accessible with current experimental techniques. The first one is a transport measurement, which uses

  2. The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlyk, Samuel; Ade, Peter; Benford, Dominic; Bennett, Charles; Chuss, David; Datta, Rahul; Dotson, Jessie; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fixsen, Dale; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary; Irwin, Kent; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimball, Mark; Kogut, Al; Lowe, Luke; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Timothy; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, Samuel Harvey; Rodriguez, Samelys; Sharp, Elmer; Shirron, Peter; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Sullivan, Dan; Switzer, Eric; Taraschi, Peter; Tucker, Carole; Wollack, Edward; Walts, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR (PIPER) uses a Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (CADR) to cool its detectors. The CADR consists of four independent stages with adjacent stages connected by gas gap (GG) or superconducting (SC) heat switches. The three warm stages cycle to transfer heat from the 100 mK detector package to the 1.5 K liquid helium bath. The coldest stage maintains a continuous temperature of 100 mK for the detector package with 10 uW cooling power. We describe the mechanical, electrical, and software design of the CADR and present recent results.

  3. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof, E-mail: krp@fuw.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Komasa, Jacek, E-mail: komasa@man.poznan.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  4. Qubit lattice coherence induced by electromagnetic pulses in superconducting metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivić, Z; Lazarides, N; Tsironis, G P

    2016-07-12

    Quantum bits (qubits) are at the heart of quantum information processing schemes. Currently, solid-state qubits, and in particular the superconducting ones, seem to satisfy the requirements for being the building blocks of viable quantum computers, since they exhibit relatively long coherence times, extremely low dissipation, and scalability. The possibility of achieving quantum coherence in macroscopic circuits comprising Josephson junctions, envisioned by Legett in the 1980's, was demonstrated for the first time in a charge qubit; since then, the exploitation of macroscopic quantum effects in low-capacitance Josephson junction circuits allowed for the realization of several kinds of superconducting qubits. Furthermore, coupling between qubits has been successfully achieved that was followed by the construction of multiple-qubit logic gates and the implementation of several algorithms. Here it is demonstrated that induced qubit lattice coherence as well as two remarkable quantum coherent optical phenomena, i.e., self-induced transparency and Dicke-type superradiance, may occur during light-pulse propagation in quantum metamaterials comprising superconducting charge qubits. The generated qubit lattice pulse forms a compound "quantum breather" that propagates in synchrony with the electromagnetic pulse. The experimental confirmation of such effects in superconducting quantum metamaterials may open a new pathway to potentially powerful quantum computing.

  5. Modern aspects of superconductivity theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kruchinin, Sergei; Aono, Shigeyuki

    2011-01-01

    Superconductivity remains one of the most interesting research areas in physics and stood as a major scientific mystery for a large part of this century. This book, written for graduate students and researchers in the field of superconductivity, discusses important aspects of the experiment and theory surrounding superconductivity. New experimental investigations of magnetic and thermodynamic superconducting properties of mesoscopic samples are explored with the help of recent developments in nanotechnologies and measurement techniques, and the results are predicted based upon theoretical mode

  6. Photonic Quantum Information Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, P.

    2012-01-01

    The advantage of the photon's mobility makes optical quantum system ideally suited for delegated quantum computation. I will present results for the realization for a measurement-based quantum network in a client-server environment, where quantum information is securely communicated and computed. Related to measurement-based quantum computing I will discuss a recent experiment showing that quantum discord can be used as resource for the remote state preparation, which might shine new light on the requirements for quantum-enhanced information processing. Finally, I will briefly review recent photonic quantum simulation experiments of four frustrated Heisenberg-interactions spins and present an outlook of feasible simulation experiments with more complex interactions or random walk structures. As outlook I will discuss the current status of new quantum technology for improving the scalability of photonic quantum systems by using superconducting single-photon detectors and tailored light-matter interactions. (author)

  7. Additive Manufactured Superconducting Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric; Rosen, Yaniv; Woolleet, Nathan; Materise, Nicholas; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Morris; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Dubois, Jonathan

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities provide an ultra-low dissipative environment, which has enabled fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, materials properties, and the search for new particles in and beyond the standard model. However, resonator designs are constrained by limitations in conventional machining techniques. For example, current through a seam is a limiting factor in performance for many waveguide cavities. Development of highly reproducible methods for metallic parts through additive manufacturing, referred to colloquially as 3D printing\\x9D, opens the possibility for novel cavity designs which cannot be implemented through conventional methods. We present preliminary investigations of superconducting cavities made through a selective laser melting process, which compacts a granular powder via a high-power laser according to a digitally defined geometry. Initial work suggests that assuming a loss model and numerically optimizing a geometry to minimize dissipation results in modest improvements in device performance. Furthermore, a subset of titanium alloys, particularly, a titanium, aluminum, vanadium alloy (Ti - 6Al - 4V) exhibits properties indicative of a high kinetic inductance material. This work is supported by LDRD 16-SI-004.

  8. Superconductivity Bordering Rashba Type Topological Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, M. L.; Sun, F.; Xing, L. Y.; Zhang, S. J.; Feng, S. M.; Kong, P. P.; Li, W. M.; Wang, X. C.; Zhu, J. L.; Long, Y. W.; Bai, H. Y.; Gu, C. Z.; Yu, R. C.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.; Zhao, Y. S.; Mao, H. K.; Jin, C. Q.

    2017-01-04

    Strong spin orbital interaction (SOI) can induce unique quantum phenomena such as topological insulators, the Rashba effect, or p-wave superconductivity. Combining these three quantum phenomena into a single compound has important scientific implications. Here we report experimental observations of consecutive quantum phase transitions from a Rashba type topological trivial phase to topological insulator state then further proceeding to superconductivity in a SOI compound BiTeI tuned via pressures. The electrical resistivity measurement with V shape change signals the transition from a Rashba type topological trivial to a topological insulator phase at 2 GPa, which is caused by an energy gap close then reopen with band inverse. Superconducting transition appears at 8 GPa with a critical temperature TC of 5.3 K. Structure refinements indicate that the consecutive phase transitions are correlated to the changes in the Bi–Te bond and bond angle as function of pressures. The Hall Effect measurements reveal an intimate relationship between superconductivity and the unusual change in carrier density that points to possible unconventional superconductivity.

  9. Experimental study on the adiabatic shear bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affouard, J.

    1984-07-01

    Four martensitic steels (Z50CDV5 steel, 28CND8 steel, 35NCDV16 steel and 4340 steel) with different hardness between 190 and 600 Hsub(B) (Brinell hardness), have been studied by means of dynamic compressive tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar. Microscopic observations show that the fracture are associated to the development of adiabatic shear bands (except 4340 steel with 190 Hsub(B) hardness). By means of tests for which the deformation is stopped at predetermined levels, the measurement of shear and hardness inside the band and the matrix indicates the chronology of this phenomenon: first the localization of shear, followed by the formation of adiabatic shear band and ultimatly crack initiation and propagation. These results correlated with few simulations by finite elements have permitted to suggest two mecanisms of deformation leading to the formation of adiabatic shear bands in this specific test [fr

  10. Adiabatic optimization versus diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarret, Michael; Jordan, Stephen P.; Lackey, Brad

    2016-10-01

    Most experimental and theoretical studies of adiabatic optimization use stoquastic Hamiltonians, whose ground states are expressible using only real nonnegative amplitudes. This raises a question as to whether classical Monte Carlo methods can simulate stoquastic adiabatic algorithms with polynomial overhead. Here we analyze diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms. We argue that, based on differences between L1 and L2 normalized states, these algorithms suffer from certain obstructions preventing them from efficiently simulating stoquastic adiabatic evolution in generality. In practice however, we obtain good performance by introducing a method that we call Substochastic Monte Carlo. In fact, our simulations are good classical optimization algorithms in their own right, competitive with the best previously known heuristic solvers for MAX-k -SAT at k =2 ,3 ,4 .

  11. Superconducting plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro; Ohno, J.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) plasmas are proposed and investigated. The SC plasmas are not yet familiar and have not yet been studied. However, the existence and the importance of SC plasmas are stressed in this report. The existence of SC plasmas are found as follows. There is a fundamental property of Meissner effect in superconductors, which shows a repulsive effect of magnetic fields. Even in that case, in a microscopic view, there is a region of magnetic penetration. The penetration length λ is well-known as London's penetration depth, which is expressed as δ = (m s /μ 0 n s q s 2 ) 1/2 where m s , n s , q s and μ o show the mass, the density, the charge of SC electron and the permeability in free space, respectively. Because this expression is very simple, no one had tried it into more simple and meaningful form. Recently, one of the authors (T.O.) has found that the length can be expressed into more simple and understandable fundamental form as λ = c/ω ps where c = (ε 0 μ 0 ) -1/2 and ω ps = (n s q s 2 /m s ε 0 ) 1/2 are the light velocity and the superconducting plasma frequency. From this simple expression, the penetration depth of the magnetic field to SC is found as a SC plasma skin depth, that is, the fundamental property of SC can be expressed by the SC plasmas. This discovery indicates an importance of the studies of superconducting plasmas. From these points, several properties (propagating modes et al) of SC plasmas, which consist of SC electrons, normal electrons and lattice ions, are investigated in this report. Observations of SC plasma frequency is also reported with a use of Terahertz electromagnet-optical waves

  12. Topological pumping in class-D superconducting wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibertini, Marco; Fazio, Rosario; Polini, Marco; Taddei, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    We study adiabatic pumping at a normal metal/class-D superconductor hybrid interface when superconductivity is induced through the proximity effect in a spin-orbit coupled nanowire in the presence of a tilted Zeeman field. When the induced order parameter in the nanowire is nonuniform, the phase diagram has isolated trivial regions surrounded by topological ones. We show that in this case the pumped charge is quantized in units of the elementary charge e and has a topological nature.

  13. Collapse and equilibrium of rotating, adiabatic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical hydrodynamics computer code has been used to follow the collapse and establishment of equilibrium of adiabatic gas clouds restricted to axial symmetry. The clouds are initially uniform in density and rotation, with adiabatic exponents γ=5/3 and 7/5. The numerical technique allows, for the first time, a direct comparison to be made between the dynamic collapse and approach to equilibrium of unconstrained clouds on the one hand, and the results for incompressible, uniformly rotating equilibrium clouds, and the equilibrium structures of differentially rotating polytropes, on the other hand

  14. Adiabatic supernova expansion into the circumstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, D.L.; Liang, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    We perform one dimensional numerical simulations with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code of the adiabatic expansion of a supernova into the surrounding medium. The early expansion follows Chevalier's analytic self-similar solution until the reverse shock reaches the ejecta core. We follow the expansion as it evolves towards the adiabatic blast wave phase. Some memory of the earlier phases of expansion is retained in the interior even when the outer regions expand as a blast wave. We find the results are sensitive to the initial configuration of the ejecta and to the placement of gridpoints. 6 refs., 2 figs

  15. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    quest for higher efficiency, better fidelity, broader bandwidth, multimode capacity and longer storage lifetime is pursued in all those approaches, as shown in this special issue. The improvement of quantum memory operation specifically requires in-depth study and control of numerous physical processes leading to atomic decoherence. The present issue reflects the development of rare earth ion doped matrices offering long lifetime superposition states, either as bulk crystals or as optical waveguides. The need for quantum sources and high efficiency detectors at the single photon level is also illustrated. Several papers address the networking of quantum memories either in long-haul cryptography or in the prospect of quantum processing. In this context, much attention has been paid recently to interfacing quantum light with superconducting qubits and with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. Finally, the quantum interfacing of light with matter raises questions on entanglement. The last two papers are devoted to the generation of entanglement by dissipative processes. It is shown that long lifetime entanglement may be built in this way. We hope this special issue will help readers to become familiar with the exciting field of ensemble-based quantum memories and will stimulate them to bring deeper insights and new ideas to this area.

  16. Coherent manipulation of Andreev states in superconducting atomic contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, C.; Tosi, L.; Bretheau, L.; Girit, Ç. Ö.; Stern, M.; Bertet, P.; Joyez, P.; Vion, D.; Esteve, D.; Goffman, M. F.; Pothier, H.; Urbina, C.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent control of quantum states has been demonstrated in a variety of superconducting devices. In all of these devices, the variables that are manipulated are collective electromagnetic degrees of freedom: charge, superconducting phase, or flux. Here we demonstrate the coherent manipulation of a quantum system based on Andreev bound states, which are microscopic quasi-particle states inherent to superconducting weak links. Using a circuit quantum electrodynamics setup, we performed single-shot readout of this Andreev qubit. We determined its excited-state lifetime and coherence time to be in the microsecond range. Quantum jumps and parity switchings were observed in continuous measurements. In addition to having possible quantum information applications, such Andreev qubits are a test-bed for the physics of single elementary excitations in superconductors.

  17. Quasiparticles in the superconducting state of high-Tc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Shaginyan, V.R.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of quasiparticles in the superconducting state of high-T c metals within the framework of the theory of superconducting state based on the fermion condensation quantum phase transition is considered. It is shown that the behavior coincides with the behavior of Bogoliubov quasiparticles, whereas the maximum value of the superconducting gap and other exotic properties are determined by the presence of the fermion condensate. If at low temperatures the normal state is recovered by the application of a magnetic field suppressing the superconductivity, the induced state can be viewed as Landau-Fermi liquid. These observations are in good agreement with recent experimental facts [ru

  18. Two-stage crossover from thermal to quantum flux creep of dilute vortex ensembles in various high-Tc superconducting thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, Johan J.; Venturini, E. L.; Siegal, M. P.; Yun, S. H.; Karlsson, U. O.; Rao, K. V.

    2001-01-01

    The thermal-to-quantum flux creep crossover at low vortex densities has been studied in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7-δ , and HgBa 2 CaCu 2 O 6+δ thin films using ac susceptibility. The crossover temperatures T cr are 10--11, 17, and 30 K, respectively. Both thermal and quantum flux creep is suppressed as the vortex density is decreased. We observe a two-stage nature in the crossover behavior which appears to be a general property of all the three materials studied

  19. Improved PID method of temperature control for adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, A.; Shinozaki, K.; Ishisaki, Y.; Mihara, T.

    2006-01-01

    We report a new method of precise temperature control for an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). Temperature of the experimental stage of ADRs is usually controlled with the standard PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative control) method by decreasing the magnet current of the superconducting solenoid surrounding the paramagnetic salt inside the ADR. In controlling the temperature of our portable ADR system, we found a small residual between the aimed and measured temperatures, which gradually increased in time as the magnet current decreases. This phenomenon is explained by the magnetic cooling theory, and we have introduced a new functional parameter to improve the standard PID method. Applying this improvement to our system, highly stabilized temperature of 10μK rms at 100mK up to the period of ∼15ks is presented. It is demonstrated that the temperature controlled time was increased by ∼30% in our experiment. Our improved PID method is useful to maintain the long-term temperature stability down to almost zero magnet current with a relatively small ADR

  20. Superconducting accelerator technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Hartline, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Modern and future accelerators for high energy and nuclear physics rely increasingly on superconducting components to achieve the required magnetic fields and accelerating fields. This paper presents a practical overview of the phenomenon of superconductivity, and describes the design issues and solutions associated with superconducting magnets and superconducting rf acceleration structures. Further development and application of superconducting components promises increased accelerator performance at reduced electric power cost

  1. Semi adiabatic theory of seasonal Markov processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkner, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of many natural and technical systems are essentially influenced by a periodic forcing. Analytic solutions of the equations of motion for periodically driven systems are generally not known. Simulations, numerical solutions or in some limiting cases approximate analytic solutions represent the known approaches to study the dynamics of such systems. Besides the regime of weak periodic forces where linear response theory works, the limit of a slow driving force can often be treated analytically using an adiabatic approximation. For this approximation to hold all intrinsic processes must be fast on the time-scale of a period of the external driving force. We developed a perturbation theory for periodically driven Markovian systems that covers the adiabatic regime but also works if the system has a single slow mode that may even be slower than the driving force. We call it the semi adiabatic approximation. Some results of this approximation for a system exhibiting stochastic resonance which usually takes place within the semi adiabatic regime are indicated. (author) 1 fig., 8 refs.

  2. On the double adiabatic continuous spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.

    1984-09-01

    In earlier work it has been found that the Alfven and cusp (or slow) continuous spectra can become unstable in toroidal geometry, as judged from the linearized double adiabatic equations. In this paper the validity of fluid approaches to the present problem is investigated. The physical implications of the stability conditions are discussed. (Author)

  3. Improving the positive feedback adiabatic logic familiy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fischer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive Feedback Adiabatic Logic (PFAL shows the lowest energy dissipation among adiabatic logic families based on cross-coupled transistors, due to the reduction of both adiabatic and non-adiabatic losses. The dissipation primarily depends on the resistance of the charging path, which consists of a single p-channel MOSFET during the recovery phase. In this paper, a new logic family called Improved PFAL (IPFAL is proposed, where all n- and pchannel devices are swapped so that the charge can be recovered through an n-channel MOSFET. This allows to decrease the resistance of the charging path up to a factor of 2, and it enables a significant reduction of the energy dissipation. Simulations based on a 0.13µm CMOS process confirm the improvements in terms of power consumption over a large frequency range. However, the same simple design rule, which enables in PFAL an additional reduction of the dissipation by optimal transistor sizing, does not apply to IPFAL. Therefore, the influence of several sources of dissipation for a generic IPFAL gate is illustrated and discussed, in order to lower the power consumption and achieve better performance.

  4. Adiabatic excitation of longitudinal bunch shape oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bai

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available By modulating the rf voltage at near twice the synchrotron frequency, the longitudinal bunch shape can be modulated. This method can be used to shorten bunches. We show experimentally that the bunch shape can be modulated while preserving the longitudinal emittance when the rf voltage modulation is turned on adiabatically. Experimental measurements will be presented along with theoretical predictions.

  5. Coupling superconducting qubits via a cavity bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, J; Chow, J M; Gambetta, J M; Koch, Jens; Johnson, B R; Schreier, J A; Frunzio, L; Schuster, D I; Houck, A A; Wallraff, A; Blais, A; Devoret, M H; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2007-09-27

    Superconducting circuits are promising candidates for constructing quantum bits (qubits) in a quantum computer; single-qubit operations are now routine, and several examples of two-qubit interactions and gates have been demonstrated. These experiments show that two nearby qubits can be readily coupled with local interactions. Performing gate operations between an arbitrary pair of distant qubits is highly desirable for any quantum computer architecture, but has not yet been demonstrated. An efficient way to achieve this goal is to couple the qubits to a 'quantum bus', which distributes quantum information among the qubits. Here we show the implementation of such a quantum bus, using microwave photons confined in a transmission line cavity, to couple two superconducting qubits on opposite sides of a chip. The interaction is mediated by the exchange of virtual rather than real photons, avoiding cavity-induced loss. Using fast control of the qubits to switch the coupling effectively on and off, we demonstrate coherent transfer of quantum states between the qubits. The cavity is also used to perform multiplexed control and measurement of the qubit states. This approach can be expanded to more than two qubits, and is an attractive architecture for quantum information processing on a chip.

  6. Quantum bus of metal nanoring with surface plasmon polaritons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhirong; Guo Guoping; Tu Tao; Li Haiou; Zou Changling; Ren Xifeng; Guo Guangcan; Chen Junxue; Lu Yonghua

    2010-01-01

    We develop an architecture for distributed quantum computation using quantum bus of plasmonic circuits and spin qubits in self-assembled quantum dots. Deterministic quantum gates between two distant spin qubits can be reached by using an adiabatic approach in which quantum dots couple with highly detuned plasmon modes in a metallic nanoring. Plasmonic quantum bus offers a robust and scalable platform for quantum optics experiments and the development of on-chip quantum networks composed of various quantum nodes, such as quantum dots, molecules, and nanoparticles.

  7. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  8. Exotic quantum holonomy and higher-order exceptional points in quantum kicked tops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atushi; Kim, Sang Wook; Cheon, Taksu

    2014-04-01

    The correspondence between exotic quantum holonomy, which occurs in families of Hermitian cycles, and exceptional points (EPs) for non-Hermitian quantum theory is examined in quantum kicked tops. Under a suitable condition, an explicit expression of the adiabatic parameter dependencies of quasienergies and stationary states, which exhibit anholonomies, is obtained. It is also shown that the quantum kicked tops with the complexified adiabatic parameter have a higher-order EP, which is broken into lower-order EPs with the application of small perturbations. The stability of exotic holonomy against such bifurcation is demonstrated.

  9. Two-stage crossover from thermal to quantum flux creep of dilute vortex ensembles in various high-T{sub c} superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerman, Johan J.; Venturini, E. L.; Siegal, M. P.; Yun, S. H.; Karlsson, U. O.; Rao, K. V.

    2001-09-01

    The thermal-to-quantum flux creep crossover at low vortex densities has been studied in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7-{delta}}, and HgBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 6+{delta}} thin films using ac susceptibility. The crossover temperatures T{sub cr} are 10--11, 17, and 30 K, respectively. Both thermal and quantum flux creep is suppressed as the vortex density is decreased. We observe a two-stage nature in the crossover behavior which appears to be a general property of all the three materials studied.

  10. Coherent transport through interacting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltscher, Bastian

    2012-10-05

    The present thesis is composed of four different works. All deal with coherent transport through interacting quantum dots, which are tunnel-coupled to external leads. There a two main motivations for the use of quantum dots. First, they are an ideal device to study the influence of strong Coulomb repulsion, and second, their discrete energy levels can easily be tuned by external gate electrodes to create different transport regimes. The expression of coherence includes a very wide range of physical correlations and, therefore, the four works are basically independent of each other. Before motivating and introducing the different works in more detail, we remark that in all works a diagrammatic real-time perturbation theory is used. The fermionic degrees of freedom of the leads are traced out and the elements of the resulting reduced density matrix can be treated explicitly by means of a generalized master equation. How this equation is solved, depends on the details of the problem under consideration. In the first of the four works adiabatic pumping through an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot embedded in each of the two arms is studied. In adiabatic pumping transport is generated by varying two system parameters periodically in time. We consider the two dot levels to be these two pumping parameters. Since they are located in different arms of the interferometer, pumping is a quantum mechanical effect purely relying on coherent superpositions of the dot states. It is very challenging to identify a quantum pumping mechanism in experiments, because a capacitive coupling of the gate electrodes to the leads may yield an undesired AC bias voltage, which is rectified by a time dependent conductance. Therefore, distinguishing features of these two transport mechanisms are required. We find that the dependence on the magnetic field is the key feature. While the pumped charge is an odd function of the magnetic flux, the rectified current is even, at least in

  11. Coherent transport through interacting quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiltscher, Bastian

    2012-01-01

    The present thesis is composed of four different works. All deal with coherent transport through interacting quantum dots, which are tunnel-coupled to external leads. There a two main motivations for the use of quantum dots. First, they are an ideal device to study the influence of strong Coulomb repulsion, and second, their discrete energy levels can easily be tuned by external gate electrodes to create different transport regimes. The expression of coherence includes a very wide range of physical correlations and, therefore, the four works are basically independent of each other. Before motivating and introducing the different works in more detail, we remark that in all works a diagrammatic real-time perturbation theory is used. The fermionic degrees of freedom of the leads are traced out and the elements of the resulting reduced density matrix can be treated explicitly by means of a generalized master equation. How this equation is solved, depends on the details of the problem under consideration. In the first of the four works adiabatic pumping through an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot embedded in each of the two arms is studied. In adiabatic pumping transport is generated by varying two system parameters periodically in time. We consider the two dot levels to be these two pumping parameters. Since they are located in different arms of the interferometer, pumping is a quantum mechanical effect purely relying on coherent superpositions of the dot states. It is very challenging to identify a quantum pumping mechanism in experiments, because a capacitive coupling of the gate electrodes to the leads may yield an undesired AC bias voltage, which is rectified by a time dependent conductance. Therefore, distinguishing features of these two transport mechanisms are required. We find that the dependence on the magnetic field is the key feature. While the pumped charge is an odd function of the magnetic flux, the rectified current is even, at least in

  12. Oscillating potential well in the complex plane and the adiabatic theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    A quantum particle in a slowly changing potential well V (x ,t ) =V ( x -x0(ɛ t ) ) , periodically shaken in time at a slow frequency ɛ , provides an important quantum mechanical system where the adiabatic theorem fails to predict the asymptotic dynamics over time scales longer than ˜1 /ɛ . Specifically, we consider a double-well potential V (x ) sustaining two bound states spaced in frequency by ω0 and periodically shaken in a complex plane. Two different spatial displacements x0(t ) are assumed: the real spatial displacement x0(ɛ t ) =A sin(ɛ t ) , corresponding to ordinary Hermitian shaking, and the complex one x0(ɛ t ) =A -A exp(-i ɛ t ) , corresponding to non-Hermitian shaking. When the particle is initially prepared in the ground state of the potential well, breakdown of adiabatic evolution is found for both Hermitian and non-Hermitian shaking whenever the oscillation frequency ɛ is close to an odd resonance of ω0. However, a different physical mechanism underlying nonadiabatic transitions is found in the two cases. For the Hermitian shaking, an avoided crossing of quasienergies is observed at odd resonances and nonadiabatic transitions between the two bound states, resulting in Rabi flopping, can be explained as a multiphoton resonance process. For the complex oscillating potential well, breakdown of adiabaticity arises from the appearance of Floquet exceptional points at exact quasienergy crossing.

  13. Zero-point energy, tunnelling, and vibrational adiabaticity in the Mu + H2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Steven L.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Fleming, Donald G.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic substitution of muonium for hydrogen provides an unparalleled opportunity to deepen our understanding of quantum mass effects on chemical reactions. A recent topical review in this journal of the thermal and vibrationally state-selected reaction of Mu with H2 raises a number of issues that are addressed here. We show that some earlier quantum mechanical calculations of the Mu + H2 reaction, which are highlighted in this review, and which have been used to benchmark approximate methods, are in error by as much as 19% in the low-temperature limit. We demonstrate that an approximate treatment of the Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction that was used in some recent studies is not valid for treating the vibrationally state-selected reaction. We also discuss why vibrationally adiabatic potentials that neglect bend zero-point energy are not a useful analytical tool for understanding reaction rates, and why vibrationally non-adiabatic transitions cannot be understood by considering tunnelling through vibrationally adiabatic potentials. Finally, we present calculations on a hierarchical family of potential energy surfaces to assess the sensitivity of rate constants to the quality of the potential surface.

  14. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshelev, N.A., E-mail: koshna71@inbox.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy str 42, 432970 (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  15. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshelev, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models

  16. Change of adiabatic invariant near the separatrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanov, S.V.

    1995-10-01

    The properties of particle motion in the vicinity of the separatrix in a phase plane are investigated. The change of adiabatic invariant value due to the separatrix crossing is evaluated as a function of a perturbation parameter magnitude and a phase of a particle for time dependent Hamiltonians. It is demonstrated that the change of adiabatic invariant value near the separatrix birth is much larger than that in the case of the separatrix crossing near the saddle point in a phase plane. The conditions of a stochastic regime to appear around the separatrix are found. The results are applied to study the longitudinal invariant behaviour of charged particles near singular lines of the magnetic field. (author). 22 refs, 9 figs

  17. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veis, Libor; Pittner, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 21 (2014), 214111 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0626 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Quantum computers * Quantum chemistry * Quantum electronics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  18. Adiabatic invariants for field-reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzmeier, J.L.; Lewis, H.R.; Seyler, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    Field reversed configurations (FRCs) are characterized by azimuthal symmetry, so two exact constants of the particle motion are the total particle energy E and the canonical angular momentum P/sub theta/. For many purposes it is desirable to construct a third (diabatic) constant of the motion if this is possible. It is shown that for parameters characteristic of current FRCs that the magnetic moment μ is a poor adiabatic invariant, while the radial action J is conserved rather well

  19. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of adiabatic heating in two impulsive solar flares on the basis of dynamic X-ray spectra in the 28-254 keV range, H-alpha, microwave, and meter-wave radio observations. It is found that the X-ray spectra of the events are like those of thermal bremsstrahlung from single-temperature plasmas in the 10-60 keV range if photospheric albedo is taken into account. The temperature-emission correlation indicates adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion and that the electron distribution remains isotropic. H-alpha data suggest compressive energy transfer. The projected areas and volumes of the flares are estimated assuming that X-ray and microwave emissions are produced in a single thermal plasma. Electron densities of about 10 to the 9th/cu cm are found for homogeneous, spherically symmetric sources. It is noted that the strong self-absorption of hot-plasma gyrosynchrotron radiation reveals low magnetic field strengths.

  20. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991

  1. Global optimization for quantum dynamics of few-fermion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xikun; Pecak, Daniel; Sowinski, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    Quantum state preparation is vital to quantum computation and quantum information processing tasks. In adiabatic state preparation, the target state is theoretically obtained with nearly perfect fidelity if the control parameter is tuned slowly enough. As this, however, leads to slow dynamics, it...

  2. Heterogeneous Superconducting Low-Noise Sensing Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob; Penanen, Konstantin I.; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2008-01-01

    A heterogeneous material construction has been devised for sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers that are subject to a combination of requirements peculiar to some advanced applications, notably including low-field magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis. The requirements in question are the following: The sensing coils must be large enough (in some cases having dimensions of as much as tens of centimeters) to afford adequate sensitivity; The sensing coils must be made electrically superconductive to eliminate Johnson noise (thermally induced noise proportional to electrical resistance); and Although the sensing coils must be cooled to below their superconducting- transition temperatures with sufficient cooling power to overcome moderate ambient radiative heat leakage, they must not be immersed in cryogenic liquid baths. For a given superconducting sensing coil, this combination of requirements can be satisfied by providing a sufficiently thermally conductive link between the coil and a cold source. However, the superconducting coil material is not suitable as such a link because electrically superconductive materials are typically poor thermal conductors. The heterogeneous material construction makes it possible to solve both the electrical- and thermal-conductivity problems. The basic idea is to construct the coil as a skeleton made of a highly thermally conductive material (typically, annealed copper), then coat the skeleton with an electrically superconductive alloy (typically, a lead-tin solder) [see figure]. In operation, the copper skeleton provides the required thermally conductive connection to the cold source, while the electrically superconductive coating material shields against Johnson noise that originates in the copper skeleton.

  3. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  4. Exploring the physics of superconducting qubits strongly coupled to microwave frequency photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallraff, Andreas [ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    Using modern micro and nano-fabrication techniques combined with superconducting materials we realize electronic circuits the properties of which are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. In such circuits the strong interaction of photons with superconducting quantum two-level systems allows us to probe fundamental quantum properties of light and to develop components for applications in quantum information technology. Here, I present experiments in which we have created and probed entanglement between stationary qubits and microwave photons freely propagating down a transmission line. In these experiments we use superconducting parametric amplifiers realized in our lab to detect both qubit and photon states efficiently. Using similar techniques we aim at demonstrating a deterministic scheme for teleportation of quantum states in a macroscopic system based on superconducting circuits.

  5. Application of magnetic resonance force microscopy cyclic adiabatic inversion for a single-spin measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Chapline, G; Gurvitz, S A; Hammel, P C; Pelekhov, D V; Suter, A; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2003-01-01

    We consider the process of a single-spin measurement using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with a cyclic adiabatic inversion (CAI). This technique is also important for different applications, including a measurement of a qubit state in quantum computation. The measurement takes place through the interaction of a single spin with a cantilever modelled by a quantum oscillator in a coherent state in a quasi-classical range of parameters. The entire system is treated rigorously within the framework of the Schroedinger equation. For a many-spin system our equations accurately describe conventional MRFM experiments involving CAI of the spin system. Our computer simulations of the quantum spin-cantilever dynamics show that the probability distribution for the cantilever position develops two asymmetric peaks with the total relative probabilities mainly dependent on the initial angle between the directions of the average spin and the effective magnetic field, in the rotating frame. We show that each of th...

  6. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-07-01

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov-Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects.

  7. Understanding quantum phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, Lincoln

    2010-01-01

    Quantum phase transitions (QPTs) offer wonderful examples of the radical macroscopic effects inherent in quantum physics: phase changes between different forms of matter driven by quantum rather than thermal fluctuations, typically at very low temperatures. QPTs provide new insight into outstanding problems such as high-temperature superconductivity and display fundamental aspects of quantum theory, such as strong correlations and entanglement. Over the last two decades, our understanding of QPTs has increased tremendously due to a plethora of experimental examples, powerful new numerical meth

  8. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... semiclassical limit) the number of operations of such a computer would be approximately the same as that of a classical computer. Our results suggest that for an adiabatic quantum computer to operate successfully within the decoherence times, it is necessary to take into account nonadiabatic corrections.

  9. Development of the experimental setup for investigation of latching of superconducting single-photon detector caused by blinding attack on the quantum key distribution system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elezov M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently bright-light control of the SSPD has been demonstrated. This attack employed a “backdoor” in the detector biasing scheme. Under bright-light illumination, SSPD becomes resistive and remains “latched” in the resistive state even when the light is switched off. While the SSPD is latched, Eve can simulate SSPD single-photon response by sending strong light pulses, thus deceiving Bob. We developed the experimental setup for investigation of a dependence on latching threshold of SSPD on optical pulse length and peak power. By knowing latching threshold it is possible to understand essential requirements for development countermeasures against blinding attack on quantum key distribution system with SSPDs.

  10. Adiabaticity criterion and the shortest adiabatic mode transformer in a coupled-waveguide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiankai; Liu, Hsi-Chun; Yariv, Amnon

    2009-02-01

    By analyzing the propagating behavior of the supermodes in a coupled-waveguide system, we have derived a universal criterion for designing adiabatic mode transformers. The criterion relates epsilon, the fraction of power scattered into the unwanted mode, to waveguide design parameters and gives the shortest possible length of an adiabatic mode transformer, which is approximately 2/piepsilon1/2 times the distance of maximal power transfer between the waveguides. The results from numerical calculations based on a transfer-matrix formalism support this theory very well.

  11. Applications of a Circuit QED Quantum Channel Constructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Noh, Kyungjoo; Albert, Victor V.; Krastanov, Stefan; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Girvin, S. M.; Jiang, Liang

    Quantum channels can describe all transformations allowed by quantum mechanics. We provide an explicit universal protocol to construct all possible quantum channels, using a single qubit ancilla with quantum non-demolition readout and adaptive control. Our construction is efficient in both physical resources and circuit depth, and can be demonstrated using superconducting circuits and various other physical platforms. There are many applications of quantum channel construction, including system stabilization and quantum error correction, Markovian and exotic channel simulation, implementation of generalized quantum measurements and more general quantum instruments. Efficient construction of arbitrary quantum channels opens up exciting new possibilities for quantum control, quantum sensing and information processing tasks.

  12. Superconducting material development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    A superconducting compound was developed that showed a transition to a zero-resistance state at 65 C, or 338 K. The superconducting material, which is an oxide based on strontium, barium, yttrium, and copper, continued in the zero-resistance state similar to superconductivity for 10 days at room temperature in the air. It was also noted that measurements of the material allowed it to observe a nonlinear characteristic curve between current and voltage at 65 C, which is another indication of superconductivity. The research results of the laboratory experiment with the superconducting material will be published in the August edition of the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

  13. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  14. Applied superconductivity handbook on devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This wide-ranging presentation of applied superconductivity, from fundamentals and materials right up to the latest applications, is an essential reference for physicists and engineers in academic research as well as in the field. Readers looking for a systematic overview on superconducting materials will expand their knowledge and understanding of both low and high Tc superconductors, including organic and magnetic materials. Technology, preparation and characterization are covered for several geometries, but the main benefit of this work lies in its broad coverage of significant applications in power engineering or passive devices, such as filter and antenna or magnetic shields. The reader will also find information on superconducting magnets for diverse applications in mechanical engineering, particle physics, fusion research, medicine and biomagnetism, as well as materials processing. SQUIDS and their usage in medicine or geophysics are thoroughly covered as are applications in quantum metrology, and, las...

  15. Path integral density matrix dynamics: a method for calculating time-dependent properties in thermal adiabatic and non-adiabatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2013-09-14

    We introduce a new approach for calculating quantum time-correlation functions and time-dependent expectation values in many-body thermal systems; both electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic cases can be treated. Our approach uses a path integral simulation to sample an initial thermal density matrix; subsequent evolution of this density matrix is equivalent to solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, which we perform using a linear expansion of Gaussian wavepacket basis functions which evolve according to simple classical-like trajectories. Overall, this methodology represents a formally exact approach for calculating time-dependent quantum properties; by introducing approximations into both the imaginary-time and real-time propagations, this approach can be adapted for complex many-particle systems interacting through arbitrary potentials. We demonstrate this method for the spin Boson model, where we find good agreement with numerically exact calculations. We also discuss future directions of improvement for our approach with a view to improving accuracy and efficiency.

  16. Exotic Magnetic Orders and Their Interplay with Superconductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Holm

    Superconductivity represents one of the most important scientific discoveries of the 20th century. The practical applications are numerous ranging from clean energy storage and MRI machines to quantum computers. However, the low temperatures required for superconductivity prohibits many practical...... applications. The more recent discovery of high-temperature superconductors, with superconducting transition temperatures above 100~K, has led to the hope that superconductivity at room-temperature might be achievable, although a complete theoretical understanding of the high-temperature superconductors...... is currently lacking. In this talk I will review the properties of a specific family of high-temperature superconductors, namely the iron-based materials. While the specific mechanism responsible for the formation of superconducting ground state is unknown, it is believed to be magnetic in nature. Thus...

  17. Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. X.; Wei, L. F.; Johansson, J. R.; Tsai, J. S.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the intrinsic nonlinearity of superconducting Josephson junctions, we propose a scalable circuit with superconducting qubits (SCQs) which is very similar to the successful one now being used for trapped ions. The SCQs are coupled to the ``vibrational'' mode provided by a superconducting LC circuit or its equivalent (e.g., a superconducting quantum interference device). Both single-qubit rotations and qubit-LC-circuit couplings and/or decouplings can be controlled by the frequencies of the time-dependent magnetic fluxes. The circuit is scalable since the qubit-qubit interactions, mediated by the LC circuit, can be selectively performed, and the information transfer can be realized in a controllable way. [4pt] Y.X. Liu, L.F. Wei, J.R. Johansson, J.S. Tsai, F. Nori, Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions, Phys. Rev. B 76, 144518 (2007). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v76/e144518

  18. Coherence properties in superconducting flux qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilla, Samuele

    2015-02-16

    The research work discussed in this thesis deals with the study of superconducting Josephson qubits. Superconducting qubits are solid-state artificial atoms which are based on lithographically defined Josephson tunnel junctions properties. When sufficiently cooled, these superconducting devices exhibit quantized states of charge, flux or junction phase depending on their design parameters. This allows to observe coherent evolutions of their states. The results presented can be divided into two parts. In a first part we investigate operations of superconducting qubits based on the quantum coherence in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID). We explain experimental data which has been observed in a SQUID subjected to fast, large-amplitude modifications of its effective potential shape. The motivations for this work come from the fact that in the past few years there have been attempts to interpret the supposed quantum behavior of physical systems, such as Josephson devices, within a classical framework. Moreover, we analyze the possibility of generating GHZ states, namely maximally entangled states, in a quantum system made out of three Josephson qubits. In particular, we investigate the possible limitations of the GHZ state generation due to coupling to bosonic baths. In the second part of the thesis we address a particular cause of decoherence of flux qubits which has been disregarded until now: thermal gradients, which can arise due to accidental non equilibrium quasiparticle distributions. The reason for these detrimental effects is that heat currents flowing through Josephson tunnel junctions in response to a temperature gradient are periodic functions of the phase difference between the electrodes. The phase dependence of the heat current comes from Andreev reflection, namely an interplay between the quasiparticles which carry heat and the superconducting condensate which is sensitive to the superconducting phase difference. Generally speaking

  19. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. On adiabatic perturbations in the ekpyrotic scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Vikman, A.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper, Khoury and Steinhardt proposed a way to generate adiabatic cosmological perturbations with a nearly flat spectrum in a contracting Universe. To produce these perturbations they used a regime in which the equation of state exponentially rapidly changed during a short time interval. Leaving aside the singularity problem and the difficult question about the possibility to transmit these perturbations from a contracting Universe to the expanding phase, we will show that the methods used in Khoury are inapplicable for the description of the cosmological evolution and of the process of generation of perturbations in this scenario

  1. Adiabatic matching section for plasma accelerated beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Floettmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic matching section is discussed as option to control the divergence and emittance growth of a beam exiting a plasma channel. Based on a general analytical solution of a focusing channel with varying focusing strength, a focusing profile is proposed which allows for a fast expansion of the beam size while keeping the emittance growth minimal. The solution is also applicable to other cases, e.g., the matching of a positron source to the downstream accelerating section, which are, however, not discussed in this contribution.

  2. Development of a semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Krishnan, R; Jogeswararao, G; Parthasarathy, R; Premalatha, S; Prabhakar Rao, J; Gunasekaran, G; Ananthasivan, K

    2014-12-01

    A semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter has been indigenously developed. The measurement system comprises modules for sensitive temperature measurement probe, signal processing, data collection, and joule calibration. The sensitivity of the temperature measurement module was enhanced by using a sensitive thermistor coupled with a lock-in amplifier based signal processor. A microcontroller coordinates the operation and control of these modules. The latter in turn is controlled through personal computer (PC) based custom made software developed with LabView. An innovative summing amplifier concept was used to cancel out the base resistance of the thermistor. The latter was placed in the dewar. The temperature calibration was carried out with a standard platinum resistance (PT100) sensor coupled with an 8½ digit multimeter. The water equivalent of this calorimeter was determined by using electrical calibration with the joule calibrator. The experimentally measured values of the quantum of heat were validated by measuring heats of dissolution of pure KCl (for endotherm) and tris (hydroxyl methyl) amino-methane (for exotherm). The uncertainity in the measurements was found to be within ±3%.

  3. Development of a semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkata Krishnan, R.; Jogeswararao, G.; Parthasarathy, R.; Premalatha, S.; Prabhakar Rao, J.; Gunasekaran, G.; Ananthasivan, K.

    2014-01-01

    A semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter has been indigenously developed. The measurement system comprises modules for sensitive temperature measurement probe, signal processing, data collection, and joule calibration. The sensitivity of the temperature measurement module was enhanced by using a sensitive thermistor coupled with a lock-in amplifier based signal processor. A microcontroller coordinates the operation and control of these modules. The latter in turn is controlled through personal computer (PC) based custom made software developed with LabView. An innovative summing amplifier concept was used to cancel out the base resistance of the thermistor. The latter was placed in the dewar. The temperature calibration was carried out with a standard platinum resistance (PT100) sensor coupled with an 8½ digit multimeter. The water equivalent of this calorimeter was determined by using electrical calibration with the joule calibrator. The experimentally measured values of the quantum of heat were validated by measuring heats of dissolution of pure KCl (for endotherm) and tris (hydroxyl methyl) amino-methane (for exotherm). The uncertainity in the measurements was found to be within ±3%

  4. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron oscillations in a static electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlberg, C.

    1977-03-01

    The influence of a static electric field on the oscillations of a one-dimensional stream of electrons is investigated. In the weak field limit the oscillations are adiabatic and mode coupling negligible, but becomes significant if the field is tronger. The latter effect is believed to be of importance for the stability of e.g. potential double layers

  5. Quantum walks in an array of quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manouchehri, K; Wang, J B

    2008-01-01

    Quantum random walks are shown to have non-intuitive dynamics, which makes them an attractive area of study for devising quantum algorithms for well-known classical problems as well as those arising in the field of quantum computing. In this work, we propose a novel scheme for the physical implementation of a discrete-time quantum random walk using laser excitations of the electronic states of an array of quantum dots. These dots represent the discrete nodes of the walk, while transitions between the energy levels inside each dot correspond to the required coin operation and stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) processes are employed to induce the steps of the walk. The quantum dot design is tailored in such a way as to enable selective coupling of the energy levels. Our simulation results show a close agreement with the ideal quantum walk distribution as well as modest robustness toward noise disturbance

  6. Geometrical Dynamics in a Transitioning Superconducting Sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claycomb J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent theoretical works have concentrated on calculating the Casimir effect in curved spacetime. In this paper we outline the forward problem of metrical variation due to the Casimir effect for spherical geometries. We consider a scalar quantum field inside a hollow superconducting sphere. Metric equations are developed describing the evolution of the scalar curvature after the sphere transitions to the normal state.

  7. An Adiabatic Phase-Matching Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [DESY; Floettmann, Klaus [DESY; Piot, Philippe [Northern Illinois U.; Kaertner, Franz X. [Hamburg U.; Assmann, Ralph [DESY

    2017-12-22

    We present a general concept to accelerate non-relativistic charged particles. Our concept employs an adiabatically-tapered dielectric-lined waveguide which supports accelerating phase velocities for synchronous acceleration. We propose an ansatz for the transient field equations, show it satisfies Maxwell's equations under an adiabatic approximation and find excellent agreement with a finite-difference time-domain computer simulation. The fields were implemented into the particle-tracking program {\\sc astra} and we present beam dynamics results for an accelerating field with a 1-mm-wavelength and peak electric field of 100~MV/m. The numerical simulations indicate that a $\\sim 200$-keV electron beam can be accelerated to an energy of $\\sim10$~MeV over $\\sim 10$~cm. The novel scheme is also found to form electron beams with parameters of interest to a wide range of applications including, e.g., future advanced accelerators, and ultra-fast electron diffraction.

  8. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando; Sesé, Javier; Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del; Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos; Majer, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  9. Wave Dynamical Chaos in Superconducting Microwave Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Rehfeld, H; Dembowski, C; Gräf, H D; Hofferbert, R; Richter, A; Lengeler, Herbert

    1997-01-01

    During the last few years we have studied the chaotic behavior of special Euclidian geometries, so-called billiards, from the quantum or in more general sense "wave dynamical" point of view. Due to the equivalence between the stationary Schroedinger equation and the classical Helmholtz equation in the two-dimensional case (plain billiards), it is possible to simulate "quantum chaos" with the help of macroscopic, superconducting microwave cavities. Using this technique we investigated spectra of three billiards from the family of Pascal's Snails (Robnik-Billiards) with a different chaoticity in each case in order to test predictions of standard stochastical models for classical chaotic systems.

  10. Tunable superconducting qudit mediated by microwave photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Un [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Myung-Ho; Kim, Nam [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kicheon [Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We have investigated the time-domain characteristics of the Autler-Townes doublet in a superconducting circuit. The transition probabilities between the ground state and the Autler-Townes doublet states are shown to be controlled in a phase-coherent manner using a well-known microwave pulse pattern technique. The experimental results are well explained by a numerical simulation based on the Markovian master equation. Our result indicates that the Autler-Townes doublet states might be useful as a tunable qudit for implementation of quantum information processing, in particular as a multivalued quantum logic element.

  11. Tunable superconducting qudit mediated by microwave photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Un Cho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the time-domain characteristics of the Autler-Townes doublet in a superconducting circuit. The transition probabilities between the ground state and the Autler-Townes doublet states are shown to be controlled in a phase-coherent manner using a well-known microwave pulse pattern technique. The experimental results are well explained by a numerical simulation based on the Markovian master equation. Our result indicates that the Autler-Townes doublet states might be useful as a tunable qudit for implementation of quantum information processing, in particular as a multivalued quantum logic element.

  12. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando, E-mail: fluis@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC—Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Sesé, Javier [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos [Dpto. de Ingeniería Electrónica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Majer, Johannes [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  13. Adiabatic motion of a neutral spinning particle in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlejohn, R.G.; Weigert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The motion of a neutral particle with a magnetic moment in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is considered. This situation, occurring, for example, in a Stern-Gerlach experiment, is investigated from classical and semiclassical points of view. It is assumed that the magnetic field is strong or slowly varying in space, i.e., that adiabatic conditions hold. To the classical model, a systematic Lie-transform perturbation technique is applied up to second order in the adiabatic-expansion parameter. The averaged classical Hamiltonian contains not only terms representing fictitious electric and magnetic fields but also an additional velocity-dependent potential. The Hamiltonian of the quantum-mechanical system is diagonalized by means of a systematic WKB analysis for coupled wave equations up to second order in the adiabaticity parameter, which is coupled to Planck's constant. An exact term-by-term correspondence with the averaged classical Hamiltonian is established, thus confirming the relevance of the additional velocity-dependent second-order contribution

  14. Modification of optical properties by adiabatic shifting of resonances in a four-level atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Panchadhyayee, Pradipta

    2018-04-01

    We describe the linear and nonlinear optical properties of a four-level atomic system, after reducing it to an effective two-level atomic model under the condition of adiabatic shifting of resonances driven by two coherent off-resonant fields. The reduced form of the Hamiltonian corresponding to the two-level system is obtained by employing an adiabatic elimination procedure in the rate equations of the probability amplitudes for the proposed four-level model. For a weak probe field operating in the system, the nonlinear dependence of complex susceptibility on the Rabi frequencies and the detuning parameters of the off-resonant driving fields makes it possible to exhibit coherent control of single-photon and two-photon absorption and transparency, the evolution of enhanced Self-Kerr nonlinearity and noticeable dispersive switching. We have shown how the quantum interference results in the generic four-level model at the adiabatic limit. The present scheme describes the appearance of single-photon transparency without invoking any exact two-photon resonance.

  15. Mid-range adiabatic wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangelov, A.A.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for efficient mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils via a mediator coil is proposed. By varying the coil frequencies, three resonances are created: emitter–mediator (EM), mediator–receiver (MR) and emitter–receiver (ER). If the frequency sweeps are adiabatic and such that the EM resonance precedes the MR resonance, the energy flows sequentially along the chain emitter–mediator–receiver. If the MR resonance precedes the EM resonance, then the energy flows directly from the emitter to the receiver via the ER resonance; then the losses from the mediator are suppressed. This technique is robust against noise, resonant constraints and external interferences. - Highlights: ► Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil. ► The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. ► Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. ► Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils.

  16. Nonadiabatic quantum state engineering driven by fast quench dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Marcela; Sarandy, Marcelo S.; Duzzioni, Eduardo I.; Serra, Roberto M.

    2014-02-01

    There are a number of tasks in quantum information science that exploit nontransitional adiabatic dynamics. Such a dynamics is bounded by the adiabatic theorem, which naturally imposes a speed limit in the evolution of quantum systems. Here, we investigate an approach for quantum state engineering exploiting a shortcut to the adiabatic evolution, which is based on rapid quenches in a continuous-time Hamiltonian evolution. In particular, this procedure is able to provide state preparation faster than the adiabatic brachistochrone. Remarkably, the evolution time in this approach is shown to be ultimately limited by its "thermodynamical cost," provided in terms of the average work rate (average power) of the quench process. We illustrate this result in a scenario that can be experimentally implemented in a nuclear magnetic resonance setup.

  17. Laser activated superconducting switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    A superconducting switch or bistable device is described consisting of a superconductor in a cryogen maintaining a temperature just below the transition temperature, having a window of the proper optical frequency band for passing a laser beam which may impinge on the superconductor when desired. The frequency of the laser is equal to or greater than the optical absorption frequency of the superconducting material and is consistent with the ratio of the gap energy of the switch material to Planck's constant, to cause depairing of electrons, and thereby normalize the superconductor. Some embodiments comprise first and second superconducting metals. Other embodiments feature the two superconducting metals separated by a thin film insulator through which the superconducting electrons tunnel during superconductivity

  18. Construction and tests of a heart scanner based on superconducting sensors cooled by small stirling cryocoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, A.P.; Blom, C.J.H.A.; Blom, Cock; Balena, A.P.; de Vries, E.; Holland, Herman J.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Rogalla, Horst

    2001-01-01

    At the University of Twente, a heart scanner has been designed and constructed that uses superconducting devices (superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs)) to measure the magnetic field of the heart. A key feature is the elimination of liquid cryogens by incorporating cryocoolers. In

  19. Monte Carlo study of superconductivity in the three-band Emery model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, M.; Pattnaik, P.C.; Morgenstern, I.; Newns, D.M.; von der Linden, W.

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the three-band Hubbard model for the copper oxide planes in high-temperature superconductors using the projector quantum Monte Carlo method. We find no evidence for s-wave superconductivity

  20. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  1. Superconductivity and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Roque, António

    2017-01-01

    Trabalho apresentado em International Conference on Renewable Energies and Power Quality (ICREPQ’17), 4 a 6 de Abril de 2017, Málaga, Espanha The research in the field of superconductivity has led to the synthesis of superconducting materials with features that allow you to expand the applicability of this kind of materials. Among the superconducting materials characteristics, the critical temperature of the superconductor is framing the range and type of industrial applications that can b...

  2. Surface and Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, L. P.

    2006-07-01

    Experiments reveal the existence of metallic bands at surfaces of metals and insulators. The bands can be doped externally. We review properties of surface superconductivity that may set up in such bands at low temperatures and various means of superconductivity defection. The fundamental difference as compared to the ordinary superconductivity in metals, besides its two-dimensionality lies in the absence of the center of space inversion. This results in mixing between the singlet and triplet channels of the Cooper pairing.

  3. Superconductivity in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Lawson, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The trends in the occurrence of superconductivity in actinide materials are discussed. Most of them seem to show simple transition metal behavior. However, the superconductivity of americium proves that the f electrons are localized in that element and that ''actinides'' is the correct name for this row of elements. Recently the superconductivity of UBe 13 and UPt 3 has been shown to be extremely unusual, and these compounds fall in the new class of compounds now known as heavy fermion materials

  4. A practical superconducting-microcalorimeter X-ray spectrometer for beamline and laboratory science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doriese, W. B.; Abbamonte, P.; Alpert, B. K.; Bennett, D. A.; Denison, E. V.; Fang, Y.; Fischer, D. A.; Fitzgerald, C. P.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J. D.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Jaye, C.; McChesney, J. L.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Morgan, K. M.; Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Rodolakis, F.; Schmidt, D. R.; Tatsuno, H.; Uhlig, J.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.; Swetz, D. S.

    2017-05-01

    We describe a series of microcalorimeter X-ray spectrometers designed for a broad suite of measurement applications. The chief advantage of this type of spectrometer is that it can be orders of magnitude more efficient at collecting X-rays than more traditional high-resolution spectrometers that rely on wavelength-dispersive techniques. This advantage is most useful in applications that are traditionally photon-starved and/or involve radiation-sensitive samples. Each energy-dispersive spectrometer is built around an array of several hundred transition-edge sensors (TESs). TESs are superconducting thin films that are biased into their superconducting-to-normal-metal transitions. The spectrometers share a common readout architecture and many design elements, such as a compact, 65 mK detector package, 8-column time-division-multiplexed superconducting quantum-interference device readout, and a liquid-cryogen-free cryogenic system that is a two-stage adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator backed by a pulse-tube cryocooler. We have adapted this flexible architecture to mate to a variety of sample chambers and measurement systems that encompass a range of observing geometries. There are two different types of TES pixels employed. The first, designed for X-ray energies below 10 keV, has a best demonstrated energy resolution of 2.1 eV (full-width-at-half-maximum or FWHM) at 5.9 keV. The second, designed for X-ray energies below 2 keV, has a best demonstrated resolution of 1.0 eV (FWHM) at 500 eV. Our team has now deployed seven of these X-ray spectrometers to a variety of light sources, accelerator facilities, and laboratory-scale experiments; these seven spectrometers have already performed measurements related to their applications. Another five of these spectrometers will come online in the near future. We have applied our TES spectrometers to the following measurement applications: synchrotron-based absorption and emission spectroscopy and energy-resolved scattering

  5. Superconductivity and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadoni, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper, after a short introduction to superconductivity and to multifilamentary superconducting composites is aiming to review the state of the art and the future perspective of some of the applications of the superconducting materials. The main interest is focussed to large scale applications like, for istance, magnets for accelerators or fusion reactors, superconducting system for NMR thomography, etc. A short paragraph is dedicated to applications for high sensitivity instrumentation. The paper is then concluded by some considerations about the potentialities of the newly discovered high critical temperature materials

  6. Superconductivity in power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings volume presents 24 conference papers and 15 posters dealing with the following aspects: 1) Principles and elementary aspects of high-temperature superconductivity (3 plenary lectures); 2) Preparation, properties and materials requirements of metallic or oxide superconductors (critical current behaviour, soldered joints, structural studies); 3) Magnet technology (large magnets for thermonuclear fusion devices; magnets for particle accelerators and medical devices); 4) Magnetic levitation and superconductivity; 5) Cryogenics; 6) Energy storage systems using superconducting coils (SMES); 7) Superconducting power transmission cables, switches, transformers, and generator systems for power plant; 8) Supporting activities, industrial aspects, patents. There are thirty-eight records in the ENERGY database relating to individual conference papers. (MM) [de

  7. Superconducting linear accelerator cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Elkonin, B.V.; Sokolowski, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A large vertical cryostat for a superconducting linear accelerator using quarter wave resonators has been developed. The essential technical details, operational experience and performance are described. (author)

  8. Dependence of adiabatic population transfer on pulse profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research Articles Volume 66 Issue 6 June 2006 pp 999-1015 ... Adiabatic passage; population inversion; selectivity; robustness. Abstract. Control of population transfer by rapid adiabatic passage has been an established technique wherein the exact amplitude profile of the shaped pulse is considered to be insignificant.

  9. Constraints on the Adiabatic Temperature Change in Magnetocaloric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the magnetocaloric effect implies constraints on the allowed variation in the adiabatic temperature change for a magnetocaloric material. An inequality for the derivative of the adiabatic temperature change with respect to temperature is derived for both first- and second...

  10. Dependence of adiabatic population transfer on pulse profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Control of population transfer by rapid adiabatic passage has been an established technique wherein the exact amplitude profile of the shaped pulse is considered to be insignificant. We study the effect of ultrafast shaped pulses for two-level systems, by density-matrix approach. However, we find that adiabaticity depends ...

  11. Progress on the superconducting magnet for the time projection chamber experiment (TPC) at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Burns, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    The TPC (Time Projection Chamber) experiment at PEP will have a two meter inside diameter superconducting magnet which creatests a 1.5 T uniform solenoidal field for the TPC. The superconducting magnet coil, cryostat, cooling system, and the TPC gas pressure vessel (which operatests at 11 atm) were designed to be about two thirds of a radiation length thick. As a result, a high current density coil design was chosen. The magnet is cooled by forced flow two phase helium. The TPC magnet is the largest adiabatically stable superconducting magnet built to date. The paper presents the parameters of the TPC thin solenoid and its subsystems. Tests results from the Spring 1980 cryogenic tes are presented. The topics to be dealt with in the paper are cryogenic services and the tests of magnet subsystems such as the folded current leads. Large thin superconducting magnet technology will be important to large detectors to be used on LEP

  12. Optimal time schedule for adiabatic evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Avron, J.E.; Fraas, Martin; Graf, G.M.; Grech, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 4 (2010), 040304/1-040304/4 ISSN 1050-2947 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : QUANTUM COMPUTATION Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.861, year: 2010

  13. Design of ternary clocked adiabatic static random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengjun, Wang; Fengna, Mei

    2011-10-01

    Based on multi-valued logic, adiabatic circuits and the structure of ternary static random access memory (SRAM), a design scheme of a novel ternary clocked adiabatic SRAM is presented. The scheme adopts bootstrapped NMOS transistors, and an address decoder, a storage cell and a sense amplifier are charged and discharged in the adiabatic way, so the charges stored in the large switch capacitance of word lines, bit lines and the address decoder can be effectively restored to achieve energy recovery during reading and writing of ternary signals. The PSPICE simulation results indicate that the ternary clocked adiabatic SRAM has a correct logic function and low power consumption. Compared with ternary conventional SRAM, the average power consumption of the ternary adiabatic SRAM saves up to 68% in the same conditions.

  14. Design of ternary clocked adiabatic static random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Pengjun; Mei Fengna

    2011-01-01

    Based on multi-valued logic, adiabatic circuits and the structure of ternary static random access memory (SRAM), a design scheme of a novel ternary clocked adiabatic SRAM is presented. The scheme adopts bootstrapped NMOS transistors, and an address decoder, a storage cell and a sense amplifier are charged and discharged in the adiabatic way, so the charges stored in the large switch capacitance of word lines, bit lines and the address decoder can be effectively restored to achieve energy recovery during reading and writing of ternary signals. The PSPICE simulation results indicate that the ternary clocked adiabatic SRAM has a correct logic function and low power consumption. Compared with ternary conventional SRAM, the average power consumption of the ternary adiabatic SRAM saves up to 68% in the same conditions. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  15. Adiabatic logic future trend and system level perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Teichmann, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Adiabatic logic is a potential successor for static CMOS circuit design when it comes to ultra-low-power energy consumption. Future development like the evolutionary shrinking of the minimum feature size as well as revolutionary novel transistor concepts will change the gate level savings gained by adiabatic logic. In addition, the impact of worsening degradation effects has to be considered in the design of adiabatic circuits. The impact of the technology trends on the figures of merit of adiabatic logic, energy saving potential and optimum operating frequency, are investigated, as well as degradation related issues. Adiabatic logic benefits from future devices, is not susceptible to Hot Carrier Injection, and shows less impact of Bias Temperature Instability than static CMOS circuits. Major interest also lies on the efficient generation of the applied power-clock signal. This oscillating power supply can be used to save energy in short idle times by disconnecting circuits. An efficient way to generate the p...

  16. Adiabatic heavy-ion fusion potentials for fusion at deep sub-barrier ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    barrier energies has been examined. The adiabatic limit of fusion barriers has been determined from experimental data using the barrier penetration model. These adiabatic barriers are consistent with the adiabatic fusion barriers derived from ...

  17. Adiabatic/diabatic polarization beam splitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRose, Christopher; Cai, Hong

    2017-09-12

    The various presented herein relate to an on-chip polarization beam splitter (PBS), which is adiabatic for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode and diabatic for the transverse electric (TE) mode. The PBS comprises a through waveguide and a cross waveguide, wherein an electromagnetic beam comprising TE mode and TM mode components is applied to an input port of the through waveguide. The PBS can be utilized to separate the TE mode component from the TM mode component, wherein the TE mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the through waveguide, and the TM mode component exits the PBS via an output port of the cross waveguide. The PBS has a structure that is tolerant to manufacturing variations and exhibits high polarization extinction ratios over a wide bandwidth.

  18. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, Mariusz [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Moiseyev, Nimrod [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Physics, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  19. Adiabatic equilibrium models for direct containment heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilch, M.; Allen, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) studies are being extended to include a wider spectrum of reactor plants than was considered in NUREG-1150. There is a need for simple direct containment heating (DCH) models that can be used for screening studies aimed at identifying potentially significant contributors to overall risk in individual nuclear power plants. This paper presents two adiabatic equilibrium models suitable for the task. The first, a single-cell model, places a true upper bound on DCH loads. This upper bound, however, often far exceeds reasonable expectations of containment loads based on CONTAIN calculations and experiment observations. In this paper, a two cell model is developed that captures the major mitigating feature of containment compartmentalization, thus providing more reasonable estimates of the containment load

  20. Adiabatic, chaotic and quasi-adiabatic charged particle motion in two-dimensional magnetic field reversals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechner, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    For a number of problems in the Plasma Astrophysics it is necessary to know the laws, which govern the non adiabatic charged particle dynamics in strongly curves magnetic field reversals. These are, e.q., the kinetic theory of the microscopic and macroscopicstability of current sheets in collionless plasma, of microturbulence, causing anomalous resistivity and dissipating currents, the problem of spontaneous reconnection, the formation of non Maxwellian distribution functions, particle acceleration and the use of particles as a diagnostic tool ('tracers'). To find such laws we derived from the differential equations of motion discrete mappings. These mappings allow an investigation of the motion after the break down of the adiabaticity of the magnetic moment. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  1. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  2. Quantum pattern recognition with liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Neigovzen, Rodion; Neves, Jorge L.; Sollacher, Rudolf; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2008-01-01

    A novel quantum pattern recognition scheme is presented, which combines the idea of a classic Hopfield neural network with adiabatic quantum computation. Both the input and the memorized patterns are represented by means of the problem Hamiltonian. In contrast to classic neural networks, the algorithm can return a quantum superposition of multiple recognized patterns. A proof of principle for the algorithm for two qubits is provided using a liquid state NMR quantum computer.

  3. Manipulating Kerr effects in a superconducting cavity via a superconducting qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Victor V.; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Vlastakis, Brian; Leghtas, Zaki; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Jiang, Liang

    2013-03-01

    Typically, models of qubit-cavity interactions in superconducting circuits have included terms strictly linear in amplitude of the cavity modes. Due to ever-increasing experimental ability to realize larger coupling strengths, induced nonlinearities in the cavity contribute significantly to the dynamics and thus need to be accounted for. Such nonlinearities include interactions between the photon numbers of two cavity modes (cross-Kerr) and between a mode and itself (self-Kerr). Motivated by the recent experimental demonstration of self-Kerr in superconducting cavities, we investigate quantum control of Kerr effects via a dispersively coupled superconducting qubit, which not only enables us to enhance or suppress the Kerr coupling, but also opens the possibility to investigate higher order Kerr effects.

  4. Comment on "Nonlinear adiabatic passage from fermion atoms to boson molecules"

    CERN Document Server

    Itin, A P; Watanabe, S

    2006-01-01

    Dynamics of an adiabatic sweep through a Feshbach resonance in a quantum gas of fermionic atoms was considered recently in I.Tikhonenkov, E.Pazy {\\it et al}, Phys. Rev. {\\bf A 73}, 043605 (2006). In the mean-field limit, the system is reduced to a classical nonlinear Hamiltonian system with a slowly changing parameter. Analysis of the latter system was done incorrectly; the main results of the commented paper are inconsistent. Here we present accurate study of the mean-field dynamics of the model based on the rigorous separatrix crossing theory. In particular, for the dependence of the remaining atomic fraction $\\Gamma$ on the sweep rate $\\alpha$ the abovementioned Refs. predict the power-law $\\Gamma \\sim \\alpha^{1/3}$ (in the case where the initial fraction of molecules is larger than the quantum fluctuations). Instead, $\\Gamma$ is related to a quasi-random jump of an adiabatic invariant which can be calculated using a general method of the separatrix crossing theory and asymptotically $\\sim\\alpha$ .

  5. Type-II Quantum Dot Nanowire Structures with Large Oscillator Strengths for Optical Quantum Gating Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taherkhani, Masoomeh; Gregersen, Niels; Willatzen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    The exciton oscillator strength (OS) in type-II quantum dot (QD) nanowires is calculated by using a fast and efficient method. We propose a new structure in Double-Well QD (DWQD) nanowire that considerably increases OS of type-II QDs which is a key parameter in optical quantum gating in the stimu...... in the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) process [1] for implementing quantum gates....

  6. The theory of anyonic superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukken, J.D.; Sonnenschien, J.; Weiss, N.

    1991-01-01

    Particles in two spatial dimensions with fractional statistics known, generically, as anyons, have been of interest to particle physicists for nearly ten years. A major change in the direction of research occurred when it was discovered that anyons could play a role as quasiparticles in condensed-matter systems. This was originally discovered to be the case in systems exhibiting the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect. The application of anyons to condensed-matter systems received yet another boost when it was discovered by Laughlin that even an ideal gas of anyons was a superfluid and, as a result, a gas of charged anyons would be a superconductor. This led immediately to attempts to explain the superconductivity of high-T c materials which are layered ceramics in terms of anyons. The main challenge was to find a reasonable model for these materials which has quasiparticles obeying anyonic statistics. The goal of this article is to review the theory of anyonic superconductivity and its possible relation to high-T c materials. The emphasis in this review is on field-theoretical methods. In this paper the authors explain what an anyon is and how it can be modeled mathematically. The authors discuss the possible relationship between anyons and high-T c materials. The authors review several of the attempts to obtain anyonic quasiparticles from the Hubbard model which is commonly used to describe these materials. The authors describe the mathematical modeling of anyons in terms of their interaction with an Abelian gauge field with a Chern-Simons term. This description of anyons is used extensively in this article. The authors discuss the possible criteria for superconductivity in anyonic systems with particular emphasis on criteria which would be useful in the Chern-Simons description

  7. Models of optical quantum computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krovi Hari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  8. Superconducting elliptical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J K

    2011-01-01

    We give a brief overview of the history, state of the art, and future for elliptical superconducting cavities. Principles of the cell shape optimization, criteria for multi-cell structures design, HOM damping schemes and other features are discussed along with examples of superconducting structures for various applications.

  9. Large superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Pérot, J

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the use of large superconducting magnets in the areas of particle physics, thermonuclear fusion, and magnetohydrodynamics. In addition to considering the physics of the superconducting state, the article considers machines such as BEBC (Big European Bubble Chamber) at CERN, the LINAC at SLAC and possible Tokamak applications. The future application of superconductors to high speed trains is discussed. (0 refs).

  10. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  11. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  12. Fidelity susceptibility in the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Lv, Xiao-Chen

    2018-01-01

    Quantum criticality usually occurs in many-body systems. Recently it was shown that the quantum Rabi model, which describes a two-level atom coupled to a single model cavity field, presents quantum phase transitions from a normal phase to a superradiate phase when the ratio between the frequency of the two-level atom and the frequency of the cavity field extends to infinity. In this work, we study quantum phase transitions in the quantum Rabi model from the fidelity susceptibility perspective. We found that the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility present universal finite-size scaling behaviors near the quantum critical point of the Rabi model if the ratio between frequency of the two-level atom and frequency of the cavity field is finite. From the finite-size scaling analysis of the fidelity susceptibility, we found that the adiabatic dimension of the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility of fourth order in the Rabi model are 4 /3 and 2, respectively. Meanwhile, the correlation length critical exponent and the dynamical critical exponent in the quantum critical point of the Rabi model are found to be 3 /2 and 1 /3 , respectively. Since the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility are the moments of the quantum noise spectrum which are directly measurable by experiments in linear response regime, the scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility in the Rabi model could be tested experimentally. The simple structure of the quantum Rabi model paves the way for experimentally observing the universal scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility at a quantum phase transition.

  13. THE ADIABATIC DEMAGNETIZATION REFRIGERATOR FOR THE MICRO-X SOUNDING ROCKET TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikus, P.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Leman, S. W.; Rutherford, J. M.; Trowbridge, S. N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Doriese, W. B.; McCammon, D.

    2010-01-01

    The Micro-X Imaging X-ray Spectrometer is a sounding rocket payload slated for launch in 2011. An array of Transition Edge Sensors, which is operated at a bath temperature of 50 mK, will be used to obtain a high resolution spectrum of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) with a 75 gram Ferric Ammonium Alum (FAA) salt pill in the bore of a 4 T superconducting magnet provides a stable heat sink for the detector array only a few seconds after burnout of the rocket motors. This requires a cold stage design with very short thermal time constants. A suspension made from Kevlar strings holds the 255 gram cold stage in place. It is capable of withstanding loads in excess of 200 g. Stable operation of the TES array in proximity to the ADR magnet is ensured by a three-stage magnetic shielding system which consists of a superconducting can, a high-permeability shield and a bucking coil. The development and testing of the Micro-X payload is well underway.

  14. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.; Hietala, V.M.; Ginley, D.S.; Tigges, C.P.; Phillips, J.M.; Siegal, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a family of digital logic circuits based on superconducting flux flow transistors that show high speed, reasonable signal levels, large fan-out, and large noise margins. The circuits are made from high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and have been shown to operate at over 90 K. NOR gates have been demonstrated with fan-outs of more than 5 and fully loaded switching times less than a fixture-limited 50 ps. Ring-oscillator data suggest inverter delay times of about 40ps when using a 3-μm linewidths. Simple flip-flops have also been demonstrated showing large noise margins, response times of less than 30 ps, and static power dissipation on the order of 30 nW. Among other uses, this logic family is appropriate as an interface between logic families such as single flux quantum and conventional semiconductor logic

  15. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However......, the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10...

  16. Superlattice platform for chiral superconductivity with tunable and high Chern numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöyhönen, Kim; Ojanen, Teemu

    2017-11-01

    Finding concrete realizations for topologically nontrivial chiral superconductivity has been a long-standing goal in quantum matter research. Here, we propose a route to a systematic realization of chiral superconductivity with nonzero Chern numbers. This goal can be achieved in a nanomagnet lattice deposited on top of a spin-orbit coupled two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with proximity s -wave superconductivity. The proposed structure can be regarded as a universal platform for chiral superconductivity supporting a large variety of topological phases. The topological state of the system can be electrically controlled by, for example, tuning the density of the 2DEG.

  17. Possible universal cause of high-Tc superconductivity in different metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Shaginyan, V.R.

    2002-01-01

    Using the theory of the high temperature superconductivity based on the idea of the fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT) it is shown that neither the d-wave pairing symmetry, nor the pseudogap phenomenon, nor the presence of the Cu-O 2 planes are of decisive importance for the existence of the high-T c superconductivity. The analysis of recent experimental data on this type of superconductivity in different materials is carried out. It is shown that these facts can be understood within the theory of superconductivity based on the FCQPT. The main features of a room-temperature superconductor are discussed [ru

  18. Superconductivity in Weyl semimetal candidate MoTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yanpeng; Naumov, Pavel; Rajamathi, Catherine; Barkalov, Oleg; Wu, Shu-Chun; Shekhar, Chandra; Sun, Yan; Suess, Vicky; Schmidt, Marcus; Schwarz, Ulrich; Schnelle, Walter; Felser, Claudia; Medvedev, Sergey [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Ali, Mazhar; Cava, Robert [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton (United States); Hanfland, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Pippel, Eckhard; Werner, Peter; Hillebrand, Reinald; Parkin, Stuart [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Halle (Germany); Foerster, Tobias; Kampert, Erik [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Dresden (Germany); Yan, Binghai [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the sister compound of WTe{sub 2}, MoTe{sub 2}, which is also predicted to be a Weyl semimetal and a quantum spin Hall insulator in bulk and monolayer form, respectively. We find that MoTe{sub 2} exhibits superconductivity with a resistive transition temperature T{sub c} of 0.1 K. The application of a small pressure is shown to dramatically enhance the T{sub c}, with a maximum value of 8.2 K being obtained at 11.7 GPa (a more than 80-fold increase in Tc). This yields a dome-shaped superconducting phase diagram. Further explorations into the nature of the superconductivity in this system may provide insights into the interplay between superconductivity and topological physics.

  19. Proximity Induced Superconducting Properties in One and Two Dimensional Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten

    that a superconducting 1D nanowire can harbor Majorana bound states in the absence of spin–orbit coupling. We fabricate and measure micrometer–sized mesoscopic devices demonstrating the inheritance of superconducting properties in the 2D electron gas. By placing a quantum point contact proximal to the interface between...... the 2D electron gas and the aluminum, we are able to demonstrate quantization of conductance in units of 4e2/h indicative of perfect Andreev reflection at the interface. We show that the quantum point contact can be operated as a tunnel probe to locally measure the density of states in the electron gas...... with a superconducting pairing potential, Majorana bound states can exist in the absence of spin–orbit coupling. Our proposal dispenses with spin–orbit coupling at the expense of a locally varying magnetic field. The presence of the topological state is demonstrated analytically by mapping our model onto...

  20. Tunneling probe of fluctuating superconductivity in disordered thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentelski, David; Frydman, Aviad; Shimshoni, Efrat; Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.

    2018-03-01

    Disordered thin films close to the superconductor-insulator phase transition (SIT) hold the key to understanding quantum phase transition in strongly correlated materials. The SIT is governed by superconducting quantum fluctuations, which can be revealed, for example, by tunneling measurements. These experiments detect a spectral gap, accompanied by suppressed coherence peaks, on both sides of the transition. Here we describe the insulating side in terms of a fluctuating superconducting field with finite-range correlations. We perform a controlled diagrammatic resummation and derive analytic expressions for the tunneling differential conductance. We find that short-range superconducting fluctuations suppress the coherence peaks even in the presence of long-range correlations. Our approach offers a quantitative description of existing measurements on disordered thin films and accounts for tunneling spectra with suppressed coherence peaks.