WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconducting accelerator ring

  1. Superconducting travelling wave ring with high gradient accelerating section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrakhov, P.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure instead of a standing wave cavity has major advantages in increasing the accelerating gradient in the ILC. In contrast with standing wave cavity STWA requires feedback loop, which sends wave from the structure output to input, making a superconducting traveling wave ring (STWR). One or few input couplers need to excite STWR and compensate power dissipations due to beam loading. To control traveling wave regime in the structure two independent knobs can be used for tuning both resonant ring frequency and backward wave. We discuss two variants of the STWR with one and two feed couplers.

  2. Ultra-high vacuum in superconducting accelerator rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanov, A. M.; Butenko, A. V.; Galimov, A. R.; Lugovnin, A. K.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Achieving the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) in the collider and booster of the NICA project is one of the main challenges when creating this device. It determines the need for a serious approach to this issue and conducting research in this direction. First, it is necessary to understand the effect of the various components of the vacuum systems on the degree of vacuum. It is also necessary to carry out studies of pumping devices for producing the required vacuum (10-9 Pa) in the beam chamber and choose the most optimal pumping scheme. At the same time, it is necessary to figure out how various operations are carried out with the vacuum chamber: preparation of vacuum surfaces, letting in the atmosphere, and warming the chamber after closing the influence on the degree of vacuum and the composition of the residual gas. The temperature may vary from room temperature to liquid helium temperature due to the difficulty of keeping the beam-chamber walls at a constant temperature, including the inner components. This complicates the processes taking place within it. Additional complexity arises due the heating of the chamber walls by various processes during the operation of the accelerator (for example, cycling the magnetic field).

  3. Tests of a niobium split-ring superconducting heavy ion accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Jaffey, A.H.; Khoe, T.K.; Olesen, M.C.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wesolowski, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A niobium split-ring accelerating structure designed for use in the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion energy booster was successfully tested. The superconducting resonator has a resonant frequency of 97 MHz and an optimum particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.11. Ultimate performance is expected to be limited by peak surface fields, which in this structure are 4.7 E/sub a/ electric and 170 E/sub a/ (Gauss) magnetic, where E/sub a/ is the effective accelerating gradient in MV/m. The rf losses in two demountable superconducting joints severely limited performance in initial tests. Following independent measurements of the rf loss properties of several types of demountable joints, one demountable joint was eliminated and the other modified. Subsequently, the resonator could be operated continuously at E/sub a/ = 3.6 MV/m (corresponding to an energy gain of 1.3 MeV per charge) with 10W rf input power. Maximum field level was limited by electron loading. The mechanical stability of the resonator under operating conditions is excellent: vibration induced eigenfrequency noise is less than 120 Hz peak to peak, and the radiation pressure induced frequency shift is ..delta..f/f = 1.6 x 10/sup -6/ E/sub a//sup 2/.

  4. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  5. Development of Low Level RF Control Systems for Superconducting Heavy Ion Linear Accelerators, Electron Synchrotrons and Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Kolesov, Sergej; Pekeler, Michael; Piel, Christian; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Since 2001 ACCEL Instruments is supplying low level RF control systems together with turn key cavity systems. The early LLRF systems used the well established technology based on discrete analogue amplitude and phase detectors and modulators. Today analogue LLRF systems can make use of advanced vector demodulators and modulators combined with a fast computer controlled analogue feed back loop. Feed forward control is implemented to operate the RF cavity in an open loop mode or to compensate for predictable perturbations. The paper will introduce the general design philosophy and show how it can be adapted to different tasks as controlling a synchrotron booster nc RF system at 500 MHz, or superconducting storage ring RF cavities, as well as a linear accelerator at 176 MHz formed by a chain of individually driven and controlled superconducting λ/2 cavities.

  6. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  7. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to 6...

  8. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to...

  9. Tutorial on Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, M. J. Penny; Goodzeit, Carl L.

    1997-05-01

    A multimedia CD-ROM tutorial on the physics and engineering concepts of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators is being developed under a U.S. Dept. of Energy SBIR grant. The tutorial, scheduled for distribution this summer, is targeted to undergraduate junior or senior level science students. However, its unified presentation of the broad range of issues involved in the design of superconducting magnets for accelerators and the extensive detail about the construction process (including animations and video clips) will also be of value to staff of research institutes and industrial concerns with an interest in applied superconductivity or magnet development. The source material, which is based on the world-wide R and D programs to develop superconducting accelerator magnets, is organized in five units with the following themes: Introduction to magnets and accelerators; (2) Superconductors for accelerator magnets; (3) Magnetic design methods for accelerator magnets; (4) Electrical, mechanical, and cryogenic considerations for the final magnet package; (5) Performance characteristics and measurement methods. A detailed outline and examples will be shown.

  10. Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Prakash; T S Datta; B P Ajith Kumar; J Antony; P Barua; J Chacko; A Choudhury; G K Chadhari; S Ghosh; S Kar; S A Krishnan; Manoj Kumar; Rajesh Kumar; A Mandal; D S Mathuria; R S Meena; R Mehta; K K Mistri; A Pandey; M V Suresh Babu; B K Sahu; A Sarkar; S S K Sonti; A Rai; S Venkatramanan; J Zacharias; R K Bhowmik; A Roy

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports the construction of a superconducting linear accelerator as a booster to the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The LINAC will use superconducting niobium quarter wave resonators as the accelerating element. Construction of the linear accelerator has progressed sufficiently. Details of the entire accelerator system including the cryogenics facility, RF electronics development, facilities for fabricating niobium resonators indigenously, and present status of the project are presented.

  11. The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab: Science Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Henderson, Stuart [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei [Fermilab; Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) currently in commissioning phase at Fermilab is foreseen to support a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop novel approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation. ASTA incorporates a superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) linac coupled to a flexible high-brightness photoinjector. The facility also includes a small-circumference storage ring capable of storing electrons or protons. This report summarizes the facility capabilities, and provide an overview of the accelerator-science researches to be enabled.

  12. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, I.; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2016-11-01

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter's free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg-Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. We also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity.

  13. Persistent current in small superconducting rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiete, Georg; Oreg, Yuval

    2009-07-17

    We study theoretically the contribution of fluctuating Cooper pairs to the persistent current in superconducting rings threaded by a magnetic flux. For sufficiently small rings, in which the coherence length xi exceeds the radius R, mean field theory predicts a full reduction of the transition temperature to zero near half-integer flux. We find that nevertheless a very large current is expected to persist in the ring as a consequence of Cooper pair fluctuations that do not condense. For larger rings with R>xi, we calculate analytically the susceptibility in the critical region of strong fluctuations and show that it reflects competition of two interacting complex order parameters.

  14. LEP superconducting accelerating cavity module

    CERN Multimedia

    With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was – and still is – the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. The excavation of the LEP tunnel was Europe’s largest civil-engineering project prior to the Channel Tunnel. Three tunnel-boring machines started excavating the tunnel in February 1985 and the ring was completed three years later. In its first phase of operation, LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions. LEP was commissioned in July 1989 and the first beam circulated in the collider on 14 July. The collider's initial energy was chosen to be around 91 GeV, so that Z bosons could be produced. The Z boson and its charged partner the W boson, both discovered at CERN in 1983, are responsible for the weak force, which drives the Sun, for example. Observing the creation and decay of the short-lived Z boson w...

  15. Acceleration for the mu-Storage Ring Neutrino Source

    OpenAIRE

    Neuffer, David

    2000-01-01

    A muon storage ring neutrino source uses an induction linac for muon capture, a 200 MHz copper cavity system for cooling, and 200 and 400 MHz superconducting rf systems for acceleration to a final energy of up to 50 GeV. These systems and their requirements are discussed in this paper.

  16. Superconducting Ring Cyclotron for Riken RI Beam Factory in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, H.; Dantsuka, T.; Yamada, K.; Kase, M.; Maie, T.; Kamigaito, O.

    2010-04-01

    Since 1997, RIKEN Nishina Center has been constructing the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) and succeeded in beam commissioning of its accelerator complex at the end of 2006. The world's first superconducting ring cyclotron (SRC) is the final booster in the RIBF accelerator complex which is able to accelerate all-element heavy ions to a speed of about 70% of the velocity of light. The ring cyclotron consists of 6 major superconducting sector magnets with a maximum field of 3.8 T. The total stored energy is 235 MJ, and its overall sizes are 19 m diameter, 8 m height and 8,300 tons. The magnet system assembly was completed in August 2005, and successfully reached the maximum field in November 2005. The first beam was extracted at the end of 2006 and the first uranium beam was extracted in March 2007. However operation of the helium refrigerator was not satisfactory although the commissioning of SRC was successful. Operation was stopped every two month due to degradation of its cooling power. In February 2008 the reason of the degradation was revealed to be oil contamination. Operation of the cryogenic system was restarted from August 2008 after hard task to clean up the helium refrigerator and to add oil separators to the compressor. After restoration long-term steady operation to keep the magnet superconducting continued for about 8 months with no sign of degradation of cooling capacity.

  17. Accelerator Technology: Magnets, Normal and Superconducting

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '8.1 Magnets, Normal and Superconducting' of the Chapter '8 Accelerator Technology' with the content: 8.1 Magnets, Normal and Superconducting 8.1.1 Introduction 8.1.2 Normal Conducting Magnets 8.1.2.1 Magnetic Design 8.1.2.2 Coils 8.1.2.3 Yoke 8.1.2.4 Costs 8.1.2.5 Undulators, Wigglers, Permanent Magnets 8.1.2.6 Solenoids 8.1.3 Superconducting Magnets 8.1.3.1 Superconducting Materials 8.1.3.2 Superconducting Cables 8.1.3.3 Stability and Margins, Quench and Protection 8.1.3.4 Magnetization, Coupling and AC Loss 8.1.3.5 Magnetic Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets 8.1.3.6 Current Leads 8.1.3.7 Mechanics, Insulation, Cooling and Manufacturing Aspects

  18. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Acceleration Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — SRF cavities enable accelerators to increase particle beam energy levels while minimizing the use of electrical power by all but eliminating electrical resistance....

  19. Niobium films for superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Circelli, N.; Hauer, M.

    1984-09-01

    Superconducting accelerating cavities made of Nb-coated copper were produced. Niobium films of a thickness ranging from 1.4 to 4 ..mu..m were deposited onto the inside of 3-GHz cavities and 500-MHz frequency by bias diode sputtering. A maximum accelerating field of 8.6 MV m/sup -1/ was reached without quench which is attributed to the large thermal conductivity of copper at liquid helium temperatures.

  20. Technology of superconducting accelerator dipoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Meuser, R.B.; Taylor, C.

    1983-06-01

    We discuss accelerator dipoles and their characteristics. Other types of magnets, in particular bubble chamber magnets have been quite successful. Their performance is based on cryogenic stability which is addressed only briefly in this chapter. This type of stability is not available to the accelerator designer because of the large quantities of copper or other stabilizer that would reduce the current density in the windings to an unacceptably low value.

  1. Application of Accelerators and Storage Rings: Accelerators in Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, U

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '11.3 Accelerators in Medicine' of the Chapter '11 Application of Accelerators and Storage Rings' with the content: 11.3 Accelerators in Medicine 11.3.1 Accelerators and Radiopharmaceuticals 11.3.2 Accelerators and Cancer Therapy

  2. Manufacturing and Testing of Accelerator Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting magnet for accelerators is a quite complex process that is not yet fully industrialized. In this paper, after a short history of the evolution of the magnet design and construction, we review the main characteristics of the accelerator magnets having an impact on the construction technology. We put in evidence how the design and component quality impact on construction and why the final product calls for a total-quality approach. LHC experience is widely discussed and main lessons are spelled out. Then the new Nb3Sn technology, under development for the next generation magnet construction, is outlined. Finally, we briefly review the testing procedure of accelerator superconducting magnets, underlining the close connection with the design validation and with the manufacturing process.

  3. Industrialization of Superconducting RF Accelerator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiniger, Michael; Pekeler, Michael; Vogel, Hanspeter

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) accelerator technology has basically existed for 50 years. It took about 20 years to conduct basic R&D and prototyping at universities and international institutes before the first superconducting accelerators were built, with industry supplying complete accelerator cavities. In parallel, the design of large scale accelerators using SRF was done worldwide. In order to build those accelerators, industry has been involved for 30 years in building the required cavities and/or accelerator modules in time and budget. To enable industry to supply these high tech components, technology transfer was made from the laboratories in the following three regions: the Americas, Asia and Europe. As will be shown, the manufacture of the SRF cavities is normally accomplished in industry whereas the cavity testing and module assembly are not performed in industry in most cases, yet. The story of industrialization is so far a story of customized projects. Therefore a real SRF accelerator product is not yet available in this market. License agreements and technology transfer between leading SRF laboratories and industry is a powerful tool for enabling industry to manufacture SRF components or turnkey superconducting accelerator modules for other laboratories and users with few or no capabilities in SRF technology. Despite all this, the SRF accelerator market today is still a small market. The manufacture and preparation of the components require a range of specialized knowledge, as well as complex and expensive manufacturing installations like for high precision machining, electron beam welding, chemical surface preparation and class ISO4 clean room assembly. Today, the involved industry in the US and Europe comprises medium-sized companies. In Japan, some big enterprises are involved. So far, roughly 2500 SRF cavities have been built by or ordered from industry worldwide. Another substantial step might come from the International Linear Collider (ILC) project

  4. Compact superconducting ring at ritsumeikan university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, H; Nakayama, Y; Ozutsumi, K; Yamamoto, Y; Tokunaga, Y; Saisho, H; Matsubara, T; Ikeda, S

    1998-05-01

    A compact superconducting storage ring (0.575 GeV and 300 mA) with a racetrack microtron injection system was installed at Ritsumeikan University and has been operated successfully since April 1996. As the radius of the circular electron orbit is small (0.5 m), it is possible to use a radiation beam of relatively high photon flux at a short distance from the source point. Beamlines have been constructed including those for XAFS, soft X-ray spectroscopy, VUV spectroscopy, fluorescent X-ray analysis, soft X-ray microscopy, X-ray diffraction/scattering and photoelectron spectroscopy; the photoelectron spectrometer is combined with an ion-beam-scattering spectrometer to obtain information both on the electronic states and on the atomic arrangements of a solid surface. In addition there are two beamlines, one for LIGA exposure and the other for synchrotron radiation ablation, which are devoted to producing new devices and materials. The synchrotron radiation facility is open not only to users in the University but also to researchers in industry, governmental institutions and other universities.

  5. Transport currents measured in ring samples: test of superconducting weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H.; Claus, H.; Chen, L.; Paulikas, A. P.; Veal, B. W.; Olsson, B.; Koshelev, A.; Hull, J.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2001-02-01

    The critical current densities in bulk melt-textured YBa 2Cu 3O x and across superconducting “weld” joints are measured using scanning Hall probe measurements of the trapped magnetic field in ring samples. With this method, critical current densities are obtained without the use of electrical contacts. Large persistent currents are induced in ring samples at 77 K, after cooling in a 3 kG field. These currents can be determined from the magnetic field they produce. At 77 K a supercurrent exceeding 2000 A (about 10 4 A/cm 2) was induced in a 2 cm diameter ring; this current produces a magnetic field exceeding 1.5 kG in the bore of the ring. We demonstrate that when a ring is cut, and the cut is repaired by a superconducting weld, the weld joint can transmit the same high supercurrent as the bulk.

  6. Superconducting Linac and associated accelerator development at NSC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit Roy

    2001-08-01

    There has been significant progress in the programme to develop a superconducting linear accelerator as a booster for the Pelletron accelerator at the Nuclear Science Centre. This paper presents the current status of the development in all the major components of the accelerator.

  7. An efficient magnetron transmitter for superconducting accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakevich, G.; Lebedev, V.; Yakovlev, V.; Pavlov, V.

    2016-12-01

    A concept of a highly-efficient high-power magnetron transmitter allowing wide-band phase and the mid-frequency power control at the frequency of the locking signal is proposed. The proposal is aimed for powering Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of intensity-frontier accelerators. The transmitter is intended to operate with phase and amplitude control feedback loops allowing suppression of microphonics and beam loading in the SRF cavities. The concept utilizes injection-locked magnetrons controlled in phase by the locking signal supplied by a feedback system. The injection-locking signal pre-excites the magnetron and allows its operation below the critical voltage in free run. This realizes control of the magnetron power in an extended range (up to 10 dB) by control of the magnetron current. Experimental studies were carried out with 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons. They demonstrated stable operation of the magnetrons and the required range of power control at a low noise level. An analysis of the kinetics of the drifting charge within the framework of the presented model of phase focusing in magnetrons substantiates the concept and the experimental results.

  8. Latest Development in Superconducting RF Structures for beta=1 Particle Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel

    2006-06-26

    Superconducting RF technology is since nearly a decade routinely applied to different kinds of accelerating devices: linear accelerators, storage rings, synchrotron light sources and FEL's. With the technology recommendation for the International Linear Collider (ILC) a year ago, new emphasis has been placed on improving the performance of accelerating cavities both in Q-value and in accelerating gradients with the goal to achieve performance levels close to the fundamental limits given by the material parameters of the choice material, niobium. This paper will summarize the challenges to SRF technology and will review the latest developments in superconducting structure design. Additionally, it will give an overview of the newest results and will report on the developments in alternative materials and technologies.

  9. Split ring resonator for the Argonne superconducting heavy ion booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A split-ring resonator for use in the ANL superconducting heavy-ion linac was constructed and is being tested. The electromagnetic characteristics of the 98-MHz device are the same as the unit described earlier, but the housing is formed of a new material consisting of niobium sheet explosively bonded to copper. The niobium provides the superconducting path and the copper conducts heat to a small area cooled by liquid helium. This arrangement greatly simplified the cryogenic system. Fabrication of the housing was relatively simple, with the result that costs have been reduced substantially. The mechanical stability of the resonator and the performance of the demountable superconducting joints are significantly better than for the earlier unit.

  10. YBCO superconducting ring resonators at millimeter-wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorey, Christopher M.; Kong, Keon-Shik; Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, J. D.; Itoh, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Microstrip ring resonators operating at 35 GHz were fabricated from laser ablated YBCO films deposited on lanthanum aluminate substrates. They were measured over a range of temperatures and their performances compared to identical resonators made of evaporated gold. Below 60 Kelvin the superconducting strip performed better than the gold, reaching an unloaded Q approximately 1.5 times that of gold at 25 K. A shift in the resonant frequency follows the form predicted by the London equations. The Phenomenological Loss Equivalence Method is applied to the ring resonator and the theoretically calculated Q values are compared to the experimental results.

  11. Unicell structure for superconducting storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repeta, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanically integrated, magnetically decoupled storage rings were designed for a heavy ion collider for 100 GeV/amu Au, at B = 2.7T. New concepts were developed, including detailed engineering design and cost estimates. A ''unicell'' contains a half-cell of both rings within a single He vessel. The unicell design is optimized for economical mass production. Survey pads welded to the laminations provide external fiducials to locate the magnet cores. Roller bearing self aligning supports accommodate cool-down shrinkage. The design tolerates relative motion of components resulting from longitudinal shrinkage in the approx.15 m long unicell without affecting performance. Magnetic and physical lengths are the same, eliminating waste space. ''Achromatic'' quadrupoles with sextupoles at both ends are located on a common precision beam tube which aligns and supports a pick-up electrode. The unicell accommodates longer dipoles compared to conventional designs, reducing B/sub max/, stored energy, and the volume of iron and superconductor. Applications to future machines will be discussed.

  12. Unicell structure for superconducting storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repeta, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-10-01

    Mechanically integrated, magnetically decoupled storage rings were designed for a heavy ion collider for 100 GeV/amu Au, at B=2.7T. New concepts were developed, including detailed engineering design and cost estimates. A ''unicell'' contains a half-cell of both rings within a single He vessel. The unicell design is optimized for economical mass production. Survey pads welded to the laminations provide external fiducials to locate the magnet cores. Roller bearing self aligning supports accommodate cool-down shrinkage. The design tolerates relative motion of components resulting from longitudinal shrinkage in the about15 m long unicell without affecting performance. Magnetic and physical lengths are the same, eliminating waste space. ''Achromatic'' quadrupoles with sextupoles at both ends are located on a common precision beam tube which aligns and supports a pick-up electrode. The unicell accommodates longer dipoles compared to conventional designs, reducing B /SUB max'/ stored energy, and the volume of iron and superconductor. Applications to future machines will be discussed.

  13. Accelerator Science and Technology in Canada -- From the Microtron to TRIUMF, Superconducting Cyclotrons and the Canadian Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, M. K.; Laxdal, R. E.

    As elsewhere, accelerators in Canada have evolved from modest beginnings to major facilities such as TRIUMF (currently with the highest-power driver for rare isotope beam production) and the third generation Canadian Light Source. Highlights along the way include construction of the first microtron, the first racetrack microtron and the first superconducting cyclotron (to which list might have been added the first pulse stretcher ring, had it been funded sooner). This article will summarize the history of accelerators in Canada, documenting both the successes and the near-misses. Besides the research accelerators, a thriving commercial sector has developed, manufacturing small cyclotrons and linacs, beam line components and superconducting rf cavities.

  14. Accelerator Science and Technology in Canada — From the Microtron to TRIUMF, Superconducting Cyclotrons and the Canadian Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, M. K.; Laxdal, R. E.

    As elsewhere, accelerators in Canada have evolved from modest beginnings to major facilities such as TRIUMF (currently with the highest-power driver for rare isotope beam production) and the third generation Canadian Light Source. Highlights along the way include construction of the first microtron, the first racetrack microtron and the first superconducting cyclotron (to which list might have been added the first pulse stretcher ring, had it been funded sooner). This article will summarize the history of accelerators in Canada, documenting both the successes and the near-misses. Besides the research accelerators, a thriving commercial sector has developed, manufacturing small cyclotrons and linacs, beam line components and superconducting rf cavities.

  15. Case Studies on Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ferracin, P

    2014-01-01

    During the CERN Accelerator School 'Superconductivity for accelerators', the students were divided into 18 groups, and 6 different exercises (case studies), involving the design and analysis of superconducting magnets and RF cavities, were assigned. The problems covered a broad spectrum of topics, from properties of superconducting materials to operation conditions and general dimensions of components. The work carried out by the students turned out to be an extremely useful opportunity to review the material explained during the lectures, to become familiar with the orders of magnitude of the key parameters, and to understand and compare different design options. We provide in this paper a summary of the activities related to the case studies on superconducting magnets and present the main outcomes.

  16. New Method to Improve the Accelerating Gradient of Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zhenchao

    2013-01-01

    Quench is a common phenomenon in a superconducting cavity and often limits the accelerating gradient of the cavity. Accurate location of the quench site can be located by second sound detection. For multi-cell superconducting cavity, one defect may cause the cell with defect quenches and then the whole cavity quenches. Now we proposed a new method to eliminate the bad influence of the quench cell to the whole cavity.

  17. Heavy-ion acceleration with a superconducting linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    This year, 1988, is the tenth anniversary of the first use of RF superconductivity to accelerate heavy ions. In June 1978, the first two superconducting resonators of the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) were used to boost the energy of a /sup 19/F beam from the tandem, and by September 1978 a 5-resonator linac provided an /sup 16/O beam for a nuclear-physics experiment. Since then, the superconducting linac has grown steadily in size and capability until now there are 42 accelerating structures and 4 bunchers. Throughout this period, the system was used routinely for physics research, and by now the total time with beam on target is 35,000 hours. Lessons learned from this long running experience and some key technical developments that made it possible are reviewed in this paper. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Integrated design of superconducting accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Russenschuck, Stephan; Ramberger, S; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Wolf, R

    1999-01-01

    This chapter introduces the main features of the ROXIE program which has been developed for the design of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The program combines numerical field calculation with a reduced vector-potential formulation, the application of vector-optimization methods, and the use of genetic as well as deterministic minimization algorithms. Together with the applied concept of features, the software is used as an approach towards integrated design of superconducting magnets. The main quadrupole magnet for the LHC, was chosen as an example for the integrated design process. (17 refs).

  19. Design and System Integration of the Superconducting Wiggler Magnets for the Compact Linear Collider Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Bernhard, A; Bragin, A; Karppinen, M; Maccaferri, R; Mezentsev, N; Papaphilippou, Y; Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R; Rumolo, G; Russenschuck, S; Vobly, P; Zolotarev, K

    2012-01-01

    To achieve high luminosity at the collision point of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the normalized horizontal and vertical emittances of the electron and positron beams must be reduced to 500 nm and 4 nm before the beams enter the 1.5TeV linear accelerators. An effective way to accomplish ultra-low emittances with only small effects on the electron polarization is using damping rings operating at 2.86 GeV equipped with superconducting wiggler magnets. This paper describes a technical design concept for the CLIC damping wigglers.

  20. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  1. Novel Approach to Linear Accelerator Superconducting Magnet System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2011-11-28

    Superconducting Linear Accelerators include a superconducting magnet system for particle beam transportation that provides the beam focusing and steering. This system consists of a large number of quadrupole magnets and dipole correctors mounted inside or between cryomodules with SCRF cavities. Each magnet has current leads and powered from its own power supply. The paper proposes a novel approach to magnet powering based on using superconducting persistent current switches. A group of magnets is powered from the same power supply through the common, for the group of cryomodules, electrical bus and pair of current leads. Superconducting switches direct the current to the chosen magnet and close the circuit providing the magnet operation in a persistent current mode. Two persistent current switches were fabricated and tested. In the paper also presented the results of magnetic field simulations, decay time constants analysis, and a way of improving quadrupole magnetic center stability. Such approach substantially reduces the magnet system cost and increases the reliability.

  2. Survey of high field superconducting material for accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scahlan, R.; Greene, A.F.; Suenaga, M.

    1986-05-01

    The high field superconductors which could be used in accelerator dipole magnets are surveyed, ranking these candidates with respect to ease of fabrication and cost as well as superconducting properties. Emphasis is on Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi. 27 refs., 2 figs. (LEW)

  3. A New Superconducting Wire for Future Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CARE/NED project has developed a new superconducting wire that can achieve very high currents (1400 amps) at high magnetic fields (12 teslas). Cross-section of the CARE/NED wire produced by SMI. As we prepare to enter a new phase of particle physics with the LHC, technological development is a continuous process to ensure the demands of future research are met. The next generation of colliders and upgrades of the present ones will require significantly larger magnetic fields for bending and focusing the particle beams. NED (Next European Dipole) is one of the projects taking on this challenge to push technology beyond the present limit (see: More about NED). The magnets in the LHC rely on niobium titanium (NbTi) as the superconducting material, with a maximum magnetic field of 8 to 10T (tesla). In order to exceed this limitation, a different material together with the corresponding technology needs to be developed. NED is assessing the suitability of niobium tin (Nb3Sn), which has the potential to at le...

  4. The Conversion of CESR to Operate as the Test Accelerator, CesrTA, Part 4: Superconducting Wiggler Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Billing, M G; Liu, X; Li, Y; Sabol, D; Smith, E N; Strohman, C R; Palmer, M A; Munson, D V

    2016-01-01

    Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it appropriate for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper, the last in a series of four, describes the vacuum system modifications of the superconducting wigglers to accommodate the diagnostic instrumentation for the study of electron cloud (EC) behavior within wigglers. Earlier papers provided an overview of the accelerator physics program, the general modifications of CESR, the modifications of the vacuum system necessary for the conversion of CESR to the test accelerator, CesrTA, enhanced to study such ...

  5. Superconducting accelerating four-cell cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A close view of the four-cell cavity. This was a prototype designed for LEP2 (LEP1 had warm copper cavities as accelerating elements). The first successful tests were made in December 1980 - reaching a Q = 10^6. (see photo 8012650X)

  6. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  7. Investigation of spontaneous magnetization of coupled 2×2 superconducting π ring array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhuang-Zhi; Wang Fu-Ren; Yang Tao; Liu Xin-Yuan; Ma Ping; Xie Fei-Xiang; Nie Rui-Juan; Dai Yuan-Dong

    2004-01-01

    We present the theoretical investigation of spontaneous magnetization of a coupled 2 × 2 π ring array. It is indicated by free energy calculation that the system has the lowest energy when the four π rings have the full antiparallel configuration. Furthermore, the numerical evaluation results show that the system which favours full antiparallel spontaneous magnetization is a quantum effect deriving from the phase cohering of the superconducting quantum wavefunctions in the four superconducting rings through the shared Josephson junctions.

  8. Superconducting Magnets for Accelerators and Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2003-01-01

    The development of superconductors for magnet applications has received a strong boost from the High Energy Physics (HEP) community, both for detector magnets and for accelerator magnets. The demand for very high current density (both Jc and Jc,overall), for fine filaments, for control of the copper content, for very compact cables with large current capability, the ability to superstabilize large cables at moderate cost, together with necessity of producing hundreds of tons of materials for large projects, have been the main motivation for the continued improvement of practical superconductors. HEP has provided so far, and still does nowadays, a unique forum where material scientists, fabrication engineers and final users, i.e. magnet designers and magnet constructors, gather together and, by sharing their knowledge and their needs, are able to accomplish real progress in the technology. In particular accelerator magnets have reached a point where, in order to go beyond the 9 T limit of the present LHC in co...

  9. The Future of Superconducting Technology for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: - Colliders constructed and operated - Future High Energy Colliders under Study - Superconducting Phases and Applications - Possible Choices among SC Materials Superconducting Magnets and the Future - Advances in SC Magnets for Accelerators - Nb3Sn for realizing Higher Field - NbTi to Nb3Sn for realizing High Field (> 10 T) - HL-LHC as a critical milestone for the Future of Acc. Magnet Technology - Nb3Sn Superconducting Magnets (> 11 T)and MgB2 SC Links for HL-LHC - HL-LHC, 11T Dipole Magnet - Nb3Sn Quadrupole (MQXF) at IR - Future Circular Collider Study - Conductor development (1998-2008) - Nb3Sn conductor program - 16 T Dipole Options and R&D sharing - Design Study and Develoment for SppC in China - High-Field Superconductor and Magnets - HTS Block Coil R&D for 20 T - Canted Cosine Theta (CCT) Coil suitable with Brittle HTS Conductor - A topic at KEK: S-KEKB IRQs just integrated w/ BELLE-II ! Superconducting RF and the Future - Superconducting Phases and Applications - Poss...

  10. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to cw acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008<β=v/c<0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication, and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3–4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  11. Superconducting RF cavity R&D for future accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, C M

    2009-01-01

    High-beta superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) elliptical cavities are being developed for several accelerator projects including Project X, the European XFEL, and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Fermilab has recently established an extensive infrastructure for SRF cavity R&D for future accelerators, including cavity surface processing and testing and cavity assembly into cryomodules. Some highlights of the global effort in SRF R&D toward improving cavity performance, and Fermilab SRF cavity R&D in the context of global projects are reviewed.

  12. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  13. Equilibrium of a system of superconducting rings in a uniform gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bush, A. A.; Gavrikov, M. B.; Gordeev, I. S.; Denisyuk, A. I.; Kamentsev, K. E.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Savel'ev, V. V.; Sigov, A. S.

    2013-05-01

    To construct a plasma trap with levitating magnetic coils in the thin ring approximation, we derive the expression for the potential energy of a system of several superconducting rings (one of which is fixed) capturing the preset flows in the uniform gravitational field as a function of the coordinates of the free ring (or rings). Calculations performed in the Mathcad system show that the potential energy of such a system has a local minimum for certain values of parameters. Stable levitation of a superconducting ring in the position corresponding to calculations is realized in the field of another superconducting ring, and this leads to the conclusion that a magnetic Galatea trap can be prepared on the basis of a levitating quadrupole.

  14. Compact Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerators and Innovative RF Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kephart, Robert [Fermilab; Chattopadhyay, Swaapan [Northern Illinois U.; Milton, Stephen [Colorado State U.

    2015-04-10

    We will present several new technical and design breakthroughs that enable the creation of a new class of compact linear electron accelerators for industrial purposes. Use of Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) cavities allow accelerators less than 1.5 M in length to create electron beams beyond 10 MeV and with average beam powers measured in 10’s of KW. These machines can have the capability to vary the output energy dynamically to produce brehmstrahlung x-rays of varying spectral coverage for applications such as rapid scanning of moving cargo for security purposes. Such compact accelerators will also be cost effective for many existing and new industrial applications. Examples include radiation crosslinking of plastics and rubbers, creation of pure materials with surface properties radically altered from the bulk, modification of bulk or surface optical properties of materials, sterilization of medical instruments animal solid or liquid waste, and destruction of organic compounds in industrial waste water effluents. Small enough to be located on a mobile platform, such accelerators will enable new remediation methods for chemical and biological spills and/or in-situ crosslinking of materials. We will describe one current design under development at Fermilab including plans for prototype and value-engineering to reduce costs. We will also describe development of new nano-structured field-emitter arrays as sources of electrons, new methods for fabricating and cooling superconducting RF cavities, and a new novel RF power source based on magnetrons with full phase and amplitude control.

  15. Complex envelope control of pulsed accelerating fields in superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Czarski, T

    2010-01-01

    A digital control system for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented in this work. FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) based controller, managed by MATLAB, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The LLRF - Low Level Radio Frequency system for FLASH project in DESY is introduced. Essential modeling of a cavity resonator with signal and power analysis is considered as a key approach to the control methods. An electrical model is represented by the non-stationary state space equation for the complex envelope of the cavity voltage driven by the current generator and the beam loading. The electromechanical model of the superconducting cavity resonator including the Lorentz force detuning has been developed for a simulation purpose. The digital signal processing is proposed for the field vector detection. The field vector sum control is considered for multiple cavities driven by one klystron. An algebraic, complex domain model is proposed for the system analysis. The c...

  16. The conversion of CESR to operate as the test accelerator, CesrTA, Part 4: superconducting wiggler diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billing, M. G.; Greenwald, S.; Liu, X.; Li, Y.; Sabol, D.; Smith, E. N.; Strohman, C. R.; Palmer, M. A.; Munson, D. V.; Suetsugu, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it appropriate for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper, the last in a series of four, describes the vacuum system modifications of the superconducting wigglers to accommodate the diagnostic instrumentation for the study of electron cloud (EC) behavior within wigglers. Earlier papers provided an overview of the accelerator physics program, the general modifications of CESR, the modifications of the vacuum system necessary for the conversion of CESR to the test accelerator, CESRTA, enhanced to study such subjects as low emittance tuning methods, EC effects, intra-beam scattering, fast ion instabilities as well as general improvements to beam instrumentation. While the initial studies of CESRTA focussed on questions related to the International Linear Collider damping ring design, CESR is a very versatile storage ring, capable of studying a wide range of accelerator physics and instrumentation questions.

  17. Superconducting wiggler magnets for beam-emittance damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge are necessary for the luminosity performance of linear electron-positron colliders, such as the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). An effective way to create ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge is to use damping rings, or storage rings equipped with strong damping wiggler magnets. The remanent field of the permanent magnet materials and the ohmic losses in normal conductors limit the economically achievable pole field in accelerator magnets operated at around room temperature to below the magnetic saturation induction, which is 2.15 T for iron. In wiggler magnets, the pole field in the center of the gap is reduced further like the hyperbolic cosine of the ratio of the gap size and the period length multiplied by pi. Moreover, damping wiggler magnets require relatively large gaps because they have to accept the un-damped beam and to generate, at a small period length, a large magnetic flux density amplitude to effectively damp the beam emittance....

  18. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  19. Experience with the LEP Superconducting RF Accelerating System

    CERN Document Server

    Geschonke, Günther

    1998-01-01

    CERN is presently upgrading the large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) to higher energy by installing superconducting RF accelerating cavities. For a total installed circumferential voltage of about 2800 MV, 272 cavities operating at 352 MHz will be needed, representing an active length of 462 m and a cold surface of more than 1600 m2. The series production cavities are made out of copper, sputter-coated with a thin layer of niobium and cooled with liquid He to 4.5 K. The cavities are produced by industry and the acceptance testing is done at CERN. In 1996, 176 cavities had been installed and run successfully at their design gradient of 6 MV/m during physics at a beam energy of 86 GeV. As RF power sources 36 klystrons will finally be installed with a nominal RF output power of 1 MW each. In this paper the superconducting accelerating system in LEP will be described and experience gained during operation for physics as well as new developments will be presented.

  20. Accelerator physics measurements at the damping ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, L.; Delahaye, J. P.; Wille, K.; Allen, M. A.; Bane, K.; Fieguth, T.; Hofmann, A.; Button, A.; Lee, M.; Linebarger, W.

    1985-05-01

    Besides the optics measurements described elsewhere, machine experiments were done at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping ring to determine some of its parameters. The synchrotron radiation energy loss which gives the damping rates was measured by observing the RF-voltage dependence of the synchronous phase angle. The emittance was obtained from the synchrotron light monitor, scraper measurements and by extracting the beam through a doublet and measuring its size for different quadrupole settings. Current dependent effects such as parasitic mode losses, head tail instabilities, synchrotron and betatron frequency shifts were measured to estimate the impedance. RF-cavity beam loading and its compensation were also studied and ion collection was investigated. All results agree reasonably well with expectations and indicate no limitations to the design performance.

  1. Cryogenic system for the MYRRHA superconducting linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, Nicolas R.; Junquera, Tomas [Accelerators and Cryogenic Systems, 86, rue de Paris, 91400 Orsay (France); Thermeau, Jean-Pierre [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris Sud, 91400 Orsay (France); Romão, Luis Medeiros; Vandeplassche, Dirk [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-01-29

    SCK⋅CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, is designing MYRRHA, a flexible fast spectrum research reactor (80 MW{sub th}), conceived as an accelerator driven system (ADS), able to operate in sub-critical and critical modes. It contains a continuous-wave (CW) superconducting (SC) proton accelerator of 600 MeV, a spallation target and a multiplying core with MOX fuel, cooled by liquid lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi). From 17 MeV onward, the SC accelerator will consist of 48 β=0.36 spoke-loaded cavities (352 MHz), 34 β=0.47 elliptical cavities (704 MHz) and 60 β=0.65 elliptical cavities (704 MHz). We present an analysis of the thermal loads and of the optimal operating temperature of the cryogenic system. In particular, the low operating frequency of spoke cavities makes their operation in CW mode possible both at 4.2 K or at 2 K. Our analysis outlines the main factors that determine at what temperature the spoke cavities should be operated. We then present different cryogenic fluid distribution schemes, important characteristics (storage, transfer line, etc.) and the main challenges offered by MYRRHA in terms of cryogenics.

  2. Mechanics of a magnet and a Meissner superconducting ring at arbitrary position and orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Diaz, J.L., E-mail: jlperez@ing.uc3m.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Butarque, 15. E28911 Leganes (Spain); Garcia-Prada, J.C.; Diaz-Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Butarque, 15. E28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2009-04-01

    The force and torque exerted by a magnetic dipole on a superconducting ring (or hollow cylinder) in the Meissner state at arbitrary position and orientation are calculated using a Maxwell-London model previously proposed by the authors. The center of the ring is an unstable equilibrium point for the magnet. At this point the ring tends to align the magnet but tends to expel it for any small axial deviation from the center. There is also a non-monotonic and oscillatory dependence of the forces and torques on the position caused by the finiteness of the ring and a torque arises when the magnet is displaced both radially and axially from the center of the cylinder which corresponds to the experimental data. Therefore, the use of a magnet in a Meissner superconducting ring as a self aligning bearing requires a centered position and that the axial unstability to be compensated by additional mechanical means.

  3. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna, E-mail: anirban.bhattacharyya@physics.uu.se; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-21

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  4. A Scaling Law for the Snapback in Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Bauer, P; Haverkamp, M; Pieloni, T; Sanfilippo, S; Velev, G

    2005-01-01

    The decay of the sextupole component in the bending dipoles during injection and the subsequent snapback at the start of beam acceleration are issues of common concern for all superconducting colliders built or in construction. Recent studies performed on LHC and Tevatron dipole magnets revealed many similarities in the snapback characteristics. Some are expected, e.g. the effect of operational history. One particular similarity, however, is striking and is the subject of this paper. It appears that there is a simple linear relation between the amount of sextupole drift during the decay and the magnet current (or field) change during the ramp required to resolve the snapback. It is surprising that the linear correlation between snapback amplitude and snapback field holds very well for all magnets of the same family (e.g. Tevatron or LHC dipoles). In this paper we present the data collected to date and discuss a simple theory that explains the scaling found.

  5. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  6. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at a superconducting electron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Attallah, A. G.; Dornberg, G.; Elsayed, M.; Enke, D.; Hussein, A. E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Liedke, M. O.; Potzger, K.; Trinh, T. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf operates a superconducting linear accelerator for electrons with energies up to 35 MeV and average beam currents up to 1.6 mA. The electron beam is employed for production of several secondary beams including X-rays from bremsstrahlung production, neutrons, and positrons. The secondary positron beam after moderation feeds the Monoenergetic Positron Source (MePS) where positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) and positron annihilation Doppler-broadening experiments in materials science are performed in parallel. The adjustable repetition rate of the continuous-wave electron beams allows matching of the pulse separation to the positron lifetime in the sample under study. The energy of the positron beam can be set between 0.5 keV and 20 keV to perform depth resolved defect spectroscopy and porosity studies especially for thin films.

  7. Superconducting RF Technology R&D for Future Accelerator Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Reece, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting rf technology (SRF) is evolving rapidly as are its applications. While there is active exploitation of what one may term the current state-of-the-practice, there is also rapid progress expanding in several dimensions the accessible and useful parameter space. While state-of-the-art performance sometimes outpaces thorough understanding, the improving scientific understanding from active SRF research is clarifying routes to obtain optimum performance from present materials and opening avenues beyond the standard bulk niobium. The improving technical basis understanding is enabling process engineering to both improve performance confidence and reliability and also unit implementation costs. Increasing confidence in the technology enables the engineering of new creative application designs. We attempt to survey this landscape to highlight the potential for future accelerator applications.

  8. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  9. Advanced Beamline Design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, Christopher [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  10. Acceleration of compact toroid plasma rings for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, C.W.; Barr, W.L.; Eddleman, J.L.; Gee, M.; Hammer, J.H.; Ho, S.K.; Logan, B.G.; Meeker, D.J.; Mirin, A.A.; Nevins, W.M.

    1988-08-26

    We describe experimental results for a new type of collective accelerator based on magnetically confined compact torus (CT) plasma rings and discuss applications to both inertial and magnetic fusion. We have demonstrated the principle of CT acceleration in the RACE device with acceleration of 0.5 mg ring masses to 400 km/s and 0.02 mg ring masses to 1400 km/s at greater than or equal to30% efficiency. Scaling the CT accelerator to the multi-megajoule level could provide an efficient, economical driver for inertial fusion (ICF) or magnetically insulated inertial fusion. Efficient conversion to x-rays for driving hohlraum-type ICF targets has been modeled using a radiation-hydrodynamics code. At less demanding conditions than required for ICF, a CT accelerator can be applied to fueling and current drive in tokamaks. Fueling is accomplished by injecting CTs at the required rate to sustain the particle inventory and at a velocity sufficient to penetrate to the magnetic axis before CT dissolution. Current drive is a consequence of the magnetic helicity content of the CT, which is approximately conserved during reconnection of the CT fields with the tokamak. Major areas of uncertainty in CT fueling and current drive concern the mechanism by which CTs will stop in a tokamak plasma and the effects of the CT on energy confinement and magnetic stability. Bounds on the required CT injection velocity are obtained by considering drag due to emission of an Alfven-wave wake and rapid reconnection and tilting on the internal Alfven time scale of the CT. Preliminary results employing a 3-D, resistive MHD code show rapid tilting with the CT aligning its magnetic moment with the tokamak field. Requirements for an experimental test of CT injection and scenarios for fueling a reactor will also be discussed. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Experimental studies on the thermal properties of fast pulsed superconducting accelerator magnets; Experimentelle Untersuchungen thermischer Eigenschaften schnell gepulster supraleitender Beschleunigermagnete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleile, Alexander

    2016-01-06

    superconducting magnets in the SIS100 accelerator ring and for the stable operation of the synchrotron.

  12. Monitoring of multiphase flows for superconducting accelerators and others applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Yu. P.; Kakorin, I. D.; Kovrizhnykh, A. M.; Miklayev, V. M.

    2017-07-01

    This paper is a review on implementation of measuring systems for two-phase helium, hydrogen, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and oil-formation/salty water flows. Two types of such systems are presented. The first type is based on two-phase flow-meters combining void fraction radio-frequency (RF) sensors and narrowing devices. They can be applied for superconducting accelerators cooled with two-phase helium, refueling hydrogen system for space ships and some applications in oil production industry. The second one is based on combination of a gamma-densitometer and a narrowing device. These systems can be used to monitor large two-phase LNG and oil-formation water flows. An electronics system based on a modular industrial computer is described as well. The metrological characteristics for different flow-meters are presented and the obtained results are discussed. It is also shown that the experience gained allows separationless flow-meter for three-phase oil-gas-formation water flows to be produced.

  13. Technical training: RF superconductivity and accelerator cavity applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training

    2016-01-01

    We are happy to announce a new training course organised by the TE-VSC group in the field of the physics and applications of superconductors. The course provides an overview and update of the theory of radiofrequency and superconductors:   RF Superconductivity and Accelerator Cavity Applications https://cern.ch/course/?164VAC19 One timetable only:  Tuesday, 8 March 2016: from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, 9 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 10 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Monday, 14 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Tuesday, 15 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Wednesday, 16 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 17 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Target audience: Experts in radiofrequency or solid state physics (PhD level). Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of quantum physics and superc...

  14. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis and Stiffening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodnizki, J [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Ben Aliz, Y [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Grin, A [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Horvitz, Z [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Perry, A [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Weissman, L [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Davis, G Kirk [JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion Universtiy

    2014-12-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) design is based on a 40 MeV 5 mA light ions superconducting RF linac. Phase-I of SARAF delivers up to 2 mA CW proton beams in an energy range of 1.5 - 4.0 MeV. The maximum beam power that we have reached is 5.7 kW. Today, the main limiting factor to reach higher ion energy and beam power is related to the HWR sensitivity to the liquid helium coolant pressure fluctuations. The HWR sensitivity to helium pressure is about 60 Hz/mbar. The cavities had been designed, a decade ago, to be soft in order to enable tuning of their novel shape. However, the cavities turned out to be too soft. In this work we found that increasing the rigidity of the cavities in the vicinity of the external drift tubes may reduce the cavity sensitivity by a factor of three. A preliminary design to increase the cavity rigidity is presented.

  15. Study on design of superconducting proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Xu Tao Guang

    2002-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac (SCL) is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. It is constitute by a series of the superconducting accelerating cavities. The cavity geometry is determined by means of the electromagnetic field computation. The SCL main parameters are determined by the particle dynamics computation

  16. Use of Tritium Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Tree Ring Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; ROBERTS, MARK L.; SOUTHON, JOHN R.; CHIARAPPA - ZUCCA, MARINA L.; DINGLEY, KAREN H.

    2010-01-01

    Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment. PMID:12144257

  17. Methods of Phase and Power Control in Magnetron Transmitters for Superconducting Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazadevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Lebedev, V. [Fermilab; Schappert, W. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Various methods of phase and power control in magnetron RF sources of superconducting accelerators intended for ADS-class projects were recently developed and studied with conventional 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons operating in pulsed and CW regimes. Magnetron transmitters excited by a resonant (injection-locking) phasemodulated signal can provide phase and power control with the rates required for precise stabilization of phase and amplitude of the accelerating field in Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of the intensity-frontier accelerators. An innovative technique that can significantly increase the magnetron transmitter efficiency at the widerange power control required for superconducting accelerators was developed and verified with the 2.45 GHz magnetrons operating in CW and pulsed regimes. High efficiency magnetron transmitters of this type can significantly reduce the capital and operation costs of the ADSclass accelerator projects.

  18. Сonditions investigations of induction of the "steady" plasma ring in the electrodynamic accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Sakun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The numerical investigation of conditions of the "steady" plasma ring induction in the electrodynamic accelerator was made. The influence of a ring resistance on transition of the ring to "steady" state was determined. The dependence of the coefficient of electrical energy conversion into magnetic field energy on the number of inductor turns and the initial velocity of the ring was found out. The technical requirements to the electrodynamic accelerator by which possible the formation of "steady" plasma ring was obtained.

  19. Application of permanent magnets in accelerators and electron storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, K.

    1985-04-01

    The use of permanent-magnet systems in high-energy accelerators and as sources of synchrotron radiation in electron-storage rings is discussed in a review of recent experimental investigations. Consideration is given to the generic advantages of permanent magnets over electromagnets (higher field strength per magnet size) in small-scale configurations; the magnetic properties of some charge-sheet-equivalent-permanent-magnet materials (CSEMs); and the design of pure-CSEM and CSEM-Fe-hybrid multipole magnetic lenses, dipoles, and undulator/wiggler systems for use in free-electron lasers and the production of elliptically polarized synchrotron light. Drawings and diagrams are provided.

  20. Accelerator physics and radiometric properties of superconducting wavelength shifters; Beschleunigerphysik und radiometrische Eigenschaften supraleitender Wellenlaengenschieber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheer, Michael

    2008-11-17

    Subject of this thesis is the operation of wave-length shifters at electron storage rings and their use in radiometry. The basic aspects of the radiometry, the technical requirements, the influence of wave-length shifters on the storage ring, and results of first measurements are presented for a device installed at BESSY. Most of the calculations are carried out by the program WAVE, which has been developed within this thesis. WAVE allows to calculate the synchrotron radiation spectra of wavelength shifters within an relative uncertainty of 1/100000. The properties of wave-length shifters in terms of accelerator physics as well as a generating function for symplectic tracking calculations can also be calculated by WAVE. The later was implemented in the tracking code BETA to investigate the influence of insertion devices on the dynamic aperture and emittance of the storage ring. These studies led to the concept of alternating low- and high-beta-sections at BESSY-II, which allow to operate superconducting insertion devices without a significant distortion of the magnetic optics. To investigate the experimental aspects of the radiometry at wave-length shifters, a program based on the Monte-Carlo-code GEANT4 has been developed. It allows to simulate the radiometrical measurements and the absorption properties of detectors. With the developed codes first radiometrical measurements by the PTB have been analysed. A comparison of measurements and calculations show a reasonable agreement with deviations of about five percent in the spectral range of 40-60 keV behind a 1-mm-Cu filter. A better agreement was found between 20 keV and 80 keV without Cu filter. In this case the measured data agreed within a systematic uncertainty of two percent with the results of the calculations. (orig.)

  1. Power Switches Utilizing Superconducting Material for Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    March, S A; Yang, Y

    2009-01-01

    Power switches that utilize superconducting material find application in superconducting systems. They can be used for the protection of magnets as a replacement for warm DC breakers, as well as for the replacement of cold diodes. This paper presents a comparison of switches made of various superconducting materials having transport currents of up to 600 A and switching times of the order of milliseconds. The switches operate in the temperature range 4.2-77 K and utilize stainless steel clad YBCO tape and MgB2 tape with a nickel, copper, and iron matrix. Results from simulations and tests are reported.

  2. Thin-film superconducting rings in the critical state: the mixed boundary value approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Roberto; Grilli, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the critical state of a thin superconducting ring (and of a perfectly conducting ring as a limiting case) as a mixed boundary value problem. The disc is characterized by a three-part boundary division of the positive real axis, so this work is an extension of the procedure used in a previous work of ours for describing superconducting discs and strips, which are characterized by a two-part boundary division of the real axis. Here, we present the mathematical tools to solve this kind of problems—the Erdélyi-Kober operators—in a frame that can be immediately used. Contrary to the two-part problems considered in our previous work, three-part problems do not generally have analytical solutions and the numerical work takes on a significant heaviness. Nevertheless, this work is remunerated by three clear advantages: firstly, all the cases are afforded in the same way, without the necessity of any brilliant invention or ability; secondly, in the case of superconducting rings, the penetration of the magnetic field in the internal/external rims is a result of the method itself and does not have to be imposed, as it is commonly done with other methods presented in the literature; thirdly, the method can be extended to investigate even more complex cases (four-part problems). In this paper, we consider the cases of rings in uniform field and with transport current, with or without flux trapping in the hole and the case without net current, corresponding to a cut ring (washer), as used in some SQUID applications.

  3. Spin Motion and Resonances in Accelerators and Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant,E.

    2008-01-01

    Some of the basic aspects of the spin dynamics of accelerators and storage rings are reviewed. Since the components of spin parallel and perpendicular to the particle velocity behave differently it is desirable to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a frame of reference that exhibits this difference explicitly. The conventional treatment employs a coordinate system derived from a reference orbit. An alternate coordinate system, based on the actual trajectory of the particle, leads to simplified equations of spin motion but, contrary to a conjecture presented in a previous note, resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical, as pointed out by Kondratenko. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  4. Powering and Machine Protection of the Superconducting LHC Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zerlauth, M

    2004-01-01

    A very large number of magnets, both superconducting and conventional copper conductor magnets, are installed in the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) for the guidance of the two proton beams around the circumference. In total, the LHC counts 1614 different electrical circuits with 1712 power converters for DC powering of the superconducting and normal conducting magnets. Besides the electrical circuits connecting main magnets for bending and focusing of the two counter-rotating beams, the demanding requirements on the quality of the magnetic fields require a large number of circuits for corrector magnets distributed around the circumference. In total, more than 10000 magnets will need to be connected to the power converters via a large inventory of electrical components such as normal conducting cables and tubes, energy extraction systems, current feedthroughs and superconducting busbars. Depending on the complexity and importance of these electrical circuits and their components, various systems will interact for...

  5. High power ring methods and accelerator driven subcritical reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahar, Malek Haj [Univ. of Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-07

    High power proton accelerators allow providing, by spallation reaction, the neutron fluxes necessary in the synthesis of fissile material, starting from Uranium 238 or Thorium 232. This is the basis of the concept of sub-critical operation of a reactor, for energy production or nuclear waste transmutation, with the objective of achieving cleaner, safer and more efficient process than today’s technologies allow. Designing, building and operating a proton accelerator in the 500-1000 MeV energy range, CW regime, MW power class still remains a challenge nowadays. There is a limited number of installations at present achieving beam characteristics in that class, e.g., PSI in Villigen, 590 MeV CW beam from a cyclotron, SNS in Oakland, 1 GeV pulsed beam from a linear accelerator, in addition to projects as the ESS in Europe, a 5 MW beam from a linear accelerator. Furthermore, coupling an accelerator to a sub-critical nuclear reactor is a challenging proposition: some of the key issues/requirements are the design of a spallation target to withstand high power densities as well as ensure the safety of the installation. These two domains are the grounds of the PhD work: the focus is on the high power ring methods in the frame of the KURRI FFAG collaboration in Japan: upgrade of the installation towards high intensity is crucial to demonstrate the high beam power capability of FFAG. Thus, modeling of the beam dynamics and benchmarking of different codes was undertaken to validate the simulation results. Experimental results revealed some major losses that need to be understood and eventually overcome. By developing analytical models that account for the field defects, one identified major sources of imperfection in the design of scaling FFAG that explain the important tune variations resulting in the crossing of several betatron resonances. A new formula is derived to compute the tunes and properties established that characterize the effect of the field imperfections on the

  6. Design and test of a superconducting magnet in a linear accelerator for an Accelerator Driven Subcritical System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Quanling, E-mail: pengql@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Fengyu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang 150006 (China); Wang, Ting [Beijing Huantong Special Equipment Co., LTD, Beijing 100192 (China); Yang, Xiangchen [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Anbin [Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang 150006 (China); Wei, Xiaotao [Beijing Huantong Special Equipment Co., LTD, Beijing 100192 (China); Gao, Yao; Hou, Zhenhua; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Haoshu [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-11-11

    A batch superconducting solenoid magnet for the ADS proton linear accelerator has been designed, fabricated, and tested in a vertical dewar in Sept. 2013. A total of ten superconducting magnets will be installed into two separate cryomodules. Each cryomodule contains six superconducting spoke RF cavities for beam acceleration and five solenoid magnets for beam focusing. The multifunction superconducting magnet contains a solenoid for beam focusing and two correctors for orbit correction. The design current for the solenoid magnet is 182 A. A quench performance test shows that the operating current of the solenoid magnet can reach above 300 A after natural quenching on three occasions during current ramping (260 A, 268 A, 308 A). The integrated field strength and leakage field at the nearby superconducting spoke cavities all meet the design requirements. The vertical test checked the reliability of the test dewar and the quench detection system. This paper presents the physical and mechanical design of the batch magnets, the quench detection technique, field measurements, and a discussion of the residual field resulting from persistent current effects.

  7. Thermo-magnetic instabilities in Nb3Sn superconducting accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordini, Bernardo [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2006-09-01

    The advance of High Energy Physics research using circulating accelerators strongly depends on increasing the magnetic bending field which accelerator magnets provide. To achieve high fields, the most powerful present-day accelerator magnets employ NbTi superconducting technology; however, with the start up of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2007, NbTi magnets will have reached the maximum field allowed by the intrinsic properties of this superconductor. A further increase of the field strength necessarily requires a change in superconductor material; the best candidate is Nb3Sn. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are currently working on developing Nb3Sn accelerator magnets, and although these magnets have great potential, it is suspected that their performance may be fundamentally limited by conductor thermo-magnetic instabilities: an idea first proposed by the Fermilab High Field Magnet group early in 2003. This thesis presents a study of thermo-magnetic instability in high field Nb3Sn accelerator magnets. In this chapter the following topics are described: the role of superconducting magnets in High Energy Physics; the main characteristics of superconductors for accelerator magnets; typical measurements of current capability in superconducting strands; the properties of Nb3Sn; a description of the manufacturing process of Nb3Sn strands; superconducting cables; a typical layout of superconducting accelerator magnets; the current state of the art of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets; the High Field Magnet program at Fermilab; and the scope of the thesis.

  8. Defect Formation in Superconducting Rings: External Fields and Finite-Size Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, D. J.; Monaco, R.; Rivers, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    Consistent with the predictions of Kibble and Zurek, scaling behaviour has been seen in the production of fluxoids during temperature quenches of superconducting rings. However, deviations from the canonical behaviour arise because of finite-size effects and stray external fields. Technical developments, including laser heating and the use of long Josephson tunnel junctions, have improved the quality of data that can be obtained. With new experiments in mind we perform large-scale 3D simulations of quenches of small, thin rings of various geometries with fully dynamical electromagnetic fields, at nonzero externally applied magnetic flux. We find that the outcomes are, in practise, indistinguishable from those of much simpler Gaussian analytical approximations in which the rings are treated as one-dimensional systems and the magnetic field fluctuation-free.

  9. Computation of Normal Conducting and Superconducting Linear Accelerator (LINAC) Availabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, M.J.

    2000-07-11

    A brief study was conducted to roughly estimate the availability of a superconducting (SC) linear accelerator (LINAC) as compared to a normal conducting (NC) one. Potentially, SC radio frequency cavities have substantial reserve capability, which allows them to compensate for failed cavities, thus increasing the availability of the overall LINAC. In the initial SC design, there is a klystron and associated equipment (e.g., power supply) for every cavity of an SC LINAC. On the other hand, a single klystron may service eight cavities in the NC LINAC. This study modeled that portion of the Spallation Neutron Source LINAC (between 200 and 1,000 MeV) that is initially proposed for conversion from NC to SC technology. Equipment common to both designs was not evaluated. Tabular fault-tree calculations and computer-event-driven simulation (EDS) computer computations were performed. The estimated gain in availability when using the SC option ranges from 3 to 13% under certain equipment and conditions and spatial separation requirements. The availability of an NC LINAC is estimated to be 83%. Tabular fault-tree calculations and computer EDS modeling gave the same 83% answer to within one-tenth of a percent for the NC case. Tabular fault-tree calculations of the availability of the SC LINAC (where a klystron and associated equipment drive a single cavity) give 97%, whereas EDS computer calculations give 96%, a disagreement of only 1%. This result may be somewhat fortuitous because of limitations of tabular fault-tree calculations. For example, tabular fault-tree calculations can not handle spatial effects (separation distance between failures), equipment network configurations, and some failure combinations. EDS computer modeling of various equipment configurations were examined. When there is a klystron and associated equipment for every cavity and adjacent cavity, failure can be tolerated and the SC availability was estimated to be 96%. SC availability decreased as

  10. Novel Ways of Heat Removal from Highly Irradiated Superconducting Windings in Accelerator Magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielert, Erwin R.; Verweij, Arjan P.; Kate, ten Herman H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Novel ideas of heat removal from superconducting windings in accelerator type magnets are investigated with the help of a recently developed and validated thermal model of a magnet cold mass implemented in COMSOL Multiphysics. Here the focus is on how to improve heat removal from the midplane of a s

  11. Transition between different quantum states in a mesoscopic system: The superconducting ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horane, E.M. [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Castro, J.I. [Departamento Fisico-Quimica, Facultad Filosofia Humanidades y Artes, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, San Juan (Argentina); Buscaglia, G.C.; Lopez, A. [Instituto Balseiro, and Centro Atomico Bariloche, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    1996-04-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a superconducting ring, both analytically and numerically, relying upon the Ginzburg-Landau theory. We find that modulated solutions for the order parameter play a role in describing the thermodynamic transitions between consecutive modes of uniform order parameter, associated with different quantum numbers. Exact expressions for these solutions are given in terms of elliptic functions. We identify the family of energy extrema which, being saddle points of the energy in the functional space of the distributions of the order parameter, represent the energy barrier to be overcome for transitions between different solutions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Genetic Algorithms for the Optimal Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Ramberger, S

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the use of genetic algorithms with the concept of niching for the optimal design of superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider, LHC at CERN. The method provides the designer with a number of local optima which can be further examined with respect to objectives such as ease of coil winding, sensitivity to manufacturing tolerances and local electromagnetic force distribution. A 6 block dipole coil was found to have advantages compared to the standard 5 block version which was previously designed using deterministic optimization methods. Results were proven by a short model magnet recently built and tested at CERN.

  13. Probing the dynamics of Andreev states in a coherent normal/superconducting ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Ferrier, M; Tikhonov, K; Virtanen, P; Heikkilä, T T; Feigelman, M; Guéron, S; Bouchiat, H

    2011-01-01

    The supercurrent that establishes between two superconductors connected through a normal N mesoscopic link is carried by quasiparticule states localized within the link, the "Andreev bound states (ABS)". Whereas the dc properties of this supercurrent in SNS junctions are now well understood, its dynamical properties are still an unresolved issue. In this letter we probe this dynamics by inductively coupling an NS ring to a multimode superconducting resonator, thereby implementing both a phase bias and current detection at high frequency. Whereas at very low temperatures we essentially measure the phase derivative of the supercurrent, at higher temperature we find a surprisingly strong frequency dependence in the current response of the ring: the ABS do not follow adiabatically the phase modulation. This experiment also illustrates a new tool to probe the fundamental time scales of phase coherent systems that are decoupled from macroscopic normal contacts and thermal baths.

  14. Digital base-band rf control system for the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Konrad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The accelerating field in superconducting cavities has to be stabilized in amplitude and phase by a radio-frequency (rf control system. Because of their high loaded quality factor superconducting cavities are very susceptible for microphonics. To meet the increased requirements with respect to accuracy, availability, and diagnostics, the previous analog rf control system of the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC has been replaced by a digital rf control system. The new hardware consists of two components: An rf module that converts the signal from the cavity down to the base-band and a field-programmable gate array board including a soft CPU that carries out the signal processing steps of the control algorithm. Different algorithms are used for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities. To improve the availability of the control system, techniques for automatic firmware and software deployment have been implemented. Extensive diagnostic features provide the operator with additional information. The architecture of the rf control system as well as the functionality of its components will be presented along with measurements that characterize the performance of the system, yielding, e.g., an amplitude stabilization down to (ΔA/A_{rms}=7×10^{-5} and a phase stabilization of (Δϕ_{rms}=0.8° for superconducting cavities.

  15. Quench simulations for superconducting elements in the LHC accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnemann, F

    2000-01-01

    The design of he protection system for he superconducting elements in an accel- erator such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC),now under construction at CERN, requires a detailed understanding of the hermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic pro- cesses during a quench.A numerical program (SPQR -Simulation Program for Quench Research)has been developed o evaluate temperature and voltage dis ri- butions during a quench as a func ion of space and ime.The quench process is simulated by approximating the heat balance equation with the finite di fference method in presence of variable cooling and powering conditions.The simulation predicts quench propagation along a superconducting cable,forced quenching with heaters,impact of eddy curren s induced by a magnetic field change,and heat trans- fer hrough an insulation layer in o helium,an adjacen conductor or other material. The simulation studies allowed a better understanding of experimental quench data and were used for determining the adequ...

  16. Development of superconducting crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dziuba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The crossbar-H-mode (CH structure is the first superconducting multicell drift tube cavity for the low and medium energy range operated in the H_{21} mode. Because of the large energy gain per cavity, which leads to high real estate gradients, it is an excellent candidate for the efficient acceleration in high power proton and ion accelerators with fixed velocity profile. A prototype cavity has been developed and tested successfully with a gradient of 7  MV/m. A few new superconducting CH cavities with improved geometries for different high power applications are under development at present. One cavity (f=325  MHz, β=0.16, seven cells is currently under construction and studied with respect to a possible upgrade option for the GSI UNILAC. Another cavity (f=217  MHz, β=0.059, 15 cells is designed for a cw operated energy variable heavy ion linac application. Furthermore, the EUROTRANS project (European research program for the transmutation of high level nuclear waste in an accelerator driven system, 600 MeV protons, 352 MHz is one of many possible applications for this kind of superconducting rf cavity. In this context a layout of the 17 MeV EUROTRANS injector containing four superconducting CH cavities was proposed by the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. The status of the cavity development related to the EUROTRANS injector is presented.

  17. Tunable Broadband Radiation Generated Via Ultrafast Laser Illumination of an Inductively Charged Superconducting Ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmer, John; Bullard, Thomas; Dolasinski, Brian; Murphy, John; Sparkes, Martin; Pangovski, Krste; O'Neill, William; Powers, Peter; Haugan, Timothy

    2015-12-11

    An electromagnetic transmitter typically consists of individual components such as a waveguide, antenna, power supply, and an oscillator. In this communication we circumvent complications associated with connecting these individual components and instead combine them into a non-traditional, photonic enabled, compact transmitter device for tunable, ultrawide band (UWB) radiation. This device is a centimeter scale, continuous, thin film superconducting ring supporting a persistent super-current. An ultrafast laser pulse (required) illuminates the ring (either at a point or uniformly around the ring) and perturbs the super-current by the de-pairing and recombination of Cooper pairs. This generates a microwave pulse where both ring and laser pulse geometry dictates the radiated spectrum's shape. The transmitting device is self contained and completely isolated from conductive components that are observed to interfere with the generated signal. A rich spectrum is observed that extends beyond 30 GHz (equipment limited) and illustrates the complex super-current dynamics bridging optical, THz, and microwave wavelengths.

  18. A new ring-shape high-temperature superconducting trapped-field magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jie; Zhang, Min; Wang, Yawei; Li, Xiaojian; Patel, Jay; Yuan, Weijia

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a new trapped-field magnet made of second-generation high-temperature superconducting (2G HTS) rings. This so-called ring-shape 2G HTS magnet has the potential to provide much stronger magnetic fields relative to existing permanent magnets. Compared to existing 2G HTS trapped- field magnets, e.g. 2G HTS bulks and stacks, this new ring-shape 2G HTS magnet is more flexible in size and can be made into magnets with large dimensions for industrial applications. Effective magnetization is the key to being able to use trapped-field magnets. Therefore, this paper focuses on the magnetization mechanism of this new magnet using both experimental and numerical methods. Unique features have been identified and quantified for this new type of HTS magnet in the field cooling and zero field cooling process. The magnetization mechanism can be understood by the interaction between shielding currents and the penetration of external magnetic fields. An accumulation in the trapped field was observed by using multiple pulse field cooling. Three types of demagnetization were studied to measure the trapped-field decay for practical applications. Our results show that this new ring-shape HTS magnet is very promising in the trapping of a high magnetic field. As a super-permanent magnet, it will have a significant impact on large-scale industrial applications, e.g. the development of HTS machines with a very high power density and HTS magnetic resonance imaging devices.

  19. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  20. Performance of Superconducting Magnet Prototypes for LCLS-II Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, Vladimir [Fermilab; Andreev, Nikolai [Fermilab; DiMarco, Joseph [Fermilab; Makarov, Alexander [Fermilab; Tartaglia, Michael [Fermilab; Velev, George [Fermilab

    2016-12-30

    The new LCLS-II Linear Superconducting Accelerator at SLAC needs superconducting magnet packages installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer an electron beam. Two magnet prototypes were built and successfully tested at Fermilab. Magnets have an iron dominated configuration, quadrupole and dipole NbTi superconducting coils, and splittable in the vertical plane configuration. Magnets inside the Cryomodule are conductively cooled through pure Al heat sinks. Both magnets performance was verified by magnetic measurements at room temperature, and during cold tests in liquid helium. Test results including magnetic measurements are discussed. Special attention was given to the magnet performance at low currents where the iron yoke and the superconductor hysteresis effects have large influence. Both magnet prototypes were accepted for the installation in FNAL and JLAB prototype Cryomodules.

  1. Conduction cooled high temperature superconducting dipole magnet for accelerator applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, N.; Nielsen, G.; Hauge, N.

    2012-01-01

    impregnated with epoxy and mounted between a support of stainless steel and a collar made from aluminum. The cold mass consisting of the coil assembly and a laminated steel yoke is cooled by two cryocoolers from via copper bars to below 20 K. Current leads were made from the same batch of HTS tape. Cryogen...... for accelerator applications in many fields, in particular where cryogenic liquid cooling is not an option....

  2. Improving the design and analysis of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ramesh Chandra [Univ. of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India). Dept. of Physics

    1996-11-01

    High energy particle accelerators are now the primary means of discovering the basic building blocks of matter and understanding the forces between them. In order to minimize the cost of building these machines, superconducting magnets are used in essentially all present day high energy proton and heavy ion colliders. The cost of superconducting magnets is typically in the range of 20--30% of the total cost of building such machines. The circulating particle beam goes through these magnets a large number of times (over hundreds of millions). The luminosity performance and life time of the beam in these machines depends significantly on the field quality in these magnets. Therefore, even a small error in the magnetic field shape may create a large cumulative effect in the beam trajectory to throw the particles of the magnet aperture. The superconducting accelerator magnets must, therefore, be designed and constructed so that these errors are small. In this thesis the research and development work will be described 3which has resulted in significant improvements in the field quality of the superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The design and the field quality improvements in the prototype of the main collider dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will also be presented. RHIC will accelerate and collide two counter rotating beams of heavy ions up to 100 GeV/u and protons up to 250 GeV. It is expected that RHIC will create a hot, dense quark-gluon plasma and the conditions which, according to the Big Bang theory, existed in the early universe.

  3. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  4. Numerical and experimental investigations of coupled electromagnetic and thermal fields in superconducting accelerator magnets; Numerische und experimentelle Untersuchungen gekoppelter elektromagnetischer und thermischer Felder in supraleitenden Beschleunigermagneten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mierau, Anna

    2013-10-01

    The new international facility for antiproton and ion research FAIR will be built in Darmstadt (Germany). The existing accelerator facility of GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Heavy Ion Research will serve as a pre-accelerator for the new facility. FAIR will provide high-energy antiproton and ion beams with unprecedented intensity and quality for fundamental research of states of matter and the evolution of the universe. The central component of FAIR's accelerator and storage rings complex is a double-ring accelerator consisting of two heavy ion synchrotrons SIS100 and SIS300. The SIS100 is the primary accelerator of FAIR. The desired beam properties of SIS100 require a design of the machine much more challenging than the conventional design of existing proton and ion synchrotrons. The key technical components of each synchrotron are the special electromagnets, which allow guiding the charged particles on their orbits in the synchrotron during the acceleration processes. For a stable operation of the SIS100's the magnets have to produce extremely homogeneous magnetic fields. Furthermore, the SIS100 high-intensity ion beam modes, for example with U{sup 28+} ions, require an ultra-high vacuum in the beam pipe of the synchrotron, which can be generated effectively only at low temperatures below 15 K. Due to the field quality requirements for the magnets, the properties of the dynamic vacuum in the beam pipe but also in order to minimise future operating costs, fast ramped superconducting magnets will be used to guide the beam in SIS100. These magnets have been developed at GSI within the framework of the FAIR project. Developing a balanced design of a superconducting accelerator magnet requires a sound understanding of the interaction between its thermal and electromagnetic fields. Of special importance in this case are the magnetic field properties such as the homogeneity of the static magnetic field in the aperture of the magnet, and the dynamic heat losses of the

  5. Cryogenic safety of the superconducting ALPI accelerator at INFN-LNL

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The superconducting linac ALPI at INFN-LNL is composed of 20 identical cryostats housing, at a group of four (or two), 74 superconducting QWR type cavities: 58 resonators are made of copper with Nb sputtered on the internal surface and 16 are made of Nb bulk. In each cryostat is installed a 100 liter volume LHe reservoir feeding by gravity the QWR’s. The thermal shield around is cooled by GHe at 6 bar abs at 60-80 K. The linac ALPI is a post-accelerator which can receive heavy ions from either the 16 MV Tandem Van de Graaf or from the superconducting injector PIAVE. The latter is composed by an ECR source, two superconducting RFQ, and two cryostats each containg four superconducting bulk Nb QWR. The ALPI cryostats are cooled by a Helium refrigerator whose refrigerator capacity is 1200 W at 4.5 K and 3900 W additional at 60-80 K. PIAVE cryostats are cooled by a separate TCF50 helium refrigerator. The complex ALPI-PIAVE is installed in a semi-open removable concrete tunnel in the same building where the two h...

  6. Multiphysics Analysis of Frequency Detuning in Superconducting RF Cavities for Proton Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awida, M. H. [Fermilab; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab; Sukanov, A. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2016-01-22

    Multiphysics analyses for superconducting cavities are essential in the course of cavity design to meet stringent requirements on cavity frequency detuning. Superconducting RF cavities are the core accelerating elements in modern particle accelerators whether it is proton or electron machine, as they offer extremely high quality factors thus reducing the RF losses per cavity. However, the superior quality factor comes with the challenge of controlling the resonance frequency of the cavity within few tens of hertz bandwidth. In this paper, we investigate how the multiphysics analysis plays a major role in proactively minimizing sources of frequency detuning, specifically; microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) in the stage of RF design of the cavity and mechanical design of the niobium shell and the helium vessel.

  7. Isogeometric Simulation of Lorentz Detuning in Superconducting Accelerator Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Corno, Jacopo; De Gersem, Herbert; Schöps, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Cavities in linear accelerators suffer from eigenfrequency shifts due to mechanical deformation caused by the electromagnetic radiation pressure, a phenomenon known as Lorentz detuning. Estimating the frequency shift up to the needed accuracy by means of standard Finite Element Methods, is a complex task due to the non exact representation of the geometry and due to the necessity for mesh refinement when using low order basis functions. In this paper, we use Isogeometric Analysis for discretising both mechanical deformations and electromagnetic fields in a coupled multiphysics simulation approach. The combined high-order approximation of both leads to high accuracies at a substantially lower computational cost.

  8. 1999 Review of superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets for particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DAPNIA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CERN, Conseil Europeen pour la recherche nucleaire, Laboratoire europeen pour la physique des particules Geneve (Switzerland)

    1999-12-01

    The quest for elementary particles has promoted the development of particle accelerators producing beams of increasingly higher energies. In a synchrotron-type accelerator, the particle energy is directly proportional to the product of the machine's radius times the bending magnets' field strength. Present proton experiments at the TeV scale require facilities with circumferences ranging from a few to tens of kilometers and relying on a large number (several hundreds to several thousands) of high field dipole magnets and high field gradient quadrupole magnets. These electro-magnets use high current density, low critical temperature superconducting cables and are cooled down at liquid helium temperature. They are among the most costly and the most challenging components of the machine. After explaining what are the various types of accelerator magnets and why they are needed (section 1), we present a brief history of large superconducting particle accelerators, and we detail ongoing superconducting accelerator magnet R and D programs around the world (Section 2). Then, we review the superconducting materials that are available at industrial scale (chiefly, NbTi and Nb3Sn), and we describe the manufacturing of NbTi wires and cables (section 3). We also present the difficulties of processing and insulating Nb3Sn conductors which, so far, have limited the use of this material in spite of its superior performances. We continue by presenting the complex formalism used to represent two-dimensional fields (section 4), and we discuss the two-dimensional current distributions that are the most appropriate for generating pure dipole and pure quadrupole fields (section 5). We explain how these ideal distributions can be approximated by so-called cos{theta} and cos{sup 2}{theta} coil designs and we describe the difficulties of realizing coil ends. Next, we present the mechanical design concepts that have been developed to restrain magnet coils and to ensure proper

  9. Raising gradient limitations in 2.1 GHz superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya I., E-mail: smirnova@lanl.gov; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Suvorova, Natalya A.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L. [Niowave, Inc., 1012 North Walnut Street, Lansing, Michigan 48906 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    We report results from recent 2.1 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) photonic band gap (PBG) resonator experiments at Los Alamos. Two 2.1 GHz PBG cells with elliptical rods were fabricated and tested at high power in a liquid helium bath at the temperatures of 4 K and below 2 K. The described SRF PBG cells were designed with a particular emphasis on changing the shape of the PBG rods to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and at the same time to preserve its effectiveness at damping higher-order-modes. The superconducting PBG cavities have great potential for damping long-range wakefields in SRF accelerator structures without affecting the fundamental accelerating mode. The cells performed in accordance with simulation's predictions and the maximum achieved accelerating gradient was 18.3 MV/m. This represents a 30% increase over gradients previously demonstrated in superconducting PBG cavities with round rods.

  10. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Ben [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Panuganti, Harsha [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Brau, Charles [Vanderbilt U.; Choi, Bo [Vanderbilt U.; Gabella, William [Vanderbilt U.; Ivanov, Borislav [Vanderbilt U.; Mendenhall, Marcus [Vanderbilt U.; Lynn, Christopher [Swarthmore Coll.; Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab; Wagner, Wolfgang [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  11. Radiation and Resonant Frequency of Superconducting Annular Ring Microstrip Antenna on Uniaxial Anisotropic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkat, Ouarda; Benghalia, Abdelmadjid

    2009-10-01

    In this work, the full-wave method is used for computing the resonant frequency, the bandwidth, and radiation pattern of High temperature superconductor, or an imperfectly conducting annular ring microstrip, which is printed on uniaxial anisotropic substrate. Galerkin’s method is used in the resolution of the electric field integral equation. The TM set of modes issued from the cavity model theory are used to expand the unknown currents on the patch. Numerical results concerning the effect of the anisotropic substrates on the antenna performance are presented and discussed. It is found that microstrip superconducting could give high efficiency with high gain in millimeter wavelengths. Results are compared with previously published data and are found to be in good agreement.

  12. Continuous Tera-Hertz wave transmission spectroscopy of Nb double superconducting split-ring resonator array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, JunWei; Liu, RuiYuan; Zhou, YuRong; Li, YanRong; Wang, YunPing

    2012-02-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of two Nb double superconducting split-ring samples with different thicknesses on MgO substrates was measured by a continuous Tera-Hertz spectrometer. The transmission curves of two different samples with the thicknesses of 50 and 150 nm at 7.5 K show dips at 480, 545 GHz, respectively, which origin from the different capacities and inductances of the samples. For the sample of 50 nm, the dip shifts to lower frequency, also decreases in depth and increases in width with temperature or field increasing below T c of Nb film, while the sample of 150 nm does not show such a phenomenon. This thickness-dependent transmission behavior is due to the kinetic inductance and conductivity change of superfluid electrons in Nb film and may suggest a practical tunable THz filter based on the thinner samples.

  13. Investigation on the fabrication of the 3rd harmonic superconducting cavity for the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhen-Yu; MA Guang-Ming; YU Hai-Bo; MAO Dong-Qing; FENG Zi-Qiang; HOU Hong-Tao; LIU Jian-Fei

    2009-01-01

    A third harmonic superconducting niobium cavity has been proposed for installation in the Shang-hai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring to improve the Touschek lifetime. In order to investigate the feasibility of the superconducting cavity fabrication indigenously and the possibility to master the fabrica-tion techniques, cavities were fabricated from copper and niobium sheets by deep drawing and electron-beam welding, and a series of measurements, such as resonant frequency, shape dimensions and wall thickness, were carried out during this process. After analysis of various problems existing in the fabrication process, tech-nique improvements were proposed, and finally the precise shape as designed and resonant frequency within 1.2 MHz were achieved for the new completed cavities. In addition, full annealing was finally proved to be a good cure for niobium sheets' tearing up during deep drawing. By fabricating niobium cavities successfully, some problems to the next step were cleared. This paper introduces the process of cavity fabrication and its technique improvements towards forming, and the initial vertical test result of niobium cavity is also presented.

  14. Accelerators and storage rings. TS Workshop 2005. Book of Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciriani, P.; Magnin, B.; Oliveira, R. de; Chevalley, J.; Artoos, K.; Bertone, C.; Minginette, P.; Corso, J.P.; Grillot, S.; Weisz, S.; Prodon, S.; Sakkinen, J.; Foraz, K.; Funken, A.; Bangert, N.; Hakulinen, T.; Boncompagni, Y.; Delamare, C.; Folch, R.; Poehler, M.; Bertarelli, A.; Martel, C.; Butin, F.; Osborne, J.; Evrard, S.; Lacarrere, D.; Gayde, J.C.; Renaglia, T.; Batz, M.; Tsesmelis, E.; Wijnands, T.; Perrot, A.L.; Gastal, M.; Atieh, S.; Cherif, A.; Costa Pinto, P.; Calatroni, S.; Ninin, P.; Battistin, M.; Arnau Izquierdo, G.; Favre, G.; Mathot, S.; Mainaud, H.; Podevin, C.; Jones, M.; Stowisek, J.; Roy, S.; Sanchez-Corral, E.; Petit, S.; Martel, P.; Colloca, C.; Van Der Bij, E.; Vadon, M.; Kahle, K.; Principe, R.; Macina, D.; Schmidt, R.; Ridewood, J.; Lopez-Hernandez, L.A

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the workshop. This workshop was dedicated to the status of the technical support of the LHC (large hadron collider) in CERN. The different issues concern: -) the installation of the equipment in the LHC tunnel (super-conducting magnets, cold boxes, PS magnets...), -) underground logistics, -) the installation of experimental areas, -) the new CERN control center, and -) special technologies. (A.C.)

  15. Fabrication and properties of single domain GdBCO superconducting rings by a buffer aided Gd+011 TSIG method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P. T.; Yang, W. M.; Chen, J. L.

    2017-08-01

    Single domain REBCO bulk superconductors can be fabricated by both the top-seeded melt texture growth process and the top-seeded infiltration and growth (TSIG) process. The buffer pellet technique used in these two methods has been demonstrated to act as an efficient seed and to aid the growth of the REBCO bulk superconductors. In this paper, we combined the Gd+011 TSIG method and buffer pellet technique together to fabricate single domain REBCO superconducting rings without any machining and obvious shrinkage of the final ring, which shows a satisfactory trapped field and very good magnetic shielding at the same time. It is found that (1) a single domain GdBCO ring, with inner diameter of 10 mm and outer diameter of 32 mm, has been fabricated by this method successfully. (2) The trapped field (0.32 T, 77 K) and maximum levitation force (80.1 N, 77 K) of the single domain GdBCO ring are nearly the same as the trapped field (0.33 T, 77 K) and maximum levitation force (80.2 N, 77 K) of the single domain GdBCO bulk with the same diameter and thickness, but the uniformity of trapped field is much better for the single domain GdBCO ring. (3) The single domain GdBCO ring shows very good magnetic shielding property, the magnetic flux density shielded by the superconducting ring is up to 0.40 T at 77 K, which is much higher than that of reported samples. The results indicate that the buffer aided Gd+011 TSIG method can provide an important way to fabricate high quality single domain REBCO superconducting rings directly.

  16. High Temperature Superconducting Magnets: Revolutionizing Next Generation Accelerators and Other Applications (466th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ramesh (BNL Superconducting Magnet Division)

    2011-02-16

    BNL has always been a leader in the world of superconducting magnets, which are essential to the great modern ccelerators such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL, or the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Switzerland. These magnets are made of material that, cooled to 4 Kelvins (K) (-452° Farenheit) become superconducting, that is, lose essentially all resistance to electricity. For the past decade, however, Lab researchers have been exploring the use of new materials that become superconducting at higher temperatures. These materials can operate at the relatively high temperature of 77 K (-351°F), allowing them to be cooled by cheap, plentiful liquid nitrogen, rather than helium, and can create very high magnetic fields. Now far in the lead of this area of research, BNL scientists are exploring avenues for high temperature superconducting magnets that are energy efficient and have magnetic fields that are a million times stronger than the Earth’s. If successful, these new magnets could potentially revolutionize usage in future accelerators, play a key role in energy efficiency and storage, and make possible new applications such as muon colliders and MRI screening in remote areas.

  17. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Leibfritz, J; Baffes, C M; Carlson, K; Chase, B; Church, M D; Harms, E R; Klebaner, A L; Kucera, M; Martinez, A; Nagaitsev, S; Nobrega, L E; Piot, P; Reid, J; Wendt, M; Wesseln, S J

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Acccelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beamlines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750-MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5-GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF a...

  18. Niobium Coatings for the HIE-ISOLDE QWR Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jecklin, N; Delaup, B; Ferreira, L; Mondino, I; Sublet, A; Therasse, M; Venturini Desolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy at ISOLDE) project is the upgrade of the existing ISOLDE (Isotope Separator On Line DEvice) facility at CERN, which is dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics experiments. A new linear accelerator made of 20 ȕ=10.3% and 12 ȕ=6.3% quarter-wave resonators (QWR) superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities at 101 MHz will be built, and in a first phase two cryomodules of 5 high-ȕ cavities each are scheduled to accelerate first beams in 2015. The cavities are made of a copper substrate, with a sputter-coated superconductive niobium (Nb) layer, operated at 4.5 K with an accelerating field of 6 MV/m at 10W Radio-Frequency (RF) losses (Q=4.5· 108). In this paper we will discuss the baseline surface treatment and coating procedure which allows obtaining the required performance, as well as the steps undertaken in order to prepare series production of the required number of cavities guaranteeing their quality and functional...

  19. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mswon@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  20. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  1. Materials, Strands, and Cables for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumption, Mike D. [Ohio State University, Columbia, OH (United States); Collings, Edward W. [Ohio State University, Columbia, OH (United States)

    2014-09-19

    This report focuses on Materials, Strands and Cables for High Energy Physics Particle accelerators. In the materials area, work has included studies of basic reactions, diffusion, transformations, and phase assemblage of Nb3Sn. These materials science aspects have been married to results, in the form of flux pinning, Bc2, Birr, and transport Jc, with an emphasis on obtaining the needed Jc for HEP needs. Attention has also been paid to the “intermediate-temperature superconductor”, magnesium diboride emphasis being placed on (i) irreversibility field enhancement, (ii) critical current density and flux pinning, and (iii) connectivity. We also report on studies of Bi-2212. The second area of the program has been in the area of “Strands” in which, aside from the materials aspect of the conductor, its physical properties and their influence on performance have been studied. Much of this work has been in the area of magnetization estimation and flux jump calculation and control. One of the areas of this work was strand instabilities in high-performance Nb3Sn conductors due to combined fields and currents. Additionally, we investigated quench and thermal propagation in YBCO coated conductors at low temperatures and high fields. The last section, “Cables”, focussed on interstrand contact resistance, ICR, it origins, control, and implications. Following on from earlier work in NbTi, the present work in Nb3Sn has aimed to make ICR intermediate between the two extremes of too little contact (no current sharing) and too much (large and unacceptable magnetization and associated beam de-focussing). Interstrand contact and current sharing measurements are being made on YBCO based Roebel cables using transport current methods. Finally, quench was investigated for YBCO cables and the magnets wound from them, presently with a focus on 50 T solenoids for muon collider applications.

  2. Status of a cylindrical superconducting undulator for the laser wakefield accelerator in Jena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso Rodriguez, Veronica; Bernhard, Axel; Grau, Andreas; Haerer, Bastian; Peiffer, Peter; Rossmanith, Robert; Weber, Marc; Widmann, Christina [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kaluza, Malte; Nicolai, Maria; Rinck, Thorsten; Saevert, Alexander [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena (Germany); Jaeckel, Oliver; Reuter, Maria [Helmholtz Institute Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Laser-Wakefield accelerators (LWFA) produce electron bunches with several 100 MeV energy within a few millimeters acceleration length, however, with a relatively large energy spread (a few percent). Undulators provide monochromatic radiation with high brilliance. The working principle of undulators requires a small energy spread of the electron beam in the order of 0.1 %. To produce monochromatic undulator radiation with LWF accelerated electrons, a novel iron-free cylindrical superconducting undulator (SCU) is under development at the KIT. This talk gives an overview about the design and the optimisation of the SCU tailored to the particular beam properties of the JETI-LWFA at the University of Jena. In addition a short model test and the construction status of the full scale undulator are shown.

  3. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  4. Study of Higher Order Modes in Superconducting Accelerating Structures for Linac Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schuh, Marcel; Welsch, C P

    2011-01-01

    Higher Order Modes (HOMs) can severely limit the operation of superconducting cavities in a linear accelerator with high beam current, high duty factor and complex pulse structure. Therefore, the full HOM spectrum has to be analysed in detail to identify potentially dangerous modes already during the design phase and to define their damping requirements. For this purpose a dedicated beam dynamics simulation code, Simulation of higher order Mode Dynamics (SMD), focusing on beam-HOM interaction, has been developed in the frame of this project. SMD allows to analyse the beam behaviour under the presence of HOMs, taking into account many important effects, such as for example the HOM frequency spread, beam input jitter, different chopping patterns, as well as klystron and alignment errors. SMD is used to investigate in detail into the effects of HOMs in the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) at CERN and in particular their potential to drive beam instabili- ties in the longitudinal and transverse direction. Based...

  5. The CERN Antiproton Collider Programme Accelerators and Accumulation Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koziol, Heribert

    2004-01-01

    One of CERN's most daring and successful undertakings was the quest for the intermediate bosons, W and Z. In this paper, we describe the accelerator part of the venture which relied on a number of innovations: an extension of the budding method of stochastic cooling by many orders of magnitude; the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator, depending on several novel accelerator methods and technologies; major modifications to the 26 GeV PS Complex; and the radical conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which just had started up as an accelerator, to a protonâ€"antiproton collider. The SPS Collider had to master the beamâ€"beam effect far beyond limits reached ever before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the huge detectors UA1 and UA2.

  6. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  7. Spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, J.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to survey the subject of spin dynamics in accelerators: to give a sense of the underlying physics, the typical analytic and numeric methods used, and an overview of results achieved. Consideration will be limited to electrons and protons. Examples of experimental and theoretical results in both linear and circular machines are included.

  8. A 166.6 MHz superconducting rf system for the HEPS storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Hao, X.; Huang, T.; Li, Z.; Lin, H.; Meng, F.; Mi, Z.; Sun, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2017-07-01

    A superconducting 166.6 MHz quarter-wave beta=1 cavity was recently proposed for the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS), a 6 GeV kilometer-scale light source. Four 166.6 MHz cavities will be used for main acceleration in the newly planned on-axis beam injection scheme realized by a double-frequency RF system. The fundamental frequency, 166.6 MHz, was dictated by the fast injection kicker technology and the preference of using 499.8 MHz SC RF cavity as the third harmonic. Each 166.6 MHz cavity will be operated at 4.2 K providing 1.2 MV accelerating voltage and 150 kW of power to the electron beam. The input coupler will use single-window coaxial type graded up to 200 kW CW power. Each cavity will be equipped with a 200 kW solid-state amplifier and digital low-level RF system. This paper describes the 166.6 MHz RF system with a focus on the design and optimization of the RF cavity and its ancillaries, the LLRF system and the status of the solid-state amplifiers.

  9. 介观超导环中的电荷分布%Charge distributions in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂必红; 查国桥; 周世平

    2007-01-01

    The charge distribution in thin mesoscopic superconducting ring is studied by the phenomenological GinzburgLandau theory. In the giant vortex states we find that the mesoscopic rings may present three kinds of charge distribution while the disk only owns the first two kinds. The charge near the inner radius may change its sign from negative to positive with increasing applied field. In the multivortex state we find that there exist saddle-point states and stable multivortex states.The distribution of charge and the superconducting electron density in the (0:2) saddle states and the (0:4), and (1:5) stable multivortex states has also been studied. The contour plot of the charge distribution and the Cooper pair density distribution are given.

  10. Capture, acceleration and bunching rf systems for the MEIC booster and storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaoheng [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Guo, Jiquan [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Lin, Fanglei [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Morozov, Vasiliy [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Rimmer, Robert A. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Wang, Haipeng [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Zhang, Yuhong [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA

    2015-09-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. The electron collider ring accepts electrons from CEBAF at energies from 3 to 12 GeV. Protons and ions are delivered to a booster and captured in a long bunch before being ramped and transferred to the ion collider ring. The ion collider ring accelerates a small number of long ion bunches to colliding energy before they are re-bunched into a high frequency train of very short bunches for colliding. Two sets of low frequency RF systems are needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping in the booster and ion collider ring. Another two sets of high frequency RF cavities are needed for re-bunching in the ion collider ring and compensating synchrotron radiation energy loss in the electron collider ring. The requirements from energy ramping, ion beam bunching, electron beam energy compensation, collective effects, beam loading and feedback capability, RF power capability, etc. are presented. The preliminary designs of these RF systems are presented. Concepts for the baseline cavity and RF station configurations are described, as well as some options that may allow more flexible injection and acceleration schemes.

  11. The elbe accelerator facility starts operation with the superconducting rf gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schneider, C; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J; Kamps, T; Rudolph, J; Schenk, M; Klemz, G; Will, I

    2010-01-01

    As the first superconducting rf photo-injector (SRF gun) in practice, the FZD 3+1/2 cell SRF gun is successfully connected to the superconducting linac ELBE. This setting will improve the beam quality for ELBE users. It is the first example for an accelerator facility fully based on superconducting RF technology. For high average power FEL and ERL sources, the combination of SRF linac and SRF gun provides a new chance to produce beams of high average current and low emittance with relative low power consumption. The main parameters achieved from the present SRF gun are the final electron energy of 3 MeV, 16 μA average current, and rms transverse normalized emittances of 3 mm mrad at 77 pC bunch charge. A modified 3+1/2 cell niobium cavity has been fabricated and tested, which will increase the rf gradient in the gun and thus better the beam parameters further. In this paper the status of the integration of the SRF gun with the ELBE linac will be presented, and the latest results of the beam experiments will ...

  12. Application of International Linear Collider superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on π-mode to provide a maximum accelerating gradient. A significant research and development effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its rf system which resulted in excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above ∼1.2  GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for β_{G}=0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H^{-} from ∼420  MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new β_{G}=0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9π-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  13. First Beam and High-Gradient Cryomodule Commissioning Results of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Darren; et al.

    2015-06-01

    The advanced superconducting test accelerator at Fermilab has accelerated electrons to 20 MeV and, separately, the International Linear Collider (ILC) style 8-cavity cryomodule has achieved the ILC performance milestone of 31.5 MV/m per cavity. When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one ILC-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We report on the results of first beam, the achievement of our cryomodule to ILC gradient specifications, and near-term future plans for the facility.

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring gravitational acceleration utilizing a high temperature superconducting bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operating temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling may be accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  15. Method and Apparatus for measuring Gravitational Acceleration Utilizing a high Temperature Superconducting Bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R.

    1998-11-06

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operative temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling maybe accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  16. Beam Dynamics Design Studies of a Superconducting Radioactive Ion Beam Post-accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, MA; Pasini, M

    2011-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE project at CERN proposes a superconducting upgrade to increase the energy range and quality of the radioactive ion beams produced at ISOLDE, which are currently post- accelerated by the normal conducting REX linac. The specification and design choices for the HIE-ISOLDE linac are outlined along with a comprehensive beam dynamics study undertaken to understand and mitigate the sources of beam emittance dilution. The dominant cause of transverse emittance growth was attributed to the coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motions through the phase dependence of the rf defocusing force in the accelerating cavities. A parametric resonance induced by the coupling was observed and its excitation surveyed as a function of trans- verse phase advance using numerical simulations and analytic models to understand and avoid the regions of transverse beam instability. Other sources of emittance growth were studied and where necessary ameliorated, including the beam steering force in the quarter-wa...

  17. Development of the superconducting 3.9-GHz accelerating cavity at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkan, T.; Bauer, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Boffo, C.; Borissov, E.; Carter, H.; Edwards, H.; Foley, M.; Gonin, I.; Khabibouline, T.; Mishra, S.; Mitchell, D.; Polubotko, V.; Rowe, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    A superconducting third harmonic 3.9 GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam quality in the TTF-like photoinjector [1]. Fermilab has developed, built and tested several prototypes, including two copper 9-cell cavities, one niobium 3-cell cavity, and one 9-cell cavity. The helium vessel and frequency tuner for the 9-cell cavity was built and tested as well. In cold tests, we achieved a peak surface magnetic field of {approx}100mT, well above the 70mT specification. The accelerating gradient was likely limited by thermal breakdown. Studies of the higher order modes in the cavity revealed that the existing cavity design with two HOM couplers will provide sufficient damping of these modes. In this paper we discuss the cavity design, results of the studies and plans for further development.

  18. Performance analysis of superconducting rf cavities for the CERN rare isotope accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatroni, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Rosaz, G.; Sublet, A.; Venturini Delsolaro, W.; Vaglio, R.; Palmieri, V.

    2016-09-01

    The first cryomodule of the new HIE-ISOLDE rare isotope accelerator has recently been commissioned with beam at CERN, with the second cryomodule ready for installation. Each cryomodule contains five superconducting low-beta quarter wave cavities, produced with the technology of sputtering a thin niobium film onto the copper substrate (Nb /Cu ). This technology has several benefits compared to the bulk niobium solution, but also drawbacks among which the most relevant is the increase of surface resistance with accelerating field. Recent work has established the possible connection of this phenomenon to local defects in the Nb /Cu interface, which may lead to increased thermal impedance and thus local thermal runaway. We have analyzed the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE cavities series production, as well as of a few prototypes', in terms of this model, and found a strong correlation between the rf properties and one of the model characteristic quantities, namely the total surface having increased interface thermal impedance.

  19. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  20. Superconducting Radio Frequency Technology: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting RF cavities are becoming more often the choice for larger scale particle accelerator projects such as linear colliders, energy recovery linacs, free electron lasers or storage rings. Among the many advantages compared to normal conducting copper structures, the superconducting devices dissipate less rf power, permit higher accelerating gradients in CW operation and provide better quality particle beams. In most cases these accelerating cavities are fabricated from high purity bulk niobium, which has superior superconducting properties such as critical temperature and critical magnetic field when compared to other superconducting materials. Research during the last decade has shown, that the metallurgical properties--purity, grain structure, mechanical properties and oxidation behavior--have significant influence on the performance of these accelerating devices. This contribution attempts to give a short overview of the superconducting RF technology with emphasis on the importance of the material properties of the high purity niobium.

  1. Study of field-limiting defects in superconducting RF cavities for electron-accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderhold, Sebastian

    2015-02-15

    Superconducting radio-frequency resonators made from niobium are an integral part of many accelerator projects. Their main advantage are the low ohmic losses resulting in the possibility for a long pulse structure and high duty cycles up to continous wave (cw) operation. The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) are based on this technology. In some cases the resonators reach accelerating electric fields close to the theoretical limit of bulk niobium. Yet most resonators are limited at lower fields and mass production for large scale accelerator projects suffers from the spread in the achievable gradient per resonator. The main limitations are field emission and the breakdown of superconductivity (quench). While field emission is mostly attributed to the overall surface cleanliness of the resonator, quench is usually associated with local defects. Optical inspection of the inner surface of the resonators with unprecedented resolution, accuracy and a special illumination has been established at DESY and used to study such local surface defects. More than 30 resonators have been inspected. Distinctive features from these inspections have been catalogued and assessed for their potential risk for the performance of the resonator. Several confirmed quenching defects could be extracted for further analysis and could be traced back to likely origins in the production process. A new, automated set-up for optical inspection of large series of resonators, named OBACHT, has been developed and successfully commissioned. Its design includes the minimal need for operator interference, reproducibility, robustness and versatility, in order to fit the requirements for application both in a laboratory and in a production environment. To facilitate the comparison of the results obtained during the global R and D effort on resonators for the ILC, the ILC global yield database has been established. The yield and selection rules for the

  2. Optimizing the configuration of a superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavity to increase the maximum achievable gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.

    2014-02-01

    We present a design of a superconducting rf photonic band gap (SRF PBG) accelerator cell with specially shaped rods in order to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and improve the effectiveness of the PBG structure for suppression of higher order modes (HOMs). The ability of PBG structures to suppress long-range wakefields is especially beneficial for superconducting electron accelerators for high power free-electron lasers (FELs), which are designed to provide high current continuous duty electron beams. Using PBG structures to reduce the prominent beam-breakup phenomena due to HOMs will allow significantly increased beam-breakup thresholds. As a result, there will be possibilities for increasing the operation frequency of SRF accelerators and for the development of novel compact high-current accelerator modules for the FELs.

  3. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  4. Multilayer coating for higher accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities: a review of theoretical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    The theory of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) multilayer structure for application in superconducting accelerating cavities is reviewed. The theoretical field limit, optimum layer thicknesses and material combination, and surface resistance are discussed for the SIS structure and are also reviewed for the superconductor-superconductor bilayer structure.

  5. A fiber-optic strain measurement and quench localization system for use in superconducting accelerator dipole magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van Johannes M.; Scanlan, Ronald M.; Kate, ten Herman H.J.

    1995-01-01

    A novel fiber-optic measurement system for superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The principal component is an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer to determine localized strain and stress in coil windings. The system can be used either as a sensitive relative strain measurement system o

  6. Universal mechanism for breaking the hc/2e periodicity of flux-induced oscillations in small superconducting rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakaryuk, Victor

    2008-10-17

    A universal mechanism of restoration of minimal hc/e periodicity in the response of small superconducting rings or cylinders to the magnetic flux is proposed. The mechanism is based on the dependence of the Cooper pair's internal energy on its motion as a whole and does not rely on the presence of quasiparticles in the system. The thermal equilibrium hc/2e periodicity is broken by an offset of the transition between different current-carrying states. The magnitude of the offset is calculated for an s-wave superconducting cylinder of radius R in the limit R>xi_{0}, where xi_{0} is the BCS coherence length and turns out to be exponentially small. A possible enhancement of the effect for nodal superconductors is suggested. Similar conclusions should also apply to the response of charged or neutral superfluids to rotation.

  7. An improved phase-control system for superconducting low-velocity accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Shepard, K.W.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Microphonic fluctuations in the rf eigenfrequency of superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures must be compensated by a fast-tuning system in order to control the rf phase. The tuning system must handle a reactive power proportional to the product of the tuning range and the rf energy content of the resonant cavity. The accelerating field level of many of the SC cavities forming the ATLAS linac has been limited by the rf power capacity of the presently used PIN-diode based fast-tuner. A new system has been developed, utilizing PIN diodes operating immersed in liquid nitrogen, with the diodes controlled by a high-voltage VMOS FET driver. The system has operated at reactive power levels above 20 KVA, a factor of four increase over an earlier design. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Laser polishing of niobium for superconducting radio-frequency accelerator applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [William and Mary College; Klopf, John M. [William and Mary College; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [JLAB

    2014-08-01

    Interior surfaces of niobium cavities used in superconducting radio frequency accelerators are now obtained by buffered chemical polish and/or electropolish. Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from noxious chemistry and availability of in-process inspection. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damage. Computational modeling was used to estimate the surface temperature and gain insight into the mechanism of laser polishing. Power spectral density analysis of surface topography measurements shows that laser polishing can produce smooth topography similar to that obtained by electropolish. This is a necessary first step toward introducing laser polishing as an alternative to the currently practiced chemical polishing.

  9. An FPGA-based quench detection and protection system for superconducting accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcagno, R.H.; Feher, S.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    A new quench detection and protection system for superconducting accelerator magnets was developed for the Fermilab's Magnet Test Facility (MTF). This system is based on a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) module, and it is made of mostly commercially available, integrated hardware and software components. It provides all the functions of our existing VME-based quench detection and protection system, but in addition the new system is easily scalable to protect multiple magnets powered independently and a more powerful user interface and analysis tools. The new system has been used successfully for testing LHC Interaction Region Quadrupoles correctors and High Field Magnet HFDM04. In this paper we describe the system and present results.

  10. Biased HiPIMS technology for superconducting rf accelerating cavities coating

    CERN Document Server

    G. Rosaz, G.; Sonato, D.; Calatroni, S.; Ehiasarian, A.; Junginger, T.; Taborelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. CERN already studied the possibility to use such a coating method for SRF accelerating cavities. Results are promising but not better from a RF point of view than dcMS coatings. Thanks to these results the next step is to go towards a biased HiPIMS approach. However the geometry of the cavities leads to complex changes in the coating setup in order to apply a bias voltage. Coating system tweaking and first superconducting properties of biased samples are presented.

  11. An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg

    2011-09-01

    We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.

  12. Calibration of the Nonlinear Accelerator Model at the Diamond Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, Riccardo; Rowland, James; Martin, Ian; Schmidt, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The correct implementation of the nonlinear ring model is crucial to achieve the top performance of a synchrotron light source. Several dynamics quantities can be used to compare the real machine with the model and eventually to correct the accelerator. Most of these methods are based on the analysis of turn-by-turn data of excited betatron oscillations. We present the experimental results of the campaign of measurements carried out at the Diamond. A combination of Frequency Map Analysis (FMA) and detuning with momentum measurements has allowed a precise calibration of the nonlinear model capable of reproducing the nonlinear beam dynamics in the storage ring

  13. Use of a ring-shaped, passively stable, superconducting magnetic bearing in the ring spinning process; Einsatz eines ringfoermigen, passiv stabilen, supraleitenden Magnetlagers im Ringspinnprozess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Anne; Sparing, Maria; Berger, Dietmar; Fuchs, Guenter; Schultz, Ludwig [IFW Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Metallische Werkstoffe; Hossain, Mahmud; Abdkader, Anwar; Cherif, Chokri [TU Dresden (Germany). ITM

    2015-07-01

    For the integration of a superconducting magnetic bearing in a ring spinning machine a LN{sub 2} continuous flow cryostat was developed, which is needed to cool the superconductor below its transition temperature of ∝91 K and simultaneously ensures that the spinning process takes place at room temperature. The ring spinning process is the most widely used process for spinning yarn. In this case, a loose fiber connection is first stretched in a roller system, then twisted by the so-called spinning ring-ring traveler system, and finally wound on a spindle. The spinning ring is a circular guide, which is mounted around the spindle. On this the ring traveler rotates as yarn guide. The yarn is driven by the rotation of the spindle and there is a balloon-shaped movement of the yarn which results the twist. The productivity of the process is limited by the systematic frictional heat between the yarn, spinning ring and ring travelers. This leads at high speeds to yarn breakage and limits the maximum spindle speed depending on the type of fiber to a maximum of 25,000 U/min. To increase the speed and thus the productivity of the process, the conventional spinning ring-ring rotor system is replaced by a superconducting magnetic bearing. Here floats a NdFeB permanent magnet passively stable over the LN{sub 2} cooled ceramic high-temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}. Driven by the yarn the permanent magnet rotates, thus ensuring the necessary balloon-shaped yarn movement to twist. Such a bearing has been successfully tested in a ring spinning machine. Preliminary results show a similar yarn quality. [German] Fuer die Integration eines supraleitenden Magnetlagers in eine Ringspinnmaschine wurde ein LN{sub 2}-Durchflusskryostat entwickelt, der noetig ist, um den Supraleiter unter seine Sprungtemperatur von ∝91 K zu kuehlen und gleichzeitig dafuer sorgt, dass der Spinnprozess bei Raumtemperatur ablaeuft. Der Ringspinnprozess ist der am weitesten verbreitete

  14. Acceleration of polarized protons and deuterons in the ion collider ring of JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratenko, A. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Kondratenko, M. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Filatov, Yu. N. [Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Moscow (Russian Federation); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasily S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The figure-8-shaped ion collider ring of Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is transparent to the spin. It allows one to preserve proton and deuteron polarizations using weak stabilizing solenoids when accelerating the beam up to 100 GeV/c. When the stabilizing solenoids are introduced into the collider's lattice, the particle spins precess about a spin field, which consists of the field induced by the stabilizing solenoids and the zero-integer spin resonance strength. During acceleration of the beam, the induced spin field is maintained constant while the resonance strength experiences significant changes in the regions of "interference peaks". The beam polarization depends on the field ramp rate of the arc magnets. Its component along the spin field is preserved if acceleration is adiabatic. We present the results of our theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of the spin dynamics during acceleration of protons and deuterons in the JLEIC ion collider ring. We demonstrate high stability of the deuteron polarization in figure-8 accelerators. We analyze a change in the beam polarization when crossing the transition energy.

  15. Design of MgB2 superconducting dipole magnet for particle beam transport in accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, A.B.; Zangenberg, N.; Baurichter, A.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the innovation potential of superconductivity at Risø was performed in February 2004 by the main author of this report [1]. Several suggestions for new products and new markets were formulated by the superconductivity group andexamined by the innovation staff at Risø. ...... accelerator, B = 4:4 Tesla and coil aperture D = 76 mm [6], which has been identified by Danfysik A/S as interesting. It isconcluded that MgB2 is useful for the dipole application and construction of a small test coil of one half of the magnet is planned in 2007....

  16. Final Commissioning of the Superconducting Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator at IUAC, Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Tripti Sekhar; Choudhury, Anup; Chacko, Jacob; Kar, Soumen; Antony, Joby; Babu, Suresh; Kumar, Manoj; Mathuria, D. S.; Sahu, Santosh; Kanjilal, Dinakar

    The superconducting linac as a booster of the 15UD Pelletron accelerator was partly commissioned with one linac module housing eight quarter wave bulk niobium cavities along with the superbuncher and rebuncher cryomodules. Subsequently two more linac cryomodules were added to have in total 24 cavities for acceleration. In addition, a new Linde helium refrigerator of capacity 750 W @ 4.2 K was installed in parallel to the earlier CCI refrigerator. The new refrigerator was integrated with the earlier cryogenics network system through a specially designed liquid helium distribution line without any valve box. The cooling philosophy with this new system is modified to have a faster cool down rate in the critical zone (150 - 70 K) to avoid Q disease. The helium gas pressure fluctuation in the cavities is reduced significantly to have stable RF locking. The full linac is being operated and beams with higher energy are being delivered to the users. The present paper will highlight the performance of the new cryogenic system with respect to cool down rate, and helium pressure fluctuation.

  17. Superconducting 500 MHz accelerating copper cavities sputter-coated with niobium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Circelli, N.; Hauer, M.; Weingarten, W.

    1985-03-01

    Thermal breakdown induced either by electron loading or by local defects of enhanced RF losses limits the accelerating field of superconducting niobium cavities. Replacing niobium with a material of higher thermal conductivity would be highly desirable to increase the maximum field. Therefore, cavities made of OFHC copper were coated by D.C. bias sputtering with a thin niobium film (1.5 to 5 ..mu..). Accelerating fields up to 8.6 MVm/sup -1/ were obtained without observing any field breakdown, the limitation being due to the available rf power. The Q values achieved at 4.2 K and low field were similar to those of niobium sheet cavities (i.e. about 2 x 10/sup 9/), but a fast initial decrease of Q to about 10/sup 9/ was reproducibly experienced. Subsequent inspection of regions of enhanced rf losses revealed defects the origin of which is under study. The apparatus used for coating the cavities and the results obtained are presented and discussed.

  18. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, P., E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Saito, K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Singer, W.; Singer, X. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Myneni, G.R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of E{sub acc}=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  19. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  20. Recent Progress in Power Refrigeration below 2 K for Superconducting Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Claudet, Serge

    2005-01-01

    As a result of technico-economical optimization and quest for increased performance, 2 K cryogenics is now present in large accelerator projects using superconducting magnets or acceleration cavities. Consequently, large cryogenic systems producing refrigeration capacity below 2 K in the kW range and with high efficiency over a large dynamic range are needed. After CEBAF and SNS, this is the case for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN for which eight 2.4 kW @ 1.8 K refrigeration units are needed to cool each a 3.3 km long sector of high-field magnets. Combining cold hydrodynamic compressors in series with warm volumetric compressors, complete pre-series units as well as sets of series cold compressors have been intensively tested and validated from two different industrial suppliers. After recalling the possible 2 K refrigeration cycles and their comparative merits, this paper describes the specific features of the LHC system and presents the achieved performance with emphasis on the progress in...

  1. A superconducting CW-LINAC for heavy ion acceleration at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Winfried; Aulenbacher, Kurt; Basten, Markus; Dziuba, Florian; Gettmann, Viktor; Miski-Oglu, Maksym; Podlech, Holger; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2017-03-01

    Recently the Universal Linear Accelerator (UNILAC) serves as a powerful high duty factor (25%) heavy ion beam accelerator for the ambitious experiment program at GSI. Beam time availability for SHE (Super Heavy Element)-research will be decreased due to the limitation of the UNILAC providing Uranium beams with an extremely high peak current for FAIR simultaneously. To keep the GSI-SHE program competitive on a high level and even beyond, a standalone superconducting continuous wave (100% duty factor) LINAC in combination with the upgraded GSI High Charge State injector is envisaged. In preparation for this, the first LINAC section (financed by HIM and GSI) will be tested with beam in 2017, demonstrating the future experimental capabilities. Further on the construction of an extended cryo module comprising two shorter Crossbar-H cavities is foreseen to test until end of 2017. As a final R&D step towards an entire LINAC three advanced cryo modules, each comprising two CH cavities, should be built until 2019, serving for first user experiments at the Coulomb barrier.

  2. A High-power 650 MHz CW Magnetron Transmitter for Intensity Frontier Superconducting Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Treado, T A; Nagaitsev, S; Pasquinelli, R J; Yakovlev, V P; Flanagan, G; Johnson, R P; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, F; Neubauer, M L

    2013-01-01

    A concept of a 650 MHz CW magnetron transmitter with fast control in phase and power, based on two-stage injection-locked CW magnetrons, has been proposed to drive Superconducting Cavities (SC) for intensity-frontier accelerators. The concept is based on a theoretical model considering a magnetron as a forced oscillator and experimentally verified with a 2.5 MW pulsed magnetron. To fulfill fast control of phase and output power requirements of SC accelerators, both two-stage injection-locked CW magnetrons are combined with a 3-dB hybrid. Fast control in output power is achieved by varying the input phase of one of the magnetrons. For output power up to 250 kW we expect the output/input power ratio to be about 35 to 40 dB in CW or quasi-CW mode with long pulse duration. All magnetrons of the transmitter should be based on commercially available models to decrease the cost of the system. An experimental model using 1 kW, CW, S-band, injection-locked magnetrons with a 3-dB hybrid combiner has been developed and ...

  3. Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

    CERN Document Server

    Le Duff, J; Thomas, C

    2000-01-01

    Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

  4. Emergence of h/e -period oscillations in the critical temperature of small superconducting rings threaded by magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-06-01

    As a function of the magnetic flux threading the object, the Little-Parks oscillation in the critical temperature of a large-radius, thin-walled superconducting ring or hollow cylinder has a period given by h/2e , due to the binding of electrons into Cooper pairs. On the other hand, the single-electron Aharonov-Bohm oscillation in the resistance or persistent current for a clean (i.e., ballistic) normal-state system, having the same topological structure, has a period given by h/e . A basic question is whether the Little-Parks oscillation changes its character, as the radius of the superconducting structure becomes smaller, and if it is even comparable to the zero-temperature coherence length. We supplement a physical argument that the h/e oscillations should also be exhibited with a microscopic analysis of this regime, formulated in terms of the Gor’kov approach to BCS theory. We see that, as the radius of the ring is made smaller, an oscillation in the critical temperature of period h/e emerges in addition to the usual Little-Parks h/2e -period oscillation. We argue that, in the clean limit, there is a superconductor-normal transition at nonzero flux as the ring radius becomes sufficiently small and that the transition can be either continuous or discontinuous, depending on the radius and the external flux. In the dirty limit, we argue that the transition is rendered continuous, which results in continuous quantum phase transitions tuned by flux and radius.

  5. A new measurement tool for characterization of superconducting rf accelerator cavities using high-performance LTS SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Neubert, R [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Knaack, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Wittenburg, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Peters, A [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a new system to measure very low currents in an accelerator environment, using a cryogenic current comparator (CCC). In principle a CCC is a conventional current transformer using the high-performance SQUID technology to sense the magnetic fields caused by the beam current. Since the system is sensitive on a pA level, it is an optimum device to detect dark currents of superconducting cavities. The system presented here is designed for the test facilities of the superconducting accelerator modules for the European XFEL at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg. Measurements in a quiet environment showed that an intrinsic noise level of the CCC of 40 pA Hz{sup -1/2} could be achieved.

  6. Feasibility study for an industrial superconducting table-top electron accelerator; Machbarkeitstudie fuer einen industriellen supraleitenden Table Top Elektronenbeschleuniger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettig, H.; Enghardt, W.; Gabriel, F.; Janssen, D.; Michel, P.; Pobell, F.; Prade, H.; Schneider, C.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Haberstroh, C.; Sandner, W.; Will, I.

    2004-07-01

    A concept of a table-top accelerator, consisting of a superconducting resonator and subsequent 6 standard TESLA cells working with a frequency of 1.3 GHz, is presented. Then electron gun is based on a photocathode. Especially described are the photocathode part, the laser system, the cryostat module, the RF system, the beam extraction, and the cryogenic facility. Finally the efficiency and the costs are considered, (HSI)

  7. Flux trapping in superconducting accelerating cavities during cooling down with a spatial temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    During the cool-down of a superconducting accelerating cavity, a magnetic flux is trapped as quantized vortices, which yield additional dissipation and contribute to the residual resistance. Recently, cooling down with a large spatial temperature gradient attracts much attention for successful reductions of trapped vortices. The purpose of the present paper is to propose a model to explain the observed efficient flux expulsions and the role of spatial temperature gradient during the cool-down of cavity. In the vicinity of a region with a temperature close to the critical temperature Tc,the critical fields are strongly suppressed and can be smaller than the ambient magnetic field. A region with a lower critical field smaller than the ambient field is in the vortex state. As a material is cooled down, a region with a temperature close Tc associating the vortex state domain sweeps and passes through the material. In this process, vortices contained in the vortex state domain are trapped by pinning centers that r...

  8. A Two-stage injection-locked magnetron for accelerators with superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, Grigory; Flanagan, Gene; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Mike; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Chase, Brian; Nagaitsev, Sergey; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Solyak, Nikolay; Tupikov, Vitali; Wolff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A concept for a two-stage injection-locked CW magnetron intended to drive Superconducting Cavities (SC) for intensity-frontier accelerators has been proposed. The concept considers two magnetrons in which the output power differs by 15-20 dB and the lower power magnetron being frequency-locked from an external source locks the higher power magnetron. The injection-locked two-stage CW magnetron can be used as an RF power source for Fermilab's Project-X to feed separately each of the 1.3 GHz SC of the 8 GeV pulsed linac. We expect output/locking power ratio of about 30-40 dB assuming operation in a pulsed mode with pulse duration of ~ 8 ms and repetition rate of 10 Hz. The experimental setup of a two-stage magnetron utilising CW, S-band, 1 kW tubes operating at pulse duration of 1-10 ms, and the obtained results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  9. A modeling GUI for accelerator physics of the storage ring at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guangling; TIAN Shunqiang; LIU Guimin; JIANG Bocheng

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a MATLAB-based GUI tool, bodgui, which integrates functions of lattice editor,linear match, and nonlinear optimization, and visualized tracking functions for beam optics design. A user can switch his/ber design procedures one to another. Flexibilities are provided for adjusting or optimizing the lattice settings in commissioning or operation of the accelerators. The algorithm of the linear match and nonlinear optimization, and the GUI windows including the main functions and running status, are presented. The SSRF storage ring was employed as a test lattice. Several optics modes designed and optimized by the GUI tools were used for commissioning the storage ring. Functions of bodgui tool are machine-independent, and it can be well applied to modern light sources being built in other parts of the world.

  10. Hysteretic method for measuring the flux trapped within the core of a superconducting lead-coated ferromagnetic torus by a linked superconducting tin ring, in a novel Aharonov-Bohm-like effect based on the Feynman path-integral principle

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    A novel kind of nonlocal, macroscopic Aharonov-Bohm effect involving two topologically linked superconducting rings made out of two different materials, namely, lead and tin, is suggested for experimental observation, in which the lead ring is a torus containing a core composed of permanently magnetized ferromagnetic material. It is predicted that the remnant fields in a hysteresis loop induced by the application of a magnetic field imposed by a large external pair of Helmholtz coils upon the tin ring, will be asymmetric with respect to the origin of the loop. An appendix based on Feynman's path-integral principle is the basis for these predictions.

  11. A preliminary study of the feasibility of using superconducting quarter-wave resonators for accelerating high intensity proton beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Liu; LU Xiang-Yang; QUAN Sheng-Wen; YAO Zhong-Yuan; LUO Xing; ZHOU Kui

    2012-01-01

    The superconducting (SC) cavities currently used for the acceleration of protons at a low velocity range are based on half-wave resonators.Due to the rising demand on high current,the issue of beam loading and space-charge problems has arisen.Qualities of low cost and high accelerating efficiency are required for SC cavities,which are properly fitted by using SC quarter-wave resonators (QWR).We propose a concept of using QWRs with frequency 162.5 MHz to accelerate high current proton beams.The main factor limiting SC QWRs being applied to high current proton beams is vertical beam steering,which is dominantly caused by the magnetic field on axis.In this paper,we intend to analyze steering and eliminate it to verify the qualification of using QWRs to accelerate high intensity proton beams.

  12. Regulation loops for the ring magnet power supplies in the SSC accelerator complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacconi, E.; Christiansen, C.

    1993-05-01

    The SSC complex consists of five cascaded accelerators: The linear accelerator (linac) and four synchrotrons: The low energy booster (LEB), the medium energy booster (MEB), the high energy booster (HEB), and the collider. Twelve- or 24-pulse phase-controlled SCR power supplies are used to energize the ring magnets. Each power supply has a voltage loop designed to regulate the voltage applied to the magnets. The voltage regulation loops for these synchrotrons and the current regulation for the LEB are analyzed in this work. The digital voltage regulator is fiber-optic isolated from the power converter. It has a closed-loop bandwidth of 150 Hz with band rejections for 60-Hz and 120-Hz perturbations. The LEB has a very precise current regulation system composed of a feedforward compensator, a fast feedback regulator, and a slow synchronous regulator. The current regulation design is corroborated by computer simulations.

  13. Decay ring design

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, A; Bouquerel, E; Hancock, S; Jensen, E

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pureand very intense fluxes of high energy, well collimated neutrinos with a welldetermined energy spectrum. A dedicated machine seems to be necessarynowadays to reach the required flux. A new concept based on the β-decayof radioactive ions which were accelerated in an accelerator chain was thenproposed. After ion production, stripping, bunching and acceleration, the unstableions are then stored in a racetrack-shaped superconducting decay ring.Finally, the ions are accumulated in the decay ring until being lost. The incomingbeam is merged to the stored beam by using a specific RF system, whichwill be presented here.We propose here to study some aspects of the decay ring, such as its opticalproperties, its RF system or the management of the losses which occur in thering (mainly by decay or by collimation).

  14. Microwave power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity for accelerator application and its testing procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianjian [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Superconducting cavity resonators offer the advantage of high field intensity for a given input power, making them an attractive contender for particle accelerator applications. Power coupling into a superconducting cavity employed in a particle accelerator requires unique provisions to maintain high vacuum and cryogenic temperature on the cavity side, while operating with ambient conditions on the source side. Components introduced to fulfill mechanical requirements must show negligible obstruction of the propagation of the microwave with absence of critical locations that may give rise to electron multipaction, leading to a multiple section design, instead of an aperture, a probe, or a loop structure as found in conventional cavities. A coaxial power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity at 3.9 GHz has been developed. The cavity is intended to be employed as an accelerator to provide enhanced electron beam quality in a free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) user facility. The design of the coupler called for two windows to sustain high vacuum in the cavity and two bellows to accommodate mechanical dimensional changes resulting from cryogenics. Suppression of multipacting was accomplished by the choice of conductor dimensions and materials with low second yield coefficients. Prior to integration with the cavity, the coupler was tested for intrinsic properties in a back-to-back configuration and conditioned for high-power operation with increasing power input. Maximum incident power was measured to be 61 kW. When integrated with the superconducting cavity, a loaded quality factor of 9 x 10 5 was measured by transient method. Coupler return loss and insertion loss were estimated to be around -21 dB and -0.2 dB, respectively.

  15. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Zhu, Jun [Mianyang CAEP

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  16. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Reece, Hui Tian, Michael Kelley, Chen Xu

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  17. The Conversion and operation of the Cornell electron storage ring as a test accelerator (cesrta) for damping rings research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, M.A.; Alexander, J.; Byrd, J.; Celata, C.M.; Corlett, J.; De Santis, S.; Furman, M.; Jackson, A.; Kraft, R.; Munson, D.; Penn, G.; Plate, D.; Rawlins, A.; Venturini, M.; Zisman, M.; Billing, M.; Calvey, J.; Chapman, S.; Codner, G.; Conolly, C.; Crittenden, J.; Dobbins, J.; Dugan, G.; Fontes, E.; Forster, M.; Gallagher, R.; Gray, S.; Greenwald, S.; Hartill, D.; Hopkins, W.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Livezey, J.; Lyndaker, A.; Medjidzade, V.; Meller, R.; Peck, S.; Peterson, D.; Rendina, M.; Revesz, P.; Rice, D.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Savino, J.; Seeley, R.; Sexton, J.; Shanks, J.; Sikora, J.; Smolenski, K.; Strohman, C.; Temnykh, A.; tigner, M.; Whitney, W.; Williams, H.; Vishniakou, S.; Wilkens, T.; Harkay, K.; Holtzapple, R.; Smith, E.; Jones, J.; Wolski, A.; He, Y.; Ross, M.; Tan, C.Y.; Zwaska, R.; Flanagan, J.; Jain, P.; Kanazawa, K.; Ohmi, K.; Sakai, H.; Shibata, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Kharakh, D.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    In March of 2008, the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) concluded twenty eight years of colliding beam operations for the CLEO high energy physics experiment. We have reconfigured CESR as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R&D. The primary goals of the CesrTA program are to achieve a beam emittance approaching that of the ILC Damping Rings with a positron beam, to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with both low emittance positron and electron beams, to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, and to develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies (in particular a fast x-ray beam size monitor capable of single pass measurements of individual bunches). We report on progress with the CESR conversion activities, the status and schedule for the experimental program, and the first experimental results that have been obtained.

  18. ACCELERATING AND COLLIDING POLARIZED PROTONS IN RHIC WITH SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROSER,T.; AHRENS,L.; ALESSI,J.; BAI,M.; BEEBE - WANG,J.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BROWN,K.A.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.D.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; ET AL

    2002-06-02

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180{sup o} about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV. We report on our experiences during commissioning and operation of collider with polarized protons.

  19. Ultrasound Diagnostics of the Superconducting Cable Connections between the Main Ring Magnets of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Kulka, J; Tock, J-P; Williams, L R

    2007-01-01

    As part of the LHC assembly program, the super-conducting magnets are interconnected after installation. Electrical continuity between the magnets is ensured via a specifically designed cable junction box which allows the cables to be electrically joined by an automated low temperature soldering technique. The electrical resistance and mechanical strength of the cable junctions depend on the quality of the soldered joint. An ultrasound diagnostic of the soldered junction has been developed to accompany the visual inspection and reinforce the quality control process. Non-standard ultrasound diagnostic techniques, without using matching liquids or gel in the harsh and congested working environment, applied to the sandwich structure of the cable junction box, which presents high ultra-sonic losses due to multiple scattering, have been developed. The equipment and methods implemented are described in detail, together with results of quality control tests made in the production environment.

  20. Measurement and Compensation of Horizontal Crabbing at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrlichman, M P; Hartung, W; Peterson, D P; Rider, N; Rubin, D; Sagan, D; Shanks, J P; Wang, S T

    2013-01-01

    In storage rings, horizontal dispersion in the rf cavities introduces horizontal-longitudinal ($xz$) coupling, contributing to beam tilt in the $xz$ plane. This coupling can be characterized by a "crabbing" dispersion term $\\zeta_a$ that comes from decomposing the $1$-turn transfer matrix. $\\zeta_a$ is proportional to the rf cavity voltage and the horizontal dispersion in the cavity. We report experiments at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) where $xz$ coupling was explored using three lattices with distinct crabbing properties. We characterize the $xz$ coupling for each case by measuring the horizontal projection of the beam with a beam size monitor. The three lattice configurations correspond to a) $16$ mrad $xz$ tilt at the beam size monitor source point, b) compensation of the $\\zeta_a$ introduced by one of two pairs of RF cavities with the second, and c) zero dispersion in RF cavities, eliminating $\\zeta_a$ entirely. Additionally, intrabeam scattering (IBS) is evident in our mea...

  1. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  2. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Baffes, C; Leibfritz, J; Oplt, S; Rakhno, I

    2013-01-01

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type RF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a Helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. In addition, the potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  3. A 5 GHz high-temperature superconducting reaction-type transmitting filter based upon split open-ring resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futatsumori, S; Hikage, T; Nojima, T [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita 14, Nishi 9, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0814 (Japan); Akasegawa, A; Nakanishi, T; Yamanaka, K [Fujitsu Limited, 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan)], E-mail: futatsumori@emwtinfo.ice.eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2008-04-01

    A new kind of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) transmitting filter based on a reaction-type resonator is presented. The purpose of an HTS reaction-type filter (HTS-RTF) is to eliminate the intermodulation distortion noise generated by microwave power amplifiers such as those employed in mobile base stations. An HTS-RTF enables both higher power handling capability and sharper cutoff characteristics compared to existing planar-type HTS transmitting filters, since a reaction-type resonator does not resonate with high power fundamental signals. To achieve steep skirt characteristics and high power handling capability simultaneously, a 5 GHz three-pole HTS-RTF using a split open-ring resonator is designed. This split open-ring resonator offers low maximum current densities and a high-unloaded Q factor with low radiation. The designed prototype filter has Chebyshev characteristics with a centre frequency of 4.95 GHz and a bandwidth of 1.5 MHz. The HTS-RTF is fabricated using a double-sided YBa{sub 2}C{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} thin film deposited on a 0.5 mm thick MgO substrate. The measured filter shows an insertion loss of less than 0.1 dB and a third intermodulation distortion value of -56.7 dBc for a 40 dBm passband signal. In addition, adjacent channel leakage power ratio (ACLR) measurements using an actual wideband CDMA signal confirm an ACLR improvement of about 10 dB for a four-carrier signal with power up to 40 dBm.

  4. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH FAST FIBER-OPTIC BEAM LOSS MONITORS FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE STORAGE RING SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooling, J.; Harkay, K.; Sajaev, V.; Shang, H.

    2017-06-25

    Fast fiber-optic (FFO) beam loss monitors (BLMs) installed with the first two superconducting undulators (SCUs) in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring have proven to be a useful diagnostic for measuring deposited charge (energy) during rapid beam loss events. The first set of FFOBLMs were installed outside the cryostat of the short SCU, a 0.33-m long device, above and below the beam centerline. The second set are mounted with the first 1.1-mlong SCU within the cryostat, on the outboard and inboard sides of the vacuum chamber. The next 1.1-m-long SCU is scheduled to replace the short SCU later in 2016 and will be fitted with FFOBLMs in a manner similar to original 1.1-m device. The FFOBLMs were employed to set timing and voltage for the abort kicker (AK) system. The AK helps to prevent quenching of the SCUs during beam dumps [1] by directing the beam away from the SC magnet windings. The AK is triggered by the Machine Protection System (MPS). In cases when the AK fails to prevent quenching, the FFOBLMs show that losses often begin before detection by the MPS.

  5. New, coupling loss induced, quench protection system for superconducting accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravaioli, E.; Datskov, V.I.; Giloux, C.; Kirby, G.; Kate, ten H.H.J.; Verweij, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    A new and promising method for the protection of superconducting high-field magnets is developed and tested on the so-called MQXC quadrupole magnet in the CERN magnet test facility. The method relies on a capacitive discharge system inducing during a few periods an oscillation of the transport curre

  6. Quench absorption coils: a quench protection concept for high-field superconducting accelerator magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink, M.; Salmi, T.

    2017-06-01

    A quench protection concept based on coupled secondary coils is studied for inductively transferring energy out of a quenching superconducting dipole and thus limiting the peak hotspot temperature. So-called ‘quench absorption coils’ are placed in close proximity to the superconducting coils and are connected in series with a diode for the purpose of preventing current transformation during regular operation. During a quench, current is then transformed into the quench absorption coils so that a significant fraction of the stored magnetic energy is dissipated in the these coils. Numerical calculations are performed to determine the impact of such a concept and to evaluate the dimensions of the quench absorption coils needed to obtain significant benefits. A previously constructed 15 T Nb3Sn block coil is taken as a reference layout. Finite-element calculations are used to determine the combined inductive and thermal response of this system and these calculations are validated with a numerical model using an adiabatic approximation. The calculation results indicate that during a quench the presence of the quench absorption coils reduces the energy dissipated in the superconducting coils by 45% and reduces the hotspot temperature by over 100 K. In addition, the peak resistive voltage over the superconducting coils is significantly reduced. This suggests that this concept may prove useful for magnet designs in which the hotspot temperature is a design driver.

  7. Unprecedented quality factors at accelerating gradients up to 45 MVm-1 in niobium superconducting resonators via low temperature nitrogen infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Checchin, M.; Martinello, M.; Melnychuk, O. S.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Crawford, A. C.; Aderhold, S.; Bice, D.

    2017-09-01

    We report the finding of new surface treatments that permits one to manipulate the niobium resonator nitrogen content in the first few nanometers in a controlled way, and the resonator fundamental Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance and residual resistance accordingly. In particular, we find surface ‘infusion’ conditions that systematically (a) increase the quality factor of these 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) bulk niobium resonators, up to very high gradients; (b) increase the achievable accelerating gradient of the cavity compared to its own baseline with state-of-the-art surface processing. Cavities subject to the new surface process have more than two times the state-of-the-art Q at 2 K for accelerating fields >35 MVm-1. Moreover, very high accelerating gradients ˜45 MVm-1 are repeatedly reached, which correspond to peak magnetic surface fields of 190 mT, among the highest measured for bulk niobium cavities. These findings open the opportunity to tailor the surface impurity content distribution to maximize performance in Q and gradients, and have therefore very important implications on future performance and cost of SRF based accelerators. They also help deepen the understanding of the physics of the RF niobium cavity surface.

  8. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei

    2013-02-15

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrumentation. At the FLASH facility in DESY, 1.3 GHz (known as TESLA) and 3.9 GHz (third harmonic) cavities are installed. Wakefields in 3.9 GHz cavities are significantly larger than in the 1.3 GHz cavities. It is therefore important to mitigate the adverse effects of HOMs to the beam by aligning the beam on the electric axis of the cavities. This alignment requires an accurate beam position diagnostics inside the 3.9 GHz cavities. It is this aspect that is focused on in this thesis. Although the principle of beam diagnostics with HOM has been demonstrated on 1.3 GHz cavities, the realization in 3.9 GHz cavities is considerably more challenging. This is due to the dense HOM spectrum and the relatively strong coupling of most HOMs amongst the four cavities in the third harmonic cryo-module. A comprehensive series of simulations and HOM spectra measurements have been performed in order to study the modal band structure of the 3.9 GHz cavities. The dependencies of

  9. Canted-Cosine-Theta Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for High Energy Physics and Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Lucas Nathan

    Advances in superconducting magnet technology have historically enabled the construction of new, higher energy hadron colliders. Looking forward to the needs of a potential future collider, a significant increase in magnet field and performance is required. Such a task requires an open mind to the investigation of new design concepts for high field magnets. Part I of this thesis will present an investigation of the Canted-Cosine-Theta (CCT) design for high field Nb3Sn magnets. New analytic and finite element methods for analysis of CCT magnets will be given, along with a discussion on optimization of the design for high field. The design, fabrication, and successful test of the 2.5 T NbTi dipole CCT1 will be presented as a proof-of-principle step towards a high field Nb3Sn magnet. Finally, the design and initial steps in the fabrication of the 16 T Nb3Sn dipole CCT2 will be described. Part II of this thesis will investigate the CCT concept extended to a curved magnet for use in an ion beam therapy gantry. The introduction of superconducting technology in this field shows promise to reduce the weight and cost of gantries, as well as open the door to new beam optics solutions with high energy acceptance. An analytic approach developed for modeling curved CCT magnets will be presented, followed by a design study of a superconducting magnet for a proton therapy gantry. Finally, a new magnet concept called the "Alternating Gradient CCT" (AG-CCT) will be introduced. This concept will be shown to be a practical magnet solution for achieving the alternating quadrupole fields desired for an achromatic gantry, allowing for the consideration of treatment with minimal field changes in the superconducting magnets. The primary motivation of this thesis is to share new developments for Canted-Cosine-Theta superconducting magnets, with the hope this design will improve technology for high energy physics and ion beam cancer therapy.

  10. Development of a superconducting CH-accelerator-structure for light and heavy ions; Entwicklung einer supraleitenden CH-Beschleuniger-Struktur fuer leichte und schwere Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebermann, Holger

    2007-07-01

    This work deals with the development of the prototype of a superconducting CH accelerator structure. The simulations were calculated with the program CST Microwave Studio. It is based on the finite integration theory, which the Maxwell equations in a two-grid matrix form convicted so they can be solved numerically. In another chapter, a method for determining the coupling strength is discussed. The conditions that previously were created for the optimization of the prototype of the superconducting CH structure are described. It was for the optimization of the field distribution on the beam axis by adjusting the end cell design, optimization of support for the magnetic and electric fields, leading to reduction of the quadrupole component of the CH-structure, the coupling and, finally, the possibility of static tuning during the completion of the structure. On the basis of these investigations the completion of an initial prototype superconducting at the company ACCEL in Bergisch Gladbach was commissioned. Finally simulations for an operation accelerator facility, and a look at possible areas of the superconducting CH-structure are presented. The optimizations performed for the high power injector led to a more stable operation of the plant. Through this work it could be shown that the newly-CH structure is very well suited for use in superconducting accelerators. (orig.)

  11. The Path to High Q-Factors in Superconducting Accelerating Cavities: Flux Expulsion and Surface Resistance Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Accelerating cavities are devices resonating in the radio-frequency (RF) range used to accelerate charged particles in accelerators. Superconducting accelerating cavities are made out of niobium and operate at the liquid helium temperature. Even if superconducting, these resonating structures have some RF driven surface resistance that causes power dissipation. In order to decrease as much as possible the power losses, the cavity quality factor must be increased by decreasing the surface resistance. In this dissertation, the RF surface resistance is analyzed for a large variety of cavities made with different state-of-the-art surface treatments, with the goal of finding the surface treatment capable to return the highest Q-factor values in a cryomodule-like environment. This study analyzes not only the superconducting properties described by the BCS surface resistance, which is the contribution that takes into account dissipation due to quasi-particle excitations, but also the increasing of the surface resistance due to trapped flux. When cavities are cooled down below their critical temperature inside a cryomodule, there is always some remnant magnetic field that may be trapped increasing the global RF surface resistance. This thesis also analyzes how the fraction of external magnetic field, which is actually trapped in the cavity during the cooldown, can be minimized. This study is performed on an elliptical single-cell horizontally cooled cavity, resembling the geometry of cavities cooled in accelerator cryomodules. The horizontal cooldown study reveals that, as in case of the vertical cooldown, when the cooling is performed fast, large thermal gradients are created along the cavity helping magnetic flux expulsion. However, for this geometry the complete magnetic flux expulsion from the cavity equator is more difficult to achieve. This becomes even more challenging in presence of orthogonal magnetic field, that is easily trapped on top of the cavity equator

  12. Efficient Homodifunctional Bimolecular Ring-Closure Method for Cyclic Polymers by Combining RAFT and Self-Accelerating Click Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lin; Sun, Peng; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Zhengping

    2017-08-01

    An efficient metal-free homodifunctional bimolecular ring-closure method is developed for the formation of cyclic polymers by combining reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and self-accelerating click reaction. In this approach, α,ω-homodifunctional linear polymers with azide terminals are prepared by RAFT polymerization and postmodification of polymer chain end groups. By virtue of sym-dibenzo-1,5-cyclooctadiene-3,7-diyne (DBA) as small linkers, well-defined cyclic polymers are then prepared using the self-accelerating double strain-promoted azide-alkyne click (DSPAAC) reaction to ring-close the azide end-functionalized homodifunctional linear polymer precursors. Due to the self-accelerating property of DSPAAC ring-closing reaction, this novel method eliminates the requirement of equimolar amounts of telechelic polymers and small linkers in traditional bimolecular ring-closure methods. It facilitates this method to efficiently and conveniently produce varied pure cyclic polymers by employing an excess molar amount of DBA small linkers. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Heat transfer between the superconducting cables of the LHC accelerator magnets and the superfluid helium bath

    CERN Document Server

    Granieri, Pier Paolo; Tommasini, D

    In this thesis work we investigate the heat transfer through the electrical insulation of superconducting cables cooled by superfluid helium. The cable insulation constitutes the most severe barrier for heat extraction from the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We performed an experimental analysis, a theoretical modeling and a fundamental research to characterize the present LHC insulation and to develop new ideas of thermally enhanced insulations. The outcome of these studies allowed to determine the thermal stability of the magnets for the LHC and its future upgrades. An innovative measurement technique was developed to experimentally analyze the heat transfer between the cables and the superfluid helium bath. It allowed to describe the LHC coil behavior using the real cable structure, an appropriate thermometry and controlling the applied pressure. We developed a new thermally enhanced insulation scheme based on an increased porosity to superfluid helium. It aims at withstan...

  14. Integrated design of superconducting accelerator magnets a case study of the main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Russenschuck, Stephan; Lewin, M; Paul, C; Ramberger, S; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Tortschanoff, Theodor; Verweij, A P; Wolf, R

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the software tool which has been developed for the design of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Applied methods include numerical field calculation with a reduced vector-potential formulation, the application of vector-optimization methods, and the use of genetic as well as deterministic minimization algorithms. Together with the applied concept of features, the software tool is used as an approach towards integrated design of superconducting magnets. The main quadrupole magnet for the LHC, which was designed at C.E.A. Saclay (France) using a different approach, was chosen as an example for the integrated design process. The paper focuses on the design issues and is not a project report on the main quadrupoles under construction.

  15. Reduction of RF accelerating voltage of Pohang Light Source-II superconducting RF cavity for stable top-up mode operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Y.; Yu, I.; Park, I.; Chun, M. H.; Sohn, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) is currently providing a top-up mode user-service operation with maximum available beam current of 400 mA and a beam emittance of below 10 nm-rad. The dimension of the beam bunch shortened to accomplish a low beam emittance of below 10 nm-rad from a high beam current of 400 mA increases the bunch charge density. As a result, the electron beam lifetime is significantly degraded and a high gradient of power is lost in the vacuum components of the storage ring. A study on how to reduce the bunch charge density without degrading beam emittance found that reducing the RF accelerating voltage (Vacc) can lower the bunch charge density by lengthening the bunch in the longitudinal direction. In addition, the Vacc required for stable operation with beam current of 400 mA can be reduced by lowering the external cavity quality factors (Qext values) of the superconducting cavities (SCs). To control the Qext values of SCs gradually without accessing the accelerator tunnel, a remote control motorized three-probe-tuner was installed in the transmission line of each SC. The optimum installation position of the three-probe-tuner was determined by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation and by experimenting on various installation positions of the three-probe-tuner. The Qext values of all the SCs were lowered to 1.40 × 105, and then, the Vacc required to store the beam current of 400 mA was decreased from 4.8 MV to 4.2 MV, which corresponds to 10% lengthening of the beam bunches. The stable operation with the reduced Vacc was confirmed during a 400 mA ten-day top-up mode user-service. Currently, the RF system of the PLS-II storage ring delivers the user-service operation with lowered Qext values to reduce the power loss at the vacuum components as well as the cryogenic heat load of SCs, and no significant problems have been found. This method of reducing the Vacc may also be applied in other synchrotron facilities.

  16. Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogacz, Alex

    2011-10-01

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  17. Accurate Calculation of Magnetic Fields in the End Regions of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets using the BEM-FEM Coupling Method

    CERN Document Server

    Kurz, S

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a new technique for the accurate calculation of magnetic fields in the end regions of superconducting accelerator magnets is presented. This method couples Boundary Elements (BEM) which discretize the surface of the iron yoke and Finite Elements (FEM) for the modelling of the nonlinear interior of the yoke. The BEM-FEM method is therefore specially suited for the calculation of 3-dimensional effects in the magnets, as the coils and the air regions do not have to be represented in the finite-element mesh and discretization errors only influence the calculation of the magnetization (reduced field) of the yoke. The method has been recently implemented into the CERN-ROXIE program package for the design and optimization of the LHC magnets. The field shape and multipole errors in the two-in-one LHC dipoles with its coil ends sticking out of the common iron yoke is presented.

  18. Numerical Investigation of a Cascaded Longitudinal Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb

    2015-06-01

    In a cascaded longitudinal space-charge amplifier (LSCA), initial density noise in a relativistic e-beam is amplified via the interplay of longitudinal space charge forces and properly located dispersive sections. This type of amplification process was shown to potentially result in large final density modulations [1] compatible with the production of broadband electromagnetic radiation. The technique was recently demonstrated in the optical domain [2]. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performances of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). We especially explore the properties of the produced broadband radiation. Our studies have been conducted with a grid-less three-dimensional space-charge algorithm.

  19. Superconducting Accelerating Structure with Gradient as 2 Times Higher as TESLA Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Avrakhov, P V

    2004-01-01

    A proposed new accelerating structure for TESLA is assumed to have an effective gradient 2 times more than existing 9-cell cavity. This structure is an interlaced combination of two side-cavity-coupled standing wave substructures with λ/4 cells length. Intercell coupling provides side-coupled cavities made from a special shape waveguide section. The high accelerating gradient is accomplished by 4 factors: The shortened accelerating cells have transit time factor 0.9 instead of 0.64 for conventional standing wave cells with λ/2 length. The side magnetic coupling has made it possible to reduce the cells beam aperture that reduce relation between the maximum surface field and the acceleration gradient. Stronger intercell coupling allows extending the accelerating cavity and improving a duty factor of linac. Availability of the side coupling elements enables to use them for power input and HOM-couplers. It reduces intercavity distance and enhances duty factor too.

  20. New, Coupling Loss Induced, Quench Protection System for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Giloux, C; Kirby, G; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    Email Print Request Permissions Save to Project A new and promising method for the protection of superconducting high-field magnets is developed and tested on the so-called MQXC quadrupole magnet at the CERN magnet test facility. The method relies on a capacitive discharge system inducing, during a few periods, an oscillation of the transport current in the superconducting cable of the coil. The corresponding fast change of the local magnetic field introduces a high coupling-current loss, which, in turn, causes a fast quench of a large fraction of the coil due to enhanced temperature. Results of measured discharges at various levels of transport current are presented and compared to discharges by quenching the coils using conventional quench heaters and an energy extraction system. The hot-spot temperature in the quenching coil is deduced from the coil voltage and current. The results are compared to simulations carried out using a lumped-element dynamic electro-thermal model of the so-called MQX...

  1. High-power magnetron transmitter as an RF source for superconducting linear accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, Grigory; Flanagan, Gene; Marhauser, Frank; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Chase, Brian; Lebedev, Valeri; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Solyak, Nikolay; Quinn, Kenneth; Wolff, Daniel; Pavlov, Viatcheslav

    2014-01-01

    A concept of a high-power magnetron transmitter for operation within a wideband control feedback loop in phase and amplitude is presented. This transmitter is proposed to drive Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for intensity-frontier GeV-scale proton/ion linacs. The transmitter performance at the dynamic control was verified in experiments with CW, S-Band, 1 kW magnetrons. The wideband control of magnetrons, required for the superconducting linacs, was realized using the magnetrons, injection-locked by the phase-modulated signals. The capabilities of the magnetrons injection-locked by the phase-modulated signals and adequateness for feeding of SRF cavities were verified by measurements of the transfer function magnitude characteristics of single and 2-cascade magnetrons, by measurements the magnetrons phase performance and by measurements of spectra of the carrier frequency. At the ratio of power of locking signal to output power less than -13 dB (in 2-cascade scheme per magnetron, respectively) we demonstrat...

  2. A Novel Idea for Coil Collar Structures in Accelerator Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Fessia, P

    2002-01-01

    The dipoles for several different machines (LHC, SSC, HERA) were designed using non-magnetic metallic collars to contain the superconducting coils. The coils are of two types, main and floating. This paper describes a structure with combined steel and plastic collars. Since the floating collars do not give an important contribution to the global rigidity of the dipole we propose to suppress them. The plastic collars are just fillers to limit the helium contained in the cold mass. Some data about thermoplastic materials to be possibly used for the collars are given and some estimations of mass and cost of this configuration are made. Finally the results of the tests of a 1-m-long twin aperture dipole with mixed steel-plastic collars are shortly described. The replacement of expensive alloys by high performance plastic in non-structural components can be a cost-effective solution in view of future projects where superconducting magnets are involved and contained costs are a key issue.

  3. Integrated Surface Topography Characterization of Variously Polished Niobium for Superconducting Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, G. Ribeill

    2009-05-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro-and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents flow. Interior surface chemical polishing (BCP/EP) to remove mechanical damage leaves surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely-used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is being used to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of EP is reported, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography.

  4. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Ribeill, Guilhem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Dept. of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Xu Chen [Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Kelley, Michael J., E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  5. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Guilhem Ribeill, Chen Xu, Charles E. Reece, Michael J. Kelley

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  6. A two-fluid model description of the Q-slope and Q-drop as observed in niobium superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting cavities made from niobium allow accelerating gradients of about 50 MV/m close to the theoretical limit. Quite often, however, the RF losses increase with the gradient faster than quadratic. This observation is equivalent with a decrease of the quality factor Q with the gradient, called “Q-slope” for intermediate gradients, and “Q-drop” for larger ones. The paper provides an explanation by an elementary model based on the London two fluid theory of RF superconductivity and compares the model with experimental data for a large variety of cavity tests.

  7. Nitrogen heat treatments of superconducting niobium radio frequency cavities: a pathway to highly efficient accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Grassellino, A; Melnychuk, O; Trenikhina, Y; Crawford, A; Rowe, A; Wong, M; Sergatskov, D; Khabiboulline, T; Barkov, F

    2013-01-01

    We report the experimental finding of a new surface treatment that systematically improves the quality factor of niobium radio frequency cavities for particle acceleration. A combination of annealing in a partial pressure of nitrogen and subsequent electropolishing of the niobium cavity surface leads to extremely low values of the cavities microwave surface resistance, and an improvement in the efficiency of these accelerating structures up to a factor of 3 compared to standard surface treatments, significantly reducing the cryogenic load of SRF cavities for both pulsed and continuous duty cycles. The field dependence of the Mattis-Bardeen/BCS surface resistance RBCS is reversed compared to that of standard chemically polished niobium with dRBCS/dB < 0 in the full range of investigated fields. This treatment can lead to even larger efficiency gains at increasing operating frequencies, and potentially to even larger cost savings by reducing the size of the accelerating structures.

  8. The Rise of Ingot Niobium as a Material for Superconducting Radiofrequency Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kneisel, P; Dhakal, P; Saito, K; Singer, W; Singer, X; Myneni, G R

    2013-01-01

    As a result of a collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer CBMM, ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This pioneering work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large grain niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this material. Most of the original expectations for this material of being less costly and allowing less expensive fabrication and treatment procedures at the same performance levels in cavities have been met. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown the performances comparable to the best cavities made from...

  9. Evaluation of source term induced by beam loss in the superconducting linear accelerator at RAON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Su Na; Nam, Shin Woo; Chung, Yon Sei [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    As a new world-class heavy ion accelerator, RAON is able to accelerate heavy ions from proton to uranium with the energy up to -400 MeV/u and produce rare isotopes. These high purity, high intensity, and high energy beams generate the various secondary radiation which will impact on the shielding aspects of the main linear accelerator tunnels. In the main tunnel the secondary neutrons are produced by uniform beam-loss or accident criteria. In this paper evaluations of several source terms induced by beam-loss will be discussed along with the physics model of the Monte Carlo simulation codes. The beam-loss criteria were tested for the evaluation of source term for the main beam line tunnel of the RAON accelerator. It was found that the amount of the secondary neutrons depends on the incident angle of projectile on the beam pipe and the mass and energy of projectile. The influence of selected physics models and libraries of MCNPX and PHITS has been examined. The secondary neutrons were produced most in the CEM and LAQGSM model.

  10. Observation of double resistance anomalies and excessive resistance in mesoscopic superconducting Au0.7In0.3 rings with phase separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Rosario, M. M.; Russell, H. L.; Liu, Y.

    2007-02-01

    We have measured mesoscopic superconducting Au0.7In0.3 rings prepared by e -beam lithography and sequential deposition of Au and In at room temperature followed by a standard lift-off procedure. The majority of the samples are found to exhibit highly unusual double resistance anomalies, two resistance peaks with the peak resistances larger than the normal-state resistance, near the onset of superconductivity in the R(T) (resistance vs temperature) curves, and an h/2e resistance oscillation with a very small amplitude. A magnetic field applied perpendicular to the ring plane appears to suppress the low-temperature peak easily, but only broadens the high-temperature peak. In the intermediate-field range, the high-temperature resistance peak becomes flat down to the lowest temperature, resulting apparently in a magnetic-field-induced metallic state with its resistance higher than the normal-state resistance, referred to here as excessive resistance. The dynamical resistance vs bias current measurements carried out in samples showing double resistance anomalies suggest that there are two critical currents in these samples. We attribute the double resistance anomalies and the two critical currents to the presence of two superconducting phases originating from the phase separation of Au0.7In0.3 in which In-rich grains of AuIn precipitate in a uniform In-dilute matrix of Au0.9In0.1 . The local superconducting transition temperature of the In-rich grains is higher than that of the In-dilute matrix. The double resistance anomalies are not found in a sample showing the conventional h/2e Little-Parks (LP) resistance oscillation, which we believe is due to the absence of the phase separation in this particular sample. Finally, we argue that the h/2e resistance oscillation observed in samples showing double resistance anomalies is not the LP but rather the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak resistance oscillation of normal electrons enhanced by superconductivity.

  11. Costs of high-field superconducting strands for particle accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Cooley, L D; Scanlan, R M; 10.1088/0953-2048/18/4/R01

    2005-01-01

    The costs of superconducting magnet strands are compared by calculating a 'production scaling factor' P that relates purchase data to the cost of raw materials. Using a consistent method, we normalize for different conductor geometries and strand diameters to arrive at cost indices in $ kg/sup -1/, $ m/sup -1/, and $ kA/sup -1/ m/sup -1/. Analyses of Nb47Ti conductors taken from the past 25 years of high-field magnet projects reveal that the price of raw materials and, to a lesser extent, finished strands, have tracked the price of niobium pentoxide. Performance gains during the 1980s produced $ kA /sup -1/ m/sup -1/ indices that fell with time ahead of strand cost in $ m/sup -1/, a situation that may reflect the present status of Nb /sub 3/Sn magnet conductors. Analyses of present materials show that P decreases systematically with billet mass. While production strands in 200-500 kg billets have costs ~3 times the cost of raw materials, the 20-50 kg billet size for internal-tin Nb/sub 3/Sn composites drives ...

  12. Upgraded phase control system for superconducting low-velocity accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Added, N. (Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear); Clifft, B.E.; Shepard, K.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Microphonic-induced fluctuations in the RF eigenfrequency of superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures must be compensated by a fast-tuning system in order to control the RF phase. The tuning system must handle a reactive power proportional to the product of the frequency range and the RF energy content of the Rf cavity. The fast tuner for the SC resonators in the ATLAS heavy-ion linac is a voltage-controlled reactance based on an array of PIN diodes operating immersed in liquid nitrogen. This paper discusses recent upgrades to the ATLAS fast tuner which can now provide as much as 30 KVA of reactive tuning capability with a real RF power loss of less than 300 watts. The design was guided by numerical modeling of all elements of the device. Also discussed is the RF coupler which can couple 30 KW from 77 K tuner to a 42 K resonant cavity with less than 2 W of RF loss into 4.2 K.

  13. Upgraded phase control system for superconducting low-velocity accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Added, N. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear; Clifft, B.E.; Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Microphonic-induced fluctuations in the RF eigenfrequency of superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures must be compensated by a fast-tuning system in order to control the RF phase. The tuning system must handle a reactive power proportional to the product of the frequency range and the RF energy content of the Rf cavity. The fast tuner for the SC resonators in the ATLAS heavy-ion linac is a voltage-controlled reactance based on an array of PIN diodes operating immersed in liquid nitrogen. This paper discusses recent upgrades to the ATLAS fast tuner which can now provide as much as 30 KVA of reactive tuning capability with a real RF power loss of less than 300 watts. The design was guided by numerical modeling of all elements of the device. Also discussed is the RF coupler which can couple 30 KW from 77 K tuner to a 42 K resonant cavity with less than 2 W of RF loss into 4.2 K.

  14. Superconducting magnet system of in-flight separator for a heavy ion accelerator planned in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. W.; Kim, D. G.; Jo, H. C. [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Y. S. [Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S. H. [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Sim, K. D.; Sohn, M. H. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    An in-flight fragment separator, which aims to produce and study rare isotopes, consists of superferric quadrupole triplets and dipole magnets to focus and bend the beams for achromatic focusing and momentum dispersion, respectively. The separator is divided into pre and main stages, and we plan to use superconducting magnets employing high-Tc superconductor (HTS) coils in the pre-separator area, where radiation heating is high. The HTS coils will be cooled by cold He gas in 20-50 K, and in the other area, superferric magnets using low-temperature superconductor (LTS) will be used at 4 K. A few LTS coils were wound and successfully tested in a LHe dewar, and the design of cryostat has been optimized. Development of the HTS coils is ongoing in collaboration with a group at KERI. An HTS coil of racetrack shape was wound and tested in a bath and in a dewar with cryocooler. No degradation on critical current due to coil winding was found.

  15. Thermodynamic Properties of Fast Ramped Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for the Fair Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E.; Mierau, A.; Schnizer, P.; Bleile, A.; Gärtner, W.; Guymenuk, O.; Khodzhibagiyan, H.; Schroeder, C.; Sikler, G.; Stafiniak, A.

    2010-04-01

    The 100 Tm synchrotron SIS 100 is the core component of the international Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) to be built at GSI Darmstadt. The 108 bending magnets are 3 m long 2 T superferric dipoles providing a nominal ramp rate of 4 T/s within a usable aperture of 115 mmṡ60 mm. An intensive R&D period was conducted to minimise the AC losses to lower operation costs and to guarantee a safe thermal stability for long term continuous cycling with a maximum repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The latter requirement is strictly limited by the overall heat flow originated by eddy currents and hysteresis losses in iron yoke and coil as well as by its hydraulic resistance respective to the forced two phase helium cooling flow within the hollow superconducting cable. Recently three full size dipoles—and one quadrupole magnets were built and intensive tests have been started in the end of 2008 at the GSI cryogenic test facility. We present the measured thermodynamic parameters of the first tested dipole: AC losses depending on Bmax and dB/dt for various characteristic ramping modes and conclude for necessary optimisations toward the final design of the series magnets.

  16. Characterization of electron clouds in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator using TE-wave transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Billing, M.; Palmer, M.; Sikora, J.; Carlson, B.

    2010-01-02

    A relatively new technique for measuring the electron cloud density in storage rings has been developed and successfully demonstrated [S. De Santis, J.M. Byrd, F. Caspers, A. Krasnykh, T. Kroyer, M.T.F. Pivi, and K.G. Sonnad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 094801 (2008).]. We present the experimental results of a systematic application of this technique at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator. The technique is based on the phase modulation of the TE mode transmitted in a synchrotron beam pipe caused by the periodic variation of the density of electron plasma. Because of the relatively simple hardware requirements, this method has become increasingly popular and has been since successfully implemented in several machines. While the principles of this technique are straightforward, quantitative derivation of the electron cloud density from the measurement requires consideration of several effects, which we address in detail.

  17. Status of Higher Order Mode Beam Position Monitors in 3.9 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Flisgen, T; van Rienen, U; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  18. Status of higher order mode beam position monitors in 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Flisgen, T; Van Rienen, U; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  19. Accelerating influence of the gem-difluoromethylene group in a ring-closing olefin metathesis reaction. A Thorpe-Ingold effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Blanco, César A; Skibiński, Maciej; O'Hagan, David; Nolan, Steven P

    2013-08-21

    The gem-difluoromethylene (CF2) group significantly accelerates ring-closing metathesis of 1,8-nonadienes relative to the methylene (CH2) group demonstrating similar rate accelerations to that observed for the classic Thorpe-Ingold substituents, diester malonates and ketals.

  20. A fast wire scanner, used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Fast wire scanners are used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring. In order to minimize blow-up of the beam through multiple Coulomb scattering, the wires are very thin (in the version shown here it is actually a twisted strand of carbon fibres with a total diameter of about 25 microns) and are swept through the beam at high speed (a linear motor, not mounted here, accelerates the wires to up to 20 m/s). One measures either the secondary emission current from the wire, or the signal from a scintillator/photomultiplier combination downstream from the wire scanner receiving the shower from nuclear reactions of beam particles with the wire nuclei. There are four such fast wire scanners in the 26 GeV PS and eight in the 1.4 GeV Booster.

  1. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  2. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  3. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Baboi, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrum...

  4. Final Report: MATERIALS, STRANDS, AND CABLES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS [Grant Number DE-SC0010312

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumption, Mike D. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials (CSMM); Collings, Edward W. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials (CSMM)

    2014-10-29

    Our program consisted of the two components: Strand Research and Cable Research, with a focus on Nb3Sn, Bi2212, and YBCO for accelerator magnet applications. We demonstrated a method to refine the grains in Nb3Sn by a factor of two, reaching 45 nm grain sizes, and layer Jcs of 6 kA/mm2 at 12 T. W also measured conductor magnetization for field quality. This has been done both with Nb3Sn conductor, as well as Bi:2212 strand. Work in support of quench studies of YBCO coils was also performed. Cable loss studies in Nb3Sn focused on connecting and comparing persistent magnetization and coupling magnetization for considering their relative impact on HEP machines. In the area of HTS cables, we have investigated both the quench in multistrand YBCO CORC cables, as well as the magnetization of these cables for use in high field magnets. In addition, we examined the magnetic and thermal properties of large (50 T) solenoids.

  5. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors Based Monitoring System for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A; Perez, J C; Bajas, H; Consales, M; Giordano, M; Breglio, G; Cusano, A

    2014-01-01

    New generation of accelerator magnets for high energy applications currently designed, manufactured and tested at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) require the implementation of precise cryogenic sensors with long-term robustness and reliability able to withstand cryogenic temperature and to monitor the mechanical stresses affecting the winding during all the stages of his service life, assembly, cool down and powering. Monitoring the mechanical behavior of the magnet from assembly to operation is a critical task which aims to assure the integrity of the magnet and to safely handle the coils made of new brittle material. This contribution deals with the first successful embedding of Fiber Bragg Grating sensors in a subscale Nb3Sn dipole magnet in order to monitor the strain developed in the coil during the cool down to 1.9 K, the powering up to 15.8 kA and the warm up, offering new perspectives for the development of a complementary sensing technology based on fiber optic sensors.

  6. Accelerating ring artifact correction for flat-detector CT using the CUDA framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Prell, D.; Kyriakou, Y.,; Kalender, W. A.

    2010-04-01

    Ring artifacts often appear in flat-detector CT because of imperfect or defect detector elements or calibration. In high-spatial resolution CT images reducing such artifacts becomes a necessity. In this paper, we used the post-processing ring correction in polar coordinates (RCP)1 to eliminate the ring artifacts. The median filter is applied to the uncorrected images in polar coordinates and ring artifacts are extracted from the original images. The algorithm has a very high computational cost due to the time-expensive median filtering and coordinate transformation on CPUs. Graphics processing units (GPUs)ca n be seen as parallel co-processors with high computational power. All steps of the RCP algorithm were implemented with CUDA2(Compute Unified Device Architecture, NVIDIA). We introduced a new GPU-based branchless vectorized median (BVM)filter. 3, 4 This algorithm is based on minmax sorting and keeps track of a sorted array from which values are deleted and to which new values are inserted. For comparison purpose a modified pivot median filter5 on GPUs was presented, which compares a pivot element to all other values and recursively finds the median element. We evaluated the performance of the RCP method using 512 slices, each slice consisted of 512×512 pixels. This post-processing method efficiently reduces ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improves image quality. Our CUDAbased RCP is up to 13.6 times faster than the optimized CPU-based (single core)r outine. Comparing our two GPU-based median filters showed a performance benefit by roughly 60% when switching from Pivot to BVM code. The main reason is that the BVM algorithm is branchless and makes use of data-level parallelism. The BVM method is better suited to the model of modern graphics processing. A multi-GPU solution showed that the performance scaled nearly linearly.

  7. Advances of Accelerator Physics and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    This volume, consisting of articles written by experts with international repute and long experience, reviews the state of the art of accelerator physics and technologies and the use of accelerators in research, industry and medicine. It covers a wide range of topics, from basic problems concerning the performance of circular and linear accelerators to technical issues and related fields. Also discussed are recent achievements that are of particular interest (such as RF quadrupole acceleration, ion sources and storage rings) and new technologies (such as superconductivity for magnets and RF ca

  8. Status of the Development of Superconducting Undulators for Storage Rings and Free Electron Lasers at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Doose, C.; Fuerst, J.; Harkay, K.; Hasse, Q.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.; Skiadopoulos, D.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Gluskin, E.; Emma, P.

    2017-06-01

    Development of superconducting undulator (SCU) technology continues at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The experience of building and successful operating the first short-length, 16-mm period length superconducting undulator SCU0 paved the way for a 1-m long, 18-mm period device— SCU18-1— which has been in operation since May 2015. The APS SCU team has also built and tested a 1.5-m long, 21-mm period length undulator as a part of the LCLS SCU R&D program, aimed at demonstration of SCU technology availability for free electron lasers. This undulator successfully achieved all the requirements including a phase error of 5° RMS. Our team has recently completed one more 1-m long, 18-mm period length undulator— SCU18-2— that is replacing the SCU0. We are also working on a helical SCU for the APS. The status of these projects will be presented.

  9. Contributions to the 1999 particle accelerator conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, M. [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Fartoukh, S.; Jablonka, M.; Joly, J.M.; Lalot, M.; Magne, C.; Napoly, O. [CEA/Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Baboi, N.; Schreiber, S.; Simrock, S.; Weise, H. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    This document puts together the 10 contributions of the laboratory to the 1999 particle accelerator conference. The titles of the papers are: 1) Evidence for a strongly coupled dipole mode with insufficient damping in the first accelerating module of the TESLA test facility (TTF); 2) An alternative scheme for stiffening superconducting RF cavities by plasma spraying; 3) A laser triggered electron source for pulsed radiolysis; 4) A cure for the energy spread increasing related bunch lengthening in electron storage rings; 5) Single bunch longitudinal instabilities in proton storage rings; 6) Analytical investigation on the halo formation in space charge dominated beams; 7) Analytical investigation on the dynamic apertures of circular accelerators; 8) The intrinsic upper limit to the beam energy of an electron-positron circular collider; 9) Coaxial disc windows for a high power superconducting cavity input coupler; and 10) RF pulsed tests on 3 GHz niobium cavities.

  10. Model for Initiation of Quality Factor Degradation at High Accelerating Fields in Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavaties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzyuba, A.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk State U.; Romanenko, A.; /Fermilab; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-13

    A model for the onset of the reduction in SRF cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration H{sub pen}. Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens, [1998 Physica C 294 257], whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter {kappa}. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of H{sub pen} when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower H{sub pen} was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice-versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of {kappa}. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by {approx}20%, and that that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model

  11. The impact of the ISR on accelerator physics and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, P J

    2012-01-01

    The ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings) were two intersecting proton synchrotron rings each with a circumference of 942 m and eight-fold symmetry that were operational for 13 years from 1971 to 1984. The CERN PS injected 26 GeV/c proton beams into the two rings that could accelerate up to 31.4 GeV/c. The ISR worked for physics with beams of 30-40 A over 40-60 hours with luminosities in its superconducting low-{\\beta} insertion of 1031-1032 cm-2 s-1. The ISR demonstrated the practicality of collider beam physics while catalysing a rapid advance in accelerator technologies and techniques.

  12. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS CHALLENGES IN THE DESIGN OF MULTI-BEND-ACHROMAT-BASED STORAGE RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, M.; Hettel, R.; Leemann, S. C.; Robin, D. S.

    2017-06-01

    With the recent success in commissioning of MAX IV, the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice has begun to deliver on its promise to usher in a new generation of higher-brightness synchrotron light sources. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the challenges, recent success, and lessons learned of the MAX-IV project. Drawing on these lessons, we then describe the physics challenges in even more ambitious rings and how these can be met. In addition, we touch on engineering issues and choices that are tightly linked with the physics design.

  13. Zurek–Kibble Symmetry Breaking Process in Superconducting Rings; Spontaneous Fluxon Formation in Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Morten; Monaco, Roberto; Dmitriev, P

    2007-01-01

    -superconducting transition. A trapped fluxon unambiguously is detected as a zero-field step in the DC I-V characteristic. Experimentally we plot the fluxon trapping probability versus the quench rate, varied over 4 decades. An allometric scaling behavior is found. By fitting to the theoretical curve we get sigma sime 0.......5 for the ZK critical scaling exponent sigma, which does not agree with an earlier theoretical prediction of sigma = 0.25. A novel theory based on the proximity effect leading to sigma = 0.50 has been proposed. The dependence of the gap voltage on temperature is measured and used for precise monitoring...

  14. Special diagnostic methods and beam loss control on high intensity proton synchrotrons and storage rings Circular proton accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Warsop, C M

    2002-01-01

    Two topics concerning high intensity, medium energy, circular proton accelerators have been studied: specialist diagnostics and beam loss control. The use of specially configured, low intensity diagnostic beams to help measure, understand and control high intensity beams is described. The ideas are developed and demonstrated on the ISIS 800 MeV, high intensity proton synchrotron at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. It is shown that these techniques make much new and valuable information available, which is particularly useful in achieving the precise beam optimisation required for low and controlled losses. Beam loss control in the proposed European Spallation Source (ESS) accumulator rings is studied. The expected losses are summarised, and a design for the beam collimation system presented. A new code for the simulation of loss control is outlined, and then used to test the collimation system under most foreseeable conditions. It is expected that the required loss control levels will be achievab...

  15. mini-b-roll : LHC Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Audiovisual Service

    2008-01-01

    How the LHC works The LHC, the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator, is the latest addition to CERN’s accelerator complex. It mainly consists of a 27 km ring of superconducting magnets with a number of accelerating structures to boost the energy of the particles along the way. Inside the accelerator, two beams of particles travel at close to the speed of light with very high energies before colliding with one another. The beams travel in opposite directions in separate beam pipes – two tubes kept at ultrahigh vacuum. They are guided around the accelerator ring by a strong magnetic field, achieved using superconducting electromagnets. These are built from coils of special electric cable that operates in a superconducting state, efficiently conducting electricity without resistance or loss of energy. This requires chilling the magnets to about ‑271°C – a temperature colder than outer space! For this reason, much of the accelerator is connected to a distribution system of liquid heli...

  16. Does One Need a 4.5 K Screen in Cryostats of Superconducting Accelerator Devices Operating in Superfluid Helium? Lessons from the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph; Tavian, L

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large proj...

  17. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2011-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs) largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J.W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004)] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µmrad), and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term ...

  18. Overview of Superconducting Photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2009-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR-FELs is contingent upon the development of an appropriate source. Electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µm rad) and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required to meet the FEL specification [1]. An elegant way to create such an unique beam is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting RF photo injector with the superconducting technology to get a superconducting RF photo injector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches are under investigation at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, JLab, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Lot of progress could be achieved during the last years and first long term operation was demonstrated at the FZD [2]. In the near future, this effort will lead to SRF guns, which are indispensab...

  19. The role of superconductivity and cryogenics in the neutrinofactory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.; Black, E.L.; Gupta, R.C.; Iarocci, M.A.; Lebedev,V.; Miller, J.R.; Palmer, R.B.; Padamsee, H.S.; Parker, B.L.; Prestemon,S.; Weggel, R.J.

    2001-05-06

    The proposed neutrino factory will produce a defined beam of neutrinos from the decay of muons in a storage ring[1,2,3]. The storage ring will be oriented so that the neutrinos can be detected at one or more detectors several thousand kilometers from the storage ring. This report presents an overview of the proposed neutrino factory and its subsystems that use cryogenics. Superconducting magnets will be used in the following ways in the neutrino factory; (1) the outsert solenoid for the 20 T pion capture system, (2) the decay channel where pions decay to muons, (3) the muon phase rotation system, (4) the muon cooling system, (5) focusing during the first stage of muon acceleration, (6) bending and focusing magnets in the re-circulating linac accelerator and (7) bending and focusing magnets in the muon storage ring where the neutrino beams are generated. Low temperature superconducting RF cavities will be used to accelerate the muons from about 200 MeV to 20 GeV. The muon cooling system uses liquid hydrogen absorbers at 20 K to reduce the emittance of the muon beam before it is accelerated to full energy.

  20. Exploration of multi-fold symmetry element-loaded superconducting radio frequency structure for reliable acceleration of low- & medium-beta ion species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shichun [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Reliable acceleration of low- to medium-beta proton or heavy ion species is needed for future high-current superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerators. Due to the high-Q nature of an SRF resonator, it is sensitive to many factors such as electron loading (from either the accelerated beam or from parasitic field emitted electrons), mechanical vibration, and liquid helium bath pressure fluctuation etc. To increase the stability against those factors, a mechanically strong and stable RF structure is desirable. Guided by this consideration, multi-fold symmetry element-loaded SRF structures (MFSEL), cylindrical tanks with multiple (n>=3) rod-shaped radial elements, are being explored. The top goal of its optimization is to improve mechanical stability. A natural consequence of this structure is a lowered ratio of the peak surface electromagnetic field to the acceleration gradient as compared to the traditional spoke cavity. A disadvantage of this new structure is an increased size for a fixed resonant frequency and optimal beta. This paper describes the optimization of the electro-magnetic (EM) design and preliminary mechanical analysis for such structures.

  1. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-06-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  2. Observation of Electron Cloud Instabilities and Emittance Dilution at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring Test Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, R. L.; Billing, M. G.; Campbell, R. C.; Dugan, G. F.; Flanagan, J.; McArdle, K. E.; Miller, M. I.; Palmer, M. A.; Ramirez, G. A.; Sonnad, K. G.; Totten, M. M.; Tucker, S. L.; Williams, H. A.

    2016-04-01

    Electron cloud related emittance dilution and instabilities of bunch trains limit the performance of high intensity circular colliders. One of the key goals of the Cornell electron-positron storage ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) research program is to improve our understanding of how the electron cloud alters the dynamics of bunches within the train. Single bunch beam diagnotics have been developed to measure the beam spectra, vertical beam size, two important dynamical effects of beams interacting with the electron cloud, for bunch trains on a turn-by-turn basis. Experiments have been performed at CesrTA to probe the interaction of the electron cloud with stored positron bunch trains. The purpose of these experiments was to characterize the dependence of beam-electron cloud interactions on the machine parameters such as bunch spacing, vertical chromaticity, and bunch current. The beam dynamics of the stored beam, in the presence of the electron cloud, was quantified using: 1) a gated beam position monitor (BPM) and spectrum analyzer to measure the bunch-by-bunch frequency spectrum of the bunch trains; 2) an x-ray beam size monitor to record the bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn vertical size of each bunch within the trains. In this paper we report on the observations from these experiments and analyze the effects of the electron cloud on the stability of bunches in a train under many different operational conditions.

  3. Characterization of Nb coating in HIE-ISOLDE QWR superconducting accelerating cavities by means of SEM-FIB and TEM

    CERN Document Server

    Bartova, Barbora; Taborelli, M; Aebersold, A B; Alexander, D T L; Cantoni, M; Calatroni, Sergio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The Quarter Wave Resonators (QWR) high-β cavities (0.3 m diameter and 0.9 m height) are made from OFE 3D-forged copper and are coated by DC-bias diode sputtering with a thin superconducting layer of niobium. The Nb film thickness, morphology, purity and quality are critical parameters for RF performances of the cavity. They have been investigated in a detailed material study.

  4. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R; Flisgen, T; Glock, H W

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using Higher Order Mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR) and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  5. Statistical methods for transverse beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M

    2014-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) can be used to provide beam diagnostics. Here we focus on 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities. In particular we study dipole mode excitation and its application to beam position determinations. In order to extract beam position information, linear regression can be used. Due to a large number of sampling points in the waveforms, statistical methods are used to effectively reduce the dimension of the system, such as singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering. These are compared with the direct linear regression (DLR) on the entire waveforms. A cross-validation technique is used to study the sample independent precisions of the position predictions given by these three methods. A RMS prediction error in the beam position of approximately 50 micron can be achieved by DLR and SVD, while k-means clustering suggests 70 micron.

  6. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Pei [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M.; Shinton, Ian R. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter [Institut fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  7. Vertical orbit excursion fixed field alternating gradient accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Stephen

    2013-08-01

    Fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators with vertical orbit excursion (VFFAGs) provide a promising alternative design for rings with fixed-field superconducting magnets. They have a vertical magnetic field component that increases with height in the vertical aperture, yielding a skew quadrupole focusing structure. Scaling-type VFFAGs are found with fixed tunes and no intrinsic limitation on momentum range. This paper presents the first multiparticle tracking of such machines. Proton driver rings to accelerate the 800 MeV beam from the ISIS synchrotron are presented, in terms of both magnet field geometry and longitudinal behavior during acceleration with space charge. The 12 GeV ring produces an output power of at least 2.18 MW. Possible applications of VFFAGs to waste transmutation, hadron therapy, and energy-recovery electron accelerators are also discussed.

  8. On the magnetization relaxation of ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films as determined by superconducting quantum interference device measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hai-hu; Ziemann, Paul; Radovan, Henri A.; Herzog, Thomas

    1998-09-01

    By using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the temporal relaxation of the magnetization was determined for ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films at various temperatures between 10 K and 80 K in magnetic fields ranging from 2 mT to 0.3 T. Based on these data, a detailed analysis has been performed related to the following methods or models: (1) Fitting the data to the thermally activated flux motion and collective pinning model; (2) Applying the Generalized Inversion Scheme to extract the temperature dependence of the unrelaxed critical current density jc( T) and pinning potential Uc( T); (3) Testing a modified Maley's method to obtain the current dependent activation energy for flux motion; (4) 2D vortex glass scaling. It is found that, for low fields (2 mT, 10 mT, 40 mT) the experimental data can be described by an elastic flux motion, most probably due to 3D single vortex creep. At higher fields (0.1 T, 0.2 T, 0.3 T), the observed behavior can be interpreted in terms of plastic flux motion which is probably governed by dislocation mediated flux creep. These high field data can also be consistently described by the 2D vortex glass scaling with scaling parameters ν2D, T0 and p being consistent with those derived from corresponding transport measurement. Also, results are presented demonstrating the importance of optimizing the scan length of the sample in a moving sample SQUID magnetometer to avoid artifacts.

  9. Structural analysis of superconducting dipole prototype for HIAF

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Ni, Dongsheng; Chen, Yuquan; Wu, Wei; Ma, Lizhen

    2015-01-01

    The High Intensity Heavy-Ion Accelerator Facility is a new project in the Institute of Modern Physics. The dipole magnets of all rings are conceived as fast cycled superconducting magnet with high magnetic field and large gap, the warm iron and superconducting coil structure (superferric) is adopted. The reasonable structure design of coil and cryostat is very important for reliable operation. Based on the finite element software ANSYS, the mechanical analysis of electromagnetic stress, the thermal stress in the cooling down and the stress in the pumping are showed in detail. According to the analysis result, the supporter structure is the key problem of coil system. With reasonable support's structure design, the stress and the deformation of coil structure can be reduced effectively, which ensure the stable operation of superconducting coil system.

  10. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Arun [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  11. Technology and materials for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintomi, Takakazu; Ishimaru, Hajime; Unno, Yoshinobu; Arai, Yasuo; Watase, Yoshiyuki; Amako, Katsuya; Kondo, Takahiko (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1992-08-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is the accelerator for the research on elementary particle physics, of which the construction was already begun in Texas, USA. Two proton rings comprising about 10,000 superconducting magnets are installed in an underground tunnel with the circumferential length of 87 km, and the proton-proton collision of superhigh energy is realized. This accelerator becomes the largest machine that mankind makes. In this report, among the high-tech and materials used for the SSC, superconducting magnets, super-high vacuum beam pipes, silicon semiconductor detector, the use of VLSI and superhigh density mounting and high speed, large quantity data processing system are taken up, and the outline of those is described. The SSC was planned for the elucidation of Higg's theory. The incidence accelerator group is composed of a linear accelerator and three booster synchrotrons. The particles generated by proton-proton collision are measured, and the discovery of new particles and the study on high energy physical phenomena are carried out. The construction of the accelerator and experimental equipment is carried out by international cooperation. (K.I.).

  12. Control System of the Small Isochronous ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix Marti; Eduard Pozdeyev

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the control system of the Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) developed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU). SIR is a small-scale experiment that simulates the dynamics of intense beams in large accelerators. A 20 to 30 keV hydrogen or deuterium ion bunch is injected in the ring, extracted after a variable number of turns and its longitudinal profile is studied. Information about the electronics used and software written to control different injection line, ring and extraction line elements is included. Some of these elements are magnets, electrostatic quadrupoles, electric and magnetic correctors, scanning wires, emittance measurement system, chopper and a fast Faraday cup.

  13. Superconducting Super Collider: A step in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAshan, M.

    1991-08-01

    The development of superconducting materials and the development of helium temperature refrigeration technology have both been propelled by their wide application in large-scale scientific research. The development of materials and technology for the Tevatron proton storage ring at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL USA, in the decade of the seventies provided the basis in the decade of the eighties, for example, for the use of superconducting helium-cooled whole-body magnets for magnetic resonance imaging in medical diagnosis. In the decade of the nineties a number of particle accelerators for high energy physics will be constructed in national and international laboratories around the world. These devices will employ superconductivity on an ambitious scale, and their operation will require more than double the amount of helium refrigeration capacity now installed worldwide. This large increase in the use of helium refrigeration will have a significant effect on the technology and on the industry that produces it. The largest of these accelerator projects is the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) now under construction at a new laboratory near Dallas, TX USA. This report discusses the development of this cryogenic system for the SSC magnets.

  14. Study of vortex ring dynamics in the nonlinear Schrodinger equation utilizing GPU-accelerated high-order compact numerical integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Ronald Meyer

    We numerically study the dynamics and interactions of vortex rings in the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE). Single ring dynamics for both bright and dark vortex rings are explored including their traverse velocity, stability, and perturbations resulting in quadrupole oscillations. Multi-ring dynamics of dark vortex rings are investigated, including scattering and merging of two colliding rings, leapfrogging interactions of co-traveling rings, as well as co-moving steady-state multi-ring ensembles. Simulations of choreographed multi-ring setups are also performed, leading to intriguing interaction dynamics. Due to the inherent lack of a close form solution for vortex rings and the dimensionality where they live, efficient numerical methods to integrate the NLSE have to be developed in order to perform the extensive number of required simulations. To facilitate this, compact high-order numerical schemes for the spatial derivatives are developed which include a new semi-compact modulus-squared Dirichlet boundary condition. The schemes are combined with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme in order to keep the overall method fully explicit. To ensure efficient use of the schemes, a stability analysis is performed to find bounds on the largest usable time step-size as a function of the spatial step-size. The numerical methods are implemented into codes which are run on NVIDIA graphic processing unit (GPU) parallel architectures. The codes running on the GPU are shown to be many times faster than their serial counterparts. The codes are developed with future usability in mind, and therefore are written to interface with MATLAB utilizing custom GPU-enabled C codes with a MEX-compiler interface. Reproducibility of results is achieved by combining the codes into a code package called NLSEmagic which is freely distributed on a dedicated website.

  15. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Deepa; Shetty, Y. Bharath; Miranda, Glynis Anita; Prabhu, M. Bharath; Karkera, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Conventional investing and casting techniques are time-consuming and usually requires 2–4 h for completion. Accelerated nonstandard, casting techniques have been reported to achieve similar quality results in significantly less time, namely, in 30–40 min. During casting, it is essential to achieve compensation for the shrinkage of solidifying alloy by investment expansion. The metal casting ring restricts the thermal expansion of investment because the thermal expansion of the ring is lesser than that of the investment. The use of casting ring was challenged with the introduction of the ringless technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 test samples of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) cast copings were obtained from the patterns fabricated using inlay casting wax. The 20 wax patterns were invested using metal ring and 20 wax patterns were invested using the ringless investment system. Of both the groups, 10 samples underwent conventional casting, and the other 10 underwent accelerated casting. The patterns were casted using the induction casting technique. All the test samples of cast copings were evaluated for vertical marginal gaps at four points on the die employing a stereo optical microscope. Results: The vertical marginal discrepancy data obtained were tabulated. Mean and standard deviations were obtained. Vertical discrepancies were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significantly different. The data obtained were found to be very highly significant (P < 0.001). Mean vertical gap was the maximum for Group II (53.64 μm) followed by Group IV (47.62 μm), Group I (44.83 μm) and Group III (35.35 μm). Conclusion: The Ni-Cr cast copings fabricated with the conventional casting using ringless investment system showed significantly better marginal fit than that of cast copings fabricated from conventional and accelerated casting with metal ring investment and accelerated casting using ringless investment since those copings had

  16. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, S., E-mail: stuarth@fnal.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Abraham, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Aleksandrov, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Allen, C. [Techsource, Inc., 1475 Central Avenue, Suite 250, Los Alamos, NM 87544-3291 (United States); Alonso, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Anderson, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Arenius, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Arthur, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Assadi, S. [Techsource, Inc., 1475 Central Avenue, Suite 250, Los Alamos, NM 87544-3291 (United States); Ayers, J.; Bach, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Badea, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Battle, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Beebe-Wang, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); and others

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ∼100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ∼400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ∼400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ∼100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  17. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  18. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arnold

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J. W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.557378] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1  μmrad, and high average current (hundreds of mA are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun. SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University. Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term operation was demonstrated at FZD [R. Xiang et al., in Proceedings of the 31st International Free Electron Laser Conference (FEL 09, Liverpool, UK (STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, 2009, p. 488]. In the near future SRF guns are expected to play an important role for linac-driven FEL facilities. In this paper we will review the concepts, the design parameters, and the status of the major SRF gun projects.

  19. A Novel Device for the Measurement of the Mechanical and Magnetic Axes of Superconducting Magnet Assemblies for Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Aznar, S; Fischer, F; Galbraith, Peter; García-Pérez, J; Goy, S; Mermillod, N; Peiro, G; Patti, G; Rathjen, C

    2002-01-01

    In the context of the LHC superconducting magnet production, especially for dipoles and quadrupoles due to their complexity, it is foreseen to perform acceptance tests, at an early production stage, to detect possible significant deviations from the design values. The knowledge of the magnetic field geometry is very important, especially for the main magnets. In order to get this information a new device has been conceived that measures the magnets at room temperature during different stages of construction. This device incorporates a sensitive measuring probe and an efficient data acquisition system because the coils are only powered at about 10-5 of the nominal D.C. current. It is dedicated to Quadrupole and Dipole (by using Quadrupole-Configured Dipole (QCD) transformation) magnets, but is also easily adaptable to higher order magnets (n = 3, 4 and 5) by specific orientation of the search coils. It is equipped with magnetic sensors (4 fixed tangential coils and AC excitation current for the magnet) and p...

  20. Stability and Resolution Studies of HOMBPMs for the 1.3 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Liangliang; Jones, Roger

    2015-01-01

    HOMBPMs (HOM based Beam Position Monitors) are installed at the FLASH facility at DESY, Hamburg. These are aimed at aligning the beam and monitoring the beam position. Over time, the accuracy of beam position prediction is degraded. This is due to instability issues in the 1.3 GHz and 3.9 GHz superconducting cavities and associated electronics. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a measurement technique which is stable and can be relied upon over a period of three months with unprecedented resolution (below 4 μm horizontally and 2 μm vertically). We attribute this improvement in stability to a focused campaign on various signal processing and analysis techniques. These techniques include SVD (Singular Value Decomposition), ANN (Artificial Neural Network) and PLS (Partial Least Square). We found the best resolution and computational power using the latter method, PLS. These techniques are directly applicable to the HOMBPM system at the European XFEL that is currently under construction. However,...

  1. Plasma characterization of the superconducting proton linear accelerator plasma generator using a 2 MHz compensated Langmuir probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitzer, C; Kronberger, M; Lettry, J; Sanchez-Arias, J; Störi, H

    2012-02-01

    The CERN study for a superconducting proton Linac (SPL) investigates the design of a pulsed 5 GeV Linac operating at 50 Hz. As a first step towards a future SPL H(-) volume ion source, a plasma generator capable of operating at Linac4 or nominal SPL settings has been developed and operated at a dedicated test stand. The hydrogen plasma is heated by an inductively coupled RF discharge e(-) and ions are confined by a magnetic multipole cusp field similar to the currently commissioned Linac4 H(-) ion source. Time-resolved measurements of the plasma potential, temperature, and electron energy distribution function obtained by means of a RF compensated Langmuir probe along the axis of the plasma generator are presented. The influence of the main tuning parameters, such as RF power and frequency and the timing scheme is discussed with the aim to correlate them to optimum H(-) ion beam parameters measured on an ion source test stand. The effects of hydrogen injection settings which allow operation at 50 Hz repetition rate are discussed.

  2. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  3. Measurement of {sup 14}C time scale of the rings of a tree by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Hirotaka; Furukawa, Michiaki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Science; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Ikeda, Akiko; Nakamura, Toshio

    1996-12-01

    {sup 14}C time scale is different from a histrical data in order that it is calculated by assuming that the concentration of {sup 14}C in the sample has not been changed by age. The object of this work is to make clear the errors in measurement of {sup 14}C time scale of the ring of a tree known the tree age. The every year ring of a Hinoki in Kiso, 950 years old, was used as a sample. The most external ring is determined as 1923 years old on the basis of the dendrochronology. The rings after 1120 years were used as the samples. {alpha}-cellulose, the most stable component in the structural components of cell of tree, was prepared from each ring. About 8 mg of {alpha}-cellulose was reduced to graphite to be measured by the tandem thoron analytic meter. The results obtained showed that {sup 14}C time scale was older than that of the histrical data in the twelfth and thirteenth century, but it was more new than that of the histrical data from the late seventeenth to the middle of eighteenth century. The results were agreement with that of Stuiver and Pearson (1933). (S.Y.)

  4. Reduction of helium loss from a superconducting accelerating cavity during initial cool-down and cryostat exchange by pre-cooling the re-condensing cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, B. E.; Minehara, E. J.; Hayashizaki, N.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.

    2015-03-01

    A Zero-Boil-Off (ZBO) cryostat is designed to realize a compact, stand-alone cryogenic system for the AIST superconducting accelerator (SCA). Under normal operation there is no evaporative helium loss from the cryomodule and therefore operating costs associated with the supply of liquid helium can be eliminated. The only significant loss of helium from the module occurs during the initial cavity cool-down procedure or when the re-condensing cryostat is replaced. It takes about 3 h to cool down the cryostat head from room temperature (300 K) to 4 K. During this time around 100 L of liquid helium is lost due to evaporation. By pre-cooling the cryostat inside a low heat load vacuum tube before transfer to the cryomodule, this evaporative loss could be essentially eliminated, significantly reducing the volume of liquid helium required for the initial cryomodule cool-down. The pre-cooling system also provides an efficient method to test the cryostat prior to use.

  5. Status Of The Work On The Base Directions Of The "rf Superconductivity For Accelerators" Program At The Federate Problem Lab At Ihep

    CERN Document Server

    Sevryukova, L

    2004-01-01

    In this report result of the study of electrophysical phenomena on the superconducting cavity surface, including plasma, bifurcation, hysteresis, emission and diffusion phenomena are considered. Science intensive recourse -saving technologies of superconducting cavities are being studied on the base of these phenomena. The superconducting cavities are made of Nb and Nb film, alloy film or HTC ceramics, which cover the working surface of the weldless copper shells using ion-plasma technologies (axial and planar magnetron sputtering). Quality monitoring (optical, emission, electrochemical and high frequency) of the working surface condition of superconducting cavities is developed under the realization of new technologies. The brief review of the experimental equipment is used as training base for individual students, post-graduate students and research staff in the field of technologies that use superconductivity phenomenon and ionic-plasma, electrochemical and high-vacuum technologies as well. For realizat...

  6. Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

  7. Large Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Védrine, P.

    2014-07-17

    The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb−Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

  8. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  9. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  10. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  11. LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Jean Leyder

    2000-01-01

    The LHC is the next step in CERN's quest to unravel the mysteries of the Universe. It will accelerate protons to energies never before achieved in laboratories, and to hold them on course it will use powerful superconducting magnets on an unprecedented scale.

  12. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  13. Accelerators for the twenty-first century a review

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Edmund J N

    1990-01-01

    The development of the synchrotron, and later the storage ring, was based upon the electrical technology at the turn of this century, aided by the microwave radar techniques of World War II. This method of acceleration seems to have reached its limit. Even superconductivity is not likely to lead to devices that will satisfy physics needs into the twenty-first century. Unless a new principle for accelerating elementary particles is discovered soon, it is difficult to imagine that high-energy physics will continue to reach out to higher energies and luminosities.

  14. Vacuum flashover of Dragon-Ⅱ accelerator insulator ring%神龙二号加速器绝缘环真空沿面闪络

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何佳龙; 陈思富; 张篁; 吕璐; 夏连胜; 石金水

    2016-01-01

    Two types of flashover phenomenons were discovered during the high voltage test of Dragon-Ⅱ linear induction ac-celerator insulator ring,which was made by cross-linked polystyrene.One type of the flashover was initialized from cathode and the other one was initialized from anode.The mechanism of the phenomenon was analyzed by comparing breakdown voltage wave-form and discharge trace,and calculating electric field combination with flashover experiment on little insulator samples.It is as-sumed that the cooperating problem of the insulator and cathode caused the difference between accelerator and injector insulator ring flashover.%在对神龙二号加速器绝缘环进行耐压考核时发现,感应腔中的绝缘支撑部件交联聚苯乙烯绝缘环在猝发多脉冲高压加载下出现的真空沿面闪络现象存在两种类型:阴极始发的闪络击穿和阳极始发的闪络击穿。通过计算绝缘环的沿面电场分布、对比击穿电压波形与绝缘环表面闪络放电烧蚀痕迹,结合小绝缘子样品实验结果对以上沿面击穿现象的机理进行了分析,认为可能是绝缘环端面与电极面的配合问题引起了加速段与注入器绝缘环击穿现象的差异。

  15. Studies of the superconducting traveling wave cavity for high gradient LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P

    2015-01-01

    Use of a traveling wave (TW) accelerating structure with a small phase advance per cell instead of standing wave may provide a significant increase of accelerating gradient in a superconducting linear accelerator. The TW section achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 larger than TESLA-shaped standing wave cavities for the same surface electric and magnetic fields. Recent tests of an L-band single-cell cavity with a waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient in a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer. This article presents the next stage of the 3- cell TW resonance ring development which will be tested in the traveling wave regime. The main simulation results of the microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) are also considered.

  16. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  17. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  18. Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Benaroya, R.; Clifft, B.E.; Jaffey, A.H.; Johnson, K.W.; Khoe, T.K.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wangler, Y.Z.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is given of the status of a project to develop and build a small superconducting linac to boost the energy of heavy ions from an existing tandem electrostatic accelerator. The design of the system is well advanced, and construction of major components is expected to start in late 1976. The linac will consist of independently-phased resonators of the split-ring type made of niobium and operating at a temperature of 4.2/sup 0/K. The resonance frequency is 97 MHz. Tests on full-scale resonators lead one to expect accelerating fields of approximately 4 MV/m within the resonators. The linac will be long enough to provide a voltage gain of at least 13.5 MV, which will allow ions with A less than or approximately 80 to be accelerated above the Coulomb barrier of any target. The modular nature of the system will make future additions to the length relatively easy. A major design objective is to preserve the good quality of the tandem beam. This requires an exceedingly narrow beam pulse, which is achieved by bunching both before and after the tandem. Focusing by means of superconducting solenoids within the linac limit the radial size of the beam. An accelerating structure some 15 meters downstream from the linac will manipulate the longitudinal phase ellipse so as to provide the experimenter with either very good energy resolution (..delta..E/E approximately equal to 2 x 10/sup -4/) or very good time resolution (..delta.. t approximately equal to 30 psec).

  19. Activities on RF superconductivity at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheisen, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    At DESY the HERA electron storage ring is supplied with normal and superconducting cavities. The superconducting system transfers up to 1 MW klystron power to the beam. Experiences are reported on luminosity and machine study runs. Since 1993 one major activity in the field of RF superconducting cavities is the installation of the TESLA Test Facility. Set-up of hardware and first tests of s.c. resonators are presented. (R.P.). 11 refs.

  20. The first LHC superconducting magnet is unloaded

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The first superconducting magnet is moved into position using a transfer table. This must be performed with great precision so that the LHC ring is correctly aligned, allowing the beams to travel along the correct paths.

  1. Superconductivity basics and applications to magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, R G

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and applications of superconducting magnets. It explains the phenomenon of superconductivity, theories of superconductivity, type II superconductors and high-temperature cuprate superconductors. The main focus of the book is on the application to superconducting magnets to accelerators and fusion reactors and other applications of superconducting magnets. The thermal and electromagnetic stability criteria of the conductors and the present status of the fabrication techniques for future magnet applications are addressed. The book is based on the long experience of the author in studying superconducting materials, building magnets and numerous lectures delivered to scholars. A researcher and graduate student will enjoy reading the book to learn various aspects of magnet applications of superconductivity. The book provides the knowledge in the field of applied superconductivity in a comprehensive way.

  2. Studies of accelerated compact toruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.H.

    1983-01-04

    In an earlier publication we considered acceleration of plasma rings (Compact Torus). Several possible accelerator configurations were suggested and the possibility of focusing the accelerated rings was discussed. In this paper we consider one scheme, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focusing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force, F/sub a/ = kappaU/sub m//R where (kappa < 1), increases as R/sup -2/, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case, however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency.

  3. Operation of the 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity in RHIC during run 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-11

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). It is the first superconducting quarter wave resonator (QWR) operating in a high-energy storage ring. We discuss herein the cavity operation with Au+Au collisions, and with asymmetrical Au+He3 collisions. The cavity is a storage cavity, meaning that it becomes active only at the energy of experiment, after the acceleration cycle is completed. With the cavity at 300 kV, an improvement in luminosity was detected from direct measurements, and the bunch length has been reduced. The uniqueness of the QWR demands an innovative design of the higher order mode dampers with high-pass filters, and a distinctive fundamental mode damper that enables the cavity to be bypassed during the acceleration stage.

  4. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (5519 S. Bruner, Hinsdale, IL 60521); Uherka, Kenneth L. (830 Ironwood, Frankfort, IL 60423); Abdoud, Robert G. (13 Country Oaks La., Barrington Hills, IL 60010)

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing.

  5. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, F.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Freire, M.L.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58109-753 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Mota-Silva, J.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970 João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted through the fact that the soliton following accelerating orbits is a Rindler observer experiencing a thermal bath.

  6. A facile glovebox-free strategy to significantly accelerate the syntheses of well-defined polypeptides by N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) ring opening polymerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jiong; Fan, Jingwei; He, Xun; Zhang, Shiyi; Wang, Hai; Wooley, Karen L

    2013-05-28

    A facile N2 flow-accelerated N-carboxyanhydride ring opening polymerization (NCA ROP) is demonstrated, herein, with rigorous kinetic studies to evaluate the methodology in detail. By using n-hexylamine as initiator and γ-benzyl-L-glutamate N-carboxyanhydride (BLG-NCA) as monomer, the NCA ROP via a normal amine mechanism (NAM) reached 90% conversion in 2 h under N2 flow at room temperature in a fume hood, much shorter than the time required for the same polymerization conducted in a glove box (14 h). The efficient removal of CO2 from the reaction by N2 flow drove the carbamic acid-amine equilibrium toward the formation of active nucleophilic amino termini and promoted polymerization. The detailed kinetic studies of the polymerization with different feed ratios and N2 flow rates were conducted, demonstrating the living feature of the NCA ROP and the tuning of the polymerization rate by simply changing the flow rate of N2. Maintenance of the reactivity of the amino ω-chain terminus and control during a subsequent polymerization were confirmed by performing chain extension reactions. The N2 flow method provides a new straightforward strategy to synthesize well-defined polypeptides with predictable molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions (PDI < 1.19).

  7. Superconducting LINAC booster for the Mumbai pelletron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Srinivasan; S K Singh; R G Pillay; M P Kurup; M K Pandey

    2001-08-01

    We are in the process of constructing a superconducting linear accelerator (LINAC), to boost the energy of heavy ion beams from the 14UD Pelletron accelerator, at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. The accelerating structures in the LINAC are quarter wave resonators (QWR) coated with lead which is superconducting at liquid helium temperature. With feasibility studies having been completed during the course of the 4th and 5th five-year plan periods, culminating with the demonstration of beam acceleration using one accelerating module, the construction of the LINAC is now under way.

  8. Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

  9. Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

  10. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    Public lecture by Philippe Lebrun, who works at CERN on applications of superconductivity and cryogenics for particle accelerators. He was head of CERN’s Accelerator Technology Department during the LHC construction period. Centre culturel Jean Monnet, route de Gex Tuesday 11 October from 8.30 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. » Suitable for all – Admission free - Lecture in French » Number of places limited For further information: +33 (0)4 50 42 29 37

  11. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  12. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  13. Superconducting magnets. Citations from NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimherr, G. W.

    1980-10-01

    The cited reports discuss research on materials studies, theory, design and applications of superconducting magnets. Examples of applications include particle accelerators, MHD power generation, superconducting generators, nuclear fusion research devices, energy storage systems, and magnetic levitation. This updated bibliography contains 218 citations, 88 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  14. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Laxdal, Robert E.; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  15. The advantages and challenges of superconducting magnets in particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Calzolaio, Ciro; Meer, David; Sanfilippo, Stéphane; Schippers, Marco

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current developments in superconducting magnets for applications in proton and ion therapy. It summarizes the benefits and challenges regarding the utilization of these magnets in accelerating systems (e.g. superconducting cyclotrons) and gantries. The paper also provides examples of currently used superconducting particle therapy systems and proposed designs.

  16. 2 March 2012 - US Google Management Team Executive Chairman E. Schmidt visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers and Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    2 March 2012 - US Google Management Team Executive Chairman E. Schmidt visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers and Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  17. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  18. Heavy ion storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  19. Argonne lectures on particles accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A

    1999-09-01

    The quest for elementary particles has promoted the development of particle accelerators producing beams of increasingly higher energies. In a synchrotron, the particle energy is directly proportional to the product of the machine's radius times the bending magnets' field strength. Present proton experiments at the TeV scale require facilities with circumferences ranging from a few to tens of kilometers and relying on a large number (several hundred to several thousand) high field dipole magnets and high field gradient quadrupole magnets. These electro-magnets use high-current-density, low-critical-temperature superconducting cables and are cooled down at liquid helium temperature. They are among the most costly and the most challenging components of the machine. After explaining what are the various types of accelerator magnets and why they are needed (lecture 1), we briefly recall the origins of superconductivity and we review the parameters of existing superconducting particle accelerators (lecture 2). Then, we review the superconducting materials that are available at industrial scale (chiefly, NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn) and we explain in details the manufacturing of NbTi wires and cables (lecture 3). We also present the difficulties of processing and insulating Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors, which so far have limited the use of this material in spite of its superior performances. We continue by discussing the two dimensional current distributions which are the most appropriate for generating pure dipole and quadrupole fields and we explain how these ideal distributions can be approximated by so called cos{theta} and cos 2{theta} coil designs (lecture 4). We also present a few alternative designs which are being investigated and we describe the difficulties of realizing coil ends. Next, we present the mechanical design concepts that are used in existing accelerator magnets (lecture 5) and we describe how the magnets are assembled (lecture 6). Some of the toughest

  20. Damping Ring R&D at CESR-TA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, David L. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2015-01-23

    Accelerators that collide high energy beams of matter and anti-matter are essential tools for the investigation of the fundamental constituents of matter, and the search for new forms of matter and energy. A “Linear Collider” is a machine that would bring high energy and very compact bunches of electrons and positrons (anti-electrons) into head-on collision. Such a machine would produce (among many other things) the newly discovered Higgs particle, enabling a detailed study of its properties. Among the most critical and challenging components of a linear collider are the damping rings that produce the very compact and intense beams of electrons and positrons that are to be accelerated into collision. Hot dilute particle beams are injected into the damping rings, where they are compressed and cooled. The size of the positron beam must be reduced more than a thousand fold in the damping ring, and this compression must be accomplished in a fraction of a second. The cold compact beams are then extracted from the damping ring and accelerated into collision at high energy. The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), would require damping rings that routinely produce such cold, compact and intense beams. The goal of the Cornell study was a credible design for the damping rings for the ILC. Among the technical challenges of the damping rings; the development of instrumentation that can measure the properties of the very small beams in a very narrow window of time, and mitigation of the forces that can destabilize the beams and prevent adequate cooling, or worse lead to beam loss. One of the most pernicious destabilizing forces is due to the formation of clouds of electrons in the beam pipe. The electron cloud effect is a phenomenon in particle accelerators in which a high density of low energy electrons, build up inside the vacuum chamber. At the outset of the study, it was anticipated that electron cloud effects would limit the intensity of the positron ring

  1. Study of a spoke-type superconducting cavity for high power proton accelerators; Etude d'une cavite acceleratrice supraconductrice Spoke pour les accelerateurs de protons de forte intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olry, G

    2003-04-01

    Since a few years, a lot of projects (especially dedicated to transmutation, radioactive beams production, spallation neutron sources or neutrinos factories) are based on high power proton linear accelerators. It has been demonstrated, thanks to their excellent RF performances, that superconducting elliptical cavities represent the best technological solution for the high energy part of these linacs (proton energy from typically 100 MeV). On the contrary, between 5 and 100 MeV, nothing is clearly settled and intensive studies on low-beta cavities are under progress. The main objective of this thesis is the study of a new low-beta cavity, called 'spoke', which could be used in the low energy part of European XADS (experimental accelerator driven system) and EURISOL (European isotope separation on-line) accelerators projects. A complete study of a beta 0.35 spoke cavity has been done: from its electromagnetic and mechanical optimization to warm and, above all, cold experimental tests: an accelerating field of 12.2 MV/m has been reached at T=4.2 K, that is to say one of the best value among the spoke cavities performances in the world. It has been shown that the specific ratio of a third, between the spoke bar diameter and the cavity length, led to optimize the surface electromagnetic fields. Moreover, spoke cavities can be used without any trouble, in the low energy part, due to their good rigidity. The experimental measurements performed on the cavity have confirmed the theoretical calculations, especially, concerning the expected frequency and mechanical behavior. Another study, performed on elliptical cavities, gave an explanation of the discrepancies between the measured and calculated frequencies thanks to a precise 3-dimensional geometrical control. (author)

  2. Saturn's largest ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  3. Time ripe for superconductivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsh

    2002-04-01

    But there is a crucial deadline and failure to meet it could send superconductivity back to the commercial shadows (at least outside the medical and scientific niches where it is a key enabler in analytical instruments, magnetic resonance imaging, and particle accelerators for another 30 years. Later this decade, the vintage infrastructure of dense copper conductors that supports power distribution in developed countries, in particular in the US, will become due for renewal. (Recent power problems in California were largely those of distribution infrastructure. At the same time, boosting capacity to serve the needs of increasingly affluent populations will pose a challenge. Superconductivity could provide the answer — if the technology matures in time and cost targets are met.

  4. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  5. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  6. Contribution to the design of superconducting Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole windings for particle accelerator; Contribution a la conception des bobinages supraconducteurs de type dipolaire en Nb{sub 3}Sn pour les accelerateurs de particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felice, H

    2006-10-15

    Improvement of particle accelerators relies on complex technologies such as the design and fabrication of superconducting magnets. A key parameter in magnet design is the mechanical pre-stress, applied at room temperature to insure compression of the coil during excitation. In dipole magnets, high field and high mechanical stresses in windings combined with the Nb{sub 3}Sn stress sensitivity ask the question of the limit of the mechanical stress that the Nb{sub 3}Sn can undergo without degradation. This limit estimated around 150 MPa is still discussed and has to be investigated. Whatever its value, preliminary studies show that conventional cosine theta design induces mechanical stresses (> 200 MPa) in large aperture (> 130 mm) and high field configurations, which underscore the need of alternative coil arrangements. The first part of this thesis gives an introduction to the issues and challenges encountered by the designers of superconducting ma nets. The second part is devoted to the study of large aperture (88, 130 and 160 mm) and high field (13 T) dipoles based on intersecting ellipses. After a theoretical study, a 2D magnetic design is detailed for each aperture and a mechanical study is developed for the 130 mm aperture dipole. In the last part, an experimental device dedicated to the study of the influence of the pre-stress on the training of sub-scale Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole and to the investigation of the mechanical stress limit is presented. The design of this magnet is detailed and the result of the first test carried out with the structure is reported. (author)

  7. Calculation Methodology and Fabrication Procedures for Particle Accelerator Strip-Line Kickers: Application to the CTF3 Combiner Ring Extraction Kicker and TL2 Tail Clippers

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Garcia, Iker

    2014-01-01

    A particle accelerator is any device that, using electromagnetic fields, is able to communicate energy to charged particles (typically electrons or ionized atoms), accelerating and/or energizing them up to the required level for its purpose. The applications of particle accelerators are countless, beginning in a common TV CRT, passing through medical X-ray devices, and ending in large ion colliders utilized to find the smallest details of the matter. Among the other engineering applications, ...

  8. Calculation Methodology and Fabrication Procedures for Particle Accelerator Strip-Line Kickers: Application to the CTF3 Combiner Ring Extraction Kicker and TL2 Tail Clippers

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Garcia, Iker

    2009-01-01

    A particle accelerator is any device that, using electromagnetic fields, is able to communicate energy to charged particles (typically electrons or ionized atoms), accelerating and/or energizing them up to the required level for its purpose. The applications of particle accelerators are countless, beginning in a common TV CRT, passing through medical X-ray devices, and ending in large ion colliders utilized to find the smallest details of the matter. Among the other engineering applications, ...

  9. A superconducting magnetic gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  10. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  11. R&D of BEPCII 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) adopts two 500 MHz superconducting cavities (SCCs) in each ring for higher accelerated gradient, higher Q and lower impedance (Wang et al. The proceedings of SRF’07). There’s no spare cavity due to the limited time and funding during BEPCII construction. If any serious trouble happened on either one of the two cavities and could not be recovered in a short time, the operation of BEPCII facility will be affected. Therefore, since 2009 three spare cavities have been fabricated in China to ensure reliable operation, and two of them have been successfully vertically tested in January and July 2011. This paper will briefly present the manufacture, post-process and vertical test performance of the 500 MHz spare cavities.

  12. Accelerator Technology Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  13. Vascular ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... Vascular ring is rare. It accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition ...

  14. ELECTRON ACCELERATION FOR E-RHIC WITH THE NON-SCALING FFAG.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRBOJEVIC,D.BALSKIEWICZ,M.COURANT,E.D.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    A non-scaling FFAG lattice design to accelerate electrons from 3.2 to 10 GeV is described. This is one of possible solutions for the future electron-ion collider (eRHIC) at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collier (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The e-RHIC proposal requires acceleration of the low emittance electrons up to energy of 10 GeV. To reduce a high cost of the full energy super-conducting linear accelerator an alternative approach with the FFAG is considered. The report describes the 1277 meters circumference non-scaling FFAG ring. The Courant-Snyder functions, orbit offsets, momentum compaction, and path length dependences on momentum during acceleration are presented.

  15. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  16. Superconducting Hadron Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Ostroumov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the main building blocks of a superconducting (SC) linac, the choice of SC resonators, their frequencies, accelerating gradients and apertures, focusing structures, practical aspects of cryomodule design, and concepts to minimize the heat load into the cryogenic system. It starts with an overview of design concepts for all types of hadron linacs differentiated by duty cycle (pulsed or continuous wave) or by the type of ion species (protons, H-, and ions) being accelerated. Design concepts are detailed for SC linacs in application to both light ion (proton, deuteron) and heavy ion linacs. The physics design of SC linacs, including transverse and longitudinal lattice designs, matching between different accelerating–focusing lattices, and transition from NC to SC sections, is detailed. Design of high-intensity SC linacs for light ions, methods for the reduction of beam losses, preventing beam halo formation, and the effect of HOMs and errors on beam quality are discussed. Examples are ta...

  17. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Brito, F A; Silva, J C M

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted as the parameter to move type I to type II domain walls. Alternatively, this means that the domain wall surface is suffering an acceleration as one goes from one type to another. On the other hand, changing from type I to type II state means a formation of a condensate what is in perfect sense of lowering the temperature around the superconductor. One can think of this scenario as an analog of holographic scenarios where this set up is replaced by a black hole near the domain wall.

  18. The new 1.5 GeV storage ring for synchrotron radiation: MAX II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Å.; Eriksson, M.; Lindgren, L.-J.; Röjsel, P.; Werin, S.

    1995-02-01

    The MAX laboratory at Lund University, Sweden, today operates an accelerator system consisting of a 100 MeV racetrack microtron and a 550 MeV storage ring (MAX I). At the moment (July 1994) a new storage ring MAX II is near completion and will start first injections within 2 months. This work gives an overview of the MAX II project including the first beamlines and a description of the accelerator system. MAX II is a 1.5 GeV third generation light source optimized for the VUV and soft-x-ray region. It consists of a ten cell double bend achromat lattice forming the 90 m circumference ring. Injection is done at 500 MeV from the existing storage ring MAX I, and ramping up to full energy will take place in MAX II. The straight sections have a length of 3.2 m and eight sections are free to house insertion devices. At start up the ring will be equipped with one 7.5 T superconducting wiggler and one 1.8 T multipole wiggler. Two more undulators are ordered and under construction. To be able to achieve the project a few shortcuts have been made in the design of the storage ring: (1) Nonzero dispersion is allowed in the straight sections, (2) chromaticity correction is built into the quadrupole magnets, and (3) the length of the straight sections is limited to 3.2 m. The project is progressing on time. Extraction of an electron beam from the MAX I storage ring has been achieved and has successfully been transported into the MAX II building. The MAX II ring is under assembly with most of the sections already mounted. First injection is planned to take place in August 1994.

  19. Vibration insensitive optical ring cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Jin; Jiang Yan-Yi; Fang Su; Bi Zhi-Yi; Ma Long-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The mounting configuration of an optical ring cavity is optimized for vibration insensitivity by finite element analysis. A minimum response to vertical accelerations is found by simulations made for different supporting positions.

  20. Autumn study on storage rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The first two weeks of October have seen storage ring people from accelerator Laboratories throughout the world at CERN to study the fundamental problems of very high energy protonproton colliding beam machines.

  1. Compact ring-based X-ray source with on-orbit and on-energy laser-plasma injection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Marlene; Edelen, Auralee; Gerity, James; Lajoie, Andrew; Lawler, Gerard; Lishilin, Osip; Moon, Kookjin; Sahai, Aakash Ajit; Seryi, Andrei; Shih, Kai; Zerbe, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    We report here the results of a one week long investigation into the conceptual design of an X-ray source based on a compact ring with on-orbit and on-energy laser-plasma accelerator. We performed these studies during the June 2016 USPAS class "Physics of Accelerators, Lasers, and Plasma..." applying the art of inventiveness TRIZ. We describe three versions of the light source with the constraints of the electron beam with energy $1\\,\\rm{GeV}$ or $3\\,\\rm{GeV}$ and a magnetic lattice design being normal conducting (only for the $1\\,\\rm{GeV}$ beam) or superconducting (for either beam). The electron beam recirculates in the ring, to increase the effective photon flux. We describe the design choices, present relevant parameters, and describe insights into such machines.

  2. ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS MODIFICATIONS FOR A SECOND TARGET STATION AT THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, John D [ORNL; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL; Plum, Michael A [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A second target station is planned for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source. The ion source will be upgraded to increase the peak current from 38 to 49 mA, additional superconducting RF cavities will be added to the linac to increase the H beam energy from 938 to 1300 MeV, and the accumulator ring will receive modifications to the injection and extraction systems to accommodate the higher beam energy. After pulse compression in the storage ring one sixth of the beam pulses (10 out of 60 Hz) will be diverted to the second target by kicker and septum magnets added to the existing Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) line. No further modifications will be made to the RTBT so that when the kicker and septum magnets are turned off the original beam transport lattice will be unaffected. In this paper we will discuss these and other planned modifications and upgrades to the accelerator facility.

  3. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  4. Ring blowers. Ring blower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Y.; Okamura, T.; Takahashi, M. (Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-06-10

    Features, structures and several products of ring blowers were outlined. The ring blower is featured by its medium characteristics because it is higher in air pressure than a turboblower and larger in airflow than a vane blower, and it is applicable flexibly to not only air blasting but various industrial fields such as suction transfer. As several products corresponding to various fields, the followings were outlined: the low noise type with optimum shapes of inlet, outlet and casing cover for reducing noises by 10 dB or more, the heat resistant, water-tight and explosion-proof types suitable for severe environmental conditions, the multi-voltage type for every country served at different voltages, the high air pressure type with two pressure rise stages, and the large airflow type with a wide impeller. In addition, as special use products, the glass fiber reinforced unsatulated polyester ring blower for respiration apparatus, and the variable speed blushless DC motor-driven one for medical beds were outlined. 2 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  6. Field quality of 1.5 m long conduction cooled superconducting undulator coils with 20 mm period length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalbuoni, S.; Glamann, N.; Grau, A. W.; Holubek, T.; Saez de Jauregui, D.; Boffo, C.; Gerhard, Th A.; Turenne, M.; Walter, W.

    2017-07-01

    The Institute for Beam Physics and Technology (IBPT) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the industrial partner Babcock Noell GmbH (BNG) are collaborating since 2007 on the development of superconducting undulators both for ANKA and low emittance light sources. The first full length device with 15 mm period length has been successfully tested in the ANKA storage ring for one year. The next superconducting undulator has 20 mm period length (SCU20) and is also planned to be installed in the accelerator test facility and synchrotron light source ANKA. The SCU20 1.5 m long coils have been characterized in a conduction cooled horizontal test facility developed at KIT IBPT. Here we present the local magnetic field and field integral measurements, as well as their analysis including the expected photon spectrum.

  7. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  8. Autocatalytic chemical smoke rings

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, M C; Rogers, Michael C.; Morris, Stephen W.

    2005-01-01

    Buoyant plumes, evolving free of boundary constraints, may develop well-defined mushroom shaped heads. In normal plumes, overturning flow in the head entrains less buoyant fluid from the surroundings as the head rises, robbing the plume of its driving force. We consider here a new type of plume in which the source of buoyancy is an autocatalytic chemical reaction. The reaction occurs at a sharp front which separates reactants from less dense products. In this type of plume, entrainment assists the reaction, producing new buoyancy which fuels an accelerating plume head. When the head has grown to a critical size, it detaches from the upwelling conduit, forming an accelerating, buoyant vortex ring. This vortex is analogous to a rising smoke ring. A second-generation head then develops at the point of detachment.Multiple generations of chemical vortex rings can detach from a single triggering event.

  9. Proceedings of the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference Held in Vancouver, B.C., Canada on 12-16 May, 1997. Volume 1: Plenary and Special Sessions; Accelerators and Storage Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Construction reports range from the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler, to the BESSY-II light source and the TRIUMF-ISAC...include the initial operation of the SPring-8 light source, the PEP-II B-factory high-energy ring, the CERN LEP2 collider , and one sextant of RHIC...radioactive beam facility. Upcoming projects described include the US Spallation Neutron Source, the Japanese Hadron Facility and the RIKEN Beam

  10. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  11. Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  12. Small type accelerator. Try for accelerator driven system

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Y

    2003-01-01

    FFAG (Fixed-field alternating gradient) accelerator for accelerator driven subcritical reactor, which aims to change from long-lived radioactive waste to short-lived radioactivity, is introduced. It is ring accelerator. The performance needed is proton as accelerator particle, 10MW (total) beam power, about 1GeV beam energy, >30% power efficiency and continuous beam. The feature of FFAG accelerator is constant magnetic field. PoP (Proof-of-principle)-FFAG accelerator, radial type, was run at first in Japan in 2000. The excursion is about some ten cm. In principle, beam can be injected and extracted at any place of ring. The 'multi-fish' acceleration can accelerate beams to 100% duty by repeating acceleration. 150MeV-FFAG accelerator has been started since 2001. It tried to practical use, for example, treatment of cancer. (S.Y.)

  13. Vortex rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, D.G. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    This book presents a comprehensive coverage of the wide field of vortex rings. The book presents the results of systematic experimental investigations, theoretical foundation, as well as the practical applications of vortex rings, such as the extinction of fires at gushing gas and oil wells. All the basic properties of vortex rings as well as their hydrodynamic structures are presented. Special attention is paid to the formation and motion of turbulent vortex rings. (orig.)

  14. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  15. Ring theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rowen, Louis H

    1991-01-01

    This is an abridged edition of the author's previous two-volume work, Ring Theory, which concentrates on essential material for a general ring theory course while ommitting much of the material intended for ring theory specialists. It has been praised by reviewers:**""As a textbook for graduate students, Ring Theory joins the best....The experts will find several attractive and pleasant features in Ring Theory. The most noteworthy is the inclusion, usually in supplements and appendices, of many useful constructions which are hard to locate outside of the original sources....The audience of non

  16. Itinerant Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karchev, Naoum

    2004-01-01

    Superconductivity has again become a challenge following the discovery of unconventional superconductivity. Resistance-free currents have been observed in heavy-fermion materials, organic conductors and copper oxides. The discovery of superconductivity in a single crystal of $UGe_2$, $ZrZn_2$ and $URhGe$ revived the interest in the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The experiments indicate that: i)The superconductivity is confined to the ferromagnetic phase. ii)The ferromag...

  17. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  18. Observation of microwave radiation using low-cost detectors at the ANKA storage ring*

    CERN Document Server

    Judin, V; Hofmann, A; Huttel, E; Kehrer, B; Klein, M; Marsching, S; Müller, A S; Nasse, M; Smale, N; Caspers, F; Peier, P

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron light sources emit Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) for wavelengths longer than or equal to the bunch length. At most storage rings CSR cannot be observed, because the vacuum chamber cuts off radiation with long wavelengths. There are different approaches for shifting the CSR to shorter wavelengths that can propagate through the beam pipe, e.g.: the accelerator optics can be optimized for a low momentum compaction factor, thus reducing the bunch length. Alternatively, laser slicing can modulate substructures on long bunches [1]. Both techniques extend the CSR spectrum to shorter wavelengths, so that CSR is emitted at wavelengths below the waveguide shielding cut off. Usually fast detectors, like superconducting bolometer detector systems or Schottky barrier diodes, are used for observation of dynamic processes in accelerator physics. In this paper, we present observations of microwave radiation at ANKA using an alternative detector, a LNB (Low Noise Block) system. These devices are usually use...

  19. Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spentzouris, Linda [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-07-07

    The objective of the proposal was to develop graduate student training in materials and engineering research relevant to the development of particle accelerators. Many components used in today's accelerators or storage rings are at the limit of performance. The path forward in many cases requires the development of new materials or fabrication techniques, or a novel engineering approach. Often, accelerator-based laboratories find it difficult to get top-level engineers or materials experts with the motivation to work on these problems. The three years of funding provided by this grant was used to support development of accelerator components through a multidisciplinary approach that cut across the disciplinary boundaries of accelerator physics, materials science, and surface chemistry. The following results were achieved: (1) significant scientific results on fabrication of novel photocathodes, (2) application of surface science and superconducting materials expertise to accelerator problems through faculty involvement, (3) development of instrumentation for fabrication and characterization of materials for accelerator components, (4) student involvement with problems at the interface of material science and accelerator physics.

  20. A preliminary quadrupole asymmetry study of a β=0.12 superconducting single spoke cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Qin; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Yang, Liu; Luo, Xing; Zhou, Kui; Quan, Sheng-Wen

    2014-10-01

    An Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been launched in China for nuclear waste transmutation. For the application of high intensity proton beam acceleration, the quadrupole asymmetry effect needs to be carefully evaluated for cavities. Single spoke cavities are the main accelerating structures in the low energy front-end. The single spoke cavity has small transverse electromagnetic field asymmetry, which may lead to transverse RF defocusing asymmetry and beam envelope asymmetry. A superconducting single spoke resonator (PKU-2 Spoke) of β=0.12 and f=325 MHz with a racetrack-shaped inner conductor has been designed at Peking university. The study of its RF field quadrupole asymmetry and its effect on transverse momentum change has been performed. The quadrupole asymmetry study has also been performed on a β=0.12 and f=325 MHz ring-shaped single spoke cavity. Our results show that the quadrupole asymmetry is very small for both the racetrack-shaped and the ring-shaped single spoke cavity.

  1. Global particle accelerator gets the big chill

    CERN Multimedia

    Sherriff, Lucy

    2004-01-01

    Scientists at an international symposium in Beijing have recommended that a new global particle accelerator should be based on "cold" or superconducting technology, bringing the construction of the multi-billion dollar facility one step closer to reality (½ page)

  2. Spontaneous fluxoid formation in superconducting loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Rivers, R.

    2009-01-01

    a scaling relation on the quenching time τQ, as one would expect if the transition took place as fast as causality permits. However, the observed Zurek-Kibble scaling exponent σ=0.62±0.15 is two times larger than anticipated for large loops. Assuming Gaussian winding number densities we show......We report on the experimental verification of the Zurek-Kibble scenario in an isolated superconducting ring over a wide parameter range. The probability of creating a single flux quantum spontaneously during the fast normal-superconducting phase transition of a wide Nb loop clearly follows...

  3. Planetary Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tiscareno, Matthew S

    2011-01-01

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks, and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft. Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 1e-7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close-range and in real-time in planetary rings. We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The main rings of Saturn comprise our system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty...

  4. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  5. Report on Workshop on Future Directions for Accelerator R&D at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; Church, M.; Spentzouris, P.; Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Accelerator R&D has played a crucial role in enabling scientific discovery in the past century and will continue to play this role in the years to come. In the U.S., the Office of High Energy Physics of DOE's Office of Science is developing a plan for national accelerator R&D stewardship. Fermilab undertakes accelerator research, design, and development focused on superconducting radio-frequency (RF), superconducting magnet, beam cooling, and high intensity proton technologies. In addition, the Lab pursues comprehensive integrated theoretical concepts and simulations of complete future facilities on both the energy and intensity frontiers. At present, Fermilab (1) supplies integrated design concept and technology development for a multi-MW proton source (Project X) to support world-leading programs in long baseline neutrino and rare processes experiments; (2) plays a leading role in the development of ionization cooling technologies required for muon storage ring facilities at the energy (multi-TeV Muon Collider) and intensity (Neutrino Factory) frontiers, and supplies integrated design concepts for these facilities; and (3) carries out a program of advanced accelerator R&D (AARD) in the field of high quality beam sources, and novel beam manipulation techniques.

  6. Theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Crisan, Mircea

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up t

  7. LHC accelerator physics and technology challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1998-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) incorporates many technological innovations in order to achieve its design objectives at the lowest cost. The two-in-one magnet design, with the two magnetic channels i ntegrated into a common yoke, has proved to be an economical alternative to two separate rings and allows enough free space in the existing (LEP) tunnel for a possible future re-installation of a lept on ring for e-p physics. In order to achieve the design energy of 7 TeV per beam, with a dipole field of 8.3 T, the superconducting magnet system must operate in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The LHC wi ll be the first hadron machine to produce appreciable synchrotron radiation which, together with the heat load due to image currents, has to be absorbed at cryogenic temperatures. A brief review of th e machine design is given and some of the main technological and accelerator physics issues are discussed.

  8. LHC Accelerator Physics and Technology Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) incorporates many technological innovations in order to achieve its design objectives at the lowest cost. The two-in-one magnet design, with the two magnetic channels integrated into a common yoke, has proved to be an economical alternative to two separate rings and allows enough free space in the existing (LEP) tunnel for a possible future re-installation of a lepton ring for e-p physics. In order to achieve the design energy of 7 TeV per beam, with a dipole field of 8.3 T, the superconducting magnet system must operate in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. This requires further development of cold compressors similar to those first used at CEBAF. The LHC will be the first hadron machine to produce appreciable synchrotron radiation which, together with the heat load due to image currents, has to be absorbed at cryogenic temperatures. Finally, the LHC is the first major CERN accelerator project built in collaboration with other laboratories. A brief review of the machine design is giv...

  9. Fast Resonance Frequency Modulation in Superconducting Stripline Resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Segev, Eran; Abdo, Baleegh; Shtempluck, Oleg; Buks, Eyal

    2006-01-01

    Fast resonance frequency modulation of a superconducting stripline resonator is investigated. The experiments are performed using a novel device which integrates a hot electron detector (HED) into a superconducting stripline ring resonator. Frequency modulation is demonstrated by both applying dc current or voltage to the HED, and by applying optical illumination, with modulation frequencies of up to 4.2GHz. Potential applications for such a device are in telecommunication, quantum cryptograp...

  10. Future Accelerator Magnet Needs

    CERN Document Server

    Devred, Arnaud; Yamamoto, A

    2005-01-01

    Superconducting magnet technology is continually evolving in order to meet the demanding needs of new accelerators and to provide necessary upgrades for existing machines. A variety of designs are now under development, including high fields and gradients, rapid cycling and novel coil configurations. This paper presents a summary of R&D programs in the EU, Japan and the USA. A performance comparison between NbTi and Nb3Sn along with fabrication and cost issues are also discussed.

  11. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  12. Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  13. Superconducting rf development at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Clifft, B.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India); Givens, J.; Potter, J.; Crandall, K. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Added, N. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    The ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linac began operation in 1978 and has operated nearly continuously since that time, while undergoing a series of upgrades and expansions, the most recent being the ``uranium upgrade`` completed earlier this year and described below. In its present configuration the ATLAS linac consists of an array of 64 resonant cavities operating from 48 to 145 MHz, which match a range of particle velocities .007 < {beta} = v/c < .2. The linac provides approximately 50 MV of effective accelerating potential for ions of q/m > 1/10 over the entire periodic table. Delivered beams include 5 {minus} 7 pnA of {sup 238}U{sup 39+} at 1535 MeV. At present more than 10{sup 6} cavity-hours of operation at surface electric fields of 15 MV/m have been accumulated. Superconducting structure development at ATLAS is aimed at improving the cost/performance of existing low velocity structures both for possible future ATLAS upgrades, and also for heavy-ion linacs at other institutions. An application of particular current interest is to develop structures suitable for accelerating radioactive ion beams. Such structures must accelerate very low charge to mass ratio beams and must also have very large transverse acceptance.

  14. Cryogenic supply for accelerators and experiments at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauschke, M.; Xiang, Y.; Schroeder, C. H.; Streicher, B.; Kollmus, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1,64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-29

    In the coming years the new international accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), one of the largest research projects worldwide, will be built at GSI. In the final construction FAIR consists of synchrotrons and storage rings with up to 1,100 meters in circumference, two linear accelerators and about 3.5 kilometers beam transfer lines. The existing GSI accelerators serve as pre-accelerators. Partly the new machines will consist of superconducting magnets and therefore require a reliable supply with liquid helium. As the requirements for the magnets is depending on the machine and have a high variety, the cooling system is different for each machine; two phase cooling, forced flow cooling and bath cooling respectively. In addition the cold mass of the individual magnets varies between less than 1t up to 80t and some magnets will cause a dynamic heat load due to ramping that is higher than the static loads. The full cryogenic system will be operated above atmospheric pressure. The refrigeration and liquefaction power will be provided by two main cryogenic plants of 8 and 25 kW at 4K and two smaller plants next to the experiments.

  15. Accelerating News Issue 4

    CERN Document Server

    Szeberenyi, A; Wildner, E

    2012-01-01

    In this winter issue, we are very pleased to announce the approval of EuCARD-2 by the European Commission. We look at the conclusions of EUROnu in proposing future neutrino facilities at CERN, a new milestone reached by CLIC and progress on the SPARC upgrade using C-band technology. We also report on recent events: second Joint HiLumi LHC-LARP Annual Meeting and workshop on Superconducting technologies for the Next Generation of Accelerators aiming at closer collaboration with industry. The launch of the Accelerators for Society brochure is also highlighted.

  16. Beam commissioning for a superconducting proton linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; He, Yuan; Jia, Huan; Dou, Wei-ping; Chen, Wei-long; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, Shu-hui; Feng, Chi; Tao, Yue; Wang, Wang-sheng; Wu, Jian-qiang; Zhang, Sheng-hu; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2016-12-01

    To develop the next generation of safe and cleaner nuclear energy, the accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system emerges as one of the most attractive technologies. It will be able to transmute the long-lived transuranic radionuclides produced in the reactors of today's nuclear power plants into shorter-lived ones, and also it will provide positive energy output at the same time. The prototype of the Chinese ADS (C-ADS) proton accelerator comprises two injectors and a 1.5 GeV, 10 mA continuous wave (CW) superconducting main linac. The injector scheme II at the C-ADS demo facility inside the Institute of Modern Physics is a 10 MeV CW superconducting linac with a designed beam current of 10 mA, which includes an ECR ion source, a low-energy beam transport line, a 162.5 MHz radio frequency quadrupole accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport line, and a superconducting half wave resonator accelerator section. This demo facility has been successfully operating with an 11 mA, 2.7 MeV CW beam and a 3.9 mA, 4.3 MeV CW beam at different times and conditions since June 2014. The beam power has reached 28 kW, which is the highest record for the same type of linear accelerators. In this paper, the parameters of the test injector II and the progress of the beam commissioning are reported.

  17. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  18. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  19. The Real-Time Data Analysis and Decision System for Particle Flux Detection in the LHC Accelerator at CERN.

    CERN Document Server

    Zamantzas, C; Dehning, B

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is an accelerator unprecedented in terms of beam energy, particle production rate and also in the potential of self-destruction. Its operation requires a large variety of instrumentation, not only for the control of the beams, but also for the protection of the complex hardware systems. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has to prevent the superconducting magnets from becoming normal conducting and protect the machine components against damages making it one of the most critical elements for the protection of the LHC. For its operation, the system requires 3600 detectors to be placed at various locations around the 27 km ring. The measurement system is sub-divided to the tunnel electronics, which are responsible for acquiring, digitising and transmitting the data, and the surface electronics, which receive the data via 2 km optical data links, process, analyze, store and issue warning...

  20. Vibration control in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  1. Design and simulation of a new type of 500 MHz single-cell superconducting RF cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chang-Wang; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; ZHENG Xiang; WEI Ye-Long; YU Hai-Bo; LI Zheng; XU Kai; LIU Jian-Fei; HOU Hong-Tao; MA Zhen-Yu; MAO Dong-Qing; FENG Zi-Qiang; ZHAO Shen-Jie; LUO Chen; ZHAO Yu-Bin

    2012-01-01

    This paper illustrates the design and simulation of a unique 500 MHz single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a fluted beam pipe and a coaxial-type fundamental power coupler.The simulation results show that the cavity has a high r/Q value,a low peak surface field and a large beam aperture,so it can be a candidate cavity for high current accelerators.With the help of a fluted beam tube,almost all the higher order modes can propagate out of the cavity,especially the first two dipole modes,TE111 and TM110,and the first higher monopole mode,TM011.The external quality factor of the coaxial fundamental power coupler is optimized to 1.2× 105,which will be useful when it is applied in the light source storage ring.

  2. SUPRAMITRAL RING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Supra mitral ring is a rare cause for congenital mitral valve obstr uction. The reported incidence of supramitral ring is 0.2-0.4% in general population and 8% in patients with congenital mitral valve disease. The condition is characterized by an abnormal ridge of connective tissue often circumferential in shape ,on the atrial side of the mitral valve encroaching on the orifice of the mitral valve. It may adhere to the leaflets of the valve and restrict their movements. Although a supramitral ring may be rarely nonobstructive, it often results in mitral valve inflow obstruction.

  3. 27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  4. The KEK Digital Accelerator and Its Brothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Ken

    Circular induction accelerators developed in the last 10 years are discussed. They are characterized by induction acceleration of a charged beam bunch trapped in the barrier bucket. This property enables acceleration of any ion species from an extremely low energy to relativistic energy in a single accelerator ring. In the future, a racetrack-shaped fixed field induction accelerator (induction microtron) could be realized as a unique accelerator for cluster ions such as C-60 and Si-100.

  5. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  6. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  7. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  8. Superconducting material development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    A superconducting compound was developed that showed a transition to a zero-resistance state at 65 C, or 338 K. The superconducting material, which is an oxide based on strontium, barium, yttrium, and copper, continued in the zero-resistance state similar to superconductivity for 10 days at room temperature in the air. It was also noted that measurements of the material allowed it to observe a nonlinear characteristic curve between current and voltage at 65 C, which is another indication of superconductivity. The research results of the laboratory experiment with the superconducting material will be published in the August edition of the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

  9. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  10. Feasibility of an XUV FEL Oscillator Driven by a SCRF Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Freund, H. P.; Reinsch, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility is currently under construction at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Using a1-ms-long macropulse composed of up to 3000 micropulses, and with beam energies projected from 45 to 800 MeV, the possibility for an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) free-electron laser oscillator (FELO) with the higher energy is evaluated. We have used both GINGER with an oscillator module and the MEDUSA/OPC code to assess FELO saturation prospects at 120 nm, 40 nm, and 13.4 nm. The results support saturation at all of these wavelengths which are also shorter than the demonstrated shortest wavelength record of 176 nm from a storage-ring-based FELO. This indicates linac-driven FELOs can be extended into this XUV wavelength regime previously only reached with single-pass FEL configurations.

  11. Selected topics in particle accelerators: Proceedings of the CAP meetings. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsa, Z. [ed.] [comp.

    1995-10-01

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Center for Accelerator Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory Editing and changes to the authors` contributions in this Report were made only to fulfill the publication requirements. This volume includes notes and transparencies on nine presentations: ``The Energy Exchange and Efficiency Consideration in Klystrons``, ``Some Properties of Microwave RF Sources for Future Colliders + Overview of Microwave Generation Activity at the University of Maryland``, ``Field Quality Improvements in Superconducting Magnets for RHIC``, ``Hadronic B-Physics``, ``Spiking Pulses from Free Electron Lasers: Observations and Computational Models``, ``Crystalline Beams in Circular Accelerators``, ``Accumulator Ring for AGS & Recent AGS Performance``, ``RHIC Project Machine Status``, and ``Gamma-Gamma Colliders.``

  12. Determinantal rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bruns, Winfried

    1988-01-01

    Determinantal rings and varieties have been a central topic of commutative algebra and algebraic geometry. Their study has attracted many prominent researchers and has motivated the creation of theories which may now be considered part of general commutative ring theory. The book gives a first coherent treatment of the structure of determinantal rings. The main approach is via the theory of algebras with straightening law. This approach suggest (and is simplified by) the simultaneous treatment of the Schubert subvarieties of Grassmannian. Other methods have not been neglected, however. Principal radical systems are discussed in detail, and one section is devoted to each of invariant and representation theory. While the book is primarily a research monograph, it serves also as a reference source and the reader requires only the basics of commutative algebra together with some supplementary material found in the appendix. The text may be useful for seminars following a course in commutative ring theory since a ...

  13. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  14. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati, E-mail: dhakal@jlab.org; Ciovati, Gianluigi, E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org; Myneni, Ganapati R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications.

  15. Post-LHC accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2001-06-10

    The design and practicality of future accelerators, such as hadron colliders and neutrino factories being considered to supercede the LHC, will depend greatly on the choice of superconducting magnets. Various possibilities will be reviewed and discussed, taking into account recent progress and projected improvements in magnet design and conductor development along with the recommendations from the 2001 Snowmass workshop.

  16. Cave Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by...who expanded on Deegan et al.[3] to find an exact form for the evaporation flux over a sessile drop . It turns out that solving 179 for the flux is

  17. Prototype Superconducting Quadrupole for the ISR high-luminosity (low beta)insertion:end view.

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    In this picture, taken before the insertion of the inner vacuum chamber with inbedded 6-pole superconducting windings, one can see the main components of the magnet structure: (from inside outwards) the superconducting quadrupole coils surronded by glass epoxy bandage rings and stainless steel spacers, the low-carbon steel yoke quadrants and the aluminium alloy shrinking rings. See also photos 7702307, 7702688X, 7702690X.

  18. Vascular rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Conversion of CESR to Operate as the Test Accelerator, CesrTA, Part 2: Vacuum Modifications

    CERN Document Server

    Billing, M G

    2015-01-01

    Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it ideal for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper, the second in a series of four, discusses the modifications of the vacuum system necessary for the conversion of CESR to the test accelerator, CesrTA, enhanced to study such subjects as low emittance tuning methods, electron cloud (EC) effects, intra-beam scattering, fast ion instabilities as well as general improvements to beam instrumentation. A separate paper describes the vacuum system modifications of the superconducting wigglers to accommodate the ...

  20. Electromagnetic radiation of superconducting cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozin, D. A.; Zadorozhna, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    Cosmic strings are relics of the early Universe which can be formed during the phase transitions of fields with spontaneously broken symmetry in the early Universe. Their existence finds support in modern superstrings theories, both in compactification models and in theories with extended additional dimensions. Strings can hold currents, effectively become electrically superconducting wires of astrophysical dimensions. Superconducting cosmic strings can serve as powerful sources of non-thermal radiation in wide energy range. Mechanisms of radiation are synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton and inverse-Compton on CMB photons radiation of electrons accelerated by bow shock wave, created by magnetosphere of relativistically moving string in intergalactic medium (IGM). Expected fluxes of radiation from the shocked plasma around superconducting cosmic strings are calculated for strings with various tensions and for different cases of their location. Possibilities of strings detection by existing facilities are estimated.

  1. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-05-01

    During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers.

  2. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Christiane Lefèvre

    2008-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  3. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    De Melis, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark blue line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  4. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Haffner, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  5. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Mobs, Esma Anais

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark blue line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  6. Nuclear physics with superconducting cyclotron at Kolkata: Scopes and possibilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sailajananda Bhattacharya

    2010-08-01

    The K500 superconducting cyclotron at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, India is getting ready to deliver its first accelerated ion beam for experiment. At the same time, the nuclear physics programme and related experimental facility development activities are taking shape. A general review of the nuclear physics research opportunities with the superconducting cyclotron and the present status of the development of different detector arrays and other experimental facilities will be presented.

  7. Baseline review of the U.S. LHC Accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Review of the U.S. Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Accelerator project was conducted February 23--26, 1998, at the request of Dr. John R. O`Fallon, Director, Division of High Energy Physics, Office of Energy Research, U.S. DOE. This is the first review of the U.S. LHC Accelerator project. Overall, the Committee found that the U.S. LHC Accelerator project effort is off to a good start and that the proposed scope is very conservative for the funding available. The Committee recommends that the project be initially baselined at a total cost of $110 million, with a scheduled completion data of 2005. The U.S. LHC Accelerator project will supply high technology superconducting magnets for the interaction regions (IRs) and the radio frequency (rf) straight section of the LHC intersecting storage rings. In addition, the project provides the cryogenic support interface boxes to service the magnets and radiation absorbers to protect the IR dipoles and the inner triplet quadrupoles. US scientists will provide support in analyzing some of the detailed aspects of accelerator physics in the two rings. The three laboratories participating in this project are Brookhaven National Laboratory, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Committee was very impressed by the technical capabilities of the US LHC Accelerator project team. Cost estimates for each subsystem of the US LHC Accelerator project were presented to the Review Committee, with a total cost including contingency of $110 million (then year dollars). The cost estimates were deemed to be conservative. A re-examination of the funding profile, costs, and schedules on a centralized project basis should lead to an increased list of deliverables. The Committee concluded that the proposed scope of US deliverables to CERN can be readily accomplished with the $110 million total cost baseline for the project. The current deliverables should serve as

  8. Topological rings

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, S

    1993-01-01

    This text brings the reader to the frontiers of current research in topological rings. The exercises illustrate many results and theorems while a comprehensive bibliography is also included. The book is aimed at those readers acquainted with some very basic point-set topology and algebra, as normally presented in semester courses at the beginning graduate level or even at the advanced undergraduate level. Familiarity with Hausdorff, metric, compact and locally compact spaces and basic properties of continuous functions, also with groups, rings, fields, vector spaces and modules, and with Zorn''s Lemma, is also expected.

  9. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  10. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  11. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-08

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed.

  12. The LEP e+e−ring at the energy frontier of circular lepton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The Large Electron Positron ring (LEP) was a circular lepton collider at CERN. It operated at beam energies around 47GeV to produce the neutral Z0 particle and above 80 GeV to create pairs of the charged W± bosons. At these high energies the emission of synchrotron radiation was important and demanded a very high voltage of the RF-system. It also influenced the choice of many other machine parameters. This presentation tries to show how the basic accelerator physics was used to optimize the machine and to find innovative solutions for some problems: magnets with concrete between the laminations, modulated cavities, Nb-Cu superconducting cavities, nonevaporable getter pumps, optics analysis from multi-turn data and many more.

  13. Fundamentals of Superconducting Nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Anatolie

    2011-01-01

    This book demonstrates how the new phenomena in superconductivity on the nanometer scale (FFLO state, triplet superconductivity, Crossed Andreev Reflection, synchronized generation etc.) serve as the basis for the invention and development of novel nanoelectronic devices and systems. It demonstrates how rather complex ideas and theoretical models, like odd-pairing, non-uniform superconducting state, pi-shift etc., adequately describe the processes in real superconducting nanostructues and novel devices based on them. The book is useful for a broad audience of readers, researchers, engineers, P

  14. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  15. Superconducting optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  16. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  17. Superconducting Materials and Conductors : Fabrication and Limiting Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is the technology that enabled the construction of the most recent generation of high-energy particle accelerators, the largest scientific instruments ever built. In this review we trace the evolution of superconducting materials for particle accelerator magnets, from the first steps in the late 1960s, through the rise and glory of Nb–Ti in the 1970s, till the 2010s, and the promises of Nb3Sn for the 2020s. We conclude with a perspective on the opportunities for high-temperature superconductors (HTSs). Many such reviews have been written in the past, as witnessed by the long list of references provided. In this review we put particular emphasis on the practical aspects of wire and tape manufacturing, cabling, engineering performance, and potential for use in accelerator magnets, while leaving in the background matters such as the physics of superconductivity and fundamental material issues.

  18. Design and development progress of a LLRF control system for a 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. S.; Kim, H. W.; Song, H. S.; Lee, J. H.; Park, K. H.; Yu, I. H.; Chai, J. S.

    2012-07-01

    The LLRF (low-level radio-frequency) control system which regulates the amplitude and the phase of the accelerating voltage inside a RF cavity is essential to ensure the stable operation of charged particle accelerators. Recent advances in digital signal processors and data acquisition systems have allowed the LLRF control system to be implemented in digitally and have made it possible to meet the higher demands associated with the performance of LLRF control systems, such as stability, accuracy, etc. For this reason, many accelerator laboratories have completed or are completing the developments of digital LLRF control systems. The digital LLRF control system has advantages related with flexibility and fast reconfiguration. This paper describes the design of the FPGA (field programmable gate array) based LLRF control system and the status of development for this system. The proposed LLRF control system includes an analog front-end, a digital board (ADC (analog to digital converter), DAC (digital to analog converter), FPGA, etc.) and a RF & clock generation system. The control algorithms will be implemented by using the VHDL (VHSIC (very high speed integrated circuits) hardware description language), and the EPICS (experiment physics and industrial control system) will be ported to the host computer for the communication. In addition, the purpose of this system is to control a 500 MHz RF cavity, so the system will be applied to the superconducting cavity to be installed in the PLS storage ring, and its performance will be tested.

  19. Ring interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Malykin, Grigorii B; Zhurov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the creation of a comprehensive formalism for quantitative description of polarized modes' linear interaction in modern single-mode optic fibers. The theory of random connections between polarized modes, developed in the monograph, allows calculations of the zero shift deviations for a fiber ring interferometer. The monograph addresses also the

  20. Prototype Superconducting Quadrupole for the ISR low-beta insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows the cold mass of the Quadrupole with its outer aluminium alloy rings pre-compressing the superconducting coils via the magnetic yoke split in 4 parts.The end of the inner vacuum chamber,supporting the 6-pole correction windings, can also be seen as well as the electrical connections. See also photos 7702690X, 7702307.

  1. Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andrew D.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Marsili, Francesco; Cohen, Justin D.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Painter, Oskar J.; Shaw, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated WSi-based superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors coupled to SiNx waveguides with integrated ring resonators. This photonics platform enables the implementation of robust and efficient photon-counting detectors with fine spectral resolution near 1550 nm.

  2. 3D calculations of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 3 Tesla magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lari, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A 20 TeV Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) proton accelerator is being proposed by the High Energy Physics Community. One proposal would consist of a ring of magnets 164 km in circumference with a field strength of 3 Tesla and would cost 2.7 billion dollars. The magnet consists of stacked steel laminations with superconducting coils. The desired field uniformity is obtained for all fields from 0.2 to 3 Tesla by using three (or more) different pole shapes. These three different laminations are stacked in the order 1-2-3-1-2-3-... creating a truly three dimensional geometry. A three laminated stack 1-2-3 with periodic boundary conditions at 1 and 3 was assigned about 5000 finite elements per lamination and solved using the computer program TOSCA. To check the TOSCA results, the field of each of the three different shaped laminations was calculated separately using periodic boundary conditions and compared to the two dimensional field calculations using TRIM. This was done for a constant permeability of 2000 and using the B-H table for fully annealed 1010 steel. The difference of the field calculations in the region of interest was always less than +-.2%

  3. Comparison of two superconducting elliptical undulators for generating circularly polarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Hwang

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of two planar superconducting elliptical undulators—a vertically wound racetrack coil structure and a staggered array structure—to generate a circularly polarized hard x-ray source was investigated. The magnetic poles and wires of the up and down magnet arrays were rotated in alternating directions on the horizontal plane, an elliptical field is generated to provide circularly polarized light in the electron-storage ring and the energy-recovery linac accelerator. Rapid switching between right- and left-circularly polarized radiations is performed using two undulators with oppositely rotated wires and poles. Given a periodic length of 15 mm and a gap of 5 mm, the magnetic-flux densities in the elliptical undulator are B_{z}=1.2   T (B_{x}=0.6   T and B_{z}=0.35   T (B_{x}=0.15   T in the planar vertically wound racetrack coil and the staggered structure with poles rotated by 35° and 25°, respectively. In maximizing the merit of the flux and the width of the effective field region in the two superconducting elliptical undulators, the trade-off rotation angles of the coils and poles are 20° and 5°, for vertically wound racetrack coil and staggered undulators, respectively.

  4. On SAP-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhixiang, Wu

    2006-01-01

    The rings whose simple right modules are absolutely pure are called right $SAP$-rings. We give a new characterization of right $SAP$ rings, right $V$ rings, and von Neumann regular rings. We also obtain a new decomposition theory of right selfinjective von Neumann regular rings. The relationships between $SAP$-rings, $V$-rings, and von Neumann regular rings are explored. Some recent results obtained by Faith are generalized and the results of Wu-Xia are strengthened.

  5. Workshop on accelerator magnet superconductors. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The workshop on accelerator magnet superconductors has gathered 102 registered participants from research laboratories, universities and industry. 8 European companies, active in superconducting materials and cables were present. This workshop has been organized to deal with the status of the world research and development on superconducting materials and cables for high field magnets (B > 10 T). The workshop has also reviewed the status of high temperature superconductors and transmission line cables for potential use in low field superconducting magnets for injectors and beam transfer lines, as well as cables for pulsed magnets that might be used in future hadron colliders or injectors.

  6. Design of a superconducting low beta niobium resonator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash Potukuchi; Amit Roy

    2012-04-01

    The proposed high current injector for the superconducting Linac at the InterUniversity Accelerator Centre will have several accelerating structures, including a superconducting module which will contain low beta niobium resonators. A prototype resonator for the low beta module has been designed. The resonator has been carefully modelled to optimize the electromagnetic parameters. In order to validate them, a room-temperature copper model has been built and tested. In this paper we present details of the electromagnetic design of the low beta resonator, briefly discuss the mechanical and engineering design, and present results from the measurements on the room-temperature copper model.

  7. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  8. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  9. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-07-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; Defense Free-Electron Lasers; AXY Programs; A Next Generation High-Power Neutron-Scattering Facility; JAERI OMEGA Project and Intense Neutron Sources for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Supercollider; The High-Power Microwave (HPM) Program; Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Power Systems Highlights; Industrial Partnering; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Theory and Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  10. Field Simulation of Main Magnet for 230 MeV Superconducting Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Chuan; LI; Ming; ZHANG; Dong-sheng; YIN; Meng; YANG; Jian-jun; CUI; Tao; LV; Yin-long; AN; Shi-zhong; ZHANG; Tian-jue

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting proton cyclotrons have many advantages over competitive accelerators in medium energy range,namely,lower construction cost,lower operation cost,more compact thus more suitable to be installed in limited cite like hospitals.More specifically,as superconducting proton cyclotrons provide CW proton

  11. Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

  12. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  13. Accelerator Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, Klaus H.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  14. Proceedings of the first international workshop on accelerator alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    This report contains papers on the following accelerator topics: current alignment topics; toolboxes: instrumentation, software, and methods; fiducialization of conventional magnets; fiducialization of superconducting magnets; and next generation linear colliders.

  15. Technology and applications of advanced accelerator concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2016-01-01

    Since its invention in the 1920s, particle accelerators have made tremendous progress in accelerator science, technology and applications. However, the fundamental acceleration principle, namely, to apply an external radiofrequency (RF) electric field to accelerate charged particles, remains unchanged. As this method (either room temperature RF or superconducting RF) is approaching its intrinsic limitation in acceleration gradient (measured in MeV/m), it becomes apparent that new methods with much higher acceleration gradient (measured in GeV/m) must be found for future very high energy accelerators as well as future compact (table-top or room-size) accelerators. This volume introduces a number of advanced accelerator concepts (AAC) — their principles, technologies and potential applications. For the time being, none of them stands out as a definitive direction in which to go. But these novel ideas are in hot pursuit and look promising. Furthermore, some AAC requires a high power laser system. This has the ...

  16. CAS Accelerator Physics held in Erice, Italy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Superconductivity for Accelerators, held at the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture in Erice, Italy from 24 April-4 May, 2013.   Photo courtesy of Alessandro Noto, Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture. Following a handful of summary lectures on accelerator physics and the fundamental processes of superconductivity, the course covered a wide range of topics related to superconductivity and highlighted the latest developments in the field. Realistic case studies and topical seminars completed the programme. The school was very successful with 94 participants representing 23 nationalities, coming from countries as far away as Belorussia, Canada, China, India, Japan and the United States (for the first time a young Ethiopian lady, studying in Germany, attended this course). The programme comprised 35 lectures, 3 seminars and 7 hours of case study. The case studies were p...

  17. Simulation of magnetization and levitation properties of arrays of ring-shaped type-II superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun, E-mail: linxj8686@163.com; Huang, Chenguang; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe, E-mail: zhouyh@lzu.edu.cn

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • A strong magnetic coupling appears if the gap between the superconducting rings is small. • The saturation magnetization of superconducting rings is related to the radial gap but independent of the vertical gap. • The array of rings in a non-uniform field experiences a levitation force, which increases with increasing height or thickness of the rings. - Abstract: This paper presents an analysis of the magnetic and mechanical properties of arrays of superconducting rings arranged in axial, radial, and matrix configurations under different magnetic fields. In terms of the Bean's critical state model and the minimum magnetic energy method, the dependences of the magnetization and levitation behaviors on the geometry, number, and gap of the superconducting rings are obtained. The results show that when the applied field is spatially uniform, the magnetic property of the superconducting array is associated with the gaps between the rings. For the case of small gaps, the entire array becomes not easy to be fully penetrated by the induced currents, and the magnetic field profiles of which are almost the same as ones in a single large ring. If the superconducting array is fully penetrated, its saturation magnetization value is affected by the radial interval and, however, is almost independent of the vertical separation. When the applied field produced by a cylindrical permanent magnet is nonuniform, the superconducting array will be subjected to a levitation force. The levitation force increases monotonically and finally reaches a saturation value with increasing height or thickness of the rings, and such saturation value is closely related to the inner radius of the array.

  18. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  19. Design of a superconducting insert to obtain a high and quasi-uniform magnetic force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, Jean [GREEN, University of Nancy BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Netter, Denis [GREEN, University of Nancy BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Quettier, Lionel [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay (France); Mailfert, Alain [INPL, 2 av de la foret de Haye, 54516 Vandoeuvre (France)

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we study the magnetic force generated by the combination of a solenoid and a superconducting ring insert. We have focused our study on the uniformity of the magnetic force. We use a genetic algorithm to determine the optimal shape of the superconducting ring. We are able to obtain uniformity of 0.5% variance. We also study the influence of several factors on uniformity, such as the critical current of the coil, the ring, and the size of the working area.

  20. An RF input coupler for a superconducting single cell cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechner, B.; Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Mukugi, Ken [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Krawczyk, F.

    1999-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposes a high intensity proton accelerator for the Neutron Science Project. A superconducting linac is a main option for the high energy part of the accelerator. Design and development work for the superconducting accelerating cavities (resonant frequency of 600 MHz) is in progress. Superconducting cavities have an advantage of very high accelerating efficiency because RF wall loss is very small and much of the RF power fed to the cavity is consumed for the beam acceleration. On the other hand, an RF input coupler for the superconducting cavity has to be matched to the beam loading. Therefore, estimation of coupling coefficient or external quality factor (Qext) of the RF input coupler is important for the design of the couplers. In this work, Qext`s were calculated by the electromagnetic analysis code (MAFIA) and were compared with those by the measurements. A {beta} (ratio of the particle velocity to the light velocity) = 0.5 single-cell cavity with either axial coupler or side coupler was used in this work. In the experiments, a model cavity made by copper is applied. Both 2- and 3-dimensional calculations were performed in the axial coupler geometry and the results were compared. The agreements between calculated and measured values are good and this method for calculation of Qext is confirmed to be proper for the design of the RF input couplers. (author)

  1. Thermal analysis of superconducting undulator cryomodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroyanagi, Y.; Doose, C.; Fuerst, J.; Harkay, K.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.

    2015-12-01

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator (SCU0) has been operating in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring since January of 2013. Based on lessons learned from the construction and operation of SCU0, a second superconducting undulator (SCU1) has been built and cold tested stand-alone. An excess cooling capacity measurement and static heat load analysis show a large improvement of cryogenic performance of SCU1 compared with SCU0. ANSYS-based thermal analysis of these cryomodules incorporating all the cooling circuits was completed. Comparisons between measured and calculated temperatures at the three operating conditions of the cryomodule (static, beam heat only, beam heat and magnet current) will be presented.

  2. Terahertz Saturable Absorption in Superconducting Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Keiser, George R; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    We present a superconducting metamaterial saturable absorber at terahertz frequencies. The absorber consists of an array of split ring resonators (SRRs) etched from a 100nm YBaCu3O7 (YBCO) film. A polyimide spacer layer and gold ground plane are deposited above the SRRs, creating a reflecting perfect absorber. Increasing either the temperature or incident electric field (E) decreases the superconducting condensate density and corresponding kinetic inductance of the SRRs. This alters the impedance matching in the metamaterial, reducing the peak absorption. At low electric fields, the absorption was optimized near 80% at T=10K and decreased to 20% at T=70K. For E=40kV/cm and T=10K, the peak absorption was 70% decreasing to 40% at 200kV/cm, corresponding to a modulation of 43%.

  3. The ISAC post-accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Marchetto, M.

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration chain of the ISAC facility boosts the energy of both radioactive and stable light and heavy ions for beam delivery to both a medium energy area in ISAC-I and a high energy area in ISAC-II. The post-accelerator comprises a 35.4 MHz RFQ to accelerate beams of A/q ≤ 30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 106.1 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of A/q ≤ 6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. A 40 MV superconducting linac further accelerates beam from 1.5 MeV/u to energies above the Coulomb barrier. All linacs operate cw to preserve beam intensity.

  4. Characterization of superconducting multilayers samples

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, C Z; Berry, S; Bouat, S; Jacquot, J F; Villegier, J C; Lamura, G; Gurevich, A

    2009-01-01

    Best RF bulk niobium accelerating cavities have nearly reached their ultimate limits at rf equatorial magnetic field H  200 mT close to the thermodynamic critical field Hc. In 2006 Gurevich proposed to use nanoscale layers of superconducting materials with high values of Hc > HcNb for magnetic shielding of bulk niobium to increase the breakdown magnetic field inside SC RF cavities [1]. Depositing good quality layers inside a whole cavity is rather difficult but we have sputtered high quality samples by applying the technique used for the preparation of superconducting electronics circuits and characterized these samples by X-ray reflectivity, dc resistivity (PPMS) and dc magnetization (SQUID). Dc magnetization curves of a 250 nm thick Nb film have been measured, with and without a magnetron sputtered coating of a single or multiple stack of 15 nm MgO and 25 nm NbN layers. The Nb samples with/without the coating clearly exhibit different behaviors. Because SQUID measurements are influenced by edge an...

  5. DC superconducting fault current limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixador, P.; Villard, C.; Cointe, Y.

    2006-03-01

    There is a lack of satisfying solutions for fault currents using conventional technologies, especially in DC networks, where a superconducting fault current limiter could play a very important part. DC networks bring a lot of advantages when compared to traditional AC ones, in particular within the context of the liberalization of the electric market. Under normal operation in a DC network, the losses in the superconducting element are nearly zero and only a small, i.e. a low cost, refrigeration system is then required. The absence of zero crossing of a DC fault current favourably accelerates the normal zone propagation. The very high current slope at the time of the short circuit in a DC grid is another favourable parameter. The material used for the experiments is YBCO deposited on Al2O3 as well as YBCO coated conductors. The DC limitation experiments are compared to AC ones at different frequencies (50-2000 Hz). Careful attention is paid to the quench homogenization, which is one of the key issues for an SC FCL. The University of Geneva has proposed constrictions. We have investigated an operating temperature higher than 77 K. As for YBCO bulk, an operation closer to the critical temperature brings a highly improved homogeneity in the electric field development. The material can then absorb large energies without degradation. We present tests at various temperatures. These promising results are to be confirmed over long lengths.

  6. Superconducting magnets and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.C. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab.)

    1989-08-01

    Superconducting magnets are now being used in applications as diverse as medical imaging, fusion research, and power conditioning. The steady improvement in the understanding of instability and quenching has allowed increases in current density and compactness of winding. The reduction in winding size that has thus followed has allowed the construction of economic magnets for imaging, for acceleration, and for high-resolution spectrometers. Large magnets for fusion and energy applications have been made possible by composite conductors containing large fractions of copper or aluminum. The advent of high-temperature superconductors may hold the promise, eventually, of very-high-field magnets. Meanwhile low-temperature superconductors capable of generating fields up to 30 T have been developed.

  7. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garifullin, I.A., E-mail: ilgiz_garifullin@yahoo.com [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Leksin, P.V.; Garif' yanov, N.N.; Kamashev, A.A. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Fominov, Ya.V. [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O.G. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Büchner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoO{sub x}/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers. - Highlights: • We studied a spin switch design F1/F2/S. • We prepared a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). • The full spin switch effect for the superconducting current was realized. • We observed its oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness. • We obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity.

  8. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  9. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  10. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C. [eds.] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  11. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  12. Origami rings

    CERN Document Server

    Buhler, Joe; de Launey, Warwick; Graham, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by a question in origami, we consider sets of points in the complex plane constructed in the following way. Let $L_\\alpha(p)$ be the line in the complex plane through $p$ with angle $\\alpha$ (with respect to the real axis). Given a fixed collection $U$ of angles, let $\\RU$ be the points that can be obtained by starting with $0$ and $1$, and then recursively adding intersection points of the form $L_\\alpha(p) \\cap L_\\beta(q)$, where $p, q$ have been constructed already, and $\\alpha, \\beta$ are distinct angles in $U$. Our main result is that if $U$ is a group with at least three elements, then $\\RU$ is a subring of the complex plane, i.e., it is closed under complex addition and multiplication. This enables us to answer a specific question about origami folds: if $n \\ge 3$ and the allowable angles are the $n$ equally spaced angles $k\\pi/n$, $0 \\le k < n$, then $\\RU$ is the ring $\\Z[\\zeta_n]$ if $n$ is prime, and the ring $\\Z[1/n,\\zeta_{n}]$ if $n$ is not prime, where $\\zeta_n := \\exp(2\\pi i/n)$ is ...

  13. Investigation of the surface resistance of superconducting materials

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, T

    2012-01-01

    In particle accelerators superconducting RF cavities are widely used to achieve high accelerating gradients and low losses. Power consumption is proportional to the surface resistance RS which depends on a number of external parameters, including frequency, temperature, magnetic and electric eld. Presently, there is no widely accepted model describing the increase of Rs with applied eld. In the frame of this project the 400MHz Quadrupole Resonator has been extended to 800 and 1200MHz to study surface resistance and intrinsic critical RF magnetic eld of superconducting samples over a wide parameter range, establishing it as a world-wide unique test facility for superconducting materials. Dierent samples were studied and it was shown that RS is mainly caused by the RF electric eld in the case of strongly oxidized surfaces. This can be explained by interface tunnel exchange of electrons between the superconductor and localized states in adjacent oxides. For well prepared surfaces, however, the majority of the di...

  14. Investigations of the surface resistance of superconducting materials

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, Tobias; Welsch, Carsten

    In particle accelerators superconducting RF cavities are widely used to achieve high accelerating gradients and low losses. Power consumption is proportional to the surface resistance RS which depends on a number of external parameters, including frequency, temperature, magnetic and electric field. Presently, there is no widely accepted model describing the increase of Rs with applied field. In the frame of this project the 400 MHz Quadrupole Resonator has been extended to 800 and 1200 MHz to study surface resistance and intrinsic critical RF magnetic field of superconducting samples over a wide parameter range, establishing it as a world-wide unique test facility for superconducting materials. Different samples were studied and it was shown that Rs is mainly caused by the RF electric field in the case of strongly oxidized surfaces. This can be explained by interface tunnel exchange of electrons between the superconductor and localized states in adjacent oxides. For well prepared surfaces, however, the majori...

  15. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e⁺/e⁻ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  16. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    , the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However...... MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train....

  17. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  18. Superconductivity fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buckel, Werner

    2004-01-01

    This is the second English edition of what has become one of the definitive works on superconductivity in German -- currently in its sixth edition. Comprehensive and easy to understand, this introductory text is written especially with the non-specialist in mind. The authors, both long-term experts in this field, present the fundamental considerations without the need for extensive mathematics, describing the various phenomena connected with the superconducting state, with liberal insertion of experimental facts and examples for modern applications. While all fields of superconducting phenomena are dealt with in detail, this new edition pays particular attention to the groundbreaking discovery of magnesium diboride and the current developments in this field. In addition, a new chapter provides an overview of the elements, alloys and compounds where superconductivity has been observed in experiments, together with their major characteristics. The chapter on technical applications has been considerably expanded...

  19. Superconducting quantum node for entanglement and storage of microwave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurin, E; Roch, N; Pillet, J D; Mallet, F; Huard, B

    2015-03-06

    Superconducting circuits and microwave signals are good candidates to realize quantum networks, which are the backbone of quantum computers. We have realized a quantum node based on a 3D microwave superconducting cavity parametrically coupled to a transmission line by a Josephson ring modulator. We first demonstrate the time-controlled capture, storage, and retrieval of an optimally shaped propagating microwave field, with an efficiency as high as 80%. We then demonstrate a second essential ability, which is the time-controlled generation of an entangled state distributed between the node and a microwave channel.

  20. Superconducting Quantum Node for Entanglement and Storage of Microwave Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurin, E.; Roch, N.; Pillet, J. D.; Mallet, F.; Huard, B.

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting circuits and microwave signals are good candidates to realize quantum networks, which are the backbone of quantum computers. We have realized a quantum node based on a 3D microwave superconducting cavity parametrically coupled to a transmission line by a Josephson ring modulator. We first demonstrate the time-controlled capture, storage, and retrieval of an optimally shaped propagating microwave field, with an efficiency as high as 80%. We then demonstrate a second essential ability, which is the time-controlled generation of an entangled state distributed between the node and a microwave channel.

  1. Superconductivity and symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarasua, L.G., E-mail: sarasua@fisica.edu.uy [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-02-15

    In the present work we consider the relation between superconductivity and spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking (SGBS). We show that ODLRO does not require in principle SBGS, even in the presence of particle number fluctuations, by examining exact solutions of a fermionic pairing model. The criteria become equivalent if a symmetry breaking field is allowed, which can be attributed to the interaction with the environment. However, superconducting states without SBGS are not forbidden.

  2. Photoemission, Correlation and Superconductivity:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Cloëtta, D.; Pavuna, D.; Perfetti, L.; Grioni, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    We review some of the problems still affecting photoemission as a probe of high-temperature superconductivity, as well as important recent results concerning their solution. We show, in particular, some of the first important results on thin epitaxial films grown by laser ablation, which break the monopoly of cleaved BCSCO in this type of experiments. Such results, obtained on thin LSCO, may have general implications on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity.

  3. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation

  4. Losses in superconducting Niobium Films caused by Interface Tunnel Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, Tobias; Welsch, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the loss mechanisms of niobium film cavities enables an accurate determination of applications for future accelerator projects and points to research topics required to mitigate their limitations. Measurements on samples show that the electric field is a dominant loss mechanism for niobium films, acting through interface tunneling between localized states in surface oxides and delocalized states in the superconducting niobium.

  5. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  6. Superconducting Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized superconducting fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs by potassium (K intercalation. They showed large superconducting volume fractions, as high as 80%. The superconducting transition temperature at 17 K was independent of the K content (x in the range between 1.6 and 6.0 in K-doped C60 nanowhiskers (KxC60NWs, while the superconducting volume fractions changed with x. The highest shielding fraction of a full shielding volume was observed in the material of K3.3C60NW by heating at 200 °C. On the other hand, that of a K-doped fullerene (K-C60 crystal was less than 1%. We report the superconducting behaviors of our newly synthesized KxC60NWs in comparison to those of KxC60 crystals, which show superconductivity at 19 K in K3C60. The lattice structures are also discussed, based on the x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses.

  7. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic, Ivan [Mount Sinai, NY; Logvenov, Gennady [Port Jefferson Station, NY; Gozar, Adrian Mihai [Port Jefferson, NY

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  8. The Large Hadron Collider and the Role of Superconductivity in One of the Largest Scientific Enterprises

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    After ten years of R&D and industrialization and seven years of construction, the LHC is near completion. The manufacture of the 1750 main superconducting magnets and of the 8000 superconducting correctors for the accelerator, as well as their cold test at CERN, is approaching the end, while their commissioning in the 27 km-long tunnel has started. The very large superconducting magnets for the main detectors, ATLAS and CMS, are installed and their commissioning is under way. Superconductivity is the key technology for the largest scientific enterprise of this decade: it accounts for half of the total cost and has proved to be affordable and reliable. Thanks to superconductivity we can probe new states of matters and reproduce conditions of 1 ps after the big bang. The paper will give the link between the Physics requirements and the answers that applied superconductivity has offered in this project.

  9. First Operation of PIAVE, the Heavy Ion Injector Based on Superconducting RFQ's

    CERN Document Server

    Bisoffi, Giovanni; Battistella, Andrea; Bezzon, Giampietro; Boscagli, Lucia; Calore, Andrea; Canella, Stefania; Carlucci, Davide; Chiurlotto, Francesca; Comunian, Michele; De Lazzari, Mauro; Facco, Alberto; Fagotti, Enrico; Lombardi, Augusto; Modanese, Paolo; Moisio, M Francesca; Pisent, Andrea; Poggi, Marco; Porcellato, Anna M; Stark, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    The Positive Ion Accelerator for low-Velocity Ions (PIAVE), based on superconducting RFQ's (SRFQ's), has been completed in fall 2004 with the first acceleration of beams from the ECR ion source. Superconducting RFQ's were used, for the first time, for beam acceleration on a user-oriented accelerator complex. A general status of the injector performances is given: it includes, besides the SRFQ's, eight superconducting (SC) QWR's and three bunchers; the beam is received from an ECR source on a HV platform and is delivered, through the SC accelerator ALPI, to nuclear physics experimental apparatuses. The paper emphasizes, in particular, the technological challenges related to the operation of the SC cavities, the cryogenics, control, diagnostics and vacuum systems.

  10. The Superconducting Super Collider: A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwitters, R.F.

    1993-04-01

    The design of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is briefly reviewed, including its key machine parameters. The scientific objectives are twofold: (1) investigation of high-mass, low-rate, rare phenomena beyond the standard model; and (2) investigation of processes within the domain of the standard model. Machine luminosity, a key parameter, is a function of beam brightness and current, and it must be preserved through the injector chain. Features of the various injectors are discussed. The superconducting magnet system is reviewed in terms of model magnet performance, including the highly successful Accelerator System String Test Various magnet design modifications are noted, reflecting minor changes in the collider arcs and improved installation procedures. The paper concludes with construction scenarios and priority issues for ensuring the earliest collider commissioning.

  11. Design of a superconducting magnet for CADS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-Liang; MA Li-Zhen; WU Vei; ZHENG Shi-Jun; DU Jun-Jie; HAN Shao-Fei; GUAN Ming-Zhi; HE Yuan

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a superconducting magnet system for the China Accelerator Driven System (CADS).The magnetic field is provided hy one main,two bucking and four racetrack coils.The main coil produces a central field of up to 7 T and the effective length is more than 140 mm,the two bucking coils can shield most of the fringe field,and the four racetrack superconducting coils produce the steering magnetic field.Its leakage field in the cavity zone is about 5 × 10-5 T when the shielding material Niobium and cryogenic permalloy are used as the Meissner shielding and passive shielding respectively.The quench calculations and protection system are also discussed.

  12. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garifullin, I. A.; Leksin, P. V.; Garif`yanov, N. N.; Kamashev, A. A.; Fominov, Ya. V.; Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers.

  13. Commercial Superconducting Electron Linac for Radioisotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, Terry Lee [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Boulware, Charles H. [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Hollister, Jerry L. [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Jecks, Randall W. [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Mamtimin, Mayir [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States); Starovoitova, Valeriia [Niowave, Inc., Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-08-13

    The majority of radioisotopes used in the United States today come from foreign suppliers or are generated parasitically in large government accelerators and nuclear reactors. Both of these restrictions limit the availability of radioisotopes and discourage the development and evaluation of new isotopes and for nuclear medicine, science, and industry. Numerous studies have been recommending development of dedicated accelerators for production of radioisotopes for over 20 years (Institute of Medicine, 1995; Reba, et al, 2000; National Research Council, 2007; NSAC 2009). The 2015 NSAC Long Range Plan for Isotopes again identified electron accelerators as an area for continued research and development. Recommendation 1(c) from the 2015 NSAC Isotope report specifically identifies electron accelerators for continued funding for the purpose of producing medical and industrial radioisotopes. Recognizing the pressing need for new production methods of radioisotopes, the United States Congress passed the American Medical Isotope Production Act of 2012 to develop a domestic production of 99Mo and to eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the production of 99Mo. One of the advantages of high power electron linear accelerators (linacs) is they can create both proton- and neutron-rich isotopes by generating high energy x-rays that knock out protons or neutrons from stable atoms or by fission of uranium. This allows for production of isotopes not possible in nuclear reactors. Recent advances in superconducting electron linacs have decreased the size and complexity of these systems such that they are economically competitive with nuclear reactors and large, high energy accelerators. Niowave, Inc. has been developing a radioisotope production facility based on a superconducting electron linac with liquid metal converters.

  14. RF accelerating unit installed in the PSB

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    RF accelerating unit installed in the PSB ring between two bending magnets. Cool air from a heat exchanger is injected into the four cavities from the central feeder and the hot air recirculated via the lateral ducts.

  15. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); TESLA Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.).

  16. Start-to-end simulation with rare isotope beam for post accelerator of the RAON accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Hyunchang

    2016-01-01

    The RAON accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) has been developed to create and accelerate various kinds of stable heavy ion beams and rare isotope beams for a wide range of the science applications. In the RAON accelerator, the rare isotope beams generated by the Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) system will be transported through the post accelerator, namely, from the post Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system and the post Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) to the superconducting linac (SCL3). The accelerated beams will be put to use in the low energy experimental hall or accelerated again by the superconducting linac (SCL2) in order to be used in the high energy experimental hall. In this paper, we will describe the results of the start-to-end simulations with the rare isotope beams generated by the ISOL system in the post accelerator of the RAON accelerator. In addition, the error analysis and correction at the superconducting linac SCL3 will be presented.

  17. High-field dipoles for future accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wipf, S.L.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents the concept for building superconducting accelerator dipoles with record high fields. Economic considerations favor the highest possible current density in the windings. Further discussion indicates that there is an optimal range of pinning strength for a superconducting material and that it is not likely for multifilamentary conductors to ever equal the potential performance of tape conductors. A dipole design with a tape-wound, inner high-field winding is suggested. Methods are detailed to avoid degradation caused by flux jumps and to overcome problems with the dipole ends. Concerns for force support structure and field precision are also addressed. An R and D program leading to a prototype 11-T dipole is outlined. Past and future importance of superconductivity to high-energy physics is evident from a short historical survey. Successful dipoles in the 10- to 20-T range will allow interesting options for upgrading present largest accelerators.

  18. Superconducting materials for large scale applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

    2004-05-06

    Significant improvements in the properties ofsuperconducting materials have occurred recently. These improvements arebeing incorporated into the latest generation of wires, cables, and tapesthat are being used in a broad range of prototype devices. These devicesinclude new, high field accelerator and NMR magnets, magnets for fusionpower experiments, motors, generators, and power transmission lines.These prototype magnets are joining a wide array of existing applicationsthat utilize the unique capabilities of superconducting magnets:accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider, fusion experiments suchas ITER, 930 MHz NMR, and 4 Tesla MRI. In addition, promising newmaterials such as MgB2 have been discovered and are being studied inorder to assess their potential for new applications. In this paper, wewill review the key developments that are leading to these newapplications for superconducting materials. In some cases, the key factoris improved understanding or development of materials with significantlyimproved properties. An example of the former is the development of Nb3Snfor use in high field magnets for accelerators. In other cases, thedevelopment is being driven by the application. The aggressive effort todevelop HTS tapes is being driven primarily by the need for materialsthat can operate at temperatures of 50 K and higher. The implications ofthese two drivers for further developments will be discussed. Finally, wewill discuss the areas where further improvements are needed in order fornew applications to be realized.

  19. Prime rings with PI rings of constants

    CERN Document Server

    Kharchenko, V K; Rodríguez-Romo, S

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that if the ring of constants of a restricted differential Lie algebra with a quasi-Frobenius inner part satisfies a polynomial identity (PI) then the original prime ring has a generalized polynomial identitiy (GPI). If additionally the ring of constants is semiprime then the original ring is PI. The case of a non-quasi-Frobenius inner part is also considered.

  20. Nanoscience and Engineering in Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Moshchalkov, Victor; Lang, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    For emerging energy saving technologies, superconducting materials with superior performance are needed. Such materials can be developed by manipulating the 'elementary building blocks' through nanostructuring. For superconductivity the 'elementary blocks' are Cooper pair and fluxon (vortex). This book presents new ways how to modify superconductivity and vortex matter through nanostructuring and the use of nanoscale magnetic templates. The basic nano-effects, vortex and vortex-antivortex patterns, vortex dynamics, Josephson phenomena, critical currents, and interplay between superconductivity

  1. High Magnetic Field Superconducting Magnets Fabricated In Budker Inp For Sr Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Zolotarev, K V; Khruschev, S V; Krämer, Dietrich; Kulipanov, G N; Lev, V H; Mezentsev, N A; Miginsky, E G; Shkaruba, V A; Syrovatin, V M; Tsukanov, V M; Zjurba, V K

    2004-01-01

    BESSY operates a 3-rd generation synchrotron light source in VUV to XUV region at Berlin-Adlershof. The main radiation sources in storage ring are special magnetic elements as undulators and wigglers. 3 superconducting shifters and one multipole superconducting wiggler are operating giving enhanced photon flux for 10-25 keV X-ray region. As the superconducting elements presently are located in straight sections, BESSY intends to exchange 4 of conventional room-temperature bending magnets by superconducting ones.The report contains brief description of 9 Tesla superbend prototype as a candidate for replacing of conventional magnets of BESSY-2, which was designed, fabricated and tested at Budker INP and was commissioned at BESSY in June 2004.Main parameters of 9 Tesla superconducting bending magnet prototype as well as testing results are presented.

  2. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  3. Radical theory of rings

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, JW

    2003-01-01

    Radical Theory of Rings distills the most noteworthy present-day theoretical topics, gives a unified account of the classical structure theorems for rings, and deepens understanding of key aspects of ring theory via ring and radical constructions. Assimilating radical theory's evolution in the decades since the last major work on rings and radicals was published, the authors deal with some distinctive features of the radical theory of nonassociative rings, associative rings with involution, and near-rings. Written in clear algebraic terms by globally acknowledged authorities, the presentation

  4. Elementary Superconductivity in Nonlinear Electrodynamics Coupled to Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dymnikova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Source-free equations of nonlinear electrodynamics minimally coupled to gravity admit regular axially symmetric asymptotically Kerr-Newman solutions which describe charged rotating black holes and electromagnetic spinning solitons (lumps). Asymptotic analysis of solutions shows, for both black holes and solitons, the existence of de Sitter vacuum interior which has the properties of a perfect conductor and ideal diamagnetic and displays superconducting behaviour which can be responsible for practically unlimited life time of an object. Superconducting current flows on the equatorial ring replacing the Kerr ring singularity of the Kerr-Newman geometry. Interior de Sitter vacuum supplies the electron with the finite positive electromagnetic mass related the interior de Sitter vacuum of the electroweak scale and to breaking of space-time symmetry, which allows to explain the mass-square differences for neutrino and the appearance of the minimal length scale in the annihilation reaction $e^{+}e^{-}\\rightarrow\\gam...

  5. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  6. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Z. A.; Ge, M.; Iwashita, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  7. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  8. Time Transient Effects in Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051280; Russenschuck, Stephan; Palumbo, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the study of time transient effects in super- conducting cables, with applications to accelerator magnets, and the development of a simulation code. The superconducting cables are modeled at the strand level as a lumped resistor, inductor generator circuit. The analysis in time domain of the circuit currents discloses the transient effects. The code developed can solve Rutherford type cable of any size, shape geometry under any exciting external field. The code has been implemented in Roxie where it is used to compute ramp dependent field error and heat losses.

  9. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Physics Division; Ge, M. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2017-01-12

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  10. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  11. Future accelerators (?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  12. Initial operation of the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    Initial operation and recent development of the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac are discussed. The linac has been developed in order to demonstrate a cost-effective means of extending the performance of electrostatic tandem accelerators. The results of beam acceleration tests which began in June 1978 are described. At present 7 of a planned array of 22 resonators are operating on-line, and the linac system provides an effective accelerating potential of 7.5 MV. Although some technical problems remain, the level of performance and reliability is sufficient that appreciable beam time is becoming available to users.

  13. Design Topics for Superconducting RF Cavities and Ancillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Padamsee, H

    2014-01-01

    RF superconductivity has become a major subfield of accelerator science. There has been an explosion in the number of accelerator applications and in the number of laboratories engaged. The first lecture at this meeting of the CAS presented a review of fundamental design principles to develop cavity geometries to accelerate velocity-of-light particles (β = v/c ~ 1), moving on to the corresponding design principles for medium-velocity (medium-β) and low-velocity (low-β) structures. The lecture included mechanical design topics. The second lecture dealt with input couplers, higher-order mode extraction couplers with absorbers, and tuners of both the slow and fast varieties.

  14. Failed theories of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalian, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Almost half a century passed between the discovery of superconductivity by Kammerlingh Onnes and the theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer. During the intervening years the brightest minds in theoretical physics tried and failed to develop a microscopic understanding of the effect. A summary of some of those unsuccessful attempts to understand superconductivity not only demonstrates the extraordinary achievement made by formulating the BCS theory, but also illustrates that mistakes are a natural and healthy part of the scientific discourse, and that inapplicable, even incorrect theories can turn out to be interesting and inspiring.

  15. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  16. Fingerprints of Mott Superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强华

    2003-01-01

    We improve a previous theory of doped Mott insulators with duality between pairing and magnetism by a further duality transform. As the result we obtained a quantum Ginzburg-Landau theory describing the Cooper pair condensate and the dual of spin condensate. We address the superconductivity by doping a Mott insulator,which we call the Mott superconductivity. Some fingerprints of such novelty in cuprates are the scaling between neutron resonance energy and superfluid density, and the induced quantized spin moment by vortices or Zn impurity (together with circulating charge super-current to be checked by experiments).

  17. TESTING AND EVALUATION OF SUPERCONDUCTING CABLES FOR THE LHC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THOMAS,R.; GHOSH,A.; MCCHESNEY,D.; JAIN,A.

    1999-03-29

    As one of the activities of the US-LHC Accelerator Project, BNL is testing short samples of superconducting cables that will be used in the main LHC dipoles and quadrupoles. The purpose of these tests is to verify that the reels of superconducting cables as supplied by the vendors meet the required critical current specifications. The short-sample testing facility and the computer-assisted testing techniques for acquiring the data will be described. We also describe the data analysis, data storage, and data transmission methods.

  18. First prototype Copper-Niobium RF Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is the first RF superconducting cavity made of copper with a very thin layer of pure niobium deposited on the inner wall by sputtering. This new developpment lead to a considerable increase of performance and stability of superconducting cavities and to non-negligible economy. The work was carried out in the ISR workshop. This technique was adopted for the LEP II accelerating cavities. At the centre is Cristoforo Benvenuti, inventor of this important technology, with his assistants, Nadia Circelli and Max Hauer, carrying the sputtering electrode. See also 8209255, 8312339.

  19. Fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons and possible path to the future of US experimental high-energy particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The authors outline primary physics motivation, present proposed new arrangement for Fermilab accelerator complex, and then discuss possible long-range application of fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons at Fermilab.

  20. Design study of a beta=0.09 high current superconducting half wave resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Hu-Tan-Xiang; Fan, Pei-Liang; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2016-01-01

    There's presently a growing demand for high current proton and deuteron linear accelerators based on superconducting technology to better support various fields of science. A \\b{eta}=0.09 162.5 MHz high current superconducting half wave resonator (HWR) has been designed at Peking University to accelerate 100 mA proton beam or 50 mA deuteron beam after the RFQ accelerating structure. The detailed electromagnetic design, multipacting simulation, mechanical analysis of the cavity will be given in this paper.

  1. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator; Etude et developpement d'un coupleur de puissance pour les cavites supraconductrices destinees aux accelerateurs de protons de haute intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souli, M

    2007-07-15

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q{sub c} in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  2. Matrix of integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high timing resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Schuck, Carsten; Minaeva, Olga; Li, Mo; Gol'tsman, Gregory; Sergienko, Alexander V; Tang, Hong X

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a large grid of individually addressable superconducting single photon detectors on a single chip. Each detector element is fully integrated into an independent waveguide circuit with custom functionality at telecom wavelengths. High device density is achieved by fabricating the nanowire detectors in traveling wave geometry directly on top of silicon-on-insulator waveguides. Our superconducting single-photon detector matrix includes detector designs optimized for high detection efficiency, low dark count rate and high timing accuracy. As an example, we exploit the high timing resolution of a particularly short nanowire design to resolve individual photon round-trips in a cavity ring-down measurement of a silicon ring resonator.

  3. Superconducting linac beam dynamics with high-order maps for RF resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, A A; Pardo, R C; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.11.177

    2004-01-01

    The arbitrary-order map beam optics code COSY Infinity has recently been adapted to calculate accurate high-order ion-optical maps for electrostatic and radio-frequency accelerating structures. The beam dynamics of the superconducting low-velocity positive-ion injector linac for the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab is used to demonstrate some advantages of the new simulation capability. The injector linac involves four different types of superconducting accelerating structures and has a total of 18 resonators. The detailed geometry for each of the accelerating cavities is included, allowing an accurate representation of the on- and off-axis electric fields. The fields are obtained within the code from a Poisson-solver for cylindrically symmetric electrodes of arbitrary geometry. The transverse focusing is done with superconducting solenoids. A detailed comparison of the transverse and longitudinal phase space is made with the conventional ray-tracing code LINRAY. The two codes are evaluated for ease ...

  4. Simulation of magnetization and levitation properties of arrays of ring-shaped type-II superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Huang, Chenguang; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the magnetic and mechanical properties of arrays of superconducting rings arranged in axial, radial, and matrix configurations under different magnetic fields. In terms of the Bean's critical state model and the minimum magnetic energy method, the dependences of the magnetization and levitation behaviors on the geometry, number, and gap of the superconducting rings are obtained. The results show that when the applied field is spatially uniform, the magnetic property of the superconducting array is associated with the gaps between the rings. For the case of small gaps, the entire array becomes not easy to be fully penetrated by the induced currents, and the magnetic field profiles of which are almost the same as ones in a single large ring. If the superconducting array is fully penetrated, its saturation magnetization value is affected by the radial interval and, however, is almost independent of the vertical separation. When the applied field produced by a cylindrical permanent magnet is nonuniform, the superconducting array will be subjected to a levitation force. The levitation force increases monotonically and finally reaches a saturation value with increasing height or thickness of the rings, and such saturation value is closely related to the inner radius of the array.

  5. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  6. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  7. Superconducting cyclotrons at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, H. G.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes the status of the three superconducting cyclotrons which are in operation or under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The oldest of these, the K500, has been in operation since September 1982 supporting a national user program in heavy ion nuclear physics. A second large research cyclotron, the K800, is now nearing completion. This cyclotron will accelerate lighter heavy ions to 200 MeV/nuc and heavier particles up to energies given by 1200 Q2/ A MeV/nucleon. The magnet for this cyclotron came into operation in May 1984 and has performed smoothly and reliably in three extended operating periods. At present, K800 construction activity centers on fabrication and installation of the rf system, the extraction system, and the ECR injection line. The third NSCL superconducting cyclotron is a smaller 50 MeV deuteron cyclotron to be used for neutron therapy in the radiation oncology center of a major Detroit hospital (Harper Hospital). Design features of this small, application oriented, cyclotron are described in some detail.

  8. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] Project: Technical Training for the Future of Texas. Navarro College/Dallas Community College District. Final Report for Year One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsak, Charles; McGlohen, Patti J.

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is a national lab for research on the fundamental forces and constituents of the universe. A major part of the research will involve an oval ring 54 miles in circumference through which superconducting magnets will steer two beams of protons in opposite directions. In response to the…

  9. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  10. Stirling engine piston ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  11. Birth Control Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring A A A What's in this article? ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  12. Superconducting Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    of Nb/Al- Nx /NbTiN junctions for SIS mixer applications,” IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconduct., vol. 11, pp. 76–79, Mar. 2001. [48] M. Gurvitch, W. A...Another connector developed by IBM for commercial applications using a dendritic interposer technology. A “beam-on-pad” approach developed by Siemens

  13. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  14. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  15. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  16. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  17. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  18. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  19. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  20. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Ejrnaes, M [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Naples (Italy); Esposito, E [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Lisitskyi, M P [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Nappi, C [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Pagano, S [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Perez de Lara, D [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.