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Sample records for supercoiled pibi30 dna

  1. DNA supercoiling during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  2. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  3. Interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling has been shown to be an important regulator of transcription that is broadly present in the cell. Here we review experimental work which shows that RNA polymerase is a powerful torsional motor that can alter DNA topology and structure, and DNA supercoiling in turn directly affects transcription elongation.

  4. Supercoiling induces denaturation bubbles in circular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Adamcik, Jozef; Dietler, Giovanni; Metzler, Ralf

    2010-11-12

    We present a theoretical framework for the thermodynamic properties of supercoiling-induced denaturation bubbles in circular double-stranded DNA molecules. We explore how DNA supercoiling, ambient salt concentration, and sequence heterogeneity impact on the bubble occurrence. An analytical derivation of the probability distribution to find multiple bubbles is derived and the relevance for supercoiled DNA discussed. We show that in vivo sustained DNA bubbles are likely to occur due to partial twist release in regions rich in weaker AT base pairs. Single DNA plasmid imaging experiments clearly demonstrate the existence of bubbles in free solution.

  5. Profiling DNA supercoiling domains in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Corless

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transitions in DNA structure have the capacity to regulate genes, but have been poorly characterised in eukaryotes due to a lack of appropriate techniques. One important example is DNA supercoiling, which can directly regulate transcription initiation, elongation and coordinated expression of neighbouring genes. DNA supercoiling is the over- or under-winding of the DNA double helix, which occurs as a consequence of polymerase activity and is modulated by topoisomerase activity [5]. To map the distribution of DNA supercoiling in nuclei, we developed biotinylated 4,5,8-trimethylpsoralen (bTMP pull-down to preferentially enrich for under-wound DNA. Here we describe in detail the experimental design, quality controls and analyses associated with the study by Naughton et al. [13] that characterised for the first time the large-scale distribution of DNA supercoiling in human cells (GEO: GSE43488 and GSE43450.

  6. Supercoiling of the DNA Template during Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Leroy F.; Wang, James C.

    1987-10-01

    Transcription of a right-handed double-helical DNA requires a relative rotation of the RNA polymerase and its nascent RNA around the DNA. We describe conditions under which the resistance to the rotational motion of the transcription ensemble around the DNA can be large. In such cases, the advancing polymerase generates positive supercoils in the DNA template ahead of it and negative supercoils behind it. Mutual annihilation of the positively and negatively supercoiled regions may be prevented by anchoring points on the DNA to a large structure, or, in the case of an unanchored plasmid, by the presence of two oppositely oriented transcription units. In prokaryotes, DNA topoisomerase I preferentially removes negative supercoils and DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II) removes positive ones. Our model thus provides an explanation for the experimentally observed high degree of negative or positive supercoiling of intracellular pBR322 DNA when DNA topoisomerase I or gyrase is respectively inhibited. We discuss the implications of our model in terms of supercoiling regulation, DNA conformational transitions, and gene regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  7. Polymer induced condensation of dna supercoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessa Ramos Jr., J.E.; Ruggiero Neto, J.; Vries, de R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Macromolecular crowding is thought to be a significant factor driving DNA condensation in prokaryotic cells. Whereas DNA in prokaryotes is supercoiled, studies on crowding-induced DNA condensation have so far focused on linear DNA. Here we compare DNA condensation by poly(ethylene oxide) for superco

  8. Determining DNA supercoiling enthalpy by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaozhou; Zhi, Xiaoduo; Leng, Fenfei

    2012-12-01

    DNA supercoiling plays a critical role in certain essential DNA transactions, such as DNA replication, recombination, and transcription. For this reason, exploring energetics of DNA supercoiling is fundamentally important for understanding its biological functions. In this paper, using a unique property of DNA intercalators, such as ethidium bromide and daunorubicin, which bind to supercoiled, nicked, and relaxed DNA templates with different DNA-binding enthalpies, we determined DNA supercoiling enthalpy of plasmid pXXZ6, a 4.5 kb plasmid to be about 11.5 kcal/mol per linking number change. This determination allowed us to partition the DNA supercoiling free energy into enthalpic and entropic contributions where the unfavorable DNA supercoiling free energy exclusively originated from the large positive supercoiling enthalpy and was compensated by a large, favorable entropy term (TΔS). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Homologous pairing in stretched supercoiled DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, T. R.; Croquette, V.; Bensimon, D.

    1998-01-01

    By using elastic measurements on single DNA molecules, we show that stretching a negatively supercoiled DNA activates homologous pairing in physiological conditions. These experiments indicate that a stretched unwound DNA locally denatures to alleviate the force-driven increase in torsional stress. This is detected by hybridization with 1 kb of homologous single-stranded DNA probes. The stretching force involved (≈2 pN) is small compared with those typically developed by molecular motors, suggesting that this process may be relevant to DNA processing in vivo. We used this technique to monitor the progressive denaturation of DNA as it is unwound and found that distinct, stable denaturation bubbles formed, beginning in A+T-rich regions. PMID:9724746

  10. Structural Transitions in Supercoiled Stretched DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    v, Croquette

    1998-03-01

    Using magnetic micromanipulation techniques [Strick 96]( uc(T.R.) Strick, J.-F. Allemand, D. Bensimon, A. Bensimon) and uc(V.) Croquette, "The elasticity of a single supercoiled DNA molecule", Science, 271, 1835 (1996)., we have studied the mechanical properties (force versus extension) of single DNA molecules under a wide range of torsional stresses (supercoiling). We show that unwinding the DNA double helix leads to a phase separation between regular B-DNA and denaturation bubbles. The fraction of denatured molecule increases linearly with the degree of unwinding, beginning at a value of 1% unwinding. We have confirmed this denatured state by hybridization of homologous single-stranded DNA probes and by a chemical attack of the exposed bases. Surprisingly, when we overwind the molecule, the elasticity curves we obtain may also be interpreted by the coexistence of two phases, B-DNA and a new phase which we note P-DNA. The fraction of this new phase increases smoothly with overwinding, beginning at 3 % and continuing up to 300 %. Our results indicate that this new phase is four times more twisted that the standard B-DNA and is 1.75 times longer. Although the structure of this phase is not yet known, such a high twisting can only be attained if the sugar-phosphate backbones of the two strands are twisted closely while the bases are expelled outside of the molecule's core, in a structure reminiscent of the one proposed by Pauling. Indeed we have shown that this new phase is sensitive to chemical attack whereas the B-DNA is not. This new phase begins to appear on a molecule overwound by 3 % and stretched by a force of 5 pN, conditions typically encountered in vivo during gene transcription. This new phase may thus play a biological role biophysique-ADN>(for more details).

  11. Studies of DNA supercoiling in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D.N.

    1990-10-01

    This thesis describes a number of diverse experiments whose common theme is to elaborate some aspect of DNA supercoiling. The torsion elastic constant of DNA is measure as a function of superhelix density using the technique of picosecond Time Resolved Fluorescence Polarization Anisotropy (FPA) of intercalated ethidium bromide. The results agree with theories which predict that the anisotropy decay should vary with the square root of the relative viscosity. This experiment furthermore demonstrates a sensitivity of FPA to a change in torsion elastic constant of less than 10%. A number of covalently closed DNA samples, ranging in superhelix density from = [minus]0.123 to [plus]0.042, are then examined. A novel method for measuring changes in local supercoiling on a large PNA molecule which is sensitive to changes in supercoiling of regions of chromosomal DNA as short as 1 kilobase in length is presented. Study of chromosomal supercoiling regulating anaerobic gene expression in the facultative photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus showed that no stable change in chromosomal supercoiling upon a shift from aerobic respiratory growth to anaerobic photosynthetic conditions. Studies to detect transient changes in DNA supercoiling indicate that DNA downstream from heavily transcribed genes for the photosynthetic reaction center are relaxed or perhaps overwound upon the induction of photosynthetic metabolism. These results are interpreted in terms of the twin domain model of transcriptional supercoiling.

  12. Studies of DNA supercoiling in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David Nelson [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1990-10-01

    This thesis describes a number of diverse experiments whose common theme is to elaborate some aspect of DNA supercoiling. The torsion elastic constant of DNA is measure as a function of superhelix density using the technique of picosecond Time Resolved Fluorescence Polarization Anisotropy (FPA) of intercalated ethidium bromide. The results agree with theories which predict that the anisotropy decay should vary with the square root of the relative viscosity. This experiment furthermore demonstrates a sensitivity of FPA to a change in torsion elastic constant of less than 10%. A number of covalently closed DNA samples, ranging in superhelix density from = -0.123 to +0.042, are then examined. A novel method for measuring changes in local supercoiling on a large PNA molecule which is sensitive to changes in supercoiling of regions of chromosomal DNA as short as 1 kilobase in length is presented. Study of chromosomal supercoiling regulating anaerobic gene expression in the facultative photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus showed that no stable change in chromosomal supercoiling upon a shift from aerobic respiratory growth to anaerobic photosynthetic conditions. Studies to detect transient changes in DNA supercoiling indicate that DNA downstream from heavily transcribed genes for the photosynthetic reaction center are relaxed or perhaps overwound upon the induction of photosynthetic metabolism. These results are interpreted in terms of the twin domain model of transcriptional supercoiling.

  13. Visualization of interaction between ribosome-inactivating proteins and supercoiled DNA with an atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓华; 刘望夷; 欧阳振乾; 李民乾

    1997-01-01

    The interaction between ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) and supercoiled DNA was observed with an atomic force microscope (AFM). It was found that RIPs can bind to both supercoiled DNA and the unwound double stranded loop region in supercoiled DNA. The RIPs hound to the supercoils can induce the conformational change of supercoiled DNA. Furthermore, the supercoiled DNA was relaxed and cleaved into nick or linear form by RIPs. It indicated that RIP seemed to be a supercoil-dependent DNA binding protein and exhibited the activity of su-percoil-dependent DNA endonuclease.

  14. Molecular modeling and energy refinement of supercoiled DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, M H; Olson, W K

    1989-12-01

    A method is presented for constructing the complete atomic structure of supercoiled DNA starting from a linear description of the double helical pathway. The folding pathway is defined by piecewise B-spline curves and the atoms are initially positioned with respect to the local Frenet trihedra determined by the equations of the curves. The resulting chemical structure is corrected and refined with an energy minimization procedure based on standard potential expressions. The refined molecular structure is then used to study the effects of supercoiling on the local secondary structure of DNA. The minimized structure is found to differ from an isotropic elastic rod model of the double helix, with the base pairs bending in an asymmetric fashion along the supercoiled trajectory. The starting trajectory is chosen so that the refined supercoiled structure is either underwound (10.37 base pairs per turn) or overwound (9.65 base pairs per turn) compared to the standard tenfold B-DNA fiber diffraction model. The underwound supercoil is also lower in energy than the overwound duplex. The variation of base pair sequence in poly(dA).poly(dT).poly(dAT).poly(dTA) and poly(dA5T5).poly(dT5A5) is additionally found to influence the secondary structural features along a given supercoiled pathway. Finally, the detailed features of the refined structures are found to be in agreement with known X-ray crystallographic structures of DNA oligomers.

  15. The effect of DNA supercoiling on nucleosome structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbel, Tabea; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-02-18

    Nucleosomes have to open to allow access to DNA in transcription, replication, and DNA damage repair. Changes in DNA torsional strain (e.g. during transcription elongation) influence the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated the effect of DNA supercoiling-induced torsional strain on nucleosome structure and stability by scanning force microscopy (SFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Nucleosomes were reconstituted onto 2.7 kb DNA plasmids with varying superhelical densities. The SFM results show a clear dependence of the amount of DNA wrapped around the nucleosome core on the strength and type of supercoiling. Negative supercoiling led to smaller nucleosome opening angles as compared to relaxed or positively supercoiled DNA. FCS experiments show that nucleosomes reconstituted on negatively superhelical DNA are more resistant to salt-induced destabilization, as seen by reduced H2A-H2B dimer eviction from the nucleosome. Our results show that changes in DNA topology, e.g. during transcription elongation, affect the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA.

  16. Variety of molecular conformation of plasmid pUC18 DNA and solenoidally supercoiled DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄熙泰; 王照清; 吴永文; 樊廷玉; 王树荣; 王勖焜

    1996-01-01

    The plasmid pUC18 DNA isolated from Escherichia coli HB101 were analyzed by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and hybridization. The results show that the DNA sample can be separated into six groups of different structural components. The plectonemically and solenoidally supercoiled pUC18 DNA coexist in it. These two different conformations of supercoiled DNA are interchangeable with the circumstances (ionic strength and type, etc.). The amount of solenoidally supercoiled pUC18 DNA in the samples can be changed by treatment of DNA topoisome rases. Under an electron microscope, the solenoidal supercoiling DNA has a round shape with an average diameter of 45 nm. The facts suggest that solenoidaUy supercoiled DNA be a structural entity independent of histones. The polymorphism of DNA structure may be important to packing of DNA in vivo.

  17. Configurational transitions in Fourier series-represented DNA supercoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Schlick, T; Olson, A J; Olson, W K

    1997-10-01

    A new Fourier series representation of supercoiled DNA is employed in Langevin dynamics simulations to study large-scale configurational motions of intermediate-length chains. The polymer is modeled as an ideal elastic rod subject to long-range van der Waals' interactions. The van der Waals' term prevents the self-contact of distant chain segments and also mimics attractive forces thought to stabilize the association of closely spaced charged rods. The finite Fourier series-derived polymer formulation is an alternative to the piecewise B-spline curves used in past work to describe the motion of smoothly deformed supercoiled DNA in terms of a limited number of independent variables. This study focuses on two large-scale configurational events: the interconversion between circular and figure-8 forms at a relatively low level of supercoiling, and the transformation between branched and interwound structures at a higher superhelical density.

  18. DNA supercoiling depends on the phosphorylation potential in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Workum, M.; van Dooren, S.J.M; Oldenburg, N

    1996-01-01

    ATP/ADP ratios were varied in different ways and the degree of negative supercoiling was determined in Escherichia coli. Independent of whether the ATP/ADP ratio was reduced by a shift to anaerobic conditions, by addition of protonophore (dinitrophenol) or by potassium cyanide addition, DNA...

  19. Theoretical study of the conformation and energy of supercoiled DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, N. G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Structural Biology Div.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-01-01

    The two sugar-phosphate backbones of the DNA molecule wind about each other in helical paths. For circular DNA molecules, or for linear pieces of DNA with the ends anchored, the two strands have a well-defined linking number, Lk. If Lk differs from the equilibrium linking number Lk{sub 0}, the molecule is supercoiled. The linking difference {Delta}Lk = Lk-Lk{sub 0} is partitioned between torsional deformation of the DNA, or twist ({Delta}Tw), and a winding of the DNA axis about itself known as writhe (Wr). In this dissertation, the conformation and energy of supercoiled DNA are examined by treating DNA as an elastic cylinder. Finite-length and entropic effects are ignored, and all extensive quantities are treated as linear densities. Two classes of conformation are considered: the plectonemic or interwound form, in which the axis of the DNA double helix winds about itself in a double superhelix, and the toroidal shape in which the axis is wrapped around a torus. Minimum energy conformation are found. For biologically relevant values of specific linking differences, the plectonemic DNA, the superhelical pitch angle {alpha} is in the range 45{degree} < {alpha} {le} 90{degree}. For low values of specific linking difference {vert_bar}{sigma}{vert_bar} ({sigma} = {Delta}Lk/Lk{sub 0}), most linking difference is in writhe. As {vert_bar}{sigma}{vert_bar} increases, a greater proportion of linking difference is in twist. Interaction between DNA strands is treated first as a hard-body excluded volume and then as a screened electrostatic repulsion. Ionic strength is found to have a large effect, resulting in significantly greater torsional stress in supercoiled DNA at low ionic strength.

  20. Supercoiled circular DNA of an insect granulosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweeten, Kathleen A.; Bulla, Lee A.; Consigli, Richard A.

    1977-01-01

    The DNA of the granulosis virus of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, was characterized by physical chemical and electron microscopic techniques. Twenty-five percent of the DNA extracted from purified virus was isolated as supercoiled circular molecules. The remaining 75% consisted of relaxed circular molecules. These molecular forms were indicated by the production of two radioactive bands during sedimentation of 3H-labeled granulosis virus DNA in alkaline sucrose gradients or in equilibrium density gradients of neutral cesium chloride/propidium iodide. Electron microscopic visualization of the DNA that banded at the higher density in the latter gradients revealed supercoiled structures whereas that of DNA that banded at the lower density demonstrated relaxed circular molecules. The superhelical molecules were converted to relaxed circles by treatment with pancreatic DNase. The molecular weight of the viral DNA was calculated to be 81 × 106 by sedimentation in neutral sucrose and 78 × 106 by sedimentation in alkaline sucrose. The molecular weight estimated from length measurements in electron micrographs was 76 × 106. The buoyant density of the granulosis virus DNA was 1.703 g/cm3 and that of its insect host DNA was 1.697 g/cm3. Equilibrium sedimentation in cesium chloride and thermal denaturation indicated G + C contents of 44% and 39% for the viral and host DNA, respectively. Images PMID:198791

  1. Effect of DNA binding protein Ssh12 from hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae on DNA supercoiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼慧强; 黄力; VietQ.Mai

    1999-01-01

    An 11.5-ku DNA binding protein, designated as Sshl2, was purified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae by column chromatography in SP Sepharose, DNA cellulose and phosphocellulose. Sshl2 accounts for about 4 % of the total cellular protein. The protein is capable of binding to both negatively supercoiled and relaxed DNAs. Nick closure analysis revealed that Sshl2 constrains negative supercoils upon binding to DNA. While the ability of the protein to constrain supercoils is weak at 22℃ , it is enhanced substantially at temperatures higher than 37℃ . Both the cellular content and supercoil-constraining ability of Sshl2 suggest that the protein may play an important role in the organization and stabilization of the chromosome of S. shibatae.

  2. Experimental phase diagram of negatively supercoiled DNA measured by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlijm, Rifka; Mashaghi, Alireza; Bernard, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Dekker, Cees

    2015-02-01

    The most common form of DNA is the well-known B-structure of double-helix DNA. Many processes in the cell, however, exert force and torque, inducing structural changes to the DNA that are vital to biological function. Virtually all DNA in cells is in a state of negative supercoiling, with a DNA structure that is complex. Using magnetic tweezers combined with fluorescence imaging, we here study DNA structure as a function of negative supercoiling at the single-molecule level. We classify DNA phases based on DNA length as a function of supercoiling, down to a very high negative supercoiling density σ of -2.5, and forces up to 4.5 pN. We characterize plectonemes using fluorescence imaging. DNA bubbles are visualized by the binding of fluorescently labelled RPA, a eukaryotic single-strand-binding protein. The presence of Z-DNA, a left-handed form of DNA, is probed by the binding of Zα77, the minimal binding domain of a Z-DNA-binding protein. Without supercoiling, DNA is in the relaxed B-form. Upon going toward negative supercoiling, plectonemic B-DNA is being formed below 0.6 pN. At higher forces and supercoiling densities down to about -1.9, a mixed state occurs with plectonemes, multiple bubbles and left-handed L-DNA. Around σ = -1.9, a buckling transition occurs after which the DNA end-to-end length linearly decreases when applying more negative turns, into a state that we interpret as plectonemic L-DNA. By measuring DNA length, Zα77 binding, plectoneme and ssDNA visualisation, we thus have mapped the co-existence of many DNA structures and experimentally determined the DNA phase diagram at (extreme) negative supercoiling.The most common form of DNA is the well-known B-structure of double-helix DNA. Many processes in the cell, however, exert force and torque, inducing structural changes to the DNA that are vital to biological function. Virtually all DNA in cells is in a state of negative supercoiling, with a DNA structure that is complex. Using magnetic tweezers

  3. Experimental phase diagram of negatively supercoiled DNA measured by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlijm, Rifka; Mashaghi, Alireza; Bernard, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Dekker, Cees

    2015-02-21

    The most common form of DNA is the well-known B-structure of double-helix DNA. Many processes in the cell, however, exert force and torque, inducing structural changes to the DNA that are vital to biological function. Virtually all DNA in cells is in a state of negative supercoiling, with a DNA structure that is complex. Using magnetic tweezers combined with fluorescence imaging, we here study DNA structure as a function of negative supercoiling at the single-molecule level. We classify DNA phases based on DNA length as a function of supercoiling, down to a very high negative supercoiling density σ of -2.5, and forces up to 4.5 pN. We characterize plectonemes using fluorescence imaging. DNA bubbles are visualized by the binding of fluorescently labelled RPA, a eukaryotic single-strand-binding protein. The presence of Z-DNA, a left-handed form of DNA, is probed by the binding of Zα77, the minimal binding domain of a Z-DNA-binding protein. Without supercoiling, DNA is in the relaxed B-form. Upon going toward negative supercoiling, plectonemic B-DNA is being formed below 0.6 pN. At higher forces and supercoiling densities down to about -1.9, a mixed state occurs with plectonemes, multiple bubbles and left-handed L-DNA. Around σ = -1.9, a buckling transition occurs after which the DNA end-to-end length linearly decreases when applying more negative turns, into a state that we interpret as plectonemic L-DNA. By measuring DNA length, Zα77 binding, plectoneme and ssDNA visualisation, we thus have mapped the co-existence of many DNA structures and experimentally determined the DNA phase diagram at (extreme) negative supercoiling.

  4. Analytical description of extension, torque and supercoiling radius of a stretched twisted DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Neukirch, Sébastien; Marko, John F.

    2011-01-01

    We study the mixture of extended and supercoiled DNA that occurs in a twisted DNA molecule under tension. Closed-form asymptotic solutions for the supercoiling radius, extension and torque of the molecule are obtained in the high-force limit where electrostatic and elastic effects dominate. We demonstrate that experimental data obey the extension and torque scaling laws apparent in our formulae, in the regime where thermal fluctuation effects are quenched by applied force.

  5. nifH Promoter Activity Is Regulated by DNA Supercoiling in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Jie LIU; Biao HU; Jia-Bi ZHU; Shan-Jiong SHEN; Guan-Qiao YU

    2005-01-01

    In prokaryotes, DNA supercoiling regulates the expression of many genes; for example, the expression of Klebsiella pneumoniae nifLA operon depends on DNA negative supercoiling in anaerobically grown cells, which indicates that DNA supercoiling might play a role in gene regulation of the anaerobic response. Since the expression of the nifH promoter in Sinorhizobium meliloti is not repressed by oxygen, it is proposed that the status of DNA supercoiling may not affect the expression of the nifH promoter. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing nifH promoter activity in wild-type and gyr- Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of DNA gyrase inhibitors. Our results show that gene expression driven by the S.meliloti nifH promoter requires the presence of active DNA gyrase. Because DNA gyrase increases the number of negative superhelical turns in DNA in the presence of ATP, our data indicate that negative supercoiling is also important for nifH promoter activity. Our study also shows that the DNA supercoilingdependent S. meliloti nifH promoter activity is related to the trans-acting factors NtrC and NifA that activate it. DNA supercoiling appeared to have a stronger effect on NtrC-activated nifH promoter activity than on NifA-activated promoter activity. Collectively, these results from the S. meliloti nifH promoter model system seem to indicate that, in addition to regulating gene expression during anaerobic signaling, DNA supercoiling may also provide a favorable topology for trans-acting factor binding and promoter activation regardless of oxygen status.

  6. DNA gyrase with a single catalytic tyrosine can catalyze DNA supercoiling by a nicking-closing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubaev, Airat; Weidlich, Daniela; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2016-12-01

    The topological state of DNA is important for replication, recombination and transcription, and is regulated in vivo by DNA topoisomerases. Gyrase introduces negative supercoils into DNA at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. It is the accepted view that gyrase achieves supercoiling by a strand passage mechanism, in which double-stranded DNA is cleaved, and a second double-stranded segment is passed through the gap, converting a positive DNA node into a negative node. We show here that gyrase with only one catalytic tyrosine that cleaves a single strand of its DNA substrate can catalyze DNA supercoiling without strand passage. We propose an alternative mechanism for DNA supercoiling via nicking and closing of DNA that involves trapping, segregation and relaxation of two positive supercoils. In contrast to DNA supercoiling, ATP-dependent relaxation and decatenation of DNA by gyrase lacking the C-terminal domains require both tyrosines and strand passage. Our results point towards mechanistic plasticity of gyrase and might pave the way for finding novel and specific mechanism-based gyrase inhibitors. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Electrostatic-undulatory theory of plectonemically supercoiled DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubbink, J; Odijk, T

    1999-05-01

    We present an analytical calculation of the electrostatic interaction in a plectonemic supercoil within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Undulations of the supercoil strands arising from thermal motion couple nonlinearly with the electrostatic interaction, giving rise to a strong enhancement of the bare interaction. In the limit of fairly tight winding, the free energy of a plectonemic supercoil may be split into an elastic contribution containing the bending and torsional energies and an electrostatic-undulatory free energy. The total free energy of the supercoil is minimized according to an iterative scheme, which utilizes the special symmetry inherent in the usual elastic free energy of the plectoneme. The superhelical radius, opening angle, and undulation amplitudes in the radius and pitch are obtained as a function of the specific linking difference and the concentration of monovalent salt. Our results compare favorably with the experimental values for these parameters of Boles et al. (1990. J. Mol. Biol. 213:931-951). In particular, we confirm the experimental observation that the writhe is a virtually constant fraction of the excess linking number over a wide range of superhelical densities. Another important prediction is the ionic strength dependence of the plectonemic parameters, which is in reasonable agreement with the results from computer simulations.

  8. DNA supercoiling and aerobic regulation of transcription from the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifLA promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R A; Henderson, N C; Austin, S

    1988-11-11

    Expression from the K. pneumoniae nifLA promoter is oxygen sensitive and is also inhibited by the DNA gyrase inhibitor coumermycin A1 under anaerobic growth conditions. The activity of this promoter was found to be highly sensitive to changes in DNA topology in vitro. Transcription was completely dependent on negative supercoiling at physiological salt concentrations although transcription from linear or fully relaxed closed circular templates was detectable at KCl concentrations lower than 50 mM. These observations suggest that aerobic regulation of nif transcription may be mediated through the level of DNA supercoiling.

  9. Magnesium concentration effects on cruciform extrusion in supercoiled DNA examined by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasovskikh, S.; Dritschilo, A.

    2002-03-01

    Cruciform structures can form in DNA sequences with inverted repeats or palindromic symmetry under unwinding torsional stress. DNA repeats are widespread in the genomes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and their extrusion into cruciform structures may be involved in various genetic processes, including transcription and replication. Intracellular Mg 2+ may change the free energy of supercoiling to provide the driving force for cruciform extrusion. We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image the effects of magnesium concentrations on cruciform extrusions in supercoiled DNA. Mg 2+ concentration dependent cruciform extrusions were observed in the supercoiled topoisomer of the pPR-PARP plasmid (=-0.065). These data show an application of AFM imaging to demonstrate that the presence of Mg 2+ results in increased extrusions and promotes compact cruciform conformation.

  10. Direct single-molecule observations of DNA unwinding by SV40 large tumor antigen under a negative DNA supercoil state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shunsuke; Motooka, Shinya; Kawasaki, Shohei; Kurita, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Takeshi; Matsuura, Shun-Ichi; Hanaoka, Fumio; Mizuno, Akira; Oshige, Masahiko; Katsura, Shinji

    2017-01-05

    Superhelices, which are induced by the twisting and coiling of double-helical DNA in chromosomes, are thought to affect transcription, replication, and other DNA metabolic processes. In this study, we report the effects of negative supercoiling on the unwinding activity of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (SV40 TAg) at a single-molecular level. The supercoiling density of linear DNA templates was controlled using magnetic tweezers and monitored using a fluorescent microscope in a flow cell. SV40 TAg-mediated DNA unwinding under relaxed and negative supercoil states was analyzed by the direct observation of both single- and double-stranded regions of single DNA molecules. Increased negative superhelicity stimulated SV40 TAg-mediated DNA unwinding more strongly than a relaxed state; furthermore, negative superhelicity was associated with an increased probability of SV40 TAg-mediated DNA unwinding. These results suggest that negative superhelicity helps to regulate the initiation of DNA replication.

  11. DNA Supercoiling Regulates the Motility of Campylobacter jejuni and Is Altered by Growth in the Presence of Chicken Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, Claire; Scanlan, Eoin; Hilliard, Amber; Cotroneo, Chiara E; Bourke, Billy; Ó Cróinín, Tadhg

    2016-09-13

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans, but relatively little is known about the global regulation of virulence factors during infection of chickens or humans. This study identified DNA supercoiling as playing a key role in regulating motility and flagellar protein production and found that this supercoiling-controlled regulon is induced by growth in chicken mucus. A direct correlation was observed between motility and resting DNA supercoiling levels in different strains of C. jejuni, and relaxation of DNA supercoiling resulted in decreased motility. Transcriptional analysis and Western immunoblotting revealed that a reduction in motility and DNA supercoiling affected the two-component regulatory system FlgRS and was associated with reduced FlgR expression, increased FlgS expression, and aberrant expression of flagellin subunits. Electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar structure remained intact. Growth in the presence of porcine mucin resulted in increased negative supercoiling, increased motility, increased FlgR expression, and reduced FlgS expression. Finally, this supercoiling-dependent regulon was shown to be induced by growth in chicken mucus, and the level of activation was dependent on the source of the mucus from within the chicken intestinal tract. In conclusion, this study reports for the first time the key role played by DNA supercoiling in regulating motility in C. jejuni and indicates that the induction of this supercoiling-induced regulon in response to mucus from different sources could play a critical role in regulating motility in vivo Although Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, very little is understood about how this pathogen controls the expression of genes involved in causing disease. This study for the first time identifies DNA supercoiling as a key regulator of motility in C. jejuni, which is essential for both pathogenesis and colonization. Altering the

  12. Extension, Torque and Supercoiling in Single, Stretched and Twisted DNA Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Pui-Man

    2016-01-01

    We reinvestigate the model originally studied by Neukirch and Marko that describes the extension, torque and supercoiling in single, stretched and twisted DNA molecules, which consists of a mixture of extended and supercoiled state, using now a more accurate form of the free energy for the untwisted but stretched DNA. The original model uses an approximate form of this free energy and the agreement with experiment is only qualitative. We find that this more accurate free energy significantly improves the results, bring them into quantitative agreement with experiment, throughout the entire force regime. This is rather surprising, considering that the theory is completely parameter-free.

  13. New conjugated polymers for photoinduced unwinding of DNA supercoiling and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gaomai; Yuan, Huanxiang; Zhu, Chunlei; Liu, Libing; Yang, Qiong; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Shu

    2012-05-01

    Three cationic polythiophene derivatives (P1, P2, P3) were synthesized and characterized. Under white light irradiation (400-800 nm), they sensitize oxygen molecule in the surrounding to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can efficiently unwind the supercoiled DNA in vitro. Further study shows that this relaxation of the DNA supercoiling results in the decrease of gene (pCX-EGFP plasmid) expression level. The ability of these conjugated polymers for regulating gene expression will add a new dimension to the function of conjugated polymers.

  14. Tethered particle analysis of supercoiled circular DNA using peptide nucleic acid handles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Andersson, Magnus; Nielsen, Peter Eigil

    2014-01-01

    of both the dynamics of the molecule itself and of its interactions with a regulatory protein. Two bis-PNA clamps designed to bind with extremely high affinity to predetermined homopurine sequence sites in supercoiled DNA are prepared: one conjugated with digoxigenin for attachment to an anti...

  15. Tethered particle analysis of supercoiled circular DNA using peptide nucleic acid handles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Andersson, Magnus; Nielsen, Peter Eigil;

    2014-01-01

    of both the dynamics of the molecule itself and of its interactions with a regulatory protein. Two bis-PNA clamps designed to bind with extremely high affinity to predetermined homopurine sequence sites in supercoiled DNA are prepared: one conjugated with digoxigenin for attachment to an anti...

  16. How topoisomerase IV can efficiently unknot and decatenate negatively supercoiled DNA molecules without causing their torsional relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawdon, Eric J; Dorier, Julien; Racko, Dusan; Millett, Kenneth C; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-06-02

    Freshly replicated DNA molecules initially form multiply interlinked right-handed catenanes. In bacteria, these catenated molecules become supercoiled by DNA gyrase before they undergo a complete decatenation by topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Topo IV is also involved in the unknotting of supercoiled DNA molecules. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the shapes of supercoiled DNA molecules that are either knotted or catenated. We are especially interested in understanding how Topo IV can unknot right-handed knots and decatenate right-handed catenanes without acting on right-handed plectonemes in negatively supercoiled DNA molecules. To this end, we investigate how the topological consequences of intersegmental passages depend on the geometry of the DNA-DNA juxtapositions at which these passages occur. We observe that there are interesting differences between the geometries of DNA-DNA juxtapositions in the interwound portions and in the knotted or catenated portions of the studied molecules. In particular, in negatively supercoiled, multiply interlinked, right-handed catenanes, we detect specific regions where DNA segments belonging to two freshly replicated sister DNA molecules form left-handed crossings. We propose that, due to its geometrical preference to act on left-handed crossings, Topo IV can specifically unknot supercoiled DNA, as well as decatenate postreplicative catenanes, without causing their torsional relaxation.

  17. DNA supercoiling in Escherichia coli is under tight and subtle homeostatic control, involving gene-expression and metabolic regulation of both topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, J.L.; van der Weijden, C.C.; Andersen, H.W.;

    2002-01-01

    DNA of prokaryotes is in a nonequilibrium. structural state, characterized as 'active' DNA supercoiling. Alterations in this state affect many life processes and a homeostatic control of DNA supercoiling has been suggested [Menzel, R. & Gellert. M. (1983) Cell 34, 105-113]. We here report on a new...

  18. Mathematical relationships among DNA supercoiling, cation concentration, and temperature for prokaryotic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J Y

    1998-08-01

    DNA twist has been proposed to affect transcription from some promoters of Escherichia coli, but involvement of twist has been difficult to test because it cannot be measured in transcription reaction mixtures. However, changes in other factors affect both DNA twist and transcription. These parameters are expected to be related when maximum transcription initiation is considered. In the present work, mathematical relationships among supercoiling, cation concentration, and temperature are derived for prokaryotic transcription initiation. The relationships indicate that as DNA becomes more negatively supercoiled, maximal initiation occurs at a higher cation concentration and at a lower temperature. For example, when superhelical density becomes more negative by 0.0025, a 1.6-fold increase in potassium concentration is predicted to be required to maintain transcription initiation at its maximum rate. Experimental verification of the relationships should provide a useful test of the idea that transcription initiation is sensitive to DNA twist.

  19. Relaxation of DNA supercoiling leads to increased invasion of epithelial cells and protein secretion by Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Eoin; Ardill, Laura; Whelan, Matthew V X; Shortt, Claire; Nally, Jarlath E; Bourke, Billy; Ó Cróinín, Tadhg

    2017-04-01

    Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by Campylobacter jejuni is a critical step during infection of the intestine by this important human pathogen. In this study we investigated the role played by DNA supercoiling in the regulation of invasion of epithelial cells and the mechanism by which this could be mediated. A significant correlation between more relaxed DNA supercoiling and an increased ability of C. jejuni strains to penetrate human epithelial cells was demonstrated. Directly inducing relaxation of DNA supercoiling in C. jejuni was shown to significantly increase invasion of epithelial cells. Mutants in the fibronectin binding proteins CadF and FlpA still displayed an increased invasion after treatment with novobiocin suggesting these proteins were not essential for the observed phenotype. However, a large increase in protein secretion from multiple C. jejuni strains upon relaxation of DNA supercoiling was demonstrated. This increase in protein secretion was not mediated by outer membrane vesicles and appeared to be dependent on an intact flagellar structure. This study identifies relaxation of DNA supercoiling as playing a key role in enhancing C. jejuni pathogenesis during infection of the human intestine and identifies proteins present in a specific invasion associated secretome induced by relaxation of DNA supercoiling. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The importance of being supercoiled: how DNA mechanics regulate dynamic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Gupta, Ashutosh; Kouzine, Fedor

    2012-07-01

    Through dynamic changes in structure resulting from DNA-protein interactions and constraints given by the structural features of the double helix, chromatin accommodates and regulates different DNA-dependent processes. All DNA transactions (such as transcription, DNA replication and chromosomal segregation) are necessarily linked to strong changes in the topological state of the double helix known as torsional stress or supercoiling. As virtually all DNA transactions are in turn affected by the torsional state of DNA, these changes have the potential to serve as regulatory signals detected by protein partners. This two-way relationship indicates that DNA dynamics may contribute to the regulation of many events occurring during cell life. In this review we will focus on the role of DNA supercoiling in the cellular processes, with particular emphasis on transcription. Besides giving an overview on the multiplicity of factors involved in the generation and dissipation of DNA torsional stress, we will discuss recent studies which give new insight into the way cells use DNA dynamics to perform functions otherwise not achievable. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. DNA supercoiling enhances cooperativity and efficiency of an epigenetic switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Andersson, Magnus; Sneppen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage λ stably maintains its dormant prophage state but efficiently enters lytic development in response to DNA damage. The mediator of these processes is the λ repressor protein, CI, and its interactions with λ operator DNA. This λ switch is a model on the basis of which epigenetic switch...

  2. Optimum range of plasmid supercoiled DNA for preparation of ccompetent Top 10 E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tahir Majeed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In-house preparation of chemically competent andelectrocompetent Top 10 E. coli is not only economical butmeets the needs for most of the molecular cloning work. Forsuch transformations an optimum range of plasmidsupercoiled DNA is needed. Therefore, the present studydescribes the modification of two protocols for the preparationof such cells, and optimization of the amount of plasmidsupercoiled DNA required for better efficiency.Materials and methods: As most of the available protocols torender bacterial cells competent need special media orchemicals and are time consuming, the methods from HelenDonis-Keller Laboratory Manual of Washington University inSt. Louis and Goldberg Laboratory Standard Protocols of theUnited States Department of Agriculture have been used aftermeticulous selection and with few modifications for preparingchemically competent and electrocompetent Top 10 E. coli,respectively. The transformation was carried out using pUC19supercoiled plasmid DNA.Results: The transformation efficiencies of chemicallycompetent and electrocompetent Top 10 E. coli were found tobe 1.1 x 106 and 7.88 x 107 tranformants/μg of DNA,respectively. Such efficiencies are slightly higher than therequired (105-106 transformants/μg DNA for most of thecloning experimentation.Conclusion: The results of the present study indicatethat for sufficient transformation competence rates theoptimum range of plasmid supercoiled DNA is 10 ng forchemically competent and 0.1 ng for electrocompetentTop 10 E. coli.

  3. Supercoiled DNA folded by nonhistone proteins in cultured mouse carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, M; Ide, T; Anzai, K; Ohara, S; Andoh, T

    1978-07-01

    Upon gentle lysis of exponentially growing mouse carcinoma cells FM3A by sodium dodecyl sulfate, DNA was released as a "DNA-protein complex" in a folded conformation. No histones could be detected in the DNA-protein complex. The proteins bound to DNA were found to be composed of several kinds of nonhistone proteins with a molecular weight range of 50,000 to 60,000; they appear to play a key role in stabilizing and maintaining the compact and folded structure of the complex. Removal of the proteins by Pronase or 2-mercaptoethanol produced a more relaxed structure sedimenting about half as fast as the original complex in a neutral sucrose gradient. DNA in the folded complex is supercoiled, as indicated by the characteristic biphasic response of its sedimentation rate to increasing concentration of various intercalating agents, actinomycin D, ethidium bromide and acriflavine, with which the cells were treated before lysis. Pronase- or 2-mercaptoethanol-treated relaxed DNA still possessed the characteristic of closed-circular structure as judged from its response to intercalating agents. Nicking with gamma-ray or 4NQO broke these superhelical turns and relaxed the folded complex to slower sedimenting forms equivalent to the relaxed DNA obtained on treatment with Pronase or 2-mercaptoethanol. Viscometric observations of DNA-protein complex were consistent with the above results. A tentative model for the structure of this DNA-protein complex is proposed in which supercoiled DNA is folded into loops by several kinds of nonhistone proteins. Autoradiographic examination of the complex appeared to support this model.

  4. Binding and elution strategy for improved performance of arginine affinity chromatography in supercoiled plasmid DNA purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, F; Prazeres, D M F; Queiroz, J A

    2009-02-01

    New interesting strategies for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification were designed, exploiting affinity interactions between amino acids and nucleic acids. The potential application of arginine-based chromatography to purify pDNA has been recently described in our work; however, to achieve higher efficiency and selectivity in arginine affinity chromatography, it is essential to characterize the behaviour of binding/elution of supercoiled (sc) isoforms. In this study, two different strategies based on increased sodium chloride (225-250 mm) or arginine (20-70 mm) stepwise gradients are described to purify sc isoforms. Thus, it was proved that well-defined binding/elution conditions are crucial to enhance the purification performance, resulting in an improvement of the final plasmids yields and transfection efficiency, as this could represent a significant impact on therapeutic applications of the purified sc isoform. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Theory of equilibria of elastic braids with applications to DNA supercoiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Gert; Starostin, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by supercoiling of DNA and other filamentous structures, we formulate a new theory for equilibria of 2-braids, i.e., structures formed by two elastic rods winding around each other in continuous contact and subject to a local interstrand interaction. Unlike in previous work no assumption is made on the shape of the contact curve. Rather, this shape is solved for. The theory is developed in terms of a moving frame of directors attached to one of the strands with one of the directors pointing to the position of the other strand. The constant-distance constraint is automatically satisfied by the introduction of what we call braid strains. The price we pay is that the potential energy involves arclength derivatives of these strains, thus giving rise to a second-order variational problem. The Euler-Lagrange equations for this problem give balance equations for the overall braid force and moment referred to the moving frame as well as differential equations that can be interpreted as effective constitutive relations encoding the effect that the second strand has on the first as the braid deforms under the action of end loads. Both open braid and closed braid solutions (links and knots) are computed and current applications to DNA supercoiling are discussed. Research supported by EPSRC and HFSP.

  6. The supercoiling state of DNA determines the handedness of both H3 and CENP-A nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlijm, R; Kim, S H; De Zwart, P L; Dalal, Y; Dekker, C

    2017-02-02

    Nucleosomes form the unit structure of the genome in eukaryotes, thereby constituting a fundamental tenet of chromatin biology. In canonical nucleosomes, DNA wraps around the histone octamer in a left-handed toroidal ramp. Here, in single-molecule magnetic tweezers studies of chaperone-assisted nucleosome assembly, we show that the handedness of the DNA wrapping around the nucleosome core is intrinsically ambidextrous, and depends on the pre-assembly supercoiling state of the DNA, i.e., it is not uniquely determined by the octameric histone core. Nucleosomes assembled onto negatively supercoiled DNA are found to exhibit a left-handed conformation, whereas assembly onto positively supercoiled DNA results in right-handed nucleosomes. This intrinsic flexibility to adopt both chiralities is observed both for canonical H3 nucleosomes, and for centromere-specific variant CENP-A nucleosomes. These data support recent advances suggesting an intrinsic adaptability of the nucleosome, and provide insights into how nucleosomes might rapidly re-assemble after cellular processes that generate positive supercoiling in vivo.

  7. Linear forms of plasmid DNA are superior to supercoiled structures as active templates for gene expression in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, N; Zakai, N; Friedberg, D; Loyter, A

    1988-07-01

    Introduction of the plasmids pUC8CaMVCAT and pNOSCAT into plant protoplasts is known to result in transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene. Also, transfection with the plasmid pDO432 results in transient appearance of the luciferase enzyme. In the present work we have used these systems to study the effect of DNA topology on the expression of the above recombinant genes. Linear forms of the above plasmids exhibited much higher activity in supporting gene expression than their corresponding super-coiled structures. CAT activity in protoplasts transfected with the linear forms of pUC8CaMVCAT and pNOSCAT was up to ten-fold higher than that observed in protoplasts transfected by the supercoiled template of these plasmids. This effect was observed in protoplasts derived from two different lines of Petunia hybrida and from a Nicotiana tabacum cell line. Transfection with the relaxed form of pUC8CaMVCAT resulted in very low expression of the CAT gene.Northern blot analysis revealed that the amount of poly(A)(+) RNA extracted from protoplasts transformed with the linear forms of the DNA was about 10-fold higher than that found in protoplasts transformed with supercoiled DNA.Southern blot analysis revealed that about the same amounts of supercoiled and linear DNA molecules were present in nuclei of transfected protoplasts. No significant quantitative differences have been observed between the degradation rates of the various DNA templates used.

  8. Surface charges effects on the 2D conformation of supercoiled DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Schmatko, Tatiana; Maaloum, Mounir

    2012-01-01

    We have adsorbed plasmid PuC19 DNA on a supported bilayer. The mobility of the lipids within the bilayer ensured a 2D equilibrium of the DNA molecule. By varying the fraction of cationic lipids in the membrane, we have tuned the surface charge. Plasmids conformations were imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).We performed two sets of experiments: deposition from salt free solution on charged bilayers and deposition from salty solutions on neutral bilayers. Plasmids can be seen as rings, completely opened structures, or tightly supercoiled plectonemes, depending on the experimental conditions. The plectonemic conformation is observed either on charged surfaces (in the absence of salt) or at 30 mM salt concentration on a neutral bilayer. We demonstrate the equivalence of surface screening by mobile interfacial charges and bulk screening from salt ions.

  9. Specific recognition of supercoiled plasmid DNA by affinity chromatography using the intercalator DAPP as ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramelo-Nunes, C; Almeida, P; Marcos, J C; Tomaz, C T

    2013-06-01

    Small molecules that bind DNA with high specificity present a promising opportunity for application as chromatographic ligands for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification. This research used the intercalator 3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridine (DAPP) as an immobilized ligand for the specific separation of supercoiled (sc) pDNA by affinity chromatography. The results showed that the protonated DAPP-Sepharose support has a great affinity for sc pDNA isoform, separating it from the less active open circular and linear isoforms. All pDNA isoforms were retained in the column using 10mM acetate buffer pH 5. Selective elution of oc and linear isoforms was achieved with 0.22M of sodium chloride in the same buffer. Finally, increasing the concentration to 0.55M led to the elution of the sc isoform. The binding of pDNA to DAPP-Sepharose varies in function of pH, and the stability of the protonated DAPP-DNA complex decreases with increasing salt concentration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcription-driven twin supercoiling of a DNA loop: A Brownian dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Steven P.; Fink, William H.; Krishnan, V. V.; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Benham, Craig J.

    2004-10-01

    The torque generated by RNA polymerase as it tracks along double-stranded DNA can potentially induce long-range structural deformations integral to mechanisms of biological significance in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this paper, we introduce a dynamic computer model for investigating this phenomenon. Duplex DNA is represented as a chain of hydrodynamic beads interacting through potentials of linearly elastic stretching, bending, and twisting, as well as excluded volume. The chain, linear when relaxed, is looped to form two open but topologically constrained subdomains. This permits the dynamic introduction of torsional stress via a centrally applied torque. We simulate by Brownian dynamics the 100 μs response of a 477-base pair B-DNA template to the localized torque generated by the prokaryotic transcription ensemble. Following a sharp rise at early times, the distributed twist assumes a nearly constant value in both subdomains, and a succession of supercoiling deformations occurs as superhelical stress is increasingly partitioned to writhe. The magnitude of writhe surpasses that of twist before also leveling off when the structure reaches mechanical equilibrium with the torsional load. Superhelicity is simultaneously right handed in one subdomain and left handed in the other, as predicted by the "transcription-induced twin-supercoiled-domain" model [L. F. Liu and J. C. Wang, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 7024 (1987)]. The properties of the chain at the onset of writhing agree well with predictions from theory, and the generated stress is ample for driving secondary structural transitions in physiological DNA.

  11. Relaxation of DNA supercoiling leads to increased invasion of epithelial cells and protein secretion by Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by Campylobacter jejuni is a critical step during infection of the human intestine by this important human pathogen. In this study we investigated the role played by DNA supercoiling in the regulation of invasion of epithelial cells and the mechanism by which ...

  12. Axial distortion as a sensor of supercoil changes: a molecular model for the homeostatic regulation of DNA gyrase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shyam Unniraman; Valakunja Nagaraja

    2001-12-01

    Negative supercoiling stimulates transcription of many genes. In contrast, transcription of the genes coding for DNA gyrase is subject to a novel mechanism of autoregulation, wherein relaxation of the template DNA stimulates their transcription. Since DNA gyrase is the sole supercoiling activity in the eubacterial cell, relaxation-stimulated transcription (RST) could reflect an autoregulatory mechanism to maintain supercoil levels within the cell. Extensive deletion and mutational analyses of Escherichia coli gyrA promoter have shown that the $-10$ region is essential for RST; however, a molecular model has proved to be elusive. We find a strong bend centre immediately downstream of the $-10$ region in the gyrA promoter. On the basis of analysis of various mutants in the $-10$ region, we propose a model where axial distortion acts as a sensor of topological changes in DNA. Our model is consistent with earlier data with E. coli gyrA and gyrB promoters. We also extrapolate the model to explain the phenomenon of RST of gyr promoters in other organisms and contrast it with promoters induced by supercoiling.

  13. DNA reshaping by MukB. Right-handed knotting, left-handed supercoiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushenko, Zoya M; Lai, Chien-Hung; Rai, Rachna; Rybenkov, Valentin V

    2006-02-24

    MukB is a bacterial SMC (structural maintenance of chromosome) protein required for faithful chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli. We report here that purified MukB introduces right-handed knots into DNA in the presence of type-2 topoisomerase, indicating that the protein promotes intramolecular DNA condensation. The pattern of generated knots suggests that MukB, similar to eukaryotic condensins, stabilizes large right-handed DNA loops. In contrast to eukaryotic condensins, however, the net supercoiling stabilized by MukB was negative. Furthermore, DNA reshaping by MukB did not require ATP. These data establish that bacterial condensins alter the shape of double-stranded DNA in vitro and lend support to the notions that the right-handed knotting is the most conserved biochemical property of condensins. Finally, we found that MukB can be eluted from a heparin column in two distinct forms, one of which is inert in DNA binding or reshaping. Furthermore, we find that the activity of MukB is reversibly attenuated during chromatographic separation. Thus, MukB has a unique set of topological properties, compared with other SMC proteins, and is likely to exist in two different conformations.

  14. A Superhelical Spiral in the Escherichia coli DNA Gyrase A C-terminal Domain Imparts Unidirectional Supercoiling Bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruthenburg,A.; Graybosch, D.; Huetsch, J.; Verdine, G.

    2005-01-01

    DNA gyrase is unique among type II topoisomerases in that its DNA supercoiling activity is unidirectional. The C-terminal domain of the gyrase A subunit (GyrA-CTD) is required for this supercoiling bias. We report here the x-ray structure of the Escherichia coli GyrA-CTD (Protein Data Bank code 1ZI0). The E. coli GyrA-CTD adopts a circular-shaped {beta}-pinwheel fold first seen in the Borrelia burgdorferi GyrA-CTD. However, whereas the B. burgdorferi GyrA-CTD is flat, the E. coli GyrA-CTD is spiral. DNA relaxation assays reveal that the E. coli GyrA-CTD wraps DNA inducing substantial (+) superhelicity, while the B. burgdorferi GyrA-CTD introduces a more modest (+) superhelicity. The observation of a superhelical spiral in the present structure and that of the Bacillus stearothermophilus ParC-CTD structure suggests unexpected similarities in substrate selectivity between gyrase and Topo IV enzymes. We propose a model wherein the right-handed ((+) solenoidal) wrapping of DNA around the E. coli GyrA-CTD enforces unidirectional (-) DNA supercoiling.

  15. Structural coupling between RNA polymerase composition and DNA supercoiling in coordinating transcription: a global role for the omega subunit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz, Marcel; Travers, Andrew; Mehandziska, Sanja; Sobetzko, Patrick; Chandra-Janga, Sarath; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2011-01-01

    In growing bacterial cells, the global reorganization of transcription is associated with alterations of RNA polymerase composition and the superhelical density of the DNA. However, the existence of any regulatory device coordinating these changes remains elusive. Here we show that in an exponentially growing Escherichia coli rpoZ mutant lacking the polymerase ω subunit, the impact of the Eσ(38) holoenzyme on transcription is enhanced in parallel with overall DNA relaxation. Conversely, overproduction of σ(70) in an rpoZ mutant increases both overall DNA supercoiling and the transcription of genes utilizing high negative superhelicity. We further show that transcription driven by the Eσ(38) and Eσ(70) holoenzymes from cognate promoters induces distinct superhelical densities of plasmid DNA in vivo. We thus demonstrate a tight coupling between polymerase holoenzyme composition and the supercoiling regimen of genomic transcription. Accordingly, we identify functional clusters of genes with distinct σ factor and supercoiling preferences arranging alternative transcription programs sustaining bacterial exponential growth. We propose that structural coupling between DNA topology and holoenzyme composition provides a basic regulatory device for coordinating genome-wide transcription during bacterial growth and adaptation. IMPORTANCE Understanding the mechanisms of coordinated gene expression is pivotal for developing knowledge-based approaches to manipulating bacterial physiology, which is a problem of central importance for applications of biotechnology and medicine. This study explores the relationships between variations in the composition of the transcription machinery and chromosomal DNA topology and suggests a tight interdependence of these two variables as the major coordinating principle of gene regulation. The proposed structural coupling between the transcription machinery and DNA topology has evolutionary implications and suggests a new methodology for

  16. Optimization of supercoiled HPV-16 E6/E7 plasmid DNA purification with arginine monolith using design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, A M; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F; Sousa, A

    2015-01-26

    The progress of DNA vaccines is dependent on the development of suitable chromatographic procedures to successfully purify genetic vectors, such as plasmid DNA. Human Papillomavirus is associated with the development of tumours due to the oncogenic power of E6 and E7 proteins, produced by this virus. The supercoiled HPV-16 E6/E7 plasmid-based vaccine was recently purified with the arginine monolith, with 100% of purity, but only 39% of recovery was achieved. Therefore, the present study describes the application of experimental design tools, a newly explored methodology in preparative chromatography, in order to improve the supercoiled plasmid DNA recovery with the arginine monolith, maintaining the high purity degree. In addition, the importance and influence of pH in the pDNA retention to the arginine ligand was also demonstrated. The Composite Central Face design was validated and the recovery of the target molecule was successfully improved from 39% to 83.5%, with an outstanding increase of more than double, while maintaining 100% of purity.

  17. Hydrolysis of ATP at only one GyrB subunit is sufficient to promote supercoiling by DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1998-01-01

    Mutation of Glu42 to Ala in the B subunit of DNA gyrase abolishes ATP hydrolysis but not nucleotide binding. Gyrase complexes that contain one wild-type and one Ala42 mutant B protein were formed, and the ability of such complexes to hydrolyze ATP was investigated. We found that ATP hydrolysis...... was able to proceed independently only in the wild-type subunit, albeit at a lower rate. With only one ATP molecule hydrolyzed at a time, gyrase could still perform supercoiling, but the limit of this reaction was lower than that observed when both subunits can hydrolyze the nucleotide....

  18. Next-generation bis-locked nucleic acids with stacking linker and 2'-glycylamino-LNA show enhanced DNA invasion into supercoiled duplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geny, Sylvain; Moreno, Pedro M D; Krzywkowski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Targeting and invading double-stranded DNA with synthetic oligonucleotides under physiological conditions remain a challenge. Bis-locked nucleic acids (bisLNAs) are clamp-forming oligonucleotides able to invade into supercoiled DNA via combined Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick binding. To improve the b...

  19. Rates of gyrase supercoiling and transcription elongation control supercoil density in a bacterial chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Rovinskiy

    Full Text Available Gyrase catalyzes negative supercoiling of DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction that helps condense bacterial chromosomes into a compact interwound "nucleoid." The supercoil density (σ of prokaryotic DNA occurs in two forms. Diffusible supercoil density (σ(D moves freely around the chromosome in 10 kb domains, and constrained supercoil density (σ(C results from binding abundant proteins that bend, loop, or unwind DNA at many sites. Diffusible and constrained supercoils contribute roughly equally to the total in vivo negative supercoil density of WT cells, so σ = σ(C+σ(D. Unexpectedly, Escherichia coli chromosomes have a 15% higher level of σ compared to Salmonella enterica. To decipher critical mechanisms that can change diffusible supercoil density of chromosomes, we analyzed strains of Salmonella using a 9 kb "supercoil sensor" inserted at ten positions around the genome. The sensor contains a complete Lac operon flanked by directly repeated resolvase binding sites, and the sensor can monitor both supercoil density and transcription elongation rates in WT and mutant strains. RNA transcription caused (- supercoiling to increase upstream and decrease downstream of highly expressed genes. Excess upstream supercoiling was relaxed by Topo I, and gyrase replenished downstream supercoil losses to maintain an equilibrium state. Strains with TS gyrase mutations growing at permissive temperature exhibited significant supercoil losses varying from 30% of WT levels to a total loss of σ(D at most chromosome locations. Supercoil losses were influenced by transcription because addition of rifampicin (Rif caused supercoil density to rebound throughout the chromosome. Gyrase mutants that caused dramatic supercoil losses also reduced the transcription elongation rates throughout the genome. The observed link between RNA polymerase elongation speed and gyrase turnover suggests that bacteria with fast growth rates may generate higher supercoil densities

  20. Negative supercoiling creates single-stranded patches of DNA that are substrates for AID-mediated mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahan-Yar Parsa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibody diversification necessitates targeted mutation of regions within the immunoglobulin locus by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID. While AID is known to act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, the source, structure, and distribution of these substrates in vivo remain unclear. Using the technique of in situ bisulfite treatment, we characterized these substrates-which we found to be unique to actively transcribed genes-as short ssDNA regions, that are equally distributed on both DNA strands. We found that the frequencies of these ssDNA patches act as accurate predictors of AID activity at reporter genes in hypermutating and class switching B cells as well as in Escherichia coli. Importantly, these ssDNA patches rely on transcription, and we report that transcription-induced negative supercoiling enhances both ssDNA tract formation and AID mutagenesis. In addition, RNaseH1 expression does not impact the formation of these ssDNA tracts indicating that these structures are distinct from R-loops. These data emphasize the notion that these transcription-generated ssDNA tracts are one of many in vivo substrates for AID.

  1. Screening of L-histidine-based ligands to modify monolithic supports and selectively purify the supercoiled plasmid DNA isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Lúcia F A; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A; Cruz, Carla; Sousa, Ângela

    2015-06-01

    The growing demand of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA (pDNA) suitable for biotherapeutic applications fostered the development of new purification strategies. The surface plasmon resonance technique was employed for a fast binding screening of l-histidine and its derivatives, 1-benzyl-L-histidine and 1-methyl-L-histidine, as potential ligands for the biorecognition of three plasmids with different sizes (6.05, 8.70, and 14 kbp). The binding analysis was performed with different isoforms of each plasmid (supercoiled, open circular, and linear) separately. The results revealed that the overall affinity of plasmids to l-histidine and its derivatives was high (KD  > 10(-8)  M), and the highest affinity was found for human papillomavirus 16 E6/E7 (K(D)  = 1.1 × 10(-10)  M and KD  = 3.34 × 10(-10)  M for open circular and linear plasmid isoforms, respectively). L-Histidine and 1-benzyl-L-histidine were immobilized on monolithic matrices. Chromatographic studies of L-histidine and 1-benzyl-L-histidine monoliths were also performed with the aforementioned samples. In general, the supercoiled isoform had strong interactions with both supports. The separation of plasmid isoforms was achieved by decreasing the ammonium sulfate concentration in the eluent, in both supports, but a lower salt concentration was required in the 1-benzyl-L-histidine monolith because of stronger interactions promoted with pDNA. The efficiency of plasmid isoforms separation remained unchanged with flow rate variations. The binding capacity for pDNA achieved with the l-histidine monolith was 29-fold higher than that obtained with conventional L-histidine agarose. Overall, the combination of either L-histidine or its derivatives with monolithic supports can be a promising strategy to purify the supercoiled isoform from different plasmids with suitable purity degree for pharmaceutical applications.

  2. Protein switches identified from diverse insertion libraries created using S1 nuclease digestion of supercoiled-form plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullman, Jennifer; Guntas, Gurkan; Dumont, Matthew; Ostermeier, Marc

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate that S1 nuclease converts supercoiled plasmid DNA to unit-length, linear dsDNA through the creation of a single, double-stranded break in a plasmid molecule. These double-stranded breaks occur not only in the origin of replication near inverted repeats but also at a wide variety of locations throughout the plasmid. S1 nuclease exhibits this activity under conditions typically employed for the nuclease's single-stranded nuclease activity. Thus, S1 nuclease digestion of plasmid DNA, unlike analogous digestion with DNaseI, effectively halts after the first double-stranded break. This property makes easier the construction of large domain insertion libraries in which the goal is to insert linear DNA at a variety of locations throughout a plasmid. We used this property to create a library in which a circularly permuted TEM1 β-lactamase gene was inserted throughout a plasmid containing the gene encoding Escherichia coli ribose binding protein. Gene fusions that encode allosteric switch proteins in which ribose modulates β-lactamase catalytic activity were isolated from this library using a combination of a genetic selection and a screen.

  3. Radiation sensitivities are not related to the sizes of DNA supercoiled domains in L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walicka, M.; Godlewska, E. (Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland). Dept. of Radiobiology and Health Protection)

    1989-06-01

    Survival of murine lymphoblasts L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S irradiated with /sup 60/Co gamma radiation was determined. The parameters of the survival curves were D/sub 0/ = 1.18 Gy, n 1.56 and D/sub 0/ = 0.55 Gy, n = 1.00 for L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S cells respectively. The sizes of DNA supercoiled domains were estimated using sedimentation of nucleoids from cells irradiated with doses from 1 to 7 Gy. These sizes were 2.44 x 10/sup 9/ and 5.13 x 10/sup 8/ Da for L5178Y-R cells and 1.30 x 10/sup 9/ and 4.07 x 10/sup 8/ Da for L5178Y-S cells. Hence, higher radiosensitivity of L5178Y-S cells was not compatible with the larger size of the DNA supercoiled domains, as suggested by Filippovich et al. (1982). The authors did not find any simple relation between sizes of DNA supercoiled domains and the susceptibility of L5178Y sublines to ionizing radiation. (author).

  4. Detection of surface free radical activity of respirable industrial fibres using supercoiled phi X174 RF1 plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, P S; Beswick, P H; Brown, D M; Donaldson, K

    1995-12-01

    The ability of a number of respirable industrial fibres, amosite and crocidolite asbestos, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) and man-made vitreous fibres (MMVFs) to cause free radical injury to plasmid phi X174 RFI DNA was assessed. The oxidative DNA damage was observed as depletion of supercoiled DNA after fibre treatment was quantified by scanning laser densitometry. The mechanism of fibre-mediated damage was determined by the use of the specific hydroxyl radical scavenger mannitol and the iron chelator desferrioxamine-B. The amosite and crocidolite asbestos caused substantial damage to DNA that was dose-related. The free radicals responsible for the asbestos-mediated DNA damage were hydroxyl radicals, as determined by inhibition with mannitol. Asbestos fibre-mediated damage to DNA was completely ameliorated by the chelation of fibre-associated iron with desferrioxamine-B. The amount of Fe(II) and Fe(III) released by equal numbers of the different fibre types at equal fibre number was determined. The fibres released very small amounts of Fe(II) and there were no significant differences between the fibre types. The fibres released substantial amounts of Fe(III); MMVF 21 released significantly more Fe(III) than any of the other fibres and short fibre amosite also released more Fe(III) than three of the MMVFs and two of the RCFs. When ability to release Fe(II) and Fe(III) was compared with ability to cause DNA damage there was not a good correlation, because only the long amosite and crocidolite caused substantial free radical injury to DNA; this contrasts with MMVF 21 and short amosite being the two fibres that released the greatest amounts of iron. The loss of ability to damage DNA in DSF-B-treated asbestos fibres shows that iron at the surface of asbestos fibres definitely has a role in generating hydroxyl radicals. However, it is clear that some fibres, such as short amosite and MMVF 21, release large quantities of iron without causing free radical damage, whilst

  5. Plasmid DNA Supercoiling and Gyrase Activity in Escherichia coli Wild-Type and rpoS Stationary-Phase Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Domínguez, Yazmid; Contreras-Ferrat, Gabriel; Ramírez-Santos, Jesús; Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Gómez-Eichelmann, M. Carmen

    2003-01-01

    Stationary-phase cells displayed a distribution of relaxed plasmids and had the ability to recover plasmid supercoiling as soon as nutrients became available. Preexisting gyrase molecules in these cells were responsible for this recovery. Stationary-phase rpoS cells showed a bimodal distribution of plasmids and failed to supercoil plasmids after the addition of nutrients, suggesting that rpoS plays a role in the regulation of plasmid topology during the stationary phase. PMID:12533486

  6. Mutations reducing replication from R-loops suppress the defects of growth, chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling in cells lacking topoisomerase I and RNase HI activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Drolet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    R-loop formation occurs when the nascent RNA hybridizes with the template DNA strand behind the RNA polymerase. R-loops affect a wide range of cellular processes and their use as origins of replication was the first function attributed to them. In Escherichia coli, R-loop formation is promoted by the ATP-dependent negative supercoiling activity of gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and is inhibited by topoisomerase (topo) I (topA) relaxing transcription-induced negative supercoiling. RNase HI (rnhA) degrades the RNA moiety of R-loops. The depletion of RNase HI activity in topA null mutants was previously shown to lead to extensive DNA relaxation, due to DNA gyrase inhibition, and to severe growth and chromosome segregation defects that were partially corrected by overproducing topo III (topB). Here, DNA gyrase assays in crude cell extracts showed that the ATP-dependent activity (supercoiling) of gyrase but not its ATP-independent activity (relaxation) was inhibited in topA null cells lacking RNase HI. To characterize the cellular event(s) triggered by the absence of RNase HI, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the growth defect of topA rnhA null cells. Suppressors affecting genes in replication (holC2::aph and dnaT18::aph) nucleotide metabolism (dcd49::aph), RNA degradation (rne59::aph) and fimbriae synthesis (fimD22::aph) were found to reduce replication from R-loops and to restore supercoiling, thus pointing to a correlation between R-loop-dependent replication in topA rnhA mutants and the inhibition of gyrase activity and growth. Interestingly, the position of fimD on the E. coli chromosome corresponds to the site of one of the five main putative origins of replication from R-loops in rnhA null cells recently identified by next-generation sequencing, thus suggesting that the fimD22::aph mutation inactivated one of these origins. Furthermore, we show that topo III overproduction is unable to complement the growth defect of topA rnhA null mutants at low

  7. DNA Structure and Supercoiling: Ribbons and a Yo-Yo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, J. David

    2011-01-01

    The double-helical structure of DNA is a pop cultural icon. Images of the DNA molecule appear in newspapers, popular journals, and advertisements. In addition to scientific instrument sales, the aura surrounding the central molecule of life has been used to sell everything from perfume to beverages and is the inspiration of items ranging from…

  8. DNA Structure and Supercoiling: Ribbons and a Yo-Yo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, J. David

    2011-01-01

    The double-helical structure of DNA is a pop cultural icon. Images of the DNA molecule appear in newspapers, popular journals, and advertisements. In addition to scientific instrument sales, the aura surrounding the central molecule of life has been used to sell everything from perfume to beverages and is the inspiration of items ranging from…

  9. Kinetic flow dichroism study of conformational changes in supercoiled DNA induced by ethidium bromide and noncovalent and covalent binding of benz[a]pyrene diol epoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, H; Swenberg, C E; Geacintov, N E

    1987-03-10

    The dynamic conformational changes due to the noncovalent intercalative binding of ethidium bromide and racemic trans-7,8-dihydroxy-anti-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE), and the covalent binding of BPDE to supercoiled phi X174 DNA, have been studied by gel electrophoresis and a novel application of a kinetic flow linear dichroism technique. The magnitude of the linear dichroism (delta A) of the DNA oriented in the flow gradient is sensitive to the hydrodynamic shape of the DNA molecule which is affected by the binding of the drug or the carcinogen BPDE. While the linear dichroism of ethidium bromide supercoiled DNA is time independent, the delta A spectra of BPDE-DNA reaction mixtures vary on time scales of minutes, which correspond to the reaction rate constant of BPDE to form 7,8,9,10-tetrahydroxytetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene hydrolysis products and covalent DNA adducts. The rapid noncovalent intercalation of BPDE causes an initial large increase in delta A (up to 250%, corresponding to the dichroism observed with relaxed circular DNA), followed by a slower decrease in the linear dichroism signal. This decrease in delta A is attributed to the removal of intercalated diol epoxide molecules and the resulting reversible increase in the number of superhelical turns. The kinetic flow dichroism spectra indicate that the noncovalent BPDE-DNA complexes are intercalative in nature, while the covalent adducts are characterized by a very different conformation in which the long axes of the pyrenyl residues are oriented at a large angle with respect to the average orientation of the planes of the DNA bases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. 亲和色谱纯化超螺旋质粒DNA的研究进展%RESEARCH PROGRESS OF AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY IN PURIFICATION OF SUPERCOILED PLASMID DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白金山; 白姝

    2013-01-01

    非病毒载体质粒DNA已被广泛应用于基因治疗和DNA疫苗,目前迫切需要开发其大规模制备和分离纯化方法.亲和色谱是一种高分辨率、高选择性的分离技术,在蛋白质、抗体、核酸等生物大分子的分离纯化方面显示了良好的应用前景.本文综述了亲和色谱技术在超螺旋质粒DNA分离纯化中的研究进展,总结了各种亲和色谱方法分离超螺旋质粒DNA的机理和优缺点,并展望了亲和纯化技术在质粒DNA生产和制备中的应用前景.%Non-viral vector,plasmid DNA has been widely used in gene therapy and DNA vaccines.It is imperative to develop large-scale preparation and purification methods of plasmid DNA at present.As a separation technology of high resolution and high selectivity,affinity chromatography shows great application potential in terms of separation and purification of biological macromolecules such as proteins,antibodies,nucleic acids and so on.The domestic and foreign research progress of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) technology,used in separation and purification of supercoiled plasmid DNA was reviewed in this paper.The advantages and disadvantages of various affinity chromatographic methods for separating supercoiled plasmid DNA were also summarized.At last,the affinity chromatography technology for preparation and purification of plasmid DNA was prospected.

  11. The main early and late promoters of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 form unstable open complexes with sigma A-RNA polymerase that are stabilized by DNA supercoiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, F; Nuez, B; Mencía, M; Salas, M

    1993-02-25

    Most Escherichia coli promoters studied so far form stable open complexes with sigma 70-RNA polymerase which have relatively long half-lives and, therefore, are resistant to a competitor challenge. A few exceptions are nevertheless known. The analysis of a number of promoters in Bacillus subtilis has suggested that the instability of open complexes formed by the vegetative sigma A-RNA polymerase may be a more general phenomenon than in Escherichia coli. We show that the main early and late promoters from the Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 form unstable open complexes that are stabilized either by the formation of the first phosphodiester bond between the initiating nucleoside triphosphates or by DNA supercoiling. The functional characteristics of these two strong promoters suggest that they are not optimized for a tight and stable RNA polymerase binding. Their high activity is probably the consequence of the efficiency of further steps leading to the formation of an elongation complex.

  12. A stochastic model of supercoiling-dependent transcription

    CERN Document Server

    Brackley, C A; Bentivogli, A; Corles, S; Gilber, N; Gonnella, G; Marenduzzo, D

    2016-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model for gene transcription coupled to DNA supercoiling, where we incorporate the experimental observation that polymerases create supercoiling as they unwind the DNA helix, and that these enzymes bind more favourably to regions where the genome is unwound. Within this model, we show that when the transcriptionally induced flux of supercoiling increases, there is a sharp crossover from a regime where torsional stresses relax quickly and gene transcription is random, to one where gene expression is highly correlated and tightly regulated by supercoiling. In the latter regime, the model displays transcriptional bursts, waves of supercoiling, and up-regulation of divergent or bidirectional genes. It also predicts that topological enzymes which relax twist and writhe should provide a pathway to down-regulate transcription. This article has been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters, May 2016.

  13. Efficient chain moves for Monte Carlo simulations of a wormlike DNA model: excluded volume, supercoils, site juxtapositions, knots, and comparisons with random-flight and lattice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2008-04-14

    We develop two classes of Monte Carlo moves for efficient sampling of wormlike DNA chains that can have significant degrees of supercoiling, a conformational feature that is key to many aspects of biological function including replication, transcription, and recombination. One class of moves entails reversing the coordinates of a segment of the chain along one, two, or three axes of an appropriately chosen local frame of reference. These transformations may be viewed as a generalization, to the continuum, of the Madras-Orlitsky-Shepp algorithm for cubic lattices. Another class of moves, termed T+/-2, allows for interconversions between chains with different lengths by adding or subtracting two beads (monomer units) to or from the chain. Length-changing moves are generally useful for conformational sampling with a given site juxtaposition, as has been shown in previous lattice studies. Here, the continuum T+/-2 moves are designed to enhance their acceptance rate in supercoiled conformations. We apply these moves to a wormlike model in which excluded volume is accounted for by a bond-bond repulsion term. The computed autocorrelation functions for the relaxation of bond length, bond angle, writhe, and branch number indicate that the new moves lead to significantly more efficient sampling than conventional bead displacements and crankshaft rotations. A close correspondence is found in the equilibrium ensemble between the map of writhe computed for pair of chain segments and the map of site juxtapositions or self-contacts. To evaluate the more coarse-grained freely jointed chain (random-flight) and cubic lattice models that are commonly used in DNA investigations, twisting (torsional) potentials are introduced into these models. Conformational properties for a given superhelical density sigma may then be sampled by computing the writhe and using White's formula to relate the degree of twisting to writhe and sigma. Extensive comparisons of contact patterns and knot

  14. Effect of supercoiling on the λ switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Andersson, Magnus; Sneppen, Kim;

    2014-01-01

    The lysogenic state of the λ switch is exceptionally stable, still, it is capable of responding to DNA-damage and rapidly enter the lytic state. We invented an assay where PNA mediated tethering of a plasmid allowed for single molecule investigations of the effect of supercoiling on the efficiency...

  15. Purification of supercoiled plasmid DNA from clarified bacterial lysate by arginine-affinity chromatography: effects of spacer arms and ligand density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jin-Shan; Bai, Shu; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2014-06-01

    Efficient loading on a chromatographic column is the dilemma of the process development faced by engineers in plasmid DNA purification. In this research, novel arginine-affinity chromatographic beads were prepared to investigate the effect of spacer arm and ligand density to their chromatographic performance for the purification of plasmid. The result indicated that dynamic binding capacity for plasmid increased with an increasing ligand density and carbon number of spacer arm, and the highest binding capacity for plasmid of 6.32 mg/mL bead was observed in the column of arginine bead with a ligand density of 47 mmol/L and 10-atom carbon spacer. Furthermore, this arginine bead exhibited better selectivity to supercoiled (sc) plasmid. The evidence of a linear gradient elution suggested further that the binding of plasmid on arginine beads was driven by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. Hence, sc plasmid could successfully be purified from clarified lysate by two-stepwise elution of salt concentration. By the refinement of the elution scheme and loading volume of clarified lysate, the column of arginine bead with a ligand density of 47 mmol/L exhibited the highest recovery yield and a much higher productivity among arginine-affinity columns. Therefore, reshaped arginine beads provided more feasible and practical application in the preparation of sc plasmid from clarified lysate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Atomic force microscopic study of aggregation of RecA-DNA nucleoprotein filaments into left-handed supercoiled bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Xian; Larson, Ronald G

    2005-12-01

    RecA and its complexes with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) are responsible for homologous recombination and DNA repair. In this study, we have observed, by atomic force microscopy (AFM), two-filament left-handed superhelices of RecA-dsDNA filaments that further interwind into four- or six-filament bundles, in addition to previously reported left-handed bundles of three or six filaments. Also revealed are four-filament bundles formed by further interwinding of two intrafilament superhelices of individual filaments. Pitches of superhelices of RecA-DNA filaments are similar to each other regardless the number of component filaments, and those formed on Phix174 RFII dsDNA and pNEB206A dsDNA are measured as 339.3 +/- 6.2 nm (690 counts of pitch/2) and 321.6 +/- 11.7 nm (101 counts of pitch/2), respectively, consistent with earlier measurements made by electron microscopy with a much smaller sample size. The study of these structures provides insight into the self-interactions of RecA and RecA-like proteins, which are present in all living cells, and into the general phenomenon of bundling, which is relevant to both biological and nonbiological filaments.

  17. Supercoiled plasmid DNA as a model target for assessing the generation of free radicals at the surface of fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, K; Gilmour, P S; Beswick, P H

    1995-09-01

    The ability of respirable amosite and crocidolite asbestos, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) and man made vitreous fibres (MMVFs) to cause free radical injury to plasmid, phiX174 RFI DNA was assessed. The amosite and crocidolite asbestos caused substantial damage to the DNA and, in the main, the free radicals responsible for the asbestos-mediated DNA damage were hydroxyl radicals as determined by inhibition with mannitol. Asbestos fibre-mediated damage to the DNA was completely ameliorated by the chelation of fibre-associated iron by pre-treatment of fibres with desferrioxamine-B, confirming the importance of iron in the production of free radicals. MMVFs and RCFs produced modest free radical damage to the DNA, which was prevented by mannitol but not by iron chelation.

  18. Development of bis-locked nucleic acid (bisLNA) oligonucleotides for efficient invasion of supercoiled duplex DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno, Pedro M D; Geny, Sylvain; Pabon, Y Vladimir;

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the many developments in synthetic oligonucleotide (ON) chemistry and design, invasion into double-stranded DNA (DSI) under physiological salt and pH conditions remains a challenge. In this work, we provide a new ON tool based on locked nucleic acids (LNAs), designed for strand invasi...

  19. A mutational mimic analysis of histone H3 post-translational modifications: specific sites influence the conformational state of H3/H4, causing either positive or negative supercoiling of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rachel H; Keberlein, Melissa; Jackson, Vaughn

    2012-10-16

    Histone H3 has specific sites of post-translational modifications that serve as epigenetic signals to cellular machinery to direct various processes. Mutational mimics of these modifications (glutamine for acetylation, methionine and leucine for methylation, and glutamic acid for phosphorylation) were constructed at the relevant sites of the major histone variant, H3.2, and their effects on the conformational equilibrium of the H3/H4 tetramer at physiological ionic strength were determined when bound to or free of DNA. The deposition vehicle used for this analysis was NAP1, nucleosome assembly protein 1. Acetylation mimics in the N-terminus preferentially stabilized the left-handed conformer (DNA negatively supercoiled), and mutations within the globular region preferred the right-handed conformer (DNA positively supercoiled). The methylation mimics in the N-terminus tended to maintain characteristics similar to those of wild-type H3/H4; i.e., the conformational equilibrium maintains similar levels of both left- and right-handed conformers. Phosphorylation mimics facilitated a mixed effect, i.e., when at serines, the left-handed conformer, and at threonines, a mixture of both conformers. When double mutations were present, the conformational equilibrium was shifted dramatically, either leftward or rightward depending on the specific sites. In contrast, these mutations tended not to affect the direction and extent of supercoiling for variants H3.1 and H3.3. Variant H3.3 promoted only the left-handed conformer, and H3.1 tended to maintain both conformers. Additional experiments indicate the importance of a propagation mechanism for ensuring the formation of a particular superhelical state over an extended region of the DNA. The potential relevance of these results to the maintenance of epigenetic information on a gene is discussed.

  20. Model of DNA topology simplification has come full (supercoiled) circle after two decades of research. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    Being a geek of DNA topology, I remember very well the stir caused by 1997 Science paper showing that DNA topoisomerases have the ability to simplify DNA topology below the topological equilibrium values [1]. In their seminal experiments Rybenkov et al. [1] started with linear double-stranded DNA molecules with cohesive ends. The mutual cohesiveness of DNA ends was due to mutual complementarity of single-stranded extensions at both ends of linear double-stranded DNA molecules. When such DNA molecules were heated up and then slowly cooled down the single-stranded ends eventually annealed with each other causing DNA circularization. This experimental protocol permitted the authors to establish topological/thermodynamic equilibrium within samples of circularized DNA molecules. Among simple unknotted circles one also observed knotted and catenated DNA molecules. The fraction of knotted molecules in DNA samples at topological equilibrium was increasing with the length of DNA molecules undergoing slow circularization. The fraction of catenated molecules was increasing with the length and the concentration of the molecules undergoing slow circularization. Rybenkov et al. incubated then such equilibrated DNA samples with type II DNA topoisomerases, which pass DNA duplex regions through each other, and observed that as the result of it the fraction of knotted and catenated DNA molecules was dramatically decreased (up to 80-fold). This elegant experiment indicated for the first time that type II DNA topoisomerases acting on knotted or catenated DNA molecules have the ability to select among many potential sites of DNA-DNA passages these that result in DNA unknotting or decatenation. Without such a selection topoisomerases could only maintain the original topological equilibrium obtained during the slow cyclization. The big question was how DNA topoisomerases can be directed to do DNA-DNA passages that preferentially result in DNA unknotting and decatenation.

  1. The supercoiling of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Neil H.

    2003-03-01

    Cylindrical shaped cells of Bacillus subtilis (0.7 X 4 mm) grow with twist and when prevented from separating at cell division form long filaments that writhe and supercoil to produce plectonemic fibers. By repetition macrofibers arise consisting of structures mm in length with loops at both ends of a twisted shaft. The entire structure is topologically a single filament. All the cells in a macrofiber also grow with twist consequently as a fiber elongates its loop ends rotate about the axis of the fiber shaft in opposite directions relative to one another. This holds for both right and left-handed structures, with any degree of twist. Although the individual cells grow with constant twist, the rate of loop rotation increases as a function of fiber length. Theory suggests that there is a gradient of rotation rates along the length of a fiber ranging from maxima at the loop ends to zero at the center of its length. In fibers prevented from rotating at one end the rotation rate gradient ranges from zero at the blocked end to maximum at the free end as shown here. When loop rotation at both ends is blocked fibers supercoil and their loop ends move toward one another. Newly designed force gauges were used to measure the tension engendered by supercoiling of such fibers. The findings illustrate a micromachine -like behavior of macrofibers, powered by cell growth, twisting and supercoiling. Biological functions of the micromachine such as self-assembly, translational motions over solid surfaces, and the dragging objects over surfaces appear to utilize only a small fraction of the total power available from the macrofiber micromachine. Collaborators: J.J. Thwaites, P. Shipman, D. Roy, and L. Cheng.

  2. Transcription dependent dynamic supercoiling is a short-range genomic force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Gupta, Ashutosh; Baranello, Laura; Wojtowicz, Damian; Benaissa, Khadija; Liu, Juhong; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Levens, David

    2013-01-01

    Transcription has the capacity to modify mechanically DNA topology, DNA structure, and nucleosome arrangement. Resulting from ongoing transcription, these modifications in turn, may provide instant feedback to the transcription machinery. To substantiate the connection between transcription and DNA dynamics, we charted an ENCODE map of transcription-dependent dynamic supercoiling in human Burkitt lymphoma cells using psoralen photobinding to probe DNA topology in vivo. Dynamic supercoils spread ~1.5 kb upstream of the start sites of active genes. Low and high output promoters handle this torsional stress differently as shown using inhibitors of transcription and topoisomerases, and by chromatin immunoprecipation of RNA polymerase and topoisomerases I and II. Whereas lower outputs are managed adequately by topoisomerase I, high output promoters additionally require topoisomerase II. The genome-wide coupling between transcription and DNA topology emphasizes the importance of dynamic supercoiling for gene regulation. PMID:23416947

  3. 基于色谱法的超螺旋质粒DNA纯化与分析进展%Advances on Purification Process and Analysis of Supercoiled Plasmid DNA Based on Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮; 柳方方; 宛煜嵩; 金芜军

    2014-01-01

    质粒DNA含有独立复制的遗传结构,是基因工程的常用工具,广泛应用于分子生物学基础研究、农业转基因检测、医疗诊断与基因治疗等领域。质粒DNA的构型一般分为超螺旋、开口环状及线性3种。初步纯化的质粒DNA溶液中常混有3种构型,并且掺杂一定量的蛋白质、RNA、内毒素以及宿主基因组DNA,这些杂质会影响后续的应用,因此质粒DNA需要进一步精细纯化。该文对质粒DNA的新应用领域、基于色谱的精细纯化技术及产物质量分析体系进行了综述,并展望了高纯度质粒DNA精细纯化及产物分析的发展方向。%Plasmid DNA,a common tool of genetic engineering containing the independent genetic structure of the replication,is widely used in basic research of molecular biology,genetically modi-fied detection,medical diagnosis and gene therapy. Plasmid DNA conformations are generally divided into three types:supercoiled,open circle and linear. Crude plasmid DNA often mixes with three configurations,and the amount of protein,RNA,endotoxin with the host genome DNA. These im-purities need to be further refined as they affect subsequent applications. The new applications of plasmid DNA,refined technologies and products based on chromatography system,and quality anal-ysis of purified plasmid DNA is reviewed in this paper. Finally,the trends of technology of high pu-rity plasmid DNA and analysis of refined product are presented.

  4. Unexpected twist: harnessing the energy in positive supercoils to control telomere resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankhead, Troy; Kobryn, Kerri; Chaconas, George

    2006-11-01

    Negative DNA supercoiling is an important conformational property of bacterial DNA that plays a significant role in a wide variety of DNA transactions. In contrast, positive DNA supercoiling is a by-product of cellular processes that involve helical unwinding or movement of DNA by a fixed translocase, and has generally been considered a necessary evil requiring removal. We now report the first evidence suggesting a physiological role for positive supercoiling; this occurs in telomere resolution in the related Lyme disease and relapsing fever Borrelia spirochetes. Telomere resolution is the process whereby covalently closed hairpin telomeres are generated from replicative intermediates by the telomere resolvase, ResT. We observe a 20-fold and greater stimulation of the reaction by positive supercoiling, which facilitates formation of a previously unobserved reaction intermediate. Our data suggest the possibility that the free energy of positive supercoiling, a resource with no previously described cellular function, may be harnessed and utilized as a regulator of post-replication events.

  5. Homeostatic regulation of supercoiling sensitivity coordinates transcription of the bacterial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Nicolas; Mavathur, Ramesh; Geertz, Marcel; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2006-07-01

    Regulation of cellular growth implies spatiotemporally coordinated programmes of gene transcription. A central question, therefore, is how global transcription is coordinated in the genome. The growth of the unicellular organism Escherichia coli is associated with changes in both the global superhelicity modulated by cellular topoisomerase activity and the relative proportions of the abundant DNA-architectural chromatin proteins. Using a DNA-microarray-based approach that combines mutations in the genes of two important chromatin proteins with induced changes of DNA superhelicity, we demonstrate that genomic transcription is tightly associated with the spatial distribution of supercoiling sensitivity, which in turn depends on chromatin proteins. We further demonstrate that essential metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of growth respond distinctly to changes of superhelicity. We infer that a homeostatic mechanism organizing the supercoiling sensitivity is coordinating the growth-phase-dependent transcription of the genome.

  6. Conversion of DNA gyrase into a conventional type II topoisomerase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1996-01-01

    DNA gyrase is unique among topoisomerases in its ability to introduce negative supercoils into closed-circular DNA. We have demonstrated that deletion of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of the A subunit of gyrase gives rise to an enzyme that cannot supercoil DNA but relaxes DNA in an ATP-depend...

  7. Models that include supercoiling of topological domains reproduce several known features of interphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Dorier, Julien; Burnier, Yannis; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the structure of interphase chromosomes is essential to elucidate regulatory mechanisms of gene expression. During recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing expanded the power of chromosome conformation capture (3C) methods that provide information about reciprocal spatial proximity of chromosomal loci. Since 2012, it is known that entire chromatin in interphase chromosomes is organized into regions with strongly increased frequency of internal contacts. These regions, with the average size of ∼1 Mb, were named topological domains. More recent studies demonstrated presence of unconstrained supercoiling in interphase chromosomes. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we show here that by including supercoiling into models of topological domains one can reproduce and thus provide possible explanations of several experimentally observed characteristics of interphase chromosomes, such as their complex contact maps.

  8. Serious overestimation in quantitative PCR by circular (supercoiled plasmid standard: microalgal pcna as the model gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Hou

    Full Text Available Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR has become a gold standard for the quantification of nucleic acids and microorganism abundances, in which plasmid DNA carrying the target genes are most commonly used as the standard. A recent study showed that supercoiled circular confirmation of DNA appeared to suppress PCR amplification. However, to what extent to which different structural types of DNA (circular versus linear used as the standard may affect the quantification accuracy has not been evaluated. In this study, we quantitatively compared qPCR accuracies based on circular plasmid (mostly in supercoiled form and linear DNA standards (linearized plasmid DNA or PCR amplicons, using proliferating cell nuclear gene (pcna, the ubiquitous eukaryotic gene, in five marine microalgae as a model gene. We observed that PCR using circular plasmids as template gave 2.65-4.38 more of the threshold cycle number than did equimolar linear standards. While the documented genome sequence of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana shows a single copy of pcna, qPCR using the circular plasmid as standard yielded an estimate of 7.77 copies of pcna per genome whereas that using the linear standard gave 1.02 copies per genome. We conclude that circular plasmid DNA is unsuitable as a standard, and linear DNA should be used instead, in absolute qPCR. The serious overestimation by the circular plasmid standard is likely due to the undetected lower efficiency of its amplification in the early stage of PCR when the supercoiled plasmid is the dominant template.

  9. Caulobacter chromosome in vivo configuration matches model predictions for a supercoiled polymer in a cell-like confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Sun-Hae; Toro, Esteban; Mortensen, Kim;

    2013-01-01

    is the contour length, and cell-to-cell distribution of the interloci distance r is a universal function of r/n0.22 with broad cell-to-cell variability. For DNA segments greater than about 300 kb, the mean interloci distances scale as n, in agreement with previous observations. The 0.22 value of the scaling......We measured the distance between fluorescent-labeled DNA loci of various interloci contour lengths in Caulobacter crescentus swarmer cells to determine the in vivo configuration of the chromosome. For DNA segments less than about 300 kb, the mean interloci distances, 〈r〉, scale as n0.22, where n...... exponent for short DNA segments is consistent with theoretical predictions for a branched DNA polymer structure. Predictions from Brownian dynamics simulations of the packing of supercoiled DNA polymers in an elongated cell-like confinement are also consistent with a branched DNA structure, and simulated...

  10. Mechanical properties of Tetra-PEG gels with supercoiled networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katashima, Takuya; Urayama, Kenji; Chung, Ung-Il; Sakai, Takamasa

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the effects of swelling and deswelling on the mechanical properties of polymer gels with variable polymer volume fractions of interest (φm) . We employed the Tetra-PEG gel as a model system. Tetra-PEG gels were prepared by the AB type crosslink-coupling between the two symmetrical tetra-arm prepolymers with precisely tuning the network strand length (Nc) and polymer fractions at preparation (φ0) . The drastic increase in the elastic modulus was observed in the high φm region due to the unusually contracted conformation of the network strands, called supercoiling. The Obukhov model can describe the φm-dependence of the elastic modulus in all φm regions. We analyzed the stress-elongation relationships for the swollen and deswollen networks. We estimated the fractal dimensions based on the Pincus blob concept, and for the first time observed the φm-, Nc-, φ0-dependence of the fractal dimension. We found that the gyration radius exhibits the affine deformation in the supercoiling region. These findings will help to understand the structure and formation mechanism of supercoiling.

  11. Effect of Supercoiling on the Mechanical and Permeability Properties of Model Collagen IV Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoneva, Lazarina; Segal, Yoav; Dorfman, Kevin D; Barocas, Victor H

    2015-07-01

    Collagen IV networks in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are essential for the maintenance and regulation of blood filtration in the kidneys. The GBM contains two different types of collagen IV networks: [α1(IV)]2α2(IV) and α3(IV)α4(IV)α5(IV), the latter of which has a higher number of supercoils (two or more collagens coiling around each other). To investigate the effects of supercoiling on the mechanical and permeability properties of collagen IV networks, we generated model collagen IV networks in the GBM and reconnected them to create different levels of supercoiling. We found that supercoiling greatly increases the stiffness of collagen IV networks but only minimally decreases the permeability. Also, doubling the amount of supercoils in a network had a bigger effect than doubling the stiffness of the supercoils. Our results suggest that the formation of supercoils is a specialized mechanism by the GBM that provides with a network stiff and strong enough to withstand the high hydrostatic pressures of filtration, yet porous enough that filtration is not hindered. Clinically, understanding the effects of supercoiling gives us insight into the mechanisms of GBM failure in some disease states where the normal collagen IV structure is disrupted.

  12. Thermodynamics of long supercoiled molecules: insights from highly efficient Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Thibaut; Képès, François; Junier, Ivan

    2015-07-01

    Supercoiled DNA polymer models for which the torsional energy depends on the total twist of molecules (Tw) are a priori well suited for thermodynamic analysis of long molecules. So far, nevertheless, the exact determination of Tw in these models has been based on a computation of the writhe of the molecules (Wr) by exploiting the conservation of the linking number, Lk=Tw+Wr, which reflects topological constraints coming from the helical nature of DNA. Because Wr is equal to the number of times the main axis of a DNA molecule winds around itself, current Monte Carlo algorithms have a quadratic time complexity, O(L(2)), with respect to the contour length (L) of the molecules. Here, we present an efficient method to compute Tw exactly, leading in principle to algorithms with a linear complexity, which in practice is O(L(1.2)). Specifically, we use a discrete wormlike chain that includes the explicit double-helix structure of DNA and where the linking number is conserved by continuously preventing the generation of twist between any two consecutive cylinders of the discretized chain. As an application, we show that long (up to 21 kbp) linear molecules stretched by mechanical forces akin to magnetic tweezers contain, in the buckling regime, multiple and branched plectonemes that often coexist with curls and helices, and whose length and number are in good agreement with experiments. By attaching the ends of the molecules to a reservoir of twists with which these can exchange helix turns, we also show how to compute the torques in these models. As an example, we report values that are in good agreement with experiments and that concern the longest molecules that have been studied so far (16 kbp).

  13. Liquid-Crystalline Mesophases of Plasmid DNA in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Ziv; Wachtel, Ellen J.; Minsky, Abraham

    1994-06-01

    Bacterial plasmids may often reach a copy number larger than 1000 per cell, corresponding to a total amount of DNA that may exceed the amount of DNA within the bacterial chromosome. This observation highlights the problem of cellular accommodation of large amounts of closed-circular nucleic acids, whose interwound conformation offers negligible DNA compaction. As determined by x-ray scattering experiments conducted on intact bacteria, supercoiled plasmids segregate within the cells into dense clusters characterized by a long-range order. In vitro studies performed at physiological DNA concentrations indicated that interwound DNA spontaneously forms liquid crystalline phases whose macroscopic structural properties are determined by the features of the molecular supercoiling. Because these features respond to cellular factors, DNA supercoiling may provide a sensitive regulatory link between cellular parameters and the packaging modes of interwound DNA in vivo.

  14. Parallel Genetic and Phenotypic Evolution of DNA Superhelicity in Experimental Populations of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crozat, Estelle; Winkworth, Cynthia; Gaffé, Joël

    2010-01-01

    DNA supercoiling is the master function that interconnects chromosome structure and global gene transcription. This function has recently been shown to be under strong selection in Escherichia coli. During the evolution of 12 initially identical populations propagated in a defined environment...... for 20,000 generations, parallel increases in DNA supercoiling were observed in ten populations. The genetic changes associated with the increased supercoiling were examined in one population, and beneficial mutations in the genes topA (encoding topoisomerase I) and fis (encoding a histone-like protein......) were identified. To elucidate the molecular basis and impact of these changes, we quantified the level of genetic, phenotypic, and molecular parallelism linked to DNA supercoiling in all 12 evolving populations. First, sequence determination of DNA topology-related loci revealed strong genetic...

  15. Helical chirality: a link between local interactions and global topology in DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    Full Text Available DNA supercoiling plays a major role in many cellular functions. The global DNA conformation is however intimately linked to local DNA-DNA interactions influencing both the physical properties and the biological functions of the supercoiled molecule. Juxtaposition of DNA double helices in ubiquitous crossover arrangements participates in multiple functions such as recombination, gene regulation and DNA packaging. However, little is currently known about how the structure and stability of direct DNA-DNA interactions influence the topological state of DNA. Here, a crystallographic analysis shows that due to the intrinsic helical chirality of DNA, crossovers of opposite handedness exhibit markedly different geometries. While right-handed crossovers are self-fitted by sequence-specific groove-backbone interaction and bridging Mg(2+ sites, left-handed crossovers are juxtaposed by groove-groove interaction. Our previous calculations have shown that the different geometries result in differential stabilisation in solution, in the presence of divalent cations. The present study reveals that the various topological states of the cell are associated with different inter-segmental interactions. While the unstable left-handed crossovers are exclusively formed in negatively supercoiled DNA, stable right-handed crossovers constitute the local signature of an unusual topological state in the cell, such as the positively supercoiled or relaxed DNA. These findings not only provide a simple mechanism for locally sensing the DNA topology but also lead to the prediction that, due to their different tertiary intra-molecular interactions, supercoiled molecules of opposite signs must display markedly different physical properties. Sticky inter-segmental interactions in positively supercoiled or relaxed DNA are expected to greatly slow down the slithering dynamics of DNA. We therefore suggest that the intrinsic helical chirality of DNA may have oriented the early

  16. Stretched and overwound DNA forms a Pauling-like structure with exposed bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, J F; Bensimon, D; Lavery, R; Croquette, V

    1998-11-24

    We investigate structural transitions within a single stretched and supercoiled DNA molecule. With negative supercoiling, for a stretching force >0.3 pN, we observe the coexistence of B-DNA and denatured DNA from sigma approximately -0.015 down to sigma = -1. Surprisingly, for positively supercoiled DNA (sigma > +0.037) stretched by 3 pN, we observe a similar coexistence of B-DNA and a new, highly twisted structure. Experimental data and molecular modeling suggest that this structure has approximately 2.62 bases per turn and an extension 75% larger than B-DNA. This structure has tightly interwound phosphate backbones and exposed bases in common with Pauling's early DNA structure [Pauling, L. & Corey, R. B. (1953), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 39, 84-97] and an unusual structure proposed for the Pf1 bacteriophage [Liu, D. J. & Day, L. A. (1994) Science 265, 671-674].

  17. Gin-mediated DNA inversion: product structure and the mechanism of strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaar, R; van de Putte, P; Cozzarelli, N R

    1988-02-01

    Inversion of the G loop of bacteriophage Mu requires the phage-encoded Gin protein and a host factor. The topological changes in a supercoiled DNA substrate generated by the two purified proteins were analyzed. More than 99% of the inversion products were unknotted rings. This result excludes synapsis by way of a random collision of recombination sites, because the resulting entrapped supercoils would be converted into knots by recombination. Instead, the recombination sites must come together in the synaptic complex in an ordered fashion with a fixed number of supercoils between the sites. The linking number of the substrate DNA increases by four during recombination. Thus, in three successive rounds of inversion, the change in linking number was +4, +8, and +12, respectively. These results lead to a quantitative model for the mechanism of Gin recombination that includes the distribution of supercoils in the synaptic complex, their alteration by strand exchange, and specific roles for the two proteins needed for recombination.

  18. A model for the mechanism of strand passage by DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Bates, A D; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of type II DNA topoisomerases involves the formation of an enzyme-operated gate in one double-stranded DNA segment and the passage of another segment through this gate. DNA gyrase is the only type II topoisomerase able to introduce negative supercoils into DNA, a feature that requir...

  19. Global force-torque phase diagram for the DNA double helix: Structural transitions, triple points, and collapsed plectonemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John F.; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2013-12-01

    We present a free energy model for structural transitions of the DNA double helix driven by tensile and torsional stress. Our model is coarse grained and is based on semiflexible polymer descriptions of B-DNA, underwound L-DNA, and highly overwound P-DNA. The statistical-mechanical model of plectonemic supercoiling previously developed for B-DNA is applied to semiflexible polymer models of P- and L-DNA to obtain a model of DNA structural transitions in quantitative accord with experiment. We identify two distinct plectonemic states, one "inflated" by electrostatic repulsion and thermal fluctuations and the other "collapsed," with the two double helices inside the supercoils driven to close contact. We find that supercoiled B and L are stable only in the inflated form, while supercoiled P is always collapsed. We also predict the behavior and experimental signatures of highly underwound "Q"-DNA, the left-handed analog of P-DNA; as for P, supercoiled Q is always collapsed. Overstretched "S"-DNA and strand-separated "stress-melted" DNA are also included in our model, allowing prediction of a global phase diagram for forces up to 1000 pN and torques between ±60 pN nm, or, in terms of linking number density, from σ =-5 to +3.

  20. Global force-torque phase diagram for the DNA double helix: structural transitions, triple points, and collapsed plectonemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John F; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2013-12-01

    We present a free energy model for structural transitions of the DNA double helix driven by tensile and torsional stress. Our model is coarse grained and is based on semiflexible polymer descriptions of B-DNA, underwound L-DNA, and highly overwound P-DNA. The statistical-mechanical model of plectonemic supercoiling previously developed for B-DNA is applied to semiflexible polymer models of P- and L-DNA to obtain a model of DNA structural transitions in quantitative accord with experiment. We identify two distinct plectonemic states, one "inflated" by electrostatic repulsion and thermal fluctuations and the other "collapsed," with the two double helices inside the supercoils driven to close contact. We find that supercoiled B and L are stable only in the inflated form, while supercoiled P is always collapsed. We also predict the behavior and experimental signatures of highly underwound "Q"-DNA, the left-handed analog of P-DNA; as for P, supercoiled Q is always collapsed. Overstretched "S"-DNA and strand-separated "stress-melted" DNA are also included in our model, allowing prediction of a global phase diagram for forces up to 1000 pN and torques between ±60 pN nm, or, in terms of linking number density, from σ=-5 to +3.

  1. Rapid purification of circular DNA by triplex-mediated affinity capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, H.; Smith, L.M.

    1997-01-07

    A single-step capture of a target supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule is accomplished by forming a local triple-helix among two strands of the supercoiled circular DNA and an oligonucleotide probe. The oligonucleotide is bound to an immobilizing support which facilitates the immobilization and purification of target DNA molecules. Non-target DNA molecules and other contaminating cellular material are easily removed by washing. The triple-helical structure is destabilized by raising the pH, leaving purified target DNA in the supernatant and reusable affinity capture oligonucleotide secured to the immobilizing support. 3 figs.

  2. Mechanical properties of tetra-PEG gels with supercoiled network structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katashima, Takuya; Asai, Makoto; Urayama, Kenji; Chung, Ung-il; Sakai, Takamasa

    2014-02-21

    We investigate the effects of swelling and deswelling on the mechanical properties of tetra-polyethylene glycol gels with the precisely tuned polymerization degree of network strand (Nc) and polymer volume fraction at preparation (ϕ0) by varying the fraction of interest (ϕm). The ϕm-dependence of the elastic modulus exhibits a crossover at ϕc due to large contraction of the network strands (supercoiling) accompanying deswelling. The Obukhov model successfully describes the ϕm-dependence of the elastic modulus. We estimate the fractal dimension of network strands (Df) by analyzing the stress-elongation relationships at high stretching using Pincus blob concept. In the supercoiling region, Df increases with an increase in ϕm, which suggests that the gyration radius of network strands decreases with deswelling in affine manner. The extensibility increases with an increase in ϕm because the deswelling reduces the distance between the neighboring junctions. These findings will help to understand the structure and formation mechanism of supercoiling.

  3. Preparation of DNA films for studies under vacuum conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smialek, M. A.; Balog, Richard; Jones, N. C.;

    2010-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conditions required for the preparation of uniform films of supercoiled plasmid DNA to be used in irradiation experiments under high vacuum conditions. Investigations reveal that significant damage to the DNA molecules occurs due to the evacua...

  4. Bending the Rules of Transcriptional Repression: Tightly Looped DNA Directly Represses T7 RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Lionberger, Troy A.; Meyhöfer, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    From supercoiled DNA to the tight loops of DNA formed by some gene repressors, DNA in cells is often highly bent. Despite evidence that transcription by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is affected in systems where DNA is deformed significantly, the mechanistic details underlying the relationship between polymerase function and mechanically stressed DNA remain unclear. Seeking to gain additional insight into the regulatory consequences of highly bent DNA, we hypothesize that tightly looping DNA is alone...

  5. Changes in DNA topology during spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risley, M S; Einheber, S; Bumcrot, D A

    1986-01-01

    DNA topology in histone- and protamine-depleted nuclei (nucleoids) from somatic cells, sperm, and spermatogenic cells was studied to determine if the superhelical configuration of DNA looped domains is altered during spermatogenesis. The expansion and contraction of nucleoid DNA was measured with a fluorescence microscope following exposure of nucleoids to different concentrations of ethidium bromide (EB). Nucleoids from Xenopus laevis erythrocytes, primary spermatocytes, and round spermatids, and from Rana catesbeiana sperm all exhibited a biphasic change (condensed-relaxed-condensed) in size as a function of exposure to increasing concentrations (0.5-100 micrograms/ml) of EB, indicating that they contain negatively supercoiled DNA. In contrast, DNA in sperm nucleoids from Xenopus laevis and Bufo fowleri was relaxed and expanded at low (0.5-6 micrograms/ml) EB concentrations, but became gradually condensed as the EB concentration was increased (6-100 micrograms/ml). Nucleoids prepared from all cell types retained the general shape of the nucleus regardless of the superhelical configuration of the nucleoid DNA. Sperm nucleoid DNA condensed by 100 micrograms/ml EB was relaxed by exposure to UV light, DNase I, proteinase K, or 4 M urea, but not by RNase A or 10 mM dithiothreitol. These results demonstrate that the DNA in sperm nucleoids is constrained in domains of supercoiling by nonbasic nuclear proteins. Negatively supercoiled DNA is present in nucleoids from cells with a full complement of histones, including Rana sperm, but not in nucleoids from Xenopus and Bufo sperm in which histones are replaced by "intermediate-type" protamines. Histone replacement in these species, therefore, is accompanied by unfolding of nucleosomal DNA and active removal of the negative supercoils. Results presented also suggest an important role for the nonbasic nuclear proteins of sperm in the morphogenesis of the nucleus and the arrangement of DNA.

  6. Relationship of histone acetylation to DNA topology and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, W A; Luchnik, A N

    1991-12-01

    An autonomously replicating plasmid constructed from bovine papiloma virus (BPV) and pBR322 was stably maintained as a nuclear episome in a mouse cell culture. Addition to a cell culture of sodium butyrate (5 mM) induced an increase in plasmid DNA supercoiling of 3-5 turns, an increase in acetylation of cellular histones, and a decrease in plasmid transcription by 2- to 4-fold. After withdrawal of butyrate, DNA supercoiling began to fluctuate in a wave-like manner with an amplitude of up to 3 turns and a period of 3-4 h. These waves gradually faded by 24 h. The transcription of the plasmid and acetylation of cellular histones also oscillated with the same period. The wave-like alterations were not correlated with the cell cycle, for there was no resumption of DNA replication after butyrate withdrawal for at least 24 h. In vitro chemical acetylation of histones with acetyl adenylate also led to an increase in the superhelical density of plasmid DNA. The parallel changes in transcription, histone acetylation, and DNA supercoiling in vivo may indicate a functional innerconnection. Also, the observed in vivo variation in the level of DNA supercoiling directly indicates the possibility of its natural regulation in eukaryotic cells.

  7. The role of the Zn(II binding domain in the mechanism of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse-Dinh Yuk-Ching

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I binds three Zn(II with three tetracysteine motifs which, together with the 14 kDa C-terminal region, form a 30 kDa DNA binding domain (ZD domain. The 67 kDa N-terminal domain (Top67 has the active site tyrosine for DNA cleavage but cannot relax negatively supercoiled DNA. We analyzed the role of the ZD domain in the enzyme mechanism. Results Addition of purified ZD domain to Top67 partially restored the relaxation activity, demonstrating that covalent linkage between the two domains is not necessary for removal of negative supercoils from DNA. The two domains had similar affinities to ssDNA. However, only Top67 could bind dsDNA with high affinity. DNA cleavage assays showed that the Top67 had the same sequence and structure selectivity for DNA cleavage as the intact enzyme. DNA rejoining also did not require the presence of the ZD domain. Conclusions We propose that during relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA, Top67 by itself can position the active site tyrosine near the junction of double-stranded and single-stranded DNA for cleavage. However, the interaction of the ZD domain with the passing single-strand of DNA, coupled with enzyme conformational change, is needed for removal of negative supercoils.

  8. Physics Based Investigations of DNA Supercoiling and of Plasmonic Nanoparticles for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Kamilla

    Hyperthermia has great potential as a cancer therapy as it weakens or causes irreversible damage to cancer cells. However, available heat sources are poor in discriminating between healthy and cancerous tissue. In this thesis work, the application of plasmonic nanoparticles as photo-induced stron...... an ecient and robust process. This part of the thesis project is described in three published papers that are included in this dissertation.......Hyperthermia has great potential as a cancer therapy as it weakens or causes irreversible damage to cancer cells. However, available heat sources are poor in discriminating between healthy and cancerous tissue. In this thesis work, the application of plasmonic nanoparticles as photo-induced strong...... remains an open question. Using positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging as a treatment evaluation tool it was found that NIR irradiated resonant silica-gold nanoshells had a higher therapeutic ecacy than non-resonant colloidal gold nanoparticles, when delivered directly...

  9. Physics Based Investigations of DNA Supercoiling and of Plasmonic Nanoparticles for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Kamilla

    Hyperthermia has great potential as a cancer therapy as it weakens or causes irreversible damage to cancer cells. However, available heat sources are poor in discriminating between healthy and cancerous tissue. In this thesis work, the application of plasmonic nanoparticles as photo-induced strong......, localized thermal transducers was investigated for cancer therapy. Gold nanoparticles exhibit surface plasmon resonance that greatly enhances their photoabsorption properties. When irradiated with resonant light, they eciently absorb the light and convert it into extremely local and well-controlled heating...... with temperature increases that easily exceed 100. Due to these unique optical properties and their biocompatibility, gold nanoparticles are promising candidates for selective photothermal cancer therapy. Light with wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR) region has low absorption and high penetration through...

  10. Minicircle DNA purification using a CIM® DEAE-1 monolithic support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantino, Tatiana; Pereira, Patrícia; Queiroz, João A; Sousa, Ângela; Sousa, Fani

    2016-09-01

    Minicircle DNA is a new biotechnological product with beneficial therapeutic perspectives for gene therapy because it is constituted only by the eukaryotic transcription unit. These features improve minicircle DNA safety and increase its therapeutic effect. However, being a recently developed product, there is a need to establish efficient purification methodologies, enabling the recovery of the supercoiled minicircle DNA isoform. Thus, this work describes the minicircle DNA purification using an anion exchange monolithic support. The results show that with this column it is possible to achieve a good selectivity, which allows the isolation of the supercoiled minicircle DNA isoform from impurities. Overall, this study shows a promising approach to obtain the minicircle DNA sample with adequate quality for future therapeutic applications.

  11. Interplay between the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS and macromolecular crowding in compacting DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintraecken, C.H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

      In this dissertation we discuss H-NS and its connection to nucleoid compaction and organization. Nucleoid formation involves a dramatic reduction in coil volume of the genomic DNA. Four factors are thought to influence coil volume: supercoiling, DNA charge neutralization, macromolecular crow

  12. [DNA metabolism in lymphocytes of experimental subjects during thermotherapy (sauna, Turkish bath)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, R; Egg, D; Klein, D; Kocsis, F; Altmann, H

    1983-01-01

    The unprogrammed DNA synthesis (UDS) in the lymphocytes of the peripheral blood was significantly higher in regular sauna-users than in those who had not had a sauna for some time. Sedimentation velocity of the supercoiled DNA in the lymphocytes was decreased 1 h and 24 h after Turkish bath, but the difference from values before the bath was not statistically significant.

  13. Separation of topological forms of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange HPLC: shifts in elution order of linear DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clara R; DePrince, Randolph B; Dackor, Jennifer; Weigl, Debra; Griffith, Jack; Persmark, Magnus

    2007-07-01

    We sought to establish a single anion-exchange HPLC method for the separation of linear, open circular and supercoiled plasmid topoisomers using purified topoisomeric forms of three plasmids (3.0, 5.5 and 7.6 kb). However, finding one condition proved elusive as the topoisomer elution order was determined to depend on salt gradient slope. The observed change in selectivity increased with plasmid size and was most pronounced for the linear form. Indeed, the elution order of the linear 7.6 kb plasmid was reversed relative to the supercoiled form. This observation may have implications for methods used in quality control of plasmid DNA.

  14. Multiplectoneme phase of double-stranded DNA under torsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emanuel, M.; Lanzani, G.; Schiessel, H.

    2013-01-01

    We use the wormlike chain model to study supercoiling of DNA under tension and torque. The model reproduces experimental data for a broad range of forces, salt concentrations, and contour lengths. We find a plane of first-order phase transitions ending in a smeared-out line of critical points, the m

  15. Determining the topology of stable protein-DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Isabel K; Vazquez, Mariel

    2013-04-01

    Difference topology is an experimental technique that can be used to unveil the topological structure adopted by two or more DNA segments in a stable protein-DNA complex. Difference topology has also been used to detect intermediates in a reaction pathway and to investigate the role of DNA supercoiling. In the present article, we review difference topology as applied to the Mu transpososome. The tools discussed can be applied to any stable nucleoprotein complex.

  16. Studies on DNA Cleaved by Seryl-histidine Dipeptide%丝组二肽对DNA的切割作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万荣; 王宁; 赵玉芬

    2001-01-01

    Linear and supercoiled DNA were cleaved by HPLC purified seryl-histidine dipeptide(SH). It was found that the DNA fragments produced by the reaction of SH and DNA could be ligated together by T4 DNA ligase. This result implied that the SH was the first example of the ion-free artificial DNA cleavage agent that could split DNA by hydrolysis mechanism.

  17. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grierson, Patrick M. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Acharya, Samir, E-mail: samir.acharya@osumc.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Groden, Joanna [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription.

  18. Dynamic Simulation of Single DNA Molecule at the Base Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Xiao-Ling; WANG Xiao-Feng; HU Jun; FANG Hai-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ A mesoscopic discrete dsDNA model at the base level is proposed based on the statistical model (Phys. Rev. Lett.82 (1999) 4560). The numerical simulations reproduce the 65 pN plateau and those on the force vs extension for different supercoiling degrees are favourable with the experimental data. Our model has potential applications on the study of short DNA segments and provides a bridge between the statistical models and atomic modelling.

  19. Energy buffering of DNA structure fails when Escherichia coli runs out of substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Loman, Leine; Petra, Bob

    1995-01-01

    number of our reporter plasmid (corresponding to a small decrease in negative supercoiling). However, when cells depleted their carbon and energy source, the ensuing drop in energy state was accompanied by a strong increase in linking number. This increase was not due to reduced transcription of the DNA...

  20. Structural Dynamics and Mechanochemical Coupling in DNA Gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Aakash; Parente, Angelica C; Bryant, Zev

    2016-05-08

    Gyrase is a molecular motor that harnesses the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to perform mechanical work on DNA. The enzyme specifically introduces negative supercoiling in a process that must coordinate fuel consumption with DNA cleavage and religation and with numerous conformational changes in both the protein and DNA components of a large nucleoprotein complex. Here we present a current understanding of mechanochemical coupling in this essential molecular machine, with a focus on recent diverse biophysical approaches that have revealed details of molecular architectures, new conformational intermediates, structural transitions modulated by ATP binding, and the influence of mechanics on motor function. Recent single-molecule assays have also illuminated the reciprocal relationships between supercoiling and transcription, an illustration of mechanical interactions between gyrase and other molecular machines at the heart of chromosomal biology.

  1. Extremely underwound chromosomal DNA in nucleoids of mouse sarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, M; Matthes, E; Arnold, W

    1981-07-01

    The superhelical properties of chromosomal DNA from cells of a mouse sarcoma were investigated in neutral sucrose gradients containing ethidium bromide. Removal of negative supercoiling from the DNA of the sarcoma cells required a substantially higher dye concentration than was necessary in the case of DNA from cultured mouse fibroblasts. The calculated value of the mean superhelical density in malignant cells (sigma = -0.14) appears abnormally high compared with the value (sigma = -0.09) obtained for DNA of mouse fibroblasts. Chromosomal DNA from mouse sarcoma cells is therefore concluded to be highly deficient in helical turns.

  2. Reverse gyrase functions in genome integrity maintenance by protecting DNA breaks in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Wenyuan; Feng, Xu; She, Qunxin

    2017-01-01

    Reverse gyrase introduces positive supercoils to circular DNA and is implicated in genome stability maintenance in thermophiles. The extremely thermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus encodes two reverse gyrase proteins, TopR1 (topoisomerase reverse gyrase 1) and TopR2, whose functions in thermophili...... genomic DNA degradation during MMS treatment, accompanied by a higher rate of cell death. Taken together, these results indicate that TopR1 probably facilitates genome integrity maintenance by protecting DNA breaks from thermo-degradation in vivo....

  3. DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  4. Chemoaffinity material for plasmid DNA analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography with condition-dependent switching between isoform and topoisomer selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahut, Marek; Gargano, Andrea; Schuchnigg, Hermann; Lindner, Wolfgang; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2013-03-05

    Plasmid DNA may exist in three isoforms, the linear, open-circular (oc, "nicked"), and covalently closed circular (ccc, "supercoiled") form. We have recently reported on the chromatographic separation of supercoiled plasmid topoisomers on cinchona-alkaloid modified silica-based stationary phases. Herein, we present a selectivity switching mechanism to achieve separation of isoforms and/or supercoiled topoisomers using the very same chromatographic column and system. While salt gradient elution facilitates topoisomer separation, the supercoiled species are eluting as a single peak upon elution by a mixed pH and organic modifier gradient, still well separated from the other isoforms. We have found that a mobile phase pH value near the pI of the zwitterionic adsorbent surface leads to full recovery of all plasmid DNA isoforms, which is a major issue when using anion exchange-based resins. Furthermore, the observed elution pattern, oc < linear < ccc, is constant upon changes of mobile phase composition, gradient slope, and plasmid size. The remarkable isoform selectivity found on quinine-based selectors is explained by van't Hoff plots, revealing a different binding mechanism between the supercoiled plasmid on one hand and the oc and linear isoforms on the other hand.

  5. DNA interaction and cytotoxic activities of square planar platinum(II) complexes with N, S-donor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Patel, Chintan R.; Joshi, Hardik N.; Thakor, Khyati P.

    2014-06-01

    The platinum(II) complexes with N, S-donor ligands have been synthesized and characterized by physicochemical methods viz. elemental, electronic, FT-IR, 1H NMR and LC-MS spectra. The binding mode and potency of the complexes with HS DNA (Herring Sperm) have been examined by absorption titration and viscosity measurement studies. The results revealed that complexes bind to HS DNA via covalent mode with the intrinsic binding constant (Kb) in the range 1.37-7.76 × 105 M-1. Decrease in the relative viscosity of HS DNA also supports the covalent mode of binding. The DNA cleavage activity of synthesized complexes has been carried out by gel electrophoresis experiment using supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA; showing the unwinding of the negatively charged supercoiled DNA. Brine shrimp (Artemia Cysts) lethality bioassay technique has been applied for the determination of toxic property of synthesized complexes in terms of μM.

  6. Dynamical Scaling and Phase Coexistence in Topologically Constrained DNA Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosado, Y. A. G.; Michieletto, D.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2017-09-01

    There is a long-standing experimental observation that the melting of topologically constrained DNA, such as circular closed plasmids, is less abrupt than that of linear molecules. This finding points to an important role of topology in the physics of DNA denaturation, which is, however, poorly understood. Here, we shed light on this issue by combining large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations with an analytically solvable phenomenological Landau mean field theory. We find that the competition between melting and supercoiling leads to phase coexistence of denatured and intact phases at the single-molecule level. This coexistence occurs in a wide temperature range, thereby accounting for the broadening of the transition. Finally, our simulations show an intriguing topology-dependent scaling law governing the growth of denaturation bubbles in supercoiled plasmids, which can be understood within the proposed mean field theory.

  7. DNA Cleavage Promoted by Cu2+ Complex of N,N'-Bis(2-aminoethyl)-2,6-pyridinedicarboxamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Ying; SHENG, Xin; SHAO, Ying; LU, Guo-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of Cu2+ complex of N,N'-bis(2-aminoethyl)-2,6-pyridinedicarboxamide (BAP) with DNA was studied by agarose gel electrophoresis analysis. The results indicate that the BAP-Cu2+ complex can promote the cleavage of phosphodiester bond of supercoiled DNA at physiological condition, which is 3.2×106 times higher than DNA natural degradation. A hydrolytic cleaving mechanism through the cooperation of copper ions and functional amino groups was proposed.

  8. Twist/Writhe Partitioning in a Coarse-Grained DNA Minicircle Model

    CERN Document Server

    Sayar, Mehmet; Kabakcioglu, Alkan

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a systematic study of supercoil formation in DNA minicircles under varying linking number by using molecular dynamics simulations of a two-bead coarse-grained model. Our model is designed with the purpose of simulating long chains without sacrificing the characteristic structural properties of the DNA molecule, such as its helicity, backbone directionality and the presence of major and minor grooves. The model parameters are extracted directly from full-atomistic simulations of DNA oligomers via Boltzmann inversion, therefore our results can be interpreted as an extrapolation of those simulations to presently inaccessible chain lengths and simulation times. Using this model, we measure the twist/writhe partitioning in DNA minicircles, in particular its dependence on the chain length and excess linking number. We observe an asymmetric supercoiling transition consistent with experiments. Our results suggest that the fraction of the linking number absorbed as twist and writhe is nontrivially depe...

  9. An architectural role of the Escherichia coli chromatin protein FIS in organising DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R; Lurz, R; Lüder, G; Tolksdorf, C; Travers, A; Muskhelishvili, G

    2001-12-15

    The Escherichia coli chromatin protein FIS modulates the topology of DNA in a growth phase-dependent manner. In this study we have investigated the global effect of FIS binding on DNA architecture in vitro. We show that in supercoiled DNA molecules FIS binds at multiple sites in a non-random fashion and increases DNA branching. This global DNA reshaping effect is independent of the helical phasing of FIS binding sites. We propose, in addition to the previously inferred stabilisation of tightly bent DNA microloops in the upstream regions of certain promoters, that FIS may perform the distinct architectural function of organising branched plectonemes in the E.coli nucleoid.

  10. Anthocyanin Interactions with DNA: Intercalation, Topoisomerase I Inhibition and Oxidative Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Anthocyanins and their aglycone anthocyanidins are pigmented flavonoids found in significant amounts in many commonly consumed foods. They exhibit a complex chemistry in aqueous solution, which makes it difficult to study their chemistry under physiological conditions. Here we used a gel electrophoresis assay employing supercoiled DNA plasmid to examine the ability of these compounds (1) to intercalate DNA, (2) to inhibit human topoisomerase I through both inhibition of plasmid relaxation act...

  11. Structure and partitioning of bacterial DNA: determined by a balance of competion and expansion forces?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldringh, C. L.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Westerhoff, H. V.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms that determine chromosome structure and chromosome partitioning in bacteria are largely unknown. Here we discuss two hypotheses: (i) the structure of the Escherichia coli nucleoid is determined by DNA binding proteins and DNA supercoiling, representing a compaction force on the one...... hand, and by the coupled transcription/translation/translocation of plasma membrane and cell wall proteins, representing an expansion force on the other hand; (ii) the two forces are important for the partitioning process of chromosomes....

  12. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J; Neuman, Keir C

    2015-04-20

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins.

  13. The DNA gyrase-quinolone complex. ATP hydrolysis and the mechanism of DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1998-01-01

    Quinolone binding to the gyrase-DNA complex induces a conformational change that results in the blocking of supercoiling. Under these conditions gyrase is still capable of ATP hydrolysis which now proceeds through an alternative pathway involving two different conformations of the enzyme (Kampranis......, S. C., and Maxwell, A. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 22606-22614). The kinetics of ATP hydrolysis via this pathway have been studied and found to differ from those of the reaction of the drug-free enzyme. The quinolone-characteristic ATPase rate is DNA-dependent and can be induced in the presence...

  14. Investigation of DNA binding, DNA photocleavage, topoisomerase I inhibition and antioxidant activities of water soluble titanium(IV) phthalocyanine compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Arzu; Barut, Burak; Demirbaş, Ümit; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya

    2016-04-01

    The binding mode of water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted titanium(IV) phthalocyanine (Pc) compounds Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 with calf thymus (CT) DNA was investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy and thermal denaturation studies in this work. The results of DNA binding constants (Kb) and the changes in the thermal denaturation profile of DNA with the addition of Pc compounds indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 are able to bind to CT-DNA with different binding affinities. DNA photocleavage studies of Pc compounds were performed in the absence and presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ascorbic acid (AA) and 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) using the agarose gel electrophoresis method at irradiation 650 nm. According to the results of electrophoresis studies, Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 cleaved of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway. The Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds were examined for topoisomerase I inhibition by measuring the relaxation of supercoiled pBR322 DNA. The all of Pc compounds inhibited topoisomerase I at 20 μM concentration. A series of antioxidant assays, including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, superoxide radical scavenging (SOD) assay and metal chelating effect assay were performed for Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds. The results of antioxidant assays indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities, moderate 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl activities and metal chelating effect activities. All the experimental studies showed that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds bind to CT-DNA via minor groove binding, cleave of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway, inhibit topoisomerase I and have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities. Thanks to these properties the Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds are suitable agents for photo dynamic therapy.

  15. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep' proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep', in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replica...

  16. REVIEW ARTICLE: DNA protein interactions and bacterial chromosome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Joel; Oppenheim, Amos

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria, like eukaryotic organisms, must compact the DNA molecule comprising their genome and form a functional chromosome. Yet, bacteria do it differently. A number of factors contribute to genome compaction and organization in bacteria, including entropic effects, supercoiling and DNA-protein interactions. A gamut of new experimental techniques have allowed new advances in the investigation of these factors, and spurred much interest in the dynamic response of the chromosome to environmental cues, segregation, and architecture, during both exponential and stationary phases. We review these recent developments with emphasis on the multifaceted roles that DNA-protein interactions play.

  17. Statistical Mechanics of Elastica on Plane as a Model of Supercoiled DNA-Origin of the MKdV hierarchy

    CERN Document Server

    Matsutani, S

    1997-01-01

    In this article, I have investigated statistical mechanics of a non-stretched elastica in two dimensional space using path integral method. In the calculation, the MKdV hierarchy naturally appeared as the equations including the temperature fluctuation.I have classified the moduli of the closed elastica in heat bath and summed the Boltzmann weight with the thermalfluctuation over the moduli. Due to the bilinearity of the energy functional,I have obtained its exact partition function.By investigation of the system,I conjectured that an expectation value at a critical point of this system obeys the Painlevé equation of the first kind and its related equations extended by the KdV hierarchy.Furthermore I also commented onthe relation between the MKdV hierarchy and BRS transformationin this system.

  18. Discovery and in vivo evaluation of alcohol-containing benzothiazoles as potent dual-targeting bacterial DNA supercoiling inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, James T; Axford, Lorraine C; Barker, Stephanie; Bennett, James M; Blair, Michael; Collins, Ian; Davies, David T; Ford, Leigh; Gannon, Carlie T; Lancett, Paul; Logan, Alastair; Lunniss, Christopher J; Morton, Craig J; Offermann, Daniel A; Pitt, Gary R W; Rao, B Narasinga; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Tarun; Srivastava, Anil; Stokes, Neil R; Thomaides-Brears, Helena B; Yadav, Anju; Haydon, David J

    2014-09-01

    A series of dual-targeting, alcohol-containing benzothiazoles has been identified with superior antibacterial activity and drug-like properties. Early lead benzothiazoles containing carboxylic acid moieties showed efficacy in a well-established in vivo model, but inferior drug-like properties demanded modifications of functionality capable of demonstrating superior efficacy. Eliminating the acid group in favor of hydrophilic alcohol moieties at C(5), as well as incorporating solubilizing groups at the C(7) position of the core ring provided potent, broad-spectrum Gram-positive antibacterial activity, lower protein binding, and markedly improved efficacy in vivo.

  19. Single-Molecule Confocal FRET Microscopy to Dissect Conformational Changes in the Catalytic Cycle of DNA Topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, S; Weidlich, D; Klostermeier, D

    2016-01-01

    Molecular machines undergo large-scale conformational changes during their catalytic cycles that are linked to their biological functions. DNA topoisomerases are molecular machines that interconvert different DNA topoisomers and resolve torsional stress that is introduced during cellular processes that involve local DNA unwinding. DNA gyrase catalyzes the introduction of negative supercoils into DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction. During its catalytic cycle, gyrase undergoes large-scale conformational changes that drive the supercoiling reaction. These conformational changes can be followed by single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Here, we use DNA gyrase from Bacillus subtilis as an illustrative example to present strategies for the investigation of conformational dynamics of multisubunit complexes. We provide a brief introduction into single-molecule FRET and confocal microscopy, with a focus on practical considerations in sample preparation and data analysis. Different strategies in the preparation of donor-acceptor-labeled molecules suitable for single-molecule FRET experiments are outlined. The insight into the mechanism of DNA supercoiling by gyrase gained from single-molecule FRET experiment is summarized. The general strategies described here can also be applied to investigate conformational changes and their link to biological function of other multisubunit molecular machines. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Topology simplification: Important biological phenomenon or evolutionary relic?. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Andrew D.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    The review, Disentangling DNA molecules[1], gives an excellent technical description of the phenomenon of topology simplification (TS) by type IIA DNA topoisomerases (topos). In the 20 years since its discovery [2], this effect has attracted a good deal of attention, probably because of its apparently magical nature, and because it seemed to offer a solution to the conundrum that all type II topos rely on ATP hydrolysis, but only bacterial DNA gyrases were known to transduce the free energy of hydrolysis into torsion (supercoiling) in the DNA. It made good sense to think that the other enzymes are using the energy to reduce the level of supercoiling, knotting, and particularly decatenation (unlinking), below equilibrium, since the key activity of the non-supercoiling topos is the removal of links between daughter chromosomes [3]. As Vologodskii discusses [1], there have been a number of theoretical models developed to explain how the local effect of a type II topo can influence the global level of knotting and catenation in large DNA molecules, and he explains how features of two of the most successful models (bent G segment and hooked juxtapositions) may be combined to explain the magnitude of the effect and overcome a kinetic problem with the hooked juxtaposition model.

  1. Brownian dynamics simulations of sequence-dependent duplex denaturation in dynamically superhelical DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Steven P.; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Krishnan, V. V.; Fink, William H.; Benham, Craig J.

    2005-09-01

    The topological state of DNA in vivo is dynamically regulated by a number of processes that involve interactions with bound proteins. In one such process, the tracking of RNA polymerase along the double helix during transcription, restriction of rotational motion of the polymerase and associated structures, generates waves of overtwist downstream and undertwist upstream from the site of transcription. The resulting superhelical stress is often sufficient to drive double-stranded DNA into a denatured state at locations such as promoters and origins of replication, where sequence-specific duplex opening is a prerequisite for biological function. In this way, transcription and other events that actively supercoil the DNA provide a mechanism for dynamically coupling genetic activity with regulatory and other cellular processes. Although computer modeling has provided insight into the equilibrium dynamics of DNA supercoiling, to date no model has appeared for simulating sequence-dependent DNA strand separation under the nonequilibrium conditions imposed by the dynamic introduction of torsional stress. Here, we introduce such a model and present results from an initial set of computer simulations in which the sequences of dynamically superhelical, 147 base pair DNA circles were systematically altered in order to probe the accuracy with which the model can predict location, extent, and time of stress-induced duplex denaturation. The results agree both with well-tested statistical mechanical calculations and with available experimental information. Additionally, we find that sites susceptible to denaturation show a propensity for localizing to supercoil apices, suggesting that base sequence determines locations of strand separation not only through the energetics of interstrand interactions, but also by influencing the geometry of supercoiling.

  2. Flexible DNA bending in HU-DNA cocrystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, Kerren K; Lemberg, Kathryn M; Zhang, Ying; Rice, Phoebe A

    2003-07-15

    HU and IHF are members of a family of prokaryotic proteins that interact with the DNA minor groove in a sequence-specific (IHF) or non-specific (HU) manner to induce and/or stabilize DNA bending. HU plays architectural roles in replication initiation, transcription regulation and site-specific recombination, and is associated with bacterial nucleoids. Cocrystal structures of Anabaena HU bound to DNA (1P71, 1P78, 1P51) reveal that while underlying proline intercalation and asymmetric charge neutralization mechanisms of DNA bending are similar for IHF and HU, HU stabilizes different DNA bend angles ( approximately 105-140 degrees ). The two bend angles within a single HU complex are not coplanar, and the resulting dihedral angle is consistent with negative supercoiling. Comparison of HU-DNA and IHF-DNA structures suggests that sharper bending is correlated with longer DNA binding sites and smaller dihedral angles. An HU-induced bend may be better modeled as a hinge, not a rigid bend. The ability to induce or stabilize varying bend angles is consistent with HU's role as an architectural cofactor in many different systems that may require differing geometries.

  3. Cable dynamics applied to long-length scale mechanics of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, Sachin; Lillian, Todd; Noel C Perkins; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the use of cable dynamics models as a means to explore the mechanics of DNA on long-length scales. It is on these length scales that DNA forms twisted and curved three-dimensional shapes known as supercoils and loops. These long-length scale DNA structures have a pronounced influence on the functions of this molecule within the cell including the packing of DNA in the cell nucleus, transcription, replication and gene repair. We provide a short background to the mechanics...

  4. Insights from the structure of a smallpox virus topoisomerase-DNA transition state mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kay; Hwang, Young; Bushman, Frederic D.; Van Duyne, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases (TopIBs) which release superhelical tension generated by replication and transcription of their genomes. To investigate the reaction catalyzed viral TopIBs, we have determined the structure of a variola virus topoisomerase-DNA complex trapped as a vanadate transition state mimic. The structure reveals how the viral TopIB enzymes are likely to position the DNA duplex for ligation following relaxation of supercoils and identifies the sources of friction observed in single molecule experiments that argue against free rotation. The structure also identifies a conformational change in the leaving group sugar that must occur prior to cleavage and reveals a mechanism for promoting ligation following relaxation of supercoils that involves a novel Asp-minor groove interaction. Overall, the new structural data support a common catalytic mechanism for the TopIB superfamily but indicate distinct methods for controlling duplex rotation in the small vs. large enzyme subfamilies. PMID:20152159

  5. Separation of plasmid DNA topoisomers by multimodal chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, A Rita; Alves, Cláudia P A; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Azevedo, Ana M

    2016-06-15

    The ability to analyze the distribution of topoisomers in a plasmid DNA sample is important when evaluating the quality of preparations intended for gene therapy and DNA vaccination or when performing biochemical studies on the action of topoisomerases and gyrases. Here, we describe the separation of supercoiled (sc) and open circular (oc) topoisomers by multimodal chromatography. A medium modified with the ligand N-benzyl-N-methyl ethanolamine and an elution scheme with increasing NaCl concentration are used to accomplish the baseline separation of sc and oc plasmid. The utility of the method is demonstrated by quantitating topoisomers in a purified plasmid sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A transition from strong right-handed to canonical left-handed supercoiling in a conserved coiled-coil segment of trimeric autotransporter adhesins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Birte Hernandez; Gruber, Markus; Ursinus, Astrid; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Lupas, Andrei N; Zeth, Kornelius

    2010-05-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) represent an important class of pathogenicity factors in proteobacteria. Their defining feature is a conserved membrane anchor, which forms a 12-stranded beta-barrel through the outer membrane. The proteins are translocated through the pore of this barrel and, once export is complete, the pore is occluded by a three-stranded coiled coil with canonical heptad (7/2) sequence periodicity. In many TAAs this coiled coil is extended by a segment of varying length, which has pentadecad (15/4) periodicity. We used X-ray crystallography and biochemical methods to analyze the transition between these two periodicities in the coiled-coil stalk of the Yersinia adhesin YadA. Our results show how the strong right-handed supercoil of the 15/4-periodic part locally undergoes further over-winding to 19/5, before switching at a fairly constant rate over 14 residues to the canonical left-handed supercoil of the 7/2-periodic part. The transition region contains two YxD motifs, which are characteristic for right-handed coiled-coil segments of TAAs. This novel coiled-coil motif forms a defined network of inter- and intrahelical hydrogen bonds, thus serving as a structural determinant. Supercoil fluctuations have hitherto been described in coiled coils whose main sequence periodicity is disrupted locally by discontinuities. Here we present the first detailed analysis of two fundamentally different coiled-coil periodicities being accommodated in the same structure.

  7. Underwound DNA under tension: L-DNA vs. plectoneme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Anmin; Kwon, Ah-Young; Johner, Albert; Hong, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Nam-Kyung

    2014-02-01

    In many biological processes DNA experiences force in the pN range and torque that underwinds it. Magnetic tweezers experiments show that the superhelicity(\\sigma) -extension curve, the so-called bell curve, is asymmetric with respect to the inversion of σ. We study the case of underwound DNA which was not addressed theoretically before. While the case of overwound DNA is fully explained by the formation of supercoil, the extension of underwound DNA reveals non-trivial tension dependence. We show that plectonemic coils form at moderate tension, whereas left-handed DNA, so-called “L-DNA”, prevails at high tension (above \\approx 0.5\\ \\text{pN} ). In a narrow but physiologically relevant crossover range of tension, that is between 0.4 pN and 0.7 pN, extra unwinding turns are statistically distributed to either plectoneme or L-DNA. In this regime the states of a torsionally stressed DNA should be most sensitive to external mechanical stimuli.

  8. Z-DNA binding protein from chicken blood nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, A. G.; Spitzner, J. R.; Lowenhaupt, K.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    A protein (Z alpha) that appears to be highly specific for the left-handed Z-DNA conformer has been identified in chicken blood nuclear extracts. Z alpha activity is measured in a band-shift assay by using a radioactive probe consisting of a (dC-dG)35 oligomer that has 50% of the deoxycytosines replaced with 5-bromodeoxycytosine. In the presence of 10 mM Mg2+, the probe converts to the Z-DNA conformation and is bound by Z alpha. The binding of Z alpha to the radioactive probe is specifically blocked by competition with linear poly(dC-dG) stabilized in the Z-DNA form by chemical bromination but not by B-form poly(dC-dG) or boiled salmon-sperm DNA. In addition, the binding activity of Z alpha is competitively blocked by supercoiled plasmids containing a Z-DNA insert but not by either the linearized plasmid or by an equivalent amount of the parental supercoiled plasmid without the Z-DNA-forming insert. Z alpha can be crosslinked to the 32P-labeled brominated probe with UV light, allowing us to estimate that the minimal molecular mass of Z alpha is 39 kDa.

  9. Double-stranded DNA homology produces a physical signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Xiaoping; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2010-01-01

    DNA is found in the cell largely as a negatively supercoiled molecule. This high-energy form of the genetic material can engender sequence-dependent structures, such as cruciforms, Z-DNA, or H-DNA, even though they are not favored by conventional conditions in relaxed DNA. A key feature of DNA in living systems is the presence of homology. We have sought homology-dependent structural phenomena based on topological relaxation. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis, we demonstrate a structural transition in supercoiled plasmid molecules containing homologous segments. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals a dumbbell structure in molecules whose linking difference is beyond the transition point. The position of the dumbbell shaft is a function of the site of homology, and its extent is proportional to the linking difference. Second-site-reversion electrophoresis data support the notion that the shaft contains PX-DNA. Predicted cross-linking patterns generated in vivo suggest that homology-dependent structures can occur within the cell. PMID:20616051

  10. The B- to Z-DNA equilibrium in vivo is perturbed by biological processes.

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharias, W; Jaworski, A; Larson, J E; Wells, R D

    1988-01-01

    Right-handed B and left-handed Z conformations coexist in equilibrium in portions of plasmids in Escherichia coli. The equilibria are influenced by the length of the sequences that undergo the structural transitions and are perturbed by biological processes. The composite results of three types of determinations indicate a supercoil density of -0.025 in vivo. The coexistence of alternative DNA conformations in living cells implies the potential of these structures or their transitions for imp...

  11. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue)

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  12. Structure of bacteriophage phi29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-22

    The tailed bacteriophage 29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 Å in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure is about 150 Å long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless 29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  13. Relaxase DNA Binding and Cleavage Are Two Distinguishable Steps in Conjugative DNA Processing That Involve Different Sequence Elements of the nic Site*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, María; González-Pérez, Blanca; Cabezas, Matilde; Moncalian, Gabriel; Rivas, Germán; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    TrwC, the relaxase of plasmid R388, catalyzes a series of concerted DNA cleavage and strand transfer reactions on a specific site (nic) of its origin of transfer (oriT). nic contains the cleavage site and an adjacent inverted repeat (IR2). Mutation analysis in the nic region indicated that recognition of the IR2 proximal arm and the nucleotides located between IR2 and the cleavage site were essential for supercoiled DNA processing, as judged either by in vitro nic cleavage or by mobilization of a plasmid containing oriT. Formation of the IR2 cruciform and recognition of the distal IR2 arm and loop were not necessary for these reactions to take place. On the other hand, IR2 was not involved in TrwC single-stranded DNA processing in vitro. For single-stranded DNA nic cleavage, TrwC recognized a sequence embracing six nucleotides upstream of the cleavage site and two nucleotides downstream. This suggests that TrwC DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing and that different sequence elements are recognized by TrwC in each step. IR2-proximal arm recognition was crucial for the initial supercoiled DNA binding. Subsequent recognition of the adjacent single-stranded DNA binding site was required to position the cleavage site in the active center of the protein so that the nic cleavage reaction could take place. PMID:20061574

  14. Relaxase DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing that involve different sequence elements of the nic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, María; González-Pérez, Blanca; Cabezas, Matilde; Moncalian, Gabriel; Rivas, Germán; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-03-19

    TrwC, the relaxase of plasmid R388, catalyzes a series of concerted DNA cleavage and strand transfer reactions on a specific site (nic) of its origin of transfer (oriT). nic contains the cleavage site and an adjacent inverted repeat (IR(2)). Mutation analysis in the nic region indicated that recognition of the IR(2) proximal arm and the nucleotides located between IR(2) and the cleavage site were essential for supercoiled DNA processing, as judged either by in vitro nic cleavage or by mobilization of a plasmid containing oriT. Formation of the IR(2) cruciform and recognition of the distal IR(2) arm and loop were not necessary for these reactions to take place. On the other hand, IR(2) was not involved in TrwC single-stranded DNA processing in vitro. For single-stranded DNA nic cleavage, TrwC recognized a sequence embracing six nucleotides upstream of the cleavage site and two nucleotides downstream. This suggests that TrwC DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing and that different sequence elements are recognized by TrwC in each step. IR(2)-proximal arm recognition was crucial for the initial supercoiled DNA binding. Subsequent recognition of the adjacent single-stranded DNA binding site was required to position the cleavage site in the active center of the protein so that the nic cleavage reaction could take place.

  15. DNA为模板的铂纳米团簇沉积%DNA-templated Platinum Nanocluster Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    晁洁; 刘霞; 刘洪波; 肖守军

    2007-01-01

    Platinum nanoclusters were deposited along the supercoiled DNA strands after incubation of cis-(trans-1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane)(dl-camphorato)platinum(Ⅱ) (Cdp), an analogue of the anti-tumor drug-carboplatin, with DNA and K2PtCl4 for 600 min and then through reduction of dimethylaminoborane (DMAB). The decrease of absorption of DNA at 260 nm indicates the coordination of Cdp and DNA. TEM and AFM were employed to characterize the morphologies and structures of platinum nanoclusters.

  16. Effect of intense, ultrashort laser pulses on DNA plasmids in their native state: strand breakages induced by {\\it in-situ} electrons and radicals

    CERN Document Server

    D'Souza, J S; Dharmadhikari, A K; Rao, B J; Mathur, D

    2011-01-01

    Single strand breaks are induced in DNA plasmids, pBR322 and pUC19, in aqueous media exposed to strong fields generated using ultrashort laser pulses (820 nm wavelength, 45 fs pulse duration, 1 kHz repetition rate) at intensities of 1-12 TW cm$^{-2}$. The strong fields generate, {\\it in situ}, electrons and radicals that induce transformation of supercoiled DNA into relaxed DNA, the extent of which is quantified. Introduction of electron and radical scavengers inhibits DNA damage; results indicate that OH radicals are the primary (but not sole) cause of DNA damage.

  17. The elastic theory of a single DNA molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haijun Zhou; Yang Zhang; Zhang-Can Ou-Yang

    2003-08-01

    We study the elastic responses of double- (ds) and single-stranded (ss) DNA at external force fields. A double-strand-polymer elastic model is constructed and solved by path integral methods and Monte Carlo simulations to understand the entropic elasticity, cooperative extensibility, and supercoiling property of dsDNA. The good agreement with experiments indicates that shortranged base-pair stacking interaction is crucial for the stability and the high deformability of dsDNA. Hairpin-coil transition in ssDNA is studied with generating function method. A threshold force is needed to pull the ssDNA hairpin patterns, stabilized by base pairing and base-pair stacking, into random coils. This phase transition is predicted to be of first order for stacking potential higher than some critical level, in accordance with experimental observations.

  18. Effect of knots on binding of intercalators to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medalion, Shlomi; Rabin, Yitzhak

    2014-05-01

    We study the effect of knots in circular dsDNA molecules on the binding of intercalating ligands. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that depending on their handedness, the presence of knots can either suppress or enhance intercalation in supercoiled DNA. When the occupancy of intercalators on DNA is low, the effect of knots on intercalation can be captured by introducing a shift in the mean writhe of the chain that accounts for the writhe of the corresponding ideal knot. In the limit of high intercalator occupancy, the writhe distribution of different knots is strongly affected by excluded volume effects and therefore by salt concentration. Based on the finding that different knots yield well-separated probability distributions of bound intercalators, we propose a new experimental approach to determine DNA topology by monitoring the intensity of fluorescence emitted by dye molecules intercalated into knotted DNA molecules.

  19. Novel actin filaments from Bacillus thuringiensis form nanotubules for plasmid DNA segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shimin; Narita, Akihiro; Popp, David; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Lee, Lin Jie; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Oda, Toshiro; Koh, Fujiet; Larsson, Mårten; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    Here we report the discovery of a bacterial DNA-segregating actin-like protein (BtParM) from Bacillus thuringiensis, which forms novel antiparallel, two-stranded, supercoiled, nonpolar helical filaments, as determined by electron microscopy. The BtParM filament features of supercoiling and forming antiparallel double-strands are unique within the actin fold superfamily, and entirely different to the straight, double-stranded, polar helical filaments of all other known ParMs and of eukaryotic F-actin. The BtParM polymers show dynamic assembly and subsequent disassembly in the presence of ATP. BtParR, the DNA-BtParM linking protein, stimulated ATP hydrolysis/phosphate release by BtParM and paired two supercoiled BtParM filaments to form a cylinder, comprised of four strands with inner and outer diameters of 57 Å and 145 Å, respectively. Thus, in this prokaryote, the actin fold has evolved to produce a filament system with comparable features to the eukaryotic chromosome-segregating microtubule.

  20. DNA moves sequentially towards the nuclear matrix during DNA replication in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranda-Anzaldo Armando

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the interphase nucleus of metazoan cells DNA is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to a nuclear matrix (NM. There is varied evidence indicating that DNA replication occurs in replication factories organized upon the NM and that DNA loops may correspond to the actual replicons in vivo. In normal rat liver the hepatocytes are arrested in G0 but they synchronously re-enter the cell cycle after partial-hepatectomy leading to liver regeneration in vivo. We have previously determined in quiescent rat hepatocytes that a 162 kbp genomic region containing members of the albumin gene family is organized into five structural DNA loops. Results In the present work we tracked down the movement relative to the NM of DNA sequences located at different points within such five structural DNA loops during the S phase and after the return to cellular quiescence during liver regeneration. Our results indicate that looped DNA moves sequentially towards the NM during replication and then returns to its original position in newly quiescent cells, once the liver regeneration has been achieved. Conclusions Looped DNA moves in a sequential fashion, as if reeled in, towards the NM during DNA replication in vivo thus supporting the notion that the DNA template is pulled progressively towards the replication factories on the NM so as to be replicated. These results provide further evidence that the structural DNA loops correspond to the actual replicons in vivo.

  1. Characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium DNA gyrase as a target of quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsoi, Siriporn; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Suprasert, Apinun; Utrarachkij, Fuangfa; Nakajima, Chie; Suthienkul, Orasa; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Quinolones exhibit good antibacterial activity against Salmonella spp. isolates and are often the choice of treatment for life-threatening salmonellosis due to multi-drug resistant strains. To assess the properties of quinolones, we performed an in vitro assay to study the antibacterial activities of quinolones against recombinant DNA gyrase. We expressed the S. Typhimurium DNA gyrase A (GyrA) and B (GyrB) subunits in Escherichia coli. GyrA and GyrB were obtained at high purity (>95%) by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose resin column chromatography as His-tagged 97-kDa and 89-kDa proteins, respectively. Both subunits were shown to reconstitute an ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. Drug concentrations that suppressed DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50 s) or generated DNA cleavage by 25% (CC25 s) demonstrated that quinolones highly active against S. Typhimurium DNA gyrase share a fluorine atom at C-6. The relationships between the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), IC50 s and CC25 s were assessed by estimating a linear regression between two components. MICs measured against S. Typhimurium NBRC 13245 correlated better with IC50 s (R = 0.9988) than CC25 s (R = 0.9685). These findings suggest that the DNA supercoiling inhibition assay may be a useful screening test to identify quinolones with promising activity against S. Typhimurium. The quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated here shows that C-8, the C-7 ring, the C-6 fluorine, and N-1 cyclopropyl substituents are desirable structural features in targeting S. Typhimurium gyrase.

  2. DNA Interaction Studies of Selected Polyamine Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szumilak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of polyamine conjugates with DNA double helix has been studied. Binding properties were examined by ethidium bromide (EtBr displacement and DNA unwinding/topoisomerase I/II (Topo I/II activity assays, as well as dsDNA thermal stability studies and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Genotoxicity of the compounds was estimated by a comet assay. It has been shown that only compound 2a can interact with dsDNA via an intercalative binding mode as it displaced EtBr from the dsDNA-dye complex, with Kapp = 4.26 × 106 M−1; caused an increase in melting temperature; changed the circular dichroism spectrum of dsDNA; converted relaxed plasmid DNA into a supercoiled molecule in the presence of Topo I and reduced the amount of short oligonucleotide fragments in the comet tail. Furthermore, preliminary theoretical study has shown that interaction of the discussed compounds with dsDNA depends on molecule linker length and charge distribution over terminal aromatic chromophores.

  3. DNA Interaction Studies of Selected Polyamine Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumilak, Marta; Merecz, Anna; Strek, Malgorzata; Stanczak, Andrzej; Inglot, Tadeusz W.; Karwowski, Boleslaw T.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of polyamine conjugates with DNA double helix has been studied. Binding properties were examined by ethidium bromide (EtBr) displacement and DNA unwinding/topoisomerase I/II (Topo I/II) activity assays, as well as dsDNA thermal stability studies and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Genotoxicity of the compounds was estimated by a comet assay. It has been shown that only compound 2a can interact with dsDNA via an intercalative binding mode as it displaced EtBr from the dsDNA-dye complex, with Kapp = 4.26 × 106 M−1; caused an increase in melting temperature; changed the circular dichroism spectrum of dsDNA; converted relaxed plasmid DNA into a supercoiled molecule in the presence of Topo I and reduced the amount of short oligonucleotide fragments in the comet tail. Furthermore, preliminary theoretical study has shown that interaction of the discussed compounds with dsDNA depends on molecule linker length and charge distribution over terminal aromatic chromophores. PMID:27657041

  4. Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni DNA gyrase as the target of quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Usui, Masaru; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Suthienkul, Orasa; Changkaew, Kanjana; Nakajima, Chie; Tamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Quinolones have long been used as the first-line treatment for Campylobacter infections. However, an increased resistance to quinolones has raised public health concerns. The development of new quinolone-based antibiotics with high activity is critical for effective, as DNA gyrase, the target of quinolones, is an essential enzyme for bacterial growth in several mechanisms. The evaluation of antibiotic activity against Campylobacter jejuni largely relies on drug susceptibility tests, which require at least 2 days to produce results. Thus, an in vitro method for studying the activity of quinolones against the C. jejuni DNA gyrase is preferred. To identify potent quinolones, we investigated the interaction of C. jejuni DNA gyrase with a number of quinolones using recombinant subunits. The combination of purified subunits exhibited DNA supercoiling activity in an ATP dependent manner. Drug concentrations that inhibit DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50s) of 10 different quinolones were estimated to range from 0.4 (sitafloxacin) to >100 μg/mL (nalidixic acid). Sitafloxacin showed the highest inhibitory activity, and the analysis of the quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated that a fluorine atom at R-6 might play the important role in the inhibitory activity against C. jejuni gyrase. Measured quinolone IC50s correlated well with minimum inhibitory concentrations (R = 0.9943). These suggest that the in vitro supercoiling inhibition assay on purified recombinant C. jejuni DNA gyrase is a useful and predictive technique to monitor the antibacterial potency of quinolones. And furthermore, these data suggested that sitafloxacin might be a good candidate for clinical trials on campylobacteriosis.

  5. The dynamic behavior of bacterial macrofibers growing with one end prevented from rotating: variation in shaft rotation along the fiber's length, and supercoil movement on a solid surface toward the constrained end

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liling

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial macrofibers twist as they grow, writhe, supercoil and wind up into plectonemic structures (helical forms the individual filaments of which cannot be taken apart without unwinding that eventually carry loops at both of their ends. Terminal loops rotate about the axis of a fiber's shaft in contrary directions at increasing rate as the shaft elongates. Theory suggests that rotation rates should vary linearly along the length of a fiber ranging from maxima at the loop ends to zero at an intermediate point. Blocking rotation at one end of a fiber should lead to a single gradient: zero at the blocked end to maximum at the free end. We tested this conclusion by measuring directly the rotation at various distances along fiber length from the blocked end. The movement of supercoils over a solid surface was also measured in tethered macrofibers. Results Macrofibers that hung down from a floating wire inserted through a terminal loop grew vertically and produced small plectonemic structures by supercoiling along their length. Using these as markers for shaft rotation we observed a uniform gradient of initial rotation rates with slopes of 25.6°/min. mm. and 36.2°/min. mm. in two different fibers. Measurements of the distal tip rotation in a third fiber as a function of length showed increases proportional to increases in length with constant of proportionality 79.2 rad/mm. Another fiber tethered to the floor grew horizontally with a length-doubling time of 74 min, made contact periodically with the floor and supercoiled repeatedly. The supercoils moved over the floor toward the tether at approximately 0.06 mm/min, 4 times faster than the fiber growth rate. Over a period of 800 minutes the fiber grew to 23 mm in length and was entirely retracted back to the tether by a process involving 29 supercoils. Conclusions The rate at which growing bacterial macrofibers rotated about the axis of the fiber shaft measured at various

  6. Designing a Single-Molecule Biophysics Tool for Characterising DNA Damage for Techniques that Kill Infectious Pathogens Through DNA Damage Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Helen; Wollman, Adam J M; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics such as the quinolones and fluoroquinolones kill bacterial pathogens ultimately through DNA damage. They target the essential type IIA topoisomerases in bacteria by stabilising the normally transient double-strand break state which is created to modify the supercoiling state of the DNA. Here we discuss the development of these antibiotics and their method of action. Existing methods for DNA damage visualisation, such as the comet assay and immunofluorescence imaging can often only be analysed qualitatively and this analysis is subjective. We describe a putative single-molecule fluorescence technique for quantifying DNA damage via the total fluorescence intensity of a DNA origami tile fully saturated with an intercalating dye, along with the optical requirements for how to implement these into a light microscopy imaging system capable of single-molecule millisecond timescale imaging. This system promises significant improvements in reproducibility of the quantification of DNA damage over traditional techniques.

  7. DNA breakage detection-fish (DBD-FISH): effect of unwinding time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Gundín, F; Gosálvez, J; de la Torre, J; Fernández, J L

    2000-09-20

    DBD-FISH is a new procedure that allows detection and quantification of DNA breakage in situ within specific DNA target sites. Cells embedded in an agarose matrix on a slide are treated in an alkaline unwinding solution to transform DNA breaks into single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). After removal of proteins, DNA probes are hybridized and detected. DNA breaks increase the ssDNA and relax supercoiling of DNA loops, so more probe hybridizes, thereby increasing the surface area and fluorescence intensity of the FISH signal. The probe selects the chromatin area to be analysed. In order to restrict the extension of unwound ssDNA to a region closer to the origin of the DNA break, human leukocytes were processed for DBD-FISH with a whole genome probe, after a 10 Gy dose of X-rays, for various unwinding times: 5, 2 min and 30s. Two cell populations were detected after 30s, but not with the 5 or 2 min unwinding times. One cell group had small to medium haloes corresponding to the relaxation of DNA supercoiling after DAPI staining, and strong DBD-FISH labelling of induced DNA breaks, whereas the other cell group showed big haloes of DNA loop unfolding and an absence of DBD-FISH labelling. The latter group was similar to cells processed by DBD-FISH without the unwinding step. Thus, they should correspond to cells unaffected by the alkaline unwinding solution, possibly because very brief unwinding times do not allow the diffusion of the alkali into the cells deep within the gel, thus biasing the results. Taking this into account, 2 min seems to be the minimum unwinding time required for an accurate detection of a signal by DBD-FISH.

  8. Microfluorometric assessment of the DNA-DNP complex in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannisson, E; Jacolino, H

    1987-06-01

    During spermiogenesis, the DNA-nucleoprotein complex undergoes alterations that are reflected in a decreasing capacity for binding DNA-specific dyes, such as ethidium bromide (EB). Human spermatozoa with a low or high capacity for EB binding were depleted of RNA and most nuclear proteins by exposure to RNAse, EDTA and trypsin, with and without additional high salt buffer (HSB) treatment. When treated with RNAse, EDTA and trypsin only, the haploid DNA fluorescence value (calculated from the diploid value of the standard cell population) was found at EB concentrations of 6.5 to 12.5 micrograms/mL. At these EB concentrations, a significantly lower fluorescence was found in the material also treated with HSB, probably reflecting an unwinding of the highly negatively supercoiled DNA loops that are induced by HSB treatment. Maximal fluorescence was not found until a concentration of 50 micrograms EB/mL. This may be due to an overwinding of the DNA by the positive supercoiling caused by EB. The significant difference in EB uptake initially found between the two groups whose spermatozoa showed low and high capacities for EB binding disappeared after removal of the nucleoproteins, suggesting that this compartment of the nucleoprotein-DNA complex is responsible for the different uptakes of EB.

  9. DNA nuclease activity of Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jeff C; Keuper, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2012-06-07

    Artificial nucleases containing Rev-coupled metal chelates based on combinations of the transition metals Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) and the chelators DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, NTA, tripeptide GGH, and tetrapeptide KGHK have been tested for DNA nuclease activity. Originally designed to target reactive transition metal chelates (M-chelates) to the HIV-1 Rev response element mRNA, attachment to the arginine-rich Rev peptide also increases DNA-binding affinity for the attached M-chelates. Apparent K(D) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.6 µM base pairs for binding of supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA by Ni-chelate-Rev complexes were observed, as a result of electrostatic attraction between the positively-charged Rev peptide and negatively-charged DNA. Attachment of M-chelates to the Rev peptide resulted in enhancements of DNA nuclease activity ranging from 1-fold (no enhancement) to at least 13-fold (for Cu-DTPA-Rev), for the rate of DNA nicking, with second order rate constants for conversion of DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) up to 6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for conversion of DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 1 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Freifelder-Trumbo analysis and the ratios of linearization and nicking rate constants (k(lin)/k(nick)) revealed concerted mechanisms for nicking and subsequent linearization of plasmid DNA for all of the Rev-coupled M-chelates, consistent with higher DNA residency times for the Rev-coupled M-chelates. Observed rates for Rev-coupled M-chelates were less skewed by differing DNA-binding affinities than for M-chelates lacking Rev, as a result of the narrow range of DNA-binding affinities observed, and therefore relationships between DNA nuclease activity and other catalyst properties, such as coordination unsaturation, the ability to consume ascorbic acid and generate diffusible radicals, and the identity of the metal center, are now clearly illustrated in light of the similar DNA-binding affinities of all M-chelate-Rev complexes. This work

  10. Novel synthetic (S,S) and (R,R)-secoisolariciresinol diglucosides (SDGs) protect naked plasmid and genomic DNA From gamma radiation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Om P; Pietrofesa, Ralph; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2014-07-01

    Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) is the major lignan in wholegrain flaxseed. However, extraction methods are complex and are associated with low yield and high costs. Using a novel synthetic pathway, our group succeeded in chemically synthesizing SDG (S,S and R,R enantiomers), which faithfully recapitulates the properties of their natural counterparts, possessing strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties. This study further extends initial findings by now investigating the DNA-radioprotective properties of the synthetic SDG enantiomers compared to the commercial SDG. DNA radioprotection was assessed by cell-free systems such as: (a) plasmid relaxation assay to determine the extent of the supercoiled (SC) converted to open-circular (OC) plasmid DNA (pBR322) after exposure of the plasmid to gamma radiation; and (b) determining the extent of genomic DNA fragmentation. Exposure of plasmid DNA to 25 Gy of γ radiation resulted in decreased supercoiled form and increased open-circular form, indicating radiation-induced DNA damage. Synthetic SDG (S,S) and SDG (R,R), and commercial SDG at concentrations of 25-250 μM significantly and equipotently reduced the radiation-induced supercoiled to open-circular plasmid DNA in a dose-dependent conversion. In addition, exposure of calf thymus DNA to 50 Gy of gamma radiation resulted in DNA fragments of low-molecular weight (DNA-radioprotective properties. Such properties along with their antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity, reported earlier, suggest that SDGs are promising candidates for radioprotection for normal tissue damage as a result of accidental exposure during radiation therapy for cancer treatment.

  11. Structure of an 'open' clamp type II topoisomerase-DNA complex provides a mechanism for DNA capture and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Veselkov, Dennis A; Crevel, Isabelle M-T; Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2013-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases regulate DNA supercoiling and chromosome segregation. They act as ATP-operated clamps that capture a DNA duplex and pass it through a transient DNA break in a second DNA segment via the sequential opening and closure of ATPase-, G-DNA- and C-gates. Here, we present the first 'open clamp' structures of a 3-gate topoisomerase II-DNA complex, the seminal complex engaged in DNA recognition and capture. A high-resolution structure was solved for a (full-length ParE-ParC55)2 dimer of Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV bound to two DNA molecules: a closed DNA gate in a B-A-B form double-helical conformation and a second B-form duplex associated with closed C-gate helices at a novel site neighbouring the catalytically important β-pinwheel DNA-binding domain. The protein N gate is present in an 'arms-wide-open' state with the undimerized N-terminal ParE ATPase domains connected to TOPRIM domains via a flexible joint and folded back allowing ready access both for gate and transported DNA segments and cleavage-stabilizing antibacterial drugs. The structure shows the molecular conformations of all three gates at 3.7 Å, the highest resolution achieved for the full complex to date, and illuminates the mechanism of DNA capture and transport by a type II topoisomerase.

  12. Dissection of the bacteriophage Mu strong gyrase site (SGS): significance of the SGS right arm in Mu biology and DNA gyrase mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oram, Mark; Travers, Andrew A; Howells, Alison J; Maxwell, Anthony; Pato, Martin L

    2006-01-01

    The bacteriophage Mu strong gyrase site (SGS), required for efficient phage DNA replication, differs from other gyrase sites in the efficiency of gyrase binding coupled with a highly processive supercoiling activity. Genetic studies have implicated the right arm of the SGS as a key structural feature for promoting rapid Mu replication. Here, we show that deletion of the distal portion of the right arm abolishes efficient binding, cleavage, and supercoiling by DNA gyrase in vitro. DNase I footprinting analysis of the intact SGS revealed an adenylyl imidodiphosphate-dependent change in protection in the right arm, indicating that this arm likely forms the T segment that is passed through the cleaved G segment during the supercoiling reaction. Furthermore, in an SGS derivative with an altered right-arm sequence, the left arm showed these changes, suggesting that the selection of a T segment by gyrase is determined primarily by the sequences of the arms. Analysis of the sequences of the SGS and other gyrase sites suggests that the choice of T segment correlates with which arm possesses the more extensive set of phased anisotropic bending signals, with the Mu right arm possessing an unusually extended set of such signals. The implications of these observations for the structure of the gyrase-DNA complex and for the biological function of the Mu SGS are discussed.

  13. DNA topology and adaptation of Salmonella typhimurium to an intracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, D G; Bowe, F; Hale, C; Dougan, G; Dorman, C J

    2000-01-01

    The expression of genes coding for determinants of DNA topology in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was studied during adaptation by the bacteria to the intracellular environment of J774A.1 macrophage-like cells. A reporter plasmid was used to monitor changes in DNA supercoiling during intracellular growth. Induction of the dps and spv genes, previously shown to be induced in the macrophage, was detected, as was expression of genes coding for DNA gyrase, integration host factor and the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS. The topA gene, coding for the DNA relaxing enzyme topoisomerase I, was not induced. Reporter plasmid data showed that bacterial DNA became relaxed following uptake of S. typhimurium cells by the macrophage. These data indicate that DNA topology in S. typhimurium undergoes significant changes during adaptation to the intracellular environment. A model describing how this process may operate is discussed. PMID:10874730

  14. Compare two methods of measuring DNA damage induced by photogenotoxicity of fluoroquinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting ZHANG; Jun-ling LI; Jian XIN; Xiao-chao MA; Zeng-hong TU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare two methods of measuring DNA damage induced by photogenotoxicity of fluoroquinolones (FQ). METHODS: Lomefloxacin (LFLX), sparfloxacin (SPFX), ciprofloxacin (CPFX), and levofloxacin (LELX)were tested by comet assay and photodynamic DNA strand breaking activity under the different conditions of UVA irradiation. RESULTS: In comet assay, photogenotoxicity was evident at SPFX 1 mg/L, LFLX 5 mg/L, and CPFX 5 mg/L, and LELX 10 mg/L. In photodynamic DNA srand-breaking activity, SPFX and LFLX induced the conversion of the supercoiled form into the nicked relaxed form at 10-50 μmol/L, while CPFX at 25 μmol/L and LELX at 50 μmol/L. CONCLUSION: There were good correlations between the two methods to detect DNA damage induced by phototoxicity of fluoroquinolones. Photodynamic DNA strand breaking activity was a good method to detect DNA damage induced by photogenotoxicity of fluoroquinolones as well as comet assay.

  15. Repercussions of DNA tracking by the type IC restriction endonuclease EcoR124I on linear, circular and catenated substrates.

    OpenAIRE

    Szczelkun, M.D.; Dillingham, M. S.; Janscak, P; Firman, K; Halford, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    Type I restriction endonucleases such as EcoR124I cleave DNA at undefined loci, distant from their recognition sequences, by a mechanism that involves the enzyme tracking along the DNA between recognition and cleavage sites. This mechanism was examined on plasmids that carried recognition sites for EcoR124I and recombination sites for resolvase, the latter to create DNA catenanes. Supercoiled substrates with either one or two restriction sites were linearized by EcoR124I at similar rates, alt...

  16. Hormonal induction of transfected genes depends on DNA topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, B; Haché, R J; Arnemann, J; Chalepakis, G; Slater, E P; Beato, M

    1990-02-01

    Plasmids containing the hormone regulatory element of mouse mammary tumor virus linked to the thymidine kinase promoter of herpes simplex virus and the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase of Escherichia coli respond to glucocorticoids and progestins when transfected into appropriate cells. In the human mammary tumor cell line T47D, the response to progestins, but not to glucocorticoids, is highly dependent on the topology of the transfected DNA. Although negatively supercoiled plasmids respond optimally to the synthetic progestin R5020, their linearized counterparts exhibit markedly reduced progestin inducibility. This is not due to changes in the efficiency of DNA transfection, since the amount of DNA incorporated into the cell nucleus is not significantly dependent on the initial topology of the plasmids. In contrast, cotransfection experiments with glucocorticoid receptor cDNA in the same cell line show no significant influence of DNA topology on induction by dexamethasone. A similar result was obtained with fibroblasts that contain endogenous glucocorticoid receptors. When the distance between receptor-binding sites or between the binding sites and the promoter was increased, the dependence of progestin induction on DNA topology was more pronounced. In contrast to the original plasmid, these constructs also revealed a similar topological dependence for induction by glucocorticoids. The differential influence of DNA topology is not due to differences in the affinity of the two hormone receptors for DNA of various topologies, but probably reflects an influence of DNA topology on the interaction between different DNA-bound receptor molecules and between receptors and other transcription factors.

  17. Protection of DNA From Ionizing Radiation-Induced Lesions by Asiaticoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Jisha; Alarifi, Saud; Alsuhaibani, Entissar; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether asiaticoside, a triterpene glycoside, can afford protection to DNA from alterations induced by gamma radiation under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. In vitro studies were done on plasmid pBR322 DNA, ex vivo studies were done on cellular DNA of human peripheral blood leukocytes, and in vivo investigations were conducted on cellular DNA of spleen and bone marrow cells of mice exposed to whole-body gamma radiation. The supercoiled form of the plasmid pBR322 DNA upon exposure to the radiation was converted into relaxed open circular form due to induction of strand breaks. Presence of asiaticoside along with the DNA during irradiation prevented the relaxation of the supercoiled form to the open circular form. When human peripheral blood leukocytes were exposed to gamma radiation, the cellular DNA suffered strand breaks as evidenced by the increased comet parameters in an alkaline comet assay. Asiaticoside, when present along with blood during irradiation ex vivo, prevented the strand breaks and the comet parameters were closer to that of the controls. Whole-body exposure of mice to gamma radiation resulted in a significant increase in comet parameters of DNA of bone marrow and spleen cells of mice as a result of radiation-induced strand breaks in DNA. Administration of asiaticoside prior to whole-body radiation exposure of the mice prevented this increase in radiation-induced increase in comet parameters, which could be the result of protection to DNA under in vivo conditions of radiation exposure. Thus, it can be concluded from the results that asiaticoside can offer protection to DNA from radiation-induced alterations under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions.

  18. Topological diversity of chromatin fibers: Interplay between nucleosome repeat length, DNA linking number and the level of transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Norouzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of nucleosomes in 30-nm fibers remains unknown in detail. To tackle this problem, we analyzed all stereochemically possible configurations of two-start chromatin fibers with DNA linkers L = 10-70 bp (nucleosome repeat length NRL = 157-217 bp. In our model, the energy of a fiber is a sum of the elastic energy of the linker DNA, steric repulsion, electrostatics, and the H4 tail-acidic patch interaction between two stacked nucleosomes. We found two families of energetically feasible conformations of the fibers—one observed earlier, and the other novel. The fibers from the two families are characterized by different DNA linking numbers—that is, they are topologically different. Remarkably, the optimal geometry of a fiber and its topology depend on the linker length: the fibers with linkers L = 10n and 10n + 5 bp have DNA linking numbers per nucleosome DLk >>-1.5 and -1.0, respectively. In other words, the level of DNA supercoiling is directly related to the length of the inter-nucleosome linker in the chromatin fiber (and therefore, to NRL. We hypothesize that this topological polymorphism of chromatin fibers may play a role in the process of transcription, which is known to generate different levels of DNA supercoiling upstream and downstream from RNA polymerase. A genome-wide analysis of the NRL distribution in active and silent yeast genes yielded results consistent with this assumption.

  19. Dynamics of DNA/intercalator complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, J. M.; Wu, Pengguang; Fujimoto, Bryant S.

    1990-05-01

    Complexes of linear and supercoiled DNAs with different intercalating dyes are studied by time-resolved fluorescence polarization anisotropy using intercalated ethidium as the probe. Existing theory is generalized to take account of excitation transfer between intercalated ethidiums, and Forster theory is shown to be valid in this context. The effects of intercalated ethidium, 9-aminoacridine, and proflavine on the torsional rigidity of linear and supercoiled DNAs are studied up to rather high binding ratios. Evidence is presented that metastable secondary structure persists in dye-relaxed supercoiled DNAs, which contradicts the standard model of supercoiled DNAs.

  20. Methods for assessing DNA hybridization of PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric M. B.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Wu, AiGuo; Thurn, K. Ted; Haley, Benjamin; Clark, Jimmy; Priester, Taisa; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoconjugates and the several novel methods developed to investigate the DNA hybridization behaviors of these constructs. PNAs are synthetic DNA analogs resistant to degradation by cellular enzymes, which hybridize to single strand DNA (ssDNA) with higher affinity than DNA oligonucleotides, invade double strand DNA (dsDNA), and form different PNA-DNA complexes. Previously, we developed a DNA-TiO2 nanoconjugate capable of hybridizing to target DNA intracellularly in a sequence-specific manner, with the ability to cleave DNA when excited by electromagnetic radiation, but susceptible to degradation which may lower its intracellular targeting efficiency and retention time. PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates described herein hybridize to target ssDNA, oligonucleotide dsDNA, and supercoiled plasmid DNA under physiological-like ionic and temperature conditions, enabling rapid and inexpensive, sequence-specific precipitation of nucleic acids in vitro. When modified by the addition of imaging agents or peptides, hybridization capabilities of PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates are enhanced which provides essential benefits for numerous in vitro and in vivo applications. The series of experiments shown here could not be done with either TiO2-DNA nanoconjugates or PNAs alone, and the novel methods developed will benefit studies of numerous other nanoconjugate systems. PMID:18786502

  1. Impact of mutations in DNA gyrase genes on quinolone resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Changkaew, Kanjana; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Suthienkul, Orasa; Usui, Masaru; Tamura, Yutaka; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-10-01

    Amino acid substitutions providing quinolone resistance to Campyloabcter jejuni have been found in the quinolone resistance-determining region of protein DNA gyrase subunit A (GyrA), with the highest frequency at position 86 followed by position 90. In this study, wild-type and mutant recombinant DNA gyrase subunits were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA agarose column chromatography. Soluble 97 kDa GyrA and 87 kDa DNA gyrase subunit B were shown to reconstitute ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. A quinolone-inhibited supercoiling assay demonstrated the roles of Thr86Ile, Thr86Ala, Thr86Lys, Asp90Asn, and Asp90Tyr amino acid substitutions in reducing sensitivity to quinolones. The marked effect of Thr86Ile on all examined quinolones suggested the advantage of this substitution in concordance with recurring isolation of quinolone-resistant C. jejuni. An analysis of the structure-activity relationship showed the importance of the substituent at position 8 in quinolones to overcome the effect of Thr86Ile. Sitafloxacin (SIT), which has a fluorinate cyclopropyl ring at R-1 and a chloride substituent at R-8, a characteristic not found in other quinolones, showed the highest inhibitory activity against all mutant C. jejuni gyrases including ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. The results suggest SIT as a promising drug for the treatment of campylobacteriosis caused by CIP-resistant C. jejuni. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Differential interactions of plasmid DNA, RNA and genomic DNA with amino acid-based affinity matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Angela; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A

    2010-09-01

    The development of a strategy to plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification has become necessary for the development of gene therapy and DNA vaccine production processes in recent years, since this nucleic acid and most of contaminants, such as RNA, genomic DNA and endotoxins, are negatively charged. An ideal separation methodology may be achieved with the use of affinity interactions between immobilized amino acids and nucleic acids. In this study, the binding behaviour of nucleic acids under the influence of different environmental conditions, such as the composition and ionic strength of elution buffer, and the temperature, is compared with various amino acids immobilized on chromatography resins. Supercoiled (sc) plasmid isoform was isolated with all matrices used, but in some cases preferential interactions with other nucleic acids were found. Particularly, lysine chromatography showed to be an ideal technology mainly on RNA purification using low salt concentration. On the other hand, arginine ligands have shown a greater ability to retain the sc isoform comparatively to the other nucleic acids retention, becoming this support more adequate to sc pDNA purification. The temperature variation, competitive elution and oligonucleotides affinity studies also allowed to recognize the dominant interactions inherent to biorecognition of pDNA molecule and the affinity matrices.

  3. The Inhibitory Effect of Extracts From Fructus Iycii and Rhizoma Polygonati on in vitro DNA B reakage by Alternariol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUDAO-SONG; KONGTIAN-QING; 等

    1996-01-01

    Alternariol caused DNA single-strand breakage.Conversion of the colsed circular double-stranded supercoiled DNA(pBR 322)to the nicked circular form and linear form was used to investigate the effect of extracts of some Chinese medical herbs on DNA nicking induced by alternariol.Some substances in the extracts of Rhizoma polygonati(RP) and Fructus lycii(FL)were shown to protect DNA from the attack by alternariol.Some substance in the RP may bind to plasmid NA,and this binding reduces the electophoretic mobility of DNA.These results indicate that substances from FL and RP may be used as DNA protectors.It is possible that they play an important role in preventing cancer.

  4. Simplified qPCR method for detecting excessive mtDNA damage induced by exogenous factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gureev, Artem P; Shaforostova, Ekaterina A; Starkov, Anatoly A; Popov, Vasily N

    2017-05-01

    Damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a meaningful biomarker for evaluating genotoxicity of drugs and environmental toxins. Existing PCR methods utilize long mtDNA fragments (∼8-10kb), which complicates detecting exact sites of mtDNA damage. To identify the mtDNA regions most susceptible to damage, we have developed and validated a set of primers to amplify ∼2kb long fragments, while covering over 95% of mouse mtDNA. We have modified the detection method by greatly increasing the enrichment of mtDNA, which allows us solving the problem of non-specific primer annealing to nuclear DNA. To validate our approach, we have determined the most damage-susceptible mtDNA regions in mice treated in vivo and in vitro with rotenone and H2O2. The GTGR-sequence-enriched mtDNA segments located in the D-loop region were found to be especially susceptible to damage. Further, we demonstrate that H2O2-induced mtDNA damage facilitates the relaxation of mtDNA supercoiled conformation, making the sequences with minimal damage more accessible to DNA polymerase, which, in turn, results in a decrease in threshold cycle value. Overall, our modified PCR method is simpler and more selective to the specific sites of damage in mtDNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sample displacement chromatography of plasmid DNA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černigoj, Urh; Martinuč, Urška; Cardoso, Sara; Sekirnik, Rok; Krajnc, Nika Lendero; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-10-02

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) is a chromatographic technique that utilises different relative binding affinities of components in a sample mixture and has been widely studied in the context of peptide and protein purification. Here, we report a use of SDC to separate plasmid DNA (pDNA) isoforms under overloading conditions, where supercoiled (sc) isoform acts as a displacer of open circular (oc) or linear isoform. Since displacement is more efficient when mass transfer between stationary and mobile chromatographic phases is not limited by diffusion, we investigated convective interaction media (CIM) monoliths as stationary phases for pDNA isoform separation. CIM monoliths with different hydrophobicities and thus different binding affinities for pDNA (CIM C4 HLD, CIM-histamine and CIM-pyridine) were tested under hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) conditions. SD efficiency for pDNA isoform separation was shown to be dependent on column selectivity for individual isoform, column efficiency and on ammonium sulfate (AS) concentration in loading buffer (binding strength). SD and negative mode elution often operate in parallel, therefore negative mode elution additionally influences the efficiency of the overall purification process. Optimisation of chromatographic conditions achieved 98% sc pDNA homogeneity and a dynamic binding capacity of over 1mg/mL at a relatively low concentration of AS. SDC was successfully implemented for the enrichment of sc pDNA for plasmid vectors of different sizes, and for separation of linear and and sc isoforms, independently of oc:sc isoform ratio, and flow-rate used. This study therefore identifies SDC as a promising new approach to large-scale pDNA purification, which is compatible with continuous, multicolumn chromatography systems, and could therefore be used to increase productivity of pDNA production in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Theoretical analysis of competing conformational transitions in superhelical DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Zhabinskaya

    Full Text Available We develop a statistical mechanical model to analyze the competitive behavior of transitions to multiple alternate conformations in a negatively supercoiled DNA molecule of kilobase length and specified base sequence. Since DNA superhelicity topologically couples together the transition behaviors of all base pairs, a unified model is required to analyze all the transitions to which the DNA sequence is susceptible. Here we present a first model of this type. Our numerical approach generalizes the strategy of previously developed algorithms, which studied superhelical transitions to a single alternate conformation. We apply our multi-state model to study the competition between strand separation and B-Z transitions in superhelical DNA. We show this competition to be highly sensitive to temperature and to the imposed level of supercoiling. Comparison of our results with experimental data shows that, when the energetics appropriate to the experimental conditions are used, the competition between these two transitions is accurately captured by our algorithm. We analyze the superhelical competition between B-Z transitions and denaturation around the c-myc oncogene, where both transitions are known to occur when this gene is transcribing. We apply our model to explore the correlation between stress-induced transitions and transcriptional activity in various organisms. In higher eukaryotes we find a strong enhancement of Z-forming regions immediately 5' to their transcription start sites (TSS, and a depletion of strand separating sites in a broad region around the TSS. The opposite patterns occur around transcript end locations. We also show that susceptibility to each type of transition is different in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. By analyzing a set of untranscribed pseudogenes we show that the Z-susceptibility just downstream of the TSS is not preserved, suggesting it may be under selection pressure.

  7. A stochastic reaction-diffusion model for protein aggregation on DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    Vital functions of DNA, such as transcription and packaging, depend on the proper clustering of proteins on the double strand. The present study investigates how the interplay between DNA allostery and electrostatic interactions affects protein clustering. The statistical analysis of a simple but transparent computational model reveals two major consequences of this interplay. First, depending on the protein and salt concentration, protein filaments exhibit a bimodal DNA stiffening and softening behavior. Second, within a certain domain of the control parameters, electrostatic interactions can cause energetic frustration that forces proteins to assemble in rigid spiral configurations. Such spiral filaments might trigger both positive and negative supercoiling, which can ultimately promote gene compaction and regulate the promoter. It has been experimentally shown that bacterial histone-like proteins assemble in similar spiral patterns and/or exhibit the same bimodal behavior. The proposed model can, thus, provide computational insights into the physical mechanisms used by proteins to control the mechanical properties of the DNA.

  8. DNA interactions of cobalt(III) mixed-polypyridyl complexes containing asymmetric ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Li; Chao, Hui; Li, Hong; Hong, Xian-Lan; Liu, Yun-Jun; Tan, Li-Feng; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2004-06-01

    Three novel asymmetric ligands, 3-(pyridine-2-yl)-5,6-diphenyl-as-triazine (pdtb), 3-(pyridine-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]acenaphthylene (pdta) and 3-(pyridine-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]phenanthroline (pdtp) and their cobalt(III) complexes have been synthesized and characterized. Binding of the three complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by spectroscopic methods, viscosity, cyclic voltammetry, and electrophoresis measurements. The experimental results indicate that the size and shape of the intercalated ligand have a marked effect on the binding affinity of complexes to CT-DNA. Complexes 2 and 3 have also been found to promote cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA from the supercoiled form I to the open circular form II upon irradiation.

  9. Single molecule study of the DNA denaturation phase transition in the force-torsion space

    CERN Document Server

    Salerno, D; Mai, I; Brogioli, D; Ziano, R; Cassina, V; Mantegazza, F

    2012-01-01

    We use the "magnetic tweezers" technique to reveal the structural transitions that DNA undergoes in the force-torsion space. In particular, we focus on regions corresponding to negative supercoiling. These regions are characterized by the formation of so-called denaturation bubbles, which have an essential role in the replication and transcription of DNA. We experimentally map the region of the force-torsion space where the denaturation takes place. We observe that large fluctuations in DNA extension occur at one of the boundaries of this region, i.e., when the formation of denaturation bubbles and of plectonemes are competing. To describe the experiments, we introduce a suitable extension of the classical model. The model correctly describes the position of the denaturation regions, the transition boundaries, and the measured values of the DNA extension fluctuations.

  10. The electrokinetic characterization of gold nanoparticles, functionalized with cationic functional groups, and its' interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Geraldine Genevive; Revaprasadu, Neerish; López-Viota, Julián; Singh, Moganavelli

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted strong biomedical interest for drug delivery due to their low toxic nature, surface plasmon resonance and capability of increasing the stability of the payload. However, gene transfection represents another important biological application. Considering that cellular barriers keep enclosed their secret to deliver genes using nanoparticles, an important step can be achieved by studying the functionalization of nanoparticles with DNA. In the present contribution the synthesis of nanoparticles consisting of a gold core coated with one or more layers of amino acid (l-lysine), and cationic polyelectrolytes (poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine) is reported. All nanoparticles were subjected to dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility measurements, UV-vis optical spectrophotometry analysis and transmission electron microscopy imaging. In addition, the adsorption of DNA plasmid (pSGS) with linear and supercoiled configurations was studied for those gold nanoparticles under the most suitable surface modifications. Preliminary results showed that the gold nanoparticles functionalized with poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine, respectively, and bound to linear DNA configurations, present in absolute value a higher electrophoretic mobility irrespective of the pH of the media, compared to the supercoiled and nicked configuration. The findings from this study suggest that poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine functionalized gold nanoparticles are biocompatible and may be promising in the chemical design and future optimization of nanostructures for biomedical applications such as gene and drug delivery.

  11. Quercetin-Iron Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, DNA Cleavage, and Antibacterial Activity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Aun; Xu, Xiuquan; Xia, Li; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin-iron (II) complex was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron micrography and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal:ligand) of the complex. Antioxidant study of the quercetin and its metal complex against 2, 2-di-phenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical showed that the complex has much more radical scavenging activity than free quercetin. The interaction of quercetin-iron (II) complex with DNA was determined using ultraviolet visible spectra, fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that quercetin-iron (II) complex can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form to nicked circular form and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was an oxidative cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of complex to cleave DNA. In addition, antibacterial activity of complex on E.coli and S. aureus was also investigated. The results showed that complex has higher antibacterial activity than ligand.

  12. Rutin-Nickel Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, and DNA Cleavage Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Aun; Bano, Shumaila; Xu, Xiuquan; Zhang, Rong Xian; Khalid, Haider; Iqbal, Furqan Muhammad; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-12-17

    The rutin-nickel (II) complex (RN) was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-visible spectroscopy, IR, mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, TG-DSC, SEM, and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal/ligand) of the complex. An antioxidant study of rutin and its metal complex against DPPH radical showed that the complex has more radical scavenging activity than free rutin. The interaction of complex RN with DNA was determined using fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that RN can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide (EB), and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form (SC) to nicked circular form (NC), and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was a hydrolytic cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of the complex to cleave DNA.

  13. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  14. Synthesis and DNA cleavage activities of mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine zinc(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) complexes which linked with uracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ji; Li, Kun; Jiang, Ning; Chen, Shan-Yong; Lin, Hong-Hui; Huang, Yu; Ma, Li-Jian; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2006-10-01

    Mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine zinc(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) complexes, which could attach to peptide nucleic acid (PNA), were synthesized as DNA cleavage agents. The structures of these new mononuclear complexes were identified by MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The catalytic activities on DNA cleavage of these mononuclear complexes with different central metals were subsequently studied, which showed that copper complex was better catalyst in the DNA cleavage process than zinc and cobalt complexes. The effects of reaction time, concentration of complexes were also investigated. The results indicated that the copper(II) complexes could catalyze the cleavage of supercoiled DNA (pUC 19 plasmid DNA) (Form I) under physiological conditions to produce selectively nicked DNA (Form II, no Form III produced) with high yields. The mechanism of the cleavage process was also studied.

  15. FACT is a sensor of DNA torsional stress in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, Alfiya; Cheney, Peter; Pal, Mahadeb; Brodsky, Leonid; Ivanov, Alexander; Kirsanov, Kirill; Lesovaya, Ekaterina; Naberezhnov, Denis; Nesher, Elimelech; Koman, Igor; Wang, Dan; Wang, Jianming; Yakubovskaya, Marianna; Winkler, Duane; Gurova, Katerina

    2017-02-28

    Transitions of B-DNA to alternative DNA structures (ADS) can be triggered by negative torsional strain, which occurs during replication and transcription, and may lead to genomic instability. However, how ADS are recognized in cells is unclear. We found that the binding of candidate anticancer drug, curaxin, to cellular DNA results in uncoiling of nucleosomal DNA, accumulation of negative supercoiling and conversion of multiple regions of genomic DNA into left-handed Z-form. Histone chaperone FACT binds rapidly to the same regions via the SSRP1 subunit in curaxin-treated cells. In vitro binding of purified SSRP1 or its isolated CID domain to a methylated DNA fragment containing alternating purine/pyrimidines, which is prone to Z-DNA transition, is much stronger than to other types of DNA. We propose that FACT can recognize and bind Z-DNA or DNA in transition from a B to Z form. Binding of FACT to these genomic regions triggers a p53 response. Furthermore, FACT has been shown to bind to other types of ADS through a different structural domain, which also leads to p53 activation. Thus, we propose that FACT acts as a sensor of ADS formation in cells. Recognition of ADS by FACT followed by a p53 response may explain the role of FACT in DNA damage prevention. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  17. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loenhout, Marijn T J; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Flebus, Benedetta; den Blanken, Johan F; Zweifel, Ludovit P; Hooning, Koen M; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Dekker, Cees

    2013-01-01

    The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  18. Increment of DNA topoisomerases in chemically and virally transformed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M.D.; Mladovan, A.G.; Baldi, A. (Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1988-03-01

    The activities of topoisomerases I and II were assayed in subcellular extracts obtained from nontumorigenic BALB/c 3T3 A31 and normal rat kidney (NRK) cell lines and from the same cells transformed by benzo(a)pyrene (BP-A31), Moloney (M-MSV-A31) and Kirsten (K-A31) sarcoma viruses, and simian virus 40 (SV-NRK). The enzymatic activity of topoisomerase I was monitored by the relaxation of negatively supercoiled pBR322 DNA and by the formation of covalent complexes between {sup 32}P-labeled DNA and topoisomerase I. Topoisomerase II activity was determined by decatenation of kinetoplast DNA (k-DNA). It was found that nuclear and cytoplasmic type I topoisomerase specific activities were higher in every transformed cell line than in the normal counterparts. These differences cannot be attributed to an inhibitory factor present in A31 cells. When chromatin was treated at increasing ionic strengths, the 0.4 M NaCl extract showed the highest topoisomerase I specific activity. Spontaneously transformed A31 cells showed topoisomerase I activity similar to that of extracts of cells transformed by benzo(a)pyrene. Topoisomerase II specific activity was also increased in SV-NRK cells, as judged by the assay for decatenation of k-DNA to yield minicircle DNA.

  19. Evidence for the role of DNA strand passage in the mechanism of action of microcin B17 on DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrat, Olivier A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2005-03-22

    Microcin B17 (MccB17) is a DNA gyrase poison; in previous work, this bacterial toxin was found to slowly and incompletely inhibit the reactions of supercoiling and relaxation of DNA by gyrase and to stabilize the cleavage complex, depending on the presence of ATP and the DNA topology. We now show that the action of MccB17 on the gyrase ATPase reaction and cleavage complex formation requires a linear DNA fragment of more than 150 base pairs. MccB17 is unable to stimulate the ATPase reaction by stabilizing the weak interactions between short linear DNA fragments (70 base pairs or less) and gyrase, in contrast with the quinolone ciprofloxacin. However, MccB17 can affect the ATP-dependent relaxation of DNA by gyrase lacking its DNA-wrapping or ATPase domains. From these findings, we propose a mode of action of MccB17 requiring a DNA molecule long enough to allow the transport of a segment through the DNA gate of the enzyme. Furthermore, we suggest that MccB17 may trap a transient intermediate state of the gyrase reaction present only during DNA strand passage and enzyme turnover. The proteolytic signature of MccB17 from trypsin treatment of the full enzyme requires DNA and ATP and shows a protection of the C-terminal 47-kDa domain of gyrase, indicating the involvement of this domain in the toxin mode of action and consistent with its proposed role in the mechanism of DNA strand passage. We suggest that the binding site of MccB17 is in the C-terminal domain of GyrB.

  20. DNA strand-scission by phloroglucinols and lignans from heartwood of Garcinia subelliptica Merr. and Justicia plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Huang; Wei, Bai-Luh; Ko, Horng-Huey; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2008-01-01

    Five 2,4,6-prenylated phloroglucinols, garcinielliptones HA (1), HB (2), HC (3), HD (4) and HE (5), were isolated from the heartwood of Garcinia subelliptica Merr. Their structures, including relative configurations, were elucidated by means of spectroscopic data analysis. The ability of phloroglucinols, 1-5 and lignans, tuberculatin (8), justicidin A (9), procumbenoside A (10) and ciliatosides A (11) and B (12), isolated from Justicia ciliata and Justicia procumbens, to induce DNA-cleavage activity was examined using pBR322, a supercoiled, covalently closed circular DNA, and it was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. In the presence of Cu (II), compounds 3, 8, 10 and 11 caused significant breakage of supercoiled plasmid pBR322. The products were relaxed circles with no detectable linear forms. In the Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage of 3 and selective compound 8, Cu(I) was shown not to be an essential intermediate by using the Cu(I)-specific sequestering reagent neocuproine.

  1. Bending the rules of transcriptional repression: tightly looped DNA directly represses T7 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionberger, Troy A; Meyhöfer, Edgar

    2010-08-09

    From supercoiled DNA to the tight loops of DNA formed by some gene repressors, DNA in cells is often highly bent. Despite evidence that transcription by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is affected in systems where DNA is deformed significantly, the mechanistic details underlying the relationship between polymerase function and mechanically stressed DNA remain unclear. Seeking to gain additional insight into the regulatory consequences of highly bent DNA, we hypothesize that tightly looping DNA is alone sufficient to repress transcription. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an assay to quantify transcription elongation by bacteriophage T7 RNAP on small, circular DNA templates approximately 100 bp in size. From these highly bent transcription templates, we observe that the elongation velocity and processivity can be repressed by at least two orders of magnitude. Further, we show that minicircle templates sustaining variable levels of twist yield only moderate differences in repression efficiency. We therefore conclude that the bending mechanics within the minicircle templates dominate the observed repression. Our results support a model in which RNAP function is highly dependent on the bending mechanics of DNA and are suggestive of a direct, regulatory role played by the template itself in regulatory systems where DNA is known to be highly bent. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Method for the preparation of plasmid DNA suitable for physicochemical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtísková, M; Lukásová, E; Palecek, E

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed for the isolation of plasmid DNA suitable for physical and physicochemical measurements. The procedure is based on the deproteinization of the cleared lysate of bacterial cells (after amplification of plasmids by chloramphenicol) by phenol at pH 8.0 and subsequent removal of chromosomal DNA by means of phenol at pH 4.0 and separation of RNA on a hydroxyapatite column at higher temperature. ColE1 DNA sample was compared with samples of the same DNA prepared by three thus far used methods. Samples obtained by means of the latter methods were contaminated with chromosomal DNA, RNA, or ethidium bromide. The presence of ethidium bromide in the DNA sample was a factor interfering in the electrochemical analysis, chromosomal DNA and RNA were disturbing in the use of other methods. DNA separated by the method devised by us was free of any detectable contaminants and fulfilled the high requirements for sample purity of differential pulse polarography. Measurements performed by means of differential pulse polarography showed that the content of single-stranded segments in superhelical ColE1 DNA is less than 0.15% (i.e. less than 20 bases per molecule). This is in keeping with the notion that a cruciform is formed in this DNA (as a result of tension due to supercoiling) in the region of inverted repeat sequence, containing only 5 bases in the single-stranded loop region.

  3. Cloning of an origin of DNA replication of Xenopus laevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, S.; Taylor, J.H.

    1980-09-01

    DNA fragments of Xenopus laevis, the African frog, were cloned in the EcoRI site of the Eschrichia coli plasmid pACYC189 and tested for ability to initiate and complete replication of the recombinant plasmid when injected into unfertilized eggs of X. laevis. After measurement of the (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation per egg for a number of recombinant plasmids, pSW14 and pSW9, which respectively contain a small segment (550 base pairs) and several kilobases of frog DNA, were selected for more extensive analysis. In spite of the small size of th segment in pSW14, it incorporates in 2 hr at least 3 times as much labeled thymidine as either pSW9 or the vector alone. To determine the number of replications of pSW14, a novel method was employed. The results showed that about 50% of the labeled, supercoiled DNA recovered from eggs after 4 hr was sensitive to EcoRI digestion, which indicates that most of the DNA that incorporated (/sup 3/H)thymidine had replicated twice during the 4 hr in the unfertilized eggs of X. laevis. We conclude the pSW14 has a functional origin in the Xenopus DNA segment.

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana GYRB3 does not encode a DNA gyrase subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M Evans-Roberts

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerases are enzymes that control the topology of DNA in all cells. DNA gyrase is unique among the topoisomerases in that it is the only enzyme that can actively supercoil DNA using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. Until recently gyrase was thought to be unique to bacteria, but has now been discovered in plants. The genome of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, is predicted to encode four gyrase subunits: AtGyrA, AtGyrB1, AtGyrB2 and AtGyrB3.We found, contrary to previous data, that AtGyrB3 is not essential to the survival of A. thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis suggests AtGyrB3 is considerably shorter than other gyrase B subunits, lacking part of the ATPase domain and other key motifs found in all type II topoisomerases; but it does contain a putative DNA-binding domain. Partially purified AtGyrB3 cannot bind E. coli GyrA or support supercoiling. AtGyrB3 cannot complement an E. coli gyrB temperature-sensitive strain, whereas AtGyrB2 can. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggests that AtGyrB3 cannot bind to AtGyrA or form a dimer.These data strongly suggest that AtGyrB3 is not a gyrase subunit but has another unknown function. One possibility is that it is a nuclear protein with a role in meiosis in pollen.

  5. Photocleavage of DNA by copper(II) complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil R Chakravarty

    2006-11-01

    The chemistry of ternary and binary copper(II) complexes showing efficient visible lightinduced DNA cleavage activity is summarized in this article. The role of the metal in photo-induced DNA cleavage reactions is explored by designing complex molecules having a variety of ligands. Ternary copper(II) complexes with amino acid like L-methionone or L-lysine and phenanthroline base are efficient photocleavers of DNA. Complexes of formulation [Cu(L)(phen)](ClO4) with NSO-donor Schiff base (HL) and NN-donor heterocyclic base 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) show significant cleavage of supercoiled (SC) DNA on exposure to red light at ≈ 700 nm. The - and CT electronic bands of the copper(II) complexes play important roles in DNA cleavage reactions. The mechanistic pathways are found to be dependent on the types of ligands present in the copper(II) complexes and the photo-excitation energy. While UV exposure generally proceeds via a type-II process forming singlet oxygen as the reactive species, red-light exposure leads to DNA cleavage following different mechanistic pathways, viz. type-I, type-II and photo-redox pathways. Ternary copper(II) complexes with phen as DNA binder and Schiff base with a thiomethyl group as photosensitizer, cleave SC DNA to its nicked circular (NC) form in a type-II process in red-light. The binary complex [Cu(dpq)2(H2O)](ClO4)2 (dpq, dipyridoquinoxaline) cleaves DNA by photo-redox pathway at 694 nm. The binuclear complex [Cu$^{\\text{II}}_{2}$(RSSR)2], where H2RSSR is a Schiff base derived from 2-(thioethyl)salicylaldimine, cleaves SC DNA at 632.8 nm (CW He-Ne laser) and 694 nm (ruby laser) involving sulphide (type-I process) and hydroxyl radicals (photo-redox pathway) as the reactive species.

  6. Specific and non-specific interactions of ParB with DNA: implications for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Pastrana, Cesar L; Butterer, Annika; Pernstich, Christian; Gwynn, Emma J; Sobott, Frank; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of many bacterial chromosomes is dependent on the interactions of ParB proteins with centromere-like DNA sequences called parS that are located close to the origin of replication. In this work, we have investigated the binding of Bacillus subtilis ParB to DNA in vitro using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We observe tight and specific binding of a ParB homodimer to the parS sequence. Binding of ParB to non-specific DNA is more complex and displays apparent positive co-operativity that is associated with the formation of larger, poorly defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Experiments with magnetic tweezers demonstrate that non-specific binding leads to DNA condensation that is reversible by protein unbinding or force. The condensed DNA structure is not well ordered and we infer that it is formed by many looping interactions between neighbouring DNA segments. Consistent with this view, ParB is also able to stabilize writhe in single supercoiled DNA molecules and to bridge segments from two different DNA molecules in trans. The experiments provide no evidence for the promotion of non-specific DNA binding and/or condensation events by the presence of parS sequences. The implications of these observations for chromosome segregation are discussed.

  7. Binding and interaction of di- and tri-substituted organometallic triptycene palladium complexes with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rina; Bhowmick, Sourav; Das, Neeladri; Das, Prolay

    2014-10-01

    Two triptycene-based ligands with pendant bromophenyl units have been prepared. These triptycene derivatives have been used as synthons for the synthesis of di and tri nuclear palladium complexes. The organic molecules and their corresponding organometallic complexes have been fully characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The mode of binding and effect of the complexes on pUC19 plasmid, calf thymus DNA and oligomer duplex DNA have been investigated by a host of analytical methods. The complexes brought about unwinding of supercoiled plasmid and the unwinding angle was found to be related to the binding affinity of the complexes with DNA, where both these parameters were guided by the structure of the complexes. Concentration-dependent inhibition of endonuclease activity of SspI and BamHI by the complexes indicates preference for G/C sequence for binding to DNA. However, neither the complexes did not introduce any cleavage at abasic site in oligomer duplex DNA, nor they created linear form of the plasmid upon co-incubation with the DNA samples. The interactions of the complexes with DNA were found to be strongly guided by the structure of the complexes, where intercalation as well as groove binding was observed, without inflicting any damage to the DNA. The mode of interaction of the complexes with DNA was further confirmed by isothermal calorimetry.

  8. Phaeophytins from Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. with inhibitory activity on human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Analucia Guedes Silveira; Tenorio-Souza, Fabio Henrique; Moura, Marcelo Dantas; Mota, Sabrina Gondim Ribeiro; Silva Lins, Antonio Claudio da; Dias, Celidarque da Silva; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Frmaceuticas; Giulietti, Ana Maria [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Silva, Tania Maria Sarmento da [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Moleculares; Santos, Creusioni Figueredo dos, E-mail: jbarbosa@ltf.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular

    2012-07-01

    Our study reports the extraction and isolation of a new phaeophytin derivative 15{sup 1}-hydroxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone, designated anamariaine (1) herein, isolated from the chloroform fraction of aerial parts of Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. along with the known 15{sup 1}-ethoxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone (2). These compounds were identified by usual spectroscopic methods. Both compounds were subjected to in vitro (inhibitory activity) tests by means of supercoiled DNA relaxation techniques and were shown to display inhibitory activity against human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha} at 50 {mu}M. Interconversion of these two pigments under the mild conditions of the isolation techniques should be highly unlikely but cannot be entirely ruled out. (author)

  9. The interaction of DNA gyrase with the bacterial toxin CcdB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Howells, A J; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    CcdB is a bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase. Analysis of the interaction of CcdB with gyrase reveals two distinct complexes. An initial complex (alpha) is formed by direct interaction between GyrA and CcdB; this complex can be detected by affinity column and gel-shift analysis, and has...... of this initial complex with ATP in the presence of GyrB and DNA slowly converts it to a second complex (beta), which has a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis and is unable to catalyse supercoiling. The efficiency of formation of this inactive complex is dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CcdB. We suggest...

  10. The action of the bacterial toxin, microcin B17, on DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, William M; Bottrill, Andrew R; Pierrat, Olivier A; Durrant, Marcus C; Maxwell, Anthony

    2007-04-01

    Microcin B17 (MccB17) is a peptide-based bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase, the bacterial enzyme that introduces supercoils into DNA. The site and mode of action of MccB17 on gyrase are unclear. We review what is currently known about MccB17-gyrase interactions and summarise approaches to understanding its mode of action that involve modification of the toxin. We describe experiments in which treatment of the toxin at high pH leads to the deamidation of two asparagine residues to aspartates. The modified toxin was found to be inactive in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that the Asn residues are essential for activity. Following on from these studies we have used molecular modelling to suggest a 3D structure for microcin B17. We discuss the implications of this model for MccB17 action and investigate the possibility that it binds metal ions.

  11. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing, into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  12. A model of DNA repeat-assembled mitotic chromosomal skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  13. Synthesis, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Ni(II) complexes with fused aromatic N-containing ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhamani, C. N.; Naik, H. S. Bhojya; Naik, T. R. Ravikumar; Prabhakara, M. C.

    2009-04-01

    The three Ni(II) complexes of fused aromatic N-containing ligands such as [Ni(bnp) 3](PF 6) 2 ( 1), [Ni(phen) 2(bnp)](PF 6) 2 ( 2) and [Ni(bpy) 2(bnp)](PF 6) 2 ( 3) (where bnp = dibenzo(b)1,8-naphthpyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline and bpy = bipyridine) were synthesized and structurally characterized. Elemental analysis, magnetic and spectroscopic data suggested octahedral geometry for all the complexes. Binding of these complexes with (ds)DNA were analyzed by absorption spectra, viscosity and thermal denaturation studies. Detailed analysis revealed that the metal complexes intercalates into the DNA base stack as intercalator. The oxidative cleavage activities of the complexes were studied with supercoiled (SC)pUC19 DNA by using gel electrophoresis, and the results show that complexes have potent nuclease activity.

  14. Palladium(II) complexes as biologically potent metallo-drugs: Synthesis, spectral characterization, DNA interaction studies and antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kollur Shiva; Kumar, Linganna Shiva; Chandan, Shivamallu; Naveen Kumar, R. M.; Revanasiddappa, Hosakere D.

    2013-04-01

    Four novel mononuclear Pd(II) complexes have been synthesized with the biologically active Schiff base ligands (L1-L4) derived from 3-amino-2-methyl-4(3H)-quinazolinone. The structure of the complexes has been proposed by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR, 1H NMR, mass, UV-Vis spectrometric and thermal studies. The investigation of interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been performed with absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The nuclease activity was done using pUC19 supercoiled DNA by gel-electrophoresis. All the ligands and their Pd(II) complexes have also been screened for their antibacterial activity by discolor diffusion technique.

  15. Auto-assembly of nanometer thick, water soluble layers of plasmid DNA complexed with diamines and basic amino acids on graphite: Greatest DNA protection is obtained with arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, T T; Boulanouar, O; Heintz, O; Fromm, M

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the ability of diamines as well as basic amino acids to condense DNA onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite with minimum damage after re-dissolution in water. Based on a bibliographic survey we briefly summarize DNA binding properties with diamines as compared to basic amino acids. Thus, solutions of DNA complexed with these linkers were drop-cast in order to deposit ultra-thin layers on the surface of HOPG in the absence or presence of Tris buffer. Atomic Force Microscopy analyses showed that, at a fixed ligand-DNA mixing ratio of 16, the mean thickness of the layers can be statistically predicted to lie in the range 0-50nm with a maximum standard deviation ±6nm, using a simple linear law depending on the DNA concentration. The morphology of the layers appears to be ligand-dependent. While the layers containing diamines present holes, those formed in the presence of basic amino acids, except for lysine, are much more compact and dense. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements provide compositional information indicating that, compared to the maximum number of DNA sites to which the ligands may bind, the basic amino acids Arg and His are present in large excess. Conservation of the supercoiled topology of the DNA plasmids was studied after recovery of the complex layers in water. Remarkably, arginine has the best protection capabilities whether Tris was present or not in the initial solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Integration host factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, mIHF, compacts DNA by a bending mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpit Mishra

    Full Text Available The bacterial chromosomal DNA is folded into a compact structure called as 'nucleoid' so that the bacterial genome can be accommodated inside the cell. The shape and size of the nucleoid are determined by several factors including DNA supercoiling, macromolecular crowding and nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs. NAPs bind to different sites of the genome in sequence specific or non-sequence specific manner and play an important role in DNA compaction as well as regulation. Until recently, few NAPs have been discovered in mycobacteria owing to poor sequence similarities with other histone-like proteins of eubacteria. Several putative NAPs have now been identified in Mycobacteria on the basis of enriched basic residues or histone-like "PAKK" motifs. Here, we investigate mycobacterial Integration Host Factor (mIHF for its architectural roles as a NAP using atomic force microscopy and DNA compaction experiments. We demonstrate that mIHF binds DNA in a non-sequence specific manner and compacts it by a DNA bending mechanism. AFM experiments also indicate a dual architectural role for mIHF in DNA compaction as well as relaxation. These results suggest a convergent evolution in the mechanism of E. coli and mycobacterial IHF in DNA compaction.

  17. Anthocyanin Interactions with DNA: Intercalation, Topoisomerase I Inhibition and Oxidative Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Michael R; Min, Kyungmi; Ebeler, Susan E

    2008-09-23

    Anthocyanins and their aglycone anthocyanidins are pigmented flavonoids found in significant amounts in many commonly consumed foods. They exhibit a complex chemistry in aqueous solution, which makes it difficult to study their chemistry under physiological conditions. Here we used a gel electrophoresis assay employing supercoiled DNA plasmid to examine the ability of these compounds (1) to intercalate DNA, (2) to inhibit human topoisomerase I through both inhibition of plasmid relaxation activity (catalytic inhibition) and stabilization of the cleavable DNA-topoisomerase complex (poisoning), and (3) to inhibit or enhance oxidative single-strand DNA nicking. We found no evidence of DNA intercalation by anthocyan(id)ins in the physiological pH range for any of the compounds used in this study-cyanidin chloride, cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, cyanidin 3,5-O-diglucoside, malvidin 3-O-glucoside and luteolinidin chloride. The anthocyanins inhibited topoisomerase relaxation activity only at high concentrations (> 50 muM) and we could find no evidence of topoisomerase I cleavable complex stabilization by these compounds. However, we observed that all of the anthocyan(id)ins used in this study were capable of inducing significant oxidative DNA strand cleavage (nicking) in the presence of 1 mM DTT (dithiothreitol), while the free radical scavenger, DMSO, at concentrations typically used in similar studies, completely inhibited DNA nicking. Finally, we propose a mechanism to explain the anthocyan(id)in induced oxidative DNA cleavage observed under our experimental conditions.

  18. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  19. Susceptibilities to DNA Structural Transitions within Eukaryotic Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhabinskaya, Dina; Benham, Craig; Madden, Sally

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the competitive transitions to alternate secondary DNA structures in a negatively supercoiled DNA molecule of kilobase length and specified base sequence. We use statistical mechanics to calculate the competition among all regions within the sequence that are susceptible to transitions to alternate structures. We use an approximate numerical method since the calculation of an exact partition function is numerically cumbersome for DNA molecules of lengths longer than hundreds of base pairs. This method yields accurate results in reasonable computational times. We implement algorithms that calculate the competition between transitions to denatured states and to Z-form DNA. We analyze these transitions near the transcription start sites (TSS) of a set of eukaryotic genes. We find an enhancement of Z-forming regions upstream of the TSS and a depletion of denatured regions around the start sites. We confirm that these finding are statistically significant by comparing our results to a set of randomized genes with preserved base composition at each position relative to the gene start sites. When we study the correlation of these transitions in orthologous mouse and human genes we find a clear evolutionary conservation of both types of transitions around the TSS.

  20. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep׳ proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Andrew K

    2015-07-01

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep׳, in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replication) and generates the single-stranded circular (ssc) genome from the displaced DNA strand. In the process, a minus-genome primer (MGP) necessary for complementary-strand synthesis, from ssc to ccc, is synthesized. Rep׳ cleaves the growing nascent-strand to regenerate the parent ccc molecule. In the process, a Rep׳-DNA hybrid containing the right palindromic sequence (at the origin of DNA replication) is generated. Analysis of the virus particle showed that it is composed of four components: ssc, MGP, capsid protein and a novel Rep-related protein (designated Protein-3).

  1. The action of the bacterial toxin microcin B17. Insight into the cleavage-religation reaction of DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrat, Olivier A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2003-09-12

    We have examined the effects of the bacterial toxin microcin B17 (MccB17) on the reactions of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase. MccB17 slows down but does not completely inhibit the DNA supercoiling and relaxation reactions of gyrase. A kinetic analysis of the cleavage-religation equilibrium of gyrase was performed to determine the effect of the toxin on the forward (cleavage) and reverse (religation) reactions. A simple mechanism of two consecutive reversible reactions with a nicked DNA intermediate was used to simulate the kinetics of cleavage and religation. The action of MccB17 on the kinetics of cleavage and religation was compared with that of the quinolones ciprofloxacin and oxolinic acid. With relaxed DNA as substrate, only a small amount of gyrase cleavage complex is observed with MccB17 in the absence of ATP, whereas the presence of the nucleotide significantly enhances the effect of the toxin on both the cleavage and religation reactions. In contrast, ciprofloxacin, oxolinic acid, and Ca2+ show lesser dependence on ATP to stabilize the cleavage complex. MccB17 enhances the overall rate of DNA cleavage by increasing the forward rate constant (k2) of the second equilibrium. In contrast, ciprofloxacin increases the amount of cleaved DNA by a combined effect on the forward and reverse rate constants of both equilibria. Based on these results and on the observations that MccB17 only slowly inhibits the supercoiling and relaxation reactions, we suggest a model of the interaction of MccB17 with gyrase.

  2. A Histone-Like Protein Induces Plasmid DNA to Form Liquid Crystals in Vitro and Gene Compaction in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid crystalline state is a universal phenomenon involving the formation of an ordered structure via a self-assembly process that has attracted attention from numerous scientists. In this study, the dinoflagellate histone-like protein HCcp3 is shown to induce super-coiled pUC18 plasmid DNA to enter a liquid crystalline state in vitro, and the role of HCcp3 in gene condensation in vivo is also presented. The plasmid DNA (pDNA-HCcp3 complex formed birefringent spherical particles with a semi-crystalline selected area electronic diffraction (SAED pattern. Circular dichroism (CD titrations of pDNA and HCcp3 were performed. Without HCcp3, pUC18 showed the characteristic B conformation. As the HCcp3 concentration increased, the 273 nm band sharply shifted to 282 nm. When the HCcp3 concentration became high, the base pair (bp/dimer ratio fell below 42/1, and the CD spectra of the pDNA-HCcp3 complexes became similar to that of dehydrated A-form DNA. Microscopy results showed that HCcp3 compacted the super-coiled gene into a condensed state and that inclusion bodies were formed. Our results indicated that HCcp3 has significant roles in gene condensation both in vitro and in histone-less eukaryotes in vivo. The present study indicates that HCcp3 has great potential for applications in non-viral gene delivery systems, where HCcp3 may compact genetic material to form liquid crystals.

  3. Mu-like prophage strong gyrase site sequences: analysis of properties required for promoting efficient mu DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oram, Mark; Pato, Martin L

    2004-07-01

    The bacteriophage Mu genome contains a centrally located strong gyrase site (SGS) that is required for efficient prophage replication. To aid in studying the unusual properties of the SGS, we sought other gyrase sites that might be able to substitute for the SGS in Mu replication. Five candidate sites were obtained by PCR from Mu-like prophage sequences present in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18, and two strains of Neisseria meningitidis. Each of the sites was used to replace the natural Mu SGS to form recombinant prophages, and the effects on Mu replication and host lysis were determined. The site from the E. coli prophage supported markedly enhanced replication and host lysis over that observed with a Mu derivative lacking the SGS, those from the N. meningitidis prophages allowed a small enhancement, and the sites from the Haemophilus and Salmonella prophages gave none. Each of the candidate sites was cleaved specifically by E. coli DNA gyrase both in vitro and in vivo. Supercoiling assays performed in vitro, with the five sites or the Mu SGS individually cloned into a pUC19 reporter plasmid, showed that the Mu SGS and the E. coli or N. meningitidis sequences allowed an enhancement of processive, gyrase-dependent supercoiling, whereas the H. influenzae or Salmonella serovar Typhi sequences did not. While consistent with a requirement for enhanced processivity of supercoiling for a site to function in Mu replication, these data suggest that other factors are also important. The relevance of these observations to an understanding of the function of the SGS is discussed. Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

  4. Cruciform structures are a common DNA feature important for regulating biological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrowsmith Cheryl

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DNA cruciforms play an important role in the regulation of natural processes involving DNA. These structures are formed by inverted repeats, and their stability is enhanced by DNA supercoiling. Cruciform structures are fundamentally important for a wide range of biological processes, including replication, regulation of gene expression, nucleosome structure and recombination. They also have been implicated in the evolution and development of diseases including cancer, Werner's syndrome and others. Cruciform structures are targets for many architectural and regulatory proteins, such as histones H1 and H5, topoisomerase IIβ, HMG proteins, HU, p53, the proto-oncogene protein DEK and others. A number of DNA-binding proteins, such as the HMGB-box family members, Rad54, BRCA1 protein, as well as PARP-1 polymerase, possess weak sequence specific DNA binding yet bind preferentially to cruciform structures. Some of these proteins are, in fact, capable of inducing the formation of cruciform structures upon DNA binding. In this article, we review the protein families that are involved in interacting with and regulating cruciform structures, including (a the junction-resolving enzymes, (b DNA repair proteins and transcription factors, (c proteins involved in replication and (d chromatin-associated proteins. The prevalence of cruciform structures and their roles in protein interactions, epigenetic regulation and the maintenance of cell homeostasis are also discussed.

  5. Direct observation of strand passage by DNA-topoisomerase and its limited processivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Yogo

    Full Text Available Type-II DNA topoisomerases resolve DNA entanglements such as supercoils, knots and catenanes by passing one segment of DNA duplex through a transient enzyme-bridged double-stranded break in another segment. The ATP-dependent passage reaction has previously been demonstrated at the single-molecule level, showing apparent processivity at saturating ATP. Here we directly observed the strand passage by human topoisomerase IIα, after winding a pair of fluorescently stained DNA molecules with optical tweezers for 30 turns into an X-shaped braid. On average 0.51 ± 0.33 µm (11 ± 6 turns of a braid was unlinked in a burst of reactions taking 8 ± 4 s, the unlinked length being essentially independent of the enzyme concentration between 0.25-37 pM. The time elapsed before the start of processive unlinking decreased with the enzyme concentration, being ~100 s at 3.7 pM. These results are consistent with a scenario where the enzyme binds to one DNA for a period of ~10 s, waiting for multiple diffusional encounters with the other DNA to transport it across the break ~10 times, and then dissociates from the binding site without waiting for the exhaustion of transportable DNA segments.

  6. Chemical shifts assignments of the archaeal MC1 protein and a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA duplex in complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Karine; Landon, Céline; Paquet, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55 in laboratory growth conditions and is structurally unrelated to other DNA-binding proteins. MC1 functions are to shape and to protect DNA against thermal denaturation by binding to it. Therefore, MC1 has a strong affinity for any double-stranded DNA. However, it recognizes and preferentially binds to bent DNA, such as four-way junctions and negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles. Combining NMR data, electron microscopy data, biochemistry, molecular modelisation and docking approaches, we proposed recently a new type of DNA/protein complex, in which the monomeric protein MC1 binds on the concave side of a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA. We present here the NMR chemical shifts assignments of each partner in the complex, (1)H (15)N MC1 protein and (1)H (13)C (15)N bent duplex DNA, as first step towards the first experimental 3D structure of this new type of DNA/protein complex.

  7. Protection of DNA strand breakage by radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Shim, Hae Won

    1997-12-01

    Human ceruloplasmin, the plasma copper containing protein, is thought to play an essential role in iron metabolism, but it also has antioxidant properties. Ceruloplasmin directly scavenged hydroxyl radicals (.OH) generated in dithiothreitol/FeCl{sub 3} system besides inhibitory function of hydroxyl radical formation and lipid peroxidation. Polyamines, spermidine and spermine, significantly protected the supercoiled DNA strand breakage by hydroxyl radicals and DNA strand breakage by UV was highly protected by all four polyamines used in this study. In polyamine deficient mutant KL527. It was shown that cell survivability following UV irradiation was slightly increased by exogenous polyamines putrescine and spermidine supplement. However the cell survivability of wild type (MG 1655) was not influenced by polyamine supplement. In {gamma}-irradiated cells, cell survivability of polyamine-deficient mutant strain KL527 was significantly increased by exogenous putrescine supplement and that of wild type strain MG1655 was similar irrespective of polyamine supplement. These results implicate the possibility that polyamines play a potent role in radioprotection of cell and DNA level. (author). 32 refs., 8 figs

  8. Cytotoxic and DNA-topoisomerase effects of lapachol amine derivatives and interactions with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Esteves-Souza

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic activity of amino (3a-e, aza-1-antraquinone (4a-e lapachol derivatives against Ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells was investigated. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay, after 48 (Ehrlich or 96 h (K562 of culture, and vincristine (for K562 leukemia and quercetin (for Ehrlich carcinoma were used as positive controls. The results showed dose-dependent growth-inhibiting activities and that the amino derivatives were active against the assayed cells, whereas the 4a-e derivatives were not. The allylamine derivative 3a was the most active against Ehrlich carcinoma, with IC50 = 16.94 ± 1.25 µM, and against K562 leukemia, with IC50 = 14.11 ± 1.39 µM. The analogous lawsone derivative, 5a, was also active against Ehrlich carcinoma (IC50 = 23.89 ± 2.3 µM, although the 5d and 5e derivatives showed lower activity. The interaction between 3a-d and calf thymus DNA was investigated by fluorimetric titration and the results showed a hyperchromic effect indicating binding to DNA as presented of ethidium bromide, used as positive control. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase II-a was also evaluated by a relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid, and the etoposide (200 µM was used as positive control. Significant inhibitory activities were observed for 3a-d at 200 µM and a partial inhibitory action was observed for lapachol and methoxylapachol.

  9. Single -and double-strand breaks induced in plasmid DNA irradiated by ultra -soft X-ray; Cassures simple- et double-brin induites par X ultra-mous dans l`ADN plasmidique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayard, B.; Touati, A.; Abel, F.; Champion, C.; Chetoui, A. [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France)]|[Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France); Sage, E. [Institut Curie, UMR 218 CNRS, 75 - Paris (France). Section de Recherche

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the molecular consequences of a carbon K photo-ionization located on DNA, dry pBS plasmid samples were irradiated with ultra-soft X-rays at energies below and above the carbon K-threshold (E{sub k}=278 eV). Single- and double-strand breaks (ssb and dsb) were quantified after resolution of the three plasmid forms (supercoiled, relaxed circular, linear) by gel electrophoresis. A factor of 1.2 was found between the doses required at 250 eV and 380 eV to induce the same number of dsb per plasmid. (authors) 6 refs.

  10. Self-entanglement of long linear DNA vectors using transient non-B-DNA attachment points: a new concept for improvement of non-viral therapeutic gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2012-05-01

    The cell-specific and long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes often requires a full array of native gene control elements including distal enhancers, regulatory introns and chromatin organisation sequences. The delivery of such extended gene expression modules to human cells can be accomplished with non-viral high-molecular-weight DNA vectors, in particular with several classes of linear DNA vectors. All high-molecular-weight DNA vectors are susceptible to damage by shear stress, and while for some of the vectors the harmful impact of shear stress can be minimised through the transformation of the vectors to compact topological configurations by supercoiling and/or knotting, linear DNA vectors with terminal loops or covalently attached terminal proteins cannot be self-compacted in this way. In this case, the only available self-compacting option is self-entangling, which can be defined as the folding of single DNA molecules into a configuration with mutual restriction of molecular motion by the individual segments of bent DNA. A negatively charged phosphate backbone makes DNA self-repulsive, so it is reasonable to assume that a certain number of 'sticky points' dispersed within DNA could facilitate the entangling by bringing DNA segments into proximity and by interfering with the DNA slipping away from the entanglement. I propose that the spontaneous entanglement of vector DNA can be enhanced by the interlacing of the DNA with sites capable of mutual transient attachment through the formation of non-B-DNA forms, such as interacting cruciform structures, inter-segment triplexes, slipped-strand DNA, left-handed duplexes (Z-forms) or G-quadruplexes. It is expected that the non-B-DNA based entanglement of the linear DNA vectors would consist of the initial transient and co-operative non-B-DNA mediated binding events followed by tight self-ensnarement of the vector DNA. Once in the nucleoplasm of the target human cells, the DNA can be disentangled by type II

  11. Statistical mechanics of topologically constrained DNA and nucleoprotein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovan, Stefan Michael

    A complex connection exists between the 3 dimensional topological state of DNA in living organisms and biological processes including gene expression, DNA replication, recombination and repair. A significant limitation in developing a detailed, quantitative understanding of this connection is due to a lack of rigorous methods to calculate statistical mechanical properties of DNA molecules with complex topologies, including supercoiling, looping and knotting. This dissertation's main focus is on developing such methods and applying them to realistic DNA and nucleoprotein models. In chapter 2, a method is presented to calculate free energies and J factors of protein mediated DNA loops by normal mode analysis (NMA). This method is similar to calculations performed previously but with several significant advances. We apply the method to the specific case of DNA looping mediated by Cre recombinase protein. J factors calculated by our method are compared to experimental measurements to extract geometric and elastic properties of the Cre-DNA synaptic complex. In particular, the results suggest the existence of a synaptic complex that is more flexible than previously expected and may be explained by a stable intermediate in the reaction pathway that deviates significantly from the planar crystal structure. Calculating free energies of DNA looping is difficult in general, especially when considering intermediate length scales such as plasmid sized DNA which may readily adopt multiple topological states. In chapter 3, a novel method is presented to obtain free energies of semiflexible biopolymers with fixed topologies and arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. High accuracy is demonstrated by calculating free energies of specific DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex

  12. Synthesis, DNA-binding and photocleavage studies of ruthenium(Ⅱ) complexes [Ru(btz)3]2+ and [Ru(btz)(dppz)2]2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Two new ruthenium(Ⅱ) complexes, [Ru(btz)3](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(btz)(dppz)2](ClO4)2 (2) (btz = 4,4′-bithi-azole, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, 1H NMR, ES-MS and X-ray crystallography. The DNA binding behaviors of two complexes have been studied by spectroscopic and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that complex 1 binds to CT-DNA via an electrostatic mode, while complex 2 via an intercalative mode. Under irradiation at 365 nm, both complexes were found to promote the cleavage of plasmid pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form Ⅰ to nicked form Ⅱ. The mechanism studies reveal that singlet oxygen 1O2 and hydroxyl radical (OH-) play a significant role in the photocleavage process.

  13. DNA's Liaison with RNA Polymerase Physical Consequences of a Twisted Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulic, Igor; Nelson, Phil

    2006-03-01

    RNA polymerase is the molecular motor that performs the fundamental process of transcription. Besides being the key- protagonist of gene regulation it is one of the most powerful nano-mechanical force generators known inside the cell. The fact that polymerase strictly tracks only one of DNA's strands together with DNA's helical geometry induces a force-to-torque transmission, with several important biological consequences like the ``twin supercoil domain'' effect and remote torsional interaction of genes. In the first part of the talk we theoretically explore the mechanisms of non-equilibrium transport of twist generated by a moving polymerase. We show that these equations are intrinsically non-linear in the crowded cellular environment and lead to peculiar effects like self-confinement of torsional strain by generation of alternative DNA structures like cruciforms. We demonstrate how the asymmetric conformational properties of DNA lead to a ``torsional diode'' effect, i.e. a rectification of polymerase-generated twist currents of different signs. In the second part we explore the possibility of exploiting the polymerase as a powerful workhorse for nanomechanical devices. We propose simple and easy to assemble arrangements of DNA templates interconnected by strand-hybridization that when transcribed by the polymerase linearly contract by tenfold. We show that the typical forces generated by such ``DNA stress fibers'' are in the piconewton range. We discuss their kinetics of contraction and relaxation and draw parallels to natural muscle fiber design.

  14. Design of Novel Relaxase Substrates Based on Rolling Circle Replicases for Bioconjugation to DNA Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagredo, Sandra; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    During bacterial conjugation and rolling circle replication, HUH endonucleases, respectively known as relaxases and replicases, form a covalent bond with ssDNA when they cleave their target sequence (nic site). Both protein families show structural similarity but limited amino acid identity. Moreover, the organization of the inverted repeat (IR) and the loop that shape the nic site differs in both proteins. Arguably, replicases cleave their target site more efficiently, while relaxases exert more biochemical control over the process. Here we show that engineering a relaxase target by mimicking the replicase target, results in enhanced formation of protein-DNA covalent complexes. Three widely different relaxases, which belong to MOBF, MOBQ and MOBP families, can properly cleave DNA sequences with permuted target sequences. Collaterally, the secondary structure that the permuted targets acquired within a supercoiled plasmid DNA resulted in poor conjugation frequencies underlying the importance of relaxase accessory proteins in conjugative DNA processing. Our results reveal that relaxase and replicase targets can be interchangeable in vitro. The new Rep substrates provide new bioconjugation tools for the design of sophisticated DNA-protein nanostructures. PMID:27027740

  15. The antibiotic microcin B17 is a DNA gyrase poison: characterisation of the mode of inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddle, J G; Blance, S J; Zamble, D B; Hollfelder, F; Miller, D A; Wentzell, L M; Walsh, C T; Maxwell, A

    2001-04-13

    Microcin B17 is a 3.1-kDa bactericidal peptide; the putative target of this antibiotic is DNA gyrase. Microcin B17 has no detectable effect on gyrase-catalysed DNA supercoiling or relaxation activities in vitro and is unable to stabilise DNA cleavage in the absence of nucleotides. However, in the presence of ATP, or the non-hydrolysable analogue 5'-adenylyl beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate, microcin B17 stabilises a gyrase-dependent DNA cleavage complex in a manner reminiscent of quinolones, Ca(2+), or the bacterial toxin CcdB. The pattern of DNA cleavage produced by gyrase in the presence of microcin B17 is different from that produced by quinolones and more closely resembles Ca(2+)-mediated cleavage. Several gyrase mutants, including well-known quinolone-resistant mutants, are cross resistant to microcin-induced DNA cleavage. We suggest that microcin exerts its effects through a mechanism that has similarities to those of both the bacterial toxin CcdB and the quinolone antibacterial agents.

  16. Atomic force microscopic study on topological structures of pBR322 DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张平城; 白春礼; 成英俊; 方晔; 王中怀; 黄熙泰

    1996-01-01

    Plasmid pBR322 DNA (0.5mg/mL) isolated from Escherichia coli HB101 was suspended in Tris-HCl-EDTA (1 mol/L - 0.1 mol/L, pH8.5); then a drop of the above solution was deposited on freshly cleaved mica substrate. After adsorption for about 1 min, the sample was stained with phosphotungstic acid. The residua] solution was removed with a piece of filter paper. Afterwards the sample was imaged with a home-made atomic force microscope (AFM) in air. The AFM images of pBR322 DNA with a molecular resolution have been obtained. These images show that pBR322 DNA exists in several different topological structures: (i) relaxed circular DNA with a different diameter; (ii) supercondensed DNA with different particle sizes; (iii) dimeric catenane connected by one relaxed circular molecule and another dose-compacted molecule which might be either supercoiled or intramolecular knotted form; (iv) oligomeric catenane with multiple irregular molecules in which DNA is interlocked into a complex oligomer; (v) possibly-existing

  17. Ternary complexes of cobalt cysteinylglycine with histidylserine and histidylphenylalanine-stabilities and DNA cleavage properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pulimamidi R Reddy; Pallerla Manjula

    2007-11-01

    Interaction of cobalt cysteinylglycine with histidylserine and histidylphenylalanine was investigated in a 1 : 1 : 1 ratio at 35°C and 0.10 mol dm-3 ionic strength. Their stabilities and geometries were determined. Their DNA binding and cleavage properties were investigated. The intrinsic binding constants () for DNA bound 1 and 2 (3.03 × 103 M-1 for 1 and 3.87 × 103 M-1 for 2) were determined. Even though the negative charge on the complexes reduced their affinity for DNA, there was an enhancement of binding through specificity. The degradation of plasmid DNA was achieved by cobalt dipeptide complexes [CoII(CysGly)(HisSer)] (1) and [CoII(CysGly)(HisPhe)] (2). Cleavage experiments revealed that 1 and 2 cleave supercoiled DNA (form I) to nicked circular (form II) through hydrolytic pathway at physiological H. The DNA hydrolytic cleavage rate constants for complexes 1 and 2 were determined to be 0.62 h-1, for 1 and 0.38 h-1 for 2 respectively.

  18. Gyramides prevent bacterial growth by inhibiting DNA gyrase and altering chromosome topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendram, Manohary; Hurley, Katherine A; Foss, Marie H; Thornton, Kelsey M; Moore, Jared T; Shaw, Jared T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-06-20

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division.

  19. Design of Novel Relaxase Substrates Based on Rolling Circle Replicases for Bioconjugation to DNA Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagredo, Sandra; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    During bacterial conjugation and rolling circle replication, HUH endonucleases, respectively known as relaxases and replicases, form a covalent bond with ssDNA when they cleave their target sequence (nic site). Both protein families show structural similarity but limited amino acid identity. Moreover, the organization of the inverted repeat (IR) and the loop that shape the nic site differs in both proteins. Arguably, replicases cleave their target site more efficiently, while relaxases exert more biochemical control over the process. Here we show that engineering a relaxase target by mimicking the replicase target, results in enhanced formation of protein-DNA covalent complexes. Three widely different relaxases, which belong to MOBF, MOBQ and MOBP families, can properly cleave DNA sequences with permuted target sequences. Collaterally, the secondary structure that the permuted targets acquired within a supercoiled plasmid DNA resulted in poor conjugation frequencies underlying the importance of relaxase accessory proteins in conjugative DNA processing. Our results reveal that relaxase and replicase targets can be interchangeable in vitro. The new Rep substrates provide new bioconjugation tools for the design of sophisticated DNA-protein nanostructures.

  20. Synthesis, structure, DNA binding and cleavage activity of a new copper(Ⅱ) complex of bispyridylpyrrolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Rui; HU Xiao-hui; YI Xiao-yi; ZHANG Shou-chun

    2015-01-01

    A copper-bispyridylpyrrolide complex [Cu(PDPH)Cl] (PDPH = 2,5-bis(2′-pyridyl)pyrrole) was synthesized and characterized. The complex crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with space groupPccn,a = 0.9016(3) nm,b = 1.0931(4) nm,c = 2.5319(8) nm, andV = 2.4951(15) nm3. The copper center is situated in a square planar geometry. The interaction of the copper(Ⅱ) complexwith calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by electronic absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectra. It is proposed that the complex binds to CT-DNA through groove binding mode. Nuclease activity of the complex was also studied by gel electrophoresis method. The complex can efficiently cleave supercoiled pBR322 DNA in the presence of ascorbate (H2A) via oxidative pathway. The preliminary mechanism of DNA cleavage by the complex with different inhibiting reagents indicates that the hydroxyl radicals were involved as the active species in the DNA cleavage process.

  1. DNA mechanics as a tool to probe helicase and translocase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionnet, Timothée; Dawid, Alexandre; Bigot, Sarah; Barre, François-Xavier; Saleh, Omar A; Heslot, François; Allemand, Jean-François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Helicases and translocases are proteins that use the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to move along or pump nucleic acid substrates. Single molecule manipulation has proved to be a powerful tool to investigate the mechanochemistry of these motors. Here we first describe the basic mechanical properties of DNA unraveled by single molecule manipulation techniques. Then we demonstrate how the knowledge of these properties has been used to design single molecule assays to address the enzymatic mechanisms of different translocases. We report on four single molecule manipulation systems addressing the mechanism of different helicases using specifically designed DNA substrates: UvrD enzyme activity detection on a stretched nicked DNA molecule, HCV NS3 helicase unwinding of a RNA hairpin under tension, the observation of RecBCD helicase/nuclease forward and backward motion, and T7 gp4 helicase mediated opening of a synthetic DNA replication fork. We then discuss experiments on two dsDNA translocases: the RuvAB motor studied on its natural substrate, the Holliday junction, and the chromosome-segregation motor FtsK, showing its unusual coupling to DNA supercoiling.

  2. Torsional stress in DNA limits collaboration among reverse gyrase molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Taisaku; Sutoh, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Reverse gyrase is an enzyme that can overwind (introduce positive supercoils into) DNA using the energy obtained from ATP hydrolysis. The enzyme is found in hyperthermophiles, and the overwinding reaction generally requires a temperature above 70 °C. In a previous study using microscopy, we have shown that 30 consecutive mismatched base pairs (a bubble) in DNA serve as a well-defined substrate site for reverse gyrase, warranting the processive overwinding activity down to 50 °C. Here, we inquire how multiple reverse gyrase molecules may collaborate with each other in overwinding one DNA molecule. We introduced one, two, or four bubbles in a linear DNA that tethered a magnetic bead to a coverslip surface. At 40-71 °C in the presence of reverse gyrase, the bead rotated clockwise as viewed from above, to relax the DNA twisted by reverse gyrase. Dependence on the enzyme concentration indicated that each bubble binds reverse gyrase tightly (dissociation constant 5 min. Rotation with two bubbles was significantly faster compared with one bubble, indicating that overwinding actions are basically additive, but four bubbles did not show further acceleration except at 40 °C where the activity was very low. The apparent saturation is due to the hydrodynamic friction against the rotating bead, as confirmed by increasing the medium viscosity. When torsional stress in the DNA, determined by the friction, approaches ~ 7 pN·nm (at 71 °C), the overwinding activity of reverse gyrase drops sharply. Multiple molecules of reverse gyrase collaborate additively within this limit.

  3. IgGs containing light chains of the lambda and kappa type and of all subclasses (IgG1-IgG4) from sera of patients with multiple sclerosis hydrolyze DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhomenko, Taisiya A; Legostaeva, Galina A; Doronin, Boris M; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2010-01-01

    We present the first evidence demonstrating that small fractions of IgGs of all four subclasses (IgG1-IgG4) are catalytically active in the hydrolysis of DNA and on average their relative activity (nM supercoiled DNA/1mg IgG/1 h) increases in the order: IgG1 (0.58) light chains of the lambda-type are severalfold more active in the hydrolysis of DNA than IgGs with light chains of the kappa-type. Using different physicochemical methods of antibody analysis we have shown that the immune system of multiple sclerosis patients generates a variety of anti-DNA abzymes of different type and with different catalytic properties, which can play an important role in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis.

  4. Revolution rather than rotation of AAA+ hexameric phi29 nanomotor for viral dsDNA packaging without coiling☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Chad; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Zhang, Hui; Fang, Huaming; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-01-01

    It has long been believed that the DNA-packaging motor of dsDNA viruses utilizes a rotation mechanism. Here we report a revolution rather than rotation mechanism for the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor. The phi29 motor contains six copies of the ATPase (Schwartz et al., this issue); ATP binding to one ATPase subunit stimulates the ATPase to adopt a conformation with a high affinity for dsDNA. ATP hydrolysis induces a new conformation with a lower affinity, thus transferring the dsDNA to an adjacent subunit by a power stroke. DNA revolves unidirectionally along the hexameric channel wall of the ATPase, but neither the dsDNA nor the ATPase itself rotates along its own axis. One ATP is hydrolyzed in each transitional step, and six ATPs are consumed for one helical turn of 360°. Transition of the same dsDNA chain along the channel wall, but at a location 60° different from the last contact, urges dsDNA to move forward 1.75 base pairs each step (10.5 bp per turn/6ATP=1.75 bp per ATP). Each connector subunit tilts with a left-handed orientation at a 30° angle in relation to its vertical axis that runs anti-parallel to the right-handed dsDNA helix, facilitating the one-way traffic of dsDNA. The connector channel has been shown to cause four steps of transition due to four positively charged lysine rings that make direct contact with the negatively charged DNA phosphate backbone. Translocation of dsDNA into the procapsid by revolution avoids the difficulties during rotation that are associated with DNA supercoiling. Since the revolution mechanism can apply to any stoichiometry, this motor mechanism might reconcile the stoichiometry discrepancy in many phage systems where the ATPase has been found as a tetramer, hexamer, or nonamer. PMID:23763768

  5. Long-range correlations in the mechanics of small DNA circles under topological stress revealed by multi-scale simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthibutpong, Thana; Matek, Christian; Benham, Craig; Slade, Gabriel G; Noy, Agnes; Laughton, Charles; K Doye, Jonathan P; Louis, Ard A; Harris, Sarah A

    2016-11-02

    It is well established that gene regulation can be achieved through activator and repressor proteins that bind to DNA and switch particular genes on or off, and that complex metabolic networks determine the levels of transcription of a given gene at a given time. Using three complementary computational techniques to study the sequence-dependence of DNA denaturation within DNA minicircles, we have observed that whenever the ends of the DNA are constrained, information can be transferred over long distances directly by the transmission of mechanical stress through the DNA itself, without any requirement for external signalling factors. Our models combine atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) with coarse-grained simulations and statistical mechanical calculations to span three distinct spatial resolutions and timescale regimes. While they give a consensus view of the non-locality of sequence-dependent denaturation in highly bent and supercoiled DNA loops, each also reveals a unique aspect of long-range informational transfer that occurs as a result of restraining the DNA within the closed loop of the minicircles. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. The Inhibition Effect of Cell DNA Oxidative Damage and LDL Oxidation by Bovine Colostrums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the effect of bovine colostrums on inhibition of DNA oxidative damage and low density lipoprotein (LDL oxidation in vitro. Results showed that whey and skimmed milk exhibited not only higher inhibitory activities of oxidative damage of deoxyribose but also an inhibitory effect on the breakdown of supercoiled DNA into open circular DNA and linear DNA. The quantities of 8-OH-2′-dG formed under whey, caseins and skimmed milk treatment were 0.24, 0.24 and 1.24 μg/mL, respectively. The quantity of malondialdehyde formed through LDL oxidation induced by copprous ion was significantly decreased as colostrums protein solutions were added, in which whey and caseins led to a more significant decrease than skimmed milk. The formation of conjugated dienes could be inhibited by treatment with colostrums protein solutions. Whey exhibited the longest lag time of conjugated dienes formation among the colostrums proteins. The lag time of the whey was 2.33 times that of the control. From the results of foregoing, the bovine colostrums protein has potential value in the inhibition of DNA oxidation damage and LDL oxidation.

  7. In vitro characterization of DNA gyrase inhibition by microcin B17 analogs with altered bisheterocyclic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamble, D B; Miller, D A; Heddle, J G; Maxwell, A; Walsh, C T; Hollfelder, F

    2001-07-01

    Microcin B17 (MccB17) is a 3.1-kDa Escherichia coli antibiotic that contains thiazole and oxazole heterocycles in a peptide backbone. MccB17 inhibits its cellular target, DNA gyrase, by trapping the enzyme in a complex that is covalently bound to double-strand cleaved DNA, in a manner similar to the well-known quinolone drugs. The identification of gyrase as the target of MccB17 provides an opportunity to analyze the relationship between the structure of this unusual antibiotic and its activity. In this report, steady-state parameters are used to describe the induction of the cleavable complex by MccB17 analogs containing modified bisheterocyclic sites. The relative potency of these analogs corresponds to the capacity of the compounds to prevent growth of sensitive cells. In contrast to previously reported experiments, inhibition of DNA gyrase supercoiling activity by wild-type MccB17 also was observed. These results suggest that DNA gyrase is the main intracellular target of MccB17. This study probes the structure-function relationship of a new class of gyrase inhibitors and demonstrates that these techniques could be used to analyze compounds in the search for clinically useful antibiotics that block DNA gyrase.

  8. Crystal structure of the breakage-reunion domain of DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais Cabral, J H; Jackson, A P; Smith, C V; Shikotra, N; Maxwell, A; Liddington, R C

    1997-08-28

    DNA gyrase is a type II DNA topoisomerase from bacteria that introduces supercoils into DNA. It catalyses the breakage of a DNA duplex (the G segment), the passage of another segment (the T segment) through the break, and then the reunification of the break. This activity involves the opening and dosing of a series of molecular 'gates' which is coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Here we present the crystal structure of the 'breakage-reunion' domain of the gyrase at 2.8 A resolution. Comparison of the structure of this 59K (relative molecular mass, 59,000) domain with that of a 92K fragment of yeast topoisomerase II reveals a very different quaternary organization, and we propose that the two structures represent two principal conformations that participate in the enzymatic pathway. The gyrase structure reveals a new dimer contact with a grooved concave surface for binding the G segment and a cluster of conserved charged residues surrounding the active-site tyrosines. It also shows how breakage of the G segment can occur and, together with the topoisomerase II structure, suggests a pathway by which the T segment can be released through the second gate of the enzyme. Mutations that confer resistance to the quinolone antibacterial agents cluster at the new dimer interface, indicating how these drugs might interact with the gyrase-DNA complex.

  9. Evaluation of the Genotoxic Potential against H2O2-Radical-Mediated DNA Damage and Acute Oral Toxicity of Standardized Extract of Polyalthia longifolia Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanion L. Jothy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants have been used in medicoculturally diverse countries around the world, where it is a part of a time-honoured tradition that is respected even today. Polyalthia longifolia leaf extract has been previously reported as an efficient antioxidant in vitro. Hence, the genotoxic effects of P. longifolia leaf were investigated by using plasmid relation, comet, and Allium cepa assay. In the presence of  ∙OH radicals, the DNA in supercoil was start nicked into open circular form, which is the product of the single-stranded cleavage of supercoil DNA and quantified as fragmented separate bands on agarose gel in plasmid relation assay. In the plasmid relation and comet assay, the P. longifolia leaf extract exhibited strong inhibitory effects against H2O2-mediated DNA damage. A dose-dependent increase of chromosome aberrations was also observed in the Allium cepa assay. The abnormalities scored were stickiness, c-mitosis, bridges, and vagrant chromosomes. Micronucleated cells were also observed at the interphase. The results of Allium cepa assay confirmed that the methanol extracts of P. longifolia exerted no significant genotoxic or mitodepressive effects at 100 μg/mL. Thus, this study demonstrated that P. longifolia leaf extract has a beneficial effect against oxidative DNA damage. This experiment is the first report for the protective effect of P. longifolia on DNA damage-induced by hydroxyl radicals. Additionally in acute oral toxicity study, female rats were treated at 5000 mg/kg body weight of P. longifolia leaf extract and observed for signs of toxicity for 14 days. P. longifolia leaf extract did not produce any treatment-related toxic effects in rats.

  10. Evaluation of the Genotoxic Potential against H2O2-Radical-Mediated DNA Damage and Acute Oral Toxicity of Standardized Extract of Polyalthia longifolia Leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothy, Subramanion L.; Chen, Yeng; Kanwar, Jagat R.; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants have been used in medicoculturally diverse countries around the world, where it is a part of a time-honoured tradition that is respected even today. Polyalthia longifolia leaf extract has been previously reported as an efficient antioxidant in vitro. Hence, the genotoxic effects of P. longifolia leaf were investigated by using plasmid relation, comet, and Allium cepa assay. In the presence of  ∙OH radicals, the DNA in supercoil was start nicked into open circular form, which is the product of the single-stranded cleavage of supercoil DNA and quantified as fragmented separate bands on agarose gel in plasmid relation assay. In the plasmid relation and comet assay, the P. longifolia leaf extract exhibited strong inhibitory effects against H2O2-mediated DNA damage. A dose-dependent increase of chromosome aberrations was also observed in the Allium cepa assay. The abnormalities scored were stickiness, c-mitosis, bridges, and vagrant chromosomes. Micronucleated cells were also observed at the interphase. The results of Allium cepa assay confirmed that the methanol extracts of P. longifolia exerted no significant genotoxic or mitodepressive effects at 100 μg/mL. Thus, this study demonstrated that P. longifolia leaf extract has a beneficial effect against oxidative DNA damage. This experiment is the first report for the protective effect of P. longifolia on DNA damage-induced by hydroxyl radicals. Additionally in acute oral toxicity study, female rats were treated at 5000 mg/kg body weight of P. longifolia leaf extract and observed for signs of toxicity for 14 days. P. longifolia leaf extract did not produce any treatment-related toxic effects in rats. PMID:23878610

  11. Process considerations related to the microencapsulation of plasmid DNA via ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jenny; Wang, Huanting; Forde, Gareth M

    2008-09-01

    An effective means of facilitating DNA vaccine delivery to antigen presenting cells is through biodegradable microspheres. Microspheres offer distinct advantages over other delivery technologies by providing release of DNA vaccine in its bioactive form in a controlled fashion. In this study, biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing polyethylenimine (PEI) condensed plasmid DNA (pDNA) were prepared using a 40 kHz ultrasonic atomization system. Process synthesis parameters, which are important to the scale-up of microspheres that are suitable for nasal delivery (i.e., less than 20 microm), were studied. These parameters include polymer concentration; feed flowrate; volumetric ratio of polymer and pDNA-PEI (plasmid DNA-polyethylenimine) complexes; and nitrogen to phosphorous (N/P) ratio. PDNA encapsulation efficiencies were predominantly in the range 82-96%, and the mean sizes of the particle were between 6 and 15 microm. The ultrasonic synthesis method was shown to have excellent reproducibility. PEI affected morphology of the microspheres, as it induced the formation of porous particles that accelerate the release rate of pDNA. The PLGA microspheres displayed an in vitro release of pDNA of 95-99% within 30 days and demonstrated zero order release kinetics without an initial spike of pDNA. Agarose electrophoresis confirmed conservation of the supercoiled form of pDNA throughout the synthesis and in vitro release stages. It was concluded that ultrasonic atomization is an efficient technique to overcome the key obstacles in scaling-up the manufacture of encapsulated vaccine for clinical trials and ultimately, commercial applications.

  12. DNA Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  13. DNA Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Alokail, Majed S.; Alenad, Amal M.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication e...

  14. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  15. Evaluation of different buffers on plasmid DNA encapsulation into PLGA microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Man Tsuey; Blatchford, Chris; Oya Alpar, H

    2009-03-31

    Double emulsion solvent evaporation is a widely used method to prepare poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles encapsulating plasmid DNA. There are inherent problems associated with preparing plasmid DNA in this form, in particular the DNA is liable to degrade during manufacture and the resulting powder has low encapsulation efficiencies. This study compares the use of two buffers, 0.1M NaHCO(3) and 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) and the effect these have on the encapsulation efficiency and other critical parameters associated with these encapsulated DNA materials. Both buffers preserved the conformation of the original plasmid DNA during the homogenization process, but those made with 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) had higher encapsulation efficiencies, as well as smaller diameters, compared with those made with 0.1M NaHCO(3) (encapsulation efficiencies of 40.72-45.65%, and mean volume diameters of 2.96-4.45microm). Buffers with a range of pH from 5 to 12 were investigated, and it was demonstrated that pH 9 was the point at which the highest amount of supercoiled DNA was balanced with the highest encapsulation efficiency. To simulate in vitro release, it was shown that microparticles made with 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) had lower DNA release rates than those made with 0.1M NaHCO(3). These results demonstrate that the use of different buffers can aid in retaining the conformation of plasmid DNA, and can also modulate the amount of DNA encapsulated and the release profiles of microparticles.

  16. Effects of Tris and Hepes buffers on the interaction of palladium-diaminopropane complexes with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdi, Khalid; Vilaplana, Rosario A; Kamah, Sanae; González-Vílchez, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    The Pd(II) complexes, [PdCl(2)(1,2-pn)] and [PdCl(2)(1,3-pn)] (pn is diaminopropane), were synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectroscopic (FT-IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) techniques. UV difference spectral study performed on Pd-pn/DNA systems, indicate a pronounced interaction of palladium complexes with DNA in cell-free media; comparison of lambda(max), Abs(max) and %H values observed for the two compounds might be attributed to structural differences of the chelated ligand rings. Results obtained from electrophoretic analysis of Pd complexes in presence of pBR322 plasmid DNA show a clear decreasing of the supercoiled (SC) DNA form mobility, that could be attributed to unwinding of the double helix; a parallel increasing of the open-circular (OC) DNA form mobility is also noted, this fact implying that the binding of complexes either shortens or condenses the DNA helix. Interaction studies of Pd complexes with plasmid DNA in different buffer systems indicate that DNA binding efficiency capable of modifying the tertiary structure of pBR322 decreased from NaClO(4) to Hepes 2, Hepes 1 [Hepes=4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid], and Tris [(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane] buffers, in this order. Moreover, the level of DNA modifications produced by palladium complexes in 10 mM NaClO(4) remains unchanged after transferring the samples into the medium required for subsequent biophysical or biochemical analyses.

  17. Synthesis, DNA and Photocleavage Studies of Ru(ll) Polypyridyl Complexes: [Ru(dppz)(pyz)4](ClO4)2 and [Ru(dppz)(dmpyz)4](ClO4)2 Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pallavi, Ponuganti; Nagababu, Penumaka; Laxmareddy, Kotha; Padmaja, Naishadham; Satyanarayana, Sirasani

    2012-01-01

    In view of the growing interest for the synthesis of metal complexes and their interaction with DNA, we have synthesized and characterized two complexes containing ruthenium as metal center. The complexes are of the type [Ru(dppz)L4](C104)2 where L are biologically important ligands such as pyrazole and dimethylpyrazole. The characterization of these complexes is done by 1 H NMR, 13C NMR, elemental analysis and mass spectroscopy. The interaction of these complexes with CT DNA was monitored and binding constants were determined using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The mode of binding was found to be intercalative for both complexes and was determined using hydrodynamic viscosity studies. The complexes were further studied for photocleavage studies with supercoiled plasmid pBR322 DNA.

  18. Tuning the activity of Zn(II) complexes in DNA cleavage: clues for design of new efficient metallo-hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzicalupi, Carla; Bencini, Andrea; Bonaccini, Claudia; Giorgi, Claudia; Gratteri, Paola; Moro, Stefano; Palumbo, Manlio; Simionato, Alessandro; Sgrignani, Jacopo; Sissi, Claudia; Valtancoli, Barbara

    2008-06-16

    The hydrolytic ability toward plasmid DNA of a mononuclear and a binuclear Zn(II) complex with two macrocyclic ligands, containing respectively a phenanthroline (L1) and a dipyridine moiety (L2), was analyzed at different pH values and compared with their activity in bis( p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (BNPP) cleavage. Only the most nucleophilic species [ZnL1(OH)]+ and [Zn2L2(OH)2]2+, present in solution at alkaline pH values, are active in BNPP cleavage, and the dinuclear L2 complex is remarkably more active than the mononuclear L1 one. Circular dichroism and unwinding experiments show that both complexes interact with DNA in a nonintercalative mode. Experiments with supercoiled plasmid DNA show that both complexes can cleave DNA at neutral pH, where the L1 and L2 complexes display a similar reactivity. Conversely, the pH-dependence of their cleavage ability is remarkably different. The reactivity of the mononuclear complex, in fact, decreases with pH while that of the dinuclear one is enhanced at alkaline pH values. The efficiency of the two complexes in DNA cleavage at different pH values was elucidated by means of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study on the adducts between DNA and the different complexed species present in solution.

  19. Differential Salt-Induced Dissociation of the p53 Protein Complexes with Circular and Linear Plasmid DNA Substrates Suggest Involvement of a Sliding Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Šebest

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the effects of salt conditions on the association and dissociation of wild type p53 with different ~3 kbp long plasmid DNA substrates (supercoiled, relaxed circular and linear, containing or lacking a specific p53 binding site, p53CON using immunoprecipitation at magnetic beads is presented. Salt concentrations above 200 mM strongly affected association of the p53 protein to any plasmid DNA substrate. Strikingly different behavior was observed when dissociation of pre-formed p53-DNA complexes in increased salt concentrations was studied. While contribution from the p53CON to the stability of the p53-DNA complexes was detected between 100 and 170 mM KCl, p53 complexes with circular DNAs (but not linear exhibited considerable resistance towards salt treatment for KCl concentrations as high as 2 M provided that the p53 basic C-terminal DNA binding site (CTDBS was available for DNA binding. On the contrary, when the CTDBS was blocked by antibody used for immunoprecipitation, all p53-DNA complexes were completely dissociated from the p53 protein in KCl concentrations ≥200 mM under the same conditions. These observations suggest: (a different ways for association and dissociation of the p53-DNA complexes in the presence of the CTDBS; and (b a critical role for a sliding mechanism, mediated by the C-terminal domain, in the dissociation process.

  20. Cloning, characterization, and properties of seven triplet repeat DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, K; Kang, S; Larson, J E; Wells, R D

    1996-07-12

    Several neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases are caused by genetically unstable triplet repeat sequences (CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, or AAG.CTT) in or near the responsible genes. We implemented novel cloning strategies with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides to clone seven of the triplet repeat sequences (GTA.TAC, GAT.ATC, GTT.AAC, CAC.GTG, AGG.CCT, TCG.CGA, and AAG.CTT), and the adjoining paper (Ohshima, K., Kang, S., Larson, J. E., and Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16784-16791) describes studies on TTA.TAA. This approach in conjunction with in vivo expansion studies in Escherichia coli enabled the preparation of at least 81 plasmids containing the repeat sequences with lengths of approximately 16 up to 158 triplets in both orientations with varying extents of polymorphisms. The inserts were characterized by DNA sequencing as well as DNA polymerase pausings, two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, and chemical probe analyses to evaluate the capacity to adopt negative supercoil induced non-B DNA conformations. AAG.CTT and AGG.CCT form intramolecular triplexes, and the other five repeat sequences do not form any previously characterized non-B structures. However, long tracts of TCG.CGA showed strong inhibition of DNA synthesis at specific loci in the repeats as seen in the cases of CTG.CAG and CGG.CCG (Kang, S., Ohshima, K., Shimizu, M., Amirhaeri, S., and Wells, R. D.(1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 27014-27021). This work along with other studies (Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 2875-2878) on CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, and TTA.TAA makes available long inserts of all 10 triplet repeat sequences for a variety of physical, molecular biological, genetic, and medical investigations. A model to explain the reduction in mRNA abundance in Friedreich's ataxia based on intermolecular triplex formation is proposed.

  1. Effective DNA binding and cleaving tendencies of malonic acid coupled transition metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravin, Narayanaperumal; Utthra, Ponnukalai Ponya; Kumaravel, Ganesan; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-11-01

    Eight transition metal complexes were designed to achieve maximum biological efficacy. They were characterized by elemental analysis and various other spectroscopic techniques. The monomeric complexes were found to espouse octahedral geometry and non-electrolytic nature. The DNA interaction propensity of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), studied at physiological pH by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, cyclic voltammetry, and viscometric techniques revealed intercalation as the possible binding mode. Fascinatingly, the complexes were found to exhibit greater binding strength than that of the free ligands. A strong hypochromism and a slight red shift were exhibited by complex 5 among the other complexes. The intrinsic binding constant values of all the complexes compared to cisplatin reveal that they are excellent metallonucleases than that of cisplatin. The complexes were also shown to reveal displacement of the ethidium bromide, a strong intercalator using fluorescence titrations. Gel electrophoresis was used to divulge the competence of the complexes in cleaving the supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA. From the results, it is concluded that the complexes, especially 5, are excellent chemical nucleases in the presence of H2O2. Furthermore, the in vitro antimicrobial screening of the complexes exposes that these complexes are excellent antimicrobial agents. Overall the effect of coligands is evident from the results of all the investigations.

  2. New Alkaloid Antibiotics That Target the DNA Topoisomerase I of Streptococcus pneumoniae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María Teresa; Blázquez, María Amparo; Ferrándiz, María José; Sanz, María Jesús; Silva-Martín, Noella; Hermoso, Juan A.; de la Campa, Adela G.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae has two type II DNA-topoisomerases (DNA-gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV) and a single type I enzyme (DNA-topoisomerase I, TopA), as demonstrated here. Although fluoroquinolones target type II enzymes, antibiotics efficiently targeting TopA have not yet been reported. Eighteen alkaloids (seven aporphine and 11 phenanthrenes) were semisynthesized from boldine and used to test inhibition both of TopA activity and of cell growth. Two phenanthrenes (seconeolitsine and N-methyl-seconeolitsine) effectively inhibited both TopA activity and cell growth at equivalent concentrations (∼17 μm). Evidence for in vivo TopA targeting by seconeolitsine was provided by the protection of growth inhibition in a S. pneumoniae culture in which the enzyme was overproduced. Additionally, hypernegative supercoiling was observed in an internal plasmid after drug treatment. Furthermore, a model of pneumococcal TopA was made based on the crystal structure of Escherichia coli TopA. Docking calculations indicated strong interactions of the alkaloids with the nucleotide-binding site in the closed protein conformation, which correlated with their inhibitory effect. Finally, although seconeolitsine and N-methyl-seconeolitsine inhibited TopA and bacterial growth, they did not affect human cell viability. Therefore, these new alkaloids can be envisaged as new therapeutic candidates for the treatment of S. pneumoniae infections resistant to other antibiotics. PMID:21169356

  3. DNA damage protection and 5-lipoxygenase inhibiting activity of areca

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... the relaxation of supercoiled plasmid to an open circular form. (Zheng et al. .... is the primary cause of cell death under oxidative stress conditions ..... of compartmentalized redox-active iron in hydrogen peroxide-induced.

  4. Characteristic effect of an anticancer dinuclear platinum(II) complex on the higher-order structure of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Naoko; Katsuda, Yousuke; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Komeda, Seiji; Sato, Takaji; Saito, Yoshihiro; Chikuma, Masahiko; Suzuki, Mari; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2010-06-01

    It is known that a 1,2,3-triazolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complex, [{cis-Pt(NH(3))(2)}(2)(micro-OH)(micro-1,2,3-ta-N (1),N (2))](NO(3))(2) (AMTA), shows high in vitro cytotoxicity against several human tumor cell lines and circumvents cross-resistance to cisplatin. In the present study, we examined a dose- and time-dependent effect of AMTA on the higher-order structure of a large DNA, T4 phage DNA (166 kbp), by adapting single-molecule observation with fluorescence microscopy. It was found that AMTA induces the shrinking of DNA into a compact state with a much higher potency than cisplatin. From a quantitative analysis of the Brownian motion of individual DNA molecules in solution, it became clear that the density of a DNA segment in the compact state is about 2,000 times greater than that in the absence of AMTA. Circular dichroism spectra suggested that AMTA causes a transition from the B to the C form in the secondary structure of DNA, which is characterized by fast and slow processes. Electrophoretic measurements indicated that the binding of AMTA to supercoiled DNA induces unwinding of the double helix. Our results indicate that AMTA acts on DNA through both electrostatic interaction and coordination binding; the former causes a fast change in the secondary structure from the B to the C form, whereas the latter promotes shrinking in the higher-order structure as a relatively slow kinetic process. The shrinking effect of AMTA on DNA is attributable to the possible increase in the number of bridges along a DNA molecule. It is concluded that AMTA interacts with DNA in a manner markedly different from that of cisplatin.

  5. Factors influencing the DNA nuclease activity of iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jeff C; Reichfield, Jared; Cowan, J A

    2011-10-05

    A library of complexes that included iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates of cyclam, cyclen, DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, tripeptide GGH, tetrapeptide KGHK, NTA, and TACN was evaluated for DNA nuclease activity, ascorbate consumption, superoxide and hydroxyl radical generation, and reduction potential under physiologically relevant conditions. Plasmid DNA cleavage rates demonstrated by combinations of each complex and biological co-reactants were quantified by gel electrophoresis, yielding second-order rate constants for DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) conversion up to 2.5 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 7 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Relative rates of radical generation and characterization of radical species were determined by reaction with the fluorescent radical probes TEMPO-9-AC and rhodamine B. Ascorbate turnover rate constants ranging from 3 × 10(-4) to 0.13 min(-1) were determined, although many complexes demonstrated no measurable activity. Inhibition and Freifelder-Trumbo analysis of DNA cleavage supported concerted cleavage of dsDNA by a metal-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the case of Cu(2+)(aq), Cu-KGHK, Co-KGHK, and Cu-NTA and stepwise cleavage for Fe(2+)(aq), Cu-cyclam, Cu-cyclen, Co-cyclen, Cu-EDTA, Ni-EDTA, Co-EDTA, Cu-GGH, and Co-NTA. Reduction potentials varied over the range from -362 to +1111 mV versus NHE, and complexes demonstrated optimal catalytic activity in the range of the physiological redox co-reactants ascorbate and peroxide (-66 to +380 mV).

  6. Transferrin-mediated PEGylated nanoparticles for delivery of DNA/PLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Wangwen; Xu Zhenghong; Gao Yu; Chen Lingli; Li Yaping [Institute of Materia Medica, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zu Chong Zhi Road, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2006-08-28

    The purpose of this work was to determine the stability of pDNA/poly(L-lysine) complex (DNA/PLL) during microencapsulation, prepare transferrin (TF) conjugated PEGylated nanoparticles (TF-PEG-NP) loading DNA/PLL, and assess its physicochemical characteristics and in vitro transfection efficiency. The DNA/PLL was prepared by mixing plasmid DNA (pDNA) in deionized water with various amounts of PLL. PEGylated nanoparticles (PEG-NP) loading DNA/PLL were prepared by a water-oil-water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. TF-PEG-NP was prepared by coupling TF with PEG-NP. The physicochemical characteristics of TF-PEG-NP and in vitro transfection efficiency on K562 cells were measured. The results showed that free pDNA reserved its double supercoiled form (dsDNA) for only on average 25.7% after sonification, but over 70% of dsDNA was reserved after pDNA was contracted with PLL. The particle size range of TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL was 150-450 nm with entrapment efficiency over 70%. TF-PEG-NP exhibited the low burst effect (<10%) within 1 day. After the first phase, DNA/PLL displayed a sustained release. The amount of cumulated DNA/PLL release from TF-PEG-NP with 2% polymer over 7 days was 85.4% for DNA/PLL (1:0.3 mass ratio), 59.8% and 43.1% for DNA/PLL (1:0.6) and DNA/PLL (1:1.0), respectively. To TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL without chloroquine, the percentage of EGFP expressing cells was 28.9% for complexes consisting of DNA/PLL (1:0.3), 38.5% and 39.7% for DNA/PLL (1:0.6) and DNA/PLL (1:1.0), respectively. In TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL with chloroquine, more cells were transfected, the percentage of positive cells was 37.6% (DNA/PLL, 1:0.3), 47.1% (DNA/PLL, 1:0.6) and 45.8% (DNA/PLL, 1:1.0), which meant that the transfection efficiency of pDNA was increased by over 50 times when PLL and TF-PEG-NP were jointly used as a plasmid DNA carrier, in particular, the maximal percentage of positive cells (47.1%) from TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL (1:0.6) was about 70 times the

  7. Ruthenium(II) complexes of saccharin with dipyridoquinoxaline and dipyridophenazine: Structures, biological interactions and photoinduced DNA damage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Priyaranjan; Dasari, Srikanth; Patra, Ashis K

    2017-08-18

    Ruthenium complexes trans-[Ru(sac)2(dpq)2] (1) and trans-[Ru(sac)2(dppz)2] (2) where sac is artificial sweetener saccharin (o-sulfobenzimide; 1,2-benzothiazole-3(2H)-one1,1-dioxide (Hsac)), dpq = dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine have been synthesized and thoroughly characterized using various analytical and spectral techniques. Saccharin known to act as carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) inhibitor which is a biomarker for highly aggressive and proliferative tumor in hypoxic stress, so inhibition of CA IX is a potential strategy for anticancer chemotherapy. The solid state structures, photophysical properties, photostability, DNA and protein binding affinity, and DNA photocleavage activity were explored. The structural analysis revealed Ru(II) centre is in discrete mononuclear, distorted octahedral {RuN6} coordination geometry with two monoanionic nitrogen donor saccharinate ligands and two neutral bidentate nitrogen donors ligands dpq and dppz. cis-[Ru(sac)2(dppz)2] (cis-2) geometrical isomer was also isolated and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The photo-induced dissociation of monodentate saccharin ligand is observed when irradiated at UV-A light of 365 nm. The complexes show significant binding affinity to the calf thymus DNA (Kb ∼ 10(5) M(-1)) through significant intercalation through planar dpq and dppz ligands. Interaction of complexes 1 and 2 with bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed remarkable tryptophan emission quenching (KBSA ∼10(5) M(-1)). The complexes showed appreciable photoinduced DNA cleavage activity upon irradiation of low power UV-A light of 365 nm from supercoiled (SC) to its nicked circular (NC) form at micromolar complex concentrations. Photocleavage mechanistic studies in presence of O2 reveals involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated through ligand-centered (3)ππ* and/or (3)MLCT excited states generated upon photoactivation leads to nicking of

  8. PprA contributes to Deinococcus radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid, genome maintenance after DNA damage and interacts with deinococcal topoisomerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kota

    Full Text Available PprA is known to contribute to Deinococcus radiodurans' remarkable capacity to survive a variety of genotoxic assaults. The molecular bases for PprA's role(s in the maintenance of the damaged D. radiodurans genome are incompletely understood, but PprA is thought to promote D. radiodurans's capacity for DSB repair. PprA is found in a multiprotein DNA processing complex along with an ATP type DNA ligase, and the D. radiodurans toposiomerase IB (DraTopoIB as well as other proteins. Here, we show that PprA is a key contributor to D. radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid (Nal, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Growth of wild type D. radiodurans and a pprA mutant were similar in the absence of exogenous genotoxic insults; however, the pprA mutant exhibited marked growth delay and a higher frequency of anucleate cells following treatment with DNA-damaging agents. We show that PprA interacts with both DraTopoIB and the Gyrase A subunit (DraGyrA in vivo and that purified PprA enhances DraTopoIB catalysed relaxation of supercoiled DNA. Thus, besides promoting DNA repair, our findings suggest that PprA also contributes to preserving the integrity of the D. radiodurans genome following DNA damage by interacting with DNA topoisomerases and by facilitating the actions of DraTopoIB.

  9. Experimental and molecular modeling studies of the interaction of the polypyridyl Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes with DNA and BSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnamfar, Mohammad Taghi; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Simpson, Jim; Darabi, Farivash; Shahpiri, Azar; Khayamian, Taghi; Ebrahimi, Malihe; Amiri Rudbari, Hadi; Salimi, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Two mononuclear iron complexes, [Fe(tppz)₂](PF₆)₂·H₂O (1) and Fe(tppz)Cl₃·2CHCl₃ (2) where tppz is (2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl)pyrazine), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis and IR) and single crystal X-ray structure analysis. The interaction of (1) as the nitrate salt ([Fe(tppz)₂](NO₃)₂) with calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy, competitive fluorescence titration, circular dichroism (CD), voltammetric techniques, viscosity measurement, and gel electrophoresis. Gel electrophoresis of DNA with [Fe(tppz)₂](NO₃)₂ demonstrated that the complex also has the ability to cleave supercoiled plasmid DNA. The results have indicated that the complex binds to CT-DNA by three binding modes, viz., electrostatic, groove and partial insertion of the pyridyl rings between the base stacks of double-stranded DNA. Molecular docking of [Fe(tppz)₂](NO₃)₂ with the DNA sequence d(ACCGACGTCGGT)₂ suggests the complex fits into the major groove. The water-insoluble complex (2) can catalyze the cleavage of BSA at 40 °C. There are no reports of the catalytic effect of polypyridyl metal complexes on the BSA cleavage. Molecular docking of (2) with BSA suggests that, when the chloro ligands in the axial positions are replaced by water molecules, the BSA can interact with the Fe(III) complex more easily.

  10. DNA Topoisomerase 1 Prevents R-loop Accumulation to Modulate Auxin-Regulated Root Development in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Sarfraz; Chen, Chunli; Yang, Jing; Cheng, Lingling; Ma, Fei; Widemann, Emilie; Sun, Qianwen

    2017-06-05

    R-loop structures (RNA:DNA hybrids) have important functions in many biological processes, including transcriptional regulation and genome instability among diverse organisms. DNA topoisomerase 1 (TOP1), an essential manipulator of DNA topology during RNA transcription and DNA replication processes, can prevent R-loop accumulation by removing the positive and negative DNA supercoiling that is made by RNA polymerases during transcription. TOP1 is required for plant development, but little is known about its function in preventing co-transcriptional R-loop accumulation in various biological processes in plants. Here we show that knockdown of OsTOP1 strongly affects rice development, causing defects in root architecture and gravitropism, which are the consequences of misregulation of auxin signaling and transporter genes. We found that R-loops are naturally formed at rice auxin-related gene loci, and overaccumulate when OsTOP1 is knocked down or OsTOP1 protein activity is inhibited. OsTOP1 therefore sets the accurate expression levels of auxin-related genes by preventing the overaccumulation of inherent R-loops. Our data reveal R-loops as important factors in polar auxin transport and plant root development, and highlight that OsTOP1 functions as a key to link transcriptional R-loops with plant hormone signaling, provide new insights into transcriptional regulation of hormone signaling in plants. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential for measurement of the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments using Correlated X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Gundolf; Krajina, Brad; Spakowitz, Andrew; Doniach, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    In vivo chromosomal behavior is dictated by the organization of genomic DNA at length scales ranging from nanometers to microns. At these disparate scales, the DNA conformation is influenced by a range of proteins that package, twist and disentangle the DNA double helix, leading to a complex hierarchical structure that remains undetermined. Thus, there is a critical need for methods of structural characterization of DNA that can accommodate complex environmental conditions over biologically relevant length scales. Based on multiscale molecular simulations, we report on the possibility of measuring supercoiling in complex environments using angular correlations of scattered X-rays resulting from X-ray free electron laser (xFEL) experiments. We recently demonstrated the observation of structural detail for solutions of randomly oriented metallic nanoparticles [D. Mendez et al., Philos. Trans. R. Soc. B 360 (2014) 20130315]. Here, we argue, based on simulations, that correlated X-ray scattering (CXS) has the potential for measuring the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments, on the scale of a few persistence lengths.

  12. Radiation protection by disulfiram: protection of membrane and DNA in vitro and in vivo against gamma-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Nitin Motilal; Gopalaswamy, Usulumarty Venu; Nair, Cherupally rishnan K

    2003-09-01

    Disufiram (a drug used for the treatment of alcoholism) protected microsomal membranes and plasmid DNA against damages induced by gamma-radiation. The peroxidation of membrane lipids increased linearly with the radiation dose up to 600 Gy, and the presence of disulfiram inhibited membrane lipid peroxidation as assayed by the presence of thiobarbituric acid reacting substances. The reduction of the quantity of the supercoiled (ccc) form of plasmid pBR322 DNA is directly related to the radiation-induced damage, particularly to DNA strand breaks. There was a complete protection of plasmid DNA when exposed to gamma-radiation in the presence of disufiram (0.1 mM) at 300 Gy. This drug also protected deoxyribose against damages caused by hydroxyl radicals produced by the Fenton reaction. The administration of DSF to mice prior to whole-body radiation exposure (4 Gy) resulted in a reduction of peroxidation of membrane lipids in mice liver as well as a decrease in radiation-induced damage to cellular DNA, as assayed by single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). The results thus suggest the possible use of DSF as a radioprotector.

  13. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  14. Torsional Buckling and Writhing Dynamics of Elastic Cables and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, S; Perkins, N C; Lee, C L

    2003-02-14

    Marine cables under low tension and torsion on the sea floor can undergo a dynamic buckling process during which torsional strain energy is converted to bending strain energy. The resulting three-dimensional cable geometries can be highly contorted and include loops and tangles. Similar geometries are known to exist for supercoiled DNA and these also arise from the conversion of torsional strain energy to bending strain energy or, kinematically, a conversion of twist to writhe. A dynamic form of Kirchhoff rod theory is presented herein that captures these nonlinear dynamic processes. The resulting theory is discretized using the generalized-method for finite differencing in both space and time. The important kinematics of cross-section rotation are described using an incremental rotation ''vector'' as opposed to traditional Euler angles or Euler parameters. Numerical solutions are presented for an example system of a cable subjected to increasing twist at one end. The solutions show the dynamic evolution of the cable from an initially straight element, through a buckled element in the approximate form of a helix, and through the dynamic collapse of this helix through a looped form.

  15. Transferrin-mediated PEGylated nanoparticles for delivery of DNA/PLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wangwen; Xu, Zhenghong; Gao, Yu; Chen, Lingli; Li, Yaping

    2006-08-28

    The purpose of this work was to determine the stability of pDNA/poly(L-lysine) complex (DNA/PLL) during microencapsulation, prepare transferrin (TF) conjugated PEGylated nanoparticles (TF-PEG-NP) loading DNA/PLL, and assess its physicochemical characteristics and in vitro transfection efficiency. The DNA/PLL was prepared by mixing plasmid DNA (pDNA) in deionized water with various amounts of PLL. PEGylated nanoparticles (PEG-NP) loading DNA/PLL were prepared by a water-oil-water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. TF-PEG-NP was prepared by coupling TF with PEG-NP. The physicochemical characteristics of TF-PEG-NP and in vitro transfection efficiency on K562 cells were measured. The results showed that free pDNA reserved its double supercoiled form (dsDNA) for only on average 25.7% after sonification, but over 70% of dsDNA was reserved after pDNA was contracted with PLL. The particle size range of TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL was 150-450 nm with entrapment efficiency over 70%. TF-PEG-NP exhibited the low burst effect (PLL displayed a sustained release. The amount of cumulated DNA/PLL release from TF-PEG-NP with 2% polymer over 7 days was 85.4% for DNA/PLL (1:0.3 mass ratio), 59.8% and 43.1% for DNA/PLL (1:0.6) and DNA/PLL (1:1.0), respectively. To TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL without chloroquine, the percentage of EGFP expressing cells was 28.9% for complexes consisting of DNA/PLL (1:0.3), 38.5% and 39.7% for DNA/PLL (1:0.6) and DNA/PLL (1:1.0), respectively. In TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL with chloroquine, more cells were transfected, the percentage of positive cells was 37.6% (DNA/PLL, 1:0.3), 47.1% (DNA/PLL, 1:0.6) and 45.8% (DNA/PLL, 1:1.0), which meant that the transfection efficiency of pDNA was increased by over 50 times when PLL and TF-PEG-NP were jointly used as a plasmid DNA carrier, in particular, the maximal percentage of positive cells (47.1%) from TF-PEG-NP loading DNA/PLL (1:0.6) was about 70 times the transfection efficiency of free plasmid DNA

  16. Physics of base-pairing dynamics in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    As a key molecule of life, Deoxyribo-Nucleic Acid (DNA) is the focus of numbers of investigations with the help of biological, chemical and physical techniques. From a physical point of view, both experimental and theoretical works have brought quantitative insights into DNA base-pairing dynamics that we review in this Report, putting emphasis on theoretical developments. We discuss the dynamics at the base-pair scale and its pivotal coupling with the polymer one, with a polymerization index running from a few nucleotides to tens of kilo-bases. This includes opening and closure of short hairpins and oligomers as well as zipping and unwinding of long macromolecules. We review how different physical mechanisms are either used by Nature or utilized in biotechnological processes to separate the two intertwined DNA strands, by insisting on quantitative results. They go from thermally-assisted denaturation bubble nucleation to force- or torque-driven mechanisms. We show that the helical character of the molecule, possibly supercoiled, can play a key role in many denaturation and renaturation processes. We categorize the mechanisms according to the relative timescales associated with base-pairing and chain orientational degrees of freedom such as bending and torsional elastic ones. In some specific situations, these chain orientational degrees of freedom can be integrated out, and the quasi-static approximation is valid. The complex dynamics then reduces to the diffusion in a low-dimensional free-energy landscape. In contrast, some important cases of experimental interest necessarily appeal to far-from-equilibrium statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics.

  17. Low energy electrons and ultra-soft X-rays irradiation of plasmid DNA. Technical innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Michel; Boulanouar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present in a first part the latest results of our group which are in relation with the study of DNA damages inflicted by low energy electrons (0-20 eV) in ultra-high vacuum as well as in air under atmospheric conditions. A short description of the drop-casting technique we developed to produce thin and nanometre-scaled DNA layers onto graphite sheets is given. We provide the absolute cross-section for loss of supercoiled topology of plasmid DNA complexed with 1,3-diaminopropane (Dap) in the vacuum under 10 eV electron impact and suggest a specific pathway for the dissociation of the transient negative ion formed by resonant capture of such a low energy electron (LEE) by the DNA's phosphate group when complexed to Dap. Well-gauged DNA-Dap layers with various nanometre-scaled thicknesses are used to evaluate the effective attenuation length of secondary photo-LEEs in the energy range (0-20 eV). The values of 11-16 nm for DNA kept under atmospheric conditions are in good agreement with the rare literature data available and which are stemming from computer simulations. In a second part, we describe the method we have developed in order to expose liquid samples of plasmid DNA to ultra-soft X-rays (Al Kα line at 1.5 keV) under hydroxyl radical scavenging conditions. We provide an experimentally determined percentage of indirect effects in aqueous medium kept under standard conditions of 94.7±2.1% indirect effects; in satisfactory agreement with the data published by others (i.e. 97.7%) relative to gamma irradiation of frozen solutions (Tomita et al., 1995).

  18. Radical-induced purine lesion formation is dependent on DNA helical topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzidis, Michael A; Prisecaru, Andreea; Molphy, Zara; Barron, Niall; Randazzo, Antonio; Dumont, Elise; Krokidis, Marios G; Kellett, Andrew; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos

    2016-11-01

    Herein we report the quantification of purine lesions arising from gamma-radiation sourced hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) on tertiary dsDNA helical forms of supercoiled (SC), open circular (OC), and linear (L) conformation, along with single-stranded folded and non-folded sequences of guanine-rich DNA in selected G-quadruplex structures. We identify that DNA helical topology and folding plays major, and unexpected, roles in the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyadenosine (8-oxo-dA), along with tandem-type purine lesions 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (5',8-cdG) and 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (5',8-cdA). SC, OC, and L dsDNA conformers together with folded and non-folded G-quadruplexes d[TGGGGT]4 (TG4T), d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] (Tel22), and the mutated tel24 d[TTGGG(TTAGGG)3A] (mutTel24) were exposed to HO(•) radicals and purine lesions were then quantified via stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS analysis. Purine oxidation in dsDNA follows L > OC ≫ SC indicating greater damage towards the extended B-DNA topology. Conversely, G-quadruplex sequences were significantly more resistant toward purine oxidation in their unfolded states as compared with G-tetrad folded topologies; this effect is confirmed upon comparative analysis of Tel22 (∼50% solution folded) and mutTel24 (∼90% solution folded). In an effort to identify the accessibly of hydroxyl radicals to quadruplex purine nucleobases, G-quadruplex solvent cavities were then modeled at 1.33 Å with evidence suggesting that folded G-tetrads may act as potential oxidant traps to protect against chromosomal DNA damage.

  19. Antioxidant and DNA Damage Protecting Activity of Exopolysaccharides from the Endophytic Bacterium Bacillus cereus SZ1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ping Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An endophytic bacterium was isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Artemisia annua L. The phylogenetic and physiological characterization indicated that the isolate, strain SZ-1, was Bacillus cereus. The endophyte could produce an exopolysaccharide (EPS at 46 mg/L. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydracyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity of the EPS reached more than 50% at 3–5 mg/mL. The EPS was also effective in scavenging superoxide radical in a concentration dependent fashion with an EC50 value of 2.6 mg/mL. The corresponding EC50 for scavenging hydroxyl radical was 3.1 mg/mL. Moreover, phenanthroline-copper complex-mediated chemiluminescent emission of DNA damage was both inhibited and delayed by EPS. The EPS at 0.7–1.7 mg/mL also protected supercoiled DNA strands in plasmid pBR322 against scission induced by Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical. The preincubation of PC12 cells with the EPS prior to H2O2 exposure increased the cell survival and glutathione (GSH level and catalase (CAT activities, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a pronounced protective effect against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. Our study indicated that the EPS could be useful for preventing oxidative DNA damage and cellular oxidation in pharmaceutical and food industries.

  20. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni(II) Schiff base complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarat Chandra Kumar; Abhijit Pal; Merry Mitra; V M Manikandamathavan; Chia -Her Lin; Balachandran Unni Nair; Rajarshi Ghosh

    2015-08-01

    Synthesis and characterization of a mononuclear Ni(II) compound [Ni(L)(H2O)2](NO3)2 [L = N,N'-bis((pyridine-2-yl)phenylidene)-1,3-diaminopropan-2-ol] (1) is reported. 1 crystallizes in triclinic P-1 space group with a = 8.1911(2) Å, b = 11.6624(3) Å, c = 16.5356(4) Å and = 108.8120(10)° , = 91.2010(10)° , = 91.1500(10)° . The binding property of the complex with DNA has been investigated using absorption and emission studies, and viscosity experiment. The binding constant (Kb) and the linear Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv) of the complex have been determined as 9.23 × 10 4 M−1 and 2.0 × 10 4 M−1, respectively. Spectroscopic and hydrodynamic investigations revealed groove or electrostatic nature of binding of 1 with DNA. 1 is also found to induce oxidative cleavage of the supercoiled pUC 18 DNA to its nicked circular form in a concentration dependent manner.

  1. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  2. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  3. DNA adductomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  4. Preparation of Ag/AgBr/TiO2 as Catalyst Carriers and Its Damage to Plasmid DNA andTetrahymena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liwei; ZHANG Yinlong

    2015-01-01

    The composites based on the TiO2 are potentially used in wetland pollution control. In this work, the biological effect of the Ag/AgBr/TiO2/Active carbon (AC) composites was studied on the plasmid DNA andTetrahymena membrane. The atomic force micrograph (AFM) images showed that, in the presence of the composites under illumination, most pUC18 DNA molecules showed quite different topography and were opened and relaxed circle shapes. After DNA was catalyzed for 40 min, all supercoiled and circular DNA were changed into the linear DNA molecules. The gel electrophoresis experiment confirmed the results and demonstrated the dynamic process of DNA degradation. ATR-FTIR spectra revealed that amide groups and PO2− of the phospho-lipid phospho-diester onTetrahymena surface were oxidized in the presence of the composites under illumination. An increase in the lfuorescence polarization of DPH was observed, relfecting a signiifcant decrease in membrane lfuidity ofTetrahymena.

  5. The nuclear higher-order structure defined by the set of topological relationships between DNA and the nuclear matrix is species-specific in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santiago, Evangelina; Pardo, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2017-01-15

    During the interphase the nuclear DNA of metazoan cells is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to constituents of a nuclear substructure or compartment known as the nuclear matrix. The stable interactions between DNA and the nuclear matrix (NM) correspond to a set of topological relationships that define a nuclear higher-order structure (NHOS). Current evidence suggests that the NHOS is cell-type-specific. Biophysical evidence and theoretical models suggest that thermodynamic and structural constraints drive the actualization of DNA-NM interactions. However, if the topological relationships between DNA and the NM were the subject of any biological constraint with functional significance then they must be adaptive and thus be positively selected by natural selection and they should be reasonably conserved, at least within closely related species. We carried out a coarse-grained, comparative evaluation of the DNA-NM topological relationships in primary hepatocytes from two closely related mammals: rat and mouse, by determining the relative position to the NM of a limited set of target sequences corresponding to highly-conserved genomic regions that also represent a sample of distinct chromosome territories within the interphase nucleus. Our results indicate that the pattern of topological relationships between DNA and the NM is not conserved between the hepatocytes of the two closely related species, suggesting that the NHOS, like the karyotype, is species-specific.

  6. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  7. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  8. DNA binding, DNA cleavage and HSA interaction of several metal complexes containing N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N'-benzoylthiourea and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Gao, Zhuantao; Li, Xibo; Li, Tingting; Chen, Guorong; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Ji

    2016-10-01

    Four novel ternary metal complexes of the type [M(Phen)(L1)2)] [phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, L1 = N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N'-benzoylthiourea, M = Ni(II)(1), Co(II) (2), Cu(II) (3), Pd(II) (4)] were synthesized. The organic ligands and their corresponding organometallic complexes have been characterized using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, element analysis, infrared radiation spectroscopy and fluorescence spectra. DNA binding and cleavage studies of these complexes were conducted in detail. In vitro DNA-binding properties were studied by electronic absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra methods. The results indicate that all of the ternary metal complexes can efficiently bind to DNA via intercalation mode. The DNA-binding constants for all ternary compounds are around 4 × 10(6) M(-1). The binding propensity of the complexes to human serum albumin (HSA) was also investigated. Agarose gel electrophoresis study revealed that the metal complexes could cleave super-coiled pBR322 DNA to a nicked form in the absence of external agents. In vitro anti bacterial studies show that copper complex has weak antibacterial activities. Copper complex exhibits a better biological activity among all complexes. This study provides a new perspective and evaluation on the role and importance of the effect factors on the medicinal properties of benzoylthiourea compounds. Synchronous fluorescence spectra of HSA (10 μM) as a function of concentration of the complexes 1-4.

  9. Zuotin, a putative Z-DNA binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Lockshin, C.; Herbert, A.; Winter, E.; Rich, A.

    1992-01-01

    A putative Z-DNA binding protein, named zuotin, was purified from a yeast nuclear extract by means of a Z-DNA binding assay using [32P]poly(dG-m5dC) and [32P]oligo(dG-Br5dC)22 in the presence of B-DNA competitor. Poly(dG-Br5dC) in the Z-form competed well for the binding of a zuotin containing fraction, but salmon sperm DNA, poly(dG-dC) and poly(dA-dT) were not effective. Negatively supercoiled plasmid pUC19 did not compete, whereas an otherwise identical plasmid pUC19(CG), which contained a (dG-dC)7 segment in the Z-form was an excellent competitor. A Southwestern blot using [32P]poly(dG-m5dC) as a probe in the presence of MgCl2 identified a protein having a molecular weight of 51 kDa. The 51 kDa zuotin was partially sequenced at the N-terminal and the gene, ZUO1, was cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli; the expressed zuotin showed similar Z-DNA binding activity, but with lower affinity than zuotin that had been partially purified from yeast. Zuotin was deduced to have a number of potential phosphorylation sites including two CDC28 (homologous to the human and Schizosaccharomyces pombe cdc2) phosphorylation sites. The hexapeptide motif KYHPDK was found in zuotin as well as in several yeast proteins, DnaJ of E.coli, csp29 and csp32 proteins of Drosophila and the small t and large T antigens of the polyoma virus. A 60 amino acid segment of zuotin has similarity to several histone H1 sequences. Disruption of ZUO1 in yeast resulted in a slow growth phenotype.

  10. Evolutionary conservation and DNA binding properties of the Ssh7 proteins from Sulfolobus shibatae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xulin(陈绪林); GUO; Rong(郭荣); HUANG; Li(黄力); Ray; Hong

    2002-01-01

    The thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae synthesizes a large amount of the 7-ku DNA binding proteins known as Ssh7. Our hybridization experiments showed that two Ssh7-encoding genes existed in the genome of S. Shibatae. These two genes, designated ssh7a and ssh7b, have been cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The two Ssh7 proteins differ only at three amino acid positions. In addition, the cis-regulatory sequences of the ssh7a and ssh7b genes are highly conserved. These results suggest the presence of a selective pressure to maintain not only the sequence but also the expression of the two genes. We have also found that there are two genes encoding the 7-ku protein in Sulfolobus solfataricus. Based on this and other studies, we suggest that the gene encoding the 7-ku protein underwent duplication before the separation of Sulfolobus species. Binding of native Ssh7 and recombinant (r)Ssh7 to short duplex DNA fragments was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Both native and recombinant forms of the protein behaved in a similar fashion in the assays, suggesting that the interaction of Ssh7 with DNA is not affected either by specific lysine methylation found in the native Ssh7 proteins or by the difference between the two Ssh7 isomers in amino acid sequence. Our data show that Ssh7 binds duplex DNA fragments with a binding size of ~ 6.6 base pairs and an apparent dissociation constant of (0.7-1.0)×10-7 mol/L under the assay conditions employed in the present study. In addition, Ssh7 binds more tightly to negatively supercoiled DNA than to linear or relaxed DNA.

  11. Generation, characterization, and docking studies of DNA-hydrolyzing recombinant F(ab) antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zein, Haggag S; El-Sehemy, Ahmed A; Fares, Mohamed O; ElHefnawi, Mahmoud; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    Previously we established a series of catalytic antibodies (catAbs) capable of hydrolyzing DNA prepared by hybridoma technology. A group of these catAbs exhibited high reactivity and substrate specificity. To determine the molecular basis for these catAbs, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the variable regions of this group of antibodies as functional F(ab) fragments. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the expressed light chain (Vκ) germline gene assignments confidently belonged to germline family Vκ1A, gene bb1.1 and GenBank accession number EF672207 while heavy chain variable region V(H) genes belonged to V(H) 1/V(H) J558, gene V130.3 and GenBank accession number EF672221. A well-established expression system based on the pARA7 vector was examined for its ability to produce catalytically active antibodies. Recombinant F(ab) (rF(ab) ) fragments were purified and their hydrolyzing activity was analyzed against supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA (scDNA). The study of rF(ab) provides important information about the potential catalytic activities of antibodies whose structure allows us to understand their basis of catalysis. Molecular surface analysis and docking studies were performed on the molecular interactions between the antibodies and poly(dA9), poly(dG9), poly(dT9), and poly(dC9) oligomers. Surface analysis identified the important sequence motifs at the binding sites, and different effects exerted by arginine and tyrosine residues at different positions in the light and heavy chains. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of the protein DNA surrogate in the investigation of the origin of anti-DNA antibodies. These studies may define important features of DNA catAbs.

  12. DNA and RNA sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; LIN; Lin; ZHAO; Hong; JIANG; Long

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes recent advances in DNA sensor. Major areas of DNA sensor covered in this review include immobilization methods of DNA, general techniques of DNA detection and application of nanoparticles in DNA sensor.

  13. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  14. DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  15. DNA nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadrian C Seeman

    2003-01-01

    We are all aware that the DNA found in cells is a double helix consisting of two antiparallel strands held together by specific hydrogen-bonded base pairs; adenine (A always pairs with thymine (T, and guanine (G always pairs with cytosine (C. The specificity of this base pairing and the ability to ensure that it occurs in this fashion (and not some other1 is key to the use of DNA in materials applications. The double helical arrangement of the two molecules leads to a linear helix axis, linear not in the geometrical sense of being a straight line, but in the topological sense of being unbranched. Genetic engineers discovered in the 1970s how to splice together pieces of DNA to add new genes to DNA molecules2, and synthetic chemists worked out convenient syntheses for short pieces of DNA (up to ∼100–150 units in the 1980s3. Regardless of the impact of these technologies on biological systems, hooking together linear molecules leads only to longer linear molecules, with circles, knots, and catenanes perhaps resulting from time to time.

  16. Structural and dynamical effects induced by the anticancer drug topotecan on the human topoisomerase I - DNA complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Mancini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human topoisomerase I catalyzes the relaxation of DNA supercoils in fundamental cell processes like transcription, replication and chromosomal segregation. It is the only target of the camptothecin family of anticancer drugs. Among these, topotecan has been used to treat lung and ovarian carcinoma for several years. Camptothecins reversibly binds to the covalent intermediate DNA-enzyme, stabilizing the cleavable complex and reducing the religation rate. The stalled complex then collides with the progression of the replication fork, producing lethal double strand DNA breaks and eventually cell death. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Long lasting molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA-topoisomerase I binary complex and of the DNA-topoisomerase-topotecan ternary complex have been performed and compared. The conformational space sampled by the binary complex is reduced by the presence of the drug, as observed by principal component and cluster analyses. This conformational restraint is mainly due to the reduced flexibility of residues 633-643 (the region connecting the linker to the core domain that causes an overall mobility loss in the ternary complex linker domain. During the simulation, DNA/drug stacking interactions are fully maintained, and hydrogen bonds are maintained with the enzyme. Topotecan keeps the catalytic residue Lys532 far from the DNA, making it unable to participate to the religation reaction. Arg364 is observed to interact with both the B and E rings of topotecan with two stable direct hydrogen bonds. An interesting constrain exerted by the protein on the geometrical arrangement of topotecan is also observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Atomistic-scale understanding of topotecan interactions with the DNA-enzyme complex is fundamental to the explaining of its poisonous effect and of the drug resistance observed in several single residue topoisomerase mutants. We observed significant alterations due to topotecan in

  17. 99mTc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI causes plasmid DNA damage with high efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzerke, Joerg; Punzet, Robert; Runge, Roswitha; Ferl, Sandra; Oehme, Liane; Wunderlich, Gerd; Freudenberg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    (99m)Tc is the standard radionuclide used for nuclear medicine imaging. In addition to gamma irradiation, (99m)Tc emits low-energy Auger and conversion electrons that deposit their energy within nanometers of the decay site. To study the potential for DNA damage, direct DNA binding is required. Plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between molecules and DNA that result in single-strand breaks (SSBs) or double-strand breaks (DSBs); the resulting DNA fragments can be separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. This study aimed to compare the plasmid DNA damage potential of a (99m)Tc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI compound with that of (99m)Tc pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4(-)). pUC19 plasmid DNA was irradiated for 2 or 24 hours. Direct and radical-induced DNA damage were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. For both compounds, an increase in applied activity enhanced plasmid DNA damage, which was evidenced by an increase in the open circular and linear DNA fractions and a reduction in the supercoiled DNA fraction. The number of SSBs elicited by 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI (1.03) was twice that caused by (99m)TcO4(-) (0.51), and the number of DSBs increased fivefold in the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated sample compared with the (99m)TcO4(-) treated sample (0.02 to 0.10). In the presence of DMSO, the numbers of SSBs and DSBs decreased to 0.03 and 0.00, respectively, in the (99m)TcO4(-) treated samples, whereas the numbers of SSBs and DSBs were slightly reduced to 0.95 and 0.06, respectively, in the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated samples. These results indicated that (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI induced SSBs and DSBs via a direct interaction of the (99m)Tc-labeled compound with DNA. In contrast to these results, (99m)TcO4(-) induced SSBs via radical formation, and DSBs were formed by two nearby SSBs. The biological effectiveness of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI increased by approximately 4-fold in terms of inducing SSBs and by

  18. 99mTc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI causes plasmid DNA damage with high efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Kotzerke

    Full Text Available (99mTc is the standard radionuclide used for nuclear medicine imaging. In addition to gamma irradiation, (99mTc emits low-energy Auger and conversion electrons that deposit their energy within nanometers of the decay site. To study the potential for DNA damage, direct DNA binding is required. Plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between molecules and DNA that result in single-strand breaks (SSBs or double-strand breaks (DSBs; the resulting DNA fragments can be separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. This study aimed to compare the plasmid DNA damage potential of a (99mTc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI compound with that of (99mTc pertechnetate ((99mTcO4(-. pUC19 plasmid DNA was irradiated for 2 or 24 hours. Direct and radical-induced DNA damage were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. For both compounds, an increase in applied activity enhanced plasmid DNA damage, which was evidenced by an increase in the open circular and linear DNA fractions and a reduction in the supercoiled DNA fraction. The number of SSBs elicited by 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI (1.03 was twice that caused by (99mTcO4(- (0.51, and the number of DSBs increased fivefold in the (99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated sample compared with the (99mTcO4(- treated sample (0.02 to 0.10. In the presence of DMSO, the numbers of SSBs and DSBs decreased to 0.03 and 0.00, respectively, in the (99mTcO4(- treated samples, whereas the numbers of SSBs and DSBs were slightly reduced to 0.95 and 0.06, respectively, in the (99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated samples. These results indicated that (99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI induced SSBs and DSBs via a direct interaction of the (99mTc-labeled compound with DNA. In contrast to these results, (99mTcO4(- induced SSBs via radical formation, and DSBs were formed by two nearby SSBs. The biological effectiveness of (99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI increased by approximately 4-fold in terms of inducing SSBs and by approximately

  19. DNA origami nanopores for controlling DNA translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Göpfrich, Kerstin; Misiunas, Karolis; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-07-23

    We combine DNA origami structures with glass nanocapillaries to reversibly form hybrid DNA origami nanopores. Trapping of the DNA origami onto the nanocapillary is proven by imaging fluorescently labeled DNA origami structures and simultaneous ionic current measurements of the trapping events. We then show two applications highlighting the versatility of these DNA origami nanopores. First, by tuning the pore size we can control the folding of dsDNA molecules ("physical control"). Second, we show that the specific introduction of binding sites in the DNA origami nanopore allows selective detection of ssDNA as a function of the DNA sequence ("chemical control").

  20. De novo design, synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of chiral benzimidazole-derived amino acid Zn(II) complexes: Development of tryptophan-derived specific hydrolytic DNA artificial nuclease agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shazia; Arjmand, Farukh

    2012-01-01

    Novel ternary dizinc(II) complexes 1- 3, derived from 1,2-bis(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethane-1,2-diol and L-form of amino acids (viz., tryptophan, leucine and valine) were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (IR, 1H NMR, UV-vis, ESI-MS) and other analytical methods. To evaluate the biological preference of chiral drugs for inherently chiral target DNA, interaction of 1- 3 with calf thymus DNA in Tris-HCl buffer was studied by various biophysical techniques which reveal that all these complexes bind to CT DNA non-covalently via electrostatic interaction. The higher Kb value of L-tryptophan complex 1 suggested greater DNA binding propensity. Further, to evaluate the mode of action at the molecular level, interaction studies of complexes 1 and 2 with nucleotides (5'-GMP and 5'-TMP) were carried out by UV-vis titrations, 1H and 31P NMR which implicates the preferential selectivity of these complexes to N3 of thymine rather than N7 of guanine. Furthermore, complex 1 exhibits efficient DNA cleavage with supercoiled pBR322. The complex 1 cleaves DNA efficiently involving hydrolytic cleavage pathway. Such chiral synthetic hydrolytic nucleases with asymmetric centers are gaining considerable attention owing to their importance in biotechnology and drug design, in particular to cleave DNA with sequence selectivity different from that of the natural enzymes.

  1. Synthesis, hydrolytic DNA-cleaving activities and cytotoxicities of EDTA analogue-tethered pyrrole-polyamide dimer-based Ce(IV) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Wei; Lin, Yan-Ling; Dong, Cheng; Zhou, Chun-Qiong; Chen, Jin-Xiang; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Zhong-Zhen; Sun, Bin; Chen, Wen-Hua

    2014-11-24

    Two EDTA analogue-tethered C2-symmetrical dimeric monopyrrole-polyamide 5 and dipyrrole-polyamide 6, and their corresponding Ce(IV) complexes Ce-5 and Ce-6 were synthesized and fully characterized. Agarose gel electrophoresis studies on pBR322 DNA cleavage indicate that complexes Ce-5 and Ce-6 exhibited potent DNA-cleaving activities under physiological conditions. The maximal first-order rate constants (kmax's) were (0.42 ± 0.02) h(-1) for Ce-5 and (0.52 ± 0.02) h(-1) for Ce-6, respectively, suggesting that both complexes catalyzed the cleavage of supercoiled DNA by up to approximately 10(8)-fold. Complex Ce-6 exhibited ca 10-fold higher overall catalytic activity (kmax/KM) than Ce-5, which may be ascribed to its higher DNA-binding affinity. Inhibition experiments and a model study convincingly suggest that both complexes Ce-5 and Ce-6 functioned as hydrolytic DNA-cleavers. In addition, both complexes were found to display moderate inhibitory activity toward A549 and HepG-2 cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Hetero-metallic trigonal cage-shaped dimeric Ni3K core complex of L-proline ligand: Synthesis, structural, electrochemical and DNA binding and cleavage activities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Nagasubramanian; A Jayamani; V Thamilarasan; G Aravindan; V Ganesan; N Sengottuvelan

    2014-05-01

    Hetero-metallic trigonal cage-shaped dimeric Ni3K core complex of L-proline ligand has been synthesized and characterized. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the hetero-metallic Ni(II)-K(I) complex has a dimeric structure with nine coordinated potassium atoms and six coordinated nickel atoms. The cyclic voltammograms of the complex exhibited two successive quasireversible reduction waves at ($E^{1}_{pc} = −1.02$ V and $E^{2}_{pc} = −1.33$ V) and two successive irreversible oxidation waves ($E^{1}_{pa} = 0.95$ V and $E^{2}_{pa} = 1.45$ V) versus Ag/AgCl in DMF solution. Interaction of the complex with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has been studied using spectroscopic techniques. The complex is an avid DNA binder with a binding constant of 3.6 × 108 M-1. The complex showed efficient oxidative cleavage of supercoiled pBR322 DNA in the presence of the reducing agent hydrogen peroxide involving hydroxyl radical (°OH) species. As evidenced from the control experiment, DNA cleavage in the presence of °OH radical was inhibited by quenchers, viz. DMSO and KI. The complex showed in vitro antimicrobial activity against four bacteria and two fungi and the activity is greater than that of the free ligand.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and DNA binding and cleavage properties of copper(II)-tryptophanphenyl-alanine-1,10-phenanthroline/2,2'-bipyridine complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Pulimamidi R; Raju, Nomula; Satyanarayana, Battu

    2011-01-01

    The mononuclear dipeptide-based Cu(II) complexes [Cu(II) (trp-phe)(phen)(H₂O)] ⋅ ClO₄ (1) and [Cu(II) (trp-phe)(bpy)(H₂O)] ⋅ ClO₄ (2) (trp-phe=tryptophanphenylalanine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) were isolated, and their interaction with DNA was studied. They exhibit intercalative mode of interaction with DNA. The intercalative interaction was quantified by Stern-Volmer quenching constant (K(sq) =0.14 for 1 and 0.08 for 2). The Cu(II) complexes convert supercoiled plasmid DNA into its nicked circular form hydrolytically at physiological conditions at a concentration as low as 5 μM (for 1) and 10 μM (for 2). The DNA hydrolysis rates at a complex concentration of 50 μM were determined as 1.74 h(-1) (R=0.985) for 1 and 0.65 h(-1) (R=0.965) for 2. The rate enhancement in the range of 2.40-4.10×10⁷-fold compared to non-catalyzed double-stranded DNA is significant. This was attributed to the presence of a H(2) O molecule in the axial position of the Cu complexes.

  4. Design, synthesis, spectral characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity studies of copper(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of 6-amino benzothiazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daravath, Sreenu; Kumar, Marri Pradeep; Rambabu, Aveli; Vamsikrishna, Narendrula; Ganji, Nirmala; Shivaraj

    2017-09-01

    Two novel Schiff bases, L1 = (2-benzo[d]thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl)-4,6-dichlorophenol), L2 = (1-benzo[d]thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenol) and their bivalent transition metal complexes [M(L1)2] and [M(L2)2], where M = Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, IR, UV-visible, mass, magnetic moments, ESR, TGA, SEM, EDX and powder XRD. Based on the experimental data a square planar geometry around the metal ion is assigned to all the complexes (1a-2c). The interaction of synthesized metal complexes with calf thymus DNA was explored using UV-visible absorption spectra, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The experimental evidence indicated that all the metal complexes strongly bound to CT-DNA through an intercalation mode. DNA cleavage experiments of metal(II) complexes with supercoiled pBR322 DNA have also been explored by gel electrophoresis in the presence of H2O2 as well as UV light, and it is found that the Cu(II) complexes cleaved DNA more effectively compared to Co(II), Ni(II) complexes. In addition, the ligands and their metal complexes were screened for antimicrobial activity and it is found that all the metal complexes were more potent than free ligands.

  5. Proteolytic dissection of Zab, the Z-DNA-binding domain of human ADAR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, T.; Lowenhaupt, K.; Kim, Y. G.; Li, L.; Brown, B. A. 2nd; Herbert, A.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Zalpha is a peptide motif that binds to Z-DNA with high affinity. This motif binds to alternating dC-dG sequences stabilized in the Z-conformation by means of bromination or supercoiling, but not to B-DNA. Zalpha is part of the N-terminal region of double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase (ADAR1), a candidate enzyme for nuclear pre-mRNA editing in mammals. Zalpha is conserved in ADAR1 from many species; in each case, there is a second similar motif, Zbeta, separated from Zalpha by a more divergent linker. To investigate the structure-function relationship of Zalpha, its domain structure was studied by limited proteolysis. Proteolytic profiles indicated that Zalpha is part of a domain, Zab, of 229 amino acids (residues 133-361 in human ADAR1). This domain contains both Zalpha and Zbeta as well as a tandem repeat of a 49-amino acid linker module. Prolonged proteolysis revealed a minimal core domain of 77 amino acids (positions 133-209), containing only Zalpha, which is sufficient to bind left-handed Z-DNA; however, the substrate binding is strikingly different from that of Zab. The second motif, Zbeta, retains its structural integrity only in the context of Zab and does not bind Z-DNA as a separate entity. These results suggest that Zalpha and Zbeta act as a single bipartite domain. In the presence of substrate DNA, Zab becomes more resistant to proteases, suggesting that it adopts a more rigid structure when bound to its substrate, possibly with conformational changes in parts of the protein.

  6. Anaerobic DNA cleavage in red light by dicopper(II) complexes on disulphide bond activation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debojyoti Lahiri; Ritankar Majumdar; Ashis K Patra; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2010-05-01

    Binuclear complexes [Cu(-RSSR)]2 (1) and [M2(-PDS)(H2O)]2 (M = Cu(II), 2; Fe(II), 3), where H2RSSR is a reduced Schiff base derived from 2-(thioethyl)salicylaldimine having a disulphide moiety and H2PDS is derived from dimerization of D-penicillamine, have been prepared, structurally characterized, and their photo-induced DNA cleavage activity studied. The crystal structure of 1 shows the complex as a discrete binuclear species with each metal in a CuN2O2 square-planar geometry (Cu…Cu, 6.420 Å). The tetradentate RSSR2- acts as a bridging ligand. The sulphur atoms in the disulphide unit do not interact with the metal ions. Complexes 1-3 do not show any DNA cleavage activity in darkness. The copper(II) complexes exhibit chemical nuclease activity in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Cleavage of supercoiled DNA has been observed in UV-A light of 365 nm for 1 and red light of 647.1 nm for both 1 and 2 in air. Mechanistic data reveal the involvement of the disulphide unit as photosensitizer generating hydroxyl radicals ($^{\\bullet}$OH) as the reactive species. Photo-induced DNA cleavage in red light seems to involve sulphide radicals in a type-I process and hydroxyl radicals. The dicopper(II) complexes show significant anaerobic photo-induced DNA cleavage activity in red light under argon following type-I pathway without involving any reactive oxygen species.

  7. Unexpected regiospecific formation and DNA binding of new 3-(acridin-9-yl)methyl-2-iminothiazolidin-4-ones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ján Imrich; Danica Sabolová; Mária Vilková; Júlia Kudláčová

    2016-02-01

    New 3-(acridin-9-yl)methyl-2-substituted imino-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were regiospecifically synthesized from unstable (acridin-9-yl)methyl thioureas and methyl bromoacetate (MBA) or bromoacetyl bromide (BAB). Unexpected formation of only one thiazolidinone regioisomer with both the reagents was due to a new mechanism involving a transient spiro 9,10-dihydroacridine intermediate. These results are in contrast with the reactions of acridin-9-yl thioureas with MBA/BAB that afforded two different thiazolidinone regioisomers with these reagents. UV-vis titrations, CD spectra, and fluorescence quenching have shown that new products intercalated into calf thymus (CT) DNA, and displaced ethidium bromide (EB) from a CT DNA–EB complex. Intrinsic binding constants, , and Stern-Volmer constants, , were found in the range 0.79✕105 – 2.85✕105 M−1 and 17950 – 3360M−1, respectively. The strongest binding affinity was found for an electrondonated 2-(4-methoxyphenylimino) thiazolidinone. Additional evidence for DNA intercalation was obtained from thermal denaturation studies. Gel electrophoresis has proven that thiazolidinone products nicked the supercoiled plasmid DNA in 5.0 M concentration.

  8. Synthesis of novel naphthoquinone-spermidine conjugates and their effects on DNA-topoisomerases I and II-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Andrea S.; Lima, Edson L.S.; Pinto, Angelo C.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Torrese, Jose C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Echevarria, Aurea [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Camara, Celso A. [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Tecnologia Farmaceutica; Vargas, Maria D. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: mdvargas@vm.uff.br

    2006-05-15

    Novel derivatives of lapachol 2, nor-lapachol 3 and lawsone 4 have been synthesized by nucleophilic displacement of the methoxynaphthoquinones 2a, 3a and 4a with the polyamine (PA) N{sup 1}-Boc-N{sup 5}-Bn-spermidine 1a. The respective products 2b-4b were obtained in good yields and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical methods. The inhibitory action of these naphthoquinone-PA conjugates on DNA-topoisomerases (topo) I and II-{alpha} was evaluated by relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid. All compounds (1a 2b, 3b and 4b) presented significant inhibition of topo II-{alpha} catalytic activity at the 2 {mu}M dose. Considering that only PA 1a did not inhibit the enzyme catalytic activity at the 0.2 {mu}M dose, the appended naphthoquinone moiety acts as a 'value added' fragment. Compounds 1a 2b, 3b and 4b did not inhibit the enzyme DNA-topo I at the 200 {mu}M dose. (author)

  9. DNA binding and cleavage activity by a mononuclear iron(II)Schiff base complex: Synthesis and structural characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Pal; Bhaskar Biswas; Merry Mitra; Subramaniyam Rajalakshmi; Chandra Shekhar Purohit; Soumitra Hazra; Gopinatha Suresh Kumar; Balachandran Unni Nair; Rajarshi Ghosh

    2013-09-01

    Synthesis and characterization of a mononuclear Fe(II) compound [Fe(L)](ClO4)2 (1) [L = N-(1-pyridin-2-yl-phenylidene)-N'-[2-({2-[(1-pyridin-2-ylphenylidene)amino]ethyl}amino)ethyl] ethane-1,2-diamine] (1) is reported. 1 crystallizes in P-1 space group with a = 11.9241(3) Å, b = 12.1994(3) Å and c = 13.0622(4) Å. The binding property of the complex with DNA has been investigated using absorption and emission studies, thermal melting, viscosity experiments and circular dichroism studies. The binding constant (b) and the linear Stern-Volmer quenching constant (sv) of the complex have been determined as 3.5 × 103M-1 and 2.73 × 104M-1, respectively. Spectroscopic and hydrodynamic investigations revealed intercalative mode of binding of 1 with DNA. 1 is also found to induce oxidative cleavage of the supercoiled pUC 18 DNA to its nicked circular form in a concentration dependent manner.

  10. DNA nanostructure immobilization to lithographic DNA arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Omar D.

    Although DNA is well known for its genetic role in biology, DNA has also been sought-after as a material for the self-assembly of biological and electronic devices. Examples of DNA nanostructure construction include DNA tiled self-assembly and DNA Origami, where by controlling the sequence and concentration of DNA molecules, the rational design of geometric DNA nanostructures is possible. The assembly of DNA nanostructures takes place in solution and thus they are in disorder and require further organization to construct circuitry or devices. Hence, it is essential for future applications of this technology to develop methods to direct the placement of DNA nanostructures on a surface. To address this challenge my research examines the use of DNA microarrays to capture DNA nanostructures via DNA hybridization. Modern DNA arrays offer a high-density of sequence-specific molecular recognition sites where the addressable placement of DNA nanostructures can be achieved. Using Maskless Array Synthesizer (MAS) technology, I have characterized photolithographic DNA arrays for the hybridization of DNA complexes like large DNA molecules (> 1 kb), DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, and DNA Origami. Although modern photolithographic DNA arrays can possess a high-density of sequence (106/cm2), the printed DNA areas are on the order of tens of microns. Thus, I have also developed a method to reduce the DNA array spot size to nanoscale dimensions through the combined use of electron beam lithography with photolithographic DNA synthesis. This work addresses the key elements towards developing a surface patterning technology that takes advantage of DNA base-pairing for both molecular sub-assembly and surface patterning.

  11. Revolution rather than rotation of AAA+ hexameric phi29 nanomotor for viral dsDNA packaging without coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Chad; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Zhang, Hui; Fang, Huaming; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-08-15

    It has long been believed that the DNA-packaging motor of dsDNA viruses utilizes a rotation mechanism. Here we report a revolution rather than rotation mechanism for the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor. The phi29 motor contains six copies of the ATPase (Schwartz et al., this issue); ATP binding to one ATPase subunit stimulates the ATPase to adopt a conformation with a high affinity for dsDNA. ATP hydrolysis induces a new conformation with a lower affinity, thus transferring the dsDNA to an adjacent subunit by a power stroke. DNA revolves unidirectionally along the hexameric channel wall of the ATPase, but neither the dsDNA nor the ATPase itself rotates along its own axis. One ATP is hydrolyzed in each transitional step, and six ATPs are consumed for one helical turn of 360°. Transition of the same dsDNA chain along the channel wall, but at a location 60° different from the last contact, urges dsDNA to move forward 1.75 base pairs each step (10.5bp per turn/6ATP=1.75bp per ATP). Each connector subunit tilts with a left-handed orientation at a 30° angle in relation to its vertical axis that runs anti-parallel to the right-handed dsDNA helix, facilitating the one-way traffic of dsDNA. The connector channel has been shown to cause four steps of transition due to four positively charged lysine rings that make direct contact with the negatively charged DNA phosphate backbone. Translocation of dsDNA into the procapsid by revolution avoids the difficulties during rotation that are associated with DNA supercoiling. Since the revolution mechanism can apply to any stoichiometry, this motor mechanism might reconcile the stoichiometry discrepancy in many phage systems where the ATPase has been found as a tetramer, hexamer, or nonamer. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Z-DNA and its biological function%Z-DNA及其生物学功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤雅男; 杨攀; 胡成钰

    2009-01-01

    Z-DNA是一种处于高能状态、不稳定的DNA分子构象.形成Z-DNA的原因有很多:首先,转录过程中,移动的RNA聚合酶在模板DNA的5'端产生负超螺旋扭曲力,导致Z-DNA的形成;其次,含有d(GC)_n序列的核酸分子在高浓度的NaCl、[Co(NH_3)_6]~(2+)盐溶液中也能够形成Z-DNA;最后,化学修饰也可以使DNA产生稳定的Z-DNA.Z-DNA是在体外首先发现的,但随着研究的不断深入,发现Z-DNA在体内也广泛存在并可能具有功能的多样性,包括参与基因表达调控、染色体断裂、基因重组、抗病毒、病毒发生等生物学过程.%Z-DNA is an instable and high energy DNA conformation in vivo and it can be formed in many conditions.Firstly,when RNA polymerase is moving on a DNA template,transcription can result in negative supercoiling behind the polymerase,thus facilitating Z-DNA conformation at permissive regions.Secondly,the Z-DNA-conformation which is formed by d(GC)_n sequence can also be stabled in high-salt solution of NaCl or [Co(NH_3)_6]~(2+) and lastly,the Z-DNA can be formed by covalent modifications.Though Z-DNA was firstly discovered in vitro,recently many evidences revealed that Z-DNA was widely existed and may possessed diversity of function in vivo,including gene expression and regulation,chromosomal breaks,recombination,antivirus defense and virus generation and so on.

  13. Internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in wild emmer wheat is catalyzed by S1-type endonucleases translocated to the nucleus upon induction of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Gila; Morgenstern, Yaakov; Khan, Asif; Rapp, Yemima Givaty; Pesok, Anat; Nevo, Eviatar; Grafi, Gideon

    2015-03-01

    Leaves of cereal plants display nucleosomal fragmentation of DNA attributed to the action of nucleases induced during program cell death (PCD). Yet, the specific nuclease activity responsible for generating double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) that lead to DNA fragmentation has not been fully described. Here, we characterized a Ca2+/Mg2+-dependent S1-type endonuclease activity in leaves of wild emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccoides Köern.) capable of introducing DSBs as demonstrated by the conversion of supercoiled plasmid DNA into a linear duplex DNA. In-gel nuclease assay revealed a nuclease of about 35 kDa capable of degrading both single stranded DNA and RNA. We further showed that the endonuclease activity can be purified on Concanavalin A and treatment with peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) did not abolish its activity. Furthermore, ConA-associated endonuclease was capable of generating nucleosomal DNA fragmentation in tobacco nuclei. Since S1-type endonucleases lack canonical nuclear localization signal it was necessary to determine their subcellular localization. To this end, a cDNA encoding for a putative 34 kDa S1-type nuclease, designated TaS1-like (TaS1L) was synthesized based on available sequence data of Triticum aestivum and fused with RFP. Introduction into protoplasts showed that TaS1L-RFP is cytoplasmic 24h post transformation but gradually turn nuclear at 48 h concomitantly with induction of cell death. Our results suggest that DNA fragmentation occurring in leaves of wild emmer wheat may be attributed to S1-type endonuclease(s) that reside in the cytoplasm but translocate to the nucleus upon induction of cell death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV: Overexpression, Purification, and Differential Inhibition by Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L. Mark

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae gyrA and gyrB genes specifying the DNA gyrase subunits have been cloned into pET plasmid vectors under the control of an inducible T7 promoter and have been separately expressed in Escherichia coli. Soluble 97-kDa GyrA and 72-kDa GyrB proteins bearing polyhistidine tags at their respective C-terminal and N-terminal ends were purified to apparent homogeneity by one-step nickel chelate column chromatography and were free of host E. coli topoisomerase activity. Equimolar amounts of the gyrase subunits reconstituted ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling with comparable activity to gyrase of E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In parallel, S. pneumoniae topoisomerase IV ParC and ParE subunits were similarly expressed in E. coli, purified to near homogeneity as 93- and 73-kDa proteins, and shown to generate efficient ATP-dependent DNA relaxation and DNA decatenation activities. Using the purified enzymes, we examined the inhibitory effects of three paradigm fluoroquinolones—ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and clinafloxacin—which previous genetic studies with S. pneumoniae suggested act preferentially through topoisomerase IV, through gyrase, and through both enzymes, respectively. Surprisingly, all three quinolones were more active in inhibiting purified topoisomerase IV than gyrase, with clinafloxacin showing the greatest inhibitory potency. Moreover, the tested agents were at least 25-fold more effective in stabilizing a cleavable complex (the relevant cytotoxic lesion) with topoisomerase IV than with gyrase, with clinafloxacin some 10- to 32-fold more potent against either enzyme, in line with its superior activity against S. pneumoniae. The uniform target preference of the three fluoroquinolones for topoisomerase IV in vitro is in apparent contrast to the genetic data. We interpret these results in terms of a model for bacterial killing by quinolones in which cellular factors can modulate the effects of target affinity to determine the cytotoxic

  15. Segregated growth kinetics of Escherichia coli DH5α-NH36 in exponential-fed perfusion culture for pDNA vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguía-Soto, Rodolfo; García-Rendón, Aurora; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Guerrero-Germán, Patricia; Tejeda-Mansir, Armando

    2015-01-01

    The clinical demand of plasmid DNA (pDNA) has been increasing constantly. An exponential-fed perfusion (EFP) culture is a new mode for plasmid production for clinical trials and commercialization. However, the culture conditions may lead to cell filamentation and growth cessation. In this study, the variation of the physiological state and the plasmid contents of Escherichia coli DH5α hosting pVAX1-NH36 in an EFP culture for application as a Leishmaniasis vaccine was investigated. The culture performance was monitored using flow cytometry (FC) and real-time quantitative PCR. The FC studies showed a high viability of cell population and a constant distribution of complexity and size. A high homogeneity of pDNA (>95 % of supercoiled) was obtained, which might be attributed to a better culture environment. The obtained plasmid specific and volumetric yields of 1.8 mg/g dcw and 36.5 mg/L represent typical values for laboratory-scale plasmid production in a defined medium. A segregated kinetic model of the perfusion system was developed and fitted to the experimental data (R(2) > 0.96). A practical conclusion of this work is that a space-time yield analysis of a bioprocess requires a viability evaluation. This new strategy of culture operation might help in the efficient production of pDNA for therapeutic use.

  16. Cobalt(III), nickel(II) and ruthenium(II) complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline family of ligands: DNA binding and photocleavage studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Arounaguiri; D Easwaramoorthy; A Ashokkumar; Aparna Dattagupta; Bhaskar G Maiya

    2000-02-01

    DNA binding and photocleavage characteristics of a series of mixedligand complexes of the type [M(phen)2LL]n+ (where M = Co(III), Ni(II) or Ru(II), LL = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), phenanthroline-dione (phen-dione) or dipyridophenazine (dppz) and = 3 or 2) have been investigated in detail. Various physico-chemical and biochemical techniques including UV/Visible, fluorescence and viscometric titration, thermal denaturation, and differential pulse voltammetry have been employed to probe the details of DNA binding by these complexes; intrinsic binding constants () have been estimated under a similar set of experimental conditions. Analysis of the results suggests that intercalative ability of the coordinated ligands varies as dppz > phen < phen-dione in this series of complexes. While the Co(II) and Ru(II) complexes investigated in this study effect photocleavage of the supercoiled pBR 322 DNA, the corresponding Ni(II) complexes are found to be inactive under similar experimental conditions. Results of detailed investigations carried out inquiring into the mechanistic aspects of DNA photocleavage by [Co(phen)2 (dppz)]3+ have also been reported.

  17. Enhancement of X-ray-induced breaks in DNA bound to molecules containing platinum: a possible application to hadrontherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K; Frohlich, H; Usami, N; Takakura, K; Le Sech, C

    2002-01-01

    Complexes made of DNA and chloroterpyridine platinum (PtTC) bound to plasmid DNA were placed in aqueous solution and irradiated with monochromatic X rays tuned to the resonant photoabsorption energy of the L(III) shell of the platinum atom. The number of single- and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) induced by irradiation on a supercoiled DNA plasmid was measured by the production of the circular-nicked and linear forms. To distinguish the contribution of the direct effects of ionization from the indirect effects due to a free radical attack, experiments were also performed in the presence of a hydroxyl free radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). An enhancement of the number of SSBs and DSBs was observed when the plasmids contained the platinum intercalating molecules. A quantitative analysis was made to evaluate the respective contributions of the direct effects (Auger effect) and the indirect effects (free radical attack) to the number of DNA strand breaks. Even when off-resonant X rays were used, the strand break efficiency remained higher than expected based upon the absorption cross section, suggesting that the platinum bound to DNA might be increasing the yield of strand breaks. A mechanism is suggested that involves photoelectrons generated from the ionization of water which efficiently ionize platinum atoms. If this mechanism is correct, then heavy atoms, with a large cross section for ionization by electrons that are bound to the DNA, should behave as a radiosensitizer. This observation may provide insight into understanding the effects of new radiotherapy protocols, related chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin, and conventional radiotherapy for the treatment of tumors. A possible way to deliver the dose selectively in a well-defined volume, which uses the properties of the linear energy transfer of atomic ions interacting with matter, is suggested.

  18. A seven-year storage report of good manufacturing practice-grade naked plasmid DNA: stability, topology, and in vitro/in vivo functional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Wolfgang; Schmeer, Marco; Kobelt, Dennis; Baier, Ruth; Harder, Alexander; Walhorn, Volker; Anselmetti, Dario; Aumann, Jutta; Fichtner, Iduna; Schleef, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The great interest for naked plasmid DNA in gene therapy studies is reflected by the fact that it is currently used in 18% of all gene therapy trials. Therefore, validation of topology and functionality of DNA resulting from its long-term stability is an essential requirement for safe and effective gene transfer. To this aim, we analyzed the stability of good manufacturing practice-grade pCMVβ reporter plasmid DNA by capillary gel electrophoresis, agarose gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy. The plasmid DNA was produced for a clinical gene transfer study started in 2005 and was stored for meanwhile 7 years under continuously monitored conditions at -20 °C. The stability of plasmid DNA was monitored by LacZ transgene expression functional assays performed in vitro and in vivo on the 7-year-old plasmid DNA samples compared with plasmid batches newly produced in similar experimental conditions and quality standards. The analyses revealed that during the overall storage time and conditions, the proportion of open circular and supercoiled or covalently closed circular forms is conserved without linearization or degradation of the plasmid. The in vitro transfection and the in vivo jet-injection of DNA showed unaltered functionality of the long-stored plasmid. In summary, the 7-year-old and the newly produced plasmid samples showed similar topology and expression performance. Therefore, our stable storage conditions are effective to preserve the integrity of the DNA to be used in clinical studies. This is an important prerequisite for the long-term performance of gene transfer materials used in trials of long duration as well as of the reference material used in standardization procedures and assays.

  19. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  20. DNA cleavage is independent of synapsis during Streptomyces phage phiBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Lu; Wang, Jin; Ou, Xijun; Zhao, Guoping; Ding, Xiaoming

    2010-10-01

    Bacteriophage-encoded serine recombinases have great potential in genetic engineering but their catalytic mechanisms have not been adequately studied. Integration of ϕBT1 and ϕC31 via their attachment (att) sites is catalyzed by integrases of the large serine recombinase subtype. Both ϕBT1 and ϕC31 integrases were found to cleave single-substrate att sites without synaptic complex formation, and ϕBT1 integrase relaxed supercoiled DNA containing a single integration site. Systematic mutation of the central att site dinucleotide revealed that cleavage was independent of nucleotide sequence, but rejoining was crucially dependent upon complementarity of the cleavage products. Recombination between att sites containing dinucleotides with antiparallel complementarity led to antiparallel recombination. Integrase-substrate pre-incubation experiments revealed that the enzyme can form an attP-integrase tetramer complex that then captures naked attB DNA, and suggested that two alternative assembly pathways can lead to synaptic complex formation.

  1. Synthesis and DNA Cleavage Studies of 2,6-Dimethoxyhydroquinone- 3-Mercaptoacetic Acid Conjugates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to investigate the use of short peptide chains as carriers of new anti-tumor agents, we synthesized four tripeptide-cytotoxic agent conjugates: DMQ-MA-Lys(DMQ-MA)-Phe -Arg-Ome, DMQ-MA-Lys(DMQ-MA)-Ile-Arg-Ome, DMQ-MA-Lys(DMQ-MA)-Val-Arg-Ome, DMQ-MA-Lys(DMQ-MA)-Lys(Cbz)-Arg-Ome. The cytotoxic agent conjugated to the N-terminal and the ξ-amino group of Lysine of the tripeptide is 2,6-dimethoxyhydroquinone-3- mercaptoacetic acid (DMQ-MA). The tripeptides were synthesized by coupling protected amino acid residues according to Pfp/DCC methods (Pfp: pentafluorophenol, DCC:N,N'-dicyclohexyl- carbodiimide) in solution. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that these compounds can cleave supercoiled DNA into open-circular form in drug concentration as low as 4-50 μM without H2O2 and UV irradiation. Further studies on their cytotoxicity for these conjugates are ongoing.

  2. Copper(II) complexes with new fluoroquinolones: Synthesis, structure, spectroscopic and theoretical study, DNA damage, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorotíková, Sandra; Kožíšková, Júlia; Malček, Michal; Jomová, Klaudia; Herich, Peter; Plevová, Kristína; Briestenská, Katarína; Chalupková, Anna; Mistríková, Jela; Milata, Viktor; Dvoranová, Dana; Bučinský, Lukáš

    2015-09-01

    Copper(II) complexes with fluoroquinolones in the presence of the nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligands 1,10-phenanthroline have been considered in detail. The phenanthroline moiety was introduced into the ligand environment with the aim to determine whether the nuclease activity is feasible. All suitable X-ray structures of the complexes under study reveal a distorted square pyramidal coordination geometry for Cu(II) atom. The conformational and spectroscopic (FT-IR and UV-visible) behavior has been analyzed and has been interpreted with respect to B3LYP/6-311G* calculations including molecular dynamics. The ability of the complexes to cleave DNA was studied by agarose gel electrophoresis with plasmid DNA pBSK+. The results have confirmed that the complexes under study behave as the chemical nucleases. Nuclease like activity in the absence of hydrogen peroxide allows us to deduce an interaction of the complexes with the DNA resulting in the conversion of supercoiled circular DNA to the nicked form. The DNA cleavage activity enhanced by the presence of hydrogen peroxide demonstrates the participation of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide radical anions and hydroxyl radicals which presence was confirmed independently using the standard radical scavenging agents. It has been suggested that the radical formation through the Fenton/Haber-Weiss reaction is mediated by the redox cycling mechanisms with the participation of cupric/cuprous ions. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated as the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50). The potential effects of tested compounds on replication of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) under in vitro conditions were also evaluated. However, no antiviral activity against MHV-68 was observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro DNA binding studies of the sweetening agent saccharin and its copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T

    2014-01-05

    The interactions of fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) with the sodium salt of sweetener saccharin (sacH) and its copper and zinc complexes, namely [M(sac)2(H2O)4]·2H2O (M=Cu(II) or Zn(II)) were studied by using UV-Vis titration, fluorometric competition, thermal denaturation, viscosity and gel electrophoresis measurements. The intrinsic binding constants (Kb) obtained from absorption titrations were estimated to be 2.86 (±0.06)×10(4)M(-1) for Na(sac), 6.67 (±0.12)×10(4)M(-1) for Cu-sac and 4.01 (±0.08)×10(4)M(-1) for Zn-sac. The Cu-sac complex binds to FS-DNA via intercalation with a KA value of 50.12 (±0.22)×10(4)M(-1) as evidenced by competitive binding studies with ethidium bromide. Moreover, competition experiments with Hoechst 33258 are indicative of a groove binding mode of Na(sac) and Zn-sac with binding constants of 3.13 (±0.16)×10(4)M(-1) and 5.25 (±0.22)×10(4)M(-1), respectively. The spectroscopic measurements indicate a moderate DNA binding affinity of Na(sac) and its metal complexes. The suggested binding modes are further confirmed by the thermal denaturation and viscosity measurements. In addition, Cu-sac and Zn-sac show weak ability to damage to pBR322 supercoiled plasmid DNA.

  4. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  5. Structure, mechanics, and binding mode heterogeneity of LEDGF/p75-DNA nucleoprotein complexes revealed by scanning force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; de Feyter, Steven

    2014-04-01

    plasmid DNA substrates I-IV in the absence of LEDGF/p75; proof-of-principle of bend angle determination on supercoiled plasmid DNA-EcoRV binding to cognate and non-cognate sites in pBR322 plasmid DNA. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00022f

  6. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  7. Synthesis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  8. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  9. Structure-guided mutational analysis of the OB, HhH, and BRCT domains of Escherichia coli DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Kai; Nair, Pravin A; Shuman, Stewart

    2008-08-22

    NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases (LigAs) are ubiquitous in bacteria and essential for growth. LigA enzymes have a modular structure in which a central catalytic core composed of nucleotidyltransferase and oligonucleotide-binding (OB) domains is linked via a tetracysteine zinc finger to distal helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and BRCT (BRCA1-like C-terminal) domains. The OB and HhH domains contribute prominently to the protein clamp formed by LigA around nicked duplex DNA. Here we conducted a structure-function analysis of the OB and HhH domains of Escherichia coli LigA by alanine scanning and conservative substitutions, entailing 43 mutations at 22 amino acids. We thereby identified essential functional groups in the OB domain that engage the DNA phosphodiester backbone flanking the nick (Arg(333)); penetrate the minor grove and distort the nick (Val(383) and Ile(384)); or stabilize the OB fold (Arg(379)). The essential constituents of the HhH domain include: four glycines (Gly(455), Gly(489), Gly(521), Gly(553)), which bind the phosphate backbone across the minor groove at the outer margins of the LigA-DNA interface; Arg(487), which penetrates the minor groove at the outer margin on the 3 (R)-OH side of the nick; and Arg(446), which promotes protein clamp formation via contacts to the nucleotidyltransferase domain. We find that the BRCT domain is required in its entirety for effective nick sealing and AMP-dependent supercoil relaxation.

  10. PprA Protein Is Involved in Chromosome Segregation via Its Physical and Functional Interaction with DNA Gyrase in Irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devigne, Alice; Guérin, Philippe; Lisboa, Johnny; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Servant, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, was previously shown to be required for cell survival and accurate chromosome segregation after exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, we used an in vivo approach to determine, by shotgun proteomics, putative PprA partners coimmunoprecipitating with PprA when cells were exposed to gamma rays. Among them, we found the two subunits of DNA gyrase and, thus, chose to focus our work on characterizing the activities of the deinococcal DNA gyrase in the presence or absence of PprA. Loss of PprA rendered cells hypersensitive to novobiocin, an inhibitor of the B subunit of DNA gyrase. We showed that treatment of bacteria with novobiocin resulted in induction of the radiation desiccation response (RDR) regulon and in defects in chromosome segregation that were aggravated by the absence of PprA. In vitro, the deinococcal DNA gyrase, like other bacterial DNA gyrases, possesses DNA negative supercoiling and decatenation activities. These two activities are inhibited in vitro by novobiocin and nalidixic acid, whereas PprA specifically stimulates the decatenation activity of DNA gyrase. Together, these results suggest that PprA plays a major role in chromosome decatenation via its interaction with the deinococcal DNA gyrase when D. radiodurans cells are recovering from exposure to ionizing radiation. IMPORTANCE D. radiodurans is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. This bacterium is able to cope with high levels of DNA lesions generated by exposure to extreme doses of ionizing radiation and to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Here, we identified partners of PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, previously shown to be required for radioresistance. Our study leads to three main findings: (i) PprA interacts with DNA gyrase after irradiation, (ii) treatment of cells with novobiocin results in defects in chromosome segregation that are

  11. Self-consistent treatment of electrostatics in molecular DNA braiding through external forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dominic J

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we consider a physical system in which two DNA molecules braid about each other. The distance between the two molecular ends, on either side of the braid, is held at a distance much larger than supercoiling radius of the braid. The system is subjected to an external pulling force, and a moment that induces the braiding. In a model, developed for understanding such a system, we assume that each molecule can be divided into a braided and unbraided section. We also suppose that the DNA is nicked so that there is no constraint of the individual linking numbers of the molecules. Included in the model are steric and electrostatic interactions, thermal fluctuations of the braided and unbraided sections of the molecule, as well as the constraint on the braid linking (catenation) number. We compare two approximations used in estimating the free energy of the braided section. One is where the amplitude of undulations of one molecule with respect to the other is determined only by steric interactions. The other is a self-consistent determination of the mean-squared amplitude of these undulations. In this second approximation electrostatics should play an important role in determining this quantity, as suggested by physical arguments. We see that if the electrostatic interaction is sufficiently large there are indeed notable differences between the two approximations. We go on to test the self-consistent approximation-included in the full model-against experimental data for such a system, and we find good agreement. However, there seems to be a slight left-right-handed braid asymmetry in some of the experimental results. We discuss what might be the origin of this small asymmetry.

  12. DNA fragmentation in apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cleavage of chromosomal DNA into oligonucleosomal size fragments is an integral part of apoptosis. Elegant biochemical work identified the DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) as a major apoptotic endonuclease for DNA fragmentation in vitro. Genetic studies in mice support the importance of DFF in DNA fragmentation and possibly in apoptosis in vivo. Recent work also suggests the existence of additional endonucleases for DNA degradation. Understanding the roles of individual endonucleases in apoptosis, and how they might coordinate to degrade DNA in different tissues during normal development and homeostasis, as well as in various diseased states, will be a major research focus in the near future.

  13. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  14. New water-soluble copper (II) complexes including 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline and L-tyrosine: synthesis, characterization, DNA interactions and cytotoxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnci, Duygu; Aydın, Rahmiye; Yılmaz, Dilek; Gençkal, Hasene Mutlu; Vatan, Özgür; Çinkılıç, Nilüfer; Zorlu, Yunus

    2015-02-05

    Two new water-soluble copper(II) complexes, [Cu(dmphen)2(NO3)]NO3 (1), [Cu(dmphen)(tyr)(H2O)]NO3·H2O (2) and the diquarternary salt of dmphen (dmphen = 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline and tyr = L-tyrosine), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The CT-DNA binding properties of these compounds have been investigated by absorption, emission spectroscopy and thermal denaturation measurements. The supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA cleavage activity of these compounds has been explored by agarose gel electrophoresis. The cytotoxicity of these compounds against MCF-7, Caco-2, A549 cancer cells and BEAS-2B healthy cells was also studied by the XTT method. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit significant cytotoxicity, with lower IC50 values than those of cisplatin.

  15. [Uracil-DNA glycosylases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Dariusz; Słupianek, Artur; Ksiazek, Dominika; Skórski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Uracil is one of four nitrogen bases, most frequently found in normal RNA. Uracyl can be found also in DNA as a result of enzymatic or non-enzymatic deamination of cytosine as well as misincorporation of dUMP instead of dTMP during DNA replication. Uracil from DNA can be removed by DNA repair enzymes with apirymidine site as an intermediate. However, if uracil is not removed from DNA a pair C:G in parental DNA can be changed into a T:A pair in the daughter DNA molecule. Therefore, uracil in DNA may lead to a mutation. Uracil in DNA, similarly to thymine, forms energetically most favorable hydrogen bonds with adenine, therefore uracil does not change the coding properties of DNA. Uracil in DNA is recognized by uracil DNA glycosylase (UDGs), which initiates DNA base excision repair, leading to removing of uracil from DNA and replacing it by thymine or cytosine, when arose as a result of cytosine deamination. Eukaryotes have at least four nuclear UDGs: UNG2, SMUG1, TDG i MBD4, while UNG1 operates in the mitochondrium. UNG2 is involved in DNA repair associated with DNA replication and interacts with PCNA and RPA proteins. Uracil can also be an intermediate product in the process of antigen-dependent antibody diversification in B lymphocytes. Enzymatic deamination of viral DNA by host cells can be a defense mechanism against viral infection, including HIV-1. UNG2, MBD4 and TDG glycosylases may cooperate with mismatch repair proteins and TDG can be involved in nucleotide excision repair system.

  16. Poly(ADP-ribose) binds to the splicing factor ASF/SF2 and regulates its phosphorylation by DNA topoisomerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Maria; Czubaty, Alicja; Girstun, Agnieszka; Staron, Krzysztof; Althaus, Felix R

    2008-07-18

    Human DNA topoisomerase I plays a dual role in transcription, by controlling DNA supercoiling and by acting as a specific kinase for the SR-protein family of splicing factors. The two activities are mutually exclusive, but the identity of the molecular switch is unknown. Here we identify poly(ADP-ribose) as a physiological regulator of the two topoisomerase I functions. We found that, in the presence of both DNA and the alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2 (ASF/SF2, a prototypical SR-protein), poly(ADP-ribose) affected topoisomerase I substrate selection and gradually shifted enzyme activity from protein phosphorylation to DNA cleavage. A likely mechanistic explanation was offered by the discovery that poly(ADP-ribose) forms a high affinity complex with ASF/SF2 thereby leaving topoisomerase I available for directing its action onto DNA. We identified two functionally important domains, RRM1 and RS, as specific poly(ADP-ribose) binding targets. Two independent lines of evidence emphasize the potential biological relevance of our findings: (i) in HeLa nuclear extracts, ASF/SF2, but not histone, phosphorylation was inhibited by poly(ADP-ribose); (ii) an in silico study based on gene expression profiling data revealed an increased incidence of alternative splicing within a subset of inflammatory response genes that are dysregulated in cells lacking a functional poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. We propose that poly(ADP-ribose) targeting of topoisomerase I and ASF/SF2 functions may participate in the regulation of gene expression.

  17. Force induced DNA melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K [Center for Condensed Matter Theory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-12 (India)], E-mail: santosh@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: maiti@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2009-01-21

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f{sub m}, at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  18. DNA damage and autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Panayiotidis, Mihalis I. [School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Franco, Rodrigo, E-mail: rfrancocruz2@unl.edu [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  19. Mixed-ligand copper(II) phenolate complexes: Synthesis, spectral characterization, phosphate-hydrolysis, antioxidant, DNA interaction and cytotoxic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumoorthy, Perumal; Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Prabhu, Durai; Arulvasu, Chinnasamy; Rahiman, Aziz Kalilur

    2015-01-01

    A series of phenol-based mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes of the type [CuL1-4(diimine)] (1-8), where L1-4 = N1,N2-bis(5-substituted-2-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-ethylene/phenylenediimine and diimine = 2,2‧-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), have been isolated and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. Electronic spectra of complexes suggest Cu(II) cation has a d9 electronic configuration, adopting distorted octahedral geometry with axial elongation, due to Jahn-Teller effect. Electrochemical studies of complexes evidenced one-electron irreversible reduction wave in the cathodic region. The observed rate constant (k) values for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylphosphate (4-NPP) are in the range of 0.25-3.82 × 10-2 min-1. The obtained room temperature magnetic moment values (1.79-1.90 BM) lies within the range observed for octahedral copper(II) complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that these complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed intercalation with minor-groove binding, and the complex 4 exhibits highest binding activity than the other complexes. The cleavage activity on supercoiled pBR322 DNA revealed the involvement of hydroxyl radical and singlet-oxygen as reactive oxygen species, and complexes encourage binding to minor-groove. Further, the cytotoxicity of complex 4 on human hepatocellular liver carcinoma HepG2 cell line implies the cell death through apoptosis.

  20. DNA tagged microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  1. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  2. DNA computing models

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatova, Zoya; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    In this excellent text, the reader is given a comprehensive introduction to the field of DNA computing. The book emphasizes computational methods to tackle central problems of DNA computing, such as controlling living cells, building patterns, and generating nanomachines.

  3. Forensic DNA and bioinformatics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bianchi, Lucia; Liò, Pietro

    The field of forensic science is increasingly based on biomolecular data and many European countries are establishing forensic databases to store DNA profiles of crime scenes of known offenders and apply DNA testing...

  4. DNA tagged microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  5. Click chemistry with DNA

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The advent of click chemistry has led to an influx of new ideas in the nucleic acids field. The copper catalysed alkyne–azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is the method of choice for DNA click chemistry due to its remarkable efficiency. It has been used to label oligonucleotides with fluorescent dyes, sugars, peptides and other reporter groups, to cyclise DNA, to synthesise DNA catenanes, to join oligonucleotides to PNA, and to produce analogues of DNA with modified nucleobases and backbone...

  6. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  7. Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructures Assembled from DNA Star Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Tile-based DNA self-assembly is a promising method in DNA nanotechnology and has produced a wide range of nanostructures by using a small set of unique DNA strands. DNA star motif, as one of DNA tiles, has been employed to assemble varieties of symmetric one-, two-, three-dimensional (1, 2, 3D) DNA nanostructures. Herein, we describe the design principles, assembly methods, and characterization methods of 3D DNA nanostructures assembled from the DNA star motifs.

  8. Using DNA Computing in Classification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abd El-Menem Abd El-Bary; Roshdy AbdelRassoul; Aya Mohamed El-Ebshihy

    2016-01-01

    ... to demonstrate better accuracy and predict some objects for example boys. In addition the explanation of DNA computing, Boolean Circuit using DNA, Molecular Beacons, also DNA logic gates and some applications using DNA computing...

  9. DNA interaction, antimicrobial studies of newly synthesized copper (II) complexes with 2-amino-6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzothiazole Schiff base ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambabu, Aveli; Pradeep Kumar, Marri; Tejaswi, Somapangu; Vamsikrishna, Narendrula; Shivaraj

    2016-12-01

    Four novel Schiff base ligands, L(1) (1-((E)-(6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)naphthalen-2-ol, C19H11F3N2O2S), L(2) (3-((E)-(6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)benzene-1,2-diol, C15H9F3N2O3S), L(3) (2-((E)-(6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)-5-methoxyphenol, C16H11F3N2O3S) and L(4) (2-((E)-(6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)-4-bromophenol, C15H8BrF3N2O2S) and their binary copper(II) complexes 1 [Cu(L(1))2], 2 [Cu(L(2))2], 3 [Cu(L(3))2] and 4 [Cu(L(4))2] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, ESI mass, FT-IR, ESR, UV-Visible, magnetic susceptibility, TGA, SEM and powder XRD studies. Based on spectral and analytical data, a square planar geometry is assigned for all Cu(II) complexes. The ligands and their Cu(II) complexes have been screened for antimicrobial activity against bacterial species E. coli, P. aeruginosa, B. amyloliquefaciens and S. aureus and fungal species S. rolfsii and M. phaseolina and it is observed that all Cu(II) complexes are more potent than corresponding ligands. DNA binding (UV absorption, fluorescence and viscosity titrations) and cleavage (oxidative and photo cleavage) studies of Cu(II) complexes have also been investigated against calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and supercoiled pBR322 DNA respectively. From the experimental results, it is found that the complexes bound effectively to CT-DNA through an intercalative mode and also cleaved pBR322 DNA in an efficient manner. The DNA binding and cleavage affinities of newly synthesized Cu(II) complexes are in the order of 2>1>3>4.

  10. Fast phylogenetic DNA barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Willerslev, Eske

    2008-01-01

    We present a heuristic approach to the DNA assignment problem based on phylogenetic inferences using constrained neighbour joining and non-parametric bootstrapping. We show that this method performs as well as the more computationally intensive full Bayesian approach in an analysis of 500 insect...... DNA sequences obtained from GenBank. We also analyse a previously published dataset of environmental DNA sequences from soil from New Zealand and Siberia, and use these data to illustrate the fact that statistical approaches to the DNA assignment problem allow for more appropriate criteria...... for determining the taxonomic level at which a particular DNA sequence can be assigned....

  11. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  12. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  13. Racemic DNA crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pradeep K; Collie, Gavin W; Kauffmann, Brice; Huc, Ivan

    2014-12-22

    Racemates increase the chances of crystallization by allowing molecular contacts to be formed in a greater number of ways. With the advent of protein synthesis, the production of protein racemates and racemic-protein crystallography are now possible. Curiously, racemic DNA crystallography had not been investigated despite the commercial availability of L- and D-deoxyribo-oligonucleotides. Here, we report a study into racemic DNA crystallography showing the strong propensity of racemic DNA mixtures to form racemic crystals. We describe racemic crystal structures of various DNA sequences and folded conformations, including duplexes, quadruplexes, and a four-way junction, showing that the advantages of racemic crystallography should extend to DNA.

  14. DNA barcoding for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C G; Trinder, Sarah A; Long, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding uses specific regions of DNA in order to identify species. Initiatives are taking place around the world to generate DNA barcodes for all groups of living organisms and to make these data publically available in order to help understand, conserve, and utilize the world's biodiversity. For land plants the core DNA barcode markers are two sections of coding regions within the chloroplast, part of the genes, rbcL and matK. In order to create high quality databases, each plant that is DNA barcoded needs to have a herbarium voucher that accompanies the rbcL and matK DNA sequences. The quality of the DNA sequences, the primers used, and trace files should also be accessible to users of the data. Multiple individuals should be DNA barcoded for each species in order to check for errors and allow for intraspecific variation. The world's herbaria provide a rich resource of already preserved and identified material and these can be used for DNA barcoding as well as by collecting fresh samples from the wild. These protocols describe the whole DNA barcoding process, from the collection of plant material from the wild or from the herbarium, how to extract and amplify the DNA, and how to check the quality of the data after sequencing.

  15. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    for a long period of time before its information is accessed by the cell. Although DNA plays a critical role as an informational storage molecule, it is by no means as unexciting as a computer tape or disk drive. The structure of the DNA described by Watson and Crick in 1953 is a right handed helix of two......This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...... individual antiparallel DNA strands. Hydrogen bonds provide specificity that allows pairing between the complementary bases (A.T and G.C) in opposite strands. Base stacking occurs near the center of the DNA helix and provides a great deal of stability to the helix (in addition to hydrogen bonding). The sugar...

  16. Biophysics of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Surveying the last sixty years of research, this book describes the physical properties of DNA in the context of its biological functioning. It is designed to enable both students and researchers of molecular biology, biochemistry and physics to better understand the biophysics of DNA, addressing key questions and facilitating further research. The chapters integrate theoretical and experimental approaches, emphasising throughout the importance of a quantitative knowledge of physical properties in building and analysing models of DNA functioning. For example, the book shows how the relationship between DNA mechanical properties and the sequence specificity of DNA-protein binding can be analyzed quantitatively by using our current knowledge of the physical and structural properties of DNA. Theoretical models and experimental methods in the field are critically considered to enable the reader to engage effectively with the current scientific literature on the physical properties of DNA.

  17. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  18. [DNA methylation and epigenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniushin, B F

    2006-09-01

    In eukaryotic cells, nuclear DNA is subject to enzymatic methylation with the formation of 5-methylcytosine residues, mostly within the CG and CNG sequences. In plants and animals this DNA methylation is species-, tissue-, and organelle-specific. It changes (decreases) with age and is regulated by hormones. On the other hand, genome methylation can control hormonal signal. Replicative and post-replicative DNA methylation types are distinguished. They are mediated by multiple DNA methyltransferases with different site-specificity. Replication is accompanied by the appearance of hemimethylated DNA sites. Pronounced asymmetry of the DNA strand methylation disappears to the end of the cell cycle. A model of methylation-regulated DNA replication is proposed. DNA methylation controls all genetic processes in the cell (replication, transcription, DNA repair, recombination, and gene transposition). It is the mechanism of cell differentiation, gene discrimination and silencing. In animals, suppression of DNA methylation stops development (embryogenesis), switches on apoptosis, and is usually lethal. Disruption of DNA methylation pattern results in the malignant cell transformation and serves as one of the early diagnostic features of carcinogenesis. In malignant cell the pattern of DNA methylation, as well as the set of DNA methyltransferase activities, differs from that in normal cell. In plants inhibition of DNA methylation is accompanied by the induction of seed storage and florescence genes. In eukaryotes one and the same gene can be simultaneously methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues. It can be thus suggested, that the plant cell contains at least two different, and probably, interdependent systems of DNA methylation. The first eukaryotic adenine DNA methyltransferase was isolated from plants. This enzyme methylates DNA with the formation of N6-methyladenine residues in the sequence TGATCA (TGATCA-->TGm6ATCA). Plants possess AdoMet-dependent endonucleases

  19. Novel DNA probes for sensitive DNA detection

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, James Alistair

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and interrogate DNA sequences allows further understanding and\\ud diagnosis of genetic disease. The ability to perform such analysis of genetic material\\ud requires highly selective and reliable technologies. Furthermore techniques which can use\\ud simple and cheap equipment allow the use of such technologies for point of care analysis.\\ud \\ud Described in this thesis are two novel DNA probe systems designed for mutation\\ud discrimination and sequence recognition of PCR ...

  20. An unusual (H(2)O)(20) discrete water cluster in the supramolecular host of a charge transfer platinum(ii) complex: cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sutanuva; Castiñeiras, Alfonso; Mondal, Tapan K; Mondal, Arindam; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Goswami, Sreebrata

    2010-10-28

    The chemical reaction of Pt(II)(L(1))Cl(2) [L(1) = N-4-tolylpyridine-2-aldimine] with a bidentate N,S-donor atom ligand, 2-methylthioaniline, (HL(2)) in alkaline methanolic medium yielded a mixed ligand donor-acceptor complex, [Pt(II)(L(1))(L(2))]Cl, [1]Cl. The complex has been characterized by different spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The complex showed intense interligand charge transfer (ILCT) transition in the long wavelength region of UV-vis spectrum (>600 nm). The single-crystal X-ray structure of complex, [1]Cl·3.3H(2)O is reported. The cationic complex upon crystallization from aqueous methanol solvent produces an assembly of discrete, three dimensional (H(2)O)(20) guest moiety within the reference Pt-complex host lattice. The water assembly showed a unique type of aggregation of a distorted cube encapsulated by hydrogen bonded network of a twelve-water ring. The complex displayed one reversible cathodic response at -0.75 V and two irreversible anodic responses at 0.42 and 0.79 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The redox processes are characterized by EPR and spectroelectrochemistry. Density-functional theory calculations were employed to confirm the structural features and to support the spectral and redox properties of the complex. The square-planar complex has been found to intercalate DNA. Fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, cyclic voltammetry, viscosity measurements, together with DNA melting studies have been employed to characterize the binding of [1]Cl with calf thymus DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis indicates that the complex cleaves supercoiled (SC) pUC19 plasmid DNA to its nicked circular (NC) form via singlet oxygen. As determined by a MTT assay, [1]Cl exhibits significant cytotoxicity with IC(50) value 58 μM.

  1. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  2. DNA media storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christy M.Bogard; Eric C.Rouchka; Benjamin Arazi

    2008-01-01

    In 1994. University of Southern California computer scientist,Dr.Leonard Adleman solved the Hamiltonian path problem using DNA as a computational mechanism.He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems.Because of the limitations in discovery time,resource requirements,and sequence mismatches,DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice.However,advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field of DNA computing.Practical applications of DNA are not restricted to computation alone.This research presents a novel approach in which DNA could be used as a means of storing files.Through the use of multiple sequence alignment combined with intelligent heuristics,the most probabilistic file contents can be determined with minimal errors.

  3. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  4. DNA topology and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions.

  5. DNA Media Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Christy M; Rouchka, Eric C

    2007-09-01

    In 1994, University of Southern California computer scientist Dr. Leonard Adelman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using DNA as a computational mechanism. He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems. Because of the limitations in discovery time, resource requirements, and sequence mismatches, DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice. However, advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field of DNA Computing. Practical applications of DNA are not restricted to computation alone. This research presents a novel approach in which DNA could be used as a means of storing files. Through the use of Multiple Sequence Alignment combined with intelligent heuristics, the most probabilistic file contents can be determined with minimal errors.

  6. DNA based computers II

    CERN Document Server

    Landweber, Laura F; Baum, Eric B

    1998-01-01

    The fledgling field of DNA computers began in 1994 when Leonard Adleman surprised the scientific community by using DNA molecules, protein enzymes, and chemicals to solve an instance of a hard computational problem. This volume presents results from the second annual meeting on DNA computers held at Princeton only one and one-half years after Adleman's discovery. By drawing on the analogy between DNA computing and cutting-edge fields of biology (such as directed evolution), this volume highlights some of the exciting progress in the field and builds a strong foundation for the theory of molecular computation. DNA computing is a radically different approach to computing that brings together computer science and molecular biology in a way that is wholly distinct from other disciplines. This book outlines important advances in the field and offers comprehensive discussion on potential pitfalls and the general practicality of building DNA based computers.

  7. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  8. Non-enolisable Knoevenagel condensate appended Schiff bases-metal (II) complexes: Spectral characteristics, DNA-binding and nuclease activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubendran, Ammavasi; Kesavan, Mookkandi Palsamy; Ayyanaar, Srinivasan; Mitu, Liviu; Athappan, Periyakaruppan; Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban

    2017-06-01

    New Schiff base complexes [Cu(L1)Cl] (1), [Ni(L1)Cl] (2), [Zn(L1)Cl] (3), and [Fe(L2)H2OCl] (4) {L1 = (4E)-3-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-4-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)pentan-2-one, L2 = 2,2‧-(1E,1‧E)-(3-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-pentane-2,4-diylidene)bis(azan-1-yl-1 idene)diphenol} have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, IR, FAB-mass, EPR, spectral studies and electrochemical studies, the ligands L1 &L2 were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectra. Complex 1 show a visible spectral d-d band near 600 nm and display cyclic voltammetric quasireversible response for the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple vs Ag/AgCl in DMSO. The EPR spectrum of 1 show g‖ > g⊥ suggesting a square planar geometry around copper with dx2 - y2 as the ground state. The mass spectral results have confirmed the proposed structure for complexes 1-4. DNA binding properties of these complexes 1-4 have been investigated by absorption titrations, cyclic voltammetric studies and circular dichroism studies. On titration with DNA, the complexes 1-4 show hypochromism at the MLCT band (13-31%) with a red shift of 1-8 nm in the electronic spectrum and positive shift of voltammetric E1/2 in the CV studies are in favour of intercalative binding. CD spectra of 1 showed an increase in molar ellipticity (θ278) of the positive band with a minor red shift indicating the transition of B-form of DNA to A like form. DNA cleavage studies of complexes 1 and 4 with pUC18 DNA were studied by gel electrophoresis and complex 4 cleaves supercoiled pUC18 DNA in an oxidative manner in the presence of H2O2 and on photo irradiation at 312 nm.

  9. Mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline with tridentate phenolate/pyridyl/(benz)imidazolyl Schiff base ligands: covalent vs non-covalent DNA binding, DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Chandrasekaran; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher

    2014-11-01

    A series of copper(II) complexes of the types [Cu(L)(phen)](ClO4) 1-2, where HL is a tridentate ligand with two nitrogen and one oxygen donor atoms (2NO) such as 2-(2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyliminomethyl)phenol (HL1) and 2-(2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl-imino)methyl)-4-methylphenol (HL2), phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and [Cu(L)(phen)](ClO4)23-6, where L is a tridentate ligand with three nitrogen donor atoms (3N) such as (2-pyridin-2-ylethyl)pyridin-2-ylmethyleneamine (L3), 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl)-pyridin-2-yl-methyleneamine (L4), 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl)(1H-imidazol-2-ylmethylene)-amine (L5) and 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl)(4,4a-dihydroquinolin-2-ylmethylene)amine (L6), has been isolated and characterized by different spectral techniques. In single crystal X-ray structures, 1 possesses square pyramidal distorted trigonal bipyramidal (SPDTBP), geometry whereas 3 and 4 possess trigonal bipyramidal distorted square pyramidal (TBDSP) geometry. UV-Vis and fluorescence spectral studies reveal that the complexes 1-6 bind non-covalently to calf thymus DNA more strongly than the corresponding covalently bound chlorido complexes [Cu(2NO)Cl] 1a-2a and [Cu(3N)Cl2] 3a-6a. On prolonged incubation, all the complexes 1-6 exhibit double strand cleavage of supercoiled (SC) plasmid DNA in the absence of an activator. Also, they exhibit cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell lines (HBL-100) more potent than their corresponding chlorido complexes 1a-6a, and have the potential to act as efficient cytotoxic drugs.

  10. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  11. DNA Media Storage

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In 1994, University of Southern California computer scientist Dr. Leonard Adelman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using DNA as a computational mechanism. He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems. Because of the limitations in discovery time, resource requirements, and sequence mismatches, DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice. However, advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field...

  12. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  13. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  14. Disentangling DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  15. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  16. DNA Microarray Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakare SP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA Microarray is the emerging technique in Biotechnology. The many varieties of DNA microarray or DNA chip devices and systems are described along with their methods for fabrication and their use. It also includes screening and diagnostic applications. The DNA microarray hybridization applications include the important areas of gene expression analysis and genotyping for point mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and short tandem repeats (STRs. In addition to the many molecular biological and genomic research uses, this review covers applications of microarray devices and systems for pharmacogenomic research and drug discovery, infectious and genetic disease and cancer diagnostics, and forensic and genetic identification purposes.

  17. DNA Based Molecular Scale Nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    water adsorption on DNA origami template and its impact on DNA- mediated chemical reactions. We also extended the concept of DNA- mediated reaction to...addition, we have expanded our efforts to include DNA- mediated HF etching of SiÜ2, DNA- mediated nanoimprinting lithography, DNA-based patterning of self...detailed kinetics study of DNA- mediated chemical reactions. Examples of such reactions include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of inorganic oxide and HF

  18. Regulation of DNA Replication Initiation by Chromosome Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in fluorescence imaging have shown that the bacterial nucleoid is surprisingly dynamic in terms of both behavior (movement and organization) and structure (density and supercoiling). Links between chromosome structure and replication initiation have been made in a number of species, and it is universally accepted that favorable chromosome structure is required for initiation in all cells. However, almost nothing is known about whether cells use changes in chromosome struct...

  19. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  20. Workshop on DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Lehmann (Alan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.A. van Zeeland (Albert); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude); B.A. Bridges; A. Collins; R.P.D. Fuchs; G.P. Margison; R. Montesano; E. Moustacchi; A.T. Natarajan; M. Radman; A. Sarasin; E. Seeberg; C.A. Smith; M. Stefanini (Miria); L.H. Thompson; G.P. van der Schans; C.A. Weber (Christine); M.Z. Zdzienika

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA workshop on DNA repair with emphasis on eukaryotic systems was held, under the auspices of the EC Concerted Action on DNA Repair and Cancer, at Noordwijkerhout (The Netherlands) 14-19 April 1991. The local organization of the meeting was done under the auspices of the Medical Genetic C

  1. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  2. Extended DNA Tile Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Martin; Kryger, Mille; Zhang, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic linear DNA tile actuator is expanded to three new structures of higher complexity. The original DNA actuator was constructed from a central roller strand which hybridizes with two piston strands by forming two half-crossover junctions. A linear expansion of the actuator is obtained...

  3. DNA sequences encoding erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.K.

    1987-10-27

    A purified and isolated DNA sequence is described consisting essentially of a DNA sequence encoding a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence sufficiently duplicative of that of erythropoietin to allow possession of the biological property of causing bone marrow cells to increase production of reticulocytes and red blood cells, and to increase hemoglobin synthesis or iron uptake.

  4. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  5. New palladium(II) and platinum(II) 5,5-diethylbarbiturate complexes with 2-phenylpyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine and 2,2'-dipyridylamine: synthesis, structures, DNA binding, molecular docking, cellular uptake, antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Kaya, Yunus; Samli, Hale; Harrison, William T A; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2015-04-21

    Novel palladium(ii) and platinum(ii) complexes of 5,5-diethylbarbiturate (barb) with 2-phenylpyridine (Hppy), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 2,2'-dipyridylamine (dpya) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, NMR and ESI-MS. Single-crystal diffraction measurements show that complex consists of binuclear [Pd2(μ-barb-κN,O)2(ppy-κN,C)2] moieties, while complexes are mononuclear, [M(barb-κN)2(L-κN,N')] (L = bpy or dpya). has a composition of [Pt(dpya-κN,N')2][Ag(barb-κN)2]2·4H2O and was assumed to have a structure of [Pt(barb-κN)(Hppy-κN)(ppy-κN,C)]·3H2O. The complexes were found to exhibit significant DNA binding affinity by a non-covalent binding mode, in accordance with molecular docking studies. In addition, complexes and displayed strong binding with supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA. Cellular uptake studies were performed to assess the subcellular localization of the selected complexes. A moderate radical scavenging activity of and was confirmed by DPPH and ABTS tests. Complexes , , and showed selectivity against HT-29 (colon) cell line.

  6. Premeltons in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Henry M

    2016-03-01

    Premeltons are examples of emergent-structures (i.e., structural-solitons) that arise spontaneously in DNA due to the presence of nonlinear-excitations in its structure. They are of two kinds: B-B (or A-A) premeltons form at specific DNA-regions to nucleate site-specific DNA melting. These are stationary and, being globally-nontopological, undergo breather-motions that allow drugs and dyes to intercalate into DNA. B-A (or A-B) premeltons, on the other hand, are mobile, and being globally-topological, act as phase-boundaries transforming B- into A-DNA during the structural phase-transition. They are not expected to undergo breather motions. A key feature of both types of premeltons is the presence of an intermediate structural-form in their central regions (proposed as being a transition-state intermediate in DNA-melting and in the B- to A-transition), which differs from either A- or B-DNA. Called beta-DNA, this is both metastable and hyperflexible--and contains an alternating sugar-puckering pattern along the polymer backbone combined with the partial unstacking (in its lower energy-forms) of every-other base-pair. Beta-DNA is connected to either B- or to A-DNA on either side by boundaries possessing a gradation of nonlinear structural-change, these being called the kink and the antikink regions. The presence of premeltons in DNA leads to a unifying theory to understand much of DNA physical chemistry and molecular biology. In particular, premeltons are predicted to define the 5' and 3' ends of genes in naked-DNA and DNA in active-chromatin, this having important implications for understanding physical aspects of the initiation, elongation and termination of RNA-synthesis during transcription. For these and other reasons, the model will be of broader interest to the general-audience working in these areas. The model explains a wide variety of data, and carries with it a number of experimental predictions--all readily testable--as will be described in this review.

  7. Whose DNA is this?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taroni, Franco; Biedermann, Alex; Vuille, Joëlle;

    2013-01-01

    This communication seeks to draw the attention of researchers and practitioners dealing with forensic DNA profiling analyses to the following question: is a scientist's report, offering support to a hypothesis according to which a particular individual is the source of DNA detected during...... evoked during the international conference "The hidden side of DNA profiles. Artifacts, errors and uncertain evidence" held in Rome (April 27th to 28th, 2012). Indeed, despite the fact that this conference brought together some of the world's leading forensic DNA specialists, it appeared clearly....... This paper intends to emphasize the actuality of this topic and suggest beneficial ways ahead towards a more reasoned use of forensic DNA in criminal proceedings....

  8. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  9. Whose DNA is this?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taroni, Franco; Biedermann, Alex; Vuille, Joëlle

    2013-01-01

    This communication seeks to draw the attention of researchers and practitioners dealing with forensic DNA profiling analyses to the following question: is a scientist's report, offering support to a hypothesis according to which a particular individual is the source of DNA detected during...... evoked during the international conference "The hidden side of DNA profiles. Artifacts, errors and uncertain evidence" held in Rome (April 27th to 28th, 2012). Indeed, despite the fact that this conference brought together some of the world's leading forensic DNA specialists, it appeared clearly...... talk considerably different languages. It thus is fundamental to address this issue of communication about results of forensic DNA analyses, and open a dialogue with practicing non-scientists at large who need to make meaningful use of scientific results to approach and help solve judicial cases...

  10. Synthesis, interaction with DNA and antiproliferative activities of two novel Cu(II) complexes with Schiff base of benzimidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen-Ji; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Jiang, Dong-Hua; Guo, Li; Cai, Meng-Fei; Yang, Hu-Bin; Lin, Qiu-Yue

    2014-03-01

    Two novel copper(II) complexes with Schiff base of benzimidazole [Cu(L)Cl]2·CH3OH have been synthesized. HL1 (N-(benzimidazol-2-ymethyl)-5-chlorosalicylideneimine, C15H11ClN3O) and HL2 (N-(benzimidazol-2-ymethyl)-salicylideneimine, C15H12N3O) are ligands of complex (1) and complex (2), respectively. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, TGA and X-ray diffraction. Within the complexes, Cu(II) ions were four coordinated by two nitrogen atom of azomethine and imine, one phenolic oxygen atom from HL and one chloride atom. A distorted quadrilateral structure was formed. Complex (1) crystallized in the triclinic crystal system. Results showed that π-π stacking effect occurred due to the existence of aromatic ring from Schiff base and hydrogen bonding between methanol and adjacent atoms. The DNA binding properties of the complexes were investigated by electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that complexes bound to DNA via partial intercalation mode. The DNA binding constants Kb/(L mol-1) were 1.81 × 104 (1), 1.37 × 104 (2), 6.27 × 103 (HL1) and 3.14 × 103 (HL2) at 298 K. The title complexes could quench the emission intensities of EB-DNA system significantly. The results of agarose gel electrophoresis indicated complex (1) could cleave supercoiled DNA through the oxidative mechanism. The inhibition ratios revealed that complex (1) and HL1 had strong antiproliferative activities against human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) lines and human colorectal cancer cells (COLO205) lines in vitro. The antiproliferative activities of complex (1) against MCF-7 lines (IC50 = 16.9 ± 1.5 μmol L-1) and against COLO205 lines (IC50 = 16.5 ± 3.4 μmol L-1) is much stronger than that of HL1, which had the potential to develop anti-cancer drug.

  11. Left-handed DNA crossovers. Implications for DNA-DNA recognition and structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timsit, Y; Shatzky-Schwartz, M; Shakked, Z

    1999-02-01

    The close approach of DNA segments participates in many biological functions including DNA condensation and DNA processing. Previous crystallographic studies have shown that B-DNA self-fitting by mutual groove-backbone interaction produces right-handed DNA crossovers. These structures have opened new perspectives on the role of close DNA-DNA interactions in the architecture and activity the DNA molecule. In the present study, the analysis of the crystal packing of two B-DNA decamer duplexes d(CCIIICCCGG) and d(CCGCCGGCGG) reveals the existence of new modes of DNA crossing. Symmetric left-handed crossovers are produced by mutual fitting of DNA grooves at the crossing point. New sequence patterns contribute to stabilize longitudinal fitting of the sugar-phosphate backbone into the major groove. In addition, the close approach of DNA segments greatly influences the DNA conformation in a sequence dependent manner. This study provides new insights into the role of DNA sequence and structure in DNA-DNA recognition. In providing detailed molecular views of DNA crossovers of opposite chirality, this study can also help to elucidate the role of symmetry and chirality in the recognition of complex DNA structures by protein dimers or tetramers, such as topoisomerase II and recombinase enzymes. These results are discussed in the context of the possible relationships between DNA condensation and DNA processing.

  12. DNA extraction from crayfish exoskeleton

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yanhe; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Xiaolian; Luo, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Gul, Yasmeen

    2011-01-01

    .... However, it is difficult to extract DNA from them. This study was intended to investigate CE as a DNA source and design an easy and efficient DNA extraction protocol for polymerase chain reactions...

  13. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  14. Multiplexed DNA-Modified Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of silicon chips with 16 DNA-modified electrodes (DME chips) utilizing DNA-mediated charge transport for multiplexed detection of DNA and DNA-binding protein targets. Four DNA sequences were simultaneously distinguished on a single DME chip with fourfold redundancy, including one incorporating a single base mismatch. These chips also enabled investigation of the sequence-specific activity of the restriction enzyme Alu1. DME chips supported dense DNA monolayer formation with ...

  15. DNA mini-barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; McKenna, Charly

    2012-01-01

    Conventional DNA barcoding uses an approximately 650 bp DNA barcode of the mitochondrial gene COI for species identification in animal groups. Similar size fragments from chloroplast genes have been proposed as barcode markers for plants. While PCR amplification and sequencing of a 650 bp fragment is consistent in freshly collected and well-preserved specimens, it is difficult to obtain a full-length barcode in older museum specimens and samples which have been preserved in formalin or similar DNA-unfriendly preservatives. A comparable issue may prevent effective DNA-based authentication and testing in processed biological materials, such as food products, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. In these cases, shorter DNA sequences-mini-barcodes-have been robustly recovered and shown to be effective in identifying majority of specimens to a species level. Furthermore, short DNA regions can be utilized via high-throughput sequencing platforms providing an inexpensive and comprehensive means of large-scale species identification. These properties of mini-barcodes, coupled with the availability of standardized and universal primers make mini-barcodes a feasible option for DNA barcode analysis in museum samples and applied diagnostic and environmental biodiversity analysis.

  16. What Controls DNA Looping?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J. Perez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The looping of DNA provides a means of communication between sequentially distant genomic sites that operate in tandem to express, copy, and repair the information encoded in the DNA base sequence. The short loops implicated in the expression of bacterial genes suggest that molecular factors other than the naturally stiff double helix are involved in bringing the interacting sites into close spatial proximity. New computational techniques that take direct account of the three-dimensional structures and fluctuations of protein and DNA allow us to examine the likely means of enhancing such communication. Here, we describe the application of these approaches to the looping of a 92 base-pair DNA segment between the headpieces of the tetrameric Escherichia coli Lac repressor protein. The distortions of the double helix induced by a second protein—the nonspecific nucleoid protein HU—increase the computed likelihood of looping by several orders of magnitude over that of DNA alone. Large-scale deformations of the repressor, sequence-dependent features in the DNA loop, and deformability of the DNA operators also enhance looping, although to lesser degrees. The correspondence between the predicted looping propensities and the ease of looping derived from gene-expression and single-molecule measurements lends credence to the derived structural picture.

  17. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  18. DNA vaccines against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccine technology has been considerably developed within the last two decades. This cost effective and promising strategy can be applied for therapy of cancers and for curing allergy, chronic and infectious diseases, such as a seasonal and pandemic influenza. Despite numerous advantages, several limitations of this technology reduce its performance and can retard its commercial exploitation in humans and its veterinary applications. Inefficient delivery of the DNA vaccine into cells of immunized individuals results in low intracellular supply of suitable expression cassettes encoding an antigen, in its low expression level and, in turn, in reduced immune responses against the antigen. Improvement of DNA delivery into the host cells might significantly increase effectiveness of the DNA vaccine. A vast array of innovative methods and various experimental strategies have been applied in order to enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. They include various strategies improving DNA delivery as well as expression and immunogenic potential of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccines. Researchers focusing on DNA vaccines against influenza have applied many of these strategies. Recent examples of the most successful modern approaches are discussed in this review.

  19. DNA Import into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Yu M; Dietrich, A; Weber-Lotfi, F; Ibrahim, N; Klimenko, E S; Tarasenko, V I; Bolotova, T A; Koulintchenko, M V

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, it has become evident that the condition for normal functioning of mitochondria in higher eukaryotes is the presence of membrane transport systems of macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids). Natural competence of the mitochondria in plants, animals, and yeasts to actively uptake DNA may be directly related to horizontal gene transfer into these organelles occurring at much higher rate compared to the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, in contrast with import of proteins and tRNAs, little is known about the biological role and molecular mechanism underlying import of DNA into eukaryotic mitochondria. In this review, we discuss current state of investigations in this area, particularly specificity of DNA import into mitochondria and its features in plants, animals, and yeasts; a tentative mechanism of DNA import across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes; experimental data evidencing several existing, but not yet fully understood mechanisms of DNA transfer into mitochondria. Currently available data regarding transport of informational macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) into the mitochondria do not rule out that the mechanism of protein and tRNA import as well as tRNA and DNA import into the mitochondria may partially overlap.

  20. DNA Bending elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, David Alexander

    DNA bending elasticity on length scales of tens of basepairs is of critical importance in numerous biological contexts. Even the simplest models of DNA bending admit of few simple analytic results, thus there is a need for numerical methods to calculate experimental observables, such as distance distributions, forces, FRET efficiencies, and timescales of particular large-scale motions. We have implemented and helped develop a coarse-grained representation of DNA and various other covalently-linked groups that allows simple calculation of such observables for varied experimental systems. The simple freely-jointed chain (FJC) model and extremely coarse resolution proved useful in understanding DNA threading through nanopores, identifying steric occlusion by other parts of the chain as a prime culprit for slower capture as distance to the pore decreased. Enhanced sampling techniques of a finer resolution discrete wormlike chain (WLC) model permitted calculation of cyclization rates for small chains and identified the ramifications of a thermodynamically-sound treatment of thermal melts. Adding treatment of double-stranded DNA's helical nature and single-stranded DNA provided a model system that helped demonstrate the importance of statistical fluctuations in even highly-stressed DNA mini-loops, and allowed us to verify that even these constructs show no evidence of excitation-induced softening. Additional incorporation of salt-sensitivity to the model allowed us to calculate forces and FRET efficiencies for such mini-loops and their uncircularized precursors, thereby furthering the understanding of the nature of IHF binding and bending of its recognition sequence. Adding large volume-excluding spheres linked to the ends of the dsDNA permits calculation of distance distributions and thus small-angle X-ray scattering, whereby we demonstrated the validity of the WLC in describing bending fluctuations in DNA chains as short as 42 bp. We also make important connections

  1. DNA-PK assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2004-10-12

    The present invention provides a method for detecting DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in a biological sample. The method includes contacting a biological sample with a detectably-labeled phosphate donor and a synthetic peptide substrate defined by the following features to provide specific recognition and phosphorylation by DNA-PK: (1) a phosphate-accepting amino acid pair which may include serine-glutamine (Ser-Gln) (SQ), threonine-glutamine (Thr-Gln) (TQ), glutamine-serine (Gln-Ser) (QS), or glutamine-threonine (Gln-Thr) (QT); (2) enhancer amino acids which may include glutamic acid or glutamine immediately adjacent at the amino- or carboxyl- side of the amino acid pair and forming an amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (3) a first spacer sequence at the amino terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (4) a second spacer sequence at the carboxyl terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit, which spacer sequences may include any combination of amino acids that does not provide a phosphorylation site consensus sequence motif; and, (5) a tag moiety, which may be an amino acid sequence or another chemical entity that permits separating the synthetic peptide from the phosphate donor. A compostion and a kit for the detection of DNA-PK activity are also provided. Methods for detecting DNA, protein phosphatases and substances that alter the activity of DNA-PK are also provided. The present invention also provides a method of monitoring protein kinase and DNA-PK activity in living cells. -A composition and a kit for monitoring protein kinase activity in vitro and a composition and a kit for monitoring DNA-PK activities in living cells are also provided. A method for identifying agents that alter protein kinase activity in vitro and a method for identifying agents that alter DNA-PK activity in living cells are also provided.

  2. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  3. Apoptosis and DNA Methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Huan X.; Hackett, James A. [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Nestor, Colm [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Dunican, Donncha S.; Madej, Monika; Reddington, James P. [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Pennings, Sari [Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Harrison, David J. [Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Meehan, Richard R., E-mail: Richard.Meehan@hgu.mrc.ac.uk [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms assist in maintaining gene expression patterns and cellular properties in developing and adult tissues. The molecular pathology of disease states frequently includes perturbation of DNA and histone methylation patterns, which can activate apoptotic pathways associated with maintenance of genome integrity. This perspective focuses on the pathways linking DNA methyltransferases and methyl-CpG binding proteins to apoptosis, and includes new bioinformatic analyses to characterize the evolutionary origin of two G/T mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylases, MBD4 and TDG.

  4. "Artifactual" arsenate DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    The recent claim by Wolfe-Simon et al. that the Halomonas bacterial strain GFAJ-1 when grown in arsenate-containing medium with limiting phosphate is able to substitute phosphate with arsenate in biomolecules including nucleic acids and in particular DNA(1) arose much skepticism, primarily due...... to the very limited chemical stability of arsenate esters (see ref. 2 and references therein). A major part of the criticisms was concerned with the insufficient (bio)chemical evidence in the Wolfe-Simon study for the actual chemical incorporation of arsenate in DNA (and/or RNA). Redfield et al. now present...... evidence that the identification of arsenate DNA was artifactual....

  5. Apoptosis and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Meehan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms assist in maintaining gene expression patterns and cellular properties in developing and adult tissues. The molecular pathology of disease states frequently includes perturbation of DNA and histone methylation patterns, which can activate apoptotic pathways associated with maintenance of genome integrity. This perspective focuses on the pathways linking DNA methyltransferases and methyl-CpG binding proteins to apoptosis, and includes new bioinformatic analyses to characterize the evolutionary origin of two G/T mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylases, MBD4 and TDG.

  6. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  7. Experimental DNA computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkel, Christiaan

    2005-01-01

    Because of their information storing and processing capabilities, nucleic acids are interesting building blocks for molecular scale computers. Potential applications of such DNA computers range from massively parallel computation to computational gene therapy. In this thesis, several implementations

  8. DNA-templated nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Héctor A; Woolley, Adam T

    2009-02-01

    Nanofabrication, or the organizational control over matter at the nanometre scale, is an intriguing scientific challenge requiring multidisciplinary tools for its solution. DNA is a biomolecule that can be combined with other nanometre-scale entities through chemical self-assembly to form a broad variety of nanomaterials. In this tutorial review we present the principles that allow DNA to interact with other chemical species, and describe the challenges and potential applications of DNA as a template for making both biological and inorganic features with nanometre resolution. As such, this report should be of interest to chemists, surface and materials scientists, biologists, and nanotechnologists, as well as others who seek to use DNA in nanofabrication.

  9. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelow, R B

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10/sup 4/ fold.

  10. DNA complexes: Durable binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Adam R.

    2011-11-01

    A tetra-intercalator compound that threads through a DNA double-helix to form a remarkably stable complex exhibits an unusual combination of sequence specificity and rapid association yet slow dissociation.

  11. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  12. Kink solitons in DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Zdravković, S; Daniel, M

    2012-01-01

    We here examine the nonlinear dynamics of artificial homogeneous DNA chain relying on the plain-base rotator model. It is shown that such dynamics can exhibit kink and antikink solitons of sine-Gordon type. In that respect we propose possible experimental assays based on single molecule micromanipulation techniques. The aim of these experiments is to excite the rotational waves and to determine their speeds along excited DNA. We propose that these experiments should be conducted either for the case of double stranded (DS) or single stranded (SS) DNA. A key question is to compare the corresponding velocities of the rotational waves indicating which one is bigger. The ratio of these velocities appears to be related with the sign of the model parameter representing ratio of the hydrogen-bonding and the covalent-bonding interaction within the considered DNA chain.

  13. DNA Sampling Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DNA Sampling Hook is a significant improvement on a method of obtaining a tissue sample from a live fish in situ from an aquatic environment. A tissue sample...

  14. Evolution of DNA sequencing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tipu, Hamid Nawaz; Shabbir, Ambreen

    2015-01-01

    Sanger and coworkers introduced DNA sequencing in 1970s for the first time. It principally relied on termination of growing nucleotide chain when a dideoxythymidine triphosphate (ddTTP) was inserted...

  15. DNA-Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2010-01-01

    DNA-nanostrukturer giver nye muligheder for studier af individuelle molekyler. Ved at udnytte DNAs unikke selvsamlende egenskaber kan man designe systemer, hvorpå der kan studeres kemiske reaktioner, fluoroforer og biiomolekyler på enkeltmolekyle-niveau....

  16. Gomphid DNA sequence data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — DNA sequence data for several genetic loci. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It's already publicly available on GenBank. It can be accessed through...

  17. Close encounters with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, C.; Yoo, J.; Comer, J.; Wells, D. B.; Luan, B.; Aksimentiev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena and we review the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field. PMID:25238560

  18. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  19. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  20. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  1. Divergent RNA transcription: a role in promoter unwinding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Catherine; Corless, Samuel; Gilbert, Nick

    2013-01-01

    New approaches using biotinylated-psoralen as a probe for investigating DNA structure have revealed new insights into the relationship between DNA supercoiling, transcription and chromatin compaction. We explore a hypothesis that divergent RNA transcription generates negative supercoiling at promoters facilitating initiation complex formation and subsequent promoter clearance.

  2. Toward larger DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Alexandria N; Saaem, Ishtiaq; Vogen, Briana N; Brown, Stanley; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-10-08

    Structural DNA nanotechnology, and specifically scaffolded DNA origami, is rapidly developing as a versatile method for bottom-up fabrication of novel nanometer-scale materials and devices. However, lengths of conventional single-stranded scaffolds, for example, 7,249-nucleotide circular genomic DNA from the M13mp18 phage, limit the scales of these uniquely addressable structures. Additionally, increasing DNA origami size generates the cost burden of increased staple-strand synthesis. We addressed this 2-fold problem by developing the following methods: (1) production of the largest to-date biologically derived single-stranded scaffold using a λ/M13 hybrid virus to produce a 51 466-nucleotide DNA in a circular, single-stranded form and (2) inexpensive DNA synthesis via an inkjet-printing process on a chip embossed with functionalized micropillars made from cyclic olefin copolymer. We have experimentally demonstrated very efficient assembly of a 51-kilobasepair origami from the λ/M13 hybrid scaffold folded by chip-derived staple strands. In addition, we have demonstrated two-dimensional, asymmetric origami sheets with controlled global curvature such that they land on a substrate in predictable orientations that have been verified by atomic force microscopy.

  3. DNA vaccines and intradermal vaccination by DNA tattooing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, K; van den Berg, J H; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, DNA vaccination has been developed as a method for the induction of immune responses. However, in spite of high expectations based on their efficacy in preclinical models, immunogenicity of first generation DNA vaccines in clinical trials was shown to be poor, and no DNA vaccines have yet been licensed for human use. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of second generation DNA vaccines and DNA vaccine delivery methods. Here we review the key characteristics of DNA vaccines as compared to other vaccine platforms, and recent insights into the prerequisites for induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines will be discussed. We illustrate the development of second generation DNA vaccines with the description of DNA tattooing as a novel DNA delivery method. This technique has shown great promise both in a small animal model and in non-human primates and is currently under clinical evaluation.

  4. Superimposed Code Theorectic Analysis of DNA Codes and DNA Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008 IEEE Proceedings of International Symposium on Information Theory, pp. 2292...5, June 2008, pp. 525-34. 32 28. A. Macula, et al., “Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008...combinatorial method of bio-memory design and detection that encodes item or process information as numerical sequences represented in DNA. ComDMem is a

  5. Simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lan-Tian; Meng, Zhenyu; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A highly useful tool for studying lncRNAs is simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH, which reveals the localization and quantitative information of RNA and DNA in cellular contexts. However, a simple combination of RNA FISH and DNA FISH often generates disappointing results because the fragile RNA signals are often damaged by the harsh conditions used in DNA FISH for denaturing the DNA. Here, we describe a robust and simple RNA-DNA FISH protocol, in which amino-labeled nucleic acid probes are used for RNA FISH. The method is suitable to detect single-RNA molecules simultaneously with DNA.

  6. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease.

  7. Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Reiter, T; Fütterer, J; Weingärtner, B; Winnacker, E L

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to study the mechanism of initiation of adenovirus DNA replication, an assay was developed to investigate the pattern of DNA synthesis in early replicative intermediates of adenovirus DNA. By using wild-type virus-infected cells, it was possible to place the origin of adenovirus type 2 DNA replication within the terminal 350 to 500 base pairs from either of the two molecular termini. In addition, a variety of parameters characteristic of adenovirus DNA replication were compared ...

  8. Forensic DNA profiling and database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerchelvam, S; Norazmi, M N

    2003-07-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection.

  9. Forensic DNA Profiling and Database

    OpenAIRE

    Panneerchelvam, S.; Norazmi, M. N.

    2003-01-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection.

  10. Cyclization of short DNA fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Pui-Man; Zhen, Yi

    2017-09-01

    From the per unit length free energy for DNA under tension, we have calculated an effective contour length dependent persistence length for short DNA. This effective persistence length results from the enhanced fluctuations in short DNA. It decreases for shorter DNA, making shorter DNA more flexible. The results of the J-factor calculated using this effective persistence length are in good agreement with experimental data.

  11. Local chromatin microenvironment determines DNMT activity : from DNA methyltransferase to DNA demethylase or DNA dehydroxymethylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Venkiteswaran, Muralidhar; Chen, Hui; Xu, Guo-Liang; Plosch, Torsten; Rots, Marianne G.

    2015-01-01

    Insights on active DNA demethylation disproved the original assumption that DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic modification. Interestingly, mammalian DNA methyltransferases 3A and 3B (DNMT-3A and -3B) have also been reported to induce active DNA demethylation, in addition to their well-known fun

  12. Programmable Quantitative DNA Nanothermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareau, David; Desrosiers, Arnaud; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2016-07-13

    Developing molecules, switches, probes or nanomaterials that are able to respond to specific temperature changes should prove of utility for several applications in nanotechnology. Here, we describe bioinspired strategies to design DNA thermoswitches with programmable linear response ranges that can provide either a precise ultrasensitive response over a desired, small temperature interval (±0.05 °C) or an extended linear response over a wide temperature range (e.g., from 25 to 90 °C). Using structural modifications or inexpensive DNA stabilizers, we show that we can tune the transition midpoints of DNA thermometers from 30 to 85 °C. Using multimeric switch architectures, we are able to create ultrasensitive thermometers that display large quantitative fluorescence gains within small temperature variation (e.g., > 700% over 10 °C). Using a combination of thermoswitches of different stabilities or a mix of stabilizers of various strengths, we can create extended thermometers that respond linearly up to 50 °C in temperature range. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility, robustness, and efficiency of these programmable DNA thermometers by monitoring temperature change inside individual wells during polymerase chain reactions. We discuss the potential applications of these programmable DNA thermoswitches in various nanotechnology fields including cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedecine, nanoelectronics, nanomaterial, and synthetic biology.

  13. Electroeluting DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzosa-Alvarez, Ana L; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Torres-Huerta, Ana L; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M

    2010-09-05

    Purified DNA fragments are used for different purposes in Molecular Biology and they can be prepared by several procedures. Most of them require a previous electrophoresis of the DNA fragments in order to separate the band of interest. Then, this band is excised out from an agarose or acrylamide gel and purified by using either: binding and elution from glass or silica particles, DEAE-cellulose membranes, "crush and soak method", electroelution or very often expensive commercial purification kits. Thus, selecting a method will depend mostly of what is available in the laboratory. The electroelution procedure allows one to purify very clean DNA to be used in a large number of applications (sequencing, radiolabeling, enzymatic restriction, enzymatic modification, cloning etc). This procedure consists in placing DNA band-containing agarose or acrylamide slices into sample wells of the electroeluter, then applying current will make the DNA fragment to leave the agarose and thus be trapped in a cushion salt to be recovered later by ethanol precipitation.

  14. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  15. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L. (Harvard)

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  16. DNA Origami with Double Stranded DNA as a Unified Scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Han, Dongran; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami is a widely used technology for self-assembling precisely structured nanoscale objects that contain a large number of addressable features. Typical scaffolds are long, single strands of DNA (ssDNA) that are folded into distinct shapes through the action of many, short ssDNA staples that are complementary to several different domains of the scaffold. However, sources of long single stranded DNA are scarce, limiting the size and complexity of structures that can be assembled. Here we demonstrated that dsDNA scaffolds can be directly used to fabricate integrated DNA origami structures that incorporate both of the constituent ssDNA molecules. Two basic principles were employed in the design of scaffold folding paths – folding path asymmetry and periodic convergence of the two ssDNA scaffold strands. Asymmetry in the folding path minimizes unwanted complementarity between staples, and incorporating an offset between the folding paths of each ssDNA scaffold strand reduces the number of times that complementary portions of the strands are brought into close proximity with one another, both of which decrease the likelihood of dsDNA scaffold recovery. Meanwhile, the folding paths of the two ssDNA scaffold strands were designed to periodically converge to promote the assembly of a single, unified structure rather than two individual ones. Our results reveal that this basic strategy can be used to reliably assemble integrated DNA nanostructures from dsDNA scaffolds. PMID:22830653

  17. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-15

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen the yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  18. Organization of DNA partners and strand exchange mechanisms during Flp site-specific recombination analyzed by difference topology, single molecule FRET and single molecule TPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chien-Hui; Liu, Yen-Ting; Savva, Christos G; Rowley, Paul A; Cannon, Brian; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Russell, Rick; Holzenburg, Andreas; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2014-02-20

    Flp site-specific recombination between two target sites (FRTs) harboring non-homology within the strand exchange region does not yield stable recombinant products. In negatively supercoiled plasmids containing head-to-tail sites, the reaction produces a series of knots with odd-numbered crossings. When the sites are in head-to-head orientation, the knot products contain even-numbered crossings. Both types of knots retain parental DNA configuration. By carrying out Flp recombination after first assembling the topologically well defined Tn3 resolvase synapse, it is possible to determine whether these knots arise by a processive or a dissociative mechanism. The nearly exclusive products from head-to-head and head-to-tail oriented "non-homologous" FRT partners are a 4-noded knot and a 5-noded knot, respectively. The corresponding products from a pair of native (homologous) FRT sites are a 3-noded knot and a 4-noded catenane, respectively. These results are consistent with non-homology-induced two rounds of dissociative recombination by Flp, the first to generate reciprocal recombinants containing non-complementary base pairs and the second to produce parental molecules with restored base pairing. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) analysis of geometrically restricted FRTs, together with single molecule tethered particle motion (smTPM) assays of unconstrained FRTs, suggests that the sites are preferentially synapsed in an anti-parallel fashion. This selectivity in synapse geometry occurs prior to the chemical steps of recombination, signifying early commitment to a productive reaction path. The cumulative topological, smFRET and smTPM results have implications for the relative orientation of DNA partners and the directionality of strand exchange during recombination mediated by tyrosine site-specific recombinases.

  19. DNA methylation in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pokrywka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of overweight and obese people is increasing at an alarming rate, especially in the developed and developing countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and in consequence for premature death. The development of obesity results from the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors, which include sedentary life style and abnormal eating habits. In the past few years a number of events accompanying obesity, affecting expression of genes which are not directly connected with the DNA base sequence (e.g. epigenetic changes, have been described. Epigenetic processes include DNA methylation, histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, as well as non-coding micro-RNA (miRNA synthesis. In this review, the known changes in the profile of DNA methylation as a factor affecting obesity and its complications are described.

  20. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  1. Optimality in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Morgiane; Fryett, Matthew; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian; Grebogi, Celso; Moura, Alessandro

    2012-01-07

    DNA within cells is subject to damage from various sources. Organisms have evolved a number of mechanisms to repair DNA damage. The activity of repair enzymes carries its own risk, however, because the repair of two nearby lesions may lead to the breakup of DNA and result in cell death. We propose a mathematical theory of the damage and repair process in the important scenario where lesions are caused in bursts. We use this model to show that there is an optimum level of repair enzymes within cells which optimises the cell's response to damage. This optimal level is explained as the best trade-off between fast repair and a low probability of causing double-stranded breaks. We derive our results analytically and test them using stochastic simulations, and compare our predictions with current biological knowledge.

  2. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  3. DNA display I. Sequence-encoded routing of DNA populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Halpin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently reported technologies for DNA-directed organic synthesis and for DNA computing rely on routing DNA populations through complex networks. The reduction of these ideas to practice has been limited by a lack of practical experimental tools. Here we describe a modular design for DNA routing genes, and routing machinery made from oligonucleotides and commercially available chromatography resins. The routing machinery partitions nanomole quantities of DNA into physically distinct subpools based on sequence. Partitioning steps can be iterated indefinitely, with worst-case yields of 85% per step. These techniques facilitate DNA-programmed chemical synthesis, and thus enable a materials biology that could revolutionize drug discovery.

  4. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  5. Rigidity of melting DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  6. Quantification of human mitochondrial DNA using synthesized DNA standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavlick, Mark F; Lawrence, Helen S; Merritt, R Travis; Fisher, Constance; Isenberg, Alice; Robertson, James M; Budowle, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Successful mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) forensic analysis depends on sufficient quantity and quality of mtDNA. A real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed to assess such characteristics in a DNA sample, which utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. The assay's 105-base pair target sequence facilitates amplification of degraded DNA and is minimally homologous to nonhuman mtDNA. The primers and probe hybridize to a region that has relatively few sequence polymorphisms. The assay can also identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification. The results show that the assay provides information down to 10 copies and provides a dynamic range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Additional experiments demonstrated that as few as 300 mtDNA copies resulted in successful hypervariable region amplification, information that permits sample conservation and optimized downstream PCR testing. The assay described is rapid, reliable, and robust.

  7. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  8. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  9. DNA tagged microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, George R.; Leif, Roald N.; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a product includes a plurality of particles, each particle including: a carrier that includes a non-toxic material; and at least one DNA barcode coupled to the carrier, where the particles each have a diameter in a range from about 1 nanometer to about 100 microns.

  10. DNA adsorption on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2013-11-01

    Here we use classical applied mathematical modeling to determine surface binding energies between both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules interacting with a graphene sheet. We adopt basic mechanical principles to exploit the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic line or surface densities. The minimum binding energy occurs when the single-strand DNA molecule is centred 20.2 Å from the surface of the graphene and the double-strand DNA molecule is centred 20.3 Å from the surface, noting that these close values apply for the case when the axis of the helix is perpendicular to the surface of graphene. For the case when the axis of the helix is parallel to the surface, the minimum binding energy occurs when the axis of the single-strand molecule is 8.3 Å from the surface, and the double-strand molecule has axis 13.3 Å from the surface. For arbitrary tilted axis, we determine the optimal angles Ω of the axis of the helix, which give the minimum values of the binding energies, and we observe that the optimal angles tend to occur in the intervals Ω ∈ ( π /4 ,π/2) and Ω ∈ ( π /7 ,π/5) for the single and double-strand DNA molecules, respectively.

  11. Making environmental DNA count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    The arc of reception for a new technology or method--like the reception of new information itself--can pass through predictable stages, with audiences' responses evolving from 'I don't believe it', through 'well, maybe' to 'yes, everyone knows that' to, finally, 'old news'. The idea that one can sample a volume of water, sequence DNA out of it, and report what species are living nearby has experienced roughly this series of responses among biologists, beginning with the microbial biologists who developed genetic techniques to reveal the unseen microbiome. 'Macrobial' biologists and ecologists--those accustomed to dealing with species they can see and count--have been slower to adopt such molecular survey techniques, in part because of the uncertain relationship between the number of recovered DNA sequences and the abundance of whole organisms in the sampled environment. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Evans et al. (2015) quantify this relationship for a suite of nine vertebrate species consisting of eight fish and one amphibian. Having detected all of the species present with a molecular toolbox of six primer sets, they consistently find DNA abundances are associated with species' biomasses. The strength and slope of this association vary for each species and each primer set--further evidence that there is no universal parameter linking recovered DNA to species abundance--but Evans and colleagues take a significant step towards being able to answer the next question audiences tend to ask: 'Yes, but how many are there?'

  12. Photo-induced DNA cleavage activity and remarkable photocytotoxicity of lanthanide(III) complexes of a polypyridyl ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Akhtar; Gadadhar, Sudarshan; Goswami, Tridib K; Karande, Anjali A; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2012-01-21

    Lanthanide(III) complexes [Ln(pyphen)(acac)(2)(NO(3))] (1, 2), [Ln(pydppz)(acac)(2)(NO(3))] (3, 4) and [La(pydppz)(anacac)(2)(NO(3))] (5), where Ln is La(III) (in 1, 3, 5) and Gd(III) (in 2, 4), pyphen is 6-(2-pyridyl)-1,10-phenanthroline, pydppz is 6-(2-pyridyl)-dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, anacac is anthracenylacetylacetonate and acac is acetylacetonate, were prepared, characterized and their DNA photocleavage activity and photocytotoxicity studied. The crystal structure of complex 2 displays a GdO(6)N(3) coordination. The pydppz complexes 3-5 show an electronic spectral band at ~390 nm in DMF. The La(III) complexes are diamagnetic, while the Gd(III) complexes are paramagnetic with seven unpaired electrons. The molar conductivity data suggest 1 : 1 electrolytic nature of the complexes in aqueous DMF. They are avid binders to calf thymus DNA giving K(b) in the range of 5.4 × 10(4)-1.2 × 10(6) M(-1). Complexes 3-5 efficiently cleave supercoiled DNA to its nicked circular form in UV-A light of 365 nm via formation of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) and hydroxyl radical (HO˙) species. Complexes 3-5 also exhibit significant photocytotoxic effect in HeLa cancer cells giving respective IC(50) value of 0.16(±0.01), 0.15(±0.01) and 0.26±(0.02) μM in UV-A light of 365 nm, while they are less toxic in dark with an IC(50) value of >3 μM. The presence of an additional pyridyl group makes the pydppz complexes more photocytotoxic than their dppz analogues. FACS analysis of the HeLa cells treated with complex 4 shows apoptosis as the major pathway of cell death. Nuclear localization of complex 5 having an anthracenyl moiety as a fluorophore is evidenced from the confocal microscopic studies.

  13. DNA ligase I selectively affects DNA synthesis by DNA polymerases delta and epsilon suggesting differential functions in DNA replication and repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossi, R; Ferrari, E; Hübscher, U

    1998-01-01

    The joining of single-stranded breaks in double-stranded DNA is an essential step in many important processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. Several data implicate a role for DNA ligase I in DNA replication, probably coordinated by the action of other enzymes and proteins. Since both DNA polymerases delta and epsilon show multiple functions in different DNA transactions, we investigated the effect of DNA ligase I on various DNA synthesis events catalyzed by th...

  14. Fungal DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in both natural and human-made environments. They play important roles in the health of plants, animals, and humans, and in broad ecosystem functions. Thus, having an efficient species-level identification system could significantly enhance our ability to treat fungal diseases and to monitor the spatial and temporal patterns of fungal distributions and migrations. DNA barcoding is a potent approach for rapid identification of fungal specimens, generating novel species hypothesis, and guiding biodiversity and ecological studies. In this mini-review, I briefly summarize (i) the history of DNA sequence-based fungal identification; (ii) the emergence of the ITS region as the consensus primary fungal barcode; (iii) the use of the ITS barcodes to address a variety of issues on fungal diversity from local to global scales, including generating a large number of species hypothesis; and (iv) the problems with the ITS barcode region and the approaches to overcome these problems. Similar to DNA barcoding research on plants and animals, significant progress has been achieved over the last few years in terms of both the questions being addressed and the foundations being laid for future research endeavors. However, significant challenges remain. I suggest three broad areas of research to enhance the usefulness of fungal DNA barcoding to meet the current and future challenges: (i) develop a common set of primers and technologies that allow the amplification and sequencing of all fungi at both the primary and secondary barcode loci; (ii) compile a centralized reference database that includes all recognized fungal species as well as species hypothesis, and allows regular updates from the research community; and (iii) establish a consensus set of new species recognition criteria based on barcode DNA sequences that can be applied across the fungal kingdom.

  15. The Dynamic Interplay Between DNA Topoisomerases and DNA Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-09-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its structure and biochemical interactions. Within the cell DNA topology is constantly in flux. Transcription and other essential processes including DNA replication and repair, alter the topology of the genome, while introducing additional complications associated with DNA knotting and catenation. These topological perturbations are counteracted by the action of topoisomerases, a specialized class of highly conserved and essential enzymes that actively regulate the topological state of the genome. This dynamic interplay among DNA topology, DNA processing enzymes, and DNA topoisomerases, is a pervasive factor that influences DNA metabolism in vivo. Building on the extensive structural and biochemical characterization over the past four decades that established the fundamental mechanistic basis of topoisomerase activity, the unique roles played by DNA topology in modulating and influencing the activity of topoisomerases have begun to be explored. In this review we survey established and emerging DNA topology dependent protein-DNA interactions with a focus on in vitro measurements of the dynamic interplay between DNA topology and topoisomerase activity.

  16. Conventional and microwave-assisted synthesis, characterization, DFT calculations, in vitro DNA binding and cleavage studies of potential chemotherapeutic diorganotin(IV) mandelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mridula; Nath, Mala

    2016-09-01

    Diorganotin(IV) complexes of the general formulae {[R2Sn(L)]2O}(R=Me (1), n-Bu (2), and n-Oct (3); L=anion of mandelic acid) and {[R2Sn(L)]2Cl2}(R=Ph (4)) have been synthesized by conventional thermal method (1a-3a), except 4a and by microwave-assisted reactions (1b-4b). The elemental analysis, IR, NMR ((1)H, (13)C and (119)Sn) and ESI-MS/DART-mass spectral studies revealed that dimeric 1:1 complexes with SnOSn bridges (1-3) are formed possessing distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the Sn atoms, except 4b which exhibits octahedral geometry with SnClSn bridges. The proposed geometries have been validated by density functional theory calculations. Thermal behavior of 1b-4b, studied by using thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) techniques, indicated that all except 4b are stable up to 200°C. In vitro interaction studies of 1b-4b with CT-DNA were performed by UV-Vis, fluorescence titrations and results suggest that the complexes are binding to DNA via an intercalative mode. The binding affinity and quenching ability were quantified in terms of intrinsic binding constant (Kb) (3.74×10(4)M(-1), 2b; >3.67×10(4)M(-1), 4b; >3.03×10(4)M(-1), 3b; >0.72×10(4)M(-1), 1b) and Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv) (2.16×10(5), 2b; >1.73×10(5), 4b; >1.66×10(5)3b; >1.51×10(5), 1b) which showed high binding affinity of 2b with CT-DNA. The cleavage studies of 1b-4b with pBR322 plasmid DNA was ascertained by agarose gel electrophoresis. They exhibited effective cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA into its nicked form (1b, 3b, 4b) and even into its linear form in presence of 2b.

  17. DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I in the initiation of plasmid DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mammalian DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli in DNA replication and in base excision repair. We have now obtained genetic evidence suggesting that DNA polymerase beta can substitute for E. coli DNA polymerase I in the initiation of replication of a plasmid containing a pMB1 origin of DNA replication. Specifically, we demonstrate that a plasmid with a pMB1 origin of replication can be maintained in an E. coli polA mutant ...

  18. Conformation-dependent DNA attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg2+ ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg2+ or Na+, benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg2+ bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription.Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by

  19. Esitleti kakskeelset luulekogu "Luule DNA"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Magrelli, Valerio. Luule DNA = Il DNA della poesia / tõlkinud [ja saatesõna:] Maarja Kangro ja Kalju Kruusa. Tallinn : Koma, 2006. Sisaldab autori teksti. Esitlus 24. jaan. Kirjanike majas Tallinnas

  20. Mitochondrial Myopathy with DNA Deletions

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1992-01-01

    Deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are reported in 19 of 56 patients with mitochondrial myopathy examined in the Department of Neurology and Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

  1. Multiplexed DNA-modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinker, Jason D; Muren, Natalie B; Gorodetsky, Alon A; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2010-03-03

    We report the use of silicon chips with 16 DNA-modified electrodes (DME chips) utilizing DNA-mediated charge transport for multiplexed detection of DNA and DNA-binding protein targets. Four DNA sequences were simultaneously distinguished on a single DME chip with 4-fold redundancy, including one incorporating a single base mismatch. These chips also enabled investigation of the sequence-specific activity of the restriction enzyme Alu1. DME chips supported dense DNA monolayer formation with high reproducibility, as confirmed by statistical comparison to commercially available rod electrodes. The working electrode areas on the chips were reduced to 10 microm in diameter, revealing microelectrode behavior that is beneficial for high sensitivity and rapid kinetic analysis. These results illustrate how DME chips facilitate sensitive and selective detection of DNA and DNA-binding protein targets in a robust and internally standardized multiplexed format.

  2. Esitleti kakskeelset luulekogu "Luule DNA"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Magrelli, Valerio. Luule DNA = Il DNA della poesia / tõlkinud [ja saatesõna:] Maarja Kangro ja Kalju Kruusa. Tallinn : Koma, 2006. Sisaldab autori teksti. Esitlus 24. jaan. Kirjanike majas Tallinnas

  3. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    Three-dimensional crystals have been self-assembled from a DNA tensegrity triangle via sticky end interaction. The tensegrity triangle is a rigid DNA motif containing three double helical edges connected pair-wise by three four-arm junctions. The symmetric triangle contains 3 unique strands combined in a 3:3:1 ratio: 3 crossover, 3 helical and 1 central. The length of the sticky end reported previously was two nucleotides (nt) (GA:TC) and the motif with 2-helical turns of DNA per edge diffracted to 4.9 A at beam line NSLS-X25 and to 4 A at beam line ID19 at APS. The purpose of these self-assembled DNA crystals is that they can be used as a framework for hosting external guests for use in crystallographic structure solving or the periodic positioning of molecules for nanoelectronics. This thesis describes strategies to improve the resolution and to incorporate guests into the 3D lattice. The first chapter describes the effect of varying sticky end lengths and the influence of 5'-phosphate addition on crystal formation and resolution. X-ray diffraction data from beam line NSLS-X25 revealed that the crystal resolution for 1-nt (G:C) sticky end was 3.4 A. Motifs with every possible combination of 1-nt and 2-nt sticky-ended phosphorylated strands were crystallized and X-ray data were collected. The position of the 5'-phosphate on either the crossover (strand 1), helical (strand 2), or central strand (3) had an impact on the resolution of the self-assembled crystals with the 1-nt 1P-2-3 system diffracting to 2.62 A at APS and 3.1 A at NSLS-X25. The second chapter describes the sequence-specific recognition of DNA motifs with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). This study examined the feasibility of using TFOs to bind to specific locations within a 3-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif. The TFO 5'-TTCTTTCTTCTCT was used to target the tensegrity motif containing an appropriately embedded oligopurine.oligopyrimidine binding site. As triplex formation involving cytidine

  4. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA-RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Cantor, Eric J; Evans, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10(-3) s(-1) and K(M) DNA ligase produced only 5'-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a K(M) ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn(2+), but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5'-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3' side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA.

  5. Statistical Approaches for DNA Barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Matz, M.

    2006-01-01

    The use of DNA as a tool for species identification has become known as "DNA barcoding" (Floyd et al., 2002; Hebert et al., 2003; Remigio and Hebert, 2003). The basic idea is straightforward: a small amount of DNA is extracted from the specimen, amplified and sequenced. The gene region sequenced...

  6. Interfacing DNA nanodevices with biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Mathias; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    in biology and biomedicine acting as a molecular ‘nanorobot’ or smart drug interacting with the cellular machinery. In this review, we will explore and examine the perspective of DNA nanotechnology for such use. We summarize which requirements DNA nanostructures must fulfil to function in cellular...... environments and inside living organisms. In addition, we highlight recent advances in interfacing DNA nanostructures with biology....

  7. Environmental influences on DNA curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Higgins, C.F.; Bolshoy, A.

    1999-01-01

    DNA curvature plays an important role in many biological processes. To study environmentalinfluences on DNA curvature we compared the anomalous migration on polyacrylamide gels ofligation ladders of 11 specifically-designed oligonucleotides. At low temperatures (25 degreesC and below) most...... for DNAcurvature and for environmentally-sensitive DNA conformations in the regulation of geneexpression....

  8. DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati Farimani, Amir; Dibaeinia, Payam; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-01-11

    DNA origami nanostructures can be used to functionalize solid-state nanopores for single molecule studies. In this study, we characterized a nanopore in a DNA origami-graphene heterostructure for DNA detection. The DNA origami nanopore is functionalized with a specific nucleotide type at the edge of the pore. Using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we computed and analyzed the ionic conductivity of nanopores in heterostructures carpeted with one or two layers of DNA origami on graphene. We demonstrate that a nanopore in DNA origami-graphene gives rise to distinguishable dwell times for the four DNA base types, whereas for a nanopore in bare graphene, the dwell time is almost the same for all types of bases. The specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between DNA origami and the translocating DNA strand yield different residence times and ionic currents. We also conclude that the speed of DNA translocation decreases due to the friction between the dangling bases at the pore mouth and the sequencing DNA strands.

  9. DNA Sequential Logic Gate Using Two-Ring DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shen, Linjing; Liang, Chao; Dong, Yafei; Yang, Jing; Xu, Jin

    2016-04-13

    Sequential DNA detection is a fundamental issue for elucidating the interactive relationships among complex gene systems. Here, a sequential logic DNA gate was achieved by utilizing the two-ring DNA structure, with the ability to recognize "before" and "after" triggering sequences of DNA signals. By taking advantage of a "loop-open" mechanism, separations of two-ring DNAs were controlled. Three triggering pathways with different sequential DNA treatments were distinguished by comparing fluorescent outputs. Programmed nanoparticle arrangement guided by "interlocked" two-ring DNA was also constructed to demonstrate the achievement of designed nanostrucutres. Such sequential logic DNA operation may guide future molecular sensors to monitor more complex gene network in biological systems.

  10. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... patterns that increase activation of the innate immune system. Importantly, viral-vectored vaccines that act through the induction of one or more of these factors also may benefit from cytokine coadministration and increased antigen presentation. In order to increase immunogenicity to the level achieved...

  11. Fleet DNA (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkokwicz, K.; Duran, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Fleet DNA project objectives include capturing and quantifying drive cycle and technology variation for the multitude of medium- and heavy-duty vocations; providing a common data storage warehouse for medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleet data across DOE activities and laboratories; and integrating existing DOE tools, models, and analyses to provide data-driven decision making capabilities. Fleet DNA advantages include: for Government - providing in-use data for standard drive cycle development, R&D, tech targets, and rule making; for OEMs - real-world usage datasets provide concrete examples of customer use profiles; for fleets - vocational datasets help illustrate how to maximize return on technology investments; for Funding Agencies - ways are revealed to optimize the impact of financial incentive offers; and for researchers -a data source is provided for modeling and simulation.

  12. DNA Methylation in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pries, Lotta-Katrin; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Kenis, Gunter

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychiatric condition that displays a complex phenotype. A multitude of genetic susceptibility loci have now been identified, but these fail to explain the high heritability estimates of schizophrenia. In addition, epidemiologically relevant environmental risk factors for schizophrenia may lead to permanent changes in brain function. In conjunction with genetic liability, these environmental risk factors-likely through epigenetic mechanisms-may give rise to schizophrenia, a clinical syndrome characterized by florid psychotic symptoms and moderate to severe cognitive impairment. These pathophysiological features point to the involvement of epigenetic processes. Recently, a wave of studies examining aberrant DNA modifications in schizophrenia was published. This chapter aims to comprehensively review the current findings, from both candidate gene studies and genome-wide approaches, on DNA methylation changes in schizophrenia.

  13. DNA repair. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals. (HLW)

  14. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new deve...

  15. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage phi29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine3+ causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation. PMID:24996111

  16. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage Phi29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-06-20

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine(3+) causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation.

  17. Geant4-DNA simulations using complex DNA geometries generated by the DnaFabric tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, S.; Vimont, U.; Incerti, S.; Clairand, I.; Villagrasa, C.

    2016-07-01

    Several DNA representations are used to study radio-induced complex DNA damages depending on the approach and the required level of granularity. Among all approaches, the mechanistic one requires the most resolved DNA models that can go down to atomistic DNA descriptions. The complexity of such DNA models make them hard to modify and adapt in order to take into account different biological conditions. The DnaFabric project was started to provide a tool to generate, visualise and modify such complex DNA models. In the current version of DnaFabric, the models can be exported to the Geant4 code to be used as targets in the Monte Carlo simulation. In this work, the project was used to generate two DNA fibre models corresponding to two DNA compaction levels representing the hetero and the euchromatin. The fibres were imported in a Geant4 application where computations were performed to estimate the influence of the DNA compaction on the amount of calculated DNA damage. The relative difference of the DNA damage computed in the two fibres for the same number of projectiles was found to be constant and equal to 1.3 for the considered primary particles (protons from 300 keV to 50 MeV). However, if only the tracks hitting the DNA target are taken into account, then the relative difference is more important for low energies and decreases to reach zero around 10 MeV. The computations were performed with models that contain up to 18,000 DNA nucleotide pairs. Nevertheless, DnaFabric will be extended to manipulate multi-scale models that go from the molecular to the cellular levels.

  18. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Baraniuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  19. Next generation DNA led technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothsna, G; Kashyap, Amita

    2016-01-01

    This brief highlights advances in DNA technologies and their wider applications. DNA is the source of life and has been studied since a generation, but very little is known as yet. Several sophisticated technologies of the current era have laid their foundations on the principle of DNA based mechanisms. DNA based technologies are bringing a new revolution of Advanced Science and Technology. Forensic Investigation, Medical Diagnosis, Paternity Disputes, Individual Identity, Health insurance, Motor Insurance have incorporated the DNA testing and profiling technologies for settling the issues.

  20. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics.

  1. A physicist's view of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids, like DNA and RNA, are molecules that are present in any life form. Their most notable function is to encode biological information. Why then would a physicist be interested in these molecules? As we will see, DNA is an interesting molecular tool for physicists to test and explore physical laws and theories, like the ergodic theorem, the theory of elasticity and information theory. DNA also has unique material properties, which attract material scientists, nanotechnologists and engineers. Among interesting developments in this field are DNA-based hybrid materials and DNA origami.

  2. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T R Rajalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde. This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers.

  3. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, T. R.; AravindhaBabu, N.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Masthan, K. M. K.

    2015-01-01

    DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde). This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers. PMID:26015708

  4. Forensic trace DNA: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    DNA analysis is frequently used to acquire information from biological material to aid enquiries associated with criminal offences, disaster victim identification and missing persons investigations. As the relevance and value of DNA profiling to forensic investigations has increased, so too has the desire to generate this information from smaller amounts of DNA. Trace DNA samples may be defined as any sample which falls below recommended thresholds at any stage of the analysis, from sample detection through to profile interpretation, and can not be defined by a precise picogram amount. Here we review aspects associated with the collection, DNA extraction, amplification, profiling and interpretation of trace DNA samples. Contamination and transfer issues are also briefly discussed within the context of trace DNA analysis. Whilst several methodological changes have facilitated profiling from trace samples in recent years it is also clear that many opportunities exist for further improvements. PMID:21122102

  5. Touch DNA-The prospect of DNA profiles from cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sharon; Subhani, Zuhaib; Daniel, Barbara; Frascione, Nunzianda

    2016-05-01

    Metal theft in the railroad industry poses significant challenges to transport investigators. Cable sheaths left behind at crime scenes, if appropriately analysed, could provide valuable evidence in a forensic investigation, but attempts at recovering DNA are not routinely made. Experiments were set up to ascertain the success in DNA recovery from the surface of cable sheaths after deposition of (a) sweat, (b) extracted DNA and (c) fingermarks. Since investigators try to collect fingermarks and often treat the cables with cyanoacrylate fuming (CNA fuming) or wet powder suspensions (WPS) to enhance the marks this study investigated the recovery of DNA from fingermarks pre- and post-enhancement. The double-swab technique and mini-taping were compared as options to recover DNA from the cable sheaths. Results demonstrate that generally, there is no significant difference between using swabs or mini-tapes to recover the DNA from the non-porous cables (p>0.05). It was also illustrated that CNA fuming performed better than WPS in terms of subsequent recovery and profiling of DNA. CNA fuming resulted in an average increase in DNA recovered via swabbing and taping (more than 4× and 8×, respectively), as compared to no treatment, with 50% of the DNA recovered after CNA fuming generating full DNA profiles.

  6. Chiral DNA packaging in DNA-cationic liposome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidam, N J; Barenholz, Y; Minsky, A

    1999-09-03

    Recent studies have indicated that the structural features of DNA-lipid assemblies, dictated by the lipid composition and cationic lipid-to-DNA ratio, critically affect the efficiency of these complexes in acting as vehicles for cellular delivery of genetic material. Using circular dichroism we find that upon binding DNA, positively-charged liposomes induce a secondary conformational transition of the DNA molecules from the native B form to the C motif. Liposomes composed of positively-charged and neutral 'helper' lipids, found to be particularly effective as transfecting agents, induce - in addition to secondary conformational changes - DNA condensation into a left-handed cholesteric-like phase. A structural model is presented according to which two distinct, yet inter-related modes of DNA packaging coexist within such assemblies. The results underline the notion that subtle changes in the components of a supramolecular assembly may substantially modulate the interplay of interactions which dictate its structure and functional properties.

  7. Mechanism of DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin; Bi

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage may compromise genome integrity and lead to cell death. Cells have evolved a variety of processes to respond to DNA damage including damage repair and tolerance mechanisms, as well as damage checkpoints. The DNA damage tolerance(DDT) pathway promotes the bypass of single-stranded DNA lesions encountered by DNA polymerases during DNA replication. This prevents the stalling of DNA replication. Two mechanistically distinct DDT branches have been characterized. One is translesion synthesis(TLS) in which a replicative DNA polymerase is temporarily replaced by a specialized TLS polymerase that has the ability to replicate across DNA lesions. TLS is mechanistically simple and straightforward, but it is intrinsically error-prone. The other is the error-free template switching(TS) mechanism in which the stalled nascent strand switches from the damaged template to the undamaged newly synthesized sister strand for extension past the lesion. Error-free TS is a complex but preferable process for bypassing DNA lesions. However, our current understanding of this pathway is sketchy. An increasing number of factors are being found to participate or regulate this important mechanism, which is the focus of this editorial.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA maintenance: an appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Alexander T; Marín-García, José

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and Ca(2+) handling to stress responses, cell survival, and death. Malfunction of the organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders, cancer, premature aging, and cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial ischemia, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Mitochondria are unique as they contain their own genome organized into DNA-protein complexes, so-called mitochondrial nucleoids, along with multiprotein machineries, which promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription, and repair. Although the organelle possesses almost all known nuclear DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and recombinational repair, the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of ROS production and the lack of protective histones may result in increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and other types of mtDNA damage. Defects in the components of these highly organized machineries, which mediate mtDNA maintenance (replication and repair), may result in accumulation of point mutations and/or deletions in mtDNA and decreased mtDNA copy number impairing mitochondrial function. This review will focus on the mechanisms of mtDNA maintenance with emphasis on the proteins implicated in these processes and their functional role in various disease conditions and aging.

  9. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen;

    2005-01-01

    in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...... findings on the search process of proteins for a specific target on the DNA. © 2006 Materials Research Society....

  10. DNA strand breaks and crosslinks induced by transient anions in the range 2-20 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xinglan; Zheng, Yi, E-mail: Yizheng@fzu.edu.cn [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Sanche, Léon [Group in the Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2014-04-21

    The energy dependence of the yields of single and double strand breaks (SSB and DSB) and crosslinks induced by electron impact on plasmid DNA films is measured in the 2-20 eV range. The yield functions exhibit two strong maxima, which are interpreted to result from the formation of core-excited resonances (i.e., transient anions) of the bases, and their decay into the autoionization channel, resulting in π → π{sup *} electronic transitions of the bases followed by electron transfer to the C–O σ{sup *} bond in the phosphate group. Occupancy of the σ{sup *} orbital ruptures the C–O bond of the backbone via dissociative electron attachment, producing a SSB. From a comparison of our results with those of other works, including theoretical calculations and electron-energy-loss spectra of the bases, the 4.6 eV peak in the SSB yield function is attributed to the resonance decay into the lowest electronically excited states of the bases; in particular, those resulting from the transitions 1{sup 3}A{sup ′} (π{sub 2} → π{sub 3}{sup *}) and 1{sup 3}A{sup ″} (n{sub 2} → π{sub 3}{sup *}) of thymine and 1{sup 3}A{sup ′} (π → π{sup *}) of cytosine. The strongest peak at 9.6 eV in the SSB yield function is also associated with electron captured by excited states of the bases, resulting mostly from a multitude of higher-energy π → π{sup *} transitions. The DSB yield function exhibits strong maxima at 6.1 and 9.6 eV. The peak at 9.6 eV is probably related to the same resonance manifold as that leading to SSB, but the other at 6.1 eV may be more restricted to decay into the electronic state 1{sup 3}A{sup ′} (π → π{sup *}) of cytosine via autoionization. The yield function of crosslinks is dominated by a broad peak extending over the 3.6-11.6 eV range with a sharper one at 17.6 eV. The different line shape of the latter function, compared to that of SSB and DSB, appears to be due to the formation of reactive radical sites in the initial supercoiled

  11. DNA Movies and Panspermia

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    There are several ways that our species might try to send a message to another species separated from us by space and/or time. Synthetic biology might be used to write an epitaph to our species, or simply “Kilroy was here”, in the genome of a bacterium via the patterns of either (1) the codons to exploit Life's non-equilibrium character or (2) the bases themselves to exploit Life's quasi-equilibrium character. We suggest here how DNA movies might be designed using such patterns. We ...

  12. The DNA Files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-09

    The DNA Files is a radio documentary which disseminates genetics information over public radio. The documentaries explore subjects which include the following: How genetics affects society. How human life began and how it evolved. Could new prenatal genetic tests hold the key to disease prevention later in life? Would a national genetic data base sacrifice individual privacy? and Should genes that may lead to the cure for cancer be privately owned? This report serves as a project update for the second quarter of 1998. It includes the spring/summer 1998 newsletter, the winter 1998 newsletter, the program clock, and the latest flyer.

  13. Protein-DNA complexes: specificity and DNA readout mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shestopalova A. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid recognition is essential in a number of cellular processes, in particular, gene regulation, DNA replication and compaction. Studies on the recognition mechanisms show that DNA sequence carries information which is read out by proteins that selectively bind to specific DNA sites. The review is focused on the processes taking place during formation of specific and nonspecific complexes of proteins and DNA. Special attention is paid to direct and indirect mechanisms of sequence-specific recognition. Several examples of protein-nucleic acid complexes are given to illustrate the variety of recognition mechanisms

  14. Properties of DnaB helicase in [lambda] DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    A tailed nicked-circle DNA substrate was used to measure the rapid replication fork (RF) movement catalyzed by E. Coli DnaB helicase and DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (pol III HE) (DnaB-RFs) (30 DnaB hexamers/substrate). The DnaB RFs can efficiently utilize the DNA substrate (60% in 5 min at 30C), and the forks move at a rapid rate (550-780 bp/sec at 30C). The DnaB-RFs have an average maximal processivity of 40,000 nt, and addition of either SSB or primase increase the processivity (150,000 nt + SSB, 70,000-140,000 nt + primase). However, SSB and primase do not affect the rate of fork movement or the amount of substrate utilized in the assay. The [lambda] SS proteins are effective at transferring DnaB onto the DNA substrate (8 DnaB hexamers/substrate). The [lambda] SS proteins do not change the rate of RF movement or the amount of substrate utilized. However, the amount of synthesis measured in the assay is [approximately]2-fold higher in the presence of the [lambda] SS proteins. Therefore, the [lambda] SS proteins increase the processivity of DnaB at the RF (100,000 nt). The [lambda] SS proteins do not appear to play a role in elongation because the processivity of the RF in the presence of SSB and primase is equivalent to the processivity of the [lambda] SS-RFs. [lambda] P protein blocks DnaB helicase activity if added to the RF assay prior to initiation or during elongation. DnaB helicase is more resistant to P inhibition, if the helicase is allowed to bind to the substrate prior to addition of [lambda] P or if primase and rNTPs are included in the assay. These results suggest that the conformation of the RF complex (DNA or nucleoprotein structure) blocks the attack of P on DnaB helicase. The heat shock proteins may play an auxiliary role in mediating the effects of [lambda] P if the concentration of P protein in the cells are high.

  15. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical sup-port for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the key reactions that typify HR: homology search and DNA strand invasion. The diverse functions of recombination are reflected in the need for context-specific factors that perform supplemental functions in conjunction with the core proteins. The inability to properly repair complex DNA damage and resolve DNA replication stress leads to genomic instability and contributes to cancer etiology. Mutations in the BRCA2 recombination gene cause predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer as well as Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a defect in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The cellular functions of recombination are also germane to DNA-based treatment modaUties of cancer, which target replicating cells by the direct or indirect induction of DNA lesions that are substrates for recombination pathways. This review focuses on mechanistic aspects of HR relating to DSB and ICL repair as well as replication fork support.

  16. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Arlinghaus, H.F. (Atom Sciences, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  17. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arlinghaus, H.F. [Atom Sciences, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-06-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  18. Recent progress in DNA origami technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology for designing defined two-dimensional DNA nanostructures. In this review, we focus on and describe several types of DNA origami-related studies, as follows: (1) programmed DNA origami assembly, (2) DNA origami-templated molecular assembly, (3) design and construction of various three-dimensional DNA origami structures, (4) programmed functionalization of DNA origami and combination with top-down nanotechnology, (5) single molecular observation on a designed DNA origami, and (6) DNA nanomachines working on a DNA origami.

  19. Ancient and modern environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Ermini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    DNA obtained from environmental samples such as sediments, ice or water (environmental DNA, eDNA), represents an important source of information on past and present biodiversity. It has revealed an ancient forest in Greenland, extended by several thousand years the survival dates for mainland....../Holocene transition, with implications for the extinction of megafauna. Furthermore, eDNA can reflect the biodiversity of extant flora and fauna, both qualitatively and quantitatively, allowing detection of rare species. As such, trace studies of plant and vertebrate DNA in the environment have revolutionized our...... knowledge of biogeography. However, the approach remains marred by biases related to DNA behaviour in environmental settings, incomplete reference databases and false positive results due to contamination. We provide a review of the field....

  20. Labeling nuclear DNA using DAPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazotte, Brad

    2011-01-01

    A number of fluorescent stains are available that label DNA and allow easy visualization of the nucleus in interphase cells and chromosomes in mitotic cells, including Hoechst, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), ethidium bromide, propidium iodide, and acridine orange. Although not as bright as the vital Hoechst stains for DNA, DAPI has greater photostability. It is believed that DAPI associates with the minor groove of double-stranded DNA, with a preference for the adenine-thymine clusters. Cells must be permeabilized and/or fixed for DAPI to enter the cell and to bind DNA. Fluorescence increases approximately 20-fold when DAPI is bound to double-stranded DNA. This protocol describes the use of DAPI to label nuclear DNA of cells grown in culture.