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Sample records for superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin

  1. Staphylococcal superantigens; toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and enterotoxins in pediatric otitis media effusion: a brief report

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    Noorbakhsh S

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcal superantigens (SAg's may have some role in otitis media with effusion (OME. The aim of this study was the search of staphylococcal SAg's in middle ear effusion of children with OME.  Methods: This cross sectional-analytic study was done in ENT & pediatric wards upon 64 children with otitis media with effusion (OME between 1-15 years, (mean age=7.42+4 years of Rasoul Akram University Hospital, Tehran, Iran in 2009-2011. Fifty six percent (36 of cases were male, 43.8% (28 were female. Staphylococcal SAg's; Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (TSST-1, Staphylococcal enterotoxin A, B, C, D (Enzyme immune assay, AB Cam, USA were detected in middle ear effusion samples after conventional culture.Results: None type of SAg's found in 39% of OME cases, enterotoxin B found in: 22%; enterotoxin A: 17%, enterotoxin C: 15.6%, enterotoxin D: 12.5%, Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (TSST-1: 7.8% Mean age of cases with positive TSST-1, enterotoxin A, B, C, and D was: 1, 5, 8.6, 9.6 and 9.6 years respectively. Positive TSST had no agreement with positive enterotoxin A and C but had weak agreement with type B and D. Mean age of cases with positive TSST was one years which had significant difference with (7.9 years in cases with negative TSST test (P<0.0001.Conclusion: At least one or more type of staphylococcal toxins had found in middle ear effusion of 70% of OME cases with negative culture for Staphylococcus aureus. Even in culture negative cases, staphylococcal toxins might have some immunologic role in middle ear effusion forming. Finding the SAg's (at least one type are important for treatment of immunosuppressive or corticosteroid in cases with resistant OME.

  2. Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin E in Complex with TCR Defines the Role of TCR Loop Positioning in Superantigen Recognition.

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    Karin E J Rödström

    Full Text Available T cells are crucial players in cell-mediated immunity. The specificity of their receptor, the T cell receptor (TCR, is central for the immune system to distinguish foreign from host antigens. Superantigens are bacterial toxins capable of inducing a toxic immune response by cross-linking the TCR and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II and circumventing the antigen specificity. Here, we present the structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE in complex with a human T cell receptor, as well as the unligated T cell receptor structure. There are clear structural changes in the TCR loops upon superantigen binding. In particular, the HV4 loop moves to circumvent steric clashes upon complex formation. In addition, a predicted ternary model of SEE in complex with both TCR and MHC class II displays intermolecular contacts between the TCR α-chain and the MHC, suggesting that the TCR α-chain is of importance for complex formation.

  3. Staphylococcal enterotoxin-like X (SElX is a unique superantigen with functional features of two major families of staphylococcal virulence factors.

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    Ries J Langley

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that produces many virulence factors. Two major families of which are the staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs and the Staphylococcal Superantigen-Like (SSL exoproteins. The former are immunomodulatory toxins that induce a Vβ-specific activation of T cells, while the latter are immune evasion molecules that interfere with a wide range of innate immune defences. The superantigenic properties of Staphylococcal enterotoxin-like X (SElX have recently been established. We now reveal that SElX also possesses functional characteristics of the SSLs. A region of SElX displays high homology to the sialyl-lactosamine (sLacNac-specific binding site present in a sub-family of SSLs. By analysing the interaction of SElX with sLacNac-containing glycans we show that SElX has an equivalent specificity and host cell binding range to the SSLs. Mutation of key amino acids in this conserved region affects the ability of SElX to bind to cells of myeloid origin and significantly reduces its ability to protect S. aureus from destruction in a whole blood killing (WBK assay. Like the SSLs, SElX is up-regulated early during infection and is under the control of the S. aureus exotoxin expression (Sae two component gene regulatory system. Additionally, the structure of SElX in complex with the sLacNac-containing tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLeX reveals that SElX is a unique single-domain SAg. In summary, SElX is an 'SSL-like' SAg.

  4. Attenuation of massive cytokine response to the staphylococcal enterotoxin B superantigen by the innate immunomodulatory protein lactoferrin

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    Hayworth, J L; Kasper, K J; Leon-Ponte, M; Herfst, C A; Yue, D; Brintnell, W C; Mazzuca, D M; Heinrichs, D E; Cairns, E; Madrenas, J; Hoskin, D W; McCormick, J K; Haeryfar, S M M

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a pyrogenic exotoxin and a potent superantigen which causes massive T cell activation and cytokine secretion, leading to profound immunosuppression and morbidity. The inhibition of SEB-induced responses is thus considered a goal in the management of certain types of staphylococcal infections. Lactoferrin (LF) is a multi-functional glycoprotein with both bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities. In addition, LF is known to have potent immunomodulatory properties. Given the anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties of this protein, we hypothesized that LF can modulate T cell responses to SEB. Here, we report that bovine LF (bLF) was indeed able to attenuate SEB-induced proliferation, interleukin-2 production and CD25 expression by human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4 transgenic mouse T cells. This inhibition was not due to bLF's iron-binding capacity, and could be mimicked by the bLF-derived peptide lactoferricin. Cytokine secretion by an engineered SEB-responsive human Jurkat T cell line and by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors was also inhibited by bLF. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized property of LF in modulation of SEB-triggered immune activation and suggest a therapeutic potential for this naturally occurring protein during toxic shock syndrome. PMID:19659771

  5. Inhibition of the superantigenic activities of Staphylococcal enterotoxin A by an aptamer antagonist.

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    Wang, Kaiyu; Wu, Dong; Chen, Zhuang; Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Xiangyue; Yang, Chaoyong James; Lan, Xiaopeng

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is an important component of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis. SEA induces T lymphocytes activation and proliferation, resulting in the release of a large number of inflammatory cytokines. Blocking the toxic cascade triggered by SEA may be an effective strategy for the treatment of SEA-induced diseases. Through a systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment process, we obtained an aptamer (S3) that could bind SEA with both high affinity and specificity, with a Kd value 36.93 ± 7.29 nM (n = 3). This aptamer antagonist effectively inhibited SEA-mediated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation and inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-6) secretion. Moreover, PEGylated S3 significantly reduced mortality in murine lethal toxic shock models established by lipopolysaccharide-potentiated SEA. Therefore, this novel aptamer antagonist has the potential to become a new strategy for treating S. aureus infections and SEA-induced diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Uncoupling of T Cell Receptor Zeta Chain Function during the Induction of Anergy by the Superantigen, Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A

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    William D. Cornwell

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins have immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we show that Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA induces a strong proliferative response in a murine T cell clone independent of MHC class II bearing cells. SEA stimulation also induces a state of hypo-responsiveness (anergy. We characterized the components of the T cell receptor (TCR during induction of anergy by SEA. Most interestingly, TCR zeta chain phosphorylation was absent under SEA anergizing conditions, which suggests an uncoupling of zeta chain function. We characterize here a model system for studying anergy in the absence of confounding costimulatory signals.

  7. Structure of the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B in complex with TCR and peptide-MHC demonstrates absence of TCR-peptide contacts.

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    Rödström, Karin E J; Elbing, Karin; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2014-08-15

    Superantigens are immune-stimulatory toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus, which are able to interact with host immune receptors to induce a massive release of cytokines, causing toxic shock syndrome and possibly death. In this article, we present the x-ray structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in complex with its receptors, the TCR and MHC class II, forming a ternary complex. The structure, in combination with functional analyses, clearly shows how SEB adopts a wedge-like position when binding to the β-chain of TCR, allowing for an interaction between the α-chain of TCR and MHC. Furthermore, the binding mode also circumvents contact between TCR and the peptide presented by MHC, which enables SEB to initiate a peptide-independent activation of T cells. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Monkey Feeding Assay for Testing Emetic Activity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin.

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    Seo, Keun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are unique bacterial toxins that cause gastrointestinal toxicity as well as superantigenic activity. Since systemic administration of SEs induces superantigenic activity leading to toxic shock syndrome that may mimic enterotoxic activity of SEs such as vomiting and diarrhea, oral administration of SEs in the monkey feeding assay is considered as a standard method to evaluate emetic activity of SEs. This chapter summarizes and discusses practical considerations of the monkey feeding assay used in studies characterizing classical and newly identified SEs.

  9. Basis of Virulence in Enterotoxin-Mediated Staphylococcal Food Poisoning

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    Emilie L. Fisher

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins are a superfamily of secreted virulence factors that share structural and functional similarities and possess potent superantigenic activity causing disruptions in adaptive immunity. The enterotoxins can be separated into two groups; the classical (SEA-SEE and the newer (SEG-SElY and counting enterotoxin groups. Many members from both these groups contribute to the pathogenesis of several serious human diseases, including toxic shock syndrome, pneumonia, and sepsis-related infections. Additionally, many members demonstrate emetic activity and are frequently responsible for food poisoning outbreaks. Due to their robust tolerance to denaturing, the enterotoxins retain activity in food contaminated previously with S. aureus. The genes encoding the enterotoxins are found mostly on a variety of different mobile genetic elements. Therefore, the presence of enterotoxins can vary widely among different S. aureus isolates. Additionally, the enterotoxins are regulated by multiple, and often overlapping, regulatory pathways, which are influenced by environmental factors. In this review, we also will focus on the newer enterotoxins (SEG-SElY, which matter for the role of S. aureus as an enteropathogen, and summarize our current knowledge on their prevalence in recent food poisoning outbreaks. Finally, we will review the current literature regarding the key elements that govern the complex regulation of enterotoxins, the molecular mechanisms underlying their enterotoxigenic, superantigenic, and immunomodulatory functions, and discuss how these activities may collectively contribute to the overall manifestation of staphylococcal food poisoning.

  10. Staphylococcal Superantigens Spark Host-Mediated Danger Signals

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    Terry eKrakauer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB of Staphylococcus aureus, and related superantigenic toxins produced by myriad microbes, are potent stimulators of the immune system causing a variety of human diseases from transient food poisoning to lethal toxic shock. These protein toxins bind directly to specific V regions of T-cell receptors (TCR and major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II on antigen-presenting cells, resulting in hyperactivation of T lymphocytes and monocytes / macrophages. Activated host cells produce excessive amounts of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, especially tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1 (IL-1, IL-2, interferon γ (IFNγ, and macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 causing clinical symptoms of fever, hypotension, and shock. Because of superantigen-induced T cells skewed towards TH1 helper cells, and the induction of proinflammatory cytokines, superantigens can exacerbate autoimmune diseases. Upon TCR / MHC ligation, pathways induced by superantigens include the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades and cytokine receptor signaling, resulting in activation of NFκB and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase / mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Various mouse models exist to study SEB-induced shock including those with potentiating agents, transgenic mice and an SEB-only model. However, therapeutics to treat toxic shock remain elusive as host response genes central to pathogenesis of superantigens have only been identified recently. Gene profiling of a murine model for SEB-induced shock reveals novel molecules upregulated in multiple organs not previously associated with SEB-induced responses. The pivotal genes include intracellular DNA / RNA sensors, apoptosis / DNA damage-related molecules, immunoproteasome components, as well as anti-viral and IFN-stimulated genes. The host-wide induction of these, and other, anti-microbial defense genes provide evidence that SEB elicits danger signals resulting in multi

  11. Therapeutic Down-Modulators of Staphylococcal Superantigen-Induced Inflammation and Toxic Shock

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    Teresa Krakauer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB and related superantigenic toxins are potent stimulators of the immune system and cause a variety of diseases in humans, ranging from food poisoning to toxic shock. These toxins bind directly to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells and specific Vb regions of T-cell receptors (TCR, resulting in hyperactivation of both monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes. Activated host cells produce massive amounts of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, activating inflammation and coagulation, causing clinical symptoms that include fever, hypotension, and shock. This review summarizes the in vitro and in vivo effects of staphylococcal superantigens, the role of pivotal mediators induced by these toxins in the pathogenic mechanisms of tissue injury, and the therapeutic agents to mitigate the toxic effects of superantigens.

  12. The olive compound 4-hydroxytyrosol inactivates Staphyloccoccus aureus bacteria and Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA)

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    The foodborne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus produces the virulent staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), a single chain protein which consists of 233 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 27,078 Da. SEA is a superantigen that is reported to contribute to animal (mastitis) and human (emesis, ...

  13. Evolutionary paths of streptococcal and staphylococcal superantigens

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    Okumura Kayo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS harbors several superantigens (SAgs in the prophage region of its genome, although speG and smez are not located in this region. The diversity of SAgs is thought to arise during horizontal transfer, but their evolutionary pathways have not yet been determined. We recently completed sequencing the entire genome of S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE, the closest relative of GAS. Although speG is the only SAg gene of SDSE, speG was present in only 50% of clinical SDSE strains and smez in none. In this study, we analyzed the evolutionary paths of streptococcal and staphylococcal SAgs. Results We compared the sequences of the 12–60 kb speG regions of nine SDSE strains, five speG+ and four speG–. We found that the synteny of this region was highly conserved, whether or not the speG gene was present. Synteny analyses based on genome-wide comparisons of GAS and SDSE indicated that speG is the direct descendant of a common ancestor of streptococcal SAgs, whereas smez was deleted from SDSE after SDSE and GAS split from a common ancestor. Cumulative nucleotide skew analysis of SDSE genomes suggested that speG was located outside segments of steeper slopes than the stable region in the genome, whereas the region flanking smez was unstable, as expected from the results of GAS. We also detected a previously undescribed staphylococcal SAg gene, selW, and a staphylococcal SAg -like gene, ssl, in the core genomes of all Staphylococcus aureus strains sequenced. Amino acid substitution analyses, based on dN/dS window analysis of the products encoded by speG, selW and ssl suggested that all three genes have been subjected to strong positive selection. Evolutionary analysis based on the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method showed that each clade included at least one direct descendant. Conclusions Our findings reveal a plausible model for the comprehensive evolutionary pathway of streptococcal and

  14. FDA approved Immunosuppressants Targeting Staphylococcal Superantigens: Mechanisms and Insights

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    2016-12-02

    cells , resulting in polyclonal T- cell activation [4-6]. Staphylococcal superantigens hyperactivate cells of the innate immune system and adaptive T... innate host defense responses, antiviral genes, apoptotic programs, immunoproteasomes, and has many immunomodulatory functions. The cell death...1692. 104. Mendis C, Das R, Hammamieh R, Royaee A, Yang D, Peel S, et al. Transcriptional response signature of human lymphoid cells to

  15. Staphylococcal superantigens stimulate immortalized human adipocytes to produce chemokines.

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    Bao G Vu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human adipocytes may have significant functions in wound healing and the development of diabetes through production of pro-inflammatory cytokines after stimulation by gram-negative bacterial endotoxin. Diabetic foot ulcers are most often associated with staphylococcal infections. Adipocyte responses in the area of the wound may play a role in persistence and pathology. We studied the effect of staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs on immortalized human adipocytes, alone and in the presence of bacterial endotoxin or staphylococcal α-toxin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary non-diabetic and diabetic human preadipocytes were immortalized by the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase (TERT and the E6/E7 genes of human papillomavirus. The immortal cells were demonstrated to have properties of non-immortalized pre-adipocytes and could be differentiated into mature and functional adipocytes. Differentiated adipocytes exposed to staphylococcal SAgs produced robust levels of cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, but there were no significant differences in levels between the non-diabetic and diabetic cells. Cytokine production was increased by co-incubation of adipocytes with SAgs and endotoxin together. In contrast, α-toxin alone was cytotoxic at high concentrations, but, at sub-cytotoxic doses, did not stimulate production of IL-6 and IL-8. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endotoxin has been proposed to contribute to diabetes through enhanced insulin resistance after chronic exposure and stimulation of adipocytes to produce cytokines. Our data indicate staphylococcal SAgs TSST-1 and SEB alone and in combination with bacterial endotoxin also stimulate adipocytes to produce cytokines and thus may contribute to the inflammatory response found in chronic diabetic ulcers and in the systemic inflammation that is associated with the development and persistence of diabetes. The immortal human pre-adipocytes reported here will be useful for studies to

  16. Manipulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity by Staphylococcal Superantigens

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    Stephen W. Tuffs

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs constitute a family of potent exotoxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus and other select staphylococcal species. SAgs function to cross-link major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules with T cell receptors (TCRs to stimulate the uncontrolled activation of T lymphocytes, potentially leading to severe human illnesses such as toxic shock syndrome. The ubiquity of SAgs in clinical S. aureus isolates suggests that they likely make an important contribution to the evolutionary fitness of S. aureus. Although the apparent redundancy of SAgs in S. aureus has not been explained, the high level of sequence diversity within this toxin family may allow for SAgs to recognize an assorted range of TCR and MHC class II molecules, as well as aid in the avoidance of humoral immunity. Herein, we outline the major diseases associated with the staphylococcal SAgs and how a dysregulated immune system may contribute to pathology. We then highlight recent research that considers the importance of SAgs in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, demonstrating that SAgs are more than simply an immunological diversion. We suggest that SAgs can act as targeted modulators that drive the immune response away from an effective response, and thus aid in S. aureus persistence.

  17. Production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A in cream-filled cake.

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    Anunciaçao, L L; Linardi, W R; do Carmo, L S; Bergdoll, M S

    1995-07-01

    Cakes were baked with normal ingredients and filled with cream, inoculated with different size enterotoxigenic-staphylococcal inocula. Samples of the cakes were incubated at room temperature and put in the refrigerator. Samples of cake and filling were taken at different times and analyzed for staphylococcal count and presence of enterotoxin. The smaller the inoculum, the longer the time required for sufficient growth (10(6)) to occur for production of detectable enterotoxin. Enterotoxin added to the cake dough before baking (210 degrees C, 45 min) did not survive the baking. The presence of enterotoxin in the contaminated cream filling indicated this as the cause of staphylococcal food poisoning from cream-filled cakes. Refrigeration of the cakes prevented the growth of the staphylococci.

  18. Double antibody solid-phase radioimmunoassay for staphylococcal enterotoxin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindroth, S.; Niskanen, A.

    1977-01-01

    A double antibody solid-phase (DASP) radioimmunoassay for staphylococcal enterotoxin A is described. In the assay the antigen-antibody complex is precipitated by anti-rabbit serum which is adsorbed onto a solid carrier (cellulose). The method is sensitive to 200 pg of enterotoxin. It was possible to detect a little as 2-5 ng of enterotoxin A/ml food extract from minced meat and sausage. Enterotoxins B and C were not found to inhibit the uptake of labled enterotoxin A at a level which might distort the results of the enterotoxin A assay. The DASP technique is sensitive, rapid, and easy to perform and thus compares favorably with other radioimmunoassays for enterotoxin. (orig.) [de

  19. Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 promotes osteogenesis and suppresses osteoclastogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Fu, Wei-ming; Zhu, Xiao; Wang, Hua; Wei-Mao Wang; Chen, Ju-yu; Liang, Yan; Zhang, Jin-fang; Kung, Hsiang-fu

    2014-03-10

    As a super-antigen, staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) stimulates the release of massive inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) which are documented to implicate osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, SEC2 was found to significantly improve the osteoblast differentiation by up-regulating BMP2 and Runx2/Cbfa1 expression. Interferon (IFN)-inducible gene IFI16, a co-activator of Runx2/Cbfa1, was also activated by SEC2 in the osteoblast differentiation. In addition, exogenous introduction of SEC2 stimulated OPG expression and suppressed RANKL, suggesting suppression of osteoclastogenesis in hMSCs. Therefore, our results displayed that SEC2 plays an important role in the commitment of MSC to the osteoblast and it might be a potential new therapeutic candidate for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of biological activity of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) by apple juice and apple polyphenols.

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    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula M; Friedman, Mendel

    2010-05-12

    The foodborne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus produces the virulent staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), a single-chain protein that consists of 233 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 27 078 Da. SEA is a superantigen that is reported to contribute to animal (mastitis) and human (emesis, diarrhea, atopic dermatitis, arthritis, and toxic shock) syndromes. Changes of the native structural integrity may inactivate the toxin by preventing molecular interaction with cell membrane receptor sites of their host cells. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of one commercial and two freshly prepared apple juices and a commercial apple polyphenol preparation (Apple Poly) to inhibit the biological activity of SEA. Dilutions of freshly prepared apple juices and Apple Poly inhibited the biological activity of SEA without any significant cytotoxic effect on the spleen cells. Additional studies with antibody-coated immunomagnetic beads bearing specific antibodies against the toxin revealed that SEA added to apple juice appears to be largely irreversibly bound to the juice constituents. The results suggest that food-compatible and safe anti-toxin phenolic compounds can be used to inactivate SEA in vitro and possibly also in vivo, even after induction of T-cell proliferation by long-term exposure to SEA. The significance of the results for microbial food safety and human health is discussed.

  1. Sulfasalazine Attenuates Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Induced Immune Responses

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    Teresa Krakauer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB and related exotoxins are important virulence factors produced by Staphylococcus aureus as they cause human diseases such as food poisoning and toxic shock. These toxins bind directly to cells of the immune system resulting in hyperactivation of both T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. The excessive release of proinflammatory cytokines from these cells mediates the toxic effects of SEB. This study examined the inhibitory activities of an anti-inflammatory drug, sulfasalazine, on SEB-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Sulfasalazine dose-dependently inhibited tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1 (IL-1 β, IL-2, IL-6, interferon γ (IFNγ, and various chemotactic cytokines from SEB-stimulated human PBMC. Sulfasalazine also potently blocked SEB-induced T cell proliferation and NFκB activation. These results suggest that sulfasalazine might be useful in mitigating the toxic effects of SEB by blocking SEB-induced host inflammatory cascade and signaling pathways.

  2. The staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) family: SEB and siblings.

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    Krakauer, Teresa; Stiles, Bradley G

    2013-11-15

    Staphylococcus aureus plays an important role in numerous human cases of food poisoning, soft tissue, and bone infections, as well as potentially lethal toxic shock. This common bacterium synthesizes various virulence factors that include staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). These protein toxins bind directly to major histocompatibility complex class II on antigen-presenting cells and specific Vβ regions of T-cell receptors, resulting in potentially life-threatening stimulation of the immune system. Picomolar concentrations of SEs ultimately elicit proinflammatory cytokines that can induce fever, hypotension, multi-organ failure, and lethal shock. Various in vitro and in vivo models have provided important tools for studying the biological effects of, as well as potential vaccines/therapeutics against, the SEs. This review succinctly presents known physical and biological properties of the SEs, including various intervention strategies. In particular, SEB will often be portrayed as per biodefense concerns dating back to the 1960s.

  3. Passive therapy with humanized anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B antibodies attenuates systemic inflammatory response and protects from lethal pneumonia caused by staphylococcal enterotoxin B-producing Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Karau, Melissa J; Tilahun, Mulualem E; Krogman, Ashton; Osborne, Barbara A; Goldsby, Richard A; David, Chella S; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2017-10-03

    Drugs such as linezolid that inhibit bacterial protein synthesis may be beneficial in treating infections caused by toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus. As protein synthesis inhibitors have no effect on preformed toxins, neutralization of pathogenic exotoxins with anti-toxin antibodies may be beneficial in conjunction with antibacterial therapy. Herein, we evaluated the efficacy of human-mouse chimeric high-affinity neutralizing anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) antibodies in the treatment of experimental pneumonia caused by SEB-producing S. aureus. Since HLA class II transgenic mice mount a stronger systemic immune response following challenge with SEB and are more susceptible to SEB-induced lethal toxic shock than conventional mice strains, HLA-DR3 transgenic mice were used. Lethal pneumonia caused by SEB-producing S. aureus in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice was characterized by robust T cell activation and elevated systemic levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Prophylactic administration of a single dose of linezolid 30 min prior to the onset of infection attenuated the systemic inflammatory response and protected from mortality whereas linezolid administered 60 min after the onset of infection failed to confer significant protection. Human-mouse chimeric high-affinity neutralizing anti-SEB antibodies alone, but not polyclonal human IgG, mitigated this response and protected from death when administered immediately after initiation of infection. Further, anti-SEB antibodies as well as intact polyclonal human IgG, but not its Fab or Fc fragments, protected from lethal pneumonia when followed with linezolid therapy 60 min later. In conclusion, neutralization of superantigens with high-affinity antibodies may have beneficial effects in pneumonia.

  4. Inhibition of Biological Activity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A (SEA) by Apple Juice and Apple Polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    The foodborne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus produces the virulent staphylococcal entertoxin A (SEA), a single-chain protein that consists of 233 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 27 078 Da. SEA is a superantigen that is reported to contribute to animal (mastitis) and human (emesis, dia...

  5. Lab-on-a-chip for label free biological semiconductor analysis of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Minghui; Sun, Steven; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Kostov, Yordan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new lab-on-a-chip (LOC) which utilizes a biological semiconductor (BSC) transducer for label free analysis of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) (or other biological interactions) directly and electronically. BSCs are new transducers based on electrical percolation through a

  6. Staphylococcal superantigen-specific IgE antibodies: degree of sensitization and association with severity of asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Elabras Filho, José; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Lupi, Omar; Bica, Blanca Elena Rios Gomes; Papi, José Angelo de Souza; França, Alfeu Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the presence of staphylococcal superantigen-specific IgE antibodies and degree of IgE-mediated sensitization, as well as whether or not those are associated with the severity of asthma in adult patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving outpatients with asthma under treatment at a tertiary care university hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Consecutive patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of asthma ba...

  7. Prevalence of Staphylococcal Enterotoxins in Ready-to-Eat Foods Sold in Istanbul.

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    Ulusoy, Beyza H; Çakmak Sancar, Burcu; Öztürk, Muhsin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods sold in Istanbul, Turkey. A total of 5,241 samples were randomly collected from various caterers, hotels, and restaurants from 2014 to 2016. The samples were classified into four groups: (i) various cooked RTE meat and vegetable meals, (ii) various RTE salads, charcuterie, and cold appetizers, (iii) various cooked RTE bakery products (pasta, pastries, pizza, pita, ravioli, etc.), and (iv) any cooked RTE sweets and desserts (pudding, custard, cream, ashura, etc.). The samples were examined for the presence of SEs by 3M Tecra Staph Enterotoxin Visual Immunoassay method, which is a manual enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Among all samples, only 1 (0.019%) RTE meal (vegetable meal with meat) was found to be contaminated with SEs, a good result in terms of staphylococcal food poisoning risk and public health.

  8. Staphylococcal aureus Enterotoxin C and Enterotoxin-Like L Associated with Post-partum Mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina T; Gumpert, Heidi; Olesen, Bente

    2017-01-01

    between isolates from the two outbreaks revealed a S. aureus pathogenicity island containing enterotoxin C and enterotoxin-like L only in isolates from outbreak 2. Enterotoxin C and enterotoxin-like L carrying S. aureus are associated with bovine mastitis and our findings indicate that these may also...... PVL and ACME negative. In outbreak 1, the isolates harbored SCCmec IVa and in outbreak 2 SCCmec V. The clinical presentation differed between the two outbreaks, as none of five MRSA positive mothers in outbreak 1 had mastitis vs. five of six MRSA positive mothers in outbreak 2 (p ....02). To investigate if whole-genome sequencing could identify virulence genes associated with mastitis, t015:ST45 isolates from Denmark (N = 101) were whole-genome sequenced. Sequence analysis confirmed two separate outbreaks with no sign of sustained spread into the community. Analysis of the accessory genome...

  9. Rauvolfia grandiflora (Apocynaceae extract interferes with staphylococcal density, enterotoxin production and antimicrobial activity

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    Lanamar de Almeida Carlos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci bacteria are involved in many human and animal infections and development of alternative antimicrobial drugs against pathogenic bacteria is of great interest to the pharmaceutical industry. This study investigated the in vitro effect of Rauvolfia grandiflora methanol extract (root bark fraction (RGE on the density of ATCC strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and a clinical enterotoxin-producer, S. aureus bovine strain. The alkaloid, isoreserpiline, obtained from dichloromethane extract of R. grandiflora was ineffective against the strains tested. After incubation of staphylococci strains in the presence of 1.2 mg.mL-1 RGE, a significant inhibition of cell growth was observed using both spectrophotometry and ELISA assays. Twelve drugs were evaluated for their antimicrobial effects on culture RGE-treated cells using the disk diffusion method. Penicillin resistant strains became sensitive to the drug after RGE treatment. Furthermore, enterotoxin production by RGE-treated S. aureus was evaluated using a standardized ELISA method. Although staphylococcal LSA 88 bovine strain cells remained viable after exposure to the extract, enterotoxin production was precluded in 20% after RGE treatment. Significant interference in staphylococci cell density, drug sensitivity and enterotoxin secretion was observed after treatment. The study highlights the necessity to find new methods of disease prevention and new antibiotic therapies against staphylococcal infections.

  10. Rauvolfia grandiflora (apocynaceae) extract interferes with staphylococcal density, enterotoxin production and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Carlos, Lanamar; da Silva Amaral, Kenas Aguiar; Curcino Vieira, Ivo José; Mathias, Leda; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Silva Samarão, Solange; Vieira-da-Motta, Olney

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococci bacteria are involved in many human and animal infections and development of alternative antimicrobial drugs against pathogenic bacteria is of great interest to the pharmaceutical industry. This study investigated the in vitro effect of Rauvolfia grandiflora methanol extract (root bark fraction) (RGE) on the density of ATCC strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and a clinical enterotoxin-producer, S. aureus bovine strain. The alkaloid, isoreserpiline, obtained from dichloromethane extract of R. grandiflora was ineffective against the strains tested. After incubation of staphylococci strains in the presence of 1.2 μg.mL(-1) RGE, a significant inhibition of cell growth was observed using both spectrophotometry and ELISA assays. Twelve drugs were evaluated for their antimicrobial effects on culture RGE-treated cells using the disk diffusion method. Penicillin resistant strains became sensitive to the drug after RGE treatment. Furthermore, enterotoxin production by RGE-treated S. aureus was evaluated using a standardized ELISA method. Although staphylococcal LSA 88 bovine strain cells remained viable after exposure to the extract, enterotoxin production was precluded in 20% after RGE treatment. Significant interference in staphylococci cell density, drug sensitivity and enterotoxin secretion was observed after treatment. The study highlights the necessity to find new methods of disease prevention and new antibiotic therapies against staphylococcal infections.

  11. Expression of Staphylococcal Enterotoxins under Stress Encountered during Food Production and Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelin, Jenny; Susilo, Yusak Budi; Johler, Sophia

    2017-12-15

    Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) is the most prevalent cause of food-borne intoxications worldwide. Consumption of enterotoxins preformed in food causes violent vomiting and can be fatal in children and the elderly. While being repressed by competing bacteria in most matrices, Staphylococcus aureus benefits from crucial competitive advantages in foods with high osmolarity or low pH. During recent years, the long-standing belief in the feasibility of assessing SFP risk based on colony-forming units of S. aureus present in food products has been disproven. Instead, researchers and food business operators are acutely aware of the imminent threat arising from unforeseeable enterotoxin production under stress conditions. This paradigm shift led to a variety of new publications enabling an improved understanding of enterotoxin expression under stress conditions encountered in food. The wealth of data provided by these studies is extremely diverse, as it is based on different methodological approaches, staphylococcal strains, stressors, and enterotoxins. Therefore, in this review, we aggregated and critically evaluated the complex findings of these studies, to provide readers with a current overview of the state of research in the field.

  12. Staphylococcal superantigen-specific IgE antibodies: degree of sensitization and association with severity of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elabras, José; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Lupi, Omar; Bica, Blanca Elena Rios Gomes; Papi, José Angelo de Souza; França, Alfeu Tavares

    2016-01-01

    To determine the presence of staphylococcal superantigen-specific IgE antibodies and degree of IgE-mediated sensitization, as well as whether or not those are associated with the severity of asthma in adult patients. This was a cross-sectional study involving outpatients with asthma under treatment at a tertiary care university hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Consecutive patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of asthma based on the Global Initiative for Asthma criteria: mild asthma (MA), comprising patients with mild intermittent or persistent asthma; and moderate or severe asthma (MSA). We determined the serum levels of staphylococcal toxin-specific IgE antibodies, comparing the results and performing a statistical analysis. The study included 142 patients: 72 in the MA group (median age = 46 years; 59 females) and 70 in the MSA group (median age = 56 years; 60 females). In the sample as a whole, 62 patients (43.7%) presented positive results for staphylococcal toxin-specific IgE antibodies: staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), in 29 (20.4%); SEB, in 35 (24.6%); SEC, in 33 (23.2%); and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST), in 45 (31.7%). The mean serum levels of IgE antibodies to SEA, SEB, SEC, and TSST were 0.96 U/L, 1.09 U/L, 1.21 U/L, and 1.18 U/L, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of the qualitative or quantitative results. Serum IgE antibodies to SEA, SEB, SEC, and TSST were detected in 43.7% of the patients in our sample. However, neither the qualitative nor quantitative results showed a statistically significant association with the clinical severity of asthma. Determinar a presença de anticorpos IgE específicos para superantígenos estafilocócicos e o grau de sensibilização mediada por esses, assim como se esses estão associados à gravidade da asma em pacientes adultos. Estudo transversal incluindo asmáticos adultos em acompanhamento ambulatorial em

  13. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 activates platelets and supports platelet adhesion under flow conditions, which involves glycoprotein Ib alpha and alpha(IIb)beta(3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, C. J. C.; Weeterings, C.; Vughs, M. M.; De Groot, P. G.; Van Strijp, J. A.; Lisman, T.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5) is an exoprotein secreted by Staphylococcus aureus that has been shown to inhibit neutrophil rolling over activated endothelial cells via a direct interaction with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1). Methods and Results: When purified

  14. Plant-Derived Polyphenols Interact with Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A and Inhibit Toxin Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Shimamura, Yuko; Aoki, Natsumi; Sugiyama, Yuka; Tanaka, Takashi; Murata, Masatsune; Masuda, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of 16 different plant-derived polyphenols on the toxicity of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA). Plant-derived polyphenols were incubated with the cultured Staphylococcus aureus C-29 to investigate the effects of these samples on SEA produced from C-29 using Western blot analysis. Twelve polyphenols (0.1-0.5 mg/mL) inhibited the interaction between the anti-SEA antibody and SEA. We examined whether the polyphenols could directly i...

  15. Staphylococcal enterotoxins in the Etiopathogenesis of Mucosal Autoimmunity within the Gastrointestinal Tract

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    MaryAnn Principato

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs are the products of Staphylococcus aureus and are recognized as the causative agents of classical food poisoning in humans following the consumption of contaminated food. While illness evoked by ingestion of the SE or its producer organism in tainted food are often self-limited, our current understanding regarding the evolution of S. aureus provokes the utmost concern. The organism and its associated toxins, has been implicated in a wide variety of disease states including infections of the skin, heart, sinuses, inflammatory gastrointestinal disease, toxic shock, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The intricate relationship between the various subsets of immunocompetent T cells and accessory cells and the ingested material found within the gastrointestinal tract present daunting challenges to the maintenance of immunologic homeostasis. Dysregulation of the intricate balances within this environment has the potential for extreme consequences within the host, some of which are long-lived. The focus of this review is to evaluate the relevance of staphylococcal enterotoxin in the context of mucosal immunity, and the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal autoimmune disease.

  16. Contamination of beef products with staphylococcal classical enterotoxins in Egypt and Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawish, Reyad R.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Food-borne pathogens are of high concern for public health and food safety. food poisoning is one of the most economically devastating types of food poisoning globally. The purpose of this study was to detect staphylococcal classical enterotoxins (SEs in processed beef from Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA and Egypt. In the present investigation a total of 250 random processed meat samples (50 each of minced meat, beef burger, beef sausage, beef kofta and beef luncheon were collected from different super markets in the study area. Using conventional cultural methods, samples were cultured for isolation and identification of . Multiplex PCR was used to detect SEs of the classical type SEA, SEB, SEC and SED from isolates.The percentage presence of in minced meat, beef burger, beef sausage, beef kofta and beef luncheon was 38%, 22%, 30%, 32% and 12%, respectively. Multiplex PCR indicated that all examined samples contain different types of classical staphylococcal enterotoxins and only minced meat samples contained all four types of toxins. Multiplex PCR is efficient in detection of SEs from food and may be used in tracing of toxins to promote food hygiene. Implications of contamination of processed meat to food hygiene in the study area are highlighted.

  17. Short communication: Pasteurization as a means of inactivating staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B, and C in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necidova, Lenka; Bogdanovicova, Katerina; Harustiakova, Danka; Bartova, Katerina

    2016-11-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of pasteurization temperature on inactivation of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE). Milk samples were inoculated with log 4.38 to 5.18cfu/mL of 40 different Staphylococcus aureus strains having the ability to produce types A, B, or C SE and incubated at 37°C for 24h to develop SE. This incubation was followed by heat treatment for 15 s at 72, 85, and 92°C. Samples were analyzed for Staph. aureus count by plate method and, specifically, for SE presence. An enzyme-linked immunofluorescent assay on a MiniVIDAS analyzer (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Étoile, France) was used to detect SE, which were determined semiquantitatively based on test values. The Staph. aureus count in milk before pasteurization did not affect the amount of SE. Before pasteurization, SEB was detected in the lowest amount compared with other SE types. Staphylococcal enterotoxins were markedly reduced with pasteurization and inactivated at pasteurization temperatures to an extent depending on the amount in the sample before pasteurization. After pasteurization at 72°C, SE were detected in 87.5% of samples (35/40), after pasteurization at 85°C in 52.5% of samples (21/40), and after pasteurization at 92°C in 45.0% of samples (18/40). We determined that SE may still persist in milk even when Staph. aureus bacteria are inactivated through pasteurization. Although pasteurization may partially inactivate SE in milk, a key measure in the prevention of staphylococcal enterotoxicosis linked to pasteurized milk consumption is to avoid any cold chain disruption during milk production and processing. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. PCR detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from raw and pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, V L M; Vieira, F P; Rall, R; Vieitis, R L; Fernandes, A; Candeias, J M G; Cardoso, K F G; Araújo, J P

    2008-12-10

    Milk is considered a nutritious food because it contains several important nutrients including proteins and vitamins. Conversely, it can be a vehicle for several pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to analyze the frequency of genes encoding the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, SEE, SEG, SEH, SEI and SEJ in S. aureus strains isolated from raw or pasteurized bovine milk. S. aureus was found in 38 (70.4%) out of 54 raw milk samples at concentrations of up to 8.9 x 10(5) CFU/ml. This microorganism was present in eight samples of pasteurized milk before the expiration date and in 11 samples analyzed on the expiration date. Of the 57 strains studied, 68.4% were positive for one or more genes encoding the enterotoxins, and 12 different genotypes were identified. The gene coding for enterotoxin A, sea, was the most frequent (16 strains, 41%), followed by sec (8 strains, 20.5%), sed (5 strains, 12.8%), seb (3 strains, 7.7%) and see (2 strains, 5.1%). Among the genes encoding the other enterotoxins, seg was the most frequently observed (11 strains, 28.2%), followed by sei (10 strains) and seh and sej (3 strains each). With the recent identification of new SEs, the perceived frequency of enterotoxigenic strains has increased, suggesting that the pathogenic potential of staphylococci may be higher than previously thought; however, further studies are required to assess the expression of these new SEs by S. aureus, and their impact in foodborne disease. The quality of Brazilian milk is still low, and efforts from the government and the entire productive chain are required to attain consumer safety.

  19. Chimeric anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B antibodies and lovastatin act synergistically to provide in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB.

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    Mulualem E Tilahun

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB is one of a family of toxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus that act as superantigens, activating a large fraction of the T-cell population and inducing production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS and death. Extracellular engagement of the TCR of T-cells and class II MHC of antigen presenting cells by SEB triggers the activation of many intracellular signaling processes. We engineered chimeric antibodies to block the extracellular engagement of cellular receptors by SEB and used a statin to inhibit intracellular signaling. Chimeric human-mouse antibodies directed against different neutralizing epitopes of SEB synergistically inhibited its activation of human T-cells in vitro. In the in vivo model of lethal toxic shock syndrome (TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice, two of these antibodies conferred significant partial protection when administered individually, but offered complete protection in a synergistic manner when given together. Similarly, in vivo, lovastatin alone conferred only partial protection from TSS similar to single anti-SEB antibodies. However, used in combination with one chimeric neutralizing anti-SEB antibody, lovastatin provided complete protection against lethal TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. These experiments demonstrate that in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB can be achieved by a statin of proven clinical safety and chimeric human-mouse antibodies, agents now widely used and known to be of low immunogenicity in human hosts.

  20. Comparative Effects of Food Preservatives on the Production of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin I from Staphylococcus aureus Isolate

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    Yanying Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin I (SEI is associated with staphylococcal food poisoning, but little is known about different food preservatives on the production of SEI. In this study, the effect of different food preservatives (sodium nitrite, polylysine, chitosan, and tea catechin on the bacteria growth, sei gene expression, and extracellular SEI production of Staphylococcus aureus isolate H4 was detected in tryptone soya broth (TSB culture. Our results showed that all of these preservatives depressed S. aureus H4 growth and the order of inhibitory effect was 0.8 g/L tea catechin > 6 g/L chitosan > 0.25 g/L polylysine > 0.4 g/L tea catechin > 0.15 g/L sodium nitrite. Furthermore, 0.25 g/L polylysine or 0.15 g/L sodium nitrite did not significantly alter sei gene transcription, while 6 g/L chitosan obviously increased the relative mRNA level of sei gene expression. 0.4 g/L tea catechin remarkably inhibited sei gene transcription. In addition, 0.15 g/L sodium nitrite and 6 g/L chitosan significantly enhanced SEI secretion. 0.25 g/L polylysine, especially 0.4 g/L tea catechin, sharply inhibited the level of SEI secretion. The results indicated that tea catechin not only suppressed Staphylococcus aureus growth, but also inhibited SEI production and secretion, suggesting that tea catechin may be better than sodium nitrite, polylysine, or chitosan for keeping the food from the contamination of SEI. These investigations would be useful for food industry to provide safer food products due to S. aureus enterotoxins-related control strategy.

  1. Plant-Derived Polyphenols Interact with Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A and Inhibit Toxin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Yuko; Aoki, Natsumi; Sugiyama, Yuka; Tanaka, Takashi; Murata, Masatsune; Masuda, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of 16 different plant-derived polyphenols on the toxicity of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA). Plant-derived polyphenols were incubated with the cultured Staphylococcus aureus C-29 to investigate the effects of these samples on SEA produced from C-29 using Western blot analysis. Twelve polyphenols (0.1-0.5 mg/mL) inhibited the interaction between the anti-SEA antibody and SEA. We examined whether the polyphenols could directly interact with SEA after incubation of these test samples with SEA. As a result, 8 polyphenols (0.25 mg/mL) significantly decreased SEA protein levels. In addition, the polyphenols that interacted with SEA inactivated the toxin activity of splenocyte proliferation induced by SEA. Polyphenols that exerted inhibitory effects on SEA toxic activity had a tendency to interact with SEA. In particular, polyphenol compounds with 1 or 2 hexahydroxydiphenoyl groups and/or a galloyl group, such as eugeniin, castalagin, punicalagin, pedunculagin, corilagin and geraniin, strongly interacted with SEA and inhibited toxin activity at a low concentration. These polyphenols may be used to prevent S. aureus infection and staphylococcal food poisoning.

  2. Plant-Derived Polyphenols Interact with Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A and Inhibit Toxin Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Shimamura

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of 16 different plant-derived polyphenols on the toxicity of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA. Plant-derived polyphenols were incubated with the cultured Staphylococcus aureus C-29 to investigate the effects of these samples on SEA produced from C-29 using Western blot analysis. Twelve polyphenols (0.1-0.5 mg/mL inhibited the interaction between the anti-SEA antibody and SEA. We examined whether the polyphenols could directly interact with SEA after incubation of these test samples with SEA. As a result, 8 polyphenols (0.25 mg/mL significantly decreased SEA protein levels. In addition, the polyphenols that interacted with SEA inactivated the toxin activity of splenocyte proliferation induced by SEA. Polyphenols that exerted inhibitory effects on SEA toxic activity had a tendency to interact with SEA. In particular, polyphenol compounds with 1 or 2 hexahydroxydiphenoyl groups and/or a galloyl group, such as eugeniin, castalagin, punicalagin, pedunculagin, corilagin and geraniin, strongly interacted with SEA and inhibited toxin activity at a low concentration. These polyphenols may be used to prevent S. aureus infection and staphylococcal food poisoning.

  3. Evaluation of Potential Effects of NaCl and Sorbic Acid on Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoleta Zeaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The prophage-encoded staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA is recognized as the main cause of staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP, a common foodborne intoxication disease, caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Studies on the production of SEA suggest that activation of the SOS response and subsequent prophage induction affect the regulation of the sea gene and the SEA produced, increasing the risk for SFP. The present study aims to evaluate the effect of NaCl and sorbic acid, in concentrations relevant to food production, on SOS response activation, prophage induction and SEA production. The impact of stress was initially evaluated on steady state cells for a homogenous cell response. NaCl 2% was found to activate the SOS response, i.e., recA expression, and trigger prophage induction, in a similar way as the phage-inducer mitomycin C. In contrast, sorbic acid decreased the pH of the culture to a level where prophage induction was probably suppressed, even when combined with NaCl stress. The impact of previous physiological state of the bacteria was also addressed on cells pre-exposed to NaCl, and was found to potentially affect cell response upon exposure to further stress. The results obtained highlight the possible SFP-related risks arising from the use of preservatives during food processing.

  4. Persistent production of TH2-type cytokines and polyclonal B cell activation after chronic administration of staphylococcal enterotoxin B in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florquin, S.; Amraoui, Z.; Goldman, M.

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the immunopathological consequences of repeated exposure to bacterial superantigens, we evaluated the production of cytokines, the profile of serum immunoglobulins and the tissue damage in BALB/c mice injected twice a week for 3 weeks with 50 micrograms of staphylococcal

  5. Colorimetric determination of staphylococcal enterotoxin B via DNAzyme-guided growth of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dandan; Chen, Hui; Xie, Guoming; Cao, Xianqing; Chen, Xueping; Zhang, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a colorimetric method for the determination of the staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) that also allows for visual readout. The assay is based on the growth of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mediated by a hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme which generates a color change from red to blue in the presence of SEB. The method is enzyme-free and does not require a label. The kinetics of the formation of the AuNPs is controlled by the hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme and this is key to the signal generation mechanism. In the presence of SEB, the reactions between aptamer and target modulated the amount of single probe G strands that form DNAzyme capable of consuming hydrogen peroxide. The growth process of AuNPs is influenced by the resulting concentration of H 2 O 2 and leads to the color change. Under optimal conditions, a linear relationship exists between absorbance and SEB concentration in the range from 0.1 to 500 pg·mL -1 which covers the clinically relevant range. In case of visual detection, the lower limit of detection is 1 pg·mL −1 . The assay described here is sensitive, comparably inexpensive and can detect SEB rapidly without the need for sophisticated equipment. In our perception, the method has a wide scope in that it may be adapted to various nucleic acids, proteins and other biomolecules if respective aptamers are available. (author)

  6. Evaluation of Handheld Assays for the Detection of Ricin and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B in Disinfected Waters

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    Mary Margaret Wade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of a rapid field test is needed capable of determining if field supplies of water are safe to drink by the warfighter during a military operation. The present study sought to assess the effectiveness of handheld assays (HHAs in detecting ricin and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB in water. Performance of HHAs was evaluated in formulated tap water with and without chlorine, reverse osmosis water (RO with chlorine, and RO with bromine. Each matrix was prepared, spiked with ricin or SEB at multiple concentrations, and then loaded onto HHAs. HHAs were allowed to develop and then read visually. Limits of detection (LOD were determined for all HHAs in each water type. Both ricin and SEB were detected by HHAs in formulated tap water at or below the suggested health effect levels of 455 ng/mL and 4.55 ng/mL, respectively. However, in brominated or chlorinated waters, LODs for SEB increased to approximately 2,500 ng/mL. LODs for ricin increased in chlorinated water, but still remained below the suggested health effect level. In brominated water, the LOD for ricin increased to approximately 2,500 ng/mL. In conclusion, the HHAs tested were less effective at detecting ricin and SEB in disinfected water, as currently configured.

  7. Selection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-binding peptide using phage display technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soykut, Esra Acar; Dudak, Fahriye Ceyda; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2008-01-01

    In this study, peptides were selected to recognize staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) which cause food intoxication and can be used as a biological war agent. By using commercial M13 phage library, single plaque isolation of 38 phages was done and binding affinities were investigated with phage-ELISA. The specificities of the selected phage clones showing high affinity to SEB were checked by using different protein molecules which can be found in food samples. Furthermore, the affinities of three selected phage clones were determined by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. Sequence analysis was realized for three peptides showing high binding affinity to SEB and WWRPLTPESPPA, MNLHDYHRLFWY, and QHPQINQTLYRM amino acid sequences were obtained. The peptide sequence with highest affinity to SEB was synthesized with solid phase peptide synthesis technique and thermodynamic constants of the peptide-SEB interaction were determined by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and compared with those of antibody-SEB interaction. The binding constant of the peptide was determined as 4.2 ± 0.7 x 10 5 M -1 which indicates a strong binding close to that of antibody

  8. Up-regulation of granzyme B and perforin by staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 mutant induces enhanced cytotoxicity in Hepa1–6 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guojun [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.72 Wenhua Road Shenhe Dis., Shenyang, Liaoning (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Xu, Mingkai, E-mail: mkxu@iae.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.72 Wenhua Road Shenhe Dis., Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Zhang, Huiwen [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.72 Wenhua Road Shenhe Dis., Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Song, Yubo [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.72 Wenhua Road Shenhe Dis., Shenyang, Liaoning (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang, Jian; Zhang, Chenggang [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.72 Wenhua Road Shenhe Dis., Shenyang, Liaoning (China)

    2016-12-15

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2), a member of bacterial superantigen, is one of the most potent known activators of T lymphocytes. With this property, SEC2 has already been used in clinic as a tumor immunotherapy agent in China. To increase the antitumor activity, a SEC2 mutant named ST-4 (GKVTG102-106WWH) with amino acid substitutions in T cell receptor (TCR)-binding domain was generated by site-directed mutagenesis, and the molecular mechanism of the enhanced antitumor activity was investigated. Results showed that ST-4 could activate much more Vβ 8.2 and 8.3 T cells and NK cells compared with SEC2, and exhibited significantly enhanced immunocyte stimulation and antitumor activity in vitro. The synthetic peptide sequencing the residues of mutant TCR-binding domain could competitively inhibit the immunocyte stimulation activity of ST-4. Most importantly, ST-4 up-regulated granzyme B and perforin at both mRNA and protein levels. We also found that expression of proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c, BAX and activation of caspase-3, 9 was up-regulated, and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL was down-regulated in the treatment with either ST-4 or SEC2. When granzyme B inhibitor or perforin inhibitor is presented, tumor cell viability was significantly rescued. Taken together, we demonstrate that increased ST-4-TCR recognition contributed to massive T cells and NK cells activation. These activated cells released up-regulated granzyme B and perforin, which induced the enhanced tumor cells apoptosis by mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and ultimately led to enhanced tumor cell growth inhibition. ST-4 may be a promising candidate for antitumor clinic usage in future. - Highlights: • We obtained a SEC2 mutant ST-4 with enhanced superantigen and antitumor activity. • Increased ST-4-TCR recognition contributed to massive T cells and NK cells activation. • Up-regulated GzmB and PRF1 in T cell by ST-4 induced enhanced tumor cells apoptosis. • Enhanced tumor cell apoptosis

  9. Inhibitory effects of food additives derived from polyphenols on staphylococcal enterotoxin A production and biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Yuko; Hirai, Chikako; Sugiyama, Yuka; Shibata, Masaharu; Ozaki, Junya; Murata, Masatsune; Ohashi, Norio; Masuda, Shuichi

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we examined the inhibitory effects of 14 food additives derived from polyphenol samples on staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) production and biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus. Tannic acid AL (TA), Purephenon 50 W (PP) and Polyphenon 70A (POP) at 0.25 mg/mL and Gravinol®-N (GN), Blackcurrant polyphenol AC10 (BP), and Resveratrol-P5 (RT) at 1.0 mg/mL significantly decreased SEA production by S. aureus C-29 (p Food additives derived from polyphenols have viability to be used as a means to inhibit the enterotoxin production and control the biofilm formation of foodborne pathogens.

  10. A regenerable piezoelectric immunosensor on the basis of electropolymerized polypyrrole for highly selective detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A in foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaseva, Nadezhda; Ermolaeva, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric immunosensors have been developed for the determination of trace concentrations of Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in foodstuff. Antibodies against SEA were covalently immobilized on an electropolymerized polypyrrole substrate on a gold electrode which warrants increased stability of the biolayer and sensitive detection. The calibration plot is linear in the 1–80 ng∙mL -1 SEA concentration range, the limit of detection is 0.4 ng∙mL -1 , and the time of analysis is <30 min. The sensor was successfully applied to quantify SEA in chicken meat and milk. (author)

  11. Modeling the effects of a Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB on the apoptosis pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammamieh Rasha

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of detailed understanding of the mechanism of action of many biowarfare agents poses an immediate challenge to biodefense efforts. Many potential bioweapons have been shown to affect the cellular pathways controlling apoptosis 1234. For example, pathogen-produced exotoxins such as Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB and Anthrax Lethal Factor (LF have been shown to disrupt the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway 24. To evaluate how these agents affect these pathways it is first necessary to understand the dynamics of a normally functioning apoptosis network. This can then serve as a baseline against which a pathogen perturbed system can be compared. Such comparisons can expose both the proteins most susceptible to alteration by the agent as well as the most critical reaction rates to better instill control on a biological network. Results We explore this through the modeling and simulation of the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway under normal and SEB influenced conditions. We stimulated human Jurkat cells with an anti-Fas antibody in the presence and absence of SEB and determined the relative levels of seven proteins involved in the core pathway at five time points following exposure. These levels were used to impute relative rate constants and build a quantitative model consisting of a series of ordinary differential equations (ODEs that simulate the network under both normal and pathogen-influenced conditions. Experimental results show that cells exposed to SEB exhibit an increase in the rate of executioner caspase expression (and subsequently apoptosis of 1 hour 43 minutes (± 14 minutes, as compared to cells undergoing normal cell death. Conclusion Our model accurately reflects these results and reveals intervention points that can be altered to restore SEB-influenced system dynamics back to levels within the range of normal conditions.

  12. Rhinosinusitis derived Staphylococcal enterotoxin B possibly associates with pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Zi-Yuan

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During clinical practice, we noticed that some patients with both ulcerative colitis (UC and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS showed amelioration of UC after treatment of CRS. This study was designed to identify a possible association between CRS and UC. Methods Thirty-two patients with both CRS and UC received treatment with functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS for CRS. Clinical symptom scores for CRS and UC, as well as serum levels of anti-Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB were evaluated at week 0 and week 12. Sinus wash fluid SEB content was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The surgically removed tissues were cultured to identify growth of Staphylococcus. aureus (S. aureus. Immunohistochemistry was employed to identify anti-SEB positive cells in the colonic mucosa. Colonic biopsies were obtained and incubated with SEB. Mast cell activation in the colonic mucosa in response to incubation with SEB was observed with electron microscopy and immunoassay. Results The clinical symptom scores of CRS and UC severe scores (UCSS were significantly reduced in the UC-CRS patients after FESS. The number of cultured S. aureus colonies from the surgically removed sinus mucosa significantly correlated with the decrease in UCSS. High levels of SEB were detected in the sinus wash fluids of the patients with UC-CRS. Histamine and tryptase release was significantly higher in the culture supernate in the patients with UC-CRS than the patients with UC-only and normal controls. Anti-SEB positive cells were located in the colonic mucosa. Conclusion The pathogenesis of UC in some patients may be associated with their pre-existing CRS by a mechanism of swallowing sinusitis-derived SEB. We speculate that SEB initiates inappropriate immune reactions and inflammation in the colonic mucosa that further progresses to UC.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies protect from Staphylococcal Enterotoxin K (SEK) induced toxic shock and sepsis by USA300 Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jorge L; Varshney, Avanish K; Pechuan, Ximo; Dutta, Kaushik; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Fries, Bettina C

    2017-08-18

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading infectious cause of life-threatening disease in humans, yet there is currently no vaccine to combat this bacterium. The pathogenesis of S. aureus is mediated by a diverse array of protein toxins including a large family of secreted pyrogenic superantigens. Neutralization of superantigens, including SEB and TSST-1, has proven to be protective in several animal models of toxic shock and sepsis. We demonstrate, for the first time, that a far more prevalent staphylococcal superantigen, SEK, can also induce lethal shock in mice. Additionally, we describe monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that inhibit SEK-induced mitogenicity as well as protect against SEK-induced lethality, and enhance survival from S. aureus septicemia in murine models. MAb-4G3 (IgG2b), mAb-5G2 (IgG1), and mAb-9H2 (IgG1), all inhibit SEK-induced proliferation and cytokine production of human immune cells. We then demonstrate that passive immunization with a combination of mAb-4G3 and mAb-5G4, 2 mAbs that do not compete for epitope(s) on SEK, significantly enhance survival in a murine model of SEK-induced toxic shock (p = 0.006). In the setting of sepsis, passive immunization with this combination of mAbs also significantly enhances survival in mice after challenge with CA-MRSA strain USA300 (p = 0.03). Furthermore, septic mice that received mAb treatment in conjunction with vancomycin exhibit less morbidity than mice treated with vancomycin alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the contribution of SEK to S. aureus pathogenesis may be greater than previously appreciated, and that adjunctive therapy with passive immunotherapy against SEs may be beneficial.

  14. Magnetic Bead and Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles Based Optical Immunodetection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB in Bottled Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva K. RASTOGI

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs are a major cause of food-borne diseases, most commonly SEs assayed immunologically with ELISA. An immunoassay based on fluorescein dye doped silica dioxide nanoparticles (F-SiNPs and magnetic bead (MB is described here for the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB. F-SiNPs have unique optical properties which make them attractive for biosensing. The water-in-oil (W/O reverse microemulsion method was used for the synthesis of F-SiNPs (~ 95 nm of diameter. The F-SiNPs were characterized using SEM, TEM and FTIR spectroscopy. The detection of SEB is preformed in PBS buffer, and bottled drinking water using sandwich immunoassay format. Target analytes were captured using MBs modified with the antigen-specific “capture” antibody, and detected using F-SiNP labeled secondary antigen-specific antibody. We report a limit of detection down to 1 ng/mL SEB spiked sample in less than 2 hr assay time using fluorocount method. This study demonstrates the bio warfare agent SEB capture by magnetic beads and detection using F-SiNPs.

  15. Noncontiguous Finished Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus KLT6, a Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Positive Strain Involved in a Food Poisoning Outbreak in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobes, Raquel; Manrique, Marina; Brozynska, Marta; Stephan, Roger; Pareja, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    We present the first complete genome sequence of a Staphylococcus aureus strain assigned to clonal complex 12. The strain was isolated in a food poisoning outbreak due to contaminated potato salad in Switzerland in 2009, and it produces staphylococcal enterotoxin B. PMID:23704175

  16. Staphylococcal enterotoxin-specific IgE antibodies in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Fumihito; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Kaneko, Miho; Ichiyama, Takashi; Mukouyama, Tokuko; Furukawa, Susumu

    2004-06-01

    The authors clarified the clinical significance of the measurement of serum concentrations of specific IgE antibodies to staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) A- and SEB in atopic dermatitis (AD). The serum concentrations of SEA- and SEB-specific IgE antibodies in 140 pediatric patients with AD were measured with an immuno CAP -radioallergosorbent test system (RAST). To check the cross-reaction of specific IgE antibodies to SEA/SEB and other allergens, the CAP RAST fluorescent enzyme immunoassay inhibition test was performed. Forty-seven patients (33.6%) tested positive for either SEA- or SEB-specific IgE antibodies. School children showed higher positive rates of SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies than infants or young children. The patients with severe AD and those with exacerbation of symptoms in summer, had higher positive rates of SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies than patients with mild AD or those with exacerbation in winter. In addition, the positive rates of specific IgE antibodies to both dog-dander and cat-dander were higher in patients with positive SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies than in patients with negative ones. No cross-reactions occurred among specific IgE antibodies to SEA/SEB and dog/cat dander with one patient's serum, which had positive IgE-specific antibodies against cat/dog dander and SEA/SEB. The positive rate of SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies in the patients with dogs and/or cats as pets was 48.4%, which was higher than in those with no pets. Atopic dermatitis patients who exhibit high positive rates of SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies were found to be school children, severe cases, cases with high serum concentrations of total IgE, cases with exacerbation in summer, and cases with dogs and/or cats as pets. The measurement of serum concentrations of specific IgE antibodies to SEA and SEB, thus has some value for evaluating AD patients.

  17. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A regulates bone marrow granulocyte trafficking during pulmonary inflammatory disease in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshita, W.M.; Gushiken, V.O.; Ferreira-Duarte, A.P.; Pinheiro-Torres, A.S.; Roncalho-Buck, I.A. [Department of Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Jundiai (FMJ), Jundiai, SP (Brazil); Squebola-Cola, D.M.; Mello, G.C.; Anhê, G.F.; Antunes, E. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil); DeSouza, I.A., E-mail: ivanidesouza@uol.com.br [Department of Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Jundiai (FMJ), Jundiai, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration produced by Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) airway exposure is accompanied by marked granulocyte accumulation in bone marrow (BM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of BM cell accumulation, and trafficking to circulating blood and lung tissue after SEA airway exposure. Male BALB/C mice were intranasally exposed to SEA (1 μg), and at 4, 12 and 24 h thereafter, BM, circulating blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were collected. Adhesion of BM granulocytes and flow cytometry for MAC-1, LFA1-α and VLA-4 and cytokine and/or chemokine levels were assayed after SEA-airway exposure. Prior exposure to SEA promoted a marked PMN influx to BAL and lung tissue, which was accompanied by increased counts of immature and/or mature neutrophils and eosinophils in BM, along with blood neutrophilia. Airway exposure to SEA enhanced BM neutrophil MAC-1 expression, and adhesion to VCAM-1 and/or ICAM-1-coated plates. Elevated levels of GM-CSF, G-CSF, INF-γ, TNF-α, KC/CXCL-1 and SDF-1α were detected in BM after SEA exposure. SEA exposure increased production of eosinopoietic cytokines (eotaxin and IL-5) and BM eosinophil VLA-4 expression, but it failed to affect eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In conclusion, BM neutrophil accumulation after SEA exposure takes place by integrated action of cytokines and/or chemokines, enhancing the adhesive responses of BM neutrophils and its trafficking to lung tissues, leading to acute lung injury. BM eosinophil accumulation in SEA-induced acute lung injury may occur via increased eosinopoietic cytokines and VLA-4 expression. - Highlights: • Airway exposure to SEA causes acute lung inflammation. • SEA induces accumulation of bone marrow (BM) in immature and mature neutrophils. • SEA increases BM granulocyte or BM PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and MAC-1 expression. • SEA induces BM elevations of CXCL-1, INF-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, G-CSF and

  18. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A regulates bone marrow granulocyte trafficking during pulmonary inflammatory disease in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, W.M.; Gushiken, V.O.; Ferreira-Duarte, A.P.; Pinheiro-Torres, A.S.; Roncalho-Buck, I.A.; Squebola-Cola, D.M.; Mello, G.C.; Anhê, G.F.; Antunes, E.; DeSouza, I.A.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration produced by Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) airway exposure is accompanied by marked granulocyte accumulation in bone marrow (BM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of BM cell accumulation, and trafficking to circulating blood and lung tissue after SEA airway exposure. Male BALB/C mice were intranasally exposed to SEA (1 μg), and at 4, 12 and 24 h thereafter, BM, circulating blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were collected. Adhesion of BM granulocytes and flow cytometry for MAC-1, LFA1-α and VLA-4 and cytokine and/or chemokine levels were assayed after SEA-airway exposure. Prior exposure to SEA promoted a marked PMN influx to BAL and lung tissue, which was accompanied by increased counts of immature and/or mature neutrophils and eosinophils in BM, along with blood neutrophilia. Airway exposure to SEA enhanced BM neutrophil MAC-1 expression, and adhesion to VCAM-1 and/or ICAM-1-coated plates. Elevated levels of GM-CSF, G-CSF, INF-γ, TNF-α, KC/CXCL-1 and SDF-1α were detected in BM after SEA exposure. SEA exposure increased production of eosinopoietic cytokines (eotaxin and IL-5) and BM eosinophil VLA-4 expression, but it failed to affect eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In conclusion, BM neutrophil accumulation after SEA exposure takes place by integrated action of cytokines and/or chemokines, enhancing the adhesive responses of BM neutrophils and its trafficking to lung tissues, leading to acute lung injury. BM eosinophil accumulation in SEA-induced acute lung injury may occur via increased eosinopoietic cytokines and VLA-4 expression. - Highlights: • Airway exposure to SEA causes acute lung inflammation. • SEA induces accumulation of bone marrow (BM) in immature and mature neutrophils. • SEA increases BM granulocyte or BM PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and MAC-1 expression. • SEA induces BM elevations of CXCL-1, INF-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, G-CSF and

  19. Staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcal enterotoxin A in breaded chicken products: detection and behavior during the cooking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Olimpia; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Bucci, Francesca; Anastasio, Marilena; Aponte, Maria; Villani, Francesco

    2006-11-01

    In this study we examined the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in 20 industrial breaded chicken products obtained from different retail butchers and supermarket stores in Italy. The levels of contamination in the products analyzed were quite low, although the pH values and water activities (a(w)) in the samples considered were in ranges favorable for S. aureus growth. As demonstrated by phenotypic and molecular characterization, in spite of the high percentage of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus strains, only three strains could be referred to the species S. aureus. Moreover, all the strains were negative in PCR assays targeting staphylococcal enterotoxin genes (seA to seE, seG to seJ, and seM to seO), as well as the toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 gene, and no SEA was detected in the retail breaded chicken samples analyzed by a reversed passive latex agglutination assay or by Western blotting. Hence, we evaluated the thermal resistance of two strains of SEA-producing S. aureus in a laboratory-scale preparation of precooked breaded chicken cutlets. The heat treatment employed in the manufacture determined the inactivation of S. aureus cells, but the preformed SEA remained active during product storage at 4 degrees C. The presence of the staphylococci and, in particular, of S. aureus in the retail breaded chicken products analyzed is a potential health risk for consumers since the pH and a(w) values of these kinds of products are favorable for S. aureus growth. The thermal process used during their manufacture can limit staphylococcal contamination but cannot eliminate preformed toxins.

  20. Natural indoles, indole-3-carbinol and 3,3′-diindolymethane, inhibit T cell activation by staphylococcal enterotoxin B through epigenetic regulation involving HDAC expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busbee, Philip B.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a potent exotoxin produced by the Staphylococcus aureus. This toxin is classified as a superantigen because of its ability to directly bind with MHC-II class molecules followed by activation of a large proportion of T cells bearing specific Vβ-T cell receptors. Commonly associated with classic food poisoning, SEB has also been shown to induce toxic shock syndrome, and is also considered to be a potential biological warfare agent because it is easily aerosolized. In the present study, we assessed the ability of indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and one of its byproducts, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), found in cruciferous vegetables, to counteract the effects of SEB-induced activation of T cells in mice. Both I3C and DIM were found to decrease the activation, proliferation, and cytokine production by SEB-activated Vβ8 + T cells in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, inhibitors of histone deacetylase class I (HDAC-I), but not class II (HDAC-II), showed significant decrease in SEB-induced T cell activation and cytokine production, thereby suggesting that epigenetic modulation plays a critical role in the regulation of SEB-induced inflammation. In addition, I3C and DIM caused a decrease in HDAC-I but not HDAC-II in SEB-activated T cells, thereby suggesting that I3C and DIM may inhibit SEB-mediated T cell activation by acting as HDAC-I inhibitors. These studies not only suggest for the first time that plant-derived indoles are potent suppressors of SEB-induced T cell activation and cytokine storm but also that they may mediate these effects by acting as HDAC inhibitors. - Highlights: • I3C and DIM reduce SEB-induced T cell activation and inflammatory cytokines. • Inhibiting class I HDACs reduces T cell activation and inflammatory cytokines. • Inhibiting class II HDACs increases T cell activation and inflammatory cytokines. • I3C and DIM selectively reduce mRNA expression of class I HDACs. • Novel use and mechanism to counteract SEB

  1. Natural indoles, indole-3-carbinol and 3,3′-diindolymethane, inhibit T cell activation by staphylococcal enterotoxin B through epigenetic regulation involving HDAC expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busbee, Philip B.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S., E-mail: prakash@mailbox.sc.edu

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a potent exotoxin produced by the Staphylococcus aureus. This toxin is classified as a superantigen because of its ability to directly bind with MHC-II class molecules followed by activation of a large proportion of T cells bearing specific Vβ-T cell receptors. Commonly associated with classic food poisoning, SEB has also been shown to induce toxic shock syndrome, and is also considered to be a potential biological warfare agent because it is easily aerosolized. In the present study, we assessed the ability of indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and one of its byproducts, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), found in cruciferous vegetables, to counteract the effects of SEB-induced activation of T cells in mice. Both I3C and DIM were found to decrease the activation, proliferation, and cytokine production by SEB-activated Vβ8{sup +} T cells in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, inhibitors of histone deacetylase class I (HDAC-I), but not class II (HDAC-II), showed significant decrease in SEB-induced T cell activation and cytokine production, thereby suggesting that epigenetic modulation plays a critical role in the regulation of SEB-induced inflammation. In addition, I3C and DIM caused a decrease in HDAC-I but not HDAC-II in SEB-activated T cells, thereby suggesting that I3C and DIM may inhibit SEB-mediated T cell activation by acting as HDAC-I inhibitors. These studies not only suggest for the first time that plant-derived indoles are potent suppressors of SEB-induced T cell activation and cytokine storm but also that they may mediate these effects by acting as HDAC inhibitors. - Highlights: • I3C and DIM reduce SEB-induced T cell activation and inflammatory cytokines. • Inhibiting class I HDACs reduces T cell activation and inflammatory cytokines. • Inhibiting class II HDACs increases T cell activation and inflammatory cytokines. • I3C and DIM selectively reduce mRNA expression of class I HDACs. • Novel use and mechanism to counteract

  2. Sensitive chemiluminescence immunoassay for staphylococcal enterotoxin C1 based on the use of dye-encapsulated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Liang; Zhang, Chunmei; Sun, Yuanjie; Jin, Boquan; Yang, Kun; Li, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhujun; Zhang, Jinpeng; Yan, Kuocheng

    2016-01-01

    A chemiluminescent immunoassay for the staphylococcal enterotoxin C1 (SEC1) based on the use of dye-encapsulated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (m-SiNPs) as a label is described. The dyes are retained in the m-SiNPs via strong hydrophobic interactions. The assay comprises the following steps: (a) Microplates coated with antibody against SEC1 are filled with sample upon which the SEC antigen will be bound to the surface; (b) following a washing step, secondary antibody linked to m-SiNPs (that were covalently labeled with rhodamine 6G and fluorescein) were added to form the sandwich complex; (c) after another washing step, bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) oxalate, H_2O_2 and imidazole are added to generate chemiluminescence whose intensity is proportional to the number of m-SiNPs and thus to the number of antigen (SEC) molecules. It is found that the use of functionalized m-SiNPs strongly amplifies the signal. Enterotoxin SEC1 can be detected by this method in the 0.025 to 2 ng⋅mL"-"1 concentration range, the detection limit is 19 pg⋅mL"-"1 (at 3σ), and the relative standard deviation (for 11 parallel measurements at a 1 ng⋅mL"-"1 level) is 4.6 %. The use of an automated chemiluminescence analyzer further improves detection. (author)

  3. Review Over a 3-Year Period of European Union Proficiency Tests for Detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxins in Food Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nia, Yacine; Mutel, Isabelle; Assere, Adrien; Lombard, Bertrand; Auvray, Frederic; Hennekinne, Jacques-Antoine

    2016-04-13

    Staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks are a major cause of foodborne illnesses in Europe and their notifications have been mandatory since 2005. Even though the European regulation on microbiological criteria for food defines a criterion on staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) only in cheese and dairy products, European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) data reported that various types of food matrices are involved in staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks. The European Screening Method (ESM) of European Union Reference Laboratory for Coagulase Positive Staphylococci (EURL CPS) was validated in 2011 for SE detection in food matrices and is currently the official method used for screening purposes in Europe. In this context, EURLCPS is annually organizing Inter-Laboratory Proficiency Testing Trials (ILPT) to evaluate the competency of the European countries' National Reference Laboratories (NRLs) to analyse SE content in food matrices. A total of 31 NRLs representing 93% of European countries participated in these ILPTs. Eight food matrices were used for ILPT over the period 2013-2015, including cheese, freeze-dried cheese, tuna, mackerel, roasted chicken, ready-to-eat food, milk, and pastry. Food samples were spiked with four SE types (i.e., SEA, SEC, SED, and SEE) at various concentrations. Homogeneity and stability studies showed that ILPT samples were both homogeneous and stable. The analysis of results obtained by participants for a total of 155 blank and 620 contaminated samples allowed for evaluation of trueness (>98%) and specificity (100%) of ESM. Further to the validation study of ESM carried out in 2011, these three ILPTs allowed for the assessment of the proficiency of the NRL network and the performance of ESM on a large variety of food matrices and samples. The ILPT design presented here will be helpful for the organization of ILPT on SE detection by NRLs or other expert laboratories.

  4. Review Over a 3-Year Period of European Union Proficiency Tests for Detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxins in Food Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Nia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks are a major cause of foodborne illnesses in Europe and their notifications have been mandatory since 2005. Even though the European regulation on microbiological criteria for food defines a criterion on staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE only in cheese and dairy products, European Food Safety Authority (EFSA data reported that various types of food matrices are involved in staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks. The European Screening Method (ESM of European Union Reference Laboratory for Coagulase Positive Staphylococci (EURL CPS was validated in 2011 for SE detection in food matrices and is currently the official method used for screening purposes in Europe. In this context, EURLCPS is annually organizing Inter-Laboratory Proficiency Testing Trials (ILPT to evaluate the competency of the European countries’ National Reference Laboratories (NRLs to analyse SE content in food matrices. A total of 31 NRLs representing 93% of European countries participated in these ILPTs. Eight food matrices were used for ILPT over the period 2013–2015, including cheese, freeze-dried cheese, tuna, mackerel, roasted chicken, ready-to-eat food, milk, and pastry. Food samples were spiked with four SE types (i.e., SEA, SEC, SED, and SEE at various concentrations. Homogeneity and stability studies showed that ILPT samples were both homogeneous and stable. The analysis of results obtained by participants for a total of 155 blank and 620 contaminated samples allowed for evaluation of trueness (>98% and specificity (100% of ESM. Further to the validation study of ESM carried out in 2011, these three ILPTs allowed for the assessment of the proficiency of the NRL network and the performance of ESM on a large variety of food matrices and samples. The ILPT design presented here will be helpful for the organization of ILPT on SE detection by NRLs or other expert laboratories.

  5. Coupling immunomagnetic separation on magnetic beads with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schlosser, G.; Kačer, P.; Kuzma, Marek; Szilágyi, Z.; Sorrentino, Z.; Manzo, C.; Pizzano, R.; Malorni, L.; Poscfalvi, G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 21 (2007), s. 6945-6952 ISSN 0099-2240 Grant - others:IT(IT) project SIFORTI (MIUR-CNR, Legge 449/97); XE(XE) 94.05.09.103, ARINCO 94.IT.16.028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : mass spectrometry * staphylococcal enterotoxin b * bacterial protein toxins Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.004, year: 2007

  6. Influence of holding temperature on the growth and survival of Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus and the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin in egg products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S E; Yu, R C; Chou, C C

    2001-01-22

    In this study, growth and survival of Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus in steamed egg and scrambled egg held at 5, 18, 22, 37, 55 and 60 degrees C are investigated. The production of staphylococcal enterotoxin in steamed egg is also examined. Results reveal that Salmonella spp. and Staph. aureus in the egg products multiply best at 37 degrees C, followed closely by 22 and 18 degrees C. Neither pathogen showed growth in the egg products held at 5 degrees C. Initial inoculation dose, holding temperature and holding time affected the population of both organisms found in the egg products. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and B (SEB) are detected only in the egg products held at 37 or 22 degrees C. After holding at 37 degrees C for 36 h, scrambled egg inoculated with ca. 5.0 log cfu/g Staph. aureus contains the highest levels of SEA (> 64 ng/g) and SEB (> 64 ng/g). Although Salmonella spp. and Staph. aureus grow better in steamed eggs than in scrambled eggs, production of staphylococcal enterotoxin, in general, was higher in scrambled eggs than in steamed eggs. On the other hand, a repaid destruction of the test organisms in steamed eggs held at 60 degrees C was observed. Holding the steamed eggs at 60 degrees C, Salmonella spp. and Staph. aureus with an initial population of ca. 5.9 and 5.6 log cfu/g, respectively, reduced to a non-detectable level in 1 h.

  7. Staphylococcal Enterotoxins, Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-I, and Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxins: Some Basic Biology of Bacterial Superantigens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krakauer, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes are facultative gram-positive cocci that play an important role in a myriad of human illnesses, including food poisoning, skin infections, pharyngitis...

  8. Staphylococcus aureus regulates the expression and production of the staphylococcal superantigen-like secreted proteins in a Rot-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Meredith A; Lilo, Sarit; Wasserman, Gregory A; Thoendel, Matthew; Smith, Amanda; Horswill, Alexander R; Fraser, John; Novick, Richard P; Shopsin, Bo; Torres, Victor J

    2011-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus overproduces a subset of immunomodulatory proteins known as the staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (Ssls) under conditions of pore-mediated membrane stress. In this study we demonstrate that overproduction of Ssls during membrane stress is due to the impaired activation of the two-component module of the quorum-sensing accessory gene regulator (Agr) system. Agr-dependent repression of ssl expression is indirect and mediated by the transcription factor repressor of toxins (Rot). Surprisingly, we observed that Rot directly interacts with and activates the ssl promoters. The role of Agr and Rot as regulators of ssl expression was observed across several clinically relevant strains, suggesting that overproduction of immunomodulatory proteins benefits agr-defective strains. In support of this notion, we demonstrate that Ssls contribute to the residual virulence of S. aureus lacking agr in a murine model of systemic infection. Altogether, these results suggest that S. aureus compensates for the inactivation of Agr by producing immunomodulatory exoproteins that could protect the bacterium from host-mediated clearance. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. The TLR2 Antagonist Staphylococcal Superantigen-Like Protein 3 Acts as a Virulence Factor to Promote Bacterial Pathogenicity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koymans, Kirsten J; Goldmann, Oliver; Karlsson, Christofer A Q; Sital, Wiedjai; Thänert, Robert; Bisschop, Adinda; Vrieling, Manouk; Malmström, Johan; van Kessel, Kok P M; de Haas, Carla J C; van Strijp, Jos A G; Medina, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is important in the initiation of immune responses and subsequent instigation of adaptive immunity. TLR2 recognizes bacterial lipoproteins and plays a central role in the host defense against bacterial infections, including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Many studies have demonstrated the importance of TLR2 in murine S. aureus infection. S. aureus evades TLR2 activation by secreting two proteins, staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 3 (SSL3) and 4 (SSL4). In this study, we demonstrate that antibodies against SSL3 and SSL4 are found in healthy individuals, indicating that humans are exposed to these proteins during S. aureus colonization or infection. To investigate the TLR2-antagonistic properties of SSL3 and SSL4, we compared the infection with wild-type and SSL3/4 knockout S. aureus strains in an intravenous murine infection model. Direct evaluation of the contribution of SSL3/4 to infection pathogenesis was hindered by the fact that the SSLs were not expressed in the murine system. To circumvent this limitation, an SSL3-overproducing strain (pLukM-SSL3) was generated, resulting in constitutive expression of SSL3. pLukM-SSL3 exhibited increased virulence compared to the parental strain in a murine model that was found to be TLR2 dependent. Altogether, these data indicate that SSL3 contributes to S. aureus virulence in vivo. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay of staphylococcal enterotoxin B in food using enzyme-nanosilica-doped carbon nanotubes for signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dianping; Tang, Juan; Su, Biling; Chen, Guonan

    2010-10-27

    A new sandwich-type electrochemical immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in food was developed using horseradish peroxidase-nanosilica-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HRPSiCNTs) for signal amplification. Rabbit polyclonal anti-SEB antibodies immobilized on the screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) and covalently bound to the HRPSiCNTs were used as capture antibodies and detection antibodies, respectively. In the presence of SEB analyte, the sandwich-type immunocomplex could be formed between the immobilized anti-SEB on the SPCE and anti-SEB-labeled HRPSiCNTs, and the carried HRP could catalyze the electrochemical reduction of H2O2 with the help of thionine. The high content of HRP in the HRPSiCNTs could greatly amplify the electrochemical signal. Under optimal conditions, the reduction current increased with the increase of SEB in the sample, and exhibited a dynamic range of 0.05-15 ng/mL with a low detection limit (LOD) of 10 pg/mL SEB (at 3σ). Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were below 10%. In addition, the assay was evaluated with SEB spiked samples including watermelon juice, soymilk, apple juice, and pork food, receiving excellent correlation with results from commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  11. Prophage-Encoded Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A: Regulation of Production in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Representing Different Sea Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoleta Zeaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the nature of the link between the staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA gene and the lifecycle of Siphoviridae bacteriophages, including the origin of strain variation regarding SEA production after prophage induction. Five strains representing three different genetic lines of the sea region were studied under optimal and prophage-induced growth conditions and the Siphoviridae lifecycle was followed through the phage replicative form copies and transcripts of the lysogenic repressor, cro. The role of SOS response on prophage induction was addressed through recA transcription in a recA-disruption mutant. Prophage induction was found to increase the abundance of the phage replicative form, the sea gene copies and transcripts and enhance SEA production. Sequence analysis of the sea regions revealed that observed strain variances were related to strain capacity for prophage induction, rather than sequence differences in the sea region. The impact of SOS response activation on the phage lifecycle was demonstrated by the absence of phage replicative form copies in the recA-disruption mutant after prophage induction. From this study it emerges that all aspects of SEA-producing strain, the Siphoviridae phage and the food environment must be considered when evaluating SEA-related hazards.

  12. Natural indoles, indole-3-carbinol (I3C and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM, attenuate staphylococcal enterotoxin B-mediated liver injury by downregulating miR-31 expression and promoting caspase-2-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip B Busbee

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB is a potent superantigen capable of inducing inflammation characterized by robust immune cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine release. Exposure to SEB can result in food poisoning as well as fatal conditions such as toxic shock syndrome. In the current study, we investigated the effect of natural indoles including indole-3-carbinol (I3C and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM on SEB-mediated liver injury. Injection of SEB into D-galactosamine-sensitized female C57BL/6 mice resulted in liver injury as indicated by an increase in enzyme aspartate transaminase (AST levels, induction of inflammatory cytokines, and massive infiltration of immune cells into the liver. Administration of I3C and DIM (40 mg/kg, by intraperitonal injection, attenuated SEB-induced acute liver injury, as evidenced by decrease in AST levels, inflammatory cytokines and cellular infiltration in the liver. I3C and DIM triggered apoptosis in SEB-activated T cells primarily through activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. In addition, inhibitor studies involving caspases revealed that I3C and DIM-mediated apoptosis in these activated cells was dependent on caspase-2 but independent of caspase-8, 9 and 3. In addition, I3C and DIM caused a decrease in Bcl-2 expression. Both compounds also down-regulated miR-31, which directly targets caspase-2 and influences apoptosis in SEB-activated cells. Our data demonstrate for the first time that indoles can effectively suppress acute hepatic inflammation caused by SEB and that this may be mediated by decreased expression of miR-31 and consequent caspase-2-dependent apoptosis in T cells.

  13. Superantigens Are Critical for Staphylococcus aureus Infective Endocarditis, Sepsis, and Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Breshears, Laura; Spaulding, Adam R.; Merriman, Joseph A.; Stach, Christopher S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infective endocarditis and kidney infections are serious complications of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis. We investigated the role of superantigens (SAgs) in the development of lethal sepsis, infective endocarditis, and kidney infections. SAgs cause toxic shock syndrome, but it is unclear if SAgs contribute to infective endocarditis and kidney infections secondary to sepsis. We show in the methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain MW2 that lethal sepsis, infective endocarditis, and kidney infections in rabbits are critically dependent on high-level SAgs. In contrast, the isogenic strain lacking staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC), the major SAg in this strain, is attenuated in virulence, while complementation restores disease production. SAgs’ role in infective endocarditis appears to be both superantigenicity and direct endothelial cell stimulation. Maintenance of elevated blood pressure by fluid therapy significantly protects from infective endocarditis, possibly through preventing bacterial accumulation on valves and increased SAg elimination. These data should facilitate better methods to manage these serious illnesses. PMID:23963178

  14. Effect of different ionizing radiation dose rates on the Staphylococcal enterotoxin in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Heliana de; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Custodio, Wilson; Kodama, Yasko; Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz

    2009-01-01

    Samples weighing 50g each were prepared from allotments of back with skin MDCM, to the EEB contamination or not (control). Each sample of MDCM contaminated or not with EEB was conditioned in low density polyethylene bag, frozen (-18 ± 1 deg C) for one night in a tunnel and irradiated with gamma rays from 60 Co source in this state with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy (5.7 kGy.h -1 - higher dose rate, 1.8 kGy.h -1 - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h -1 - lower dose rate) and 3.0 kGy (8.4 kGy.h - '1 - higher dose rate, 2.4 kGy.h -1 - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h -1 - lower dose rate). Irradiated or non irradiated MDCM samples were processed to the EEB extraction, according to the VIDAS Staph enterotoxin II kit (bioMerieux) manufacturer protocol. The calculation to determinate the MDCM EEB recovery after the sample (control or irradiated) processing were carried out applying the principle of mass balance, along the whole process. Described experiment was performed in triplicate. Results showed that the irradiation process was effective to remove the MDCM EEB, to both 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy. According to the expected, doses of 3.0 kGy showed the highest values of MDCM EEB removal. Regarding the effect of dose rate of radiation on the removal of EEB of the MDCM, it could be observed only for samples irradiated with 1.5 kGy radiation dose; in these processing conditions, the highest value of EEB removal was obtained for samples processed with low radiation dose rate. (author)

  15. Multiple-Strain Approach and Probabilistic Modeling of Consumer Habits in Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment: A Quantitative Assessment of Exposure to Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A in Raw Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotta, Matteo; Rizzi, Rita; Varisco, Giorgio; Daminelli, Paolo; Cunico, Elena Cosciani; Luini, Mario; Graber, Hans Ulrich; Paterlini, Franco; Guitian, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) models are extensively applied to inform management of a broad range of food safety risks. Inevitably, QMRA modeling involves an element of simplification of the biological process of interest. Two features that are frequently simplified or disregarded are the pathogenicity of multiple strains of a single pathogen and consumer behavior at the household level. In this study, we developed a QMRA model with a multiple-strain approach and a consumer phase module (CPM) based on uncertainty distributions fitted from field data. We modeled exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin A in raw milk in Lombardy; a specific enterotoxin production module was thus included. The model is adaptable and could be used to assess the risk related to other pathogens in raw milk as well as other staphylococcal enterotoxins. The multiplestrain approach, implemented as a multinomial process, allowed the inclusion of variability and uncertainty with regard to pathogenicity at the bacterial level. Data from 301 questionnaires submitted to raw milk consumers were used to obtain uncertainty distributions for the CPM. The distributions were modeled to be easily updatable with further data or evidence. The sources of uncertainty due to the multiple-strain approach and the CPM were identified, and their impact on the output was assessed by comparing specific scenarios to the baseline. When the distributions reflecting the uncertainty in consumer behavior were fixed to the 95th percentile, the risk of exposure increased up to 160 times. This reflects the importance of taking into consideration the diversity of consumers' habits at the household level and the impact that the lack of knowledge about variables in the CPM can have on the final QMRA estimates. The multiple-strain approach lends itself to use in other food matrices besides raw milk and allows the model to better capture the complexity of the real world and to be capable of geographical

  16. Positive Regulation of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin H by Rot (Repressor of Toxin) Protein and Its Importance in Clonal Complex 81 Subtype 1 Lineage-Related Food Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Hisatsune, Junzo; Nagasako, Yuria; Ono, Hisaya K; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the clonal complex 81 (CC81) subtype 1 lineage is the major staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP)-associated lineage in Japan (Y. Sato'o et al., J Clin Microbiol 52:2637-2640, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00661-14). Strains of this lineage produce staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) in addition to SEA. However, an evaluation of the risk for the recently reported SEH has not been sufficiently conducted. We first searched for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes and SE proteins in milk samples that caused a large SFP outbreak in Japan. Only SEA and SEH were detected, while there were several SE genes detected in the samples. We next designed an experimental model using a meat product to assess the productivity of SEs and found that only SEA and SEH were detectably produced in situ. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SEH production using a CC81 subtype 1 isolate. Through mutant analysis of global regulators, we found the repressor of toxin (Rot) functioned oppositely as a stimulator of SEH production. SEA production was not affected by Rot. seh mRNA expression correlated with rot both in media and on the meat product, and the Rot protein was shown to directly bind to the seh promoter. The seh promoter sequence was predicted to form a loop structure and to hide the RNA polymerase binding sequences. We propose Rot binds to the promoter sequence of seh and unfolds the secondary structure that may lead the RNA polymerase to bind the promoter, and then seh mRNA transcription begins. This alternative Rot regulation for SEH may contribute to sufficient toxin production by the CC81 subtype 1 lineage in foods to induce SFP. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. [The staphylococcal enterotoxin burden determines the ultrastructure of ciliated epithelia and inflammatory changes in maxillary sinus mucosa of rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongqi; Zhu, Zhengwen; Cao, Zhongsheng; Liu, Zhiyong; Wu, Xiaofan; Yuan, Hui

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the ultrastructure of ciliated epithelia and inflammatory changes upon repeated exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) of different concentrations in the maxillary sinus mucosa of rabbits. The rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups (24 rabbits per group): low-dose SEA group and high-dose SEA group. The low-dose SEA group and high-dose SEA group received daily injections of 0.6 ng of SEA (2 ml) and 60 ng of SEA (2 ml) into the left maxillary sinus of rabbits for 28 days, respectively. Concurrent treatment of the right maxillary sinus with normal saline was used as control. Six rabbits chosen randomly in two groups were examined by computed tomography (CT) scans and then sacrificed to obtain the sinus mucosa from the two-side of maxillary sinuses for histological assessment on days 3, 7, 14 and 28. To characterize the inflammatory changes of the sinus mucosa examined using light microscope, hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and toluidine blue staining was performed. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were performed to observe ultrastructure of ciliated epithelia in the maxillary sinus mucosa. SPSS 13.0 software was used to analyze the data. On days 14 and 28, CT images showed opacification of the left maxillary sinus in the high-dose SEA group. The percentage of epithelial disruption was (22.73 ± 5.72) % and (30.79 ± 4.30)% in the high-dose SEA group respectively, and were significantly greater than those in the low-dose SEA group (5.12% ± 1.98% and 5.38% ± 1.64%, q value was 10.079 and 19.132) and control group (4.08% ± 1.29% and 4.81% ± 1.62%, q value was 11.016 and 19.592, respectively, all P microscope, loss of cilia was observed, a few compound cilia and cytoplasmic protrusion were found, an obvious stretching of the endoplasmic reticulum and an obvious turgescence of the mitochondria was also observed. However, in the low-dose SEA group on days 14 and 28, CT scan of the left maxillary sinus showed transparency; light

  18. Molecular and epidemiological characterization of staphylococcal foodborne outbreak of Staphylococcus aureus harboring seg, sei, sem, sen, seo, and selu genes without production of classical enterotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Kaoru; Nakamura, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Kaori; Nishina, Nobuko; Yasufuku, Kiyoshi; Hirai, Yuki; Hirayama, Teruo; Goto, Kaoru; Hase, Atsushi; Ogasawara, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is the result of consumption of food contaminated with staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) produced by Staphylococcus aureus. To date, 23 SEs and SE-like enterotoxins (SEls) have been described in the literature. They are divided into classical SEs (SEA-SEE) and new SE/SEls (SEG-SElX). Some have proved to be foodborne-inducible, but others remain unidentified. In May 2016, at an elderly group home in Osaka city, Japan, an outbreak from foodborne pathogens occurred among lunch party participants. Within 2h 30min to 4h 40min, 15 of 53 participants presented gastrointestinal symptoms of vomiting, diarrhea, and nausea. A subsequent laboratory investigation detected S. aureus from most stool samples from patients, several left-over food items, a kitchen swab, and hand swabs from two food handlers. Classical SEs was not detected from S. aureus isolates or left-over food items. From examination for the presence of SE/SEl genes of 20 kinds by PCR, seg, sei, sem, sen, seo, and selu genes were detected in almost all isolates. These isolates exhibited identical or closely related types by coagulase type (type VII), Sma I digested pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST-CC45 lineage). These results suggest that the foodborne outbreak was caused by S. aureus harboring seg, sei, sem, sen, seo, and selu genes without production of classical SEs. Additionally, some S. aureus isolates from human nasal swabs and healthy human feces harboring seg, sei, sem, sen, seo, and selu genes without production of classical SEs were classified into CC45 lineage using MLST. These findings suggest new SE/SEls as a potential cause of foodborne outbreaks. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji, E-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Kodama, Yasko, E-mail: ykodama@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz, E-mail: miya@fea.unicamp.br, E-mail: pereira@fea.unicamp.br [Campinas State University (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Food Sciences

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18{+-}1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  20. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Kodama, Yasko; Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18±1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  1. A highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer aptasensor for staphylococcal enterotoxin B detection based on exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Wang, Hongxin; Wang, Zhouping

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An ultrasensitive FRET aptasensor was developed for staphylococcal enterotoxin B determination. •SEB was recognized by SEB aptamer with high affinity and specificity. •The Mn 2+ doped NaYF 4 :Yb/Er UCNPs used as donor to quencher dye (BHQ 3 ) in new FRET. •The fluorescence intensity was prominently amplified using an exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy. -- Abstract: An ultrasensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) bioassay was developed to detect staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), a low molecular exotoxin, using an aptamer-affinity method coupled with upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs)-sensing, and the fluorescence intensity was prominently enhanced using an exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy. To construct this aptasensor, both fluorescence donor probes (complementary DNA 1 –UCNPs) and fluorescence quencher probes (complementary DNA 2 –Black Hole Quencher 3 (BHQ 3 )) were hybridized to an SEB aptamer, and double-strand oligonucleotides were fabricated, which quenched the fluorescence of the UCNPs via FRET. The formation of an aptamer–SEB complex in the presence of the SEB analyte resulted in not only the dissociation of aptamer from the double-strand DNA but also both the disruption of the FRET system and the restoration of the UCNPs fluorescence. In addition, the SEB was liberated from the aptamer–SEB complex using exonuclease I, an exonuclease specific to single-stranded DNA, for analyte recycling by selectively digesting a particular DNA (SEB aptamer). Based on this exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy, an amplified fluorescence intensity could be produced using different SEB concentrations. Using optimized experimental conditions produced an ultrasensitive aptasensor for the detection of SEB, with a wide linear range of 0.001–1 ng mL −1 and a lower detection limit (LOD) of 0.3 pg mL −1 SEB (at 3σ). The fabricated aptasensor was used to measure SEB in a

  2. Isolation of a new ssDNA aptamer against staphylococcal enterotoxin B based on CNBr-activated sepharose-4B affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati Ch, Mojtaba; Amani, Jafar; Sedighian, Hamid; Amin, Mohsen; Salimian, Jafar; Halabian, Raheleh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are potent human pathogens possessing arsenal of virulence factors. Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) and respiratory infections mediated by staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are common clinical manifestations. Many diagnostic techniques are based on serological detection and quantification of SEB in different food and clinical samples. Aptamers are known as new therapeutic and detection tools which are available in different ssDNA, dsDNA and protein structures. In this study, we used a new set of ssDNA aptamers against SEB. The methods used included preparation of a dsDNA library using standard SEB protein as the target analyte, affinity chromatography matrix in microfuge tubes, SELEX procedures to isolate specific ssDNA-aptamer as an affinity ligand, aptamer purification using ethanol precipitation method, affinity binding assay using ELISA, aptamer cloning and specificity test. Among 12 readable sequences, three of them were selected as the most appropriate aptamer because of their affinity and specificity to SEB. This study presents a new set of ssDNA aptamer with favorable selectivity to SEB through 12 rounds of SELEX. Selected aptamers were used to detect SEB in infected serum samples. Results showed that SEB c1 aptamer (2 µg SEB/100 nM aptamer) had favorable specificity to SEB (kd  = 2.3 × 10(-11) ). In conclusion, aptamers can be considered as useful tools for detecting and evaluating SEB. The results showed that affinity chromatography was an affordable assay with acceptable accuracy to isolate sensitive and selective novel aptamers. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Detection of target staphylococcal enterotoxin B antigen in orange juice and popular carbonated beverages using antibody-dependent antigen-capture assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principato, MaryAnn; Njoroge, Joyce M; Perlloni, Andrei; O' Donnell, Michael; Boyle, Thomas; Jones, Robert L

    2010-10-01

    There is a critical need for qualitative and quantitative methodologies that provide the rapid and accurate detection of food contaminants in complex food matrices. However, the sensitivity of the assay can be affected when antigen-capture is applied to certain foods or beverages that are extremely acidic. This study was undertaken to assess the effects of orange juice and popular carbonated soft drink upon the fidelity of antibody-based antigen-capture assays and to develop simple approaches that could rescue assay performance without the introduction of additional or extensive extraction procedures. We examined the effects of orange juice and a variety of popular carbonated soft drink beverages upon a quantitative Interleukin-2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay system and a lateral flow device (LFD) adapted for the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in foods. Alterations in the performance and sensitivity of the assay were directly attributable to the food matrix, and alterations in pH were especially critical. The results demonstrate that approaches such as an alteration of pH and the use of milk as a blocking agent, either singly or in combination, will partially rescue ELISA performance. The same approaches permit lateral flow to efficiently detect antigen. Practical Application: The authors present ways to rescue an ELISA assay compromised by acidity in beverages and show that either the alteration of pH, or the use of milk as a blocking agent are not always capable of restoring the assay to its intended efficiency. However, the same methods, when employed with lateral flow technology, are rapid and extremely successful.

  4. Staphylococcal Entertotoxins of the Enterotoxin Gene Cluster (egcSEs Induce Nitrous Oxide- and Cytokine Dependent Tumor Cell Apoptosis in a Broad Panel of Human Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eTerman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The egcSEs comprise five genetically linked staphylococcal enterotoxins, SEG, SEI, SElM, SElN and SElO and two pseudotoxins which constitute an operon present in up to 80% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates. A preparation containing theses proteins was recently used to treat advanced lung cancer with pleural effusion. We investigated the hypothesis that egcSEs induce nitrous oxide (NO and associated cytokine production and that these agents may be involved in tumoricidal effects against a broad panel of clinically relevant human tumor cells. Preliminary studies showed that egcSEs and SEA activated T cells (range: 11-25% in a concentration dependent manner. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs stimulated with equimolar quantities of egcSEs expressed NO synthase and generated robust levels of nitrite (range: 200-250 µM, a breakdown product of NO; this reaction was inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA (0.3 mM, an NO synthase antagonist. Cell free supernatants (CSFs of all egcSE-stimulated PBMCs were also equally effective in inducing concentration dependent tumor cell apoptosis in a broad panel of human tumor cells. The latter effect was due in part to the generation of NO and TNF-α since it was significantly abolished by L-NMMA, anti-TNF-α antibodies respectively and a combination thereof. A hierarchy of tumor cell sensitivity to these CFSs was as follows: lung carcinoma>osteogenic sarcoma>melanoma>breast carcinoma>neuroblastoma. Notably, SEG induced robust activation of NO/TNFα-dependent tumor cell apoptosis comparable to the other egcSEs and SEA despite TNF-α and IFN-γ levels that were 2 and 8 fold lower respectively than the other egcSEs and SEA. Thus, egcSEs produced by S. aureus induce NO synthase and the increased NO formation together with TNF-α appear to contribute to egcSE-mediated apoptosis against a broad panel of human tumor cells.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins A- and B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Karlsdóttir, Edda

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxins of Staphylococcus aureus are among the most common causes of food poisoning. Acting as superantigens they intoxicate the organism by causing a massive uncontrolled T cell activation that ultimately may lead to toxic shock and death. In contrast to our detailed knowledge regarding...

  6. CD28: Direct and Critical Receptor for Superantigen Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziv Rotfogel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Every adaptive immune response requires costimulation through the B7/CD28 axis, with CD28 on T-cells functioning as principal costimulatory receptor. Staphylococcal and streptococcal superantigen toxins hyperstimulate the T-cell-mediated immune response by orders of magnitude, inducing a lethal cytokine storm. We show that to elicit an inflammatory cytokine storm and lethality, superantigens must bind directly to CD28. Blocking access of the superantigen to its CD28 receptor with peptides mimicking the contact domains in either toxin or CD28 suffices to protect mice effectively from lethal shock. Our finding that CD28 is a direct receptor of superantigen toxins broadens the scope of microbial pathogen recognition mechanisms.

  7. Superantigens are critical for Staphylococcus aureus Infective endocarditis, sepsis, and acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Breshears, Laura; Spaulding, Adam R; Merriman, Joseph A; Stach, Christopher S; Horswill, Alexander R; Peterson, Marnie L; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2013-08-20

    Infective endocarditis and kidney infections are serious complications of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis. We investigated the role of superantigens (SAgs) in the development of lethal sepsis, infective endocarditis, and kidney infections. SAgs cause toxic shock syndrome, but it is unclear if SAgs contribute to infective endocarditis and kidney infections secondary to sepsis. We show in the methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain MW2 that lethal sepsis, infective endocarditis, and kidney infections in rabbits are critically dependent on high-level SAgs. In contrast, the isogenic strain lacking staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC), the major SAg in this strain, is attenuated in virulence, while complementation restores disease production. SAgs' role in infective endocarditis appears to be both superantigenicity and direct endothelial cell stimulation. Maintenance of elevated blood pressure by fluid therapy significantly protects from infective endocarditis, possibly through preventing bacterial accumulation on valves and increased SAg elimination. These data should facilitate better methods to manage these serious illnesses. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in 2007 that Staphylococcus aureus is the most significant cause of serious infectious diseases in the United States (R. M. Klevens, M. A. Morrison, J. Nadle, S. Petit, K. Gershman, et al., JAMA 298:1763-1771, 2007). Among these infections are sepsis, infective endocarditis, and acute kidney injury. Infective endocarditis occurs in 30 to 60% of patients with S. aureus bacteremia and carries a mortality rate of 40 to 50%. Over the past decades, infective endocarditis outcomes have not improved, and infection rates are steadily increasing (D. H. Bor, S. Woolhandler, R. Nardin, J. Brusch, D. U. Himmelstein, PLoS One 8:e60033, 2013). There is little understanding of the S. aureus virulence factors that are key for infective endocarditis development and kidney abscess formation. We demonstrate that

  8. Therapeutic Inhibition of Pro-Inflammatory Signaling and Toxicity to Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B by a Synthetic Dimeric BB-Loop Mimetic of MyD88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    56 stock solution and 75 ml of the 16 dilution buffer was mixed with 25 ml of the supernatant, incubated for 30 min at 65 oC to inactivate endogenous ...shock by staphylococcal pyrogenic exotoxin type C. Infect Immun 36: 123–128. Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were performed to compare

  9. Experimental investigation into the effects of irradiation with mixed neutron-gamma-rays on the immune system as demonstrated by the model of immunity to Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1984-01-01

    Using the model of immunisation of rabbits with Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B the influence of neutron radiation on the antibody response was investigated. Four groups were formed, which differed by the moment of irradiation with regard to the moment of immunisation and re-immunisation, and were irradiated with neutron-rays of 200 rad and 300 rad doses. Both doses were each given before and after vaccination, respectively before and after re-vaccination. The antibody response has been evaluated by the Radio-Immuno-Assay (RIA): Neutron-radiation given 24 hours before vaccination effects a stronger immune suppression than given 24 hours after vaccination. By pre-antigenic radiation a secondary immune response is more suppressed than by radiation following the antigen; the recovery of lymphoid tissue, however, takes place in a shorter time than in case of radiation before or after a primary vaccination. The secondary antibody response to a re-vaccination is not influenced by a subsequent neutron-radiation. The formation of secondary antibodies is not as radiosensitive as the formation of primary ones. By a neutron-radiation preformed antibodies are hardly damaged. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Organization and ELISA-Based Results of the First Proficiency Testing to Evaluate the Ability of European Union Laboratories to Detect Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Type B (SEB in Buffer and Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Nia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to organize the first proficiency test (PT dedicated to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB detection in milk and buffer solutions. This paper describes the organization of the PT trial according to EN ISO 17043 requirements. Characterization of the SEB stock solution was performed using SDS-PAGE and SE-specific ELISA, and amino acid analysis was used to assign its protein concentration. The solution was then used to prepare six PT materials (four milk and two buffer batches at a ng/g toxin level, which included one blank and one SEA-containing milk as specificity control. Suitable material homogeneity and stability were assessed using screening and quantitative ELISAs. Among the methods used by the participants, ELISA-based methods demonstrated their efficiency for the detection of SEB in both simple and complex matrices. The results serve as a basis for further improving the detection capabilities in expert laboratories and can therefore be considered as a contribution to biopreparedness.

  11. Superantigen and HLA-DR ligation induce phospholipase-C gamma 1 activation in class II+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanner, S B; Odum, Niels; Grosmaire, L

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial enterotoxin superantigens bind directly to HLA class II molecules (HLA-DR) expressed on both APC and activated human T cells, and simultaneously bind to certain V beta chains of the TCR. In this report, we compared early T cell signaling events in human alloantigen-stimulated T cells when...... activated by HLA-DR ligation through antibody cross-linking or by direct enterotoxin superantigen binding. Both types of stimuli induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and an increase in intracellular calcium concentration; however......, superantigen-induced signaling was stronger than class II ligation alone. Antibody-mediated ligation of HLA-DR with CD3 resulted in augmented PLC gamma 1 activation and increased calcium mobilization, consistent with a mechanism of superantigen activity through a combination of class II and CD3/Ti signals...

  12. Spreading of genes encoding enterotoxins, haemolysins, adhesin and biofilm among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IIIA isolated from burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motallebi, Mitra; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Asadollahi, Kheirollah; Taherikalani, Morovat; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is an important concern in burn medical centers either in Iran or worldwide. A total of 128 S. aureus isolates were collected from wound infection of burn patients during June 2013 to June 2014. Multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (MPCR) assay was performed for the characterization of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). Genes encoding virulence factors and biofilm were targeted by PCR. Of 128 S. aureus isolates, 77 (60.1%) isolates were MRSA. Fifty four (70.1%) isolates were identified as SCCmec type IIIA. The most frequently detected toxin genes among MRSA isolates with SCCmec type IIIA were sea (64.1%) and hla (51.8%). The rate of coexistence of sea with hla and sea with hla and hlb was 37% and12.9%, respectively. The sec, eta, tst, pvl, hla and hlb genes were not detected in any of the MRSA isolates. The most prevalent genes encoding biofilm was eno, found in 61.1% of isolates, followed by fib and icaA found in 48.1% and 38.8% of the isolates, respectively. The rate of coexistence of fib + eno + icaA + icaD and fib + eno was 20.3% and 9.2%, respectively. The ebps gene was not detected in any of the isolates. In conclusion, our study indicated that the sea, hla, fib and icaA were most frequent genes encoding virulence factors among MRSA with SCCmec type IIIA isolated from burn wound infection. Moreover, the results of this study shows that the rate of coexistence of genes encoding different virulence factor were high. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of an alternative extraction procedure for enterotoxin determination in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrand, A; Atrache, V; Bavai, C; Montet, M P; Vernozy-Rozand, C

    1999-06-01

    A concentration protocol based on trichloroacetic acid precipitation was evaluated and compared with the reference method using dialysis concentration. Different quantities of purified staphylococcal enterotoxins were added to pasteurized Camembert-type cheeses. Detection of enterotoxins in these cheeses was performed using an automated detection system. Raw goat milk Camembert-type cheeses involved in a staphylococcal food poisoning were also tested. Both enterotoxin extraction methods allowed detection of the lowest enterotoxin concentration level used in this study (0.5 ng g-1). Compared with the dialysis concentration method, TCA precipitation of staphylococcal enterotoxins was 'user-friendly' and less time-consuming. These results suggest that TCA precipitation is a rapid (1 h), simple and reliable method of extracting enterotoxin from food which gives excellent recovery from dairy products.

  14. Histopathological Changes Induced By Staphylococcal Enterotoxin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, six Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from contaminated yoghurt were evaluated for enterotoxigenicity. Two o the strains were enterotoxigenic and caused fluid accumulation in rabbit ileal loops. Fluid aspirated from the loops was bloody and histopathological changes in sections collected from rabbit ...

  15. Geographical variation in the presence of genes encoding superantigenic exotoxins and beta-hemolysin among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in Europe and USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, H. D.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, N. E.

    2002-01-01

    The object was to examine the geographical variation in the presence of superantigenic exotoxins and beta-hemolysin among epidemiologically independent Staphyirrcoccus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis. A total of 462 S. aureus isolates from nine European countries and USA were examined...... for the individual exotoxins. The genes encoding enterotoxin C, TSST-1, and enterotoxin D were the most common superantigens. The present and earlier studies demonstrate that the superantigenic exotoxins that were investigated in this study, do not play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine S. aureus mastitis...... regions in the beta-hemolysin encoding gene of the Norwegian isolates is suggested, and should be investigated further. The consistent presence of beta-hemolysin suggests that this factor, or a co-existing gene correlated to beta-hemolysin, may be an active virulence factor in the pathogenesis of bovine S...

  16. A Model of an Integrated Immune System Pathway in Homo sapiens and Its Interaction with Superantigen Producing Expression Regulatory Pathway in Staphylococcus aureus: Comparing Behavior of Pathogen Perturbed and Unperturbed Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Namrata; De, Rajat K.

    2013-01-01

    Response of an immune system to a pathogen attack depends on the balance between the host immune defense and the virulence of the pathogen. Investigation of molecular interactions between the proteins of a host and a pathogen helps in identifying the pathogenic proteins. It is necessary to understand the dynamics of a normally behaved host system to evaluate the capacity of its immune system upon pathogen attack. In this study, we have compared the behavior of an unperturbed and pathogen perturbed host system. Moreover, we have developed a formalism under Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) for the optimization of conflicting objective functions. We have constructed an integrated pathway system, which includes Staphylococcal Superantigen (SAg) expression regulatory pathway and TCR signaling pathway of Homo sapiens. We have implemented the method on this pathway system and observed the behavior of host signaling molecules upon pathogen attack. The entire study has been divided into six different cases, based on the perturbed/unperturbed conditions. In other words, we have investigated unperturbed and pathogen perturbed human TCR signaling pathway, with different combinations of optimization of concentrations of regulatory and signaling molecules. One of these cases has aimed at finding out whether minimization of the toxin production in a pathogen leads to the change in the concentration levels of the proteins coded by TCR signaling pathway genes in the infected host. Based on the computed results, we have hypothesized that the balance between TCR signaling inhibitory and stimulatory molecules can keep TCR signaling system into resting/stimulating state, depending upon the perturbation. The proposed integrated host-pathogen interaction pathway model has accurately reflected the experimental evidences, which we have used for validation purpose. The significance of this kind of investigation lies in revealing the susceptible interaction points that can take back the

  17. Superantigen-primed T cells exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) replicate poorly following recall encounter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulconer, Laura; Camacho, Iris; Nagarkatti, Mitzi [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical College of Virginia Campus, 980613, Richmond, VA (United States); Nagarkatti, Prakash S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Medical College of Virginia Campus, 980613, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2006-03-15

    The current study investigated the effect of tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the ability of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA)-primed T cells to divide by dual-labeling the cells with 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) and antibodies against the specific T cell receptors. C57BL/6 wild-type mice were injected ip with TCDD (10 {mu}g/kg body weight) followed by hind footpad injections of SEA (10 {mu}g/footpad). The draining popliteal lymph nodes (PLN) were harvested 1-4 days posttreatment, labeled with CFSE and cultured for 1-4 days without further stimulation or in the presence of the recall antigen. TCDD-exposed SEA-reactive V{beta}3+ and V{beta}11+ T cells showed decreased cell divisions upon in vitro culture in the absence of any stimulation, which correlated with increased levels of apoptosis. The recall cell-division response was also defective in SEA-reactive T cells isolated from TCDD-exposed mice. However, during the recall response, cells from TCDD-exposed mice did not exhibit a defect in apoptosis, suggesting the defective recall response may result from a state of anergy rather than increased apoptosis. Using AhR knockout (KO) mice, we found AhR involvement in the regulation of defective cell division and apoptosis induced by TCDD. Together, these data demonstrate, while TCDD-induced apoptosis may account for the decreased primary T cell proliferative response, that the reduced cell division seen during subsequent exposure to recall antigen may result from a state of anergy. The study also demonstrates that a combined use of superantigen and CFSE may offer a simple and useful tool to monitor the ability of immunotoxicants to alter the proliferative responsiveness of antigen-specific T cells. (orig.)

  18. A Single-Stranded DNA Aptamer That Selectively Binds to Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin B

    OpenAIRE

    DeGrasse, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a common foodborne pathogen capable of secreting a cocktail of small, stable, and strain-specific, staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) results when improperly handled food contaminated with SEs is consumed. Gastrointestinal symptoms of SFP include emesis, diarrhea and severe abdominal pain, which manifest within hours of ingesting contaminated food. Immuno-affinity based methods directly detect, identify, and quantify s...

  19. Lung and pharyngeal abscess caused by enterotoxin G- and I-producing Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, S Y; Hattotuwa, K L; Teare, L

    2012-05-01

    We report a particularly serious case of extensive meticillin sensitive Staphylococcal lung and pharyngeal abscess. Our patient had no significant risk factors for severe infection. The detection of enterotoxin G and I here suggest that when present together, these toxins work synergistically to produce a more virulent strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus growth and enterotoxin production in different types of milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohdana Janštová, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to assess Staphylococcus aureus growth and the time of first detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins type A, B and C (SEA, SEB, SEC in different type of milk, depending on the strain and storage conditions. Raw, pasteurized, and UHT milk were inoculated with three strains of S. aureus, and growth patterns were determined by the plate method in accordance with EN ISO 6888-1. Baird-Parker agar medium was used for the detection of S. aureus and the Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assay (ELFA used with a miniVIDAS analyzer tested the production of staphylococcal enterotoxins. The results of model experiments showed the dependence of the growth rate and subsequent production of staphylococcal enterotoxins on incubation (storage temperature, S. aureus strain, and type of milk. A significant finding was that the growth of S. aureus and production of enterotoxins in raw milk was inhibited by natural microflora, and production of enterotoxins was therefore not detected in raw milk within 102 hours of storage either at 15 °C or 22 °C. The highest risk of SEs production is associated with secondary contamination of pasteurized and UHT milk when stored at room temperature, where production was first detected after 12 hours of incubation.

  1. Novel Tissue Level Effects of the Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin Gene Cluster Are Essential for Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stach, Christopher S; Vu, Bao G; Merriman, Joseph A; Herrera, Alfa; Cahill, Michael P; Schlievert, Patrick M; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are indispensable virulence factors for Staphylococcus aureus in disease causation. Superantigens stimulate massive immune cell activation, leading to toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and contributing to other illnesses. However, superantigens differ in their capacities to induce body-wide effects. For many, their production, at least as tested in vitro, is not high enough to reach the circulation, or the proteins are not efficient in crossing epithelial and endothelial barriers, thus remaining within tissues or localized on mucosal surfaces where they exert only local effects. In this study, we address the role of TSS toxin-1 (TSST-1) and most importantly the enterotoxin gene cluster (egc) in infective endocarditis and sepsis, gaining insights into the body-wide versus local effects of superantigens. We examined S. aureus TSST-1 gene (tstH) and egc deletion strains in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. Importantly, we also assessed the ability of commercial human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) plus vancomycin to alter the course of infective endocarditis and sepsis. TSST-1 contributed to infective endocarditis vegetations and lethal sepsis, while superantigens of the egc, a cluster with uncharacterized functions in S. aureus infections, promoted vegetation formation in infective endocarditis. IVIG plus vancomycin prevented lethality and stroke development in infective endocarditis and sepsis. Our studies support the local tissue effects of egc superantigens for establishment and progression of infective endocarditis providing evidence for their role in life-threatening illnesses. In contrast, TSST-1 contributes to both infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis. IVIG may be a useful adjunct therapy for infective endocarditis and sepsis.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin A Gene Isolated From Raw Red Meat and Poultry in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Sarrafzadeh Zargar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus is the most prevalent infectious agent of food materials. Enterotoxin producing types of S. aureus cause well-known food-borne disease. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A (SEA is the most important agent of gastroenteritis. Objectives: The present study aimed to screen the raw meat samples collected from different regions of Tehran for S. aureus infection and type of encoding enterotoxin. Materials and Methods: Hundred and eighty six meat samples were collected randomly from city dealers and transferred to laboratory within screw cap containers. The samples were first cultured according to the standard bacteriological methods and then S. aureus isolates were identified using standard bacteriological tests. The isolates were subjected to Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR to detect gene encoding SEA. Results: Staphylococcus aureus isolated from 29 (15.6% meat samples including beef 14.8%, raw lamb 15%, raw chicken 15.7% and raw turkey 16.6%. Using special primer sets proved that the species isolated from five samples (two raw chicken, two raw beef and one raw turkey encoded enterotoxin A. Conclusions: Although staphylococcal contamination within food material is more or less a routine, but detection of enterotoxin encoding species from raw meat samples is alarming for health authorities. These data highlight the importance of periodic surveillance of raw meat distributed among ordinary consumers.

  3. Role of the T cell receptor ligand affinity in T cell activation by bacterial superantigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Geisler, C; Buus, S

    2001-01-01

    Similar to native peptide/MHC ligands, bacterial superantigens have been found to bind with low affinity to the T cell receptor (TCR). It has been hypothesized that low ligand affinity is required to allow optimal TCR signaling. To test this, we generated variants of Staphylococcus enterotoxin C3...... (SEC3) with up to a 150-fold increase in TCR affinity. By stimulating T cells with SEC3 molecules immobilized onto plastic surfaces, we demonstrate that increasing the affinity of the SEC3/TCR interaction caused a proportional increase in the ability of SEC3 to activate T cells. Thus, the potency...... correlation between ligand affinity and ligand potency indicating that it is the density of receptor-ligand complexes in the T cell contact area that determines TCR signaling strength....

  4. Contagem de Staphylococcus sp. e detecção de enterotoxinas estafilocócicas e toxina da síndrome do choque tóxico em amostras de leite cru refrigerado Staphylococcus sp. counting and detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins and toxic shock toxin syndrome from cooled raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.C. Lamaita

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Analisaram-se 80 amostras de leite cru refrigerado a 4°C e estocado por 48 horas em tanques refrigeradores de propriedades rurais do estado de Minas Gerais quanto à contagem e identificação de Staphylococcus sp. e detecção de enterotoxinas estafilocócicas (SE e da toxina da síndrome do choque tóxico (TSST-1. Staphylococcus sp. foi detectado em 100% das amostras de leite de tanque refrigerador em contagens que variaram de 1,0 × 10(5 a 2,5 × 10(7 UFC/ml (média = 5,60 log UFC/ml; s = 0,53 e CV = 9,5%. Isolaram-se e identificaram-se 436 estirpes como: S. aureus, S hyicus, S. epidermidis, S. intermedius, S. cohnii, S. sciuri, S. schleirferi e S. delphini. As estirpes de mesmo perfil bioquímico, oriundas da mesma amostra, foram agrupadas (pools e induzidas a produzir SE e TSST-1. A detecção dessas enterotoxinas foi feita pelo método optimum sensitivity plate, usando-se técnica de celofane sobre ágar. Identificou-se a produção de SEA, SEB, SEC, SED e de TSST-1 em percentuais variados. Dos 138 pools preparados, 91 produziram, pelo menos, uma toxina isoladamente ou em associação a outras toxinas. Dos pools enterotoxigênicos, 24,6% eram coagulase positiva e 41,3%, coagulase negativa. A confirmação de estirpes enterotoxigênicas de Staphylococcus coagulase negativa isoladas de amostras de leite é importante em relação à saúde pública.In order to count and identify Staphylococcus sp., the detection of the Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE and toxic shock toxin syndrome (TSST-1, 80 raw milk samples cooled at 4°C and stored in bulk tanks for 48 hours in different farms from Minas Gerais State were analyzed. Staphylococcus sp. was observed in all samples and the counts varied from 1.0 × 10(5 to 2.5 × 10(7 CFU/ml (mean = 5.60 log CFU/ml; sd = 0.53 and CV = 9.46 %. A total of 436 strains of Staphylococcus were isolated and identified as S. aureus, S hyicus, S. epidermidis, S. intermedius, S. cohnii, S. sciuri, S. schleirferi and S

  5. Staphylococcal enterotoxins stimulate lymphoma-associated immune dysregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn Frej; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Lindahl, Lise Maria

    2014-01-01

    a cascade of events involving cell-cell and asymmetric cytokine interactions between malignant and benign T cells, which stimulated the malignant T cells to express high levels of IL-10. Much evidence supports that malignant activation of the Stat3/IL-10 axis plays a key role in driving the immune...... dysregulation and severe immunodeficiency that characteristically develops in CTCL patients. The present findings thereby establish a novel link between SEs and immune dysregulation in CTCL strengthening the rationale for antibiotic treatment of colonized patients with severe or progressive disease....

  6. Molecular Typing of Staphylococcus Aureus Isolate Responsible for Staphylococcal Poisoning Incident in Homemade Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macori, Guerrino; Bellio, Alberto; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Gallina, Silvia; Adriano, Daniela; Zuccon, Fabio; Chiesa, Francesco; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Casalinuovo, Francesco; Decastelli, Lucia

    2016-04-19

    In October 2012, two persons fell ill with symptoms consistent with staphylococcal food poisoning after eating home-canned tuna fish and tomatoes. Laboratory investigation detected the enterotoxins in the home-canned tuna and molecular analysis of the isolated Staphylococcus aureus confirmed it carried toxin genes. Qualitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzime linked fluorescent assay methods and quantitative assay identified the enterotoxins in the food leftovers, specifically staphylococcal enterotoxins type A (SEA) and D (SED), respectively 0.49 and 2.04 ng/g. The laboratory results are discussed considering the relation to the fish in oil, survival and heat resistance of S. aureus , and presumptive microbial contamination due to improper handling during home-canning procedures. This is the first reported cluster of foodborne illnesses due to staphylococcal enterotoxins in tuna in Italy. In this study, we reported cases described and analysed for their spa -type. Showing a high heterogeneity of isolates, spa -type t 13252 is correlated in a node of the minimum spanning tree and it has never been reported as responsible for foodborne outbreak. This case underlines the importance of risk communication and dissemination of home-canning guidelines to reduce the incidence of foodborne outbreaks caused by homemade conserves.

  7. Molecular typing of Staphylococcus aureus isolate responsible for staphylococcal poisoning incident in homemade food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrino Macori

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In October 2012, two persons fell ill with symptoms consistent with staphylococcal food poisoning after eating home-canned tuna fish and tomatoes. Laboratory investigation detected the enterotoxins in the home-canned tuna and molecular analysis of the isolated Staphylococcus aureus confirmed it carried toxin genes. Qualitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzime linked fluorescent assay methods and quantitative assay identified the enterotoxins in the food leftovers, specifically staphylococcal enterotoxins type A (SEA and D (SED, respectively 0.49 and 2.04 ng/g. The laboratory results are discussed considering the relation to the fish in oil, survival and heat resistance of S. aureus, and presumptive microbial contamination due to improper handling during home-canning procedures. This is the first reported cluster of foodborne illnesses due to staphylococcal enterotoxins in tuna in Italy. In this study, we reported cases described and analysed for their spa-type. Showing a high heterogeneity of isolates, spa-type t13252 is correlated in a node of the minimum spanning tree and it has never been reported as responsible for foodborne outbreak. This case underlines the importance of risk communication and dissemination of home-canning guidelines to reduce the incidence of foodborne outbreaks caused by homemade conserves.

  8. The crystal structures of EAP domains from Staphylococcus aureus reveal an unexpected homology to bacterial superantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbrecht, Brian V; Hamaoka, Brent Y; Perman, Benjamin; Zemla, Adam; Leahy, Daniel J

    2005-04-29

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 A resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an alpha-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed beta-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the beta-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  9. Inhibitory effect of totarol on exotoxin proteins hemolysin and enterotoxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ce; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Wenli; Meng, Rizeng; Liu, Zonghui; Liu, Mingyuan; Guo, Na; Yu, Lu

    2015-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes a wide variety of infections, which are of major concern worldwide. S. aureus produces multiple virulence factors, resulting in food infection and poisoning. These virulence factors include hyaluronidases, proteases, coagulases, lipases, deoxyribonucleases and enterotoxins. Among the extracellular proteins produced by S. aureus that contribute to pathogenicity, the exotoxins α-hemolysin, staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are thought to be of major significance. Totarol, a plant extract, has been revealed to inhibit the proliferation of several pathogens effectively. However, there are no reports on the effects of totarol on the production of α-hemolysin, SEA or SEB secreted by S. aureus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of totarol on these three exotoxins. Hemolysis assay, western blotting and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay were performed to identify the influence of graded subinhibitory concentrations of totarol on the production of α-hemolysin and the two major enterotoxins, SEA and SEB, by S. aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the TNF-α production of RAW264.7 cells stimulated by S. aureus supernatants was inhibited by subinhibitory concentrations of totarol. Form the data, we propose that totarol could potentially be used as a promising natural compound in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  10. MAIT cells launch a rapid, robust and distinct hyperinflammatory response to bacterial superantigens and quickly acquire an anergic phenotype that impedes their cognate antimicrobial function: Defining a novel mechanism of superantigen-induced immunopathology and immunosuppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Shaler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Superantigens (SAgs are potent exotoxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. They target a large fraction of T cell pools to set in motion a "cytokine storm" with severe and sometimes life-threatening consequences typically encountered in toxic shock syndrome (TSS. Given the rapidity with which TSS develops, designing timely and truly targeted therapies for this syndrome requires identification of key mediators of the cytokine storm's initial wave. Equally important, early host responses to SAgs can be accompanied or followed by a state of immunosuppression, which in turn jeopardizes the host's ability to combat and clear infections. Unlike in mouse models, the mechanisms underlying SAg-associated immunosuppression in humans are ill-defined. In this work, we have identified a population of innate-like T cells, called mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT cells, as the most powerful source of pro-inflammatory cytokines after exposure to SAgs. We have utilized primary human peripheral blood and hepatic mononuclear cells, mouse MAIT hybridoma lines, HLA-DR4-transgenic mice, MAIThighHLA-DR4+ bone marrow chimeras, and humanized NOD-scid IL-2Rγnull mice to demonstrate for the first time that: i mouse and human MAIT cells are hyperresponsive to SAgs, typified by staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB; ii the human MAIT cell response to SEB is rapid and far greater in magnitude than that launched by unfractionated conventional T, invariant natural killer T (iNKT or γδ T cells, and is characterized by production of interferon (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-2, but not IL-17A; iii high-affinity MHC class II interaction with SAgs, but not MHC-related protein 1 (MR1 participation, is required for MAIT cell activation; iv MAIT cell responses to SEB can occur in a T cell receptor (TCR Vβ-specific manner but are largely contributed by IL-12 and IL-18; v as MAIT cells are primed by SAgs, they also begin to

  11. Staphylococcal poisoning foodborne outbreak: epidemiological investigation and strain genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, S; Bianchi, D M; Bellio, A; Nogarol, C; Macori, G; Zaccaria, T; Biorci, F; Carraro, E; Decastelli, L

    2013-12-01

    In June 2011, an outbreak of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin food poisoning gastroenteritis occurred in Turin, Italy, following a catered dinner party at a private home. Within a few hours, 26 of the 47 guests experienced gastrointestinal illness, and 9 were hospitalized. A retrospective cohort study using a standardized questionnaire was carried out, and the risk ratios for each food item were calculated. The analysis indicated consumption of seafood salad as the most probable cause of the outbreak (risk ratio = 11.72; 95 % confidence interval, 1.75 to 78.54). Biological samples were collected from four of the hospitalized guests (stool and vomit), nasal mucosa swabs from three food handlers employed with the caterer, and available food residuals. All stool and vomit samples tested positive for enterotoxigenic S. aureus. As residues of the seafood salad were no longer available for sampling, suspected contamination could not be verified. However, no other food was found contaminated by S. aureus or its enterotoxins. All isolates from the biological samples were characterized at the genomic level by means of two multiplex PCR protocols to determine the presence of genes encoding staphylococcal enterotoxins, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and staphylococcal protein A gene (spa) typing to describe their genetic profiles. All the isolates presented genes encoding SEA and SEI; the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genetic profiles revealed the same pulsotype in the microorganism isolated from the hospitalized guests as in one of the isolates from a food handler's nasal mucosa, and the spa typing analysis reported two closely related spa types (t701 and t267), implicating the food handler as the most likely outbreak source.

  12. Growth and enterotoxin production of Staphylococcus aureus during the manufacture and ripening of Camembert-type cheeses from raw goats' milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrand, A; Boutrand-Loei, S; Ray-Gueniot, S; Mazuy, C; Gaspard, C E; Jaubert, G; Perrin, G; Lapeyre, C; Vernozy-Rozand, C

    1998-09-01

    Tests were carried out to determine the effect of manufacturing procedures for a Camembert-type cheese from raw goats' milk on the growth and survival of Staphylococcus aureus organisms added to milk at the start of the process, and to study the possible presence of staphylococcal enterotoxin A in these cheeses. The initial staphylococcal counts were, respectively, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 log cfu ml-1. Cheese was prepared following the industrial specifications and ripened for 41 d. Detection of enterotoxins was done by the Vidas SET test and by an indirect double-sandwich ELISA technique using antienterotoxin monoclonal antibodies. Generally, numbers of microbes increased at a similar rate during manufacture in all cheeses until salting. During the ripening period, the aerobic plate count population and Staph. aureus levels remained stable and high. There was an approximately 1 log reduction of Staph. aureus in cheeses made with an initial inoculum of Staph. aureus greater than 10(3) cfu ml-1 at the end of the ripening period (41 d) compared with the count at 22 h. The level of staphylococcal enterotoxin A recovered varied from 1 to 3.2 ng g-1 of cheese made with an initial population of 10(3)-10(6) cfu ml-1. No trace of enterotoxin A was detected in cheeses made with the lowest Staph. aureus inoculum used in this study.

  13. Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus sensu lato and Staphylococcus aureus Isolates and Associated Enterotoxin Production Dynamics in Milk or Meat-Based Broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-York-Moore, Laura; Moore, Sean C; Fox, Edward M

    2017-07-15

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato species, as well as Staphylococcus aureus , are important pathogenic bacteria which can cause foodborne illness through the production of enterotoxins. This study characterised enterotoxin genes of these species and examined growth and enterotoxin production dynamics of isolates when grown in milk or meat-based broth. All B. cereus s. l. isolates harboured nheA , hblA and entFM toxin genes, with lower prevalence of bceT and hlyII . When grown at 16 °C, toxin production by individual B. cereus s. l. isolates varied depending on the food matrix; toxin was detected at cell densities below 5 log 10 (CFU/mL). At 16 °C no staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC) production was detected by S. aureus isolates, although low levels of SED production was noted. At 30 °C all S. aureus isolates produced detectable enterotoxin in the simulated meat matrix, whereas SEC production was significantly reduced in milk. Relative to B. cereus s. l. toxin production, S. aureus typically required reaching higher cell numbers to produce detectable levels of enterotoxin. Phylogenetic analysis of the sec and sel genes suggested population evolution which correlated with animal host adaptation, with subgroups of bovine isolates or caprine/ovine isolates noted, which were distinct from human isolates. Taken together, this study highlights the marked differences in the production of enterotoxins both associated with different growth matrices themselves, but also in the behaviour of individual strains when exposed to different food matrices.

  14. Detection of Genes for Superantigen Toxins in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taj, Y.; Fatima, I.; Ali, S. W.; Kazmi, S. U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect genes for enterotoxins, exfoliative and toxic shock syndrome toxins in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains isolated from clinical specimens. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Molecular Genetics, Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, Karachi, from January to December 2010. Methodology: Two hundred and ninety eight S. aureus clinical isolates were obtained from various clinical samples received at Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, Karachi. Out of these, 115 were detected as methicillin resistant (MRSA) by cefoxitin disk diffusion test showing a prevalence rate of 38.6%. Detection of individual toxin genes was performed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) by using only one primer pair for each tube. Uniplex primers were preferred as multiplex primers are longer in base pairs and have the potential for cross reaction due to non-specific binding and increase in optimization time. Results: The possession of a single gene or more than a single gene in MRSA isolates was found in 61.73% of clinical samples; the highest number was found in pus swab, followed by sputum, blood, urethral swab, and urine. The prevalence of toxin genes was higher in MRSA as compared to methicillin sensitive (MSSA) isolates (19.12%). Conclusion: PCR detects strains possessing toxin genes independent of their expression. The possession of genes for super-antigens seems to be a frequent and habitual trait of S. aureus more so in MRSA. (author)

  15. Production of enterotoxins of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from samples of sheep milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Zigo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In our study was followed occurrence of mastitis in herd of 430 sheep of breed zoslachtena valaska with hand milking technology examined two times during one lactation season. Individual examination consisted from clinical examination of udder and microbiological examination of milk samples. By PCR was determined presence of genes coding production of enterotoxins, and by ELISA methods production individual types of enterotoxins. From individual forms of mastitis were frequently detected subacute (6.7%, subclinical (5.7% and acute (2.9%. The coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS were identified in 102 (65.4% from all 156 positive isolates. The CNS and S. aureus caused subacute (5.1%, subclinical (3.9% and acute (2.4% forms of mastitis. The most frequently isolated were S. epidermidis, followed by S. chromogenes and S. xylosus from ewes with subacute and subclinical mastitis. From acute and chronical forms of mastitis were  predominantly isolated S. aureus, S. uberis and S. epidermidis. The production of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE - SEA, SEB, SEC, SED and the presence of genes sec (3, sea (2, seb (2 and sed (2 were determined in S. aureus, S. epidermidis, S. schleiferi and S. chromogenes, respectively. The results suggested on the high occurrence (12.4% of subacute and subclinical forms. Confirmed production of enterotoxins and presence of genes coding their production present a risk for human health and decreased a quality of milk and products from sheep´s milk.

  16. Cloning Sequencing and Structural Manipulation of the Enterotoxin D and E Genes from Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Iandolo, J.J. and R.K. Tweten. 1988. Purification of staphylococcal enterotoxin. In. Methods of Enzymology, (N.O. Kaplan , S. Harshman, Eds.) volume 165...N C V 9 L G 0 K 1 S P A K I C T S N 0 149 "T7AACTGG&&C&hICG&clhht:7caflCATGTAATAa~aI ACca CAACaCAA 942 L K D G D K L Z L I G T P r D H K V N 0 H L..L

  17. Elevated Enterotoxin A Expression and Formation in Staphylococcus aureus and Its Association with Prophage Induction

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Rong; Zeaki, Nikoleta; Wallin-Carlquist, Nina; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.; Schelin, Jenny; Rådström, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strains producing the bacteriophage-encoded staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) were divided into two groups, high- and low-SEA-producing strains, based on the amount of SEA produced. After growth under favorable conditions in batch cultures, 10 of the 21 strains tested produced more than 1,000 ng/ml SEA, and 9 strains produced less than 10 ng/ml SEA; two enterotoxigenic strains, MRSA252 and Newman, produced intermediate levels of SEA (around 450 ng/ml). The differences i...

  18. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus strains and evidence for the involvement of non-classical enterotoxin genes in food poisoning outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupescu, Laurentiu-Mihai; Auvray, Frederic; Nicorescu, Isabela Madalina; Meheut, Thomas; Ciupescu, Veronica; Lardeux, Anne-Laure; Tanasuica, Rodica; Hennekinne, Jacques-Antoine

    2018-06-05

    To an increasing extent, molecular and genetic characterization is now used to investigate foodborne outbreaks. The aim of this study was to seek molecular links among coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) isolated from three recent food poisoning outbreaks in Romania using polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) techniques. Nineteen CPS isolates were identified as Staphylococcus aureus by detection of the 23S rDNA gene. Among them, 15 carried at least one staphylococcal enterotoxin-encoding gene (se). The Calarași outbreak strains grouped in pulsotype 2 and were sed/sej/ser-positive, whereas the Arad outbreak strains clustered in pulsotype 17 and were either sed/seg/sei/sej/ser- or seg/sei-positive. The Pitești outbreak strains clustered in pulsotype 1 and, surprisingly, possessed only one enterotoxin gene, i.e. seh. Similar to other European countries, the seh gene has been identified with increasing frequency in Romanian outbreaks; this highlights the importance of considering the application of methods recommended for staphylococcal enterotoxin regulation in Europe.

  19. A single-stranded DNA aptamer that selectively binds to Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrasse, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a common foodborne pathogen capable of secreting a cocktail of small, stable, and strain-specific, staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) results when improperly handled food contaminated with SEs is consumed. Gastrointestinal symptoms of SFP include emesis, diarrhea and severe abdominal pain, which manifest within hours of ingesting contaminated food. Immuno-affinity based methods directly detect, identify, and quantify several SEs within a food or clinical sample. However, the success of these assays depends upon the availability of a monoclonal antibody, the development of which is non-trivial and costly. The current scope of the available immuno-affinity based methods is limited to the classical SEs and does not encompass all of the known or emergent SEs. In contrast to antibodies, aptamers are short nucleic acids that exhibit high affinity and specificity for their targets without the high-costs and ethical concerns of animal husbandry. Further, researchers may choose to freely distribute aptamers and develop assays without the proprietary issues that increase the per-sample cost of immuno-affinity assays. This study describes a novel aptamer, selected in vitro, with affinity to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) that may be used in lieu of antibodies in SE detection assays. The aptamer, designated APT(SEB1), successfully isolates SEB from a complex mixture of SEs with extremely high discrimination. This work sets the foundation for future aptamer and assay development towards the entire family of SEs. The rapid, robust, and low-cost identification and quantification of all of the SEs in S. aureus contaminated food is essential for food safety and epidemiological efforts. An in vitro generated library of SE aptamers could potentially allow for the comprehensive and cost-effective analysis of food samples that immuno-affinity assays currently cannot provide.

  20. A single-stranded DNA aptamer that selectively binds to Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A DeGrasse

    Full Text Available The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a common foodborne pathogen capable of secreting a cocktail of small, stable, and strain-specific, staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs. Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP results when improperly handled food contaminated with SEs is consumed. Gastrointestinal symptoms of SFP include emesis, diarrhea and severe abdominal pain, which manifest within hours of ingesting contaminated food. Immuno-affinity based methods directly detect, identify, and quantify several SEs within a food or clinical sample. However, the success of these assays depends upon the availability of a monoclonal antibody, the development of which is non-trivial and costly. The current scope of the available immuno-affinity based methods is limited to the classical SEs and does not encompass all of the known or emergent SEs. In contrast to antibodies, aptamers are short nucleic acids that exhibit high affinity and specificity for their targets without the high-costs and ethical concerns of animal husbandry. Further, researchers may choose to freely distribute aptamers and develop assays without the proprietary issues that increase the per-sample cost of immuno-affinity assays. This study describes a novel aptamer, selected in vitro, with affinity to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB that may be used in lieu of antibodies in SE detection assays. The aptamer, designated APT(SEB1, successfully isolates SEB from a complex mixture of SEs with extremely high discrimination. This work sets the foundation for future aptamer and assay development towards the entire family of SEs. The rapid, robust, and low-cost identification and quantification of all of the SEs in S. aureus contaminated food is essential for food safety and epidemiological efforts. An in vitro generated library of SE aptamers could potentially allow for the comprehensive and cost-effective analysis of food samples that immuno-affinity assays currently cannot provide.

  1. Safety Evaluation of the Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Microbiota of Salami: Superantigenic Toxin Production and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Soares Casaes Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The risks of contracting staphylococci food poisoning by the consumption of improperly manufactured salami and the possibility of this food being reservoirs for antibiotic resistance were evaluated. Nineteen coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS strains were found in commercial and artisanal salami. The species in commercial salami were S. saprophyticus, S. sciuri, S. xylosus, and S. carnosus. Artisanal salami showed S. succinus, S. epidermidis, and S. hominis but no S. carnosus. Phylogenetic analyses grouped the strains into three major staphylococcal species groups, comprised of 4 refined clusters with similarities superior to 90%. Fifteen strains harbored multiple enterotoxin genes, with high incidence of seb/sec and sea, 57% and 50%, respectively, intermediate incidence of sed/seh/selm and sei/seln/tst-H, 33% and 27%, correspondingly, and low incidence of see/selj/selo and seg, of respectively 13% and 1%. Real time RT-PCR and enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays confirmed the enterotoxigenicity of the strains, which expressed and produced enterotoxins in vitro. The CNS strains showed multiresistance to several antimicrobials of therapeutic importance in both human and veterinarian medicine, such as β-lactams, vancomycin, and linezolid. The effective control of undue staphylococci in fermented meat products should be adopted to prevent or limit the risk of food poisoning and the spread of antimicrobial-resistant strains.

  2. Lipid-derived free radical production in superantigen-induced interstitial pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Hisako; Mason, Ronald P.; Jiang, JinJie; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the free radical generation involved in the development of interstitial pneumonia (IP) in an animal model of autoimmune disease. We observed an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum of α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN) radical adducts detected in the lipid extract of lungs in autoimmune-prone mice after intratracheal instillation of staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The POBN adducts detected by ESR were paralleled by infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To further investigate the mechanism of free radical generation, mice were pretreated with the macrophage toxicant gadolinium chloride, which significantly suppressed the radical generation. Free radical generation was also decreased by pretreatment with the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor allopurinol, the iron chelator Desferal, and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor 1400W. Histopathologically, these drugs significantly reduced both the cell infiltration to alveolar septal walls and the synthesis of pulmonary collagen fibers. Experiments with NADPH oxidase knockout mice showed that NADPH oxidase did not contribute to lipid radical generation. These results suggest that lipid-derived carbon-centered free radical production is important in the manifestation of IP and that a macrophage toxicant, an XO inhibitor, an iron chelator, and an iNOS inhibitor protect against both radical generation and the manifestation of IP. PMID:19376221

  3. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hema; Smith, Debra; Turner, Claire E.; Game, Laurence; Pichon, Bruno; Hope, Russell; Hill, Robert; Kearns, Angela

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) was originally described in menstruating women and linked to TSS toxin 1 (TSST-1)–producing Staphylococcus aureus. Using UK national surveillance data, we ascertained clinical, molecular and superantigenic characteristics of TSS cases. Average annual TSS incidence was 0.07/100,000 population. Patients with nonmenstrual TSS were younger than those with menstrual TSS but had the same mortality rate. Children <16 years of age accounted for 39% of TSS cases, most caused by burns and skin and soft tissue infections. Nonmenstrual TSS is now more common than menstrual TSS in the UK, although both types are strongly associated with the tst+ clonal complex (CC) 30 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus lineage, which accounted for 49.4% of all TSS and produced more TSST-1 and superantigen bioactivity than did tst+ CC30 methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains. Better understanding of this MSSA lineage and infections in children could focus interventions to prevent TSS in the future. PMID:29350159

  4. The Isolation and Detection of Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxins A-E and TSST-1 Genes from Different Sources by PCR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norouzi J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin–1 (TSST-1 are an important virulence factor of S. aureus. The purpose of this study was to analyze the presence of S. aureus enterotoxin (sea-see and tst genes in the samples that collected from different sources with PCR method. Methods: During 5 months from 150 collected samples, 80 strains were identified as S. aureus. PCR reaction was used for investigation on the presence of genes for staphylococcal enterotoxins (A-E and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1. Results: Fifty three samples (66.25% out of 80 samples were positive for one or more ETs and TSST-1 genes. of these positive strains, 17 (32.07% were positive for sea 39 (73.58% for seb, 30 (56.6% for sec, 2 (3.7% for sed, 21 (39.62% for see, and 14 (26.41% for tst. Enterotoxins and tst in 40 samples (75.47% observed.Conclusion: In this study, high prevalence of S. aureus, its enterotoxin, and tst genes were observed in clinical samples, food samples, and healthy people. This fact emphasizes on the role of human as original source and carrier of S. aureus. Also, use of PCR reaction for detection of these genes in S. aureus that isolated from various sources is recommended.

  5. Presence of superantigen genes and antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus isolates obtained from the uteri of dairy cows with clinical endometritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J-L; Ding, Y-X; Zhao, H-X; He, X-L; Li, P-F; Li, Z-F; Guan, H; Guo, X

    2014-10-11

    Clinical endometritis is an important disease of dairy cattle and results in decreased reproductive performance. This disease is caused by contamination of the uterus with a broad spectrum of microorganisms after calving. In this study, staphylococcal isolates from the uterus of dairy cows with clinical endometritis were tested for their distribution of superantigen (SAg) genes and antimicrobial resistance. Between the 127 staphylococcal isolates collected in this study, 10 species were identified. The predominant strain identified was Staphylococcus aureus (n=53), followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus (n=38) and Staphylococcus chromogenes (n=22). PCR analysis demonstrated that most isolates (63.0 per cent) harboured at least one SAg gene. The most commonly observed SAg gene and genotype was selj (38.6 per cent) and sec-selj-seln (24.0 per cent), respectively. Most isolates were resistant to penicillin (79.5 per cent), ampicillin (71.7 per cent), erythromycin (56.7 per cent), and tetracycline (52.0 per cent). PCR analysis demonstrated that the antimicrobial resistance determinants ermA, ermB, ermC, tetK, tetM and blaZ were detected in 0 per cent, 44.4 per cent, 51.4 per cent, 68.2 per cent, 13.6 per cent and 86.1 per cent of the erythromycin, tetracycline and β-lactam resistant isolates, respectively. There were 22 (17.3 per cent of all isolates) coagulase-negative staphylococci shown to be methicillin resistant. In the methicillin-resistant isolates, significant resistances to ampicillin, erythromycin and penicillin were observed (P<0.01). The results of this study demonstrate that staphylococci recovered from dairy cows with clinical endometritis contain an extensive and complex prevalence of SAg genes. Significant resistances to antibiotics were also seen, highlighting the need for the rational appliance of antibiotics in veterinary medicine. British Veterinary Association.

  6. METHICILLIN RESISTANCE IN STAPHYLOCOCCAL ISOLATES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the importance of Staphylococcus aureus as a urinary pathogen and the incidence of multidrug resistant (MDR), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A total of 86 staphylococcal isolates made up of 50 clinical isolates from urine samples submitted to the Medical Microbiology Laboratory ...

  7. Streptococcal pharyngitis and rheumatic heart disease: the superantigen hypothesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Jacklyn R; Kasper, Katherine J; Sule, Akshay N; McCormick, John K

    2018-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human-specific and globally prominent bacterial pathogen that despite causing numerous human infections, this bacterium is normally found in an asymptomatic carrier state. This review provides an overview of both bacterial and human factors that likely play an important role in nasopharyngeal colonization and pharyngitis, as well as the development of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. Here we highlight a recently described role for bacterial superantigens in promoting acute nasopharyngeal infection, and discuss how these immune system activating toxins could be crucial to initiate the autoimmune process in rheumatic heart disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Influence of carvacrol and thymol on the physiological attributes, enterotoxin production and surface characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.L. Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the phenolic compounds carvacrol (CAR and thymol (THY on some physiological characteristics and on the modulation of the secretion of some staphylococcal virulence factors, that is, coagulase and enterotoxin. This study also investigated possible mechanisms for the establishment of the anti-staphylococcal activity of these compounds. Sublethal concentrations (0.3 and 0.15 µL/mL of CAR and THY inhibited the activity of the enzymes coagulase and lipase and led to a decrease in salt tolerance. At the tested sublethal concentrations, both CAR and THY led to a total suppression of enterotoxin production. The loss of a 260-nm-absorbing material and an efflux of potassium ions occurred immediately after the addition of CAR and THY at 0.6 and 1.2 µL/mL and increased up to 120 min of exposure. Electron microscopy of cells exposed to CAR and THY (0.6 µL/mL revealed that individual cells appeared to be deformed, with projections of cellular material. The observations of leakage of cellular material and an altered cell surface suggest that gross damage to a cell's cytoplasmic membrane, which results in a disruption in protein secretion, could be responsible for the anti-staphylococcal properties of CAR and THY.

  9. The N-Terminal Flanking Region of the Invariant Chain Peptide Augments the Immunogenicity of a Cryptic “Self” Epitope from a Tumor-Associated Antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hess, A.D.; Thoburn, C.; Chen, W.; Miura, Y.; Wall, E. van der

    2001-01-01

    The N-terminal flanking region of the invariant chain peptide termed CLIP appears to have superagonistic properties interacting with the T cell receptor and the MHC class II molecule at or near the binding site for the bacterial superantigen Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). The present studies

  10. Pilot Scale Production and Testing of a Recombinant Staphylococcal Enterotoxin (SEB) Triple Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Polymerase Chain Reaction . J. Food Prot. 2000, 63, (4), 479–488. 6. Ulrich, R.G.; Olson, M.A.; Bavari, S. Development of Engineered Vaccines...TR-1471 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense, Joint Project...distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: The use of chemically or thermally inactivated biothreat toxins in detection

  11. Stress-caused Anergy of Leukocytes towards Staphylococcal enterotoxin B and Exposure Transcriptome Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-28

    concerted immune depletion was highly pronounced in the case of genes involved in synthesis /secretion of chemokines and antigen presentation. (c) The 21...biosynthetic process 48545 8.03E-03 12 Response to steroid hormone stimulus 16126 9.50E-03 5 Sterol biosynthetic process 6950 1.01E-02 44 Response to

  12. Direct, Specific and Rapid Detection of Staphylococcal Proteins and Exotoxins Using a Multiplex Antibody Microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Stieber

    Full Text Available S. aureus is a pathogen in humans and animals that harbors a wide variety of virulence factors and resistance genes. This bacterium can cause a wide range of mild to life-threatening diseases. In the latter case, fast diagnostic procedures are important. In routine diagnostic laboratories, several genotypic and phenotypic methods are available to identify S. aureus strains and determine their resistances. However, there is a demand for multiplex routine diagnostic tests to directly detect staphylococcal toxins and proteins.In this study, an antibody microarray based assay was established and validated for the rapid detection of staphylococcal markers and exotoxins. The following targets were included: staphylococcal protein A, penicillin binding protein 2a, alpha- and beta-hemolysins, Panton Valentine leukocidin, toxic shock syndrome toxin, enterotoxins A and B as well as staphylokinase. All were detected simultaneously within a single experiment, starting from a clonal culture on standard media. The detection of bound proteins was performed using a new fluorescence reading device for microarrays.110 reference strains and clinical isolates were analyzed using this assay, with a DNA microarray for genotypic characterization performed in parallel. The results showed a general high concordance of genotypic and phenotypic data. However, genotypic analysis found the hla gene present in all S. aureus isolates but its expression under given conditions depended on the clonal complex affiliation of the actual isolate.The multiplex antibody assay described herein allowed a rapid and reliable detection of clinically relevant staphylococcal toxins as well as resistance- and species-specific markers.

  13. Modulation of Interleukin-8 and staphylococcal flora by Avène hydrotherapy in patients suffering from chronic inflammatory dermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, C; Ribet, V; Alvarez-Georges, S; Sibaud, V; Guerrero, D; Schmitt, A-M; Redoulès, D

    2011-02-01

    A number of studies argue in favour of an important role of microbial colonization, in particular of Staphylococcus aureus, in triggering atopic dermatitis (AD) flare-up and psoriasis, in particular through the superantigenic properties of toxins generated by S. aureus. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a 3-week Avène hydrotherapy on the skin surface of patients suffering from psoriasis or atopic dermatitis. Skin samples were taken from healthy subjects or atopic (n = 18) or psoriatic patients (n = 39) undergoing hydrotherapy at Avène at the beginning (D0) and the end of treatment (D18). The severity of the dermatosis was evaluated according to SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) or Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) scores at D0 and D18. Marker of inflammation interleukin 8 (IL-8), S. aureus colonization (protein A) and enterotoxins were assessed in skin samples using RT-PCR. At D0, significant differences were observed between healthy subjects and atopic or psoriatic patients in all the parameters evaluated (IL-8, protein A). At the end of the hydrotherapy, a significant decrease in SCORAD was associated with a significant reduction of IL-8, S. aureus colonization and enterotoxin D in patients with atopic dermatitis. Similarly, a significant decrease in PASI was associated with a significant reduction of IL-8, S. aureus colonization and enterotoxin N in patients with psoriasis. This study demonstrates the positive effects of Avène hydrotherapy on the skin of patients suffering from chronic dermatosis, with decreased inflammation and reduced colonization by S. aureus. © 2010 The Authors. JEADV © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  14. Probabilistic risk model for staphylococcal intoxication from pork-based food dishes prepared in food service establishments in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Griffiths, Mansel W; Fazil, Aamir M; Lammerding, Anna M

    2009-09-01

    Foodborne illness contracted at food service operations is an important public health issue in Korea. In this study, the probabilities for growth of, and enterotoxin production by, Staphylococcus aureus in pork meat-based foods prepared in food service operations were estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation. Data on the prevalence and concentration of S. aureus as well as compliance to guidelines for time and temperature controls during food service operations were collected. The growth of S. aureus was initially estimated by using the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Pathogen Modeling Program. A second model based on raw pork meat was derived to compare cell number predictions. The correlation between toxin level and cell number as well as minimum toxin dose obtained from published data was adopted to quantify the probability of staphylococcal intoxication. When data gaps were found, assumptions were made based on guidelines for food service practices. Baseline risk model and scenario analyses were performed to indicate possible outcomes of staphylococcal intoxication under the scenarios generated based on these data gaps. Staphylococcal growth was predicted during holding before and after cooking, and the highest estimated concentration (4.59 log CFU/g for the 99.9th percentile value) of S. aureus was observed in raw pork initially contaminated with S. aureus and held before cooking. The estimated probability for staphylococcal intoxication was very low, using currently available data. However, scenario analyses revealed an increased possibility of staphylococcal intoxication when increased levels of initial contamination in the raw meat, andlonger holding time both before and after cooking the meat occurred.

  15. Investigating an outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning among travellers across two Australian states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Fletcher

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of staphylococcal food poisoning in Australia with several outbreaks associated with foods prepared by commercial caterers. Laboratory testing on cases of gastrointestinal illness caused by enterotoxin-producing S. aureus is not routinely done as this condition is self-limiting. Hence outbreaks of such illness may go undetected. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted among a group of tourists who were hospitalized in Sydney shortly after flying from Queensland. The group had consumed food prepared by a restaurant on the Gold Coast before transit. Laboratory analyses on stool specimens were conducted in Sydney. An environmental assessment of the restaurant in the Gold Coast was conducted, and environmental specimens were assessed for contamination. Results: Epidemiological investigations linked the outbreak to a restaurant in the Gold Coast where the suspected food was produced. Stool samples from two of the hospitalized cases were confirmed to have enterotoxin-producing S. aureus, and several environmental samples were found to be contaminated with S. aureus as well. Investigations suggested that absence of hand washing and other unhygienic food handling at the implicated restaurant was the likely cause of this outbreak. Conclusion: Food poisoning due to toxin-mediated S. aureus is frequently undetected and underreported. Public health units should consider toxin-producing pathogens such as S. aureus when investigating outbreaks where vomiting is the predominant symptom and occurs rapidly after consuming food.

  16. Investigating an outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning among travellers across two Australian states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephanie; Boonwaat, Leng; Moore, Terry; Chavada, Ruchir; Conaty, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of staphylococcal food poisoning in Australia with several outbreaks associated with foods prepared by commercial caterers. Laboratory testing on cases of gastrointestinal illness caused by enterotoxin-producing S. aureus is not routinely done as this condition is self-limiting. Hence outbreaks of such illness may go undetected. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among a group of tourists who were hospitalized in Sydney shortly after flying from Queensland. The group had consumed food prepared by a restaurant on the Gold Coast before transit. Laboratory analyses on stool specimens were conducted in Sydney. An environmental assessment of the restaurant in the Gold Coast was conducted, and environmental specimens were assessed for contamination. Epidemiological investigations linked the outbreak to a restaurant in the Gold Coast where the suspected food was produced. Stool samples from two of the hospitalized cases were confirmed to have enterotoxin-producing S. aureus, and several environmental samples were found to be contaminated with S. aureus as well. Investigations suggested that absence of hand washing and other unhygienic food handling at the implicated restaurant was the likely cause of this outbreak. Food poisoning due to toxin-mediated S. aureus is frequently undetected and underreported. Public health units should consider toxin-producing pathogens such as S. aureus when investigating outbreaks where vomiting is the predominant symptom and occurs rapidly after consuming food.

  17. Outbreak of Staphylococcal food poisoning due to SEA-producing Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johler, Sophia; Tichaczek-Dischinger, Petra S; Rau, Jörg; Sihto, Henna-Maria; Lehner, Angelika; Adam, Maja; Stephan, Roger

    2013-09-01

    In 2008, 150 people gathered for a wedding celebration in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Three hours after ingestion of a variety of foods including pancakes filled with minced chicken, several guests exhibited symptoms of acute gastroenteritis such as vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and ague. Twelve guests were reported to have fallen ill, with nine of these seeking medical care in hospitals. At least four patients were admitted to the hospital and received inpatient treatment, among them a 2-year-old child and a woman in the 4th month of pregnancy. Within 24 h of the event, an investigative team collected a variety of samples including refrigerated leftovers, food in the storage unit of the caterer, nasal swabs of the caterer, as well as 21 environmental swabs. Five stool samples from patients were provided by the hospitals. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were gathered from eight samples, among them nasal swabs of the caterer, food samples, and one stool sample. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy was used for species identification and for primary clustering of the isolates in a similarity tree. The isolates were further characterized by spa typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and a DNA microarray was used to determine the presence/absence of genes involved in virulence and antimicrobial resistance. We were able to match an enterotoxigenic strain from the stool sample of a patient to isolates of the same strain obtained from food and the nasal cavity of a food handler. The strain produced the enterotoxin SEA and the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, and was also found to exhibit the genes encoding enterotoxins SEG and SEI, as well as the enterotoxin gene cluster egc. This is one of only a few studies that were able to link a staphylococcal food poisoning outbreak to its source.

  18. Superantigen-Induced Cytokine Release from Whole-Blood Cell Culture as a Functional Measure of Drug Efficacy after Oral Dosing in Nonhuman Primates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krakauer, Teresa; Stephens, Julie; Buckley, Marilyn; Tate, Mallory

    2007-01-01

    ...) closely resemble humans. We examined the ex vivo cytokine response of superantigen-stimulated whole-blood cells as a first step to therapeutic efficacy testing for bacterial superantigen-induced shock in NHP after oral dosing of pentoxifylline...

  19. Binding of superantigen toxins into the CD28 homodimer interface is essential for induction of cytokine genes that mediate lethal shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gila Arad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial superantigens, a diverse family of toxins, induce an inflammatory cytokine storm that can lead to lethal shock. CD28 is a homodimer expressed on T cells that functions as the principal costimulatory ligand in the immune response through an interaction with its B7 coligands, yet we show here that to elicit inflammatory cytokine gene expression and toxicity, superantigens must bind directly into the dimer interface of CD28. Preventing access of the superantigen to CD28 suffices to block its lethality. Mice were protected from lethal superantigen challenge by short peptide mimetics of the CD28 dimer interface and by peptides selected to compete with the superantigen for its binding site in CD28. Superantigens use a conserved β-strand/hinge/α-helix domain of hitherto unknown function to engage CD28. Mutation of this superantigen domain abolished inflammatory cytokine gene induction and lethality. Structural analysis showed that when a superantigen binds to the T cell receptor on the T cell and major histocompatibility class II molecule on the antigen-presenting cell, CD28 can be accommodated readily as third superantigen receptor in the quaternary complex, with the CD28 dimer interface oriented towards the β-strand/hinge/α-helix domain in the superantigen. Our findings identify the CD28 homodimer interface as a critical receptor target for superantigens. The novel role of CD28 as receptor for a class of microbial pathogens, the superantigen toxins, broadens the scope of pathogen recognition mechanisms.

  20. Extracellular adherence protein (Eap) from Staphylococcus aureus does not function as a superantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggar, A; Flock, J-I; Norrby-Teglund, A

    2010-08-01

    Extracellular adherence protein (Eap) from Staphylococcus aureus has been reported to have strong anti-inflammatory properties, which make Eap a potential anti-inflammatory agent. However, Eap has also been demonstrated to trigger T-cell activation and to share structural homology with superantigens. In this study, we focused on whether Eap fulfilled the definition criteria for a superantigen. We demonstrate that T-cell activation by Eap is dependent on both major histocompatibility complex class II and intercellular adhesion molecule type 1, that cellular processing is required for Eap to elicit T-cell proliferation, and that the kinetics of proliferation resemble the profile of a conventional antigen and not that of a superantigen.

  1. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins in sheep cheese and dairy desserts by multiplex PCR technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Nurhan; Gonulalan, Zafer; Yildirim, Yeliz; Kum, Erhan

    2010-08-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) genes in sheep cheese and dairy dessert samples by multiplex PCR (mPCR) technique. A total of 150 samples were analyzed consisting of 50 dairy dessert samples and 100 sheep cheese. Coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS) were found in 86 (57.3%) out of 150 analyzed samples. S. aureus were isolated from 60 (60%), 26 (52%) of sheep cheese and from of dairy desserts, respectively. Five suspected colonies were tested from each sheep cheese and dairy dessert samples for phenotypic and genotypic characterizations. A total of 430 isolates from the 86 positive samples were investigated in this study. Eighty (18.6%) isolates were characterized as S. aureus. The enterotoxin genes (sea, seb, sec, sed) were found in 13 (3.02%) out of 80 isolates. From cheese isolates, sea, seb and sed were detected in 5 (1.6%), 2 (0.6%), 1 (0.3%), respectively. From dairy dessert isolates, sea, sec and sed were detected in 3 (2.3%), 1 (0.76%), 1 (0.76%), respectively. The presence of SEs was identified in 12 (2.8%) out of 80 isolates by using ELISA technique. It was determined that these SEs had a distribution of 7 (1.6%) SEA, 2 (0.46%) SEB, 1 (0.23%) SEC, and 2 (0.46%) SED. SEs were found in 7 (2.3%) cheese and 5 (3.8%) dairy dessert isolates. In conclusion, S.aureus and their SEs were found to be present in sheep cheese and dairy desserts in this study. It is emphasized that the presence of S. aureus and their SEs genes in sheep cheese and dairy desserts may be regarded as a potential risk for human health. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of enterotoxin-encoding genes and antimicrobial resistance in coagulase-negative and coagulase-positive Staphylococcus isolates from black pudding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiane Martin de Moura

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Staphylococcal species are pathogens that are responsible for outbreaks of foodborne diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of enterotoxin-genes and the antimicrobial resistance profile in staphylococcus coagulase-negative (CoNS and coagulasepositive (CoPS isolates from black pudding in southern Brazil. METHODS: Two hundred typical and atypical colonies from Baird-Parker agar were inoculated on mannitol salt agar. Eighty-two mannitol-positive staphylococci were submitted to conventional biochemical tests and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling. The presence of coagulase (coa and enterotoxin (se genes was investigated by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The isolates were divided into 2 groups: 75.6% (62/82 were CoNS and 24.4% (20/82 were CoPS. The biochemical tests identified 9 species, of which Staphylococcus saprophyticus (37.8% and Staphylococcus carnosus (15.9% were the most prevalent. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed resistance phenotypes to antibiotics widely administered in humans, such as gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin. The coa gene was detected in 19.5% (16/82 of the strains and 4 polymorphic DNA fragments were observed. Five CoNS isolates carrying the coa gene were submitted for 16S rRNA sequencing and 3 showed similarity with CoNS. Forty strains were positive for at least 1 enterotoxin-encoding gene, the genes most frequently detected were sea (28.6% and seb (27.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of antimicrobial resistant and enterotoxin-encoding genes in staphylococci isolates from black pudding indicated that this fermented food may represent a potential health risk, since staphylococci present in food could cause foodborne diseases or be a possible route for the transfer of antimicrobial resistance to humans.

  3. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Qingwen [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jiang, Songmin [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Han, Baohui [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Tongwen [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China); Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang [College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Sun, Jialin, E-mail: jialin_sun@126.com [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  4. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor–superantigen conjugate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Qingwen; Jiang, Songmin; Han, Baohui; Sun, Tongwen; Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Jialin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF–SEA. ► VEGF–SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. ► T cells driven by VEGF–SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. ► VEGF–SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. ► The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF–SEA treated with 15 μg, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4 + and CD8 + T cells driven by VEGF–SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF–SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  5. Relationships among superantigen toxin gene profiles, genotypes, and pathogenic characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Limei; Yong, Changfu; Shen, Mingliang; Ali, Tariq; Shahid, Muhammad; Han, Kun; Zhou, Xuezhang; Han, Bo

    2017-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major etiological agents of bovine mastitis, harboring a wide variety of staphylococcal superantigen (SAg) toxin genes. The SAg toxin genes are reported to be closely associated with the pathogenicity of the Staph. aureus causing the bovine mastitis. This study was conducted to investigate SAg toxin gene profiles and to assess the relationships among SAg toxin genes, genotypes of Staph. aureus, and their pathogenic properties. A total of 327 quarter milk samples were collected from bovine mastitis cases for isolation and identification of pathogens. In total, 35 isolates were identified as Staph. aureus, and the prevalence of Staph. aureus in milk samples was 13.6% (35/256). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assays were used to detect the SAg toxin genes and to genotype Staph. aureus strains isolated from milk samples of bovine mastitis in 10 dairy herds located in Ningxia, China, respectively. The results showed that among the Staph. aureus isolates (n = 35), 71.4% (n = 25) of isolates carried at least one SAg toxin gene. In total, 18 SAg genes and 21 different gene combination patterns were detected among these isolates. The most common SAg genes in Staph. aureus isolates were sei, sen, and seu (44.0% each), followed by seo, tst, and etB (28.0% each), etA (24.0%), sem and sep (16.0% each), seb, sec, sed, and sek (12.0% each), and sea and seh genes (8.0% each); the seg, sej, and ser genes were present in 4.0% of the isolates. Three gene combinations were found to be related to mobile genetic elements that carried 2 or more genes. The egc-cluster of the seg-sei-sem-sen-seo genes, located on the pathogenicity island Type I υSaβ, was detected in 16% of isolates. Interestingly, we observed 6 RAPD genotypes (I to VI) in Staph. aureus isolates, and 2 of these genotypes were strongly associated with the severity of bovine mastitis; there was a close relationship between the RAPD genotypes

  6. Comparative Genomics and Identification of an Enterotoxin-Bearing Pathogenicity Island, SEPI-1/SECI-1, in Staphylococcus epidermidis Pathogenic Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argemi, Xavier; Nanoukon, Chimène; Affolabi, Dissou; Keller, Daniel; Hansmann, Yves; Riegel, Philippe; Baba-Moussa, Lamine; Prévost, Gilles

    2018-02-25

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of nosocomial infections, majorly resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics, and may transfer several mobile genetic elements among the members of its own species, as well as to Staphylococcus aureus ; however, a genetic exchange from S. aureus to S. epidermidis remains controversial. We recently identified two pathogenic clinical strains of S. epidermidis that produce a staphylococcal enterotoxin C3-like (SEC) similar to that by S. aureus pathogenicity islands. This study aimed to determine the genetic environment of the SEC-coding sequence and to identify the mobile genetic elements. Whole-genome sequencing and annotation of the S. epidermidis strains were performed using Illumina technology and a bioinformatics pipeline for assembly, which provided evidence that the SEC-coding sequences were located in a composite pathogenicity island that was previously described in the S. epidermidis strain FRI909, called SePI-1/SeCI-1, with 83.8-89.7% nucleotide similarity. Various other plasmids were identified, particularly p_3_95 and p_4_95, which carry antibiotic resistance genes ( hsrA and dfrG , respectively), and share homologies with SAP085A and pUSA04-2-SUR11, two plasmids described in S. aureus . Eventually, one complete prophage was identified, ΦSE90, sharing 30 out of 52 coding sequences with the Acinetobacter phage vB_AbaM_IME200. Thus, the SePI-1/SeCI-1 pathogenicity island was identified in two pathogenic strains of S. epidermidis that produced a SEC enterotoxin causing septic shock. These findings suggest the existence of in vivo genetic exchange from S. aureus to S. epidermidis .

  7. Comparative Genomics and Identification of an Enterotoxin-Bearing Pathogenicity Island, SEPI-1/SECI-1, in Staphylococcus epidermidis Pathogenic Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Argemi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of nosocomial infections, majorly resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics, and may transfer several mobile genetic elements among the members of its own species, as well as to Staphylococcus aureus; however, a genetic exchange from S. aureus to S. epidermidis remains controversial. We recently identified two pathogenic clinical strains of S. epidermidis that produce a staphylococcal enterotoxin C3-like (SEC similar to that by S. aureus pathogenicity islands. This study aimed to determine the genetic environment of the SEC-coding sequence and to identify the mobile genetic elements. Whole-genome sequencing and annotation of the S. epidermidis strains were performed using Illumina technology and a bioinformatics pipeline for assembly, which provided evidence that the SEC-coding sequences were located in a composite pathogenicity island that was previously described in the S. epidermidis strain FRI909, called SePI-1/SeCI-1, with 83.8–89.7% nucleotide similarity. Various other plasmids were identified, particularly p_3_95 and p_4_95, which carry antibiotic resistance genes (hsrA and dfrG, respectively, and share homologies with SAP085A and pUSA04-2-SUR11, two plasmids described in S. aureus. Eventually, one complete prophage was identified, ΦSE90, sharing 30 out of 52 coding sequences with the Acinetobacter phage vB_AbaM_IME200. Thus, the SePI-1/SeCI-1 pathogenicity island was identified in two pathogenic strains of S. epidermidis that produced a SEC enterotoxin causing septic shock. These findings suggest the existence of in vivo genetic exchange from S. aureus to S. epidermidis.

  8. Staphylococcal enterotoxin-A directly stimulates signal transduction and interferon-gamma production in psoriatic T-cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M B; Odum, N; Gerwien, J

    1998-01-01

    class II. Here we address the question of whether SEA can directly activate psoriatic T cells in the absence of professional antigen-presenting cells. We show that SEA induces i) tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, ii) downregulation of the T-cell receptor (TCR), and iii) production......-mediated proliferation. In contrast, SEA with a mutation in the MHC class II alpha-binding site induces IFN-gamma and a qualitatively changed tyrosine phosphorylation profile. Both mutations delete the co-stimulatory effect on cytokine-mediated proliferation. This suggests that both MHC class II binding sites...

  9. Dietary n-3 PUFAs augment caspase 8 activation in Staphylococcal aureus enterotoxin B stimulated T-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, R. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Jen, K.L. [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Center for Urban Responses to Environmental Stressors (CURES), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); McCabe, M.J.J. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Rosenspire, A., E-mail: arosenspire@wayne.edu [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Center for Urban Responses to Environmental Stressors (CURES), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies have linked consumption of n-3 PUFAs with a variety of beneficial health benefits, particularly with respect to putative anti-inflammatory effects. Unfortunately, many of these results remain somewhat controversial because in most instances there has not been a linkage to specific molecular mechanisms. For instance, dietary exposure to low levels of mercury has been shown to be damaging to neural development, but concomitant ingestion of n-3 PUFAs as occurs during consumption of fish, has been shown to counteract the detrimental effects. As the mechanisms mediating the neurotoxicity of environmental mercury are not fully delineated, it is difficult to conceptualize a testable molecular mechanism explaining how n-3 PUFAs negate its neurotoxic effects. However, environmental exposure to mercury also has been linked to increased autoimmunity. By way of a molecular understanding of this immuno-toxic association, disruption of CD95 signaling is well established as a triggering factor for autoimmunity, and we have previously shown that environmentally relevant in vitro and dietary exposures to mercury interfere with CD95 signaling. In particular we have shown that activation of caspase 8, as well as downstream activation of caspase 3, in response to CD95 agonist stimulation is depressed by mercury. More recently we have shown in vitro that the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid counteracts the negative effect of mercury on CD95 signaling by restoring caspase activity. We hypothesized that concomitant ingestion of n-3 PUFAs with mercury might be protective from the immuno-toxic effects of mercury, as it is with mercury's neuro-toxic effects, and in the case of immuno-toxicity this would be related to restoration of CD95 signal strength. We now show that dietary ingestion of n-3 PUFAs generally promotes CD95 signaling by upregulating caspase 8 activation. Apart from accounting for the ability of n-3 PUFAs to specifically counteract autoimmune sequelae of mercury exposure, this novel finding for the first time suggests a testable molecular mechanism explaining the overall anti-inflammatory properties of n-3 PUFAs. - Highlights: • Dietary n-3 PUFAs counter Hg{sup 2+} immunotoxicity • Hg{sup 2+} interference with SEB-mediated signal transduction is ameliorated by n-3 PUFA rich diets. • Dietary n-3 PUFAs augment SEB-mediated activation of caspase 8 in vivo.

  10. Dietary n-3 PUFAs augment caspase 8 activation in Staphylococcal aureus enterotoxin B stimulated T-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.; Jen, K.L.; McCabe, M.J.J.; Rosenspire, A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked consumption of n-3 PUFAs with a variety of beneficial health benefits, particularly with respect to putative anti-inflammatory effects. Unfortunately, many of these results remain somewhat controversial because in most instances there has not been a linkage to specific molecular mechanisms. For instance, dietary exposure to low levels of mercury has been shown to be damaging to neural development, but concomitant ingestion of n-3 PUFAs as occurs during consumption of fish, has been shown to counteract the detrimental effects. As the mechanisms mediating the neurotoxicity of environmental mercury are not fully delineated, it is difficult to conceptualize a testable molecular mechanism explaining how n-3 PUFAs negate its neurotoxic effects. However, environmental exposure to mercury also has been linked to increased autoimmunity. By way of a molecular understanding of this immuno-toxic association, disruption of CD95 signaling is well established as a triggering factor for autoimmunity, and we have previously shown that environmentally relevant in vitro and dietary exposures to mercury interfere with CD95 signaling. In particular we have shown that activation of caspase 8, as well as downstream activation of caspase 3, in response to CD95 agonist stimulation is depressed by mercury. More recently we have shown in vitro that the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid counteracts the negative effect of mercury on CD95 signaling by restoring caspase activity. We hypothesized that concomitant ingestion of n-3 PUFAs with mercury might be protective from the immuno-toxic effects of mercury, as it is with mercury's neuro-toxic effects, and in the case of immuno-toxicity this would be related to restoration of CD95 signal strength. We now show that dietary ingestion of n-3 PUFAs generally promotes CD95 signaling by upregulating caspase 8 activation. Apart from accounting for the ability of n-3 PUFAs to specifically counteract autoimmune sequelae of mercury exposure, this novel finding for the first time suggests a testable molecular mechanism explaining the overall anti-inflammatory properties of n-3 PUFAs. - Highlights: • Dietary n-3 PUFAs counter Hg 2+ immunotoxicity • Hg 2+ interference with SEB-mediated signal transduction is ameliorated by n-3 PUFA rich diets. • Dietary n-3 PUFAs augment SEB-mediated activation of caspase 8 in vivo

  11. Production of enterotoxin by Salmonella exposed to X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szulc, M.; Pliszka, A.; Peconek, J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of irradiation on enterotoxin production by Salmonella enteritidis and S. typhimurium was evaluated using skin test elaborated by Tschaepe and others. The strains examined appeared to be equally sensitive to X rays. A dose of 100 Gy decreased the number of bacterial cells at approx. 10 D 10 and 200 Gy at 2-3 D 10 . Irradiation with 100 and 200 Gy of X rays did not influence enterotoxin production by microorganisms which were resistant to the process of irradiation. (author)

  12. Produção de enterotoxinas e da toxina da síndrome do choque tóxico por cepas de Staphylococcus aureus isoladas na mastite bovina Production of enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin by Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nader Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A total of 72 strains of Staphylococcus aureus were examined for the production of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE A, B, C, D and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST-1. The strains were isolated from milk samples from cows with mastitis in dairy herds of São Paulo State, Brazil. Off 72 isolates, 38 (52.8% produced SEA, 38 (52.8% SEB, 32 (44.4% SED, 28 (38.9% SEC and 27 (37.5% TSST-1. From the 72 strains, 66 (91.7% produced, at least, one or more toxin, including TSST-1.

  13. Prevalence of enterotoxigenic Bacillus Cereus and Its enterotoxins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) and enterotoxins in milk and milk products. Design: A random sampling of milk products was carried out. Setting: Market milk and milk products were collected from retail shops in Nairobi and analysed for contamination with ...

  14. Prevalence, antibiotic-resistance properties and enterotoxin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence, antibiotic-resistance properties and enterotoxin gene profile of Bacillus cereus strains isolated from milk-based baby foods. ... Conclusion: Considerable prevalence of resistant and toxigenic B. cereus and high consumption of milk-based infant foods in Iran, represent an important public health issue which ...

  15. Construction of PVX virus-expression vector to express enterotoxin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potato X potyvirus (PVX)-based vector has been comprehensively applied in transient expression system. In order to produce the heterologous proteins more quickly and stably, the ClaI and NotI enzyme sites were introduced into the Enterotoxin fusion gene LTB-ST by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the LTB-ST ...

  16. Superantigen profiles of emm and emm-like typeable and nontypeable pharyngeal streptococcal isolates of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Thangarajan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major virulence factors determining the pathogenicity of streptococcal strains include M protein encoded by emm and emm-like (emmL genes and superantigens. In this study, the distribution of emm, emmL and superantigen genes was analyzed among the streptococcal strains isolated from the patients of acute pharyngitis. Methods The streptococcal strains were isolated from the throat swabs of 1040 patients of acute pharyngitis. The emm and emmL genes were PCR amplified from each strain and sequenced to determine the emm types. The dot-blot hybridization was performed to confirm the pathogens as true emm nontypeable strains. The presence of eleven currently known superantigens was determined in all the strains by multiplex PCR. Results Totally, 124 beta-hemolytic streptococcal strains were isolated and they were classified as group A streptococcus (GAS [15.3% (19/124], group C streptococcus (GCS [59.7% (74/124] and group G streptococcus (GGS [25.0% (31/124]. Among 124 strains, only 35 strains were emm typeable and the remaining 89 strains were emm nontypeable. All GAS isolates were typeable, whereas most of the GCS and GGS strains were nontypeable. These nontypeable strains belong to S. anginosus [75.3% (67/89] and S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis [24.7% (22/89]. The emm and emmL types identified in this study include emm12.0 (28.6%, stG643.0 (28.6%, stC46.0 (17.0%, emm30.11 (8.5%, emm3.0 (2.9%, emm48.0 (5.7%, st3343.0 (2.9%, emm107.0 (2.9% and stS104.2 (2.9%. Various superantigen profiles were observed in typeable as well as nontypeable strains. Conclusions Multiplex PCR analysis revealed the presence of superantigens in all the typeable strains irrespective of their emm types. However, the presence of superantigen genes in emm and emmL nontypeable strains has not been previously reported. In this study, presence of at least one or a combination of superantigen coding genes was identified in all the emm and emmL nontypeable

  17. The TLR2 Antagonist Staphylococcal Superantigen-Like Protein 3 Acts as a Virulence Factor to Promote Bacterial Pathogenicity in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koymans, Kirsten J.; Goldmann, Oliver; Karlsson, Christofer A.Q.; Sital, Wiedjai; Thänert, Robert; Bisschop, Adinda; Vrieling, Manouk; Malmström, Johan; van Kessel, Kok P M; De Haas, Carla J.C.; Van Strijp, Jos A.G.; Medina, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is important in the initiation of immune responses and subsequent instigation of adaptive immunity. TLR2 recognizes bacterial lipoproteins and plays a central role in the host defense against bacterial infections, including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

  18. Determination of staphylococcal exotoxins, SCCmec types, and genetic relatedness of Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jung-Ho; Ahn, Kuk Ju; Lim, Suk-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The Staphylococcus (S.) intermedius group (SIG) has been a main research subject in recent years. S. pseudintermedius causes pyoderma and otitis in companion animals as well as foodborne diseases. To prevent SIG-associated infection and disease outbreaks, identification of both staphylococcal exotoxins and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types among SIG isolates may be helpful. In this study, it was found that a single isolate (one out of 178 SIG isolates examined) harbored the canine enterotoxin SEC gene. However, the S. intermedius exfoliative toxin gene was found in 166 SIG isolates although the S. aureus-derived exfoliative toxin genes, such as eta, etb and etd, were not detected. SCCmec typing resulted in classifying one isolate as SCCmec type IV, 41 isolates as type V (including three S. intermedius isolates), and 10 isolates as non-classifiable. Genetic relatedness of all S. pseudintermedius isolates recovered from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Strains having the same band patterns were detected in S. pseudintermedius isolates collected at 13 and 18 months, suggesting possible colonization and/or expansion of a specific S. pseudintermedius strain in a veterinary hospital. PMID:21897094

  19. Superantigenic activity of emm3 Streptococcus pyogenes is abrogated by a conserved, naturally occurring smeZ mutation.

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    Claire E Turner

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes M/emm3 strains have been epidemiologically linked with enhanced infection severity and risk of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS, a syndrome triggered by superantigenic stimulation of T cells. Comparison of S. pyogenes strains causing STSS demonstrated that emm3 strains were surprisingly less mitogenic than other emm-types (emm1, emm12, emm18, emm28, emm87, emm89 both in vitro and in vivo, indicating poor superantigenic activity. We identified a 13 bp deletion in the superantigen smeZ gene of all emm3 strains tested. The deletion led to a premature stop codon in smeZ, and was not present in other major emm-types tested. Expression of a functional non-M3-smeZ gene successfully enhanced mitogenic activity in emm3 S. pyogenes and also restored mitogenic activity to emm1 and emm89 S. pyogenes strains where the smeZ gene had been disrupted. In contrast, the M3-smeZ gene with the 13 bp deletion could not enhance or restore mitogenicity in any of these S. pyogenes strains, confirming that M3-smeZ is non-functional regardless of strain background. The mutation in M3-smeZ reduced the potential for M3 S. pyogenes to induce cytokines in human tonsil, but not during invasive infection of superantigen-sensitive mice. Notwithstanding epidemiological associations with STSS and disease severity, emm3 strains have inherently poor superantigenicity that is explained by a conserved mutation in smeZ.

  20. Nematode Infections Are Risk Factors for Staphylococcal Infection in Children

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    Sandra F Moreira-Silva

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Nematode infection may be a risk factor for pyogenic liver abscess in children and we hypothesized that the immunomodulation induced by those parasites would be a risk factor for any staphylococcal infection in children. The present study was designed to compare, within the same hospital, the frequency of intestinal nematodes and Toxocara infection in children with and without staphylococcal infections. From October 1997 to February 1998, 80 children with staphylococcal infection and 110 children with other diseases were submitted to fecal examination, serology for Toxocara sp., evaluation of plasma immunoglobulin levels, and eosinophil counts. Mean age, gender distribution, birthplace, and socioeconomic conditions did not differ significantly between the two groups. Frequency of intestinal nematodes and positive serology for Toxocara, were remarkably higher in children with staphylococcal infections than in the non-staphylococcal group. There was a significant correlation between intestinal nematodes or Toxocara infection and staphylococcal infection in children, reinforced by higher eosinophil counts and higher IgE levels in these children than in the control group. One possible explanation for this association would be the enhancement of bacterial infection by the immunomodulation induced by helminth infections, due to strong activation of the Th2 subset of lymphocytes by antigens from larvae and adult worms.

  1. Stimulation of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin formation by caffeine and theobromine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, R G; Nolan, L L

    1981-01-01

    In the presence of 100 micrograms of caffeine per ml or 200 micrograms of theobromine per ml, sporulation of Clostridium perfringens NCTC 8679 rose from less than 1 to 80 or 85%. Enterotoxin concentration increased from undetectable levels to 450 micrograms/mg of cell extract protein. Heat-resistant spore levels increased from less than 1,000 to between 1 X 10(7) and 2 X 10(7)/ml. These effects were partially reversible by the addition of adenosine or thymidine. In the case of NCTC 8238, caffeine and theobromine caused a three- to fourfold increase in the percentages of cells possessing refractile spores and a similar increase in enterotoxin concentration. Heat-resistant spore levels, however, were unaffected. Inosine was ineffective in promoting sporulation in NCTC 8679. PMID:6271685

  2. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus strains producing enterotoxin A and B

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    Safiyeh Abbasi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a gram positive coccus which is able to cause different kinds of infection in certain condition. The function of this bacteria is to provide the conditions for the invasion of it to the host with the secretion of different sorts of toxins such as Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin, including important virulence factors that super antigens are all factors digestive inconvenience. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin-secreting toxins such conditions provides invasion of host genes. There are different types of SE, but type A enterotoxin (SEA and type B enterotoxin (SEB are the most important types. Therefore, in this study, the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus toxin-producing enterotoxin genes (SEB, SEA in clinical strains isolated from patients in teaching hospitals of Shahrekord city, Iran, were studied. Methods: This cross-sectional and descriptive study, which was conducted from May 2014 to December 2014. A hundred and ten isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from patients collected over a period of 8 months and were first identified using standard biochemical methods and laboratory. Using standard methods and laboratory tests were identified and compared with the antibiotic oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentration were determined by broth micro dilution, and then they were assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique. Results: The results indicated that, 110 samples of dairy products infected by Staphylococcus aureus were detected. Two cases (1.8% of these infected samples were carrying both enterotoxin A and enterotoxin B genes. The frequencies of enterotoxin A genes were twenty-six cases (23/6% and The frequencies of enterotoxin B genes were two cases (1/8%, respectively. Conclusion: The detection of enterotoxin A and enterotoxin B genes, shows the most important role they have in bringing about superinfection. The detection of enterotoxin A and B genes, shows the most important role they have in

  3. Profilaxis, immunoprophylaxis and therapy of staphylococcal mastitis

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    Vakanjac Slobodanka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation of the mammary gland, mastitis, in cows presents one of the most acute problems in intensive milk production, incurring huge economic losses which reach from 20-80% even in developed countries in the past decade. On the grounds of the programme of the respective Ministry, the Veterinary Service of the Republic of Serbia is obliged to monitor, detect, curb and control infective inflammation of the mammary gland caused by staphylococcus and streptococcus. Long-term different approaches to mastitis treatment did not result in the required solution, so that the problem of mastitis is still present and acute. In order to prevent the infiltration of the pathogenic cause into the mammary gland, its populating and multiplication, it is necessary to maintain constant and regular controls of milk, as well as undertake of preventive and therapeutic measures aimed at reducing the incidence of mastitis. Immunization and immunotherapy of mastitis are new and very interesting areas for scientific investigations and work. In the recent decades vaccines against staphylococcal mastitis are being successfully developed, whose success is reflected in the reduced incidence of clinical and subcilinical mastitis.

  4. Assessment of Enterotoxin Production and Cross-Contamination of Staphylococcus aureus between Food Processing Materials and Ready-To-Eat Cooked Fish Paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Charles Nkufi; Hong, Sung-Sam; Wang, Jun; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated Staphylococcus aureus growth and subsequent staphylococcal enterotoxin A production in tryptone soy broth and on ready-to-eat cooked fish paste at 12 to 37 °C, as well as cross-contamination between stainless steel, polyethylene, and latex glove at room temperature. A model was developed using Barany and Roberts's growth model, which satisfactorily described the suitable growth of S. aureus with R(2)-adj from 0.94 to 0.99. Except at 12 °C, S. aureus cells in TSB presented a lag time lower (14.64 to 1.65 h), grew faster (0.08 to 0.31 log CFU/h) and produced SEA at lower cell density levels (5.65 to 6.44 log CFU/mL) compare to those inoculated on cooked fish paste with data of 16.920 to 1.985 h, 0.02 to 0.23 log CFU/h, and 6.19 to 7.11 log CFU/g, respectively. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA) visual immunoassay test showed that primary SEA detection varied considerably among different storage temperature degrees and media. For example, it occurred only during exponential phase at 30 and 37 °C in TSB, but in cooked fish paste it took place at late exponential phase of S. aureus growth at 20 and 25 °C. The SEA detection test was negative on presence of S. aureus on cooked fish paste stored at 12 and 15 °C, although cell density reached level of 6.12 log CFU/g at 15 °C. Cross-contamination expressed as transfer rate of S. aureus from polyethylene surface to cooked fish paste surface was slower than that observed with steel surface to cooked fish paste under same conditions. These results provide helpful information for controlling S. aureus growth, SEA production and cross-contamination during processing of cooked fish paste. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Heat-Labile Enterotoxin: Beyond G M1 Binding

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    Benjamin Mudrak

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. One major virulence factor released by ETEC is the heat-labile enterotoxin LT, which is structurally and functionally similar to cholera toxin. LT consists of five B subunits carrying a single catalytically active A subunit. LTB binds the monosialoganglioside GM1, the toxin’s host receptor, but interactions with A-type blood sugars and E. coli lipopolysaccharide have also been identified within the past decade. Here, we review the regulation, assembly, and binding properties of the LT B-subunit pentamer and discuss the possible roles of its numerous molecular interactions.

  6. Cloning the enterotoxin gene from Clostridium perfringens type A

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanejko, Lesley Ann.

    1991-01-01

    A C. perfringens type A genomic library was constructed in E. coli by banking overlapping 6-10 kbp Hind III fragments of chromosomal DNA from the enterotoxin (CPE) positive strain NCTC 8239 into the pUC derived vector pHG165. The library was screened by colony hybridization with a degenerate 26 bp oligonucleotide probe, derived from the amino acid sequence CPE9_17A. complex mixture of plasmid DNA was isolated from the only hybridization positive clone. A second round of screening picked out a...

  7. Growth and enterotoxin production of Bacillus cereus in cow, goat, and sheep milk

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    Lenka Necidová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare Bacillus cereus growth rates and diarrhoeal enterotoxin production in raw and pasteurized goat, sheep, and cow milk in terms of storage conditions. Milk samples were inoculated with B. cereus (CCM 2010, which produces diarrhoeal enterotoxins. Enterotoxin production was tested by ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, and the count of B. cereus was determined by the plate method. With raw cow milk, B. cereus growth and enterotoxin production can be completely suppressed; in raw goat and sheep milk, enterotoxin was produced at 22 °C. In pasteurized cow, goat, and sheep milk, the B. cereus count increased under all storage conditions, with more rapid growth being observed at 15 °C (sheep milk and 22 °C (cow and goat milk. Enterotoxin presence was detected at 15 °C and 22 °C, and with pasteurized cow milk also at 8 °C. Our model experiments have determined that B. cereus multiplication and subsequent enterotoxin production depend on storage temperature and milk type.

  8. Evolutionary Origin of the Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolo, Joana; Worning, Peder; Nielsen, Jesper Boye

    2017-01-01

    , many steps are still missing from this evolutionary history. In particular, it is not known how mecA was incorporated into the mobile element SCC prior to dissemination among Staphylococcus aureus and other pathogenic staphylococcal species. To gain insights into the possible contribution of several...

  9. Congenital staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in a premature infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveman, LM; Fleer, A; de Vries, LS; Gerards, LJ

    2004-01-01

    A case of congenital staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) with fatal outcome in a premature infant is reported. An intrauterine infection with Staphylococcus aureus was probably the cause for the fulminant course of the disease. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment, the infant died within 24

  10. Effects of a superantigen-antibody recombinant fusion protein (r-C242 Fab-SEA) on toxicological responses in the anaesthetised rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilbaeck, Nils-Gunnar; Gunnarsson, Kjell; Persson, Robert; Lindh, Ulf; Staaalhandske, Torbjoern

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to study toxin-induced effects on physiological parameters in the rabbit and whether these parameters show dose-response and co-variation after administration of a recombinant fusion protein between staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) and the Fab fragment of an antibody. Rabbits are very sensitive to SE toxins and the cardiovascular and immune effects are similar to those observed in septic shock in man. The test compound, r-C242 Fab-SEA, was administered intravenously to anaesthetised New Zealand white rabbits at doses in the range of 0.00005-50 μg/kg. All rabbits were checked for titres of anti-SEA antibodies before entering the experiment, since they could neutralise the effect of the test compound. Heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature were continuously monitored before and during 6 h after dosing. Immediately before the start of administration and 3 and 6 h during the experiment, blood gases (pO 2 and pCO 2 ), pH, haematology, clinical chemistry, cytokine response (TNF-α) and trace elements (Mn, Cu, Zn, Se, Ag, Cd, Hg and Pb) were measured. No mortality occurred, but at 50 μg/kg severe adverse clinical signs developed. The decrease in blood pressure was weakly dose-related. Heart rate, ECG, body temperature, pCO 2 and pH were not affected by the treatment. pO 2 tended to increase as a function of time, but not in relation to dose. WBC and PLT decreased dose dependently. TNF-α was not affected by the treatment. The major effects on clinical chemistry were a dose-dependent increase in AST and creatinine. Potassium and urea showed dose dependent increases, mainly at higher doses, though these changes were of less value for drug selection purposes. Trace element changes were observed, including an increase in Mn and a decrease of Zn at all doses. The Cu/Zn ratio decreased below normal at low doses, whereas at high doses in which adverse effects developed, it increased above normal. Post mortem examination revealed minimal to moderate

  11. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces Fas-dependent activation-induced cell death in superantigen-primed T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, Iris A; Nagarkatti, Mitzi [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Nagarkatti, Prakash S [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, PO Box 980613, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0613 (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Immune response against a foreign antigen is characterized by a growth phase, in which antigen-specific T cells clonally expand, followed by a decline phase in which the activated T cells undergo apoptosis, a process termed activation-induced cell death (AICD). In the current study, we have investigated the phase at which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) acts to downregulate the antigen-specific T cell response. To this end, C57BL/6 +/+ mice were injected with staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) into the footpads (10 {mu}g/footpad), and simultaneously treated with TCDD (10 or 50 {mu}g/kg intraperitoneally). At various time points, the draining lymph node (LN) cells were analyzed for SEA-activated T cells. The data demonstrated that in C57BL/6 +/+ mice, TCDD treatment did not alter the growth phase but facilitated the decline phase of SEA-reactive T cells. TCDD caused a significant decrease in the percentage and absolute numbers of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} SEA-responsive T cells expressing V{beta}3{sup +} and V{beta}11{sup +} but did not affect SEA-nonresponsive V{beta}8{sup +} T cells. Upon in vitro culture, TCDD-exposed SEA-immunized LN cells exhibited increased levels of apoptosis when compared with the vehicle controls. When Fas-deficient (C57BL/6 lpr/lpr) or Fas ligand defective (C57BL/6 gld/gld) mice were treated with TCDD, they failed to exhibit a decrease in percentage and cellularity of SEA-reactive T cells, thereby suggesting a role of Fas-Fas ligand interactions in the TCDD-induced downregulation of SEA-reactive T cell response. The resistance to TCDD-induced decrease in T cell responsiveness to SEA seen in Fas- and FasL-mutant mice was neither due to decreased aryl hydrocabon receptor (AhR) expression nor to altered T cell responsiveness to SEA. The current study demonstrates that TCDD does not prevent T cell activation, but prematurely induces Fas-based AICD, which may contribute to the deletion of antigen-primed T cells. (orig.)

  12. Distinct cytokine profiles of circulating mononuclear cells stimulated with Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A in vitro during early and late episodes of chronic osteomyelitis

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    Gabriella Freitas Ferreira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the cytokine profile of peripheral mononuclear cells from chronic osteomyelitis (OST patients following in vitro stimulation with staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA. We demonstrate that stimulation with SEA induced prominent lymphocyte proliferation and high levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-4 and IL-10 secretion in both OST and non-infected individuals (NI. Even though stimulation with SEA had no impact on IL-6 production in either patient group, the baseline level of IL-6 production by cells from OST patients was always significantly less than that produced by cells from NI. After classifying the osteomyelitic episodes based on the time after the last reactivation event as "early" (1-4 months or "late" osteomyelitis (5-12 months, we found that increased levels of TNF-α and IL-4 in combination with decreased levels of IL-6 were observed in the early episodes. By contrast, increased levels of IL-10, IL-2 and IL-6 were hallmarks of late episodes. Our data demonstrate that early osteomyelitic episodes are accompanied by an increased frequency of "high producers" of TNF-α and IL-4, whereas late events are characterised by increased frequencies of "high producers" of IL-10, IL-6 and IL-2. These findings demonstrate the distinct cytokine profiles in chronic osteomyelitis, with a distinct regulation of IL-6 production during early and late episodes.

  13. Bacteriophage-Derived Peptidase CHAPK Eliminates and Prevents Staphylococcal Biofilms

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    Mark Fenton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New antibacterial agents are urgently needed for the elimination of biofilm-forming bacteria that are highly resistant to traditional antimicrobial agents. Proliferation of such bacteria can lead to significant economic losses in the agri-food sector. This study demonstrates the potential of the bacteriophage-derived peptidase, CHAPK, as a biocidal agent for the rapid disruption of biofilm-forming staphylococci, commonly associated with bovine mastitis. Purified CHAPK applied to biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus DPC5246 completely eliminated the staphylococcal biofilms within 4 h. In addition, CHAPK was able to prevent biofilm formation by this strain. The CHAPK lysin also reduced S. aureus in a skin decolonization model. Our data demonstrates the potential of CHAPK as a biocidal agent for prevention and treatment of biofilm-associated staphylococcal infections or as a decontaminating agent in the food and healthcare sectors.

  14. Repurposing ebselen for treatment of multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-06-26

    Novel antimicrobials and new approaches to developing them are urgently needed. Repurposing already-approved drugs with well-characterized toxicology and pharmacology is a novel way to reduce the time, cost, and risk associated with antibiotic innovation. Ebselen, an organoselenium compound, is known to be clinically safe and has a well-known pharmacology profile. It has shown potent bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA). We demonstrated that ebselen acts through inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequently inhibited toxin production in MRSA. Additionally, ebselen was remarkably active and significantly reduced established staphylococcal biofilms. The therapeutic efficacy of ebselen was evaluated in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infections. Ebselen 1% and 2% significantly reduced the bacterial load and the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in MRSA USA300 skin lesions. Furthermore, it acts synergistically with traditional antimicrobials. This study provides evidence that ebselen has great potential for topical treatment of MRSA skin infections and lays the foundation for further analysis and development of ebselen as a potential treatment for multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections.

  15. Effect of Sodium Chloride and pH on Enterotoxin C Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genigeorgis, Constantin; Foda, Mohamed S.; Mantis, Antony; Sadler, Walter W.

    1971-01-01

    Growth and production of enterotoxin C by Staphylococcus aureus strain 137 in 3% + 3% protein hydrolysate powder N-Z Amine NAK broths with 0 to 12% NaCl and an initial pH of 4.00 to 9.83 were studied during an 8-day incubation period at 37 C. Growth was initiated at pH values as low as 4.00 and as high as 9.83 at 0% salt level as long as the inoculum contained at least 108 cells per ml. Rate of growth decreased as the NaCl concentration was increased gradually to 12%. Enterotoxin C was produced in broths inoculated with 108 cells per ml and above and having initial pH ranges of 4.00 to 9.83, 4.40 to 9.43, 4.50 to 8.55 and respective NaCl concentrations of 0, 4, and 8%. In the presence of 10% NaCl, the pH range supporting enterotoxin C production was 5.45 to 7.30 for an inoculum level of 108 cells per ml and 6.38 to 7.30 for 3.6 × 106 cells per ml. In repeated experiments in which the inoculum contained 108 cells per ml, we failed to demonstrate enterotoxin C production in broths with 12% NaCl and a pH range of 4.50 to 8.55 and concentrated up to 14 times. The effect of NaCl on enterotoxin C production followed the same pattern as its effect on enterotoxin B production. As the concentration of NaCl increased from 0 to 10%, yields of enterotoxin B and C decreased to undetectable amounts. PMID:5574320

  16. Lactobacilli require physical contact to reduce staphylococcal TSST-1 secretion and vaginal epithelial inflammatory response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Younes, Jessica A.; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms can be found on vaginal epithelia, secreting toxins and causing inflammation. The co-vaginal species Lactobacillus can alter staphylococcal-induced epithelial secretion of inflammatory cytokines and quench staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion. It is

  17. Sub-inhibitory stress with essential oil affects enterotoxins production and essential oil susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Barbara; Mancini, Simone; Pistelli, Luisa; Najar, Basma; Cerri, Domenico; Fratini, Filippo

    2018-03-01

    Fourteen wild strains of Staphylococcus aureus positive for gene sea were tested for enterotoxins production and the minimum inhibitory concentration of Leptospermum scoparium, Origanum majorana, Origanum vulgare, Satureja montana and Thymus vulgaris essential oils (EOs) were determined. After this trial, bacteria stressed with sub-inhibitory concentration of each EO were tested for enterotoxins production by an immunoenzymatic assay and resistance to the same EO. Oregano oil exhibited the highest antibacterial activity followed by manuka and thyme oils. After the exposure to a sub-inhibitory concentration of EOs, strains displayed an increased sensitivity in more than 95% of the cases. After treatment with oregano and marjoram EOs, few strains showed a modified enterotoxins production, while 43% of the strains were no longer able to produce enterotoxins after treatment with manuka EO. The results obtained in this study highlight that exposure to sub-inhibitory concentration of EO modifies strains enterotoxins production and EOs susceptibility profile.

  18. Receptors and cGMP signalling mechanism for E. coli enterotoxin in opossum kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, L.R.; Krause, W.J.; Freeman, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Receptors for the heat-stable enterotoxin produced by Escherichia coli were found in the kidney and intestine of the North American opossum and in cultured renal cell lines. The enterotoxin markedly increased guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) production in slices of kidney cortex and medulla, in suspensions of intestinal mucosa, and in the opossum kidney (OK) and rat kangaroo kidney (PtK-2) cell lines. In contrast, atrial natriuretic factor elicited much smaller increases in cGMP levels of kidney, intestine, or cultured kidney cell lines. The enterotoxin receptors in OK cells had a molecular mass of approximately 120 kDa when measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of receptors crosslinked with 125 I-enterotoxin. The occurrence of receptors for the E. coli peptide in OK implies that these receptors may be involved in the regulation of renal tubular function in the opossum. E. coli enterotoxin caused a much larger increase in urine cGMP excretion than did atrial natriuretic factor when these peptides were injected intravenously into opossums. However, atrial natriuretic factor elicited a marked diuresis, natriuresis, and increased urinary excretion of calcium, phosphate, potassium, and magnesium. In contrast, the enterotoxin did not acutely influence OK fluid and electrolyte excretion. Thus the substantial increase in cGMP synthesis produced by the bacterial peptide in OK cortex and medulla in vitro and the increased renal excretion of cGMP in vivo were not associated with changes in electrolyte or water excretion. Whether cGMP represents a second messenger molecule in the kidney is an interesting question that was raised but not answered in this series of experiments

  19. Organ Culture as a Model System for Studies on Enterotoxin Interactions with the Intestinal Epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Ulver Spangsberg; Hansen, Gert H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies on bacterial enterotoxin-epithelium interactions require model systems capable of mimicking the events occurring at the molecular and cellular levels during intoxication. In this chapter, we describe organ culture as an often neglected alternative to whole-animal experiments or enterocyte......-like cell lines. Like cell culture, organ culture is versatile and suitable for studying rapidly occurring events, such as enterotoxin binding and uptake. In addition, it is advantageous in offering an epithelium with more authentic permeability/barrier properties than any cell line, as well...

  20. Bystander Host Cell Killing Effects of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Shrestha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE binds to claudin receptors, e.g., claudin-4, and then forms a pore that triggers cell death. Pure cultures of host cells that do not express claudin receptors, e.g., fibroblasts, are unaffected by pathophysiologically relevant CPE concentrations in vitro. However, both CPE-insensitive and CPE-sensitive host cells are present in vivo. Therefore, this study tested whether CPE treatment might affect fibroblasts when cocultured with CPE-sensitive claudin-4 fibroblast transfectants or Caco-2 cells. Under these conditions, immunofluorescence microscopy detected increased death of fibroblasts. This cytotoxic effect involved release of a toxic factor from the dying CPE-sensitive cells, since it could be reproduced using culture supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells, particularly Caco-2 cells, were found to contain high levels of membrane vesicles, often containing a CPE species. However, most cytotoxic activity remained in those supernatants even after membrane vesicle depletion, and CPE was not detected in fibroblasts treated with supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Instead, characterization studies suggest that a major cytotoxic factor present in supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells may be a 10- to 30-kDa host serine protease or require the action of that host serine protease. Induction of caspase-3-mediated apoptosis was found to be important for triggering release of the cytotoxic factor(s from CPE-treated sensitive host cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxic factor(s in these supernatants was shown to induce a caspase-3-mediated killing of fibroblasts. This bystander killing effect due to release of cytotoxic factors from CPE-treated sensitive cells could contribute to CPE-mediated disease.

  1. Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Kasper

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs as 'trademark' virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS, how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6 mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC -II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms.

  2. Plain chest film findings of staphylococcal pneumonia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sook Young; Cha, Seong Sook; Kim, Jong Deok; Chung, Duck Hwan

    1991-01-01

    Infants during the first year of life are particularly prone to the development of staphylococcal pneumonia: in fact, it is the commonest bacterial cause of death due to respiratory tract infection in this age group. Pneumatoceles within the lungs and pleural complication such as pleural effusion, empyema, pyopneumothorax and pneumothorax are characteristics in this pneumonia. Retrospectively we reviewed 22 patients of staphylococcal pneumonia in children diagnosed by pleural fluid or blood culture, throat suction cytology, or culture of pus from thigh, joint fluid or ear discharge in one or combining them during the recent 5 years from January, 1985 to December, 1989 and obtained the following results: Male to female ratio was 1:1 and peak incidence was between 1 month and 1 year of age (45.5% : 10/22). Fever, coughing and dyspnea were the predominant symptoms, and duration of symptoms was 4 to 7 dyas in 59%. Plain chest film findings on admission day: 1) 27.3% (6/22) showed the lesion almost entirely restricted to the lung with ratio of 2:1 of right and left involvement and these were treated without complication. 2) Only one case (4.5%) showed pneumatoceles combined with pneumonic infiltration and pleural effusion. 3) Pleural lesion occurred in 72.7% (16/22) : 22.7% (5/22) without pneumonic infiltration and 50% (11/22) with pneumonic infiltration. They were empyema, pyopneumothorax, and pleural effusion in descending order. Mortalty was 4.5% (1/22)

  3. Staphylococcal endogenous endophthalmitis in association with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeples, L R; Jones, N P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To describe pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis as a rare infection associated with endogenous endophthalmitis.METHODS A retrospective review of three patients with endogenous endophthalmitis and sepsis due to underlying Staphylococcal vertebral osteomyelitis presenting during a 21-month time period. The ophthalmic and systemic features and management and outcomes are presented.RESULTS One patient developed unilateral endophthalmitis with cervical spine osteomyelitis, Staphylococcus aureus being isolated from blood cultures. The second presented with bilateral endophthalmitis with disseminated Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infection, with thoracic and lumbar discitis and para-spinal abscesses. MRSA was cultured from vitreous, blood, and synovial fluid. Both patients received prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics. Intravitreal antibiotic therapy was used in the second patient. Excellent visual and systemic outcomes were achieved in both cases with no ocular complications. The third patient developed lumbar osteomyelitis following spinal surgery and presented with disseminated S. aureus sepsis including unilateral endogenous endophthalmitis. Despite systemic antibiotics and intensive care the patient died.CONCLUSIONS Endogenous endophthalmitis should be suspected in septic patients developing eye symptoms. Endogenous endophthalmitis with staphylococcal bone infection is a rare but serious condition. Osteomyelitis should be considered as an infective source in any such patient reporting bone pain or reduced spinal mobility. Prompt investigation and treatment can achieve favourable visual and systemic outcomes.

  4. Neonatal staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome: clinical and outbreak containment review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neylon, Orla

    2012-01-31

    Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is a toxin-mediated exfoliating skin condition predominated by desquamation and blistering. Neonatal outbreaks have already been reported; however, our outbreak highlights the potential for SSSS following neonatal health promotion measures such as intra-muscular vitamin K administration and metabolic screening (heel prick) as well as effective case containment measures and the value of staff screening. Between February and June 2007, five confirmed cases of neonatal SSSS were identified in full-term neonates born in an Irish regional maternity hospital. All infants were treated successfully. Analysis of contact and environmental screening was undertaken, including family members and healthcare workers. Molecular typing on isolates was carried out. An outbreak control team (OCT) was assembled and took successful prospective steps to prevent further cases. All five Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested positive for exfoliative toxin A, of which two distinct strains were identified on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. Two cases followed staphylococcal inoculation during preventive measures such as intra-muscular vitamin K administration and metabolic screening (heel prick). None of the neonatal isolates were methicillin resistant. Of 259 hospital staff (70% of staff) screened, 30% were colonised with S. aureus, and 6% were positive for MRSA carriage. This is the first reported outbreak of neonatal SSSS in Ireland. Effective case containment measures and clinical value of OCT is demonstrated. Results of staff screening underlines the need for vigilance and compliance in hand disinfection strategies in maternity hospitals especially during neonatal screening and preventive procedures.

  5. Effects of Bile Acids and Nisin on the Production of Enterotoxin by Clostridium perfringens in a Nutrient-Rich Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miseon Park

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is the second most common cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States, with nearly a million cases each year. C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE, produced during sporulation, damages intestinal epithelial cells by pore formation, which results in watery diarrhea. The effects of low concentrations of nisin and bile acids on sporulation and toxin production were investigated in C. perfringens SM101, which carries an enterotoxin gene on the chromosome, in a nutrient-rich medium. Bile acids and nisin increased production of enterotoxin in cultures; bile acids had the highest effect. Both compounds stimulated the transcription of enterotoxin and sporulation-related genes and production of spores during the early growth phase. They also delayed spore outgrowth and nisin was more inhibitory. Bile acids and nisin enhanced enterotoxin production in some but not all other C. perfringens isolates tested. Low concentrations of bile acids and nisin may act as a stress signal for the initiation of sporulation and the early transcription of sporulation-related genes in some strains of C. perfringens, which may result in increased strain-specific production of enterotoxin in those strains. This is the first report showing that nisin and bile acids stimulated the transcription of enterotoxin and sporulation-related genes in a nutrient-rich bacterial culture medium.

  6. Effects of Bile Acids and Nisin on the Production of Enterotoxin by Clostridium perfringens in a Nutrient-Rich Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miseon; Rafii, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the second most common cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States, with nearly a million cases each year. C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), produced during sporulation, damages intestinal epithelial cells by pore formation, which results in watery diarrhea. The effects of low concentrations of nisin and bile acids on sporulation and toxin production were investigated in C. perfringens SM101, which carries an enterotoxin gene on the chromosome, in a nutrient-rich medium. Bile acids and nisin increased production of enterotoxin in cultures; bile acids had the highest effect. Both compounds stimulated the transcription of enterotoxin and sporulation-related genes and production of spores during the early growth phase. They also delayed spore outgrowth and nisin was more inhibitory. Bile acids and nisin enhanced enterotoxin production in some but not all other C. perfringens isolates tested. Low concentrations of bile acids and nisin may act as a stress signal for the initiation of sporulation and the early transcription of sporulation-related genes in some strains of C. perfringens , which may result in increased strain-specific production of enterotoxin in those strains. This is the first report showing that nisin and bile acids stimulated the transcription of enterotoxin and sporulation-related genes in a nutrient-rich bacterial culture medium.

  7. Use of inactivated E.Coli enterotoxins to enhance respiratory mucosal adjuvanticity during vaccination in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to augment responses to respiratory vaccines in swine, various adjuvants were intranasally co-administered with an antigen to pigs. Detoxified E. coli enterotoxins LTK63 and LTR72 enhanced mucosal and systemic immunity to the model peptide, exhibiting their efficacy as mucosal adjuvants for...

  8. Cloning and Expression of Nano Body Gene against Enterotoxin B of Staphylococcus Aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Tavassoli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Staphylococcus aureus bacteria causes many different diseases by secretion of various enterotoxins. Therefore, it is necessary to develop ways that facilitate the detection of enterotoxins. Nowadays, immunochemical methods which are based on monoclonal antibody technology are used. The heavy chain antibodies that are called VHH or Nano body were found in blood serum of the Camelidae family. The unique properties of this antibody such as their binding to small molecules like toxins make them attractive candidates for the development of immunodiagnostic tests. The present study was done to achieve a VHH molecules against Staphylococcus enterotoxin B. Materials & Methods: Freighting phage library for isolate private Nano bodies against enterotoxin B was done in previous works. Next, pCANTAB 5E vector that consists VHH, extracted from E.coli bacteria strain xl1blue, and after doing PCR process with relative primers, sub cloning in pET21a(+ as an expression vector with cut sites NdeI and XhoI was done. Transformation in E.coli bacteria strain BL21(DE3 was done. Then, the cells effected with IPTG and producing time, and other terms were optimized. Finally, the expression of the protein with SDS-PAGE and western blot techniques was evaluated. Result: For proving cloning of nano body gene in pET21a (+ vector, nucleotide sequence of gene was analyzed, and transforming to E.coli bacteria strain BL21(DE3 was successful. After inspiration, active protein in cell was seen by SDS-PAGE technique and proved by western blot. Conclusion: cloning, sub cloning, and nonabody expression were surveyed in this research. Production of this protein can help to develop new therapeutic methods and produce vaccine against enterotoxin B of Staphylococcus aureus

  9. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in a 4-year-old child: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasnoot, P J; De Vries, A

    2018-01-29

    Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is an exfoliating skin disease which primarily affects children. Differential diagnosis includes toxic epidermal necrolysis, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, epidermolysis bullosa, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome primarily affects children and can cause serious morbidity. In this case report we highlight the case of a 4-year-old Caucasian boy. Diagnostic and therapeutic challenges are discussed. Differential diagnoses are considered and therapy is described and discussed. The latest treatment options are used and described. Successful results are achieved in this case due to timely and correct management. Some therapeutic options are widely used without thorough research bases. This case report highlights staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome and its treatment, and future challenges. Further research is warranted and this case report aims to further research in exfoliating skin disorders.

  10. Early Increases in Superantigen-Specific Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells during Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Infection▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Gabriel; Burzyn, Dalia; Mundiñano, Juliana; Courreges, M. Cecilia; Camicia, Gabriela; Lorenzo, Daniela; Costa, Héctor; Ross, Susan R.; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a milk-borne betaretrovirus that has developed strategies to exploit and subvert the host immune system. Here, we show in a natural model of MMTV infection that the virus causes early and progressive increases in superantigen (SAg)-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) in Peyer's patches (PP). These increases were shown to be dependent on the presence of dendritic cells. CD4+ CD25+ T cells from the PP of infected mice preferentially suppress the proliferative response of T cells to SAg-expressing antigen-presenting cells ex vivo. We investigated the influence of the depletion of CD25+ cells at different stages of the infection. When CD25+ cells were depleted before MMTV infection, an increase in the number of PP SAg-cognate Foxp3− T cells was found at day 6 of infection. Since the SAg response is associated with viral amplification, the possibility exists that Treg cells attenuate the increase in viral load at the beginning of the infection. In contrast, depletion of CD25+ cells once the initial SAg response has developed caused a lower viral load, suggesting that at later stages Treg cells may favor viral persistence. Thus, our results indicated that Treg cells play an important and complex role during MMTV infection. PMID:18495774

  11. Development of a panel of seven duplex real-time PCR assays for detecting 13 streptococcal superantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Peng, Xiaomin; Cui, Shujuan; Shao, Junbin; Zhu, Xuping; Zhang, Daitao; Liang, Huijie; Wang, Quanyi

    2013-07-30

    Streptococcal superantigens (SAgs) are the major virulence factors of infection in humans for group A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria. A panel consisting of seven duplex real-time PCR assays was developed to simultaneously detect 13 streptococcal SAgs and one internal control which may be important in the control of GAS-mediated diseases. Primer and probe sequences were selected based on the highly conserved region from an alignment of nucleotide sequences of the 13 streptococcal SAgs. The reaction conditions of the duplex real-time PCR were optimized and the specificity of the duplex assays was evaluated using SAg positive strains. The limit of detection of the duplex assays was determined by using 10-fold serial dilutions of the DNA of 13 streptococcal SAgs and compared to a conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for evaluating the duplex assays sensitivity. Using the duplex assays, we were able to differentiate between 13 SAgs from Streptococcus strains and other non-Streptococcus bacteria without cross-reaction. On the other hand, the limit of detection of the duplex assays was at least one or two log dilutions lower than that of the conventional PCR. The panel was highly specific (100%) and the limit of detection of these duplex groups was at least ten times lower than that obtained by using a conventional PCR method.

  12. [Enterotoxin genes occurance among S. aureus strains isolated from inpatients and carriers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrynowicz-Paciorek, Maja; Kochman, Maria; Piekarska, Katarzyna; Wyrebiak, Agata; Potracka, Ewa; Leniak-Chmiel, Urszula; Magdziak, Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    We examined 44 inpatients and 66 carriers Staphylococcus aureus strains, isolated in years 2002-2005, for the presence of 18 enterotoxin genes (se/sel) (by PCR), the ability for A-D enterotoxin production (by SET-RPLA) and antibiotic resistance distribution (by disc diffusion method). se/sel genes were detected in 90,9% of all strains, sea (70,5%) and selk and selq (52,3%) - among inpatients strains and egc (65,2%) - among carriers strains were the most frequently se/sel genes found. Positive results of SET-RPLA were consistent with PCR results. There was no correlation observed between antibiotic resistance and se/sel genes distribution among tested S. aureus strains.

  13. The influence of radiation on the enterotoxin and thermoresistant deoxyribo-nuclease production by Staphylococcus sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szulc, M.; Pliszka, A.; Peconek, J.

    1980-01-01

    Six strains of Staph. aureus present in the environment with and without protein were exposed to X rays in the doses range from 1 to 400 Gy. The production of enterotoxin and thermoresistant deoxyribonuclease by enterotoxic strains No 262 and 100 was determined. All the strains showed similar radiosensitivity to X rays. About 1 per cent of protein in the environment exposed to radiation increased the resistance of Staphylococcus strains. The doses of radiation from 1 to 400 Gy did not influence the enterotoxin A and B production by bacteria multiplied from those which had survived the radiation. The irradiation of the strains present in the environment without protein brought about a temporary inhibition of thermoresistant deoxyribonuclease production. (author)

  14. Cloning in Escherichia coli of the enterotoxin gene from Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, L A; Routledge, M N; Stewart, G S

    1989-04-01

    A 26 bp DNA probe has been constructed with minimal degeneracy to the protein sequence for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin. The probe has been hybridized against a 6-10 kb chromosomal bank from C. perfringens 8239, prepared as a HindIII partial digest in pHG165. From this survey a clone has been identified containing a 6.8 kb DNA insert with strong hybridization to the probe. Direct plasmid sequencing has identified a translational reading frame within this clone which correlates with the known protein sequence for the type A enterotoxin. DNA sequences 5' to this open reading frame and containing the putative transcriptional control regions show areas of significant homology with regions upstream from the ATG codon of the tetanus toxin gene.

  15. Selection and characterization of DNA aptamers against Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yukun; Chen, Xiujuan; Duan, Nuo; Wu, Shijia; Wang, Zhouping; Wei, Xinlin; Wang, Yuanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxins from pathogenic bacteria are known as the main reason that can cause the bacterial foodborne diseases. In this study, aptamers that bound to Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin C1 (SEC1) with high affinity and selectivity were generated in vitro by twelve rounds of selection based on magnetic separation technology, with a low-level dissociation constant (Kd) value of 65.14 ± 11.64 nmol/L of aptamer C10. Aptamer-based quantification of SEC1 in the food sample by a graphene oxide (GO)-based method was implemented to investigate the potential of the aptamer against SEC1 with a limit of detection of 6 ng/mL. On the basis of this work, biosensors using the selected SEC1 aptamers as new molecular recognition elements could be applied for innovative determinations of SEC1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. GM1 erythroimmunoassay for detection and titration of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Germani, Y; Bégaud, E; Guesdon, J L; Moreau, J P

    1986-01-01

    A GM1 ganglioside erythroimmunoassay for the detection of heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin (LT) was developed for use in poorly equipped laboratories in developing countries. This assay is based on the immunological similarity between Vibrio cholerae toxin and LT and uses cholera toxin antiserum and sheep anti-rabbit immunoglobulin covalently coupled to sheep erythrocytes as conjugate. This assay has the following advantages over other currently available techniques: the reagents it u...

  17. Estrogen inhibits chloride secretion caused by cholera and Escherichia coli enterotoxins in female rat distal colon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alzamora, Rodrigo

    2011-05-08

    Excessive Cl(-) secretion is the driving force for secretory diarrhea. 17β-Estradiol has been shown to inhibit Cl(-) secretion in rat distal colon through a nongenomic pathway. We examined whether 17β-estradiol inhibits Cl(-) secretion in an animal model of secretory diarrhea and the downstream effectors involved. The effect of 17β-estradiol on cholera toxin and heat-stable enterotoxin induced Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosal sheets was studied by current-voltage clamping. Selective permeabilization of apical or basolateral membranes with amphotericin B or nystatin was used to isolate basolateral K(+) channel and apical Cl(-) channel activity, respectively. 17β-Estradiol dose-dependently inhibited secretory responses to both toxins with IC(50) values of approximately 1nM. This effect was female-gender specific, with no inhibition observed in male tissues. 17β-Estradiol responses were insensitive to the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182,720. 17β-Estradiol exerted its effects downstream of enterotoxin-induced production of second messengers (cAMP and cGMP) but was dependent on PKCδ activation. In nystatin-permeabilized tissues, apical Cl(-) currents were unaffected by 17β-estradiol treatment while basolateral K(+) current was profoundly inhibited by the hormone. This current was sensitive to the specific KCNQ1 channel inhibitors chromanol 293B and HMR-1556. In conclusion, 17β-estradiol inhibits enterotoxin-induced Cl(-) secretion via a PKCδ-dependent mechanism involving inhibition of basolateral KCNQ1 channels. These data elucidate mechanisms of 17β-estradiol inhibition of Cl(-) secretion induced by enterotoxins in intestinal epithelia, which may be relevant for the treatment of diarrheal diseases.

  18. Estrogen inhibits chloride secretion caused by cholera and Escherichia coli enterotoxins in female rat distal colon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alzamora, Rodrigo

    2012-02-01

    Excessive Cl(-) secretion is the driving force for secretory diarrhea. 17beta-Estradiol has been shown to inhibit Cl(-) secretion in rat distal colon through a nongenomic pathway. We examined whether 17beta-estradiol inhibits Cl(-) secretion in an animal model of secretory diarrhea and the downstream effectors involved. The effect of 17beta-estradiol on cholera toxin and heat-stable enterotoxin induced Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosal sheets was studied by current-voltage clamping. Selective permeabilization of apical or basolateral membranes with amphotericin B or nystatin was used to isolate basolateral K(+) channel and apical Cl(-) channel activity, respectively. 17beta-Estradiol dose-dependently inhibited secretory responses to both toxins with IC(50) values of approximately 1nM. This effect was female-gender specific, with no inhibition observed in male tissues. 17beta-Estradiol responses were insensitive to the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182,720. 17beta-Estradiol exerted its effects downstream of enterotoxin-induced production of second messengers (cAMP and cGMP) but was dependent on PKCdelta activation. In nystatin-permeabilized tissues, apical Cl(-) currents were unaffected by 17beta-estradiol treatment while basolateral K(+) current was profoundly inhibited by the hormone. This current was sensitive to the specific KCNQ1 channel inhibitors chromanol 293B and HMR-1556. In conclusion, 17beta-estradiol inhibits enterotoxin-induced Cl(-) secretion via a PKCdelta-dependent mechanism involving inhibition of basolateral KCNQ1 channels. These data elucidate mechanisms of 17beta-estradiol inhibition of Cl(-) secretion induced by enterotoxins in intestinal epithelia, which may be relevant for the treatment of diarrheal diseases.

  19. Antibiotic resistance and enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus sp. isolates from polluted water in Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    BASSO, ANA P.; MARTINS, PAULA D.; NACHTIGALL, GISELE; SAND, SUELI VAN DER; MOURA, TIANE M. DE; FRAZZON, ANA PAULA G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the species distribution, antibiotic-resistance profile and presence of enterotoxin (SE) genes in staphylococci isolated from the Dilúvio stream in South Brazil. Eighty-eight staphylococci were identified, 93.18% were identified as coagulase-negative (CNS) and 6.82% coagulase-positive (CPS). Fourteen Staphylococcus species were detected and the most frequently were Staphylococcus cohnii (30.48%) and S. haemolyticus (21.95%). Resistance to erythromycin was...

  20. Estrogen inhibits chloride secretion caused by cholera and Escherichia coli enterotoxins in female rat distal colon.

    OpenAIRE

    Alzamora, Rodrigo; O'Mahony, Fiona; Harvey, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Excessive Cl(-) secretion is the driving force for secretory diarrhea. 17β-Estradiol has been shown to inhibit Cl(-) secretion in rat distal colon through a nongenomic pathway. We examined whether 17β-estradiol inhibits Cl(-) secretion in an animal model of secretory diarrhea and the downstream effectors involved. The effect of 17β-estradiol on cholera toxin and heat-stable enterotoxin induced Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosal sheets was studied by current-voltage clamping. Selective per...

  1. Effects of frozen storage on survival of Staphylococcus aureus and enterotoxin production in precooked tuna meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xulei; Su, Yi-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the survival of Staphylococcus aureus in precooked tuna meat for producing canned products during frozen storage (-20 ± 2 °C) as well as its growth and enterotoxin production at 35 to 37 °C after the storage. Samples (50 ± 5 g) of precooked albacore (loin, chunk, and flake) and skipjack (chunk and flake) tuna were inoculated with 5 enterotoxin-producing strains of S. aureus at a level of approximately 3.5 log CFU/g and individually packed in a vacuum bag after 3 h incubation at 35 to 37 °C. Vacuum-packed samples were stored in a freezer (-20 ± 2 °C) for 4 wk. The frozen samples were then thawed in 37 °C circulating water for 2 h and incubated at 35 to 37 °C for 22 h. Populations of S. aureus in all precooked tuna samples decreased slightly (canned tuna within 6 to 8 h of thawing to avoid product spoilage and potential enterotoxin production by S. aureus in contaminated precooked tuna meat. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Immune evasion by a staphylococcal inhibitor of myeloperoxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Nienke W. M.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Guerra, Fermin E.; Fevre, Cindy; Voyich, Jovanka M.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Garcia, Brandon L.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Haas, Pieter-Jan A.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is highly adapted to its host and has evolved many strategies to resist opsonization and phagocytosis. Even after uptake by neutrophils, S. aureus shows resistance to killing, which suggests the presence of phagosomal immune evasion molecules. With the aid of secretome phage display, we identified a highly conserved protein that specifically binds and inhibits human myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major player in the oxidative defense of neutrophils. We have named this protein “staphylococcal peroxidase inhibitor” (SPIN). To gain insight into inhibition of MPO by SPIN, we solved the cocrystal structure of SPIN bound to a recombinant form of human MPO at 2.4-Å resolution. This structure reveals that SPIN acts as a molecular plug that prevents H2O2 substrate access to the MPO active site. In subsequent experiments, we observed that SPIN expression increases inside the neutrophil phagosome, where MPO is located, compared with outside the neutrophil. Moreover, bacteria with a deleted gene encoding SPIN showed decreased survival compared with WT bacteria after phagocytosis by neutrophils. Taken together, our results demonstrate that S. aureus secretes a unique proteinaceous MPO inhibitor to enhance survival by interfering with MPO-mediated killing. PMID:28808028

  3. Regional outbreak of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jeong Do

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS is a relatively uncommon superficial blistering skin disease that is due to Staphylococcus aureus. We had experienced a regional outbreak of SSSS over 3 years in healthy children. Methods : We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of those patients diagnosed as SSSS. Most of neonatal cases were nosocomial infections and excluded from the analysis. The clinical features, laboratory findings, the isolation and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus, the antibiotic management and other supportive treatments were analyzed. Results : Fifty-five patients with SSSS were admitted to our hospital from October 2001 to September 2004. The median age of patients was 3.0 years. Of the 55 patients, 9 were the generalized type, 13 were the intermediate type and 33 were the scarletiniform rash. All the patients were living in neighborhood of the Jinju area. S. aureus were isolated from 9 of the patients and all of the isolated S. aureus were methicillin resistant. All the patients except two were treated with intravenous flocloxacillin or nafcillin and/or cefotaxime. All the patients recovered during the follow-up period of 2 to 3 weeks. Conclusion : We experienced a regional outbreak of SSSS in previous healthy children. Further study for finding the carriers of S. aureus caused SSSS and preventing the spread of this disease is needed. Additionally, guidelines for treating SSSS due to methicillin resistant S. aureus should be established.

  4. Immune evasion by a staphylococcal inhibitor of myeloperoxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Jong, Nienke W. M.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Guerra, Fermin E.; Nijland, Reindert; Fevre, Cindy; Voyich, Jovanka M.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Garcia, Brandon L.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Haas, Pieter-Jan A.

    2017-08-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is highly adapted to its host and has evolved many strategies to resist opsonization and phagocytosis. Even after uptake by neutrophils, S. aureus shows resistance to killing, which suggests the presence of phagosomal immune evasion molecules. With the aid of secretome phage display, we identified a highly conserved protein that specifically binds and inhibits human myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major player in the oxidative defense of neutrophils. We have named this protein “staphylococcal peroxidase inhibitor” (SPIN). To gain insight into inhibition of MPO by SPIN, we solved the cocrystal structure of SPIN bound to a recombinant form of human MPO at 2.4-Å resolution. This structure reveals that SPIN acts as a molecular plug that prevents H2O2 substrate access to the MPO active site. In subsequent experiments, we observed that SPIN expression increases inside the neutrophil phagosome, where MPO is located, compared with outside the neutrophil. Moreover, bacteria with a deleted gene encoding SPIN showed decreased survival compared with WT bacteria after phagocytosis by neutrophils. Taken together, our results demonstrate that S. aureus secretes a unique proteinaceous MPO inhibitor to enhance survival by interfering with MPO-mediated killing.

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance of Staphylococcal Strains Isolated from Various Pathological Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Mihaela SIMON

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The optimal choice of antimicrobial therapy is an important problem in hospital environment in which the selection of resistant and virulent strains easy occurs. S. aureus and especially MRSA(methicillin-resistant S. aureus creates difficulties in both treatment and prevention of nosocomial infections. Aim: The purpose of this study is to determine the sensitivity and the resistance to chemotherapy of staphylococci strains isolated from various pathological products. Material and Method: We identified Staphylococccus species after morphological appearance, culture properties, the production of coagulase, hemolisines and the enzyme activity. The susceptibility tests were performed on Mueller-Hinton medium according to CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: The strains were: MSSA (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (74%, MRSA (8%, MLS B (macrolides, lincosamides and type B streptogramines resistance (12% and MRSA and MLS B (6%. MRSA strains were more frequently isolated from sputum. MRSA associated with the MLS B strains were more frequently isolated from pus. MLS B strains were more frequently isolated from sputum and throat secretions. All S. aureus strains were susceptible to vancomycin and teicoplanin. Conclusions: All staphylococcal infections require resistance testing before treatment. MLS B shows a high prevalence among strains of S. aureus. The association between MLS B and MRSA remains a major problem in Romania.

  6. Effect of low-dose gamma irradiation on enterotoxin-positive strains of Clostridium perfringens Type A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnhart, H.M. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of low-dose gamma irradiation on selected enterotoxin producing strains of Clostridium perfringens Type A was studied. The radioresistance of three strains NCTC-8239, NCTC-10239 and NCTC-8798 in 0.1 percent peptone water, beef gravy and ground beef was determined for both vegetative cells and spores. D 10 values were approximately 30 Krad in 0.1 percent peptone water and 175 Krad in beef menstruums. D 10 values for spores were approximately 250 Krad in 0.1 percent peptone water and 335 Krad in beef. Low-level irradiation induced a 2 hr lag for cell recovery at 37 0 C following irradiation though this was strain dependent. Heat resistance of vegetative cells decreased following irradiation, although one strain was stimulated in growth response and unaltered in its heat resistance. Spore activation and germination were not affected by low-level irradiation. Spores were not significantly inactivated at this level. Irradiation had no effect on subsequent survival of vegetative cells stored at cold temperatures. Enterotoxin production by irradiated cultures was not affected by the irradiation treatment. A method for quantitating C. perfringens enterotoxin using crossed-immunoelectrophoresis was developed. It was found that this technique could detect at least .05 g of enterotoxin, could utilize crude enterotoxin preparations and was more sensitive than other methods based on biological activity

  7. Inhibition of Binding of the AB5-Type Enterotoxins LT-I and Cholera Toxin to Ganglioside GM1 by Galactose-Rich Dietary Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.; Widjaja-Greefkes, H.C.A.; Wikselaar, van P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Cholera, travelers' diarrhea, or colibacillosis in pigs can possibly be prevented or attenuated by dietary provision of competitive inhibitors that react with the GM1-binding sites of the enterotoxins cholera toxin (CT), human Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin of serogroup I (LTh-I), and

  8. Staphylococcal biofilm exopolysaccharide protects against Caenorhabditis elegans immune defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Begun

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are leading causes of hospital-acquired infections that have become increasingly difficult to treat due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in these organisms. The ability of staphylococci to produce biofilm is an important virulence mechanism that allows bacteria both to adhere to living and artificial surfaces and to resist host immune factors and antibiotics. Here, we show that the icaADBC locus, which synthesizes the biofilm-associated polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA in staphylococci, is required for the formation of a lethal S. epidermidis infection in the intestine of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Susceptibility to S. epidermidis infection is influenced by mutation of the C. elegans PMK-1 p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase or DAF-2 insulin-signaling pathways. Loss of PIA production abrogates nematocidal activity and leads to reduced bacterial accumulation in the C. elegans intestine, while overexpression of the icaADBC locus in S. aureus augments virulence towards nematodes. PIA-producing S. epidermidis has a significant survival advantage over ica-deficient S. epidermidis within the intestinal tract of wild-type C. elegans, but not in immunocompromised nematodes harboring a loss-of-function mutation in the p38 MAP kinase pathway gene sek-1. Moreover, sek-1 and pmk-1 mutants are equally sensitive to wild-type and icaADBC-deficient S. epidermidis. These results suggest that biofilm exopolysaccharide enhances virulence by playing an immunoprotective role during colonization of the C. elegans intestine. These studies demonstrate that C. elegans can serve as a simple animal model for studying host-pathogen interactions involving staphylococcal biofilm exopolysaccharide and suggest that the protective activity of biofilm matrix represents an ancient conserved function for resisting predation.

  9. Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Producing Staphylococcal aureus: Report of Four Siblings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-producing Staphylococcus aureus results in leukocyte destruction and tissue necrosis (Pediatric Dermatology 2007;24:401). It can be associated with a spectrum of clinical manifestations that range from localized staphylococcal skin infections to sometimes severe necrotizing pneumonia (Clin Infect Dis 1999;29:1128). We report a case of four siblings, three brothers whose atopic dermatitis was complicated by cutaneous lesions and furunculosis, while their 21-month-old sister had a fatal PVL positive staphylococcal pneumonia.

  10. A complex array of Hpr consensus DNA recognition sequences proximal to the enterotoxin gene in Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynestad, S; Iwanejko, L A; Stewart, G S; Granum, P E

    1994-01-01

    Enterotoxin production in Clostridium perfringens is both strain dependent and sporulation associated. Underlying these phenotypic observations must lie a genetic and molecular explanation and the principal keys will be held within the DNA sequence both upstream and downstream of the structural gene cpe. In accordance with the above we have sequenced 4.1 kbp of DNA upstream of cpe in the type strain NCTC 8239. A region of DNA extending up to 1.5 kb 5' to cpe is conserved in all enterotoxin-positive strains. This region contains a putative ORF with substantial homology to an ORF in the Salmonella typhimurium IS200 insertion element and, in addition, contains multiple perfect consensus DNA-binding sequences for the Bacillus subtilis transition state regulator Hpr. The detailed structural elements revealed by the sequence analysis are presented and used to develop a new perspective on the molecular basis of enterotoxin production in this important food-poisoning bacterium.

  11. How do the rotavirus NSP4 and bacterial enterotoxins lead differently to diarrhea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseur Monique

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rotavirus is the major cause of infantile gastroenteritis and each year causes 611 000 deaths worldwide. The virus infects the mature enterocytes of the villus tip of the small intestine and induces a watery diarrhea. Diarrhea can occur with no visible tissue damage and, conversely, the histological lesions can be asymptomatic. Rotavirus impairs activities of intestinal disaccharidases and Na+-solute symports coupled with water transport. Maldigestion of carbohydrates and their accumulation in the intestinal lumen as well as malabsorption of nutrients and a concomitant inhibition of water reabsorption can lead to a malabsorption component of diarrhea. Since the discovery of the NSP4 enterotoxin, diverse hypotheses have been proposed in favor of an additional secretion component in the pathogenesis of diarrhea. Rotavirus induces a moderate net chloride secretion at the onset of diarrhea, but the mechanisms appear to be quite different from those used by bacterial enterotoxins that cause pure secretory diarrhea. Rotavirus failed to stimulate Cl- secretion in crypt, whereas it stimulated Cl- reabsorption in villi, questioning, therefore, the origin of net Cl- secretion. A solution to this riddle was that intestinal villi do in fact secrete chloride as a result of rotavirus infection. Also, the overall chloride secretory response is regulated by a phospholipase C-dependent calcium signaling pathway induced by NSP4. However, the overall response is weak, suggesting that NSP4 may exert both secretory and subsequent anti-secretory actions, as did carbachol, hence limiting Cl- secretion. All these characteristics provide the means to make the necessary functional distinction between viral NSP4 and bacterial enterotoxins.

  12. Suppression of colorectal tumorigenesis by recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, You; Ye, Tao; Wang, Hui-Peng; Zhao, Jia-Ying; Chen, Wen-Jie; Wang, Xin; Shen, Chen-Xia; Wu, Yi-Bin; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 (BFT-2, or Fragilysin) on colorectal tumorigenesis in mice induced by azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS). METHODS Recombinant proBFT-2 was expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta (DE3) and BFT-2 was obtained and tested for its biological activity via colorectal adenocarcinoma cell strains SW-480. Seventy C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into a blank (BC; n = 10), model (AD; n = 20), model + low-dos...

  13. An Enterotoxin-Like Binary Protein from Pseudomonas protegens with Potent Nematicidal Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun-Zhi; Siehl, Daniel L; Hou, Zhenglin; Rosen, Barbara; Oral, Jarred; Taylor, Christopher G; Wu, Gusui

    2017-10-01

    Soil microbes are a major food source for free-living soil nematodes. It is known that certain soil bacteria have evolved systems to combat predation. We identified the nematode-antagonistic Pseudomonas protegens strain 15G2 from screening of microbes. Through protein purification we identified a binary protein, designated Pp-ANP, which is responsible for the nematicidal activity. This binary protein inhibits Caenorhabditis elegans growth and development by arresting larvae at the L1 stage and killing older-staged worms. The two subunits, Pp-ANP1a and Pp-ANP2a, are active when reconstituted from separate expression in Escherichia coli The binary toxin also shows strong nematicidal activity against three other free-living nematodes ( Pristionchus pacificus , Panagrellus redivivus , and Acrobeloides sp.), but we did not find any activity against insects and fungi under test conditions, indicating specificity for nematodes. Pp-ANP1a has no significant identity to any known proteins, while Pp-ANP2a shows ∼30% identity to E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) subunit A and cholera toxin (CT) subunit A. Protein modeling indicates that Pp-ANP2a is structurally similar to CT/LT and likely acts as an ADP-ribosyltransferase. Despite the similarity, Pp-ANP shows several characteristics distinct from CT/LT toxins. Our results indicate that Pp-ANP is a new enterotoxin-like binary toxin with potent and specific activity to nematodes. The potency and specificity of Pp-ANP suggest applications in controlling parasitic nematodes and open an avenue for further research on its mechanism of action and role in bacterium-nematode interaction. IMPORTANCE This study reports the discovery of a new enterotoxin-like binary protein, Pp-ANP, from a Pseudomonas protegens strain. Pp-ANP shows strong nematicidal activity against Caenorhabditis elegans larvae and older-staged worms. It also shows strong activity on other free-living nematodes ( Pristionchus pacificus , Panagrellus redivivus , and

  14. Molecular Characterization of Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli Collected in 2011-2012, Russia.

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    Nikolay N Kartsev

    Full Text Available Enterotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (ETEC are one of the main causative agents of diarrhea in children especially in developing countries and travel diarrhoea in adults. Pathogenic properties of ETEC associated with their ability to produce a heat-stable (ST and/or heat-labile (LT enterotoxins, as well as adhesins providing bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. This study presents the molecular characterization of the ETEC isolates collected from the Central and Far-Eastern regions of Russia in 2011-2012. It was shown that all ETEC under study (n=18 had the heat-labile enterotoxin-coding operon elt, and had no the genes of the heat-stable enterotoxin operon est. DNA sequencing revealed two types of nucleotide exchanges in the eltB gene coding subunit B of LT in isolates collected from Cherepovets city (Central region, Russia and Vladivostok city (Far-East region, Russia. Only one ETEC strain carried genes cfaA, cfaB, cfaC and cfaD coding adhesion factor CFA/I. Expression of LT in four ETEC isolates in the agglutination reaction was detected using a latex test-system. The isolates were assigned to serogroups O142 (n = 6, О6 (n = 4, О25 (n = 5, О26 (n = 2, and O115 (n = 1. Genotyping showed that they belonged to an earlier described sequence-type ST4 (n = 3 as well as to 11 novel sequence-types ST1043, ST1312, ST3697, ST3707, ST3708, ST3709, ST3710, ST3755, ST3756, ST3757 and ST4509. The ETEC isolates displayed different levels of antimicrobial resistance. Eight isolates were resistant to only one drug, three isolates-to two drugs, one isolate-to three drugs, two isolates-to four antibacterials, and only one isolate to each of the five, six and ten antibacterials simultaneously. Genetic determinants of the resistance to beta-lactams and other classes of antibacterials on the ETEC genomes were identified. There are blaTEM (n = 10, blaCTX-M-15 (n = 1, class 1 integron (n = 3 carrying resistance cassettes to aminoglycosides and

  15. Molecular Characterization of Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli Collected in 2011-2012, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsev, Nikolay N; Fursova, Nadezhda K; Pachkunov, Dmitry M; Bannov, Vasiliy A; Eruslanov, Boris V; Svetoch, Edward A; Dyatlov, Ivan A

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (ETEC) are one of the main causative agents of diarrhea in children especially in developing countries and travel diarrhoea in adults. Pathogenic properties of ETEC associated with their ability to produce a heat-stable (ST) and/or heat-labile (LT) enterotoxins, as well as adhesins providing bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. This study presents the molecular characterization of the ETEC isolates collected from the Central and Far-Eastern regions of Russia in 2011-2012. It was shown that all ETEC under study (n=18) had the heat-labile enterotoxin-coding operon elt, and had no the genes of the heat-stable enterotoxin operon est. DNA sequencing revealed two types of nucleotide exchanges in the eltB gene coding subunit B of LT in isolates collected from Cherepovets city (Central region, Russia) and Vladivostok city (Far-East region, Russia). Only one ETEC strain carried genes cfaA, cfaB, cfaC and cfaD coding adhesion factor CFA/I. Expression of LT in four ETEC isolates in the agglutination reaction was detected using a latex test-system. The isolates were assigned to serogroups O142 (n = 6), О6 (n = 4), О25 (n = 5), О26 (n = 2), and O115 (n = 1). Genotyping showed that they belonged to an earlier described sequence-type ST4 (n = 3) as well as to 11 novel sequence-types ST1043, ST1312, ST3697, ST3707, ST3708, ST3709, ST3710, ST3755, ST3756, ST3757 and ST4509. The ETEC isolates displayed different levels of antimicrobial resistance. Eight isolates were resistant to only one drug, three isolates-to two drugs, one isolate-to three drugs, two isolates-to four antibacterials, and only one isolate to each of the five, six and ten antibacterials simultaneously. Genetic determinants of the resistance to beta-lactams and other classes of antibacterials on the ETEC genomes were identified. There are blaTEM (n = 10), blaCTX-M-15 (n = 1), class 1 integron (n = 3) carrying resistance cassettes to aminoglycosides and

  16. Perfil de contaminação por Staphylococcus e suas enterotoxinas e monitorização das condições de higiene em uma linha de produção de queijo de coalho Contamination profile for staphylococci and its enterotoxins and monitorization of the conditions of hygiene in a ‘coalho' cheese production line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fatima Borges

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o perfil de contaminação por Staphylococcus e suas enterotoxinas e monitorou-se as condições de higiene em uma linha de produção de queijo de coalho por meio da técnica de bioluminescência (ATP. A população de Staphylococcus sp. variou de This research aimed to evaluate the contamination by staphylococci and its enterotoxins as well as to monitor the conditions of hygiene from a coalho cheese production line, using ATP bioluminescence assay. Staphylococcus sp. population varied from <1CFU mL-1, in pasteurized milk to 1.5 x 107CFU mL-1, in raw milk, whereas coagulase-positive staphylococci count ranged from <1CFU mL-1, in pasteurized milk to 5.0 x 106CFU mL-1 in raw milk. Coagulase-positive staphylococci were detected in 100% (25/25 of the raw milk samples and in 8% (2/25 of cheese samples. Twelve Staphylococcus species were identified within the selected 68 isolates, being nine negative and three positive for coagulase. Raw milk samples showed a high rate of coagulase-positive, being S. aureus the most common, whereas other product samples and equipment surfaces, pieces of furniture, utensils and manipulator gloves samples presented a high frequency of coagulase-negative and low frequency of coagulase-positive. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was detected in 20% of the raw milk samples and therefore in pasteurized milk, curd and cheese. ATP measurement permitted to assess the effectiveness of the surfaces cleaning, being considered adequate in 62.1% (36/95, "alert state" in 23.2% (22/95 and inadequate in 14.7% (14/95 of surfaces evaluated. Detection of staphylococci species with enterotoxigenic potential as well as enterotoxin presence reveal dissemination of contamination at the "coalho" cheese production line, possibly due inappropriate Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP from the initial milking step until the final cheese production.

  17. Distribution and characterization of staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRUs) and potential use for strain differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardy, K.J.; Ussery, David; Oppenheim, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    are similar to those used in the study of the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clades. Seven VNTRs, termed staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRUs), distributed around the genome are described, occurring in both unique and multiple sites, and varying in length from 48 to 159 bp. Variations...

  18. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton) Hassk. leaf extract: An alternative approach for the treatment of staphylococcal bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordmuang, Auemphon; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic residues in dairy products as well as emergence of antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens have been recognized as global public health concerns. The present work was aimed to study a potent antibacterial extract from natural product as an alternative treatment for staphylococcal bovine mastitis. Staphylococcal isolates (n=44) were isolated from milk samples freshly squeezed from individual cows. All staphylococcal isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, gentamicin, penicillin, except vancomycin. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf ethanolic extract was accessed for its antibacterial activity and anti-inflammatory potential. The extract exhibited profound antibacterial activity against all of staphylococcal isolates with MIC and MBC values ranged from 16-64 μg/ml and 64->128 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, the extract also exerted anti-protein denaturation and human red blood cell membrane stabilizing activity. The results support the use of R. tomentosa extract that could be applied to cure bovine mastitis and to reduce inflammatory injury caused by the bacterial infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of Enterotoxin-Producing Staphylococci in Zoonotic Infections in Iran

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    Abdolmajid Ghasemian

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococci spp, are enterotoxin-producing zoonotic agents causing a variety of infections such as mastitis in animals and wound bite infections in humans. This review was conducted to determine the prevalence of Staphylococci infections especially to uncover enterotoxin-producing species in Iran. Evidence acquisition: for this review, words of "Staphylococcus", "zoonotic", "prevalence", "animals", "human" and "Iran" were searched in the internet engines such as Google Scholar, PubMed, Google, Science Direct and so on. Patients with no history of contact with animals were also included in the study for comparison aims. Both veterinary and human coagulase positive isolates were included. Data was analyzed with Graph Pad Prism 6, meta-analysis section. A total of 20 previous studies (450 clinical samples were found. S. intermedius was the predominant isolate identified in veterinary sources. Other coagulase positive spp such as S. hycus and S. simulans were isolated with lower prevalence, but S. delphini has not been detected. Conclusion: S. intermedius was the most isolate identified in veterinary sources with potential of causing infections in humans. Other coagulase positive spp such as S. hycus and S. simulans were isolated with lower prevalence, but S. delphini was not detected.

  20. Detection of enterotoxins and genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from Isfahan Educational Hospital, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Asghar Havaei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Staphylococcus aureus is known as one of the most important nosocomial pathogens, which may lead to several infections. The aim of this study was determining the enterotoxins A, C, and TSST-1 and molecular characterization of S. aureus strains with PFGE and MLST typing methods. Materials and methods: In the present study during the sixmonths sampling, fifty S. aureus strains were isolated from patients admitted to Al-Zahra university hospital. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, Multiplex PCR for detection of enterotoxin A, C and TSST-1, pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST were used for molecular typing. Results: In antibiogram the highest and lowest percentage of resistance was belonged to tetracycline and rifampin respectively. Multiplex PCR indicated that 30% of the strains harbored sea and 34% harbored sec genes. However, only 4% of our collected isolates had tsst gene. In PFGE method analysis on all S. aureus strains, a total of 19 different patterns were identified. Nine various sequence types in 27 selected S. aureus isolates were identified by MLST. Conclusions: Present study indicates a possible higher variability among our S. aureus strains by two different molecular typing methods; nevertheless four main common types (CT1, CT7, CT9, and CT11 with at least one toxin genes were determined.

  1. Antibiotic resistance and enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus sp. isolates from polluted water in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Ana P; Martins, Paula D; Nachtigall, Gisele; Van Der Sand, Sueli; De Moura, Tiane M; Frazzon, Ana Paula G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the species distribution, antibiotic-resistance profile and presence of enterotoxin (SE) genes in staphylococci isolated from the Dilúvio stream in South Brazil. Eighty-eight staphylococci were identified, 93.18% were identified as coagulase-negative (CNS) and 6.82% coagulase-positive (CPS). Fourteen Staphylococcus species were detected and the most frequently were Staphylococcus cohnii (30.48%) and S. haemolyticus (21.95%). Resistance to erythromycin was verified in 37.50% of the strains, followed by 27.27% to penicillin, 12.50% to clindamycin, 6.81% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 5.68% to chloramphenicol and 2.27% to norfloxacin. None of the investigated strains showed gentamicin and ciprofloxacin resistance. The strains were tested for the presence of sea, seb, sec, sed and see genes by PCR and only CNS strains (43.18%) showed positive results to one or more SE genes. The scientific importance of our results is due to the lack of data about these topics in polluted waters in Brazil. In conclusion, polluted waters from the Dilúvio stream may constitute a reservoir for disseminating antibiotic-resistance and enterotoxin into the community. In addition, the detection of staphylococci in the polluted waters of the Dilúvio stream indicated a situation of environmental contamination and poor sanitation conditions.

  2. Antibiotic resistance and enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus sp. isolates from polluted water in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA P. BASSO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the species distribution, antibiotic-resistance profile and presence of enterotoxin (SE genes in staphylococci isolated from the Dilúvio stream in South Brazil. Eighty-eight staphylococci were identified, 93.18% were identified as coagulase-negative (CNS and 6.82% coagulase-positive (CPS. Fourteen Staphylococcus species were detected and the most frequently were Staphylococcus cohnii (30.48% and S. haemolyticus (21.95%. Resistance to erythromycin was verified in 37.50% of the strains, followed by 27.27% to penicillin, 12.50% to clindamycin, 6.81% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 5.68% to chloramphenicol and 2.27% to norfloxacin. None of the investigated strains showed gentamicin and ciprofloxacin resistance. The strains were tested for the presence of sea, seb, sec, sed and see genes by PCR and only CNS strains (43.18% showed positive results to one or more SE genes. The scientific importance of our results is due to the lack of data about these topics in polluted waters in Brazil. In conclusion, polluted waters from the Dilúvio stream may constitute a reservoir for disseminating antibiotic-resistance and enterotoxin into the community. In addition, the detection of staphylococci in the polluted waters of the Dilúvio stream indicated a situation of environmental contamination and poor sanitation conditions.

  3. Insertional inactivation of Eap in Staphylococcus aureus strain Newman confers reduced staphylococcal binding to fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Muzaffar; Haggar, Axana; Heilmann, Christine; Peters, Georg; Flock, Jan-Ingmar; Herrmann, Mathias

    2002-06-01

    To initiate invasive infection, Staphylococcus aureus must adhere to host substrates, such as the extracellular matrix or eukaryotic cells, by virtue of different surface proteins (adhesins). Recently, we identified a 60-kDa cell-secreted extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of S. aureus strain Newman with broad-spectrum binding characteristics (M. Palma, A. Haggar, and J. I. Flock, J. Bacteriol. 181:2840-2845, 1999), and we have molecularly confirmed Eap to be an analogue of the previously identified major histocompatibility complex class II analog protein (Map) (M. Hussain, K. Becker, C. von Eiff, G. Peter, and M. Herrmann, Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 8:1281-1286, 2001). Previous analyses of the Eap/Map function performed with purified protein did not allow dissection of its precise role in the complex situation of the staphylococcal whole cell presenting several secreted and wall-bound adhesins. Therefore, the role of Eap was investigated by constructing a stable eap::ermB deletion in strain Newman and by complementation of the mutant. Patterns of extracted cell surface proteins analyzed both by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by Western ligand assays with various adhesive matrix molecules clearly confirmed the absence of Eap in the mutant. However, binding and adhesion tests using whole staphylococcal cells demonstrated that both the parent and mutant strains bound equally well to fibronectin- and fibrinogen-coated surfaces, possibly due to their recognition by other staphylococcal adhesins. Furthermore, Eap mediated staphylococcal agglutination of both wild-type and mutant cells. In contrast, the mutant adhered to a significantly lesser extent to cultured fibroblasts (P Eap, whereas preimmune serum was not active. In conclusion, Eap may contribute to pathogenicity by promoting adhesion of whole staphylococcal cells to complex eukaryotic substrates.

  4. A probability model for enterotoxin production of Bacillus cereus as a function of pH and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacillus cereus is frequently isolated from a variety of foods including vegetables, dairy products, meat, and other raw and processed foods. The bacterium is capable of producing enterotoxin and emetic toxin that can cause severe nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. The objectives of this study were to a...

  5. Claudins Overexpression in Ovarian Cancer: Potential Targets for Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin (CPE Based Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana P. English

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Claudins are a family of tight junction proteins regulating paracellular permeability and cell polarity with different patterns of expression in benign and malignant human tissues. There are approximately 27 members of the claudin family identified to date with varying cell and tissue-specific expression. Claudins-3, -4 and -7 represent the most highly differentially expressed claudins in ovarian cancer. While their exact role in ovarian tumors is still being elucidated, these proteins are thought to be critical for ovarian cancer cell invasion/dissemination and resistance to chemotherapy. Claudin-3 and claudin-4 are the natural receptors for the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE, a potent cytolytic toxin. These surface proteins may therefore represent attractive targets for the detection and treatment of chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer and other aggressive solid tumors overexpressing claudin-3 and -4 using CPE-based theranostic agents.

  6. Association and dissociation of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin from rat brush border membrane receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.B.; Thompson, M.R.; Overmann, G.J.; Giannella, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) binds to receptors on rat intestinal cells and brush border membranes (BBM). We devised experiments to examine the reversibility of ST binding. We found that both 125 I-labeled ST and native ST were spontaneously dissociable from the BBM receptor. Radiolabeled ST bound to BBM was also dissociated by the addition of avid goat anti-ST antiserum. Furthermore, using a computer program for analysis of ligand binding, we calculated an apparent Ka of 10(8) liters/mol from competitive inhibition and saturation-binding data. This is significantly lower than the value previously reported by others. Our findings, of a lower Ka and a reversible ST-binding process, suggest that a therapeutic strategy of removing bound ST from its receptor or competing with the enterocyte receptor for unbound ST might be successful in terminating ST-induced secretion

  7. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canovas de la Nuez, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    -inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction...... between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus...... suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly influence the ability of S. aureus to cause infection, and we propose that other staphylococci are potential sources...

  8. Identification and Characterization of a New Enterotoxin Produced by Clostridium perfringens Isolated from Food Poisoning Outbreaks.

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    Daisuke Irikura

    Full Text Available There is a strain of Clostridium perfringens, W5052, which does not produce a known enterotoxin. We herein report that the strain W5052 expressed a homologue of the iota-like toxin components sa and sb of C. spiroforme, named Clostridium perfringens iota-like enterotoxin, CPILE-a and CPILE-b, respectively, based on the results of a genome sequencing analysis and a systematic protein screening. In the nicotinamide glyco-hydrolase (NADase assay the hydrolysis activity was dose-dependently increased by the concentration of rCPILE-a, as judged by the mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the actin monomer of the lysates of Vero and L929 cells were radiolabeled in the presence of [32P]NAD and rCPILE-a. These findings indicated that CPILE-a possesses ADP-ribosylation activity. The culture supernatant of W5052 facilitated the rounding and killing of Vero and L929 cells, but the rCPILE-a or a non-proteolyzed rCPILE-b did not. However, a trypsin-treated rCPILE-b did. Moreover, a mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b enhanced the cell rounding and killing activities, compared with that induced by the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b alone. The injection of the mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b into an ileum loop of rabbits evoked the swelling of the loop and accumulation of the fluid dose-dependently, suggesting that CPILE possesses enterotoxic activity. The evidence presented in this communication will facilitate the epidemiological, etiological, and toxicological studies of C. perfringens food poisoning, and also stimulate studies on the transfer of the toxins' gene(s among the Genus Clostridium.

  9. Studies on the mechanism of action of enterotoxin-induced fluid secretion in the gut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirgi-Degen, A.

    1992-12-01

    The mechanism of action of Clostridium difficile enterotoxin A (CA), of Escherichia coli enterotoxin (STa) and of cholera toxin (CT), which are known to cause severe diarrhea, were studied in a preparation of ligated jejunal loops of anesthetized rats in vivo. The toxins were administered intraluminally. Pharmacological agents, which were tested for their potency to influence toxin-related effects, were administered subcutaneously. Net fluid transport was determined gravimetrically, prostaglandin (PG) E 2 -output into the lumen, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) contents in the mucosa were measured by radioimmunoassay, serotonin-(5-HT)-output into the lumen was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The histopathological effects of CA and CT were examined by light- and scanning electron microscopy. All three toxins caused net fluid secretion (FS). 5-HT 2 -(ketanserin) and 5-HT 3 -receptor antagonists (tropisetron, ondansetron, granisetron) dose-dependently reduced or abolished CT- and STa-induced net FS, CA-induced net FS was not influenced. Indomethacin reduced CA-, CT- and STa-induced net FS. Elevation of PGE 2 -output occurred after exposure to CA and CT and was reduced by indomethacin. CA caused severe histopathological lesions and also CT time-dependently caused morphological changes, which may take part in the secretory response. It is concluded that 5-HT, using both 5-HT 2 - and 5-HT 3 -receptors, mediates CT- and STa, but not CA-induced FS. PGE 2 is involved in FS caused by all three toxins. CAMP and cGMP are presumedly no causative mediators of toxin-induced FS

  10. Lactobacilli require physical contact to reduce staphylococcal TSST-1 secretion and vaginal epithelial inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Jessica A; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-06-01

    ITALIC! Staphylococcus aureusbiofilms can be found on vaginal epithelia, secreting toxins and causing inflammation. The co-vaginal species ITALIC! Lactobacilluscan alter staphylococcal-induced epithelial secretion of inflammatory cytokines and quench staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion. It is hypothesized that these effects of lactobacilli require direct physical contact between lactobacilli, staphylococci and the epithelium. Indeed, lactobacilli only reduced ITALIC! S. aureus-induced inflammatory cytokine expression when allowed physical contact with vaginal epithelial cells. Furthermore, a reduction in toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion only occurred when a probiotic ITALIC! Lactobacillusstrain was allowed contact, but not when being physically separated from ITALIC! S. aureus Bacterial-probe atomic force microscopy demonstrated that lactobacilli and staphylococci strongly adhere to epithelial cells, while lactobacilli adhere stronger to staphylococci than staphylococci to each other, giving lactobacilli opportunity to penetrate and reside in staphylococcal biofilms, as visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy with fluorescence ITALIC! in situhybridization probes. These results identify that physical contact and biochemical signaling by lactobacilli are intrinsically linked mechanisms that reduce virulence of ITALIC! S. aureusbiofilm. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Meta-analysis of staphylococcal diarrhea in some developing African countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Einstein

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal diarrhea is a common gastro-intestinal illness caused by poor water supply and unhygienic food preparation. Although, about 70% of diarrheal cases per year have been attributed to the consumption of contaminated foods, in Africa, few studies have reported the incidence of Staphylococcus-related diarrhea and the implicated virulence factors. We investigated the implications of common factors such as age of children, age of mothers, maternal level of education, gender of children, overall bacteria isolated, sanitary condition status and feeding type of mothers on the burden of staphylococcal diarrhea. A literature search was performed using Pubmed, Googlescholar, American society for microbiology (ASM journals and other sources. The quality of studies was assessed. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI for the occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus amongst other causes were extracted. For each study, a multivariate logistic regression analysis of the adjusted odds ratio was performed to identify the risk factors on the burden of staphylococcal diarrhea. Six case-control studies were included in the meta–analysis. Quality of individual studies rages from 0.57–0.84 (median, 0.69. meta-analysis gave pooled odds ratios 3.27 (95% CI; 2.88–4.17. The results identified inadequate sanitary conditions and type of feeding as major risk factors.

  12. An Alternative Approach to Combination Vaccines: Intradermal Administration of Isolated Components for Control of Anthrax, Botulism, Plague and Staphylococcal Toxic Shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morefield, Garry L; Tammariello, Ralph F; Purcell, Bret K; Worsham, Patricia L; Chapman, Jennifer; Smith, Leonard A; Alarcon, Jason B; Mikszta, John A; Ulrich, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    ... incompatible vaccine mixtures. Intradermally administered arrays of vaccines for protection from anthrax, botulism, plague, and staphylococcal toxic shock were biocompatible in vivo, retained potent antibody responses...

  13. DNA microarray profiling of a diverse collection of nosocomial methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus isolates assigns the majority to the correct sequence type and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type and results in the subsequent identification and characterization of novel SCCmec-SCCM1 composite islands.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shore, Anna C

    2012-10-01

    One hundred seventy-five isolates representative of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones that predominated in Irish hospitals between 1971 and 2004 and that previously underwent multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing were characterized by spa typing (175 isolates) and DNA microarray profiling (107 isolates). The isolates belonged to 26 sequence type (ST)-SCCmec types and subtypes and 35 spa types. The array assigned all isolates to the correct MLST clonal complex (CC), and 94% (100\\/107) were assigned an ST, with 98% (98\\/100) correlating with MLST. The array assigned all isolates to the correct SCCmec type, but subtyping of only some SCCmec elements was possible. Additional SCCmec\\/SCC genes or DNA sequence variation not detected by SCCmec typing was detected by array profiling, including the SCC-fusidic acid resistance determinant Q6GD50\\/fusC. Novel SCCmec\\/SCC composite islands (CIs) were detected among CC8 isolates and comprised SCCmec IIA-IIE, IVE, IVF, or IVg and a ccrAB4-SCC element with 99% DNA sequence identity to SCC(M1) from ST8\\/t024-MRSA, SCCmec VIII, and SCC-CI in Staphylococcus epidermidis. The array showed that the majority of isolates harbored one or more superantigen (94%; 100\\/107) and immune evasion cluster (91%; 97\\/107) genes. Apart from fusidic acid and trimethoprim resistance, the correlation between isolate antimicrobial resistance phenotype and the presence of specific resistance genes was ≥97%. Array profiling allowed high-throughput, accurate assignment of MRSA to CCs\\/STs and SCCmec types and provided further evidence of the diversity of SCCmec\\/SCC. In most cases, array profiling can accurately predict the resistance phenotype of an isolate.

  14. Effects of nisin and temperature on survival, growth, and enterotoxin production characteristics of psychrotrophic Bacillus cereus in beef gravy.

    OpenAIRE

    Beuchat, L R; Clavero, M R; Jaquette, C B

    1997-01-01

    The presence of psychrotrophic enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus in ready-to-serve meats and meat products that have not been subjected to sterilization treatment is a public health concern. A study was undertaken to determine the survival, growth, and diarrheal enterotoxin production characteristics of four strains of psychrotrophic B. cereus in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth and beef gravy as affected by temperature and supplementation with nisin. A portion of unheated vegetative cells from...

  15. Effects of nisin and temperature on survival, growth, and enterotoxin production characteristics of psychrotrophic Bacillus cereus in beef gravy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, L R; Clavero, M R; Jaquette, C B

    1997-05-01

    The presence of psychrotrophic enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus in ready-to-serve meats and meat products that have not been subjected to sterilization treatment is a public health concern. A study was undertaken to determine the survival, growth, and diarrheal enterotoxin production characteristics of four strains of psychrotrophic B. cereus in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth and beef gravy as affected by temperature and supplementation with nisin. A portion of unheated vegetative cells from 24-h BHI broth cultures was sensitive to nisin as evidenced by an inability to form colonies on BHI agar containing 10 micrograms of nisin/ml. Heat-stressed cells exhibited increased sensitivity to nisin. At concentrations as low as 1 microgram/ml, nisin was lethal to B. cereus, the effect being more pronounced in BHI broth than in beef gravy. The inhibitory effect of nisin (1 microgram/ml) was greater on vegetative cells than on spores inoculated into beef gravy and was more pronounced at 8 degrees C than at 15 degrees C. Nisin, at a concentration of 5 or 50 micrograms/ml, inhibited growth in gravy inoculated with vegetative cells and stored at 8 or 15 degrees C, respectively, for 14 days. Growth of vegetative cells and spores of B. cereus after an initial period of inhibition is attributed to loss of activity of nisin. One of two test strains produced diarrheal enterotoxin in gravy stored at 8 or 15 degrees C within 9 or 3 days, respectively. Enterotoxin production was inhibited in gravy supplemented with 1 microgram of nisin/ml and stored at 8 degrees C for 14 days; 5 micrograms of nisin/ml was required for inhibition at 15 degrees C. Enterotoxin was not detected in gravy in which less than 5.85 log10 CFU of B. cereus/ml had grown. Results indicate that as little as 1 microgram of nisin/ml may be effective in inhibiting or retarding growth of and diarrheal enterotoxin production by vegetative cells and spores of psychrotrophic B. cereus in beef gravy at 8 degrees C, a

  16. CodY Promotes Sporulation and Enterotoxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type A Strain SM101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihong; Freedman, John C; Evans, Daniel R; McClane, Bruce A

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D strains cause enterotoxemia and enteritis in livestock via epsilon toxin production. In type D strain CN3718, CodY was previously shown to increase the level of epsilon toxin production and repress sporulation. C. perfringens type A strains producing C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) cause human food poisoning and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Sporulation is critical for C. perfringens type A food poisoning since spores contribute to transmission and resistance in the harsh food environment and sporulation is essential for CPE production. Therefore, the current study asked whether CodY also regulates sporulation and CPE production in SM101, a derivative of C. perfringens type A food-poisoning strain NCTC8798. An isogenic codY -null mutant of SM101 showed decreased levels of spore formation, along with lower levels of CPE production. A complemented strain recovered wild-type levels of both sporulation and CPE production. When this result was coupled with the earlier results obtained with CN3718, it became apparent that CodY regulation of sporulation varies among different C. perfringens strains. Results from quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis clearly demonstrated that, during sporulation, codY transcript levels remained high in SM101 but rapidly declined in CN3718. In addition, abrB gene expression patterns varied significantly between codY -null mutants of SM101 and CN3718. Compared to the levels in their wild-type parents, the level of abrB gene expression decreased in the CN3718 codY -null mutant strain but significantly increased in the SM101 codY -null mutant strain, demonstrating CodY-dependent regulation differences in abrB expression between these two strains. This difference appears to be important since overexpression of the abrB gene in SM101 reduced the levels of sporulation and enterotoxin production, supporting the involvement of AbrB repression in regulating C. perfringens sporulation. Copyright © 2017

  17. Mupirocin in the Treatment of Staphylococcal Infections in Chronic Rhinosinusitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Seung Kim

    Full Text Available Saline irrigation of the nasal cavity is a classic and effective treatment for acute or chronic rhinosinusitis. Topical antibiotics such as mupirocin have been widely used for recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of saline irrigation using mupirocin.A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of mupirocin saline irrigation were performed using EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Cochrane library through December 2015. Data were analyzed with R 3.2.2 software. A random effects model was used because of the diversity of included studies. Sensitivity analysis of particular tested groups and single proportion tests were also performed. The main outcome measure was residual staphylococcal infection, as confirmed by culture or PCR.Two RCTs, two prospective studies and two retrospective studies were included. A random effects model meta-analysis of the pooled data identified a relative risk of residual infection of 0.13 (95% CI: 0.06-0.26, p<0.05 with low heterogeneity (I2 = 0%. The proportion of residual staphylococcal infections after 1 month was 0.08 (95% CI: 0.04-0.16. However, this proportion increased to 0.53 at 6 months (95% CI: 0.27-0.78.The short-term use of mupirocin has a strongly reductive effect on staphylococcal infection in chronic rhinosinusitis. Although there is currently a lack of clear evidence, future studies with well-designed inclusion criteria and randomized controlled trials are needed to examine mupirocin's long-term effect on chronic rhinosinusitis.

  18. Filaggrin-dependent secretion of sphingomyelinase protects against staphylococcal α-toxin-induced keratinocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauweiler, Anne M; Bin, Lianghua; Kim, Byung Eui; Oyoshi, Michiko K; Geha, Raif S; Goleva, Elena; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-02-01

    The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) has defects in keratinocyte differentiation, particularly in expression of the epidermal barrier protein filaggrin. AD skin lesions are often exacerbated by Staphylococcus aureus-mediated secretion of the virulence factor α-toxin. It is unknown whether lack of keratinocyte differentiation predisposes to enhanced lethality from staphylococcal toxins. We investigated whether keratinocyte differentiation and filaggrin expression protect against cell death induced by staphylococcal α-toxin. Filaggrin-deficient primary keratinocytes were generated through small interfering RNA gene knockdown. RNA expression was determined by using real-time PCR. Cell death was determined by using the lactate dehydrogenase assay. Keratinocyte cell survival in filaggrin-deficient (ft/ft) mouse skin biopsies was determined based on Keratin 5 staining. α-Toxin heptamer formation and acid sphingomyelinase expression were determined by means of immunoblotting. We found that filaggrin expression, occurring as the result of keratinocyte differentiation, significantly inhibits staphylococcal α-toxin-mediated pathogenicity. Furthermore, filaggrin plays a crucial role in protecting cells by mediating the secretion of sphingomyelinase, an enzyme that reduces the number of α-toxin binding sites on the keratinocyte surface. Finally, we determined that sphingomyelinase enzymatic activity directly prevents α-toxin binding and protects keratinocytes against α-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. The current study introduces the novel concept that S aureus α-toxin preferentially targets and destroys filaggrin-deficient keratinocytes. It also provides a mechanism to explain the increased propensity for S aureus-mediated exacerbation of AD skin disease. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The clinical spectrum and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of staphylococcal pyodermas in the community and hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shireen Furtado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The uncontrolled use of antibiotics has resulted in a relentless spread of multiresistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. There are studies conducted in medical colleges in Chandigarh, Chennai, Mumbai and Vellore comparing pyodermas in the community and hospital setting based on clinical and bacteriological parameters. Aims: This study, conducted over 1½ years from March 2009 to August 2010, aimed at analyzing the clinical spectrum and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of community and hospital-associated (HA staphylococcal pyoderma. It also assessed the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA in the community and hospital cohort settings. Subjects and Methods: The study comprised of 200 cases of staphylococcal pyodermas, derived from the community (150 cases and hospital (50 cases. Patients were evaluated based on their clinical presentation; antibiotic susceptibility was tested using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical significance between individual attributes between the community and HA staphylococcal pyoderma groups was analyzed using Chi-square test and mean differences using student′s t-test. Results: Factors associated with community-associated (CA pyodermas were young age (P = 0.0021, primary pyodermas, and involvement of extremities, while those with HA pyodermas were middle age, secondary pyodermas, and significantly increased body surface involvement (P = 0.041. Incidence of CA-MRSA was 11.3%, while that of HA-MRSA was 18%. Conclusions: A high level of resistance to first-line drugs such as penicillin, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole was observed, more so in the hospital strain than in the community strain. S. aureus demonstrated good susceptibility to cephalosporins. Though the two strains of MRSA differed clinically, they showed 100% sensitivity to vancomycin and linezolid.

  20. Plant plasma membrane-bound staphylococcal-like DNases as a novel class of eukaryotic nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leśniewicz Krzysztof

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of degradative nucleases responsible for genomic DNA digestion has been observed in all kingdoms of life. It is believed that the main function of DNA degradation occurring during plant programmed cell death is redistribution of nucleic acid derived products such as nitrogen, phosphorus and nucleotide bases. Plant degradative nucleases that have been studied so far belong mainly to the S1-type family and were identified in cellular compartments containing nucleic acids or in the organelles where they are stored before final application. However, the explanation of how degraded DNA components are exported from the dying cells for further reutilization remains open. Results Bioinformatic and experimental data presented in this paper indicate that two Arabidopsis staphylococcal-like nucleases, named CAN1 and CAN2, are anchored to the cell membrane via N-terminal myristoylation and palmitoylation modifications. Both proteins possess a unique hybrid structure in their catalytic domain consisting of staphylococcal nuclease-like and tRNA synthetase anticodon binding-like motifs. They are neutral, Ca2+-dependent nucleaces showing a different specificity toward the ssDNA, dsDNA and RNA substrates. A study of microarray experiments and endogenous nuclease activity revealed that expression of CAN1 gene correlates with different forms of programmed cell death, while the CAN2 gene is constitutively expressed. Conclusions In this paper we present evidence showing that two plant staphylococcal-like nucleases belong to a new, as yet unidentified class of eukaryotic nucleases, characterized by unique plasma membrane localization. The identification of this class of nucleases indicates that plant cells possess additional, so far uncharacterized, mechanisms responsible for DNA and RNA degradation. The potential functions of these nucleases in relation to their unique intracellular location are discussed.

  1. Effectiveness of a Glycylcycline Antibiotic for Reducing the Pathogenicity of Superantigen-Producing Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Burn Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosanov, Lauren B; Jo, Daniel Y; Randad, Pranay R; Moffatt, Lauren T; Carney, Bonnie C; Ortiz, Rachel T; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2017-01-01

    Objective : Burn-injured patients are highly susceptible to infectious complications, which are often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Rates of antibiotic resistance have increased, and resistant species such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus provide additional challenges in the form of virulence factors. Proteins can disrupt local healing, leading to systemic immune disruption. To optimize outcomes, treatments that reduce pathogenicity must be identified. This study aims to compare a glycylcycline antibiotic-tigecycline-with clindamycin for effectiveness in treating superantigenic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in burn wounds. Methods : Sprague-Dawley rats received paired 2 × 2-cm burn wounds, which were subsequently inoculated with known virulence factor-producing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or media alone on postinjury day 1. Infected animals received twice-daily tigecycline (high or low dose), twice-daily clindamycin (high or low dose), or saline alone (positive controls). Daily sampling and imaging assessments were performed. Results : Bacterial counts and toxin levels were reduced significantly in antibiotic-treated groups relative to positive controls ( P study supports the use of tigecycline in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus -infected burn wounds. While both protein synthesis inhibitors are effective, tigecycline appears to be superior in controlling toxin levels, enabling better wound healing.

  2. Staphylococcal species associated with bovine mastitis in the North West of Iran: Emerging of coagulase-negative staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayyeh Hosseinzadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal mastitis is a major and costly problem of dairy cattle all over the world. The objective of this study was to isolate and identify the main staphylococcal species causing bovine mastitis in 7 dairy herds located in 4 different areas of East and West Azerbaijan provinces, Iran. Of the 158 mastitic milk samples collected, 113 staphylococcal isolates were identified (71.5% on the basis of cultural and biochemical features as well as by genus specific PCR. Then, species level identification of staphylococcal isolates was carried out using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis of the gap gene (933 bp. On the basis of polymerase chain reaction-RFLP, 10 different patterns were identified. Of 113 isolates, 5 (4.4% were Staphylococcus aureus and 108 (95.6% were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS. Overall, nine different species of CoNS were identified as: 44 Staphylococcus haemolyticus (40.7%, 17 Staphylococcus chromogenes (15.7%, 11 Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus warneri and Staphylococcus cohnii each (10.2%, 6 Staphylococcus simulans (5.5%, 4 Staphylococcus hominis (3.7%, 3 Staphylococcus capitis (2.7% and 1 Staphylococcus xylosus (0.9%. S. haemolyticus, S. chromogenes and S. warneri were the only species identified from clinical mastitis. No significant difference in staphylococcal IMI was found among the studied herds and regions. This study demonstrated that CoNS, especially S. haemolyticus and S. chromogenes, were predominant and thus be considered as emerging pathogens causing mastitis in the North West of Iran. Our results also revealed that the gap PCR-RFLP was useful for identifying staphylococcal isolates derived from bovine mastitis at species level.

  3. Modified wound dressing with phyto-nanostructured coating to prevent staphylococcal and pseudomonal biofilm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ion; Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Ficai, Anton; Anghel, Alina Georgiana; Maganu, Maria; Lazǎr, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports a newly fabricated nanophyto-modified wound dressing with microbicidal and anti-adherence properties. Nanofluid-based magnetite doped with eugenol or limonene was used to fabricate modified wound dressings. Nanostructure coated materials were characterized by TEM, XRD, and FT-IR. For the quantitative measurement of biofilm-embedded microbial cells, a culture-based method for viable cell count was used. The optimized textile dressing samples proved to be more resistant to staphylococcal and pseudomonal colonization and biofilm formation compared to the uncoated controls. The functionalized surfaces for wound dressing seems to be a very useful tool for the prevention of wound microbial contamination on viable tissues.

  4. [Poisoning by enterotoxin from Staphylococcus aureus associated with mocha pastry. Microbiology and epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escartín, E F; Saldaña-Lozano, J; Montiel-Falcón, A

    1998-01-01

    A brief description of a foodborne outbreak due to S. aureus enterotoxin associated with the consumption of mocha cake in the city of Guadalajara is presented. The cake was prepared in a bakery and affected nearly 100 persons. S. aureus was isolated from the nose and skin of one of the pastry cooks. A S. aureus strain isolated from the cake involved in the outbreak was not only unable to grow in the mocha cream, but it actually decreased in numbers by 2 log after 72 h of storage at 30 degrees C. The pH of mocha cream ranged from 6.2 to 6.6, and water activity from 0.833 to 0.859, with a media of 0.841. In preparing mocha cake at the shop, one half of the dough used to be sprayed with a sucrose solution in water (20% w/v); mocha cream was spread on the other half of the dough before overlapping the two halves. When mocha cake was prepared in this manner, and stored at 30 degrees C, S. aureus increased in number by more than 4 log after 48 h. S. aureus did not grow in the cake stored at 4-7 degrees C. Contributory factors in this outbreak were an increase of water activity in the interphase of the mocha and the cake dough, storage of the cake in an unrefrigerated area, and an unusually high ambient temperature (28-32 degrees C) at that time.

  5. Formation of cereulide and enterotoxins by Bacillus cereus in fermented African locust beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Line; Azokpota, Paulin; Munk Hansen, Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    Afitin, iru and sonru are three spontaneously fermented African locust bean Benin condiments. The fermentation processes are exothermic, with temperatures mostly being above 40 °C. A total of 19 predominant Bacillus cereus isolates from afitin, iru and sonru, were investigated. The enterotoxin...... genes nhe (A, B, C) were present in all 19 isolates, the hbl (A, C, D) in one (afitin), and the cytK gene in three isolates (afitin). Levels of cytotoxicity to Vero cells and NheA production in BHI-broth was within the range of known diarrheal outbreak strains. Autoclaved cooked African locust beans...... inoculated with emetic (cereulide producing) B. cereus Ba18H2/RIF supported growth at 25, 30 and 40 °C with highly different maximum cereulide productions of 6 ± 5, 97 ± 3 and 0.04 ± 0.02 μg/g beans, respectively (48 h). For non-autoclaved cooked beans inoculated with 2, 4 and 6 log10 B. cereus Ba18H2/RIF...

  6. From Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin to mammalian endogenous guanylin hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.A.M.; Fonteles, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) from Escherichia coli and cholera toxin from Vibrio cholerae has increased our knowledge of specific mechanisms of action that could be used as pharmacological tools to understand the guanylyl cyclase-C and the adenylyl cyclase enzymatic systems. These discoveries have also been instrumental in increasing our understanding of the basic mechanisms that control the electrolyte and water balance in the gut, kidney, and urinary tracts under normal conditions and in disease. Herein, we review the evolution of genes of the guanylin family and STa genes from bacteria to fish and mammals. We also describe new developments and perspectives regarding these novel bacterial compounds and peptide hormones that act in electrolyte and water balance. The available data point toward new therapeutic perspectives for pathological features such as functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with constipation, colorectal cancer, cystic fibrosis, asthma, hypertension, gastrointestinal barrier function damage associated with enteropathy, enteric infection, malnutrition, satiety, food preferences, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and effects on behavior and brain disorders such as attention deficit, hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia

  7. Colorimetric DNAzyme Biosensor for Convenience Detection of Enterotoxin B Harboring Staphylococcus aureus from Food Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bhairab; N, Bhavanashri; Ramlal, Shylaja; Kingston, Joseph

    2018-02-14

    In the present study, a colorimetric DNAzymes biosensor strategy was devised in combination with immunomagnetic separation for rapid and easy detection of enterotoxin B harboring Staphylococcus aureus from food and clinical samples. The method employs immunocapture of S. aureus and amplification of seb gene by DNAzyme complementary sequence integrated forward primer and with specific reverse primer. The DNAzyme sequence integrated dsDNA PCR products when treated with hemin and TMB (3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine) in the presence of H 2 O 2 produce colorimetric signal. A linear relationship of optical signal with the initial template of seb was obtained which could be monitored by visually or spectrophotrometrically for qualitative and quantitative detection. The limit of detection for the assay was approximately 10 2 CFU/mL of seb gene harboring target. This method is convenient compared to gel based and ELISA systems. Further, spiking studies and analysis on natural samples emphasized the robustness and applicability of developed method. Altogether, the established assay could be a reliable alternative, low-cost, viable detection tool for the routine investigation of seb from food and clinical sources.

  8. From Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin to mammalian endogenous guanylin hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, A.A.M. [Universidade Federal do Ceará, Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Escola de Medicina, Instituto de Biomedicina, Unidade de Pesquisas Clínicas, Fortaleza, CE, Brasil, Unidade de Pesquisas Clínicas, Instituto de Biomedicina, Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Escola de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Fonteles, M.C. [Universidade Federal do Ceará, Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Escola de Medicina, Instituto de Biomedicina, Unidade de Pesquisas Clínicas, Fortaleza, CE, Brasil, Unidade de Pesquisas Clínicas, Instituto de Biomedicina, Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Escola de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Universidade Estadual do Ceará, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Fortaleza, CE, Brasil, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Estadual do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2014-03-03

    The isolation of heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) from Escherichia coli and cholera toxin from Vibrio cholerae has increased our knowledge of specific mechanisms of action that could be used as pharmacological tools to understand the guanylyl cyclase-C and the adenylyl cyclase enzymatic systems. These discoveries have also been instrumental in increasing our understanding of the basic mechanisms that control the electrolyte and water balance in the gut, kidney, and urinary tracts under normal conditions and in disease. Herein, we review the evolution of genes of the guanylin family and STa genes from bacteria to fish and mammals. We also describe new developments and perspectives regarding these novel bacterial compounds and peptide hormones that act in electrolyte and water balance. The available data point toward new therapeutic perspectives for pathological features such as functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with constipation, colorectal cancer, cystic fibrosis, asthma, hypertension, gastrointestinal barrier function damage associated with enteropathy, enteric infection, malnutrition, satiety, food preferences, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and effects on behavior and brain disorders such as attention deficit, hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia.

  9. Concerted action of sphingomyelinase and non-hemolytic enterotoxin in pathogenic Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria M Doll

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe, which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation.

  10. Artificial biofilms establish the role of matrix interactions in staphylococcal biofilm assembly and disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Elizabeth J.; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms can be created through colloidal self-assembly of cells and polymers, and thereby link the complex material properties of biofilms to well understood colloidal and polymeric behaviors. This finding is applied to soften and disassemble staphylococcal biofilms through pH changes. Bacterial biofilms are viscoelastic, structured communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA. Although the identity and abundance of EPS macromolecules are known, how these matrix materials interact with themselves and bacterial cells to generate biofilm morphology and mechanics is not understood. Here, we find that the colloidal self-assembly of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A cells and polysaccharides into viscoelastic biofilms is driven by thermodynamic phase instability of EPS. pH conditions that induce phase instability of chitosan produce artificial S. epidermidis biofilms whose mechanics match natural S. epidermidis biofilms. Furthermore, pH-induced solubilization of the matrix triggers disassembly in both artificial and natural S. epidermidis biofilms. This pH-induced disassembly occurs in biofilms formed by five additional staphylococcal strains, including three clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that colloidal self-assembly of cells and matrix polymers produces biofilm viscoelasticity and that biofilm control strategies can exploit this mechanism. PMID:26272750

  11. Identification of Clinical Staphylococcal Isolates from Humans by Internal Transcribed Spacer PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Isabel; Pereira, Sandro; Miragaia, Maria; Sanches, Ilda Santos; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of coagulase-negative staphylococci not only as human pathogens but also as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants requires the deployment and development of methods for their rapid and reliable identification. Internal transcribed spacer-PCR (ITS-PCR) was used to identify a collection of 617 clinical staphylococcal isolates. The amplicons were resolved in high-resolution agarose gels and visually compared with the patterns obtained for the control strains of 29 staphylococcal species. Of the 617 isolates studied, 592 (95.95%) were identified by ITS-PCR and included 11 species: 302 isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, 157 of S. haemolyticus, 79 of S. aureus, 21 of S. hominis, 14 of S. saprophyticus, 8 of S. warneri, 6 of S. simulans, 2 of S. lugdunensis, and 1 each of S. caprae, S. carnosus, and S. cohnii. All species analyzed had unique ITS-PCR patterns, although some were very similar, namely, the group S. saprophyticus, S. cohnii, S. gallinarum, S. xylosus, S. lentus, S. equorum, and S. chromogenes, the pair S. schleiferi and S. vitulus, and the pair S. piscifermentans and S. carnosus. Four species, S. aureus, S. caprae, S. haemolyticus, and S. lugdunensis, showed polymorphisms on their ITS-PCR patterns. ITS-PCR proved to be a valuable alternative for the identification of staphylococci, offering, within the same response time and at lower cost, higher reliability than the currently available commercial systems. PMID:11526135

  12. Study of action of biological aerococcus аutosymbiont on the model of staphylococcal infection

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    Stepanskyi D.O.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the study of the antagonistic effect of aerococcus autosymbionts in experimental models of infections caused by staphylococci. To study the antagonistic action of aerococcus autosymbiont on staphylococcus, a model of chronic staphylococcal infection in white mice and rabbits was used. In staphylococcal experimental infection, aerococcus antagonistic action against staphylococcus was tested by subcutaneous injection on white mice. Aerococci survival under the skin was studied. Aerococcus autosymbionts introduced under the skin to staphylococcus in 5 hours and 3 hours after administration of the latter cause antagonist effect and inhibit the development of infiltrates. Similar results were obtained when introducing aerococcus autosymbionts in the focus of infection in 5 minutes, 5 minutes and 3 hours, 1 and 5 hours after infection. Aerococci introduced after 24 and 48 hours shortened terms of disease manifestations as compared to the control group of mice. The therapeutic effect of aerococcus autosymbionts was tested on the experimental model of burns and wounds infected with staphylococcus. In animals with wounds treated with aerococcus autostrains the number of pathogenic staphylococci was 10 times less than in the control group. According to our observations aerococcus autosymbionts showed no irritant effect when applied on the wound surface, helped its healing, sharply reduced the percentage of staphylococcus inoculation from wound secretions.

  13. Identification of clinical staphylococcal isolates from humans by internal transcribed spacer PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, I; Pereira, S; Miragaia, M; Sanches, I S; de Lencastre, H

    2001-09-01

    The emergence of coagulase-negative staphylococci not only as human pathogens but also as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants requires the deployment and development of methods for their rapid and reliable identification. Internal transcribed spacer-PCR (ITS-PCR) was used to identify a collection of 617 clinical staphylococcal isolates. The amplicons were resolved in high-resolution agarose gels and visually compared with the patterns obtained for the control strains of 29 staphylococcal species. Of the 617 isolates studied, 592 (95.95%) were identified by ITS-PCR and included 11 species: 302 isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, 157 of S. haemolyticus, 79 of S. aureus, 21 of S. hominis, 14 of S. saprophyticus, 8 of S. warneri, 6 of S. simulans, 2 of S. lugdunensis, and 1 each of S. caprae, S. carnosus, and S. cohnii. All species analyzed had unique ITS-PCR patterns, although some were very similar, namely, the group S. saprophyticus, S. cohnii, S. gallinarum, S. xylosus, S. lentus, S. equorum, and S. chromogenes, the pair S. schleiferi and S. vitulus, and the pair S. piscifermentans and S. carnosus. Four species, S. aureus, S. caprae, S. haemolyticus, and S. lugdunensis, showed polymorphisms on their ITS-PCR patterns. ITS-PCR proved to be a valuable alternative for the identification of staphylococci, offering, within the same response time and at lower cost, higher reliability than the currently available commercial systems.

  14. Varicella infection in a neonate with subsequent staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome and fatal shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shakal Narayan; Tahazzul, Mohammad; Singh, Anita; Chandra, Surabhi

    2012-08-01

    A male term neonate, at day 23 of life, presented with vesicular lesions over the trunk, which spread to allover the body on the next day. Five days later, he started developing blistering of the skin over the trunk and extremities, which subsequently ruptured, leaving erythematous, tender raw areas with peeling of the skin. The mother had vesicular eruptions, which started on the second day of delivery and progressed over the next 3 days. Subsequently, similar eruptions were noticed in two of the siblings before affecting the neonate. On the basis of the exposure history and clinical picture, a diagnosis was made of varicella infection with staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS). The blood culture and the wound surface culture grew Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment included intravenous fluid, antibiotics, acyclovir and wound care. However, after 72 h of hospitalisation, the neonate first developed shock, refractory to fluid boluses, vasopressors and catecholamine along with other supports; and he then succumbed. In all neonates, staphylococcal infection with varicella can be fatal due to SSSS, the toxic shock syndrome or septicaemia.

  15. Lactobacillus zeae protects Caenorhabditis elegans from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-caused death by inhibiting enterotoxin gene expression of the pathogen.

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    Mengzhou Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become increasingly used for screening antimicrobials and probiotics for pathogen control. It also provides a useful tool for studying microbe-host interactions. This study has established a C. elegans life-span assay to preselect probiotic bacteria for controlling K88(+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, a pathogen causing pig diarrhea, and has determined a potential mechanism underlying the protection provided by Lactobacillus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Life-span of C. elegans was used to measure the response of worms to ETEC infection and protection provided by lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB. Among 13 LAB isolates that varied in their ability to protect C. elegans from death induced by ETEC strain JG280, Lactobacillus zeae LB1 offered the highest level of protection (86%. The treatment with Lactobacillus did not reduce ETEC JG280 colonization in the nematode intestine. Feeding E. coli strain JFF4 (K88(+ but lacking enterotoxin genes of estA, estB, and elt did not cause death of worms. There was a significant increase in gene expression of estA, estB, and elt during ETEC JG280 infection, which was remarkably inhibited by isolate LB1. The clone with either estA or estB expressed in E. coli DH5α was as effective as ETEC JG280 in killing the nematode. However, the elt clone killed only approximately 40% of worms. The killing by the clones could also be prevented by isolate LB1. The same isolate only partially inhibited the gene expression of enterotoxins in both ETEC JG280 and E. coli DH5α in-vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The established life-span assay can be used for studies of probiotics to control ETEC (for effective selection and mechanistic studies. Heat-stable enterotoxins appeared to be the main factors responsible for the death of C. elegans. Inhibition of ETEC enterotoxin production, rather than interference of its intestinal colonization, appears to be the

  16. Novel types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements identified in clonal complex 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, S.; Skov, R.L.; Han, X.; Larsen, A.R.; Larsen, J.; Sorum, M.; Wulf, M.; Voss, A.; Hiramatsu, K.; Ito, T.

    2011-01-01

    The structures of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements carried by 31 clonal complex 398 (CC398) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from the participants at a conference were analyzed. The SCCmecs were classified into novel types, namely, IX, X,

  17. Nitrate salts suppress sporulation and production of enterotoxin in Clostridium perfringens strain NCTC8239.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasugi, Mayo; Otsuka, Keisuke; Miyake, Masami

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is a common source of food-borne illness in humans. Ingested vegetative cells sporulate in the small intestinal tract and in the process produce C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). Although sporulation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of food-borne illness, the molecules triggering/inhibiting sporulation are still largely unknown. It has previously been reported by our group that sporulation is induced in C. perfringens strain NCTC8239 co-cultured with Caco-2 cells in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). In contrast, an equivalent amount of spores was not observed when bacteria were co-cultured in Roswell Park Memorial Institute-1640 medium (RPMI). In the present study it was found that, when these two media are mixed, RPMI inhibits sporulation and CPE production induced in DMEM. When a component of RPMI was added to DMEM, it was found that calcium nitrate (Ca[NO 3 ] 2 ) significantly inhibits sporulation and CPE production. The number of spores increased when Ca(NO 3 ) 2 -deficient RPMI was used. The other nitrate salts significantly suppressed sporulation, whereas the calcium salts used did not. qPCR revealed that nitrate salts increased expression of bacterial nitrate/nitrite reductase. Furthermore, it was found that nitrite and nitric oxide suppress sporulation. In the sporulation stages, Ca(NO 3 ) 2 down-regulated the genes controlled by Spo0A, a master regulator of sporulation, but not spo0A itself. Collectively, these results indicate that nitrate salts suppress sporulation and CPE production by down-regulating Spo0A-regulated genes in C. perfringens strain NCTC8239. Nitrate reduction may be associated with inhibition of sporulation. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Suppression of colorectal tumorigenesis by recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, You; Ye, Tao; Wang, Hui-Peng; Zhao, Jia-Ying; Chen, Wen-Jie; Wang, Xin; Shen, Chen-Xia; Wu, Yi-Bin; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2017-01-28

    To evaluate the impact of recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 (BFT-2, or Fragilysin) on colorectal tumorigenesis in mice induced by azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS). Recombinant proBFT-2 was expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta (DE3) and BFT-2 was obtained and tested for its biological activity via colorectal adenocarcinoma cell strains SW-480. Seventy C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into a blank (BC; n = 10), model (AD; n = 20), model + low-dose toxin (ADLT; n = 20, 10 μg), and a model + high-dose toxin (ADHT; n = 20, 20 μg) group. Mice weight, tumor formation and pathology were analyzed. Immunohistochemistry determined Ki-67 and Caspase-3 expression in normal and tumor tissues of colorectal mucosa. Recombinant BFT-2 was successfully obtained, along with its biological activity. The most obvious weight loss occurred in the AD group compared with the ADLT group (21.82 ± 0.68 vs 23.23 ± 0.91, P ADHT group (21.82 ± 0.68 vs 23.57 ± 1.06, P ADHT groups (19.75 ± 3.30 vs 6.50 ± 1.73, P ADHT group. The incidence of colorectal adenocarcinoma in both the ADHT group and the ADHT group was reduced compared to that in the AD group ( P ADHT group was 50% and 40%, respectively, both of which were lower than that found in the AD group (94.44%, P ADHT group was 45% and 55%, both of which were higher than that found in the BC group (16.67%, P < 0.05, P < 0.05). Oral administration with lower-dose biologically active recombinant BFT-2 inhibited colorectal tumorigenesis in mice.

  19. Nosocomial coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections in bone marrow transplantation recipients with central vein catheter. A 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, D; Elishoov, H; Strauss, N; Naparstek, E; Nagler, A; Simhon, A; Raveh, D; Slavin, S; Or, R

    1996-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) patients with central vein catheters by investigating incidence, clinical relevance, risk factors, methicillin resistance, clinical impact of initial empiric antimicrobial therapy without vancomycin, and management of documented catheter-related infections. A 5-year prospective study was conducted with daily evaluation of 242 BMT patients during hospitalization, including clinical assessment and blood culture via the Hickman/Broviac catheter. If fever or infected appearance occurred, peripheral blood cultures or exit site cultures, respectively, were done. Results showed a septicemia incidence of 7.0%, including in 6 patients following colonization, in 1 patient with tunnel infection, in 1 patient with thrombophlebitis, in 1 patient with exit site infection, and in 8 patients with septicemia of unknown origin. Total colonization incidence was 7%, with colonization only in 11 patients who had 16 episodes; incidence of exit site infection was 3.7%. Age > or = 18 years was the only identified risk factor for developing staphylococcal infection (P = 0.03). Despite a methicillin resistance rate of 45% and omission of vancomycin from the routine initial empiric antimicrobial regimen, the clinical course of coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections was relatively benign. A single patient, who experienced marrow rejection, died on day +31 with septicemia and only one patient experienced microbiological failure with recurrent colonization. Bacteria grown in both aerobic and anaerobic bottles were more likely true bacteremia than contaminant (P = 0.03). We conclude that the hazard of coagulase-negative staphylococcal infection does not mandate inclusion of a glycopeptide in the initial empiric antimicrobial regimen in BMT patients, even during febrile neutropenia. Hickman/Broviac-related staphylococcal infections, except for tunnel infection or

  20. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

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    Jaime Canovas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci

  1. Comparison of Genotypes and Enterotoxin Genes Between Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Blood and Nasal Colonizers in a Korean Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Kyong Ran; Baek, Jin Yang; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the genetic background of 70 Staphylococcus aureus isolates (36 methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA] and 34 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA]) obtained from blood at a Korean tertiary-care hospital, using spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, and SCCmec typing. In addition, the prevalence of enterotoxin (sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, sei, and sek), tst, and pvl genes among the samples was assessed via polymerase chain reaction, and the results were compared with those of 95 isolates of S. aureus obtained from nasal swabs. All MRSA isolates from blood, except one, belonged to three major clones: sequence type (ST)5-MRSA-II, ST72-MRSA-II (or IVA), and ST239-MRSA-III, among which ST5-MRSA-II was the predominant clone. The prevalence of enterotoxin genes in the S. aureus isolates obtained from blood differed significantly from those from the nasal swabs for the sea, seb, sec, and seh gene. In particular, the seb and sec genes were detected exclusively in the MRSA isolates of ST5 or spa-CC002, thereby suggesting the co-adaptation of virulence genes with the genetic background and their contribution to biological fitness. PMID:19654937

  2. Presence of Classical Enterotoxin Genes, agr Typing, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Genetic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus from Milk of Cows with Mastitis in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroning, Isabela S; Iglesias, Mariana A; Mendonça, Karla S; Lopes, Graciela V; Silva, Wladimir P

    2018-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common causative agent of bovine mastitis in dairy cows and commonly associated with foodborne disease outbreaks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of enterotoxin genes, agr typing, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic diversity of S. aureus isolated from milk of cows with mastitis in dairy farms from southern Brazil. Results showed that 7 (22.6%) of 31 S. aureus isolates were positive for enterotoxin genes. Specifically, the genes encoding for enterotoxins A ( n = 4), C ( n = 2), and B ( n = 1) were detected. Isolates belonging to the agr group III (10 of 31, 32.2%) and agr group I (7 of 31, 22.5%) were the most common. To our knowledge, this is the first report of both agr I and III in the same S. aureus isolate from milk of cows with bovine mastitis. The antimicrobial resistance test showed that 54% of the isolates were multiresistant to antimicrobial agents. The macrorestriction analysis produced 16 different major SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, with up to two subpatterns. Moreover, the presence of some S. aureus clones in a distinct area was observed. Although this study characterized a limited number of S. aureus isolates, the presence of classical enterotoxin genes and resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents reinforces the importance of this microorganism to animal and human health. In addition, similar genetic profiles have been identified in distinct geographic areas, suggesting clonal dissemination of S. aureus in dairy herds from southern Brazil.

  3. Detection of coding genes for enterotoxins in Bacillus cereus by PCR and their products by BCET-RPLA and ELISA Assay

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    Marcela Vyletělová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of enterotoxin production, diarrhoeal and emetic gene identification was studied in 41 Bacillus cereus strains isolated from raw cows’ and raw goats’ milk, pasteurized milk, dairy products during technological processing and from dairy plant equipment. Presence of enterotoxins was detected by BCET-RPLA (HBL and ELISA immunoassay (NHE. Gene identification (nheA, nheB, nheC, hblA, hblC, hblD, bceT, cytK-1, cytK-2, entFM and ces was achieved by means of PCR. Enterotoxin HBL was detected in 32 strains, enterotoxin NHE in all 41 strains. Presence of all three genes nheA, nheB and nheC was confirmed in 40 strains and genes hblA, hblC and hblD in 29 strains. Comparison of used methods was as follow: 1 BCET-RPLA (which detects L2 component and PCR (positive or negative all three hblA, hblC and hblD gene detection were identical in 30 (73%; 2 ELISA (NheA and PCR (all three nheC, nheB and nheA gene expression were identical in 40 (98% cases isolated strains.

  4. Comparison of toxicity neutralization-, ELISA- and PCR tests for typing of Clostridium perfringens and detection of the enterotoxin gene by PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kristian; Ahrens, Peter

    1996-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the specific amplification of a part of each of the five Clostridium perfringens toxin genes: alpha (alpha), beta (beta), epsilon (epsilon), iota (iota), and enterotoxin (CPE). While the toxicity neutralization test (TNT) only showed limited...

  5. Enterotoxin Producing Ability And Antimicrobial Susceptibility Of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Isolated From Goat Milk Cheese And Salted Yoghurt In Turkey

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    S. Pehlivanlar Onen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine enterotoxin producing ability and antimicrobial susceptibility of coagulase negative staphylococci CNS in goats bulk milk cheese and salted yoghurt. CNS strains were identified by using GP card in VITEK 2 system. The presence of enterotoxins was determined by enzyme immunoassay test by using RIDASCREEN test kit. Antibiotic susceptibility in CNS strains was detected by using AST-P640 card in VITEK 2 system. A total of 100 CNS strains were isolated in 22 55 bulk milk samples and in 23 57.5 cheese samples. Staphylococcus spp. could not be isolated from salted yoghurt samples. The most encountered species were S. caprae 51.9 S. chromogenes 11.5 and S. xylosus 9.6 from milk samples and S. saprophyticus 60.4 S. xylosus 12.5 and S. haemolyticus 8.3 from cheese samples. Four CNS strains 4 isolated from samples were capable of producing enterotoxin. While all isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic 74 of CNS strains showed resistance to two or more antibiotics. Enterotoxin production ability and high antibiotic resistance of the CNS strains isolated from goat bulk milk and cheese can lead to a risk for public health.

  6. Molecular Detection of Inducible Clindamycin Resistance among Staphylococcal Strains Isolated from Hospital Patients

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    Shadiyeh Abdollahi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB antimicrobial agents are used in the treatment of staphylococcal infections. They prevent the microbial protein synthesis system through binding to 23 S rRNA. The aim of this study was to apply molecular methods to detect inducible clindamycin resistance genes among staphylococcal strains isolated from clinical specimens.   Methods : Two hundred staphylococcus strains were isolated from nose and throat swabs of patients in Toohid and Besat hospitals in Sanandaj . Antimicrobial susceptibilities of isolates were determined using disc diffusion method, agar screen test and D-Test. A multiplex PCR was performed using primers specific for erm (A, B, C, TR genes.   Results: Out of 200 isolates, 18.5 % were MRSA and 32% were MRCNS (methicillin resistant coagulase negative staphylococci. Of 80 erythromycin resistant isolates, 48 were coagulase negative and 32 were S. aureus. Among the 48 coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS isolates, 11.63% expressed the MLSB-inducible phenotypes. Using PCR, the frequency of different genes in the collection of isolates were as follows: ermA 5.41 % , erm B 5.41 % , and erm C 3.13%. The ermTR gene was negative in all isolates. Among the 32 S. aureus isolates, 9.38% expressed the MLSB-nducible phenotype. Using PCR, these isolates harbored erm A (2.22%, ermB (2.22%, ermC (2.22% and ermTR (2.22% .   Conclusion: This is the first study to show the rate of inducible clindamycin clinical isolates of staphylococci harboring erm genes in Sananadaj. It also demonstrated the frequency of erm genes was higher among CONS isolates than S. aureus. This data suggested the transfer of resistance gene from nonpathogenic to pathogenic strains is likely to happen. Therefore, screening and control of these resistance genes is recommended at clinical laboratories.

  7. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation of linezolid for the treatment of staphylococcal infections in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haiyan; Xie, Jiao; Wang, Taotao; Chen, Lihong; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Sun, Jinyao; Wang, Xue; Dong, Yalin

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the ideal therapeutic effect of linezolid cannot be achieved in critically ill patients with the recommended standard dosing regimen of 600 mg every 12 h (q12h). Moreover, the optimal strategy for successful treatment is still lacking. This study analysed factors influencing the efficacy of linezolid treatment and determined the target for successful treatment by logistic regression in 27 critically ill patients with staphylococcal infection who received linezolid 600 mg q12h. The results showed that only the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC24/MIC) ratio was significantly associated with staphylococcal eradication. Reaching 80% bacterial eradication required an AUC24/MIC of 120.5, defining the therapeutic target. Different dosing regimens were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation to determine the optimal dosage strategy for linezolid. Although the probability of target attainment (PTA) was high (>99.9%) for the standard dosing regimen at MIC ≤ 1 mg/L, the PTA was almost 0 at MIC = 2 mg/L, thus the dosing regimen required adjustment. In addition, if the dosing regimen was adjusted to 600 mg every 8 h or 600 mg every 6 h, the major staphylococci (except for MRSA and MSSA) exhibited a cumulative fraction of response of >80%, showing a higher treatment success. These findings indicate that a strategy of high linezolid dosage may be needed to increase the probability of successful treatment at MIC > 1 mg/L. The role of therapeutic drug monitoring should be encouraged for optimising linezolid exposure in critically ill patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. New quantitative image analysis of staphylococcal biofilms on the surfaces of nontranslucent metallic biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kouichi; Tsurumoto, Toshiyuki; Yonekura, Akihiko; Nishimura, Seisuke; Kajiyama, Shiro; Hirakata, Yoichi; Shindo, Hiroyuki

    2007-03-01

    Implant-related infection after orthopedic surgery is difficult to cure. One of the causes of infection is the bacterial biofilm that forms around biomaterials used during surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate bacterial biofilms extensively to resolve the problems of these postoperative infections. However, no established culture method or quantification system exists for bacterial biofilms grown on the surface of the metallic biomaterials used in orthopedics, which are nonradiolucent. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative method to evaluate the difference in resistance of stainless steel versus titanium to staphylococcal biofilms and the efficacy of antibiotics against biofilms. The bacterial strains used in this study were three Staphylococcus aureus stains: strain Seattle 1945 and two clinical strains cultured from postoperative infections. Staphylococcal biofilms were formed on stainless steel washers (SUS304) and titanium washers (pure titanium). They were stained with crystal violet and were examined with a digital microscope to calculate the bacterial coverage rate (BCR) by NIH imaging. The BCR of S. aureus biofilms formed on stainless steel and titanium washers increased over time. At 24, 48, and 72 h after cultivation, the amount of biofilm on the surface of the stainless steel washers was significantly greater or tended to be greater than that on the titanium. Cefazolin was applied to the obtained biofilms of two clinically isolated S. aureus strains. Cefazolin did not eradicate the biofilms but significantly reduced the biofilm of one strain. The newly developed quantitative method (static microtube culture and measurement system) was useful for assessing the amount of bacterial biofilms on the surface of nontranslucent biomaterial. We found that titanium may be more resistant to bacterial infection than stainless steel. To control implant-related severe infections, the biomaterials should be assessed from the viewpoint of

  9. Detection of enterotoxins produced by B. cereus through PCR analysis of ground and roasted coffee samples in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Cyllene de Matos Ornelas da Cunha Corrêa de Souza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is one of the most appreciated drinks in the world. Coffee ground is obtained from the fruit of a small plant that belongs to the genus Coffea. Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora robusta are the two most commercially important species. They are more commonly known as arabica and robusta, respectively. Two-thirds of Coffea arabica plants are grown in South and Central America, and Eastern Africa - the place of origin for this coffee species. Contamination by microorganisms has been a major matter affecting coffee quality in Brazil, mainly due to the harvesting method adopted. Brazilian harvests are based on fruits collected from the ground mixed with those that fall on collection cloths. As the Bacillus cereus bacterium frequently uses the soil as its environmental reservoir, it is easily capable of becoming a contaminant. This study aimed to evaluate the contamination and potential of B. cereus enterotoxin genes encoding the HBL and NHE complexes, which were observed in strains of ground and roasted coffee samples sold in Rio de Janeiro. The PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction results revealed high potential of enterotoxin production in the samples. The method described by Speck (1984 was used for the isolation of contaminants. The investigation of the potential production of enterotoxins through isolates of the microorganism was performed using the B. cereus enterotoxin Reverse Passive Latex Agglutination test-kit (BCET-RPLA, Oxoid, according to the manufacturer's instructions. The potential of enterotoxin production was investigated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods for hblA, hblD and hblC genes (encoding hemolysin HBL and for nheA, nheB and nheC genes (encoding non-hemolytic enterotoxin - NHE. Of all the 17 strains, 100% were positive for at least 1 enterotoxin gene; 52.9% (9/17 were positive for the 3 genes encoding the HBL complex; 35.3% (6/17 were positive for the three NHE encoding genes; and 29.4% (5/17 were positive for

  10. Acetic acid increases the phage-encoded enterotoxin A expression in Staphylococcus aureus

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    da Silva Ayla

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of acetic acid, a common food preservative, on the bacteriophage-encoded enterotoxin A (SEA expression and production in Staphylococcus aureus was investigated in pH-controlled batch cultures carried out at pH 7.0, 6.5, 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Also, genomic analysis of S. aureus strains carrying sea was performed to map differences within the gene and in the temperate phage carrying sea. Results The sea expression profile was similar from pH 7.0 to 5.5, with the relative expression peaking in the transition between exponential and stationary growth phase and falling during stationary phase. The levels of sea mRNA were below the detection limit at pH 5.0 and 4.5, confirmed by very low SEA levels at these pH values. The level of relative sea expression at pH 6.0 and 5.5 were nine and four times higher, respectively, in the transitional phase than in the exponential growth phase, compared to pH 7.0 and pH 6.5, where only a slight increase in relative expression in the transitional phase was observed. Furthermore, the increase in sea expression levels at pH 6.0 and 5.5 were observed to be linked to increased intracellular sea gene copy numbers and extracellular sea-containing phage copy numbers. The extracellular SEA levels increased over time, with highest levels produced at pH 6.0 in the four growth phases investigated. Using mitomycin C, it was verified that SEA was at least partially produced as a consequence of prophage induction of the sea-phage in the three S. aureus strains tested. Finally, genetic analysis of six S. aureus strains carrying the sea gene showed specific sea phage-groups and two versions of the sea gene that may explain the different sea expression and production levels observed in this study. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the increased sea expression in S. aureus caused by acetic acid induced the sea-encoding prophage, linking SEA production to the lifecycle of the phage.

  11. Parenteral adjuvant potential of recombinant B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin

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    Carlos Eduardo Pouey da Cunha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LTB is a potent mucosal immune adjuvant. However, there is little information about LTB's potential as a parenteral adjuvant. OBJECTIVES We aimed at evaluating and better understanding rLTB's potential as a parenteral adjuvant using the fused R1 repeat of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae P97 adhesin as an antigen to characterise the humoral immune response induced by this construct and comparing it to that generated when aluminium hydroxide is used as adjuvant instead. METHODS BALB/c mice were immunised intraperitoneally with either rLTBR1 or recombinant R1 adsorbed onto aluminium hydroxide. The levels of systemic anti-rR1 antibodies (total Ig, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgA were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The ratio of IgG1 and IgG2a was used to characterise a Th1, Th2, or mixed Th1/Th2 immune response. FINDINGS Western blot confirmed rR1, either alone or fused to LTB, remained antigenic; anti-cholera toxin ELISA confirmed that LTB retained its activity when expressed in a heterologous system. Mice immunised with the rLTBR1 fusion protein produced approximately twice as much anti-rR1 immunoglobulins as mice vaccinated with rR1 adsorbed onto aluminium hydroxide. Animals vaccinated with either rLTBR1 or rR1 adsorbed onto aluminium hydroxide presented a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response. We speculate this might be a result of rR1 immune modulation rather than adjuvant modulation. Mice immunised with rLTBR1 produced approximately 1.5-fold more serum IgA than animals immunised with rR1 and aluminium hydroxide. MAIN CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that rLTB is a more powerful parenteral adjuvant than aluminium hydroxide when administered intraperitoneally as it induced higher antibody titres. Therefore, we recommend that rLTB be considered an alternative adjuvant, even if different administration routes are employed.

  12. Cross-sectional study to identify staphylococcal species isolated from teat and inguinal skin of different-aged dairy heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, P R F; Dufour, S; Spain, J N; Calcutt, M J; Reilly, T J; Stewart, G C; Middleton, J R

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and distribution of staphylococcal species on the teat and inguinal skin of dairy heifers across the various stages of the heifer life cycle. The cross-sectional study included 106 Holstein heifers with an age range of 0 d to 27 mo that were selected from 11 different groups, based on housing type and age, on a single dairy operation. A composite swabbing sample including all 4 teats and a second composite sample including both inguinal regions of each heifer were collected using gas-sterilized electrostatic dusters (Swiffers; Procter and Gamble, Cincinnati, OH). Swabbing samples were mixed with 10 mL of sterile saline, agitated, and cultured on mannitol salt agar plates. At 24 h, plates were read and up to 10 staphylococcal colonies were saved for further analysis. Staphylococcal isolates were speciated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry or PCR amplification and partial sequencing of rpoB or tuf. The prevalence of staphylococci was compared between the inguinal and teat regions using the chi-squared or Fisher's exact test, as applicable. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between a heifer's age (treated as a quantitative continuous variable) and the probability of isolating a given staphylococcal species from a given body site (inguinal region or teats). Overall, the most common species identified were Staphylococcus haemolyticus followed by Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus devriesei, and Staphylococcus sciuri. Staphylococcus aureus was more prevalent on the teat than in the inguinal region, whereas Staphylococcus arlettae was more prevalent in the inguinal region than on the teat. All other staphylococcal species were as likely to be found on the teat skin as the inguinal region skin. Isolation from the inguinal and teat skin was associated with age for Staphylococcus agnetis, S. chromogenes

  13. Knowledge and Perceptions About Community-acquired Staphylococcal Infections Among Health Care Workers in Hawai‘i

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    Tice, Alan D; Hurwitz, Eric L; Katz, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically.1,2 Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai‘i's expanding S. aureus and MRSA epidemic closely approximating the national trend in inpatient and outpatient settings,7,8 a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully control this evolving epidemic. Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes and obesity, as well as to demonstrate awareness of a growing staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic.9,10 Perceptions were estimated by level of concern of antibiotic resistance as well as of the severity of the staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic. Variations in knowledge and perception concerning basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as characteristics of the evolving S. aureus and MRSA epidemic were observed among various occupations (advance clinical practitioners, nurses, public health professionals, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work locations (hospital, community, and non-clinical community). Overall, health care and related workers in community settings demonstrated disparities in knowledge regarding S. aureus and MRSA infections. They were also more likely to misperceive this growing threat. These findings provide support for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers to improve awareness of staphylococcal infections in order to successfully address and combat this evolving epidemic. PMID:24069572

  14. Knowledge and perceptions about community-acquired staphylococcal infections among health care workers in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Brandyn S; Tice, Alan D; Hurwitz, Eric L; Katz, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically.1,2 Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai'i's expanding S. aureus and MRSA epidemic closely approximating the national trend in inpatient and outpatient settings,7,8 a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully control this evolving epidemic. Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes and obesity, as well as to demonstrate awareness of a growing staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic.9,10 Perceptions were estimated by level of concern of antibiotic resistance as well as of the severity of the staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic. Variations in knowledge and perception concerning basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as characteristics of the evolving S. aureus and MRSA epidemic were observed among various occupations (advance clinical practitioners, nurses, public health professionals, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work locations (hospital, community, and non-clinical community). Overall, health care and related workers in community settings demonstrated disparities in knowledge regarding S. aureus and MRSA infections. They were also more likely to misperceive this growing threat. These findings provide support for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers to improve awareness of staphylococcal infections in order to successfully address and combat this evolving epidemic.

  15. Hepatic Artery Mycotic Aneurysm Associated with Staphylococcal Endocarditis with Successful Treatment: Case Report with Review of the Literature

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    Dhara Chaudhari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycotic hepatic artery aneurysm is a vascular pathology associated with bacterial endocarditis. It is rare in occurrence after the introduction of effective antibiotics. We present a young patient with injection drug abuse associated staphylococcal endocarditis which was successfully treated with antibiotics and valve replacement who presented with abdominal pain. He was found to have mycotic aneurysm of hepatic artery which was successfully treated with coil embolization.

  16. Weak effect of metal type and ica genes on staphylococcal infection of titanium and stainless steel implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, D; Ursic Hudetz, S; Harris, L G; Luginbühl, R; Friederich, N F; Landmann, R

    2008-12-01

    Currently, ica is considered to be the major operon responsible for staphylococcal biofilm. The effect of biofilm on susceptibility to staphylococcal infection of different implant materials in vivo is unclear. The interaction of ica-positive (wild-type (WT)) and ica-negative (ica(-)) Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains with titanium and both smooth and rough stainless steel surfaces was studied by scanning electron microscopy in vitro and in a mouse tissue cage model during 2 weeks following perioperative or postoperative inoculation in vivo. In vitro, WT S. epidermidis adhered equally and more strongly than did WT S. aureus to all materials. Both WT strains, but not ica(-) strains, showed multilayered biofilm. In vivo, 300 CFUs of WT and ica(-)S. aureus led, in all metal cages, to an infection with a high level of planktonic CFUs and only 0.89% adherent CFUs after 8 days. In contrast, 10(6) CFUs of the WT and ica(-) strains were required for postoperative infection with S. epidermidis. In all metal types, planktonic numbers of S. epidermidis dropped to titanium cages adherent WT bacteria survived in higher numbers than ica(-) bacteria. In conclusion, the metal played a minor role in susceptibility to and persistence of staphylococcal infection; the presence of ica genes had a strong effect on biofilm in vitro and a weak effect in vivo; and S. epidermidis was more pathogenic when introduced during implantation than after implantation.

  17. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in a premature newborn caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: case report

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    Andreas Hörner

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is an exfoliative skin disease. Reports of this syndrome in newborns caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are rare but, when present, rapid diagnosis and treatment is required in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. CASE REPORT: A premature newly born girl weighing 1,520 g, born with a gestational age of 29 weeks and 4 days, developed staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome on the fifth day of life. Cultures on blood samples collected on the first and fourth days were negative, but Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus sp. (vancomycin-sensitive developed in blood cultures performed on the day of death (seventh day, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were identified in cultures on nasopharyngeal, buttock and abdominal secretions. In addition to these two Gram-negative bacilli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in a culture on the umbilical stump (seventh day. The diagnosis of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome was based on clinical criteria.

  18. Subinhibitory concentrations of thymol reduce enterotoxins A and B and alpha-hemolysin production in Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

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    Jiazhang Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeting bacterial virulence factors is now gaining interest as an alternative strategy to develop new types of anti-infective agents. It has been shown that thymol, when used at low concentrations, can inhibit the TSST-1 secretion in Staphylococcus aureus. However, there are no data on the effect of thymol on the production of other exotoxins (e.g., alpha-hemolysin and enterotoxins by S. aureus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Secretion of alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB in both methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates cultured with graded subinhibitory concentrations of thymol was detected by immunoblot analysis. Hemolysin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF release assays were performed to elucidate the biological relevance of changes in alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB secretion induced by thymol. In addition, the influence of thymol on the transcription of hla, sea, and seb (the genes encoding alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB, respectively was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Thymol inhibited transcription of hla, sea and seb in S. aureus, resulting in a reduction of alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB secretion and, thus, a reduction in hemolytic and TNF-inducing activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Subinhibitory concentrations of thymol decreased the production of alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB in both MSSA and MRSA in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that thymol may be useful for the treatment of S. aureus infections when used in combination with beta-lactams and glycopeptide antibiotics, which induce expression of alpha-hemolysin and enterotoxins at subinhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, the structure of thymol may potentially be used as a basic structure for development of drugs aimed against these bacterial virulence factors.

  19. Rapid and Direct VHH and Target Identification by Staphylococcal Surface Display Libraries

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    Marco Cavallari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Unbiased and simultaneous identification of a specific antibody and its target antigen has been difficult without prior knowledge of at least one interaction partner. Immunization with complex mixtures of antigens such as whole organisms and tissue extracts including tumoral ones evokes a highly diverse immune response. During such a response, antibodies are generated against a variety of epitopes in the mixture. Here, we propose a surface display design that is suited to simultaneously identify camelid single domain antibodies and their targets. Immune libraries of single-domain antigen recognition fragments from camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VHH were attached to the peptidoglycan of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus employing its endogenous housekeeping sortase enzyme. The sortase transpeptidation reaction covalently attached the VHH to the bacterial peptidoglycan. The reversible nature of the reaction allowed the recovery of the VHH from the bacterial surface and the use of the VHH in downstream applications. These staphylococcal surface display libraries were used to rapidly identify VHH as well as their targets by immunoprecipitation (IP. Our novel bacterial surface display platform was stable under harsh screening conditions, allowed fast target identification, and readily permitted the recovery of the displayed VHH for downstream analysis.

  20. Platelet crossmatch tests using radiolabelled staphylococcal protein A or peroxidase anti-peroxidase in alloimmunised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yam, P.; Petz, L.D.; Scott, E.P.; Santos, S.

    1984-01-01

    Refractoriness to random-donor platelets as a result of alloimmunization remains a major problem in long-term platelet transfusion therapy despite the use of HLA-matched platelets. A study has been made of two methods for detection of platelet associated IgG as platelet crossmatch tests for the selection of platelet donors. These methods use radiolabelled staphylococcal protein A( 125 I-SPA) and peroxidase anti-peroxidase (PAP), respectively. One hundred and ten crossmatch tests using 125 I-SPA were performed retrospectively in 18 alloimmunized patients. The results indicated that the predictive value of a positive or a negative test was 87%; the sensitivity was 73% and the specificity was 95%. Results with the PAP test were similar. The HLA types were known for 48 donor-recipient pairs. With few exceptions, there was a correlation between the results of the platelet crossmatch tests and the effectiveness of platelet transfusion regardless of the degree of HLA match. These results indicate that platelet crossmatch tests may be valuable even when closely HLA matched donors are not available. A large-scale prospective study is warranted, particularly in highly immunized patients. (author)

  1. Distinction between Pore Assembly by Staphylococcal α-Toxin versus Leukotoxins

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    Olivier Joubert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The staphylococcal bipartite leukotoxins and the homoheptameric α-toxin belong to the same family of β-barrel pore-forming toxins despite slight differences. In the α-toxin pore, the N-terminal extremity of each protomer interacts as a deployed latch with two consecutive protomers in the vicinity of the pore lumen. N-terminal extremities of leukotoxins as seen in their three-dimensional structures are heterogeneous in length and take part in the β-sandwich core of soluble monomers. Hence, the interaction of these N-terminal extremities within structures of adjacent monomers is questionable. We show here that modifications of their N-termini by two different processes, using fusion with glutathione S-transferase (GST and bridging of the N-terminal extremity to the adjacent β-sheet via disulphide bridges, are not deleterious for biological activity. Therefore, bipartite leukotoxins do not need a large extension of their N-terminal extremities to form functional pores, thus illustrating a microheterogeneity of the structural organizations between bipartite leukotoxins and α-toxin.

  2. Hiding in plain sight: immune evasion by the staphylococcal protein SdrE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Andrew B; Thorman, Alexander W

    2017-05-10

    The human immune system is responsible for identification and destruction of invader cells, such as the bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus In response, S. aureus brings to the fight a large number of virulence factors, including several that allow it to evade the host immune response. The staphylococcal surface protein SdrE was recently reported to bind to complement Factor H, an important regulator of complement activation. Factor H attaches to the surface of host cells to inhibit complement activation and amplification, preventing the destruction of the host cell. SdrE binding to Factor H allows S. aureus to mimic a host cell and reduces bacterial killing by granulocytes. In a new study published in Biochemical Journal , Zhang et al. describe crystal structures of SdrE and its complex with the C-terminal portion of Factor H. The structure of SdrE and its interaction with the Factor H peptide closely resemble a family of surface proteins that recognize extracellular matrix components such as fibrinogen. However, unbound SdrE forms a novel 'Closed' conformation with an occluded peptide-binding groove. These structures reveal a fascinating mechanism for immune evasion and provide a potential avenue for the development of novel antimicrobial agents to target SdrE. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Study of the Anti-Staphylococcal Potential of Honeys Produced in Northern Poland

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    Katarzyna Grecka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of 144 samples of honeys including 95 products from apiaries located in Northern Poland was evaluated. The antibacterial activity of those natural products, their thermal stability, and activity in the presence of catalase was investigated by microdilution assays in titration plates. The MTT assay was performed for the determination of anti-biofilm activity. Spectrophotometric assays were used for the determination of antioxidant potential, total phenolic content, and ability to generate hydrogen peroxide. Some of the investigated honeys exhibited surprisingly high antimicrobial, especially anti-staphylococcal, potential, with Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC values of only 1.56% (v/v. Much higher resistance was observed in the case of staphylococci growing as biofilms. Lower concentrations of the product, up to 12.5% (v/v stimulated its growth and effective eradication of biofilm required concentration of at least 25% (v/v. Hydrogen peroxide has been identified as a crucial contributor to the antimicrobial activity of honeys supplied by Polish beekeepers. However, some of the results suggest that phytochemicals, especially polyphenols, play an important role depending on botanical source (both positive, e.g., in the case of buckwheat honeys as well as negative, e.g., in the case of some rapeseed honeys in their antimicrobial potential.

  4. Epidemiological investigation of nosocomial outbreak of staphylococcal skin diseases in neonatal ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlenda, J; Grinholc, M; Krzysztoń-Russjan, J; Wiśniewska, K

    2009-05-01

    During a 1-month period, eight neonates developed staphylococcal skin disease diagnosed as a bullous impetigo in the maternity unit of the Provincial Hospital in Gdansk. An epidemiological investigation based on phenotyping and genotyping methods was performed. All neonates involved in the outbreak, their mothers and 15 staff members were screened for carriage of Staphylococcus aureus by nasal swabs. Isolated strains were compared with strains cultured from affected skin and purulent conjunctiva of infected newborns. Isolates were analyzed for the presence of the etA and etB genes using polymerase chain reaction and genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and coa gene polymorphism. The analyzed S. aureus strains were methicillin-sensitive and could be divided into two groups according to antibiotyping, phage typing, coa polymorphism and PFGE pattern. The first group consisted of etA and etB negative strains, and the second one involved only the etB positive ones. Our results have shown that there were two different clusters of infection caused by two populations of S. aureus strains. Among the 15 medical staff members screened we have found seven carriers. However, phage typing revealed that distinct strains unrelated to the outbreak isolates were carried. Although we have not been able to establish the source of bacteria involved in the outbreak, our results suggest that for both groups, mothers could be the source of the infecting strains.

  5. Antibody production in response to staphylococcal MS-1 phage cocktail in patients undergoing phage therapy

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    Maciej Żaczek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties towards applied phages (K rate. Among 20 examined patients receiving the MS-1 phage cocktail orally and/or locally, the majority did not show a noticeably higher level of antiphage antibodies in their sera during phage administration. Even in those individual cases with an increased immune response, mostly by induction of IgG and IgM, the presence of antiphage antibodies did not translate into unsatisfactory clinical results of phage therapy. On the other hand, a negative outcome of the treatment occurred in some patients who showed relatively weak production of antiphage antibodies before and during treatment. This may imply that possible induction of antiphage antibodies is not an obstacle to the implementation of phage therapy and support our assumption that the outcome of the phage treatment does not primarily depend on the appearance of antiphage antibodies in sera of patients during therapy. These conclusions are in line with our previous findings. The confirmation of this thesis is of great interest as regards the efficacy of phage therapy in humans.

  6. Antibody Production in Response to Staphylococcal MS-1 Phage Cocktail in Patients Undergoing Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żaczek, Maciej; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Owczarek, Barbara; Kopciuch, Agnieszka; Fortuna, Wojciech; Rogóż, Paweł; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies) to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties toward applied phages (K rate). Among 20 examined patients receiving the MS-1 phage cocktail orally and/or locally, the majority did not show a noticeably higher level of antiphage antibodies in their sera during phage administration. Even in those individual cases with an increased immune response, mostly by induction of IgG and IgM, the presence of antiphage antibodies did not translate into unsatisfactory clinical results of phage therapy. On the other hand, a negative outcome of the treatment occurred in some patients who showed relatively weak production of antiphage antibodies before and during treatment. This may imply that possible induction of antiphage antibodies is not an obstacle to the implementation of phage therapy and support our assumption that the outcome of the phage treatment does not primarily depend on the appearance of antiphage antibodies in sera of patients during therapy. These conclusions are in line with our previous findings. The confirmation of this thesis is of great interest as regards the efficacy of phage therapy in humans.

  7. A novel MSCRAMM sub-family in Coagulase negative staphylococcal species

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    Srishtee eArora

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Coagulase negative staphylococci are important opportunistic pathogens. Staphylococcus epidermidis, a coagulase negative staphylococcus, is the third leading cause of nosocomial infections in the US. Surface proteins like Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules (MSCRAMMs are major virulence factors of pathogenic gram positive bacteria. Here, we identified a new chimeric protein; SesJ in S. epidermidis, which represents a prototype of a new subfamily of MSCRAMMs. Structural predictions show that SesJ has structural features characteristic of a MSCRAMM along with a N-Terminal repeat region and an Aspartic acid containing repeat region, features that have not been previously observed in staphylococcal MSCRAMMs but have been found in other surface proteins from gram positive bacteria. We identified and analyzed structural homologs of SesJ in three other coagulase negative staphylococci. These homologs of SesJ have an identical structural organization but varying sequence identities within the domains. Using flow cytometry, we also show that SesJ is expressed constitutively on the surface of a representative S. epidermidis strain, from early exponential to stationary growth phase. Thus SesJ is positioned to interact with protein targets in the environment and play a role in S. epidermidis virulence.

  8. Investigation and Treatment of Fusidic Acid Resistance Among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcal Isolates from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelfetouh, Alaa; Kassem, Mervat; Naguib, Marwa; El-Nakeeb, Moustafa

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin resistance among staphylococci isolated from patients in northern Egypt has escalated alarmingly in the past decade. Data about the prevalence of fusidic acid (FA) resistance in Egyptian clinical isolates are limited. This work investigates the prevalence and mechanism of FA resistance among 81 methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates from major hospitals of Alexandria, Egypt. Some combinations for treating infections due to resistant isolates were studied. Twenty-six isolates (32.1%) were FA resistant (minimum inhibitory concentrations [MICs] = 2-1,024 μg/ml), and fusB and fusC genes coding for FA resistance were detected in 30.77% and 34.62% of the FA-resistant strains, respectively. One highly resistant isolate, S502 (MIC = 1,024 μg/ml), possessed both genes. Plasmid curing resulted in fusB loss and MIC decrease by 16-64 folds. Conjugation caused acquisition of FA resistance among susceptible isolates. Serial passages in subinhibitory FA concentrations produced mutants with increased MIC by 4-32 folds. The combination of FA with rifampin, gentamicin, or ampicillin/sulbactam, in a subinhibitory concentration, was synergistic against the isolates, including serial passage mutants, decreasing number of survivors by an average of 2-4 logs. A relatively moderate rate of FA resistance was detected in Alexandria hospitals. Combination therapy with gentamicin, rifampin, or ampicillin/sulbactam is crucial to preserve the effectiveness of FA.

  9. Adhesion of staphylococcal and Caco-2 cells on diamond-like carbon polymer hybrid coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnari, Teemu J; Soininen, Antti; Esteban, Jaime; Zamora, Nieves; Alakoski, Esa; Kouri, Vesa-Petteri; Lappalainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Gomez-Barrena, Enrique; Tiainen, Veli-Matti

    2008-09-01

    Staphylococci cause the majority of the nosocomial implant-related infections initiated by adhesion of planktonic bacteria to the implant surface. It was hypothesized that plasma accelerating filtered pulsed arc discharge method enables combination of the advantageous properties of diamond with the antisoiling properties of polymers. Diamond-like carbon polytetrafluoroethylene hybrid (DLC-PTFE-h) coating was produced. The adhesion of S. aureus ATCC 25923 (10(8) colony-forming units/mL) to surfaces diminished from 2.32%, 2.35%, and 2.57% of high quality DLC, titanium, and oxidized silicon, respectively, to 1.93% of DLC-PTFE-h. For S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 the corresponding figures were 3.90%, 3.32%, 3.47%, and 2.57%. Differences in bacterial adhesion between recombinant DLC-PTFE-h and other materials were statistically significant (p DLC-PTFE-h as to DLC, titanium, or silicon, which were all in the MTT test found to be cytocompatible. DLC-PTFE-h coating can be used to modify the surface properties of any surgical implants and is an unfavorable substrate for staphylococcal cells, but compatible with human Caco-2 cells. DLC-PTFE-h coating may help in the combat against Staphylococcus-related implant infections which usually require both antibiotics and surgical removal of the implant for cure.

  10. Staphylococcal SCCmec elements encode an active MCM-like helicase and thus may be replicative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; Roman, Christina A.; Misiura, Agnieszka; Pigli, Ying Z.; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Rice , Phoebe A. (UC)

    2016-08-29

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a public-health threat worldwide. Although the mobile genomic island responsible for this phenotype, staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC), has been thought to be nonreplicative, we predicted DNA-replication-related functions for some of the conserved proteins encoded by SCC. We show that one of these, Cch, is homologous to the self-loading initiator helicases of an unrelated family of genomic islands, that it is an active 3'-to-5' helicase and that the adjacent ORF encodes a single-stranded DNA–binding protein. Our 2.9-Å crystal structure of intact Cch shows that it forms a hexameric ring. Cch, like the archaeal and eukaryotic MCM-family replicative helicases, belongs to the pre–sensor II insert clade of AAA+ ATPases. Additionally, we found that SCC elements are part of a broader family of mobile elements, all of which encode a replication initiator upstream of their recombinases. Replication after excision would enhance the efficiency of horizontal gene transfer.

  11. Prevalence and Genetic Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus argenteus Isolates Harboring Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, Enterotoxins, and TSST-1 Genes from Food Handlers in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Meiji Soe; San, Thida; Aye, Mya Mya; Mya, San; Maw, Win Win; Zan, Khin Nyein; Htut, Wut Hmone Win; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2017-08-04

    Asymptomatic carriers of toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus are potential source of diseases, including food poisoning. Toxigenic potential and genetic traits of colonizing S. aureus were investigated for 563 healthy food handlers in Myanmar. Carriage of S. aureus was found in 110 individuals (19.5%), and a total of 144 S. aureus isolates were recovered from nasal cavities (110 isolates) and hands (34 isolates). Panton-Valentine leucocidin genes ( pvl ) were detected in 18 isolates (12.5%), among which 11 isolates were classified into coa -VIa, agr type III, and ST1930 (CC96) that had been also detected in pvl -positive clinical isolates in Myanmar. A pvl -positive, ST2250 nasal isolate was identified as S. argenteus , a novel coagulase-positive staphylococcus species. Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) gene was detected in five pvl -negative isolates. All of the 144 isolates harbored at least one of the 21 enterotoxin(-like) gene(s). The most prevalent enterotoxin(-like) gene was selw (98%), followed by selx (97%), sei (28%), sely (28%), sem (26%), sel (24%), and sea and sec (22% each). Considerable genetic diversity with five groups was detected for selw . The present study revealed the relatively high rate of pvl , as well as the wide distribution of enterotoxin(-like) genes among colonizing S. aureus in Myanmar.

  12. An alternative explanation for the occurrence of short circuit current increases in the small intestine following challenge by bacterial enterotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, M L

    2013-10-01

    Secretory diarrhoeal disease due to enterotoxins is thought to arise from the enhancement to pathologically high rates of normally occurring chloride ion and therefore fluid secretion from enterocytes. In support of this concept, many enterotoxins increase intestinal short-circuit current, regarded now as faithfully reflecting the increased chloride ion secretion. Contradicting this assumption, STa reduces absorption but does not cause secretion in vivo although short-circuit current is increased in vitro. There is therefore a mismatch between an assumed enterocyte mediated secretory event that should but does not cause net fluid secretion and an undoubtedly increased short-circuit current. It is proposed here that short-circuit current increases are not themselves secretory events but result from interrupted fluid absorption. A noteworthy feature of compounds that inhibit the increase in short-circuit current is that the majority are vasoactive, neuroactive or both. In general, vasodilator substances increase current. An alternative hypothesis for the origin of short-circuit current increases is that these result from reflex induction of electrogenic fluid absorption. This reflex enhances a compensatory response that is also present at a cellular level. An intestinal reflex is therefore proposed by which decreases in interstitial and intravascular volume or pressure within the intestine initiate an electrogenic fluid absorption mechanism that compensates for the loss of electrically neutral fluid absorption. This hypothesis would explain the apparently complex pharmacology of short-circuit current increases since many depressor substances have receptors in common with enterocytes and enteric nerves. The proposed alternative view of the origin of short-circuit current increases assumes that these do not represent chloride secretion from the enterocytes. This view may therefore aid the successful development of anti-diarrhoeal drugs to overcome a major cause of

  13. Systematic review of a patient care bundle in reducing staphylococcal infections in cardiac and orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Cameron, Alun; Tivey, David; Grae, Nikki; Roberts, Sally; Morris, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious adverse events hindering surgical patients' recovery. In Australia and New Zealand, SSIs are a huge burden to patients and healthcare systems. A bundled approach, including pre-theatre nasal and/or skin decolonization has been used to reduce the risk of staphylococcal infection. The aim of this review is to assess the effectiveness of the bundle in preventing SSIs for cardiac and orthopaedic surgeries. The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Published literature was searched in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library of Systematic reviews. Identified articles were selected and extracted based on a priori defined Population-Intervention-Comparator-Outcome and eligibility criteria. Data of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative observational studies were synthesized by meta-analyses. Quality appraisal tools were used to assess the evidence quality. The review included six RCTs and 19 observational studies. The bundled treatment regimens varied substantially across all studies. RCTs showed a trend of Staphylococcus aureus SSIs reduction due to the bundle (relative risk = 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33, 1.06) with moderate heterogeneity. Observational studies showed statistically significant reduction in all-cause and S. aureus SSIs, with 51% (95% CI = 0.41, 0.59) and 47% (95% CI = 0.35, 0.65), respectively. No publication biases were detected. SSIs in major cardiac and orthopaedic surgeries can be effectively reduced by approximately 50% with a pre-theatre patient care bundle approach. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  14. Nosocomial outbreak of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in neonates: epidemiological investigation and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Helali, N; Carbonne, A; Naas, T; Kerneis, S; Fresco, O; Giovangrandi, Y; Fortineau, N; Nordmann, P; Astagneau, P

    2005-10-01

    Over a three-month period, 13 neonates developed staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) in a maternity unit, between four and 18 days after their birth. An epidemiological and descriptive study followed by a case-control study was performed. A case was defined as a neonate with blistering or peeling skin, and exfoliative toxin A Staphylococcus aureus positive cultures. Controls were selected at random from the asymptomatic, non-colonized neonates born on the same day as the cases. All staff members and all neonates born during the outbreak period were screened for carriage by nasal swabs and umbilical swabs, respectively. S. aureus isolates were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screened for etA gene and genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Two clusters of eight and five cases were identified. Receiving more than one early umbilical care procedure by the same ancillary nurse was the only risk factor identified in the case-control study (odds ratio=15, 95% confidence intervals 2-328). The ancillary nurse suffered from chronic dermatitis on her hands that favoured S. aureus carriage. Exfoliative-toxin-A-producing strains, as evidenced by PCR and indistinguishable by PFGE, were isolated from all but one of the SSSS cases, from four asymptomatic neonates, from two staff members and from the ancillary nurse's hands. Removal of the ancillary nurse from duty, infection control measures (isolation precautions, chlorhexidine handwashing and barrier protections), and treatment of the carriers (nasal mupirocin and chlorhexidine showers) led to control of the epidemic. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the need for tight surveillance of chronic dermatitis in healthcare workers.

  15. Improved detection of a staphylococcal infection by monomeric and protein A-purified polyclonal human immunoglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calame, W.

    1993-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the technetium-99m labelled non-specific polyclonal human immunoglobulin (Ig) with 99m Tc-labelled monomeric human immunoglobulin (m-Ig), 99m Tc-labelled, protein A-purified, human immunoglobulin (A-IG) and 99m Tc-labelled monomeric, protein A-purified, human immunoglobulin (mA-Ig) as tracer agents for the detection of a thigh infection with Staphylococcus aureus. In vitro the binding of the various tracer agents to bacteria at various intervals was determined. For the in vivo evaluation, mice were infected and received one of the various labelled proteins. Scintigrams were made 0.25, 1, 4 and 24 h later. All 99m Tc-labelled Igs bound to bacteria in vitro: The percentages of binding for the m-Ig (from 1 h onwards) and A-Ig and mA-Ig (from 3 h onwards) were significantly higher than that for Ig. The in vivo target-to-non-target (T/NT) ratios were significantly higher from 4 h onwards for all purified Igs than for Ig. Protein A-purified Ig yielded higher T/NT ratios than m-Ig. Furthermore, the amount of activity in the liver was significantly lower 24 h after administration of m-Ig, A-Ig and mA-Ig than after administration of Ig. It is concluded that in this experimental infection 99m Tc-labelled monomeric Ig localizes a staphylococcal thigh infection better and faster than 99m Tc-labelled unpurified Ig. However, the accumulation obtained with protein A-purified Ig or protein A-purified monomeric Ig was the highest of all tracer agents tested. (orig.)

  16. Pharmacokinetic/Toxicity Properties of the New Anti-Staphylococcal Lead Compound SK-03-92

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Schwan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of the potential of a new anti-staphylococcal lead compound SK-03-92 as a topical antibiotic, a patch, or an orally active drug, we sought to determine its safety profile and oral bioavailability. SK-03-92 had a high IC50 (125 μg/mL in vitro against several mammalian cell lines, and mice injected intraperiteonally at the highest dose did not exhibit gross toxicity (e.g., altered gait, ungroomed, significant weight loss. Single dose (100 μg/g pharmacokinetic (PK analysis with formulated SK-03-92 showed that peak plasma concentration (1.64 μg/mL was achieved at 20–30 min. Oral relative bioavailability was 8%, and the drug half-life was 20–30 min, demonstrating that SK-03-92 is likely not a candidate for oral delivery. Five-day and two-week PK analyses demonstrated that SK-03-92 plasma levels were low. Multi-dose analysis showed no gross adverse effects to the mice and a SK-03-92 peak plasma concentration of 2.12 μg/mL with the presence of significant concentrations of breakdown products 15 min after dosing. SK-03-92 appeared to be very safe based on tissue culture and mouse gross toxicity determinations, but the peak plasma concentration suggests that a pro-drug of SK-03-92 or preparation of analogs of SK-03-92 with greater bioavailability and longer half-lives are warranted.

  17. Characterization of fatty acid modifying enzyme activity in staphylococcal mastitis isolates and other bacteria

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    Lu Thea

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid modifying enzyme (FAME has been shown to modify free fatty acids to alleviate their bactericidal effect by esterifying fatty acids to cholesterol or alcohols. Although it has been shown in previous studies that FAME is required for Staphylococcus aureus survival in skin abscesses, FAME is poorly studied compared to other virulence factors. FAME activity had also been detected in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS. However, FAME activity was only surveyed after a bacterial culture was grown for 24 h. Therefore if FAME activity was earlier in the growth phase, it would not have been detected by the assay and those strains would have been labeled as FAME negative. Results Fifty CNS bovine mastitis isolates and several S. aureus, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus uberis strains were assayed for FAME activity over 24 h. FAME activity was detected in 54% of CNS and 80% S. aureus strains surveyed but none in E. coli or S. uberis. While some CNS strains produced FAME activity comparable to the lab strain of S. aureus, the pattern of FAME activity varied among strains and across species of staphylococci. All CNS that produced FAME activity also exhibited lipase activity. Lipase activity relative to colony forming units of these CNS decreased over the 24 h growth period. No relationship was observed between somatic cell count in the milk and FAME activity in CNS. Conclusions Some staphylococcal species surveyed produced FAME activity, but E. coli and S. uberis strains did not. All FAME producing CNS exhibited lipase activity which may indicate that both these enzymes work in concert to alter fatty acids in the bacterial environment.

  18. Staphylococcal Bicomponent Pore-Forming Toxins: Targets for Prophylaxis and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Javad Aman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococccus aureus represents one of the most challenging human pathogens as well as a common colonizer of human skin and mucosal surfaces. S. aureus causes a wide range of diseases from skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI to debilitating and life-threatening conditions such as osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and necrotizing pneumonia. The range of diseases reflects the remarkable diversity of the virulence factors produced by this pathogen, including surface antigens involved in the establishment of infection and a large number of toxins that mediate a vast array of cellular responses. The staphylococcal toxins are generally believed to have evolved to disarm the innate immune system, the first line of defense against this pathogen. This review focuses on recent advances on elucidating the biological functions of S. aureus bicomponent pore-forming toxins (BCPFTs and their utility as targets for preventive and therapeutic intervention. These toxins are cytolytic to a variety of immune cells, primarily neutrophils, as well as cells with a critical barrier function. The lytic activity of BCPFTs towards immune cells implies a critical role in immune evasion, and a number of epidemiological studies and animal experiments relate these toxins to clinical disease, particularly SSTI and necrotizing pneumonia. Antibody-mediated neutralization of this lytic activity may provide a strategy for development of toxoid-based vaccines or immunotherapeutics for prevention or mitigation of clinical diseases. However, certain BCPFTs have been proposed to act as danger signals that may alert the immune system through an inflammatory response. The utility of a neutralizing vaccination strategy must be weighed against such immune-activating potential.

  19. Staphylococcal bicomponent pore-forming toxins: targets for prophylaxis and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, M Javad; Adhikari, Rajan P

    2014-03-04

    Staphylococccus aureus represents one of the most challenging human pathogens as well as a common colonizer of human skin and mucosal surfaces. S. aureus causes a wide range of diseases from skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) to debilitating and life-threatening conditions such as osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and necrotizing pneumonia. The range of diseases reflects the remarkable diversity of the virulence factors produced by this pathogen, including surface antigens involved in the establishment of infection and a large number of toxins that mediate a vast array of cellular responses. The staphylococcal toxins are generally believed to have evolved to disarm the innate immune system, the first line of defense against this pathogen. This review focuses on recent advances on elucidating the biological functions of S. aureus bicomponent pore-forming toxins (BCPFTs) and their utility as targets for preventive and therapeutic intervention. These toxins are cytolytic to a variety of immune cells, primarily neutrophils, as well as cells with a critical barrier function. The lytic activity of BCPFTs towards immune cells implies a critical role in immune evasion, and a number of epidemiological studies and animal experiments relate these toxins to clinical disease, particularly SSTI and necrotizing pneumonia. Antibody-mediated neutralization of this lytic activity may provide a strategy for development of toxoid-based vaccines or immunotherapeutics for prevention or mitigation of clinical diseases. However, certain BCPFTs have been proposed to act as danger signals that may alert the immune system through an inflammatory response. The utility of a neutralizing vaccination strategy must be weighed against such immune-activating potential.

  20. MCCE analysis of the pKas of introduced buried acids and bases in staphylococcal nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M R; Zhu, Xuyu; Klein, Max C

    2011-12-01

    The pK(a)s of 96 acids and bases introduced into buried sites in the staphylococcal nuclease protein (SNase) were calculated using the multiconformation continuum electrostatics (MCCE) program and the results compared with experimental values. The pK(a)s are obtained by Monte Carlo sampling of coupled side chain protonation and position as a function of pH. The dependence of the results on the protein dielectric constant (ε(prot)) in the continuum electrostatics analysis and on the Lennard-Jones non-electrostatics parameters was evaluated. The pK(a)s of the introduced residues have a clear dependence on ε(prot,) whereas native ionizable residues do not. The native residues have electrostatic interactions with other residues in the protein favoring ionization, which are larger than the desolvation penalty favoring the neutral state. Increasing ε(prot) scales both terms, which for these residues leads to small changes in pK(a). The introduced residues have a larger desolvation penalty and negligible interactions with residues in the protein. For these residues, changing ε(prot) has a large influence on the calculated pK(a). An ε(prot) of 8-10 and a Lennard-Jones scaling of 0.25 is best here. The X-ray crystal structures of the mutated proteins are found to provide somewhat better results than calculations carried out on mutations made in silico. Initial relaxation of the in silico mutations by Gromacs and extensive side chain rotamer sampling within MCCE can significantly improve the match with experiment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Characterization of the residual structure in the unfolded state of the Delta 131 Delta fragment of staphylococcal nuclease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, C. J.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    dynamics simulations to characterise the residual structure of the 131 fragment of staphylococcal nuclease under physiological conditions. Our findings indicate that 131 under these conditions shows a tendency to form transiently hydrophobic clusters similar to those present in the native state of wild......The determination of the conformational preferences in unfolded states of proteins constitutes an important challenge in structural biology. We use inter-residue distances estimated from site-directed spin-labeling NMR experimental measurements as ensemble-averaged restraints in all-atom molecular...

  2. Immunochemical and PCR analysis of Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin B (SEB in milk and fruit juices collected in Lahore, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dar Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxins secreted by S. aureus are known as a food-poisoning agent that is associated with various gastro-intestinal pathological conditions. In this study, a one-step immunodetection method was devised for routine checking of SEB in milk and fruit juices available locally. Antibodies against recombinant SEB were raised, purified, and cross reactivity was checked against clinically important bacteria (Shigella flexneri, Streptococci, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella and Bacillus subtilis. Purified anti-SEB antibodies were conjugated with gold nanoparticles (Ab-GNPs for direct detection of SEB in samples. SEB (33%, 4.76% and 15% was found in non-sterilized milk (118, sterilized milk (42 and juices (60, respectively. Coagulase, MSA tests and PCR amplification of 725 bp of the SEB gene confirmed the presence of S. aureus in the collected samples positive for SEB. Immunoassay is easy, reliable and less time consuming and will be helpful to detect the SEB in food samples at local level.

  3. A cfr-positive clinical staphylococcal isolate from India with multiple mechanisms of linezolid-resistance

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    Vineeth Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Linezolid, a member of the oxazolidinone class of antibiotics, has been an effective therapeutic option to treat severe infections caused by multidrug resistant Gram positive bacteria. Emergence of linezolid resistant clinical strains is a serious issue in the healthcare settings worldwide. We report here the molecular characterization of a linezolid resistant clinical isolate of Staphylococcus haemolyticus from India. Methods: The species of the clinical isolate was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of linezolid, clindamycin, chloramphenicol and oxacillin were determined by E-test method. To elucidate the mechanism of linezolid-resistance, presence of cfr gene (chloramphenicol florfenicol resistance and mutations in 23S rRNA and ribosomal proteins (L3, L4 and L22 were investigated. Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec typing was performed by multiplex PCR. Results: The study documented a rare clinical S. haemolyticus strain with three independent mechanisms of linezolid-resistance. The strain carried cfr gene, the only known transmissible mechanism of linezolid-resistance. The strain also possessed resistance-conferring mutations such as G 2576 T in domain V of 23S rRNA gene and Met 156 Thr in L3 ribosomal protein. The other ribosomal proteins (L4 and L22 did not exhibit mutations accountable for linezolid-resistance. Restriction digestion by NheI revealed that all the alleles of 23S rRNA gene were mutated. The isolate showed elevated MIC values (>256 ΅g ml -[1] of linezolid, clindamycin, chloramphenicol and oxacillin. Methicillin resistance was conferred by type I SCCmec element. The strain also harboured lsa(B gene which encodes an ABC transporter that can efflux clindamycin. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study reports the first clinical strain from India with transmissible and multiple mechanisms of linezolid-resistance. Judicious use of

  4. Novel staphylococcal glycosyltransferases SdgA and SdgB mediate immunogenicity and protection of virulence-associated cell wall proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenbos, Wouter L. W.; Kajihara, Kimberly K.; Vandlen, Richard; Morisaki, J. Hiroshi; Lehar, Sophie M.; Kwakkenbos, Mark J.; Beaumont, Tim; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Phung, Qui; Swem, Lee R.; Ramakrishnan, Satish; Kim, Janice; Xu, Min; Shah, Ishita M.; Diep, Binh An; Sai, Tao; Sebrell, Andrew; Khalfin, Yana; Oh, Angela; Koth, Chris; Lin, S. Jack; Lee, Byoung-Chul; Strandh, Magnus; Koefoed, Klaus; Andersen, Peter S.; Spits, Hergen; Brown, Eric J.; Tan, Man-Wah; Mariathasan, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Infection of host tissues by Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis requires an unusual family of staphylococcal adhesive proteins that contain long stretches of serine-aspartate dipeptide-repeats (SDR). The prototype member of this family is clumping factor A (ClfA), a key virulence factor that

  5. A simplified multiplex PCR assay for fast and easy discrimination of globally distributed staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec types in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Ghaznavi Rad (Ehsanollah); N.S. Mariana (Nor Shamsudin); Z. Sekawi (Zamberi); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); V. Neela (Vasanthakumari)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA multiplex PCR assay was developed for the identification of major types and subtypes of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. The method uses a novel 9 valent multiplex PCR plus two primer pairs for S. aureus

  6. Type II heat-labile enterotoxins from 50 diverse Escherichia coli isolates belong almost exclusively to the LT-IIc family and may be prophage encoded.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Jobling

    Full Text Available Some enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC produce a type II heat-labile enterotoxin (LT-II that activates adenylate cyclase in susceptible cells but is not neutralized by antisera against cholera toxin or type I heat-labile enterotoxin (LT-I. LT-I variants encoded by plasmids in ETEC from humans and pigs have amino acid sequences that are ≥ 95% identical. In contrast, LT-II toxins are chromosomally encoded and are much more diverse. Early studies characterized LT-IIa and LT-IIb variants, but a novel LT-IIc was reported recently. Here we characterized the LT-II encoding loci from 48 additional ETEC isolates. Two encoded LT-IIa, none encoded LT-IIb, and 46 encoded highly related variants of LT-IIc. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the predicted LT-IIc toxins encoded by these loci could be assigned to 6 subgroups. The loci corresponding to individual toxins within each subgroup had DNA sequences that were more than 99% identical. The LT-IIc subgroups appear to have arisen by multiple recombinational events between progenitor loci encoding LT-IIc1- and LT-IIc3-like variants. All loci from representative isolates encoding the LT-IIa, LT-IIb, and each subgroup of LT-IIc enterotoxins are preceded by highly-related genes that are between 80 and 93% identical to predicted phage lysozyme genes. DNA sequences immediately following the B genes differ considerably between toxin subgroups, but all are most closely related to genomic sequences found in predicted prophages. Together these data suggest that the LT-II loci are inserted into lambdoid type prophages that may or may not be infectious. These findings raise the possibility that production of LT-II enterotoxins by ETEC may be determined by phage conversion and may be activated by induction of prophage, in a manner similar to control of production of Shiga-like toxins by converting phages in isolates of enterohemmorhagic E. coli.

  7. Identification of novel Clostridium perfringens type E strains that carry an iota toxin plasmid with a functional enterotoxin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE is a major virulence factor for human gastrointestinal diseases, such as food poisoning and antibiotic associated diarrhea. The CPE-encoding gene (cpe can be chromosomal or plasmid-borne. Recent development of conventional PCR cpe-genotyping assays makes it possible to identify cpe location (chromosomal or plasmid in type A isolates. Initial studies for developing cpe genotyping assays indicated that all cpe-positive strains isolated from sickened patients were typable by cpe-genotypes, but surveys of C. perfringens environmental strains or strains from feces of healthy people suggested that this assay might not be useful for some cpe-carrying type A isolates. In the current study, a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis Southern blot assay showed that four cpe-genotype untypable isolates carried their cpe gene on a plasmid of ∼65 kb. Complete sequence analysis of the ∼65 kb variant cpe-carrying plasmid revealed no intact IS elements and a disrupted cytosine methyltransferase (dcm gene. More importantly, this plasmid contains a conjugative transfer region, a variant cpe gene and variant iota toxin genes. The toxin genes encoded by this plasmid are expressed based upon the results of RT-PCR assays. The ∼65 kb plasmid is closely related to the pCPF4969 cpe plasmid of type A isolates. MLST analyses indicated these isolates belong to a unique cluster of C. perfringens. Overall, these isolates carrying a variant functional cpe gene and iota toxin genes represent unique type E strains.

  8. Anti-staphylococcal properties of Eichhornia crassipes, Pistacia vera, and Ziziphus amole leaf extracts: Isolates from cattle and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Morales, Andrea; Velázquez-Ordoñez, Valente; Khusro, Ameer; Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Estrada-Zúñiga, María Elena; Salem, Mohamed Z M; Valladares-Carranza, Benjamin; Burrola-Aguilar, Cristina

    2017-12-01

    The desideratum aim of the present context was to assess the biopotency of methanolic extracts of Eichhornia crassipes (E. crassipes), Pistacia vera (P. vera), and Ziziphus amole (Z. amole) leaves against various staphylococcal strains, and to quantify the phenolics as well as saponin content in them. The antibacterial activity of various concentrations (62.5-1000 μg/mL) of plant extracts was tested against control clinical strains (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 29213, and S. aureus ATCC 43300), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA1 and MRSA2), oxacillin sensitive S. aureus (SOSA1 and SOSA2), and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis (CoNS1, CoNS2, and CoNS3) using disc diffusion assay. Leaf extracts of the three plants exhibited pronounced growth inhibitory characteristics against staphylococci in a dose dependent manner. E. crassipes extract depicted the highest relative percentage inhibition values against control clinical strains (68.6 ± 0.5%), while P. vera (68.6 ± 0.3%) and Z. amole (74.79 ± 0.3%) extracts showed pronounced relative inhibition values against staphylococcal strains isolated from cattle. Total phenols and saponin content of leaf extracts were investigated by standard in vitro methods. The methanolic extracts of these plants were found to comprise substantial content of phenolics and saponin at varying levels. The highest value of phenolics was estimated in P. vera extract (60.0 ± 1.3 mg gallic acid/g extract), followed by Z. amole (33.6 ± 1.4 mg gallic acid/g extract), and E. crassipes (23.0 ± 1.3 mg gallic acid/g extract). Saponin content for P. vera, Z. amole, and E. crassipes extracts were estimated as 41.0 ± 1.3, 35.8 ± 1.3, and 25.0 ± 1.2 mg diosgenin/g extract, respectively. The outcome of this study suggested the exploitation of methanolic extract of P. vera, Z. amole, and E. crassipes leaves for their possible application in ethnomedicine, particularly as drugs preparation

  9. An evaluation of the emerging vaccines and immunotherapy against staphylococcal pneumonia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Craig

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal of human skin and nares. It is also one of the leading nosocomial pathogens in both developed and developing countries and is responsible for a wide range of life threatening infections, especially in patients who are immunocompromised, post-surgery, undergoing haemodialysis and those who are treated with catheters and ventilators. Over the past two decades, the incidence of nosocomial staphylococcal infections has increased dramatically. Currently there are at least seven vaccine and immunotherapy candidates against S. aureus in the developmental phase targeting both active and passive immunization. Methods We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was done in two stages. In Stage I, we systematically reviewed the literature related to emerging vaccines against Staphylococcus aureus relevant to several criteria of interest: answerability; cost of development, production and implementation; efficacy and effectiveness; deliverability, affordability and sustainability; maximum potential impact on disease burden reduction; acceptability to the end users and health workers; and effect on equity. In Stage II, we conducted an expert opinion exercise by inviting 20 experts (leading basic scientists, international public health researchers, international policy makers and representatives of pharmaceutical companies to participate. The policy makers and industry representatives accepted our invitation on the condition of anonymity, due to sensitive nature of their involvement in such exercises. They answered questions from CHNRI framework and their “collective optimism” towards each criterion was documented on a scale from 0 to 100%. Results The panel of experts expressed low levels of optimism (score around or below 50% on the criteria of answerability, efficacy, maximum disease burden reduction potential, low cost of production, low cost

  10. Does Extracellular DNA Production Vary in Staphylococcal Biofilms Isolated From Infected Implants versus Controls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorska, Beata; Groger, Marion; Moser, Doris; Diab-Elschahawi, Magda; Lusignani, Luigi Segagni; Presterl, Elisabeth

    2017-08-01

    Prosthetic implant infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis are major challenges for early diagnosis and treatment owing to biofilm formation on the implant surface. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is actively excreted from bacterial cells in biofilms, contributing to biofilm stability, and may offer promise in the detection or treatment of such infections. (1) Does DNA structure change during biofilm formation? (2) Are there time-dependent differences in eDNA production during biofilm formation? (3) Is there differential eDNA production between clinical and control Staphylococcal isolates? (4) Is eDNA production correlated to biofilm thickness? We investigated eDNA presence during biofilm formation in 60 clinical and 30 control isolates of S aureus and S epidermidis. The clinical isolates were isolated from patients with infections of orthopaedic prostheses and implants: 30 from infected hip prostheses and 30 from infected knee prostheses. The control isolates were taken from healthy volunteers who had not been exposed to antibiotics and a hospital environment during the previous 3 and 12 months, respectively. Control S epidermidis was isolated from the skin of the antecubital fossa, and control S aureus was isolated from the nares. For the biofilm experiments the following methods were used to detect eDNA: (1) fluorescent staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), (2) eDNA extraction using a commercial kit, and (3) confocal laser scanning microscopy for 24-hour biofilm observation using propidium iodide and concanavalin-A staining; TOTO ® -1 and SYTO ® 60 staining were used for observation and quantification of eDNA after 6 and 24 hours of biofilm formation. Additionally antibiotic resistance was described. eDNA production as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy was greater in clinical isolates than controls (clinical isolates mean ± SD: 1.84% ± 1.31%; control mean ± SD: 1.17% ± 1.37%; p biofilm formation. After 24 hours, the

  11. An evaluation of the emerging vaccines and immunotherapy against staphylococcal pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Tanvir; Nair, Harish; Theodoratou, Evropi; Zgaga, Lina; Fattom, Ali; El Arifeen, Shams; Rubens, Craig; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor

    2011-04-13

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal of human skin and nares. It is also one of the leading nosocomial pathogens in both developed and developing countries and is responsible for a wide range of life threatening infections, especially in patients who are immunocompromised, post-surgery, undergoing haemodialysis and those who are treated with catheters and ventilators. Over the past two decades, the incidence of nosocomial staphylococcal infections has increased dramatically. Currently there are at least seven vaccine and immunotherapy candidates against S. aureus in the developmental phase targeting both active and passive immunization. We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was done in two stages. In Stage I, we systematically reviewed the literature related to emerging vaccines against Staphylococcus aureus relevant to several criteria of interest: answerability; cost of development, production and implementation; efficacy and effectiveness; deliverability, affordability and sustainability; maximum potential impact on disease burden reduction; acceptability to the end users and health workers; and effect on equity. In Stage II, we conducted an expert opinion exercise by inviting 20 experts (leading basic scientists, international public health researchers, international policy makers and representatives of pharmaceutical companies) to participate. The policy makers and industry representatives accepted our invitation on the condition of anonymity, due to sensitive nature of their involvement in such exercises. They answered questions from CHNRI framework and their "collective optimism" towards each criterion was documented on a scale from 0 to 100%. The panel of experts expressed low levels of optimism (score around or below 50%) on the criteria of answerability, efficacy, maximum disease burden reduction potential, low cost of production, low cost of implementation and affordability; moderate levels of

  12. Staphylococcal diaphyseal subacute osteomyelitis of the ulna in a child: an unusual cause of post-traumatic forearm swelling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kearns, S R

    2004-01-01

    Paediatric subacute osteomyelitis (SAO) presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to clinicians. Typically located in the metaphysis of long bones, diaphyseal SAO of the upper limb is rare. We present the case of a three-year-old girl referred to our fracture clinic as an occult fracture following trauma to her forearm with normal initial radiographs. Follow-up radiographs one week later showed cortical erosion of the distal ulna, while a subsequent MRI scan showed soft tissue swelling with an area of high signal in the distal ulna. A limited biopsy diagnosed staphylococcal subacute osteomyelitis of the ulna. The patient responded to high dose antibiotic therapy and made a full recovery. We present this case to highlight the high index of suspicion required to diagnose and appropriately manage this insidious condition, which may easily be confused with any number of benign and malignant bony lesions and provide a review of the relevant literature.

  13. Clostridium difficile bacteremia and meningitis as a complication of prolonged cephalosporin therapy in a case of staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abhrajit Ganguly; Saibal Das; Jayanta Kumar Dey; Somnath Mondal

    2012-01-01

    With increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, several extra-intestinal manifestations of the organism have been unmasked which include-bacteremia, brain abscess, pericarditis etc. We report a rare and interesting case of C. difficile bacteremia and subsequent meningitis in a 10 year old child. The child was immune competent, which further raises the question about the virulent possibilities of the organism and its implications in the near future. The condition resulted from a prolonged treatment with intravenous (I.V.) cefotaxime for staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis. The child recovered from the septic arthritis but on the 7th day post-admission developed features of bacteremia. The child was later treated with intravenous metronidazole and vancomycin and he was discharged on the 21st day post-admission. No recurrence of symptoms was noted.

  14. A solid-phase radioimmunoassay for IgG gliadin antibodies using 125I-labelled staphylococcal protein A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troncone, R.; Pignata, C.; Farris, E.; Ciccimarra, F.

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for IgG gliadin antibodies is described. Serum specimens were added to wells of plastic microtitre plates coated with gliadin. After removal of the unbound material, gliadin antibodies were detected by adding 125 I-labelled staphylococcal protein A ( 125 I-SpA). Serum specimens from coeliac patients on a normal diet or on a gluten-free diet were tested, as well as sera from an age-matched control group. Measurements to obtain precise quantitative values were made with gliadin antibody-rich serum as reference standard. High titres of gliadin antibodies were found in 18 out of 19 coeliac patients on a normal diet (95%); in patients on a strict gluten-free diet serum values did not exceed 2 S.D. of the control mean. Due to the high sensitivity of the method a low but detectable amount of gliadin antibody was present in the sera of all controls. (Auth.)

  15. Solid-phase radioimmunoassay for IgG gliadin antibodies using /sup 125/I-labelled staphylococcal protein A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troncone, R.; Pignata, C.; Farris, E.; Ciccimarra, F. (Naples Univ. (Italy). II Facolta di Medicina)

    1983-10-14

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for IgG gliadin antibodies is described. Serum specimens were added to wells of plastic microtitre plates coated with gliadin. After removal of the unbound material, gliadin antibodies were detected by adding /sup 125/I-labelled staphylococcal protein A (/sup 125/I-SpA). Serum specimens from coeliac patients on a normal diet or on a gluten-free diet were tested, as well as sera from an age-matched control group. Measurements to obtain precise quantitative values were made with gliadin antibody-rich serum as reference standard. High titres of gliadin antibodies were found in 18 out of 19 coeliac patients on a normal diet (95%); in patients on a strict gluten-free diet serum values did not exceed 2 S.D. of the control mean. Due to the high sensitivity of the method a low but detectable amount of gliadin antibody was present in the sera of all controls.

  16. Probing force-induced unfolding intermediates of a single staphylococcal nuclease molecule and the effect of ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Murayama, Yoshihiro; Katano, Atsuto; Maki, Kosuke; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Sano, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation techniques have given experimental access to unfolding intermediates of proteins that are inaccessible in conventional experiments. A detailed characterization of the intermediates is a challenging problem that provides new possibilities for directly probing the energy landscape of proteins. We investigated single-molecule mechanical unfolding of a small globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), using atomic force microscopy. The unfolding trajectories of the protein displayed sub-molecular and stochastic behavior with typical lengths corresponding to the size of the unfolded substructures. Our results support the view that the single protein unfolds along multiple pathways as suggested in recent theoretical studies. Moreover, we found the drastic change, caused by the ligand and inhibitor bindings, in the mechanical unfolding dynamics

  17. A Review of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Types in Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci (CoNS) Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Huda; Jasni, Azmiza Syawani; Jamaluddin, Tengku Zetty Maztura Tengku; Ibrahim, Rosni

    2017-10-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are considered low pathogenic organisms. However, they are progressively causing more serious infections with time because they have adapted well to various antibiotics owing to their ability to form biofilms. Few studies have been conducted on CoNS in both, hospital and community-acquired settings, especially in Malaysia. Thus, it is important to study their species and gene distributions. A mobile genetic element, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCC mec ), plays an important role in staphylococci pathogenesis. Among CoNS, SCC mec has been studied less frequently than Staphylococcus aureus (coagulase-positive staphylococci). A recent study (8) conducted in Malaysia successfully detected SCC mec type I to VIII as well as several new combination patterns in CoNS species, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis . However, data are still limited, and further research is warranted. This paper provides a review on SCC mec types among CoNS species.

  18. The challenge of staphylococcal pacemaker endocarditis in a patient with transposition of the great arteries endocarditis in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ch'ng, Julie; Chan, William; Lee, Paul; Joshi, Subodh; Grigg, Leanne E.; Ajani, Andrew E.

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis. The overall incidence of staphylococcal bacteraemia is increasing, contributing to 16% of all hospital-acquired bacteraemias. The use of cardiac pacemakers has revolutionized the management of rhythm disturbances, yet this has also resulted in a group of patients at risk of pacemaker lead endocarditis and seeding in the range of 1% to 7%. We describe a 26-year-old man with transposition of the great arteries who had a pacemaker implanted and presented with S. aureus septicaemia 2 years postpacemaker implantation and went on to develop pacemaker lead endocarditis. This report illustrates the risk of endocarditis in the population with congenital heart disease and an intracardiac device

  19. Chemical Genetic Analysis and Functional Characterization of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid 2-Epimerases Reveals Unconventional Antibiotic Drug Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Paul A.; Müller, Anna; Wolff, Kerstin A.; Fischmann, Thierry; Wang, Hao; Reed, Patricia; Hou, Yan; Li, Wenjin; Müller, Christa E.; Xiao, Jianying; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; Sheth, Payal R.; Mirza, Asra; Labroli, Marc; Xiao, Li; McCoy, Mark; Gill, Charles J.; Pinho, Mariana G.; Schneider, Tanja; Roemer, Terry (Merck); (Bonn); (FCT/UNL)

    2016-05-04

    Here we describe a chemical biology strategy performed in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to identify MnaA, a 2-epimerase that we demonstrate interconverts UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAc to modulate substrate levels of TarO and TarA wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis enzymes. Genetic inactivation of mnaA results in complete loss of WTA and dramatic in vitro β-lactam hypersensitivity in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and S. epidermidis (MRSE). Likewise, the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem exhibits restored bactericidal activity against mnaA mutants in vitro and concomitant efficacy against 2-epimerase defective strains in a mouse thigh model of MRSA and MRSE infection. Interestingly, whereas MnaA serves as the sole 2-epimerase required for WTA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis, MnaA and Cap5P provide compensatory WTA functional roles in S. aureus. We also demonstrate that MnaA and other enzymes of WTA biosynthesis are required for biofilm formation in MRSA and MRSE. We further determine the 1.9Å crystal structure of S. aureus MnaA and identify critical residues for enzymatic dimerization, stability, and substrate binding. Finally, the natural product antibiotic tunicamycin is shown to physically bind MnaA and Cap5P and inhibit 2-epimerase activity, demonstrating that it inhibits a previously unanticipated step in WTA biosynthesis. In summary, MnaA serves as a new Staphylococcal antibiotic target with cognate inhibitors predicted to possess dual therapeutic benefit: as combination agents to restore β-lactam efficacy against MRSA and MRSE and as non-bioactive prophylactic agents to prevent Staphylococcal biofilm formation.

  20. Knowledge and Perceptions Regarding Community-Acquired Staphylococcal Infections Among Health Care Workers in Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alan; Hurwitz, Eric; Tice, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically. Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai‘i's strikingly high incidence and prevalence of MRSA infections, a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully controlling this evolving epidemic. Methods Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes, obesity, pets, and seawater exposure as well as understanding the seriousness of antibiotic resistance. Perceptions were estimated by demonstrated awareness of the severity and elevated incidence and prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA infections. Results This study identified that occupation (advance clinical practitioner, nurse, public health professional, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work location (community vs hospital) influence knowledge and perceptions regarding the epidemiology, severity, and risk factors of S. aureus and MRSA infections. Additionally, despite a well-documented global crisis with antibiotic resistance, Hawai‘i's community health care workers were less inclined to correctly identify the threat of antibiotic resistance as compared to their hospital-based colleagues. Conclusion Trends were observed in knowledge and perceptions with level of medical education. Differences were also noted according to work location. Overall, health care and related workers in the community were less likely to understand basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as misperceive this imminent threat. These findings provide compelling evidence for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers

  1. Staphylococcal phenotypes induced by naturally occurring and synthetic membrane-interactive polyphenolic β-lactam resistance modifiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Palacios

    Full Text Available Galloyl catechins, in particular (--epicatechin gallate (ECg, have the capacity to abrogate β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; they also prevent biofilm formation, reduce the secretion of a large proportion of the exoproteome and induce profound changes to cell morphology. Current evidence suggests that these reversible phenotypic traits result from their intercalation into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We have endeavoured to potentiate the capacity of ECg to modify the MRSA phenotype by stepwise removal of hydroxyl groups from the B-ring pharmacophore and the A:C fused ring system of the naturally occurring molecule. ECg binds rapidly to the membrane, inducing up-regulation of genes responsible for protection against cell wall stress and maintenance of membrane integrity and function. Studies with artificial membranes modelled on the lipid composition of the staphylococcal bilayer indicated that ECg adopts a position deep within the lipid palisade, eliciting major alterations in the thermotropic behaviour of the bilayer. The non-galloylated homolog (--epicatechin enhanced ECg-mediated effects by facilitating entry of ECg molecules into the membrane. ECg analogs with unnatural B-ring hydroxylation patterns induced higher levels of gene expression and more profound changes to MRSA membrane fluidity than ECg but adopted a more superficial location within the bilayer. ECg possessed a high affinity for the positively charged staphylococcal membrane and induced changes to the biophysical properties of the bilayer that are likely to account for its capacity to disperse the cell wall biosynthetic machinery responsible for β-lactam resistance. The ability to enhance these properties by chemical modification of ECg raises the possibility that more potent analogs could be developed for clinical evaluation.

  2. The detection of K88, K99 fimbrial antigen and enterotoxin genes of Escherichia coli isolated from piglets and calves with diarrhoea in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supar

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC strains cause diarrhoeal disease in piglets and calves in Indonesia. These strains possess two virulence factors namely attachment and enterotoxin antigens . These factors could be detected phenotypically and genetically. Haemolytic Escherichia coli (E coli isolates possessing K88 fimbrial antigen associated with 0-group 108 and 149. They were positive for K88 gene and demonstrated their ability to produce heat labile enterotoxin (LT and genetically were all positive for LT gene . Seventeen isolates ofE coli K88 which associated with 0-group 149 were positive forSTb gene, other O-serotypes were negative . Ten isolates of Ecoli K88 which associated with 0-group 108 possessed K88, K99, LT and STa genes, but negative for STb gene . However, phenotypically the K99 antigen and STa toxin were not expressed under laboratory conditions, the reason was not well understood . E. coli K99 strains isolated from calves wit h diarrhoea were all associated with 0-group 9 and produced STa toxin when tested by suckling mousse bioassay. The E. coli K99 calf isolates were all hybridized with K99 and STa gene only . It is likely that K99 gene is associated with STa gene . The DNA hybridization technique is more convenience to be used for confirmation diagnosis of colibacillosis, however, not all veterinary laboratories could perform these tests .

  3. Safety and efficacy of E coli enterotoxin adjuvant for urease-based rectal immunization against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sougioultzis, Stavros; Lee, Cynthia K; Alsahli, Mazen; Banerjee, Subhas; Cadoz, Michel; Schrader, Robert; Guy, Bruno; Bedford, Philip; Monath, Thomas P; Kelly, Ciaran P; Michetti, Pierre

    2002-12-13

    Low dose E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), delivered orally or enterically, has been used as an adjuvant for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) urease in healthy adults. In this study we aim to test the safety and adjuvant efficacy of LT delivered rectally together with recombinant H. pylori urease. Eighteen healthy adults without present or past H. pylori infection were enrolled in a double blind, randomized, ascending dose study to receive either urease (60 mg), or urease (60 mg) + LT (5 or 25 microg). The immunization preparation was administered per rectum on days 0, 14 and 28. Serum, stool and saliva anti-urease and anti-LT IgG and IgA antibodies (Abs) were measured and urease-specific and LT-specific antigen secreting cells (ASCs) were counted in peripheral blood at baseline and 7 (ASC counts) or 14 days (antibody levels) after each dosing. Peripheral blood lymphoproliferation assays were also performed at baseline and at the end of the study. Rectally delivered urease and LT were well tolerated. Among the 12 subjects assigned to urease+LT, 2 (16.7%) developed anti-urease IgG Abs, 1 (8.3%) developed anti-urease IgA Abs, and 3 (25%) showed urease-specific IgA(+) ASCs. Immune responses to LT were more vigorous, especially in subjects exposed to 5 microg LT. In the urease+ 5 microg LT group, anti-LT IgG and IgA Abs developed in 60 and 80% of the subjects, respectively, while LT-specific IgG(+) and IgA(+) ASCs were detected in all subjects. The magnitude of the anti-LT response was much higher than the response to urease. No IgA anti-urease or anti-LT Abs were detected in stool or saliva and lymphocyte proliferative responses to urease were unsatisfactory. In conclusion, rectal delivery of 5 microg LT is safe and induces vigorous systemic anti-LT immune responses. Further studies are needed to determine if LT can be an effective adjuvant for rectally delivered antigens.

  4. Role of blood culture systems in the evaluation of epidemiological features of coagulase-negative staphylococcal bloodstream infection in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, L; Krimerman, S; Salam, N; Srugo, I

    1999-12-01

    The impact of blood culture systems on the detection of coagulase-negative staphylococcal bloodstream infections in critically ill patients prior to and following the introduction of the Bactec 9240 blood culture system (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems, USA), which replaced the Bactec NR 730 (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems), was investigated over a 3-year period. Following the introduction of the new culture system, the incidence of bloodstream infections doubled (P<0.001). Patient demographics, severity of illness, and mortality remained unchanged, while the annual standardized mortality ratio decreased significantly. These data suggest that blood culture systems may have a major impact on the perceived incidence of coagulase-negative staphylococcal bloodstream infections in this population.

  5. Rapid containment of nosocomial transmission of a rare community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) clone, responsible for the Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome (SSSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Lamanna, Onofrio; Bongiorno, Dafne; Bertoncello, Lisa; Grandesso, Stefano; Mazzucato, Sandra; Pozzan, Giovanni Battista; Cutrone, Mario; Chirico, Michela; Baesso, Flavia; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Cafiso, Viviana; Stefani, Stefania; Campanile, Floriana

    2017-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to identify the source and the transmission pathway for a Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome (SSSS) outbreak in a maternity setting in Italy over 2?months, during 2014; to implement appropriate control measures in order to prevent the epidemic spread within the maternity ward; and to identify the Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) epidemic clone. Methods Epidemiological and microbiological investigations, based on phenotyping and genoty...

  6. Novel staphylococcal glycosyltransferases SdgA and SdgB mediate immunogenicity and protection of virulence-associated cell wall proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter L W Hazenbos

    Full Text Available Infection of host tissues by Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis requires an unusual family of staphylococcal adhesive proteins that contain long stretches of serine-aspartate dipeptide-repeats (SDR. The prototype member of this family is clumping factor A (ClfA, a key virulence factor that mediates adhesion to host tissues by binding to extracellular matrix proteins such as fibrinogen. However, the biological siginificance of the SDR-domain and its implication for pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Here, we identified two novel bacterial glycosyltransferases, SdgA and SdgB, which modify all SDR-proteins in these two bacterial species. Genetic and biochemical data demonstrated that these two glycosyltransferases directly bind and covalently link N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc moieties to the SDR-domain in a step-wise manner, with SdgB appending the sugar residues proximal to the target Ser-Asp repeats, followed by additional modification by SdgA. GlcNAc-modification of SDR-proteins by SdgB creates an immunodominant epitope for highly opsonic human antibodies, which represent up to 1% of total human IgG. Deletion of these glycosyltransferases renders SDR-proteins vulnerable to proteolysis by human neutrophil-derived cathepsin G. Thus, SdgA and SdgB glycosylate staphylococcal SDR-proteins, which protects them against host proteolytic activity, and yet generates major eptopes for the human anti-staphylococcal antibody response, which may represent an ongoing competition between host and pathogen.

  7. c-Jun Proto-Oncoprotein Plays a Protective Role in Lung Epithelial Cells Exposed to Staphylococcal α-Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro J. Moyano

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available c-Jun is a member of the early mammalian transcriptional regulators belonging to the AP-1 family, which participates in a wide range of cellular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and differentiation. Despite its established role in cell survival upon stress, its participation in the stress response induced by bacterial infections has been poorly investigated. To study the potential role of c-Jun in this context we choose the widely studied α-toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a pore-forming toxin that is a critical virulence factor in the pathogenesis of these bacteria. We analyzed the effect of α-toxin treatment in the activation, expression, and protein levels of c-Jun in A549 lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, we explored the role of c-Jun in the cellular fate after exposure to α-toxin. Our results show that staphylococcal α-toxin per se is able to activate c-Jun by inducing phosphorylation of its Serine 73 residue. Silencing of the JNK (c-Jun N-terminal Kinase signaling pathway abrogated most of this activation. On the contrary, silencing of the ERK (Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase pathway exacerbated this response. Intriguingly, while the exposure to α-toxin induced a marked increase in the levels of c-Jun transcripts, c-Jun protein levels noticeably decreased in the same time-frame as a consequence of active proteolytic degradation through the proteasome-dependent pathway. In addition, we established that c-Jun promoted cell survival when cells were challenged with α-toxin. Similarly, c-Jun phosphorylation was also induced in cells upon intoxication with the cytolysin produced by Vibrio cholerae in a JNK-dependent manner, suggesting that c-Jun-JNK axis would be a conserved responsive cellular pathway to pore-forming toxins. This study contributes to understanding the role of the multifaceted c-Jun proto-oncoprotein in cell response to bacterial pore-forming toxins, positioning it as a relevant

  8. Antimicrobial resistance and detection of the mecA gene besides enterotoxin-encoding genes among coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolated from clam meat of Anomalocardia brasiliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Jacqueline Ellen Camelo; Ferreira, Ewerton Lucena; Nascimento, Danielle Cristina de Oliveira; Ventura, Roberta Ferreira; de Oliveira, Wagner Luis Mendes; Leal, Nilma Cintra; Lima-Filho, José Vitor

    2013-12-01

    The marine clam Anomalocardia brasiliana is a candidate as a sentinel animal to monitor the contamination levels of coliforms in shellfish-harvesting areas of Brazil's northeastern region. The aim of the present study was to search enterotoxin-encoding genes plus the mecA gene among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolates from shellfish meats of A. brasiliana. The specimen clam (n=48; 40 clams per sample) was collected during low tide in the bay area of Mangue Seco from April through June 2009, and random samples of chilled and frozen shelled clam meat (n=33; 250 g per sample) were obtained from retail shops from January through March 2012. Seventy-nine CNS isolates were identified, including Staphylococcus xylosus, S. cohnii spp. urealyticus, S. sciuri, and S. lentus. A high percentage of isolates resistant to erythromycin (58.5%), penicillin (51.2%), and tetracycline (43.9%), and the fluoroquinolones levofloxacin (39%) and ciprofloxacin (34.1%) were recorded from those environmental samples. Isolates from retail shops were particularly resistant to oxacillin (55.3%) and penicillin (36.8%). All CNS resistant to oxacillin and/or cefoxitin were positive for the presence of the mecA gene, but phenotypically susceptible to vancomycin. Also, the enterotoxin-encoding genes seg and seh were detected through multiplex-polymerase chain reaction in 77.7% and 88.8% of the isolates from environmental samples, versus 90.5% and 100% of the isolates from retail shops, respectively. The data reveal the risk to public health due to consuming raw or undercooked shellfish containing enterotoxigenic plus methicillin-resistant CNS.

  9. The fecal presence of enterotoxin and F4 genes as an indicator of efficacy of treatment with colistin sulfate in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Fairbrother, John Morris; Thériault, William; Beaudry, Francis; Bergeron, Nadia; Laurent-Lewandowski, Sylvette; Letellier, Ann

    2017-01-05

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains producing multiple enterotoxins are important causes of post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) in pigs. The aim of the present study was to investigate the fecal presence of ETEC enterotoxin as well as F4 and F18 genes as an indicator of colistin sulfate (CS) efficacy for treatment of PWD in pigs. Forty-eight piglets were weaned at the age of 21 days, and were divided into four groups: challenged treated, challenged untreated, unchallenged treated, and unchallenged untreated. Challenge was performed using 10 9  CFU of an ETEC: F4 strain, and treatment was conducted using oral CS at the dose of 50,000 IU/kg. The fecal presence of genes encoding for STa, STb, LT, F4 and F18 was detected using PCR. The PCR amplification of ETEC virulence genes showed that nearly 100% of pigs excreted genes encoding for STa and STb toxins in the feces before the challenge. These genes, in the absence of the gene encoding F4, were considered as a marker for F4-negative ETEC. One day after ETEC: F4 oral challenge pigs in the two challenged groups excreted the genes encoding LT and F4 in the feces. These genes were considered as a marker for F4-positive ETEC. However, the gene encoding F18 was not detected in any fecal samples of the 4 groups throughout the experiment. After only 3 days of successive oral treatment with CS, a significant reduction in both the F4-positive and negative ETEC populations was observed in the challenged treated group compared to the challenged untreated group (p F4-positive and F4-negative ETEC in pigs. However, CS clinical efficiency was correlated with non-detection of F4-positive ETEC in the feces. Furthermore the fecal presence of F4-negative ETEC was not associated with clinical symptoms of post-weaning diarrhea in pigs.

  10. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A Hill-Cawthorne

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec. We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA, a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (∼4% of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization Differs among Pig Lineages and Is Associated with the Presence of Other Staphylococcal Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Koen M; Willems, Eveline; Fluit, Ad C; Duim, Birgitta; Martens, Marc; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common colonizer in pigs, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in particular being a potential health risk to humans. To reduce the exposure to humans, the colonization in pigs should be reduced. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the susceptibility of pig lineages for S. aureus colonization, and if the absence of S. aureus could be associated with the presence or absence of other staphylococcal species. Nasal samples ( n  = 129) were obtained from seven different pig lineages in the Netherlands, France, and Germany. S. aureus and other staphylococci were enumerated from these samples by real-time (RT)-PCR and culture. Associations were explored between the presence of S. aureus and other staphylococci. S. aureus was detected by RT-PCR on all farms and in samples from pigs of all lineages. Twenty-five percent of the pigs from lineage F (from two farms) were colonized with S. aureus , while in all other lineages it was more than 50% ( p  Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus cohnii , and Staphylococcus saprophyticus were usually not found in combination with S. aureus in these samples. (i) pigs from different genetic lineages have different susceptibilities for colonization with S. aureus . These pigs might contain a genetic factor influencing nasal colonization. (ii) Colonization of S. aureus is also associated with the absence of S. sciuri, S. cohnii , or S. saprophyticus . (iii) The farm environment seems to influence the presence of S. aureus in pigs.

  12. Genotypic versus phenotypic identification of staphylococcal species of canine origin with special reference to Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. coagulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousson, Olivier; Di Bello, Domenica; Vanni, Michele; Cardini, Giovanni; Soldani, Giulio; Pretti, Carlo; Intorre, Luigi

    2007-07-20

    A comparative study was performed to examine the respective accuracy of 16S rDNA sequencing and of the commercial biochemical assay ID32 STAPH (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) in the identification of 232 staphylococcal samples representing 20 species and subspecies isolated from 367 dogs. Notable differences in species distribution were observed by comparing genotypic and phenotypic data. Partial sequencing of 16S rDNA resulted in an unambiguous identification of 226 (97.4%) of the isolates, whereas the phenotypic approach resulted in a correct diagnosis of 162 (69.8%) of the isolates. Statistical agreement between genotypic and phenotypic identification of staphylococci was substantial (Kappa coefficient of 0.6-0.8) for Staphylococcus aureus, S. hominis, S. warneri, S. cohnii subsp. urealyticus, and S. simulans, and "almost perfect" (Kappa coefficient of 0.8-1) for S. intermedius, S. epidermidis, S. equorum, S. haemolyticus, S. sciuri, and S. kloosi. No agreement above that expected by chance (Kappa coefficient=0) was observed for S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, which was either confounded with S. intermedius and S. capitis, or categorized as unacceptable by the biochemical assay. Given the growing importance of this pathogen in veterinary medicine and its frequent misidentification with related staphylococci, a PCR-RFLP approach producing a S. schleiferi-specific restriction profile was developed. This fast and reliable assay represents a valuable tool in assisting in the monitoring of this pathogen.

  13. A rapid radioimmunoassay using 125I-labeled staphylococcal protein A for antibody to varicella-zoster virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, D.D.; Cleveland, P.H.; Oxman, M.N.; Zaia, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for serum antibody to varicella-zoster virus is described; it uses 125I-labeled staphylococcal protein A and a specially designed immunofiltration apparatus. The assay accurately distinguishes between individuals who are susceptible and those who are immune to infection with varicella-zoster virus. In addition, it can detect passive antibody in recipients of varicella-zoster immune globulin. This radioimmunoassay also detects the heterologous antibody responses that occasionally occur in patients infected with herpes simplex virus, which also have been detected by other antibody assays. The particular advantages of this assay are the use of noninfectious reagents, the speed of execution (less than 3 hr), the requirement for only small quantities of serum (30 microliters), the objectivity of end-point determination, and the capability of screening large numbers of sera. Consequently, this radioimmunoassay is especially useful for the rapid identification of susceptible individuals, which is essential for the appropriate management of patients and hospital personnel after exposure to varicella

  14. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.

    2014-06-27

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (?4%) of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates. © 2014 Hill-Cawthorne et al.

  15. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Hudson, Lyndsey O.; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Piepenburg, Olaf; Nair, Mridul; Dodgson, Andrew; Forrest, Matthew S.; Clark, Taane G.; Pain, Arnab

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (?4%) of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates. © 2014 Hill-Cawthorne et al.

  16. Increasing trend of community-acquired methicillin-resistant: Staphylococcal carriers: An alarming bell for urgent measures

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    Poongodi Lakshmi Santhana Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increase in the incidence of infections caused by community-associated-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been reported. Hence, the knowledge of resistance pattern of these isolates is a precondition for alleviating emerging antibiotic resistance and devising better treatment strategies Aim: To find out the prevalence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains from nasal carriers. Materials and Methods: A total of 352 nasal swabs collected during routine health checkup were analyzed. Results: Of the 58 (16% staphylococci isolated, 32 (55% were S. aureus and 26 (45% were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS. Methicillin resistance was observed in 7 (22% of staphylococci aureus and 11 (42% of CoNS. "D test" was positive in 1 (14% MRSA, 2 (8% methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and 2 (8% methicillin resistant-CoNS. Conclusion: Effective implementation of the antibiotic policy along with measures like hand wash, isolation of patients will reduce the incidence of resistance.

  17. Rapid Identification of Intact Staphylococcal Bacteriophages Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

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    Dana Štveráková

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major causative agent of infections associated with hospital environments, where antibiotic-resistant strains have emerged as a significant threat. Phage therapy could offer a safe and effective alternative to antibiotics. Phage preparations should comply with quality and safety requirements; therefore, it is important to develop efficient production control technologies. This study was conducted to develop and evaluate a rapid and reliable method for identifying staphylococcal bacteriophages, based on detecting their specific proteins using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS profiling that is among the suggested methods for meeting the regulations of pharmaceutical authorities. Five different phage purification techniques were tested in combination with two MALDI-TOF MS matrices. Phages, either purified by CsCl density gradient centrifugation or as resuspended phage pellets, yielded mass spectra with the highest information value if ferulic acid was used as the MALDI matrix. Phage tail and capsid proteins yielded the strongest signals whereas the culture conditions had no effect on mass spectral quality. Thirty-seven phages from Myoviridae, Siphoviridae or Podoviridae families were analysed, including 23 siphophages belonging to the International Typing Set for human strains of S. aureus, as well as phages in preparations produced by Microgen, Bohemia Pharmaceuticals and MB Pharma. The data obtained demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to effectively distinguish between Staphylococcus-specific bacteriophages.

  18. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Leaf Extract on Staphylococcal Adhesion and Invasion in Bovine Udder Epidermal Tissue Model

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    Auemphon Mordmuang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bovine mastitis is one of the most important infectious diseases in dairy herds, and staphylococci are the most important etiologic agents of this disease. Antibiotics and chemical agents used in livestock for prevention and cure of the disease can accumulate in milk and give rise to food safety concerns. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf extract was studied as an alternative approach to reduce the bacterial infections. The ethanolic extract of this plant demonstrated antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values as low as 16–64 μg/mL against staphylococcal isolates. In addition, the extract had an effect on the bacterial cell surface properties by increasing its hydrophobicity in a concentration dependent manner. To further extend the antibacterial efficacy, silver nanoparticles synthesized with the extract, a pure rhodomyrtone, and liposomal encapsulated rhodomyrtone were applied and their inhibitory effects on bacterial adhesion and invasion were determined by ex vivo study in a bovine udder epidermal tissue model. These agents exerted remarkable antibacterial activity against staphylococci and decreased the adhesion of the bacterial cells to the tissues. These results supported that R. tomentosa ethanolic extract could be applied as an alternative agent for bovine udder care in dairy farms.

  19. Immune mediators of sea-cucumber Holothuria tubulosa (Echinodermata) as source of novel antimicrobial and anti-staphylococcal biofilm agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Domenico; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Russo, Debora; Vazzana, Mirella; Vitale, Maria; Arizza, Vincenzo

    2013-06-24

    The present study aims to investigate coelomocytes, immune mediators cells in the echinoderm Holothuria tubulosa, as an unusual source of antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents. The activity of the 5kDa peptide fraction of the cytosol from H. tubulosa coelomocytes (5-HCC) was tested against a reference group of Gram-negative and Gram-positive human pathogens. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 125 to 500 mg/ml were determined against tested strains. The observed biological activity of 5-HCC could be due to two novel peptides, identified by capillary RP-HPLC/nESI-MS/MS, which present the common chemical-physical characteristics of antimicrobial peptides. Such peptides were chemically synthesized and their antimicrobial activity was tested. The synthetic peptides showed broad-spectrum activity at 12.5 mg/ml against the majority of the tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains, and they were also able to inhibit biofilm formation in a significant percentage at a concentration of 3.1 mg/ml against staphylococcal and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.The immune mediators in H. tubulosa are a source of novel antimicrobial peptides for the development of new agents against biofilm bacterial communities that are often intrinsically resistant to conventional antibiotics.

  20. Evaluation of in-situ fatty acid extraction protocols for the analysis of staphylococcal cell membrane associated fatty acids by gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Marcus J; Dunstan, R Hugh

    2018-05-01

    The composition and integrity of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane is critical to the survival of staphylococci in dynamic environments and it is important to investigate how the cell membrane responds to changes in the environmental conditions. The staphylococcal membrane differs from eukaryotic and many other bacterial cell membranes by having a high abundance of branch fatty acids and relatively few unsaturated fatty acids. The range of available methods for extraction and efficient analyses of staphylococcal fatty acids was initially appraised to identify the best potential procedures for appraisal. Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (ATCC® 29213) was grown under optimal conditions to generate a cell biomass to compare the efficiencies of three approaches to extract and prepare methyl esters of the membrane fatty acids: (1) acidic direct transesterification of lipids, (2) modified basic direct transesterification of membrane lipids with adjusted reaction times and temperatures, and (3) base catalysed hydrolysis followed by acid catalysed esterification in two separate chemical reactions (MIDI process). All methods were able to extract fatty acids from the cell mass effectively where these lipids represented approximately 5% of the cellular dry mass. The acidic transesterification method had the least number of steps, the lowest coefficient of variation at 6.7% and good resistance to tolerating water. Basic transesterification was the least accurate method showing the highest coefficient of variation (26%). The MIDI method showed good recoveries, but had twice the number of steps and a coefficient of variation of 16%. It was also found that there was no need to use an anti-oxidant such as BHT for the protection of polyunsaturated fatty acids when the GC-MS injection liner was clean. It was concluded that the acidic transesterification procedures formed the most efficient and reproducible method for the analyses of staphylococcal membrane fatty acids

  1. Short- versus long-duration levofloxacin plus rifampicin for acute staphylococcal prosthetic joint infection managed with implant retention: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Euba, Gorane; Cobo, Javier; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Soriano, Alex; Sandoval, Enrique; Pigrau, Carles; Benito, Natividad; Falgueras, Luis; Palomino, Julián; Del Toro, María Dolores; Jover-Sáenz, Alfredo; Iribarren, José Antonio; Sánchez-Somolinos, Mar; Ramos, Antonio; Fernández-Sampedro, Marta; Riera, Melchor; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu Mirena; Ariza, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Levofloxacin plus rifampicin (L+R) is the treatment of choice for acute staphylococcal prosthetic joint infection (PJI) managed with debridement and implant retention (DAIR). Long courses have been empirically recommended, but some studies have suggested that shorter treatments could be as effective. Our aim was to prove that a short treatment schedule was non-inferior to the standard long schedule. An open-label, multicentre, randomised clinical trial (RCT) was performed. Patients with an early post-surgical or haematogenous staphylococcal PJI, managed with DAIR and initiated on L+R were randomised to receive 8 weeks of treatment (short schedule) versus a long schedule (3 months or 6 months for hip or knee prostheses, respectively). The primary endpoint was cure rate. From 175 eligible patients, 63 were included (52% women; median age, 72 years): 33 patients (52%) received the long schedule and 30 (48%) received the short schedule. There were no differences between the two groups except for a higher rate of polymicrobial infection in the long-schedule group (27% vs. 7%; P = 0.031). Median follow-up was 540 days. In the intention-to-treat analysis, cure rates were 58% and 73% in patients receiving the long and short schedules, respectively (difference -15.7%, 95% CI -39.2% to 7.8%). Forty-four patients (70%) were evaluable per-protocol: cure rates were 95.0% and 91.7% for the long and short schedules, respectively (difference 3.3%, 95% CI -11.7% to 18.3%). This is the first RCT suggesting that 8 weeks of L+R could be non-inferior to longer standard treatments for acute staphylococcal PJI managed with DAIR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization Differs among Pig Lineages and Is Associated with the Presence of Other Staphylococcal Species

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    Koen M. Verstappen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common colonizer in pigs, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA in particular being a potential health risk to humans. To reduce the exposure to humans, the colonization in pigs should be reduced. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the susceptibility of pig lineages for S. aureus colonization, and if the absence of S. aureus could be associated with the presence or absence of other staphylococcal species. Nasal samples (n = 129 were obtained from seven different pig lineages in the Netherlands, France, and Germany. S. aureus and other staphylococci were enumerated from these samples by real-time (RT-PCR and culture. Associations were explored between the presence of S. aureus and other staphylococci. S. aureus was detected by RT-PCR on all farms and in samples from pigs of all lineages. Twenty-five percent of the pigs from lineage F (from two farms were colonized with S. aureus, while in all other lineages it was more than 50% (p < 0.01. Moreover, in S. aureus-positive samples from pigs of lineage F smaller amounts of S. aureus were found than in other lineages. Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus cohnii, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus were usually not found in combination with S. aureus in these samples. In conclusion: (i pigs from different genetic lineages have different susceptibilities for colonization with S. aureus. These pigs might contain a genetic factor influencing nasal colonization. (ii Colonization of S. aureus is also associated with the absence of S. sciuri, S. cohnii, or S. saprophyticus. (iii The farm environment seems to influence the presence of S. aureus in pigs.

  3. Diversity of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec structures in coagulase-negative staphylococci and relationship to drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-González, Elvira; López, Daniel; Pezina, Cesar; Muruet, Walter; Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; Muñoz, Ivan; Ramírez, Camilo; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge M

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements in meticillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) isolated from a tertiary-care hospital in Mexico and to examine the relationship to drug resistance. Fifty selected MR-CoNS isolates collected from catheters (n=15), blood (n=15), bone (n=9), bronchial lavage (n=2) and urine (n=2) and one isolate each from an abscess, cerebrospinal fluid, eye, pleural effusion, synovial fluid, tracheal aspirate and wound secretion were examined. Susceptibility testing was performed by the broth microdilution method. SCCmec types were determined by multiplex PCR and PFGE was carried out as described previously for Staphylococcus aureus. Among the MR-CoNS strains studied, the most frequently isolated species were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=26) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=13). Staphylococcus cohnii (n=5), Staphylococcus hominis (n=3), Staphylococcus sciuri (n=1), Staphylococcus pasteuri (n=1) and the recently described species Staphylococcus pettenkoferi (n=1) were also identified. The most frequent MR-CoNS genotype identified was SCCmec type IVa in S. epidermidis isolates, which also showed a high diversity in their PFGE patterns. A clone was found that amplified both SCCmec III and V elements in five isolates examined. The single MR S. pettenkoferi isolate harboured SCCmec type IVd and the single MR S. pasteuri isolate harboured SCCmec type I. The carriage of SCCmec type III was associated with resistance or intermediate resistance to meropenem (P <0.05). These results confirm the high prevalence of S. epidermidis SCCmec IVa and the high genetic diversity among MR-CoNS strains. As far as is known, this is the first report describing the newly identified S. pettenkoferi possessing SCCmec IVd and S. pasteuri harbouring SCCmec type I. MR-CoNS harbouring SCCmec type III were found to be more resistant to meropenem.

  4. Cleavage of influenza RNA by using a human PUF-based artificial RNA-binding protein–staphylococcal nuclease hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Kento; Masaoka, Keisuke; Fujita, Yusuke; Morisada, Ryosuke; Mori, Koichi; Tobimatsu, Takamasa; Sera, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Various viruses infect animals and humans and cause a variety of diseases, including cancer. However, effective methodologies to prevent virus infection have not yet been established. Therefore, development of technologies to inactivate viruses is highly desired. We have already demonstrated that cleavage of a DNA virus genome was effective to prevent its replication. Here, we expanded this methodology to RNA viruses. In the present study, we used staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) instead of the PIN domain (PilT N-terminus) of human SMG6 as an RNA-cleavage domain and fused the SNase to a human Pumilio/fem-3 binding factor (PUF)-based artificial RNA-binding protein to construct an artificial RNA restriction enzyme with enhanced RNA-cleavage rates for influenzavirus. The resulting SNase-fusion nuclease cleaved influenza RNA at rates 120-fold greater than the corresponding PIN-fusion nuclease. The cleaving ability of the PIN-fusion nuclease was not improved even though the linker moiety between the PUF and RNA-cleavage domain was changed. Gel shift assays revealed that the RNA-binding properties of the PUF derivative used was not as good as wild type PUF. Improvement of the binding properties or the design method will allow the SNase-fusion nuclease to cleave an RNA target in mammalian animal cells and/or organisms. - Highlights: • A novel RNA restriction enzyme using SNase was developed tor cleave viral RNA. • Our enzyme cleaved influenza RNA with rates >120-fold higher rates a PIN-fusion one. • Our artificial enzyme with the L5 linker showed the highest RNA cleavage rate. • Our artificial enzyme site-selectively cleaved influenza RNA in vitro.

  5. Fine typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates using direct repeat unit and staphylococcal interspersed repeat unit typing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Mao; Ho, Mao-Wang; Li, Chi-Yuan; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2015-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) typing is an important epidemiologic tool for monitoring trends and preventing outbreaks. However, the efficiency of various MRSA typing methods for each SCCmec MRSA isolate is rarely evaluated. A total of 157 MRSA isolates from four different regions in Taiwan were typed with five different molecular methods, including SCCmec typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, mec-associated direct repeat unit (dru) copy number determination, and staphylococcal interspersed repeat unit (SIRU) profiling. There were four SCCmec types, eight MLST types, 15 spa types, 11 dru types, and 31 SIRU profiles. The most common type determined by each molecular typing method was SCCmec III (115 isolates, 73.2%), ST239 (99 isolates, 63.1%), t037 (107 isolates, 68.2%), 14 dru copies (76 isolates, 48.4%), and SIRU profile 3013722 (102 isolates, 65%), respectively. When using the combination of MLST, spa typing, and dru copy number, ST5-t002-4 (n = 8), ST239-t037-14 (n = 68), ST59-t437-9 (n = 9), and ST59-t437-11 (n = 6) were found to be the most common types of SCCmec types II (n = 9), III (n = 115), IV (n = 21), and VT (n = 11) isolates, respectively. SCCmec type III isolates were further classified into 11 dru types. Of the 21 SCCmec type IV isolates, 14 SIRU profiles were found. Seven SIRU patterns were observed in the 11 SCCmec type VT isolates. Different typing methods showed a similar Hunter-Gaston discrimination index among the 157 MRSA isolates. However, dru and SIRU typing methods had a better discriminatory power for SCCmec type III and SCCmec types IV and VT isolates, respectively, suggesting that dru and SIRU can be used to further type these isolates. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Distribution of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec Types and correlation with comorbidity and infection type in patients with MRSA bacteremia.

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    Jiun-Ling Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular epidemiological definitions that are based on staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec typing and phylogenetic analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates are considered a reliable way to distinguish between healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA. However, there is little information regarding the clinical features and outcomes of bacteremia patients with MRSA carrying different SCCmec types. METHODS: From January 1 through December 31, 2006, we recorded the demographic data and outcomes of 159 consecutive adult MRSA bacteremia patients from whom isolates for SCCmec analysis were collected. All participants were patients at a tertiary care center in Taiwan. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The following SCCmec types were identified in MRSA isolates: 30 SCCmec II (18.9%, 87 SCCmec III (54.7%, 22 SCCmec IV (13.8%, and 20 SCCmec V (12.6%. The time from admission to the first MRSA-positive blood culture for patients infected with isolates with the SCCmec III element (mean/median, 50.7/26 days was significantly longer than for patients infected with isolates carrying SCCmec IV or V (mean/median, 6.7/3 days for SCCmec IV; 11.1/10.5 days for SCCmec V (P<0.05. In univariate analysis, community onset, soft tissue infection, and deep-seated infection were predictors for SCCmec IV/V. In multivariate analysis, length of stay before index culture, diabetes mellitus, and being bedridden were independent risk factors associated with SCCmec II/III. CONCLUSIONS: These findings are in agreement with previous studies of the genetic characteristics of CA-MRSA. MRSA bacteremia with SCCmec II/III isolates occurred more among patients with serious comorbidities and prolonged hospitalization. Community onset, skin and soft tissue infection, and deep-seated infection best predicted SCCmec IV/V MRSA bacteremia.

  7. In Vivo Role of TLR2 and MyD88 Signaling in Eliciting Innate Immune Responses in Staphylococcal Endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talreja, Deepa; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective mechanisms evoked by TLR2 and MyD88 signaling in bacterial endophthalmitis in vivo. Methods. Endophthalmitis was induced in wild-type (WT), TLR2−/−, MyD88−/−, and Cnlp−/− mice by intravitreal injections of a laboratory strain (RN6390) and two endophthalmitis isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. Disease progression was monitored by assessing corneal and vitreous haze, bacterial burden, and retinal tissue damage. Levels of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines were determined using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ELISA. Flow cytometry was used to assess neutrophil infiltration. Cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) expression was determined by immunostaining and dot blot. Results. Eyes infected with either laboratory or clinical isolates exhibited higher levels of inflammatory mediators at the early stages of infection (≤24 hours) in WT mice than in TLR2−/− or MyD88−/− mice. However, their levels surpassed that of WT mice at the later stages of infection (>48 hours), coinciding with increased bacterial burden and retinal damage. Both TLR2−/− and MyD88−/− retinas produced reduced levels of CRAMP, and its deficiency (Cnlp−/−) rendered the mice susceptible to increased bacterial burden and retinal tissue damage as early as 1 day post infection. Analyses of inflammatory mediators and neutrophil levels in WT versus Cnlp−/− mice showed a trend similar to that observed in TLR2 and MyD88 KO mice. Furthermore, we observed that even a 10-fold lower infective dose of S. aureus was sufficient to cause endophthalmitis in TLR2−/− and MyD88−/− mice. Conclusions. TLR2 and MyD88 signaling plays an important role in protecting the retina from staphylococcal endophthalmitis by production of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP. PMID:25678692

  8. Tabebuia avellanedae naphthoquinones: activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains, cytotoxic activity and in vivo dermal irritability analysis

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    Giambiagi-deMarval Marcia

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and coagulase-negative staphylococcus infections are a worldwide concern. Currently, these isolates have also shown resistance to vancomycin, the last therapy used in these cases. It has been observed that quinones and other related compounds exhibit antibacterial activity. This study evaluated the antibacterial activity, toxicity and in vivo dermal irritability of lapachol extracted from Tabebuia avellanedae and derivatives against methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates. In addition, its mechanism of action was also analyzed. Methods The compounds β-lapachone, 3-hydroxy β N lapachone and α-lapachone were tested to determine the MIC values against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus strains, being the two last ones hetero-resistant to vancomycin. Experiments of protein synthesis analysis to investigate the naphthoquinones action were assessed. In vitro toxicity to eukaryotic BSC-40 African Green Monkey Kidney cell cultures and in vivo primary dermal irritability in healthy rabbits were also performed. Results The compounds tested showed antibacterial activity (MICs of 8, 4/8 and 64/128 μg/mL to β-lapachone, 3-hydroxy β N lapachone and α-lapachone, respectively, but no bactericidal activity was observed (MBC > 512 μg/mL for all compounds. Although it has been observed toxic effect in eukaryotic cells, the compounds were shown to be atoxic when applied as topic preparations in healthy rabbits. No inhibition of proteins synthesis was observed. Conclusion Our results suggest that quinones could be used in topic preparations against wound infections caused by staphylococci, after major investigation of the pharmacological properties of the compounds. Studies about the use of these compounds on tumoral cells could be carried on, due to their effect in eukaryotic cells metabolism.

  9. Increasing the frequency of hand washing by healthcare workers does not lead to commensurate reductions in staphylococcal infection in a hospital ward

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    Kerr Kevin G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hand hygiene is generally considered to be the most important measure that can be applied to prevent the spread of healthcare-associated infection (HAI. Continuous emphasis on this intervention has lead to the widespread opinion that HAI rates can be greatly reduced by increased hand hygiene compliance alone. However, this assumes that the effectiveness of hand hygiene is not constrained by other factors and that improved compliance in excess of a given level, in itself, will result in a commensurate reduction in the incidence of HAI. However, several researchers have found the law of diminishing returns to apply to hand hygiene, with the greatest benefits occurring in the first 20% or so of compliance, and others have demonstrated that poor cohorting of nursing staff profoundly influences the effectiveness of hand hygiene measures. Collectively, these findings raise intriguing questions about the extent to which increasing compliance alone can further reduce rates of HAI. Methods In order to investigate these issues further, we constructed a deterministic Ross-Macdonald model and applied it to a hypothetical general medical ward. In this model the transmission of staphylococcal infection was assumed to occur after contact with the transiently colonized hands of HCWs, who, in turn, acquire contamination only by touching colonized patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of imperfect hand cleansing on the transmission of staphylococcal infection and to identify, whether there is a limit, above which further hand hygiene compliance is unlikely to be of benefit. Results The model demonstrated that if transmission is solely via the hands of HCWs, it should, under most circumstances, be possible to prevent outbreaks of staphylococcal infection from occurring at a hand cleansing frequencies Conclusion Although our study confirmed hand hygiene to be an effective control measure, it demonstrated that the law of

  10. Roles of CcrA and CcrB in Excision and Integration of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec, a Staphylococcus aureus Genomic Island▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Archer, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    The gene encoding resistance to methicillin and other β-lactam antibiotics in staphylococci, mecA, is carried on a genomic island, SCCmec (for staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec). The chromosomal excision and integration of types I to IV SCCmec are catalyzed by the site-specific recombinases CcrA and CcrB, the genes for which are encoded on each element. We sought to identify the relative contributions of CcrA and CcrB in the excision and integration of SCCmec. Purified CcrB but not CcrA ...

  11. A simplified multiplex PCR assay for fast and easy discrimination of globally distributed staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec types in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Nor Shamsudin, Mariana; Sekawi, Zamberi; van Belkum, Alex; Neela, Vasanthakumari

    2010-10-01

    A multiplex PCR assay was developed for the identification of major types and subtypes of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. The method uses a novel 9 valent multiplex PCR plus two primer pairs for S. aureus identification and detection of meticillin resistance. All 389 clinical MRSA isolates from Malaysia and 18 European isolates from the Harmony collection harbouring different SCCmec types that we tested were correctly characterized by our PCR assay. SCCmec type III and V were by far the most common types among both hospital- and community-acquired Malaysian MRSA isolates, with an apparent emergence of MRSA harbouring the IVh type.

  12. Structural variations of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec Type IVa in Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 8 and unrelated lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Boye, Kit

    2011-01-01

    PCR mapping of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IVa and adjacent mobile elements in 94 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains identified two primary structures (A and B) that could be further classified into two (A1 and A2) and five (B1 to B5) variants, primarily...... based on structural differences in the orfX-J3 region. While spa type t008 (USA300) invariably contained the A variants, other spa types belonging to clonal complex 8 and unrelated lineages generally contained B variants. These findings have important implications for the typing and identification...

  13. Pathogen-Reactive T Helper Cell Analysis in the Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Ebner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in studying host–pathogen interactions in human-relevant large animal models such as the pig. Despite the progress in developing immunological reagents for porcine T cell research, there is an urgent need to directly assess pathogen-specific T cells—an extremely rare population of cells, but of upmost importance in orchestrating the host immune response to a given pathogen. Here, we established that the activation marker CD154 (CD40L, known from human and mouse studies, identifies also porcine antigen-reactive CD4+ T lymphocytes. CD154 expression was upregulated early after antigen encounter and CD4+CD154+ antigen-reactive T cells coexpressed cytokines. Antigen-induced expansion and autologous restimulation enabled a time- and dose-resolved analysis of CD154 regulation and a significantly increased resolution in phenotypic profiling of antigen-responsive cells. CD154 expression identified T cells responding to staphylococcal Enterotoxin B superantigen stimulation as well as T cells responding to the fungus Candida albicans and T cells specific for a highly prevalent intestinal parasite, the nematode Ascaris suum during acute and trickle infection. Antigen-reactive T cells were further detected after immunization of pigs with a single recombinant bacterial antigen of Streptococcus suis only. Thus, our study offers new ways to study antigen-specific T lymphocytes in the pig and their contribution to host–pathogen interactions.

  14. Real-Time Fluorogenic Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays to Nucleic Acid-Based Detection of Simulants and Biothreat Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khan, Akbar S; O'Connell, Kevin P; Bucher, Jennifer R; Anderson, Patricia E; Cao, Cheng J; Gostomski, Mark V; Valdes, James J

    2003-01-01

    .... We describe here assays for the detection of the gene encoding staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), a toxin produced by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and an agent responsible for a significant fraction of food poisoning incidents worldwide...

  15. Characteristics of enterotoxin distribution, hemolysis, lecithinase, and starch hydrolysis of Bacillus cereus isolated from infant formulas and ready-to-eat foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-Yeon; Park, Jong-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous environmental microbe implicated as a main cause of food poisoning with various symptoms, depending on the strain type and the isolation source. In this study, the potential virulence factors and biochemical properties of B. cereus isolated from infant formulas and ready-to-eat (RTE) foods were analyzed and compared. A total of 347 B. cereus strains were isolated and identified from 687 infant food formulas and RTE food samples. All the isolates had one or more enterotoxin genes, and one-half of the strains had all 3 enterotoxin genes (hbl, nhe, and cytK) that are involved in food poisoning in humans. Here, all the 3 genes were detected in 50% of the B. cereus isolates from RTE foods and only 14% of the isolates were identified from infant formulas. The latter harbored low cytK and bceT, and very low hbl genes. Most B. cereus isolates possessed the hemolysis gene, but not the ces gene. The infant formula isolates showed stronger hemolysis activity than the other isolates. In addition, 26% of the total isolates showed low lecithinase activities and 10% showed high lecithinase activities. A greater number of isolates from the infant formula showed high lecithinase activity than those from the RTE foods. Approximately 83% of the isolates were positive and 17% were negative for starch hydrolysis. Over 90% of the RTE food isolates and only 35% of the infant formula isolates were positive for starch hydrolysis. However, all the strains possessed nhe, but their harboring patterns of hbl and cytK were significantly different. Most starch-hydrolyzing strains possessed hbl, but only 23% nonstarch-hydrolyzing isolates possessed this gene. Moreover, very low nonstarch hydrolyzing strains harbored cytK. Most nonstarch-hydrolyzing isolates showed high lecithinase and strong hemolysis activities, and very low hbl and cytK harboring. In summary, most infant formula isolates showed stronger hemolysis and higher lecithinase activities with lower

  16. Real-time monitoring of bacterial infection in vivo: development of bioluminescent staphylococcal foreign-body and deep-thigh-wound mouse infection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklin, Nelly A; Pancari, Gregory D; Tobery, Timothy W; Cope, Leslie; Jackson, Jesse; Gill, Charles; Overbye, Karen; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Montgomery, Donna; Anderson, Annaliesa S; McClements, William; Jansen, Kathrin U

    2003-09-01

    Staphylococcal infections associated with catheter and prosthetic implants are difficult to eradicate and often lead to chronic infections. Development of novel antibacterial therapies requires simple, reliable, and relevant models for infection. Using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, we have adapted the existing foreign-body and deep-wound mouse models of staphylococcal infection to allow real-time monitoring of the bacterial colonization of catheters or tissues. This approach also enables kinetic measurements of bacterial growth and clearance in each infected animal. Persistence of infection was observed throughout the course of the study until termination of the experiment at day 16 in a deep-wound model and day 21 in the foreign-body model, providing sufficient time to test the effects of antibacterial compounds. The usefulness of both animal models was assessed by using linezolid as a test compound and comparing bioluminescent measurements to bacterial counts. In the foreign-body model, a three-dose antibiotic regimen (2, 5, and 24 h after infection) resulted in a decrease in both luminescence and bacterial counts recovered from the implant compared to those of the mock-treated infected mice. In addition, linezolid treatment prevented the formation of subcutaneous abscesses, although it did not completely resolve the infection. In the thigh model, the same treatment regimen resulted in complete resolution of the luminescent signal, which correlated with clearance of the bacteria from the thighs.

  17. Paracentrin 1, a synthetic antimicrobial peptide from the sea-urchin Paracentrotus lividus, interferes with staphylococcal and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Domenico; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Spinello, Angelo; Barone, Giampaolo; Russo, Debora; Vitale, Maria; Parrinello, Daniela; Arizza, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The rise of antibiotic-resistance as well as the reduction of investments by pharmaceutical companies in the development of new antibiotics have stimulated the investigation for alternative strategies to conventional antibiotics. Many antimicrobial peptides show a high specificity for prokaryotes and a low toxicity for eukaryotic cells and, due to their mode of action the development of resistance is considered unlikely. We recently characterized an antimicrobial peptide that was called Paracentrin 1 from the 5-kDa peptide fraction from the coelomocyte cytosol of the Paracentrotus lividus. In this study, the chemically synthesized Paracentrin 1, was tested for its antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties against reference strains of Gram positive and Gram negative. The Paracentrin 1 was active against planktonic form of staphylococcal strains (reference and isolates) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 6.2 mg/ml. The Paracentrin 1 was able to inhibit biofilm formation of staphylococcal and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains at concentrations ranging from 3.1 to 0.75 mg/ml. We consider the tested peptide as a good starting molecule for novel synthetic derivatives with improved pharmaceutical potential.

  18. Frequency of enterotoxins, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, and biofilm formation genes in Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with mastitis in the Northeast of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, F N; Belo, N O; Costa, E A; Andrade, G I; Pereira, L S; Carvalho, I A; Santos, R L

    2018-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is among the microorganisms more frequently associated with subclinical bovine mastitis. S. aureus may produce several virulence factors. This study aimed at determining the frequency of virulence factors such as enterotoxins, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1, and ica adhesion genes. In addition, we assessed antimicrobial drug resistance in S. aureus isolated from clinical and subclinical cases of mastitis. A total of 88 cows with clinical or subclinical mastitis were sampled, resulting in 38 S. aureus isolates, from which 25 (65.78%) carried toxin genes, including seb, sec, sed, tst, and icaD adhesion gene. These S. aureus isolates belong to 21 ribotypes and three S. aureus strains belonged to the same ribotype producing ica adhesion gene. Approximately 90% of S. aureus strains obtained in our study demonstrated multiple resistance to different antimicrobial agents. The most efficacious antimicrobial agents against the isolates were gentamicin, amoxicillin, and norfloxacin. Gentamicin was the most efficacious agent inhibiting 78.95% of the S. aureus isolates. The least efficacious were penicillin, streptomycin, and ampicillin. Our results can help in understanding the relationship between virulence factors and subclinical mastitis caused by S. aureus. Further research about diversity of S. aureus isolates and genes responsible for the pathogenicity of subclinical mastitis is essential.

  19. Involvement of protein kinase C in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in a human colonic carcinoma cell line, COLO-205

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Dyuti Datta; Saha, Subhrajit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.

    2005-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the involvement of calcium-protein kinase C pathway in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa) apart from STa-induced activation of guanylate cyclase in human colonic carcinoma cell line COLO-205, which was used as a model cultured cell line to study the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. In response to E. coli STa, protein kinase C (PKC) activity was increased in a time-dependent manner with its physical translocation from cytosol to membrane. Inhibition of the PKC activity in membrane fraction and inhibition of its physical translocation in response to IP 3 -mediated calcium release inhibitor dantrolene suggested the involvement of intracellular store depletion in the regulation of PKC activity. Among different PKC isoforms, predominant involvement of calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKCα) was specified using isotype-specific pseudosubstrate, which showed pronounce enzyme activity. Inhibition of enzyme activity by PKCα-specific inhibitor Goe6976 and immunoblott study employing isotype-specific antibody further demonstrated the involvement of calcium-dependent isoform of PKC in the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. Moreover, inhibition of guanylate cyclase activity by PKCα-specific inhibitor Goe6976 suggested the involvement of PKCα in the regulation of guanylate cyclase activity

  20. Effects of tetrodotoxin and ion replacements on the short-circuit current induced by Escherichiacoli heat stable enterotoxin across small intestine of the gerbil (Gerbillus cheesmani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Yaqoub Al-Balool

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mucosally added Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa 30 ng ml-1 on the basal short-circuit current (Isc in µA cm-2 across stripped and unstripped sheets of jejuna and ilea taken from fed, starved (4 days, water ad lib and undernourished (50% control food intake for 21 days gerbil (Gerbillus cheesmani were investigated. The effect of neurotoxin tetrodotoxin (TTX 10 µM and the effects of replacing chloride by gluconate or the effects of removing bicarbonate from bathing buffers on the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa were also investigated. The maximum increase in Isc which resulted from the addition of STa were significantly higher in jejuna and ilea taken from starved and undernourished gerbils when compared with the fed control both using stripped and unstripped sheets. In the two regions of the small intestine taken from fed and starved animals TTX reduced the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa across unstripped sheets only. Moreover in jejuna and ilea taken from undernourished gerbils TTX reduced significantly the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa across stripped and unstripped sheets. Replacing chloride by gluconate decreased the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa across jejuna and ilea taken from undernourished gerbils only. Removing bicarbonates from bathing buffer decreased the maximum increase in Isc across the jejuna and ilea taken from starved and undernourished gerbils.

  1. (68)Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET/CT imaging of peri-implant tissue responses and staphylococcal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtinen, Helena; Kulkova, Julia; Lindholm, Laura; Eerola, Erkki; Hakanen, Antti J; Moritz, Niko; Söderström, Mirva; Saanijoki, Tiina; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Roivainen, Anne; Aro, Hannu T

    2014-01-01

    difference between the S. aureus group and group 3 was neither statistically significant. PET/CT imaging with novel (68)Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 tracer was able to detect inflammatory tissue response induced by catheter implantation and staphylococcal infections.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Superantigen Function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

    2004-01-01

    ...) Vb domains and can result in systemic shock and death. Rational design of strategies for prevention or treatments of such diseases may only be possible if we have insights into the mechanisms of T cell activation by SEs...

  3. The diversities of staphylococcal species, virulence and antibiotic resistance genes in the subclinical mastitis milk from a single Chinese cow herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Tan, Xiao; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococci are the leading pathogens of bovine mastitis which is difficult to control. However, the published data on the prevalence of staphylococcal species, virulence and antibiotic resistance genes in bovine mastitis from China are limited. In this study, 104 out of 209 subclinical mastitis milk samples from a single Chinese dairy herd were cultured-positive for staphylococci (49.8%), which were further identified as coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) or coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). According to the partial tuf and/or 16S rRNA gene sequence, the 28 CPS isolates were confirmed to be Staphylococcus aureus (26.9%), and 76 CNS isolates were assigned to 13 different species (73.1%) with Staphylococcus arlettae, Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus chromogenes as the dominant species. In the 28 S. aureus isolates, the most prevalent general virulence genes were coa, Ig and eno (100%), followed by hla (96.4%), hlb (92.9%), fib (92.9%), clfA (89.3%), clfB (85.7%) and nuc (85.7%). Both exotoxin and biofilm-associated genes were significantly less prevalent than the previously reported. Although 19 different virulence gene patterns were found, only one was dominant (32.1%). The prevalence of blaZ (82.1%) or mecA gene (35.7%) was much higher than the previously reported. In the 76 CNS isolates, the virulence genes were significantly less prevalent than that in the S. aureus isolates. Among the 4 main CNS species, S. chromogenes (n = 12) was the only species with high percentage (75%) of blaZ gene, while S. sciuri (n = 12) was the only species with the high percentage (66.7%) of mecA gene. The most of antibiotic resistance genes were present as multi-resistance genes, and the antibiotic resistances were attributed by different resistance genes between resistant S. aureus and CNS isolates. These data suggest that the prevalence of staphylococcal species, virulence and antibiotic resistance in the mastitis milk from the Chinese

  4. SCCmecFinder, a Web-Based Tool for Typing of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec in Staphylococcus aureus Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Hülya; Hasman, Henrik; Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Johannesen, Thor Bech; Allesøe, Rosa Lundbye; Lemvigh, Camilla Koldbæk; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Lund, Ole; Larsen, Anders Rhod

    2018-01-01

    Typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is important in infection control and surveillance. The current nomenclature of MRSA includes the genetic background of the S. aureus strain determined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) or equivalent methods like spa typing and typing of the mobile genetic element staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCC mec ), which carries the mecA or mecC gene. Whereas MLST and spa typing are relatively simple, typing of SCC mec is less trivial because of its heterogeneity. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) provides the essential data for typing of the genetic background and SCC mec , but so far, no bioinformatic tools for SCC mec typing have been available. Here, we report the development and evaluation of SCC mec Finder for characterization of the SCC mec element from S. aureus WGS data. SCC mec Finder is able to identify all SCC mec element types, designated I to XIII, with subtyping of SCC mec types IV (2B) and V (5C2). SCC mec elements are characterized by two different gene prediction approaches to achieve correct annotation, a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST)-based approach and a k -mer-based approach. Evaluation of SCC mec Finder by using a diverse collection of clinical isolates ( n = 93) showed a high typeability level of 96.7%, which increased to 98.9% upon modification of the default settings. In conclusion, SCC mec Finder can be an alternative to more laborious SCC mec typing methods and is freely available at https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/SCCmecFinder. IMPORTANCE SCC mec in MRSA is acknowledged to be of importance not only because it contains the mecA or mecC gene but also for staphylococcal adaptation to different environments, e.g., in hospitals, the community, and livestock. Typing of SCC mec by PCR techniques has, because of its heterogeneity, been challenging, and whole-genome sequencing has only partially solved this since no good bioinformatic tools have been available. In this

  5. Antibiotic resistance, ability to form biofilm and susceptibility to copper alloys of selected staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Różańska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the employment of sanitary regimes, contact transmission of the aetiological agents of hospital infections is still exceedingly common. The issue of microbe transmission becomes particularly important when facing multidrug-resistant microorganisms such as methicillin-resistant staphylococci. In the case of deficiencies in cleaning and disinfection procedures, hospital equipment made of copper alloys can play an important role, complementing traditional hospital hygiene procedures. The objective of this study was to characterize staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards in terms of their drug resistance, ability to form biofilm and susceptibility to antimicrobial activity of copper alloys. Methods The materials for the study were 95 staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in 13 different hospital wards from Małopolska province (the south of Poland. Phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance were checked for erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and mupirocin. Biofilm formation ability for the tested strains was checked with the use of culture on Congo red agar. Susceptibility to copper, tin bronze, brass and new silver was tested using a modification of the Japanese standard. Results Over 67% of the analysed staphylococcal strains were methicillin-resistant (MR. Four strains were resistant to all of the tested antibiotics, and 14 were resistant to all except mupirocin. Strains classified as MR had significantly increased resistance to the remaining antibiotic groups. About one-third of the analysed strains revealed biofilm-forming ability. Among the majority of species, biofilm-forming and non-biofilm-forming strains were distributed evenly; in the case of S. haemolyticus only, negative strains accounted for 92.8%. Susceptibility to copper alloys was different between strains and rather lower than in the case of the SA

  6. The immunogenic SigA enterotoxin of Shigella flexneri 2a binds to HEp-2 cells and induces fodrin redistribution in intoxicated epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Al-Hasani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that the enterotoxin SigA which resides on the she pathogenicity island (PAI of S. flexneri 2a is an autonomously secreted serine protease capable of degrading casein. We have also demonstrated that SigA is cytopathic for HEp-2 cells and plays a role in the intestinal fluid accumulation associated with S. flexneri infections. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we show that SigA binds specifically to HEp-2 cells and degrades recombinant human alphaII spectrin (alpha-fodrin in vitro, suggesting that the cytotoxic and enterotoxic effects mediated by SigA are likely associated with the degradation of epithelial fodrin. Consistent with our data, this study also demonstrates that SigA cleaves intracellular fodrin in situ, causing its redistribution within cells. These results strongly implicate SigA in altering the cytoskeleton during the pathogenesis of shigellosis. On the basis of these findings, cleavage of fodrin is a novel mechanism of cellular intoxication for a Shigella toxin. Furthermore, information regarding immunogenicity to SigA in infected patients is lacking. We studied the immune response of SigA from day 28 post-challenge serum of one volunteer from S. flexneri 2a challenge studies. Our results demonstrate that SigA is immunogenic following infection with S. flexneri 2a. CONCLUSIONS: This work shows that SigA binds to epithelial HEp-2 cells as well as being able to induce fodrin degradation in vitro and in situ, further extending its documented role in the pathogenesis of Shigella infections.

  7. [Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit enhances the immune response against canine parvovirus VP2 in mice immunized by VP2 DNA vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongmei; Zhong, Fei; Li, Xiujin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xingxing; Pan, Sumin

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) B subunit (LTB) gene on canine parvovirus (CPV) VP2 gene vaccine. The LTB gene was amplified by PCR from genomic DNA of E. coli 44815 strain. The VP2-70 fragment (210 bp) encoding major epitope of VP2 (70 amino acids) was amplified by PCR from a plasmid encoding VP2 gene. VP2-70 and LTB genes were inserted into the eukaryotic vector to construct VP2-70 gene,LTB gene and VP2-70-LTB fused gene vectors. The mice were immunized with VP2-70 vector, VP2-70-LTB fused vector, or VP2-70 vector plus LTB vector, respectively. The antibody titers at the different time were measured by using ELISA method. The spleen lymphocyte proliferation activity was analyzed by 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The sequence of VP2-70 and LTB genes was identified. The recombinant VP2-70 and LTB proteins could be expressed in HEK293T cells in a secretory manner. The mice immunized with VP2-70 vector, VP2-70-LTB vector or VP2-70 vector plus LTB vector could generate the specific antibody against VP2 protein. The antibody titer immunized with VP2-70-LTB vector reached 1:5120 at 35 d post immunization, significantly higher than that of other two groups (P vaccine in mice.

  8. Peanut allergy as a trigger for the deterioration of atopic dermatitis and precursor of staphylococcal and herpetic associated infections – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a multifactorial and chronic disease, with genetic, environmental, immunological and nutritional origins. AD may be aggravated by allergies associated with infections. This study aims to describe a paediatric case of AD in which the peanut allergy was the triggering factor to aggravate the disease, and was also the concomitant precursor of staphylococcal (methicillin-sensitive [i]Staphylococcus aureus[/i], carrier of the Panton-Valentine leukocidine (PVL genes and herpetic (Herpes Simplex – HSV infections. The clinical management approach and nursing strategies promoted a favourable evolution during the hospitalization period, besides the family approach, which was essential to control any flare-up of the disease. Adherence to a recommended diet and the use of strategies to prevent any recurrent infections were important to ensure the patient’s quality of life.

  9. Surfactant-free purification of membrane protein complexes from bacteria: application to the staphylococcal penicillin-binding protein complex PBP2/PBP2a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin, Sarah; Rosado, Helena; Taylor, Peter W; Jamshad, Mohammed; Dafforn, Timothy R; Garcia-Lara, Jorge; Foster, Simon J; Galley, Nicola F; Roper, David I

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant-mediated removal of proteins from biomembranes invariably results in partial or complete loss of function and disassembly of multi-protein complexes. We determined the capacity of styrene-co-maleic acid (SMA) co-polymer to remove components of the cell division machinery from the membrane of drug-resistant staphylococcal cells. SMA-lipid nanoparticles solubilized FtsZ-PBP2-PBP2a complexes from intact cells, demonstrating the close physical proximity of these proteins within the lipid bilayer. Exposure of bacteria to (-)-epicatechin gallate, a polyphenolic agent that abolishes β-lactam resistance in staphylococci, disrupted the association between PBP2 and PBP2a. Thus, SMA purification provides a means to remove native integral membrane protein assemblages with minimal physical disruption and shows promise as a tool for the interrogation of molecular aspects of bacterial membrane protein structure and function. (paper)

  10. Peanut allergy as a trigger for the deterioration of atopic dermatitis and precursor of staphylococcal and herpetic associated infections – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a multifactorial and chronic disease, with genetic, environmental, immunological and nutritional origins. AD may be aggravated by allergies associated with infections. This study aims to describe a paediatric case of AD in which the peanut allergy was the triggering factor to aggravate the disease, and was also the concomitant precursor of staphylococcal (methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, carrier of the Panton-Valentine leukocidine (PVL genes and herpetic (Herpes Simplex – HSV infections. The clinical management approach and nursing strategies promoted a favourable evolution during the hospitalization period, besides the family approach, which was essential to control any flare-up of the disease. Adherence to a recommended diet and the use of strategies to prevent any recurrent infections were important to ensure the patient’s quality of life.

  11. Excision of the Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) and its crucial role in the horizontal transfer of methicillin resistance in staphylococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanov, M.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus est un pathogène humain majeur ayant développé des résistances contre la quasi totalité des antibiotiques disponibles, incluant la très importante famille des β- lactamines. La résistance à cette classe d'antibiotiques est conférée par la « Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec » (SCCmec), qui est un élément génétique mobile capable de s'insérer dans le chromosome bactérien et capable d'être transféré horizontalement chez d'autres staphylocoques. Le mécanisme moléculair...

  12. Surfactant-free purification of membrane protein complexes from bacteria: application to the staphylococcal penicillin-binding protein complex PBP2/PBP2a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, Sarah; Jamshad, Mohammed; Dafforn, Timothy R.; Garcia-Lara, Jorge; Foster, Simon J.; Galley, Nicola F.; Roper, David I.; Rosado, Helena; Taylor, Peter W.

    2014-07-01

    Surfactant-mediated removal of proteins from biomembranes invariably results in partial or complete loss of function and disassembly of multi-protein complexes. We determined the capacity of styrene-co-maleic acid (SMA) co-polymer to remove components of the cell division machinery from the membrane of drug-resistant staphylococcal cells. SMA-lipid nanoparticles solubilized FtsZ-PBP2-PBP2a complexes from intact cells, demonstrating the close physical proximity of these proteins within the lipid bilayer. Exposure of bacteria to (-)-epicatechin gallate, a polyphenolic agent that abolishes β-lactam resistance in staphylococci, disrupted the association between PBP2 and PBP2a. Thus, SMA purification provides a means to remove native integral membrane protein assemblages with minimal physical disruption and shows promise as a tool for the interrogation of molecular aspects of bacterial membrane protein structure and function.

  13. Construction of bifunctional molecules specific to antigen and antibody’s Fc-fragment by fusion of scFv-antibodies with staphylococcal protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolibo D. V.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop approach for detection of scFv and their complexes with antigens. Methods. The fusion proteins, which include sequences of scFv and staphylococcal protein A, were constructed and the obtained bifunctional molecules were immunochemically analysed. Results. It was shown, that scFv fused with protein A and their complexes with antigens are effectively recognized by labelled immunoglobulins with unrestricted antigenic specificity. Conclusions. The fusion of scFv with protein A fragment is a perspective approach to increase the efficiency of application in ELISA. The obtained scFv, fused with protein A, could be used for development of test-systems for the detection of diphtheria toxin.

  14. TCR-Vß8 as alternative to animal testing for quantifying active SEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is a result of ingestion of Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) produced by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. SEs cause gastroenteritis and also cause activation of T cells and massive cytokine release. A current method for the detection of active SEs relies on its eme...

  15. The Efficacy of the Quorum Sensing Inhibitor FS8 and Tigecycline in Preventing Prosthesis Biofilm in an Animal Model of Staphylococcal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Giacometti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the efficacy of tigecycline and FS8, alone or combined, in preventing prosthesis biofilm in a rat model of staphylococcal vascular graft infection. Graft infections were established in the back subcutaneous tissue of adult male Wistar rats by implantation of Dacron prostheses followed by topical inoculation with 2 x 107 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus, strain Smith diffuse. The study included a control group, a contaminated group that did not receive any antibiotic prophylaxis, and three contaminated groups that received: (i intraperitoneal tigecycline, (ii FS8-soaked graft, and (iii tigecycline plus FS8-soaked graft, respectively. Each group included 15 animals. The infection burden was evaluated by using sonication and quantitative agar culture. Moreover, an in vitro binding-study was performed to quantify the how much FS8 was coated to the surface of the prosthesis. Tigecycline, combined with FS8, against the adherent bacteria showed MICs (2.00 mg/L and MBCs (4.00 mg/L four-fold lower with respect to tigecycline alone in in vitro studies. The rat groups treated with tigecycline showed the lowest bacterial numbers (4.4 x 104 ± 1.2 x 104 CFU/mL. The FS8-treated group showed a good activity and significant differences compared to control group with bacterial numbers of 6.8 x 104 ± 2.0 x 104 CFU/mL. A stronger inhibition of bacterial growth was observed in rats treated with a combined FS8 and tigecycline therapy than in those that were singly treated with bacterial numbers of 101 CFU/mL graft. In conclusion, the ability to affect biofilm formation as well, its property to be an antibiotic enhancer suggests FS8 as alternative or additional agent to use in conjunction with conventional antimicrobial for prevention of staphylococcal biofilm related infection.

  16. Antimicrobial Agent of Susceptibilities and Antiseptic Resistance Gene Distribution among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients with Impetigo and Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Norihisa; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Nishijima, Setsuko; Kurokawa, Ichiro; So, Hiromu; Sasatsu, Masanori

    2006-01-01

    The susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents of and distributions of antiseptic resistance genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated between 1999 and 2004 in Japan were examined. The data of MRSA strains that are causative agents of impetigo and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) were compared with those of MRSA strains isolated from patients with other diseases. The susceptibilities to antiseptic agents in MRSA isolates from patients with impetigo and SSSS were higher than those in MRSA isolates from patients with other diseases. The distribution of the qacA/B genes in MRSA strains isolated from patients with impetigo and SSSS (1.3%, 1/76) was remarkably lower than that in MRSA strains isolated from patients with other diseases (45.9%, 95/207). Epidemiologic typings of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that MRSA strains isolated from patients with impetigo and SSSS had type IV SCCmec (75/76), except for one strain, and 64.5% (49/76) of the strains had different PFGE types. In addition, the patterns of restriction digestion of all tested qacA/B plasmid in MRSA isolates having different PFGE types were identical. The results showed that a specific MRSA clone carrying qacA/B was not prevalent, but qacA/B was spread among health care-associated MRSA strains. Therefore, it was concluded that the lower distribution rate of qacA/B resulted in higher susceptibilities to cationic antiseptic agents in MRSA isolated from patients with impetigo and SSSS. PMID:16757607

  17. Immunogenicity of recombinant Lactobacillus casei-expressing F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG in conjunction with a heat-labile enterotoxin A (LTAK63) and heat-labile enterotoxin B (LTB) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli as an oral adjuvant in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M; Qi, R; Chen, C; Yin, J; Ma, S; Shi, W; Wu, Y; Ge, J; Jiang, Y; Tang, L; Xu, Y; Li, Y

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to develop an effective oral vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection and to design new and more versatile mucosal adjuvants. Genetically engineered Lactobacillus casei strains expressing F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG (rLpPG-2-FaeG) and either co-expressing heat-labile enterotoxin A (LTA) subunit with an amino acid mutation associated with reduced virulence (LTAK63) and a heat-labile enterotoxin B (LTB) subunit of E. coli (rLpPG-2-LTAK63-co-LTB) or fused-expressing LTAK63 and LTB (rLpPG-2-LTAK63-fu-LTB) were constructed. The immunogenicity of rLpPG-2-FaeG in conjunction with rLpPG-2-LTAK63-co-LTB or rLpPG-2-LTAK63-fu-LTB as an orally administered mucosal adjuvant in mice was evaluated. Results showed that the levels of FaeG-specific serum IgG and mucosal sIgA, as well as the proliferation of lymphocytes, were significantly higher in mice orally co-administered rLpPG-2-FaeG and rLpPG-2-LTAK63-fu-LTB compared with those administered rLpPG-2-FaeG alone, and were lower than those co-administered rLpPG-2-FaeG and rLpPG-2-LTAK63-co-LTB. Moreover, effective protection was observed after challenge with F4+ ETEC strain CVCC 230 in mice co-administered rLpPG-2-FaeG and rLpPG-2-LTAK63-co-LTB or rLpPG-2-FaeG and rLpPG-2-LTAK63-fu-LTB group compared with those that received rLpPG-2-FaeG alone. rLpPG-2-FaeG showed greater immunogenicity in combination with LTAK63 and LTB as molecular adjuvants. Recombinant Lactobacillus provides a promising platform for the development of vaccines against F4+ ETEC infection. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Incorporation of membrane-anchored flagellin or Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit enhances the immunogenicity of rabies virus-like particles in mice and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinglin eQi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies remains an important worldwide public health threat, so safe, effective and affordable vaccines are still being sought. Virus-like particle (VLP-based vaccines targeting various viral pathogens have been successfully produced, licensed and commercialized. Here, we designed and constructed two chimeric rabies virus-like particles (cRVLPs containing rabies virus (RABV glycoprotein (G, matrix (M protein, and membrane-anchored flagellin (EVLP-F or Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (EVLP-L as molecular adjuvants to enhance the immune response against rabies. The immunogenicity and potential of cRVLPs as novel rabies vaccine were evaluated by intramuscular vaccination in mouse and dog models. Mouse studies demonstrated that both EVLP-F and EVLP-L induced faster and larger virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNA responses and elicited greater numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting IFN-γ or IL-4 compared with a standard rabies VLP (sRVLP containing only G and M. Moreover, cRVLPs recruited and/or activated more B cells and dendritic cells in inguinal lymph nodes. EVLP-F induced a strong, specific IgG2a response but not an IgG1 response, suggesting the activation of Th1 class immunity; in contrast, Th2 class immunity was observed with EVLP-L. The significantly enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses induced by cRVLPs provided complete protection against lethal challenge with RABV. Most importantly, dogs vaccinated with EVLP-F or EVLP-L exhibited increased VNA titers in sera and enhanced IFN-γ and IL-4 secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Taken together, these results illustrate that when incorporated into sRVLP, membrane-anchored flagellin and LTB possess strong adjuvant activity. EVLP-F and EVLP-L induce significantly enhanced RABV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in both mouse and dog. Therefore, these cRVLPs may be developed as safe and more efficacious rabies vaccine candidate for animals.

  19. Diversity of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec structures in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus strains among outpatients from four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppé, Etienne; Barbier, François; Mesli, Yasmine; Maiga, Aminata; Cojocaru, Radu; Benkhalfat, Mokhtar; Benchouk, Samia; Hassaine, Hafida; Maiga, Ibrahim; Diallo, Amadou; Koumaré, Abdel Karim; Ouattara, Kalilou; Soumaré, Sambou; Dufourcq, Jean-Baptiste; Nareth, Chhor; Sarthou, Jean-Louis; Andremont, Antoine; Ruimy, Raymond

    2009-02-01

    In staphylococci, methicillin (meticillin) resistance (MR) is mediated by the acquisition of the mecA gene, which is carried on the size and composition variable staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). MR has been extensively studied in Staphylococcus aureus, but little is known about MR coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS). Here, we describe the diversity of SCCmec structures in MR-CoNS from outpatients living in countries with contrasting environments: Algeria, Mali, Moldova, and Cambodia. Their MR-CoNS nasal carriage rates were 29, 17, 11, and 31%, respectively. Ninety-six MR-CoNS strains, comprising 75 (78%) Staphylococcus epidermidis strains, 19 (20%) Staphylococcus haemolyticus strains, 1 (1%) Staphylococcus hominis strain, and 1 (1%) Staphylococcus cohnii strain, were analyzed. Eighteen different SCCmec types were observed, with 28 identified as type IV (29%), 25 as type V (26%), and 1 as type III (1%). Fifteen strains (44%) were untypeable for their SCCmec. Thirty-four percent of MR-CoNS strains contained multiple ccr copies. Type IV and V SCCmec were preferentially associated with S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus, respectively. MR-CoNS constitute a widespread and highly diversified MR reservoir in the community.

  20. Comparison of the solution and crystal structures of staphylococcal nuclease with 13C and 15N chemical shifts used as structural fingerprints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, H.B.R.; Sparks, S.W.; Torchia, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report high-resolution 13 C and 15 N NMR spectra of crystalline staphylococcal nuclease (Nase) complexed to thymidine 3',5'-diphosphate and Ca 2+ . High sensitivity and resolution are obtained by applying solid-state NMR techniques-high power proton decoupling and cross-polarization magic angle sample spinning (CPMASS)-to protein samples that have been efficiently synthesized and labeled by an overproducing strain of Escherichia coli. A comparison of CPMASS and solution spectra of Nase labeled with either [methyl- 13 C]methionine or [ 15 ]valine shows that the chemical shifts in the crystalline and solution states are virtually identical. This result is strong evidence that the protein conformations in the solution and crystalline states are nearly the same. Because of the close correspondence of the crystal and solution chemical shifts, sequential assignments obtained in solution apply to the crystal spectra. It should therefore be possible to study the molecular structure and dynamics of many sequentially assigned atomic sites in Nase crystals. Similar experiments are applicable to the growing number of proteins that can be obtained from efficient expression systems

  1. Rapid containment of nosocomial transmission of a rare community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) clone, responsible for the Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome (SSSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, Onofrio; Bongiorno, Dafne; Bertoncello, Lisa; Grandesso, Stefano; Mazzucato, Sandra; Pozzan, Giovanni Battista; Cutrone, Mario; Chirico, Michela; Baesso, Flavia; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Cafiso, Viviana; Stefani, Stefania; Campanile, Floriana

    2017-01-06

    The aims of this study were to identify the source and the transmission pathway for a Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome (SSSS) outbreak in a maternity setting in Italy over 2 months, during 2014; to implement appropriate control measures in order to prevent the epidemic spread within the maternity ward; and to identify the Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) epidemic clone. Epidemiological and microbiological investigations, based on phenotyping and genotyping methods, were performed. All neonates involved in the outbreak underwent clinical and microbiological investigations to detect the cause of illness. Parents and healthcare workers were screened for Staphylococcus aureus to identify asymptomatic carriers. The SSSS outbreak was due to the cross-transmission of a rare clone of ST5-CA-MRSA-SCCmecV-spa type t311, exfoliative toxin A-producer, isolated from three neonates, one mother (from her nose and from dermatological lesions due to pre-existing hand eczema) and from a nurse (colonized in her nose by this microorganism). The epidemiological and microbiological investigation confirmed these as two potential carriers. A rapid containment of these infections was obtained only after implementation of robust swabbing of mothers and healthcare workers. The use of molecular methodologies for typing was able to identify all carriers and to trace the transmission.

  2. Distribusi Gen Enterotoksin Staphylococcus aureus dari Susu Segar dan Pangan Asal Hewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Isrina Oktavia Salasia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a potential pathogen causing disease in human and animals due to severalvirulence factors. Staphylococcal enterotoxins which is responsible for foodborne disease is considered tobe one of the important virulence factor for the bacteria. The research was conducted to identify variousenterotoxin genes of S. aureus. Twenty three S. aureus isolates from milk cows (12 isolates and foodanimal products (11 isolates were used to study various enterotoxins genes (sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh,sei, and sej. The enterotoxins genes of S. aureus were investigated by using polymerase chain reaction(PCR with specific primers. There were 3 isolates (13.04% negative for staphylococcal enterotoxin genes.Twenty isolates (86.96% harboured for one or more staphylococcal enterotoxin genes such as: sec (6 isolates/26.09%, see, seh for 1 isolate (4.35%, combination of 2 genes se (b,i, se (c,g, se (g,i for 1 isolate of each(4.35%, se(c,e for 2 isolates (8.70%, se(b,c for 4 isolates (17.39%. Staphylococcal enterotoxin could bedetected in 3 combination genes of se(b,c,i, se(c,e,i, se(c,g,i for 1 isolate of each (4.35%.

  3. Staphylococcal nuclease active-site amino acids: pH dependence of tyrosines and arginines by 13C NMR and correlation with kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grissom, C.G.; Markley, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The pH and temperature dependence of the kinetic parameters of staphylococcal nuclease have been examined with three p-nitrophenyl phosphate containing DNA analogues that vary as to 3'-substituent. With wild-type (Foggi variant) nuclease (nuclease wt) and the substrates thymidine 3'-phosphate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp), thymidine 3'-methylphosphonate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp Me), and thymidine 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdT), k cat remains nearly constant at 13 min -1 . However, k cat /k m with nuclease wt varies considerably. The data suggests that the inflection k cat /K m with pK a at 9.67 arises from ionization of tyrosine-85, which hydrogen bonds to the divalent 3'-phosphomonester of substrates with this substituent. The enthalpy of ionization of both deprotonation steps in the k cat /K m versus pH profile is 5 kcal/mol. 13 C NMR has been used to determine the pK a values of the arginine and tyrosine residues. The results do not rule out arginine as a candidate for the acidic catalyst that protonates the 5'-ribose alkoxide prior to product release. The phenolic hydroxyl carbon of tyrosine-85 has been assigned by comparing the 13 C NMR spectrum of nuclease wt and nuclease Y85F. This correlation between pK a values along with the absence of other candidates indicates that the ionization of tyrosine-85 is the pK a seen in the k cat /K m vs pH profile for substrates with a divalent 3'-phosphomonester. This conclusion is consistent with the proposed role of tyrosine-85 as a hydrogen-bond donor to the 3'-phosphomonoester of substrates poised for exonucleolytic hydrolysis

  4. Emergence of Sequence Type 779 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Harboring a Novel Pseudo Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec)-SCC-SCCCRISPR Composite Element in Irish Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnevey, Peter M.; Shore, Anna C.; Brennan, Grainne I.; Sullivan, Derek J.; Ehricht, Ralf; Monecke, Stefan; Slickers, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a major cause of nosocomial infection in Irish hospitals for 4 decades, and replacement of predominant MRSA clones has occurred several times. An MRSA isolate recovered in 2006 as part of a larger study of sporadic MRSA exhibited a rare spa (t878) and multilocus sequence (ST779) type and was nontypeable by PCR- and DNA microarray-based staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element typing. Whole-genome sequencing revealed the presence of a novel 51-kb composite island (CI) element with three distinct domains, each flanked by direct repeat and inverted repeat sequences, including (i) a pseudo SCCmec element (16.3 kb) carrying mecA with a novel mec class region, a fusidic acid resistance gene (fusC), and two copper resistance genes (copB and copC) but lacking ccr genes; (ii) an SCC element (17.5 kb) carrying a novel ccrAB4 allele; and (iii) an SCC element (17.4 kb) carrying a novel ccrC allele and a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) region. The novel CI was subsequently identified by PCR in an additional 13 t878/ST779 MRSA isolates, six from bloodstream infections, recovered between 2006 and 2011 in 11 hospitals. Analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) carried by the CI showed amino acid sequence similarity of 44 to 100% to ORFs from S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). These findings provide further evidence of genetic transfer between S. aureus and CoNS and show how this contributes to the emergence of novel SCCmec elements and MRSA strains. Ongoing surveillance of this MRSA strain is warranted and will require updating of currently used SCCmec typing methods. PMID:23147725

  5. Photodynamic antibacterial enhanced effect of methylene blue-gold nanoparticles conjugate on Staphylococcal aureus isolated from impetigo lesions in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Abeer Attia; Alsharnoubi, Jehan; Morsy, Mona

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcal aureus is the most common organism which has been encountered in impetigo infection. Gold nanoparticles can be used as a tool to deliver antimicrobials or to enhance photodynamic destruction of bacteria. To evaluate the photodynamic effect of methylene blue gold nanoparticles (MB-gold nanoparticles conjugate) on S. aureus which were isolated from impetigo lesions. Twenty children were diagnosed clinically as impetigo, and aged from 3 to 5 years of both sexes were recruited in the study. Two bacteriological samples were collected from each patient, identified and cultured. Samples of S. aureus of a concentration of 10(-1)ml were divided into four groups. S. aureus was treated by MB-gold nanoparticles conjugate, gold nanoparticles, MB, and the fourth group served as a control group. Diode laser (660 nm) was used for photoactivation. The bacterial growth inhibition was determined by two methods: the percentage of reduction of viable bacteria count and the optical density (O.D) of bacterial growth. The highest significant inhibitory effect on S. aureus was obtained with MB-gold nanoparticles conjugate when irradiated by diode laser 660 nm (P < 0.0001). The percentage of viable bacteria was 3%. The photoactivated gold nanoparticles showed a significant inhibitory effect on bacterial growth (P < 0.05). A non-significant inhibitory effect was elicited in other groups. The photoactivated MB-gold nanoparticles conjugate showed the maximum inhibitory effect on S. aureus activity. The gold nanoparticles proved efficacy as a drug delivery system. It enhanced the photodynamic antibacterial effect of methylene blue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Staphylococcal Protein A Typing Revealed Novel and Diverse Clones of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Seafood and the Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugadas, V; Toms, C Joseph; Reethu, Sara A; Lalitha, K V

    2017-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a global health concern since the 1960s, and isolation of this pathogen from food-producing animals has been increasing. However, little information is available on the prevalence of MRSA and its clonal characteristics in seafood and the aquatic environment. In this study, 267 seafood and aquatic environment samples were collected from three districts of Kerala, India. Staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed for 65 MRSA strains isolated from 20 seafood and aquatic environment samples. The MRSA clonal profiles were t657-ST772, t002-ST5, t334-ST5, t311-ST5, t121-ST8, t186-ST88, t127-ST1, and two non-spa assignable strains. Whole spa gene sequence analysis along with MLST confirmed one strain as t711-ST6 and another as a novel MRSA clone identified for the first time in seafood and the aquatic environment with a t15669 spa type and a new MLST profile of ST420-256-236-66-82-411-477. The MRSA strains were clustered into five clonal complexes based on the goeBURST algorithm, indicating high diversity among MRSA strains in seafood and the aquatic environment. The novel clone formed a separate clonal complex with matches to three loci. This study recommends large-scale spa typing and MLST of MRSA isolates from seafood and the aquatic environment to determine the prevalence of new MRSA clones. This monitoring process can be useful for tracing local spread of MRSA isolates into the seafood production chain in a defined geographical area.

  7. Prevalence of antiseptic resistance genes increases in staphylococcal isolates from orthokeratology lens wearers over initial six-month period of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang-Sen, Shi; Boost, Maureen; Cho, Pauline

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of antiseptic-resistance (QAC) genes in staphylococci colonizing periorbital tissues and accessories of orthokeratology (ortho-k) lens wearers over a 6-month period and determine the effect of their presence on minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of disinfectants and log reduction of multipurpose contact lens solutions (MPS). Staphylococci were isolated from periorbital tissues and accessories of patients before commencing ortho-k therapy and at two subsequent visits. Presence of QAC genes in 116 S. aureus and 67 CNS isolates was determined by PCR and association with period of ortho-k use determined. MICs and MBCs of staphylococci gene-positive were compared with gene-negative strains and the effectiveness of four MPS for rigid contact lenses investigated. S. aureus carriage rates in the conjunctiva decreased significantly from 41.2 % (baseline) to 11.8 % (3-months), and 13.3 % (6-months) (p trend 0.03), while CNS increased from 58.8 %(baseline) to 94.1 % (3-months), and 93.3 % (6-months) (p trend 0.02). Prevalence of qacA/B increased considerably over time (S. aureus: 4.4 % to 15.4 %, CNS: 6.7 % to 25 %), but frequency of smr was relatively stable. Only five CNS isolates harboured qacH. MICs and MBCs of gene-positive isolates were significantly increased and three MPS did not achieve a 3-log reduction of many QAC-positive strains. Ortho-k lens wear contributed to changes of staphylococcal carriage rates in the conjunctival sac. Use of MPS containing quaternary ammonium compounds may select for the carriage of organisms harbouring QAC genes, as the low concentration of disinfecting agents is not adequate for killing gene-positive strains.

  8. Emergence of sequence type 779 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus harboring a novel pseudo staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec)-SCC-SCCCRISPR composite element in Irish hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinnevey, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a major cause of nosocomial infection in Irish hospitals for 4 decades, and replacement of predominant MRSA clones has occurred several times. An MRSA isolate recovered in 2006 as part of a larger study of sporadic MRSA exhibited a rare spa (t878) and multilocus sequence (ST779) type and was nontypeable by PCR- and DNA microarray-based staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element typing. Whole-genome sequencing revealed the presence of a novel 51-kb composite island (CI) element with three distinct domains, each flanked by direct repeat and inverted repeat sequences, including (i) a pseudo SCCmec element (16.3 kb) carrying mecA with a novel mec class region, a fusidic acid resistance gene (fusC), and two copper resistance genes (copB and copC) but lacking ccr genes; (ii) an SCC element (17.5 kb) carrying a novel ccrAB4 allele; and (iii) an SCC element (17.4 kb) carrying a novel ccrC allele and a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) region. The novel CI was subsequently identified by PCR in an additional 13 t878\\/ST779 MRSA isolates, six from bloodstream infections, recovered between 2006 and 2011 in 11 hospitals. Analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) carried by the CI showed amino acid sequence similarity of 44 to 100% to ORFs from S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). These findings provide further evidence of genetic transfer between S. aureus and CoNS and show how this contributes to the emergence of novel SCCmec elements and MRSA strains. Ongoing surveillance of this MRSA strain is warranted and will require updating of currently used SCCmec typing methods.

  9. Food-Borne Outbreak Investigation and Molecular Typing: High Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Strains and Importance of Toxin Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denayer, Sarah; Nia, Yacine; Botteldoorn, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important aetiological agent of food intoxications in the European Union as it can cause gastro-enteritis through the production of various staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in foods. Reported enterotoxin dose levels causing food-borne illness are scarce and varying. Three food poisoning outbreaks due to enterotoxin-producing S. aureus strains which occurred in 2013 in Belgium are described. The outbreaks occurred in an elderly home, at a barbecue event and in a kindergarten and involved 28, 18, and six cases, respectively. Various food leftovers contained coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS). Low levels of staphylococcal enterotoxins ranging between 0.015 ng/g and 0.019 ng/g for enterotoxin A (SEA), and corresponding to 0.132 ng/g for SEC were quantified in the food leftovers for two of the reported outbreaks. Molecular typing of human and food isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and enterotoxin gene typing, confirmed the link between patients and the suspected foodstuffs. This also demonstrated the high diversity of CPS isolates both in the cases and in healthy persons carrying enterotoxin genes encoding emetic SEs for which no detection methods currently exist. For one outbreak, the investigation pointed out to the food handler who transmitted the outbreak strain to the food. Tools to improve staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) investigations are presented. PMID:29261162

  10. Food-Borne Outbreak Investigation and Molecular Typing: High Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Strains and Importance of Toxin Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denayer, Sarah; Delbrassinne, Laurence; Nia, Yacine; Botteldoorn, Nadine

    2017-12-20

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important aetiological agent of food intoxications in the European Union as it can cause gastro-enteritis through the production of various staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in foods. Reported enterotoxin dose levels causing food-borne illness are scarce and varying. Three food poisoning outbreaks due to enterotoxin-producing S. aureus strains which occurred in 2013 in Belgium are described. The outbreaks occurred in an elderly home, at a barbecue event and in a kindergarten and involved 28, 18, and six cases, respectively. Various food leftovers contained coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS). Low levels of staphylococcal enterotoxins ranging between 0.015 ng/g and 0.019 ng/g for enterotoxin A (SEA), and corresponding to 0.132 ng/g for SEC were quantified in the food leftovers for two of the reported outbreaks. Molecular typing of human and food isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and enterotoxin gene typing, confirmed the link between patients and the suspected foodstuffs. This also demonstrated the high diversity of CPS isolates both in the cases and in healthy persons carrying enterotoxin genes encoding emetic SEs for which no detection methods currently exist. For one outbreak, the investigation pointed out to the food handler who transmitted the outbreak strain to the food. Tools to improve staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) investigations are presented.

  11. Prevention of allergic rhinitis by ginger and the molecular basis of immunosuppression by 6-gingerol through T cell inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Yuki; Nakahashi, Emiko; Obayashi, Momoko; Sugihara, Kento; Qiao, Shanlou; Iida, Machiko; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Yajima, Ichiro; Goto, Yuji; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Kato, Masashi; Takeda, Kozue

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of allergies has recently been increasing worldwide. Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity is central to the pathogenesis of asthma, hay fever and other allergic diseases. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its extracts have been valued for their medical properties including antinausea, antiinflammation, antipyresis and analgesia properties. In this study, we investigated the antiallergic effects of ginger and 6-gingerol, a major compound of ginger, using a mouse allergy model and primary/cell line culture system. In mice with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis, oral administration of 2% ginger diet reduced the severity of sneezing and nasal rubbing by nasal sensitization of OVA and suppressed infiltration of mast cells in nasal mucosa and secretion of OVA-specific IgE in serum. 6-Gingerol inhibited the expression of not only Th2 cytokines but also Th1 cytokines in OVA-sensitized spleen cells. Accordingly, 6-gingerol suppressed in vitro differentiation of both Th1 cells and Th2 cells from naïve T cells. In addition, 6-gingerol suppressed both superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)- and anti-CD3-induced T cell proliferation. 6-Gingerol also abrogated PMA plus ionomycin- and SEB-induced IL-2 production in T cells, suggesting that 6-gingerol affected T cell receptor-mediated signal transduction rather than the antigen-presentation process. Indeed, 6-gingerol inhibited the phosphorylation of MAP kinases, calcium release and nuclear localization of c-fos and NF-κB by PMA and ionomycin stimulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that 6-gingerol suppresses cytokine production for T cell activation and proliferation, thereby not causing B cell and mast cell activation and resulting in prevention or alleviation of allergic rhinitis symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of headspace and dissolved oxygen level on growth and haemolytic BL enterotoxin production of a psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis isolate on potato based ready-to-eat food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samapundo, S; Everaert, H; Wandutu, J N; Rajkovic, A; Uyttendaele, M; Devlieghere, F

    2011-04-01

    The major objective of this study was to determine the influence of the initial headspace and dissolved O(2) level and vacuum packaging on growth and diarrhoeal enterotoxin production by Bacillus weihenstephanensis on potato based ready-to-eat food products. In general, the lower the initial headspace or dissolved O(2) level the slower the maximum growth rate (μ(max), log(10) CFU g(-1) d(-1)), the longer the lag phase duration (λ, d) and the smaller the maximum population density (N(max), log(10) CFU g(-1)) became. The slowest μ(max), the longest λ and the smallest N(max) were generally found for growth under vacuum packaging. This implies shorter shelf-lives will occur at higher initial headspace or dissolved O(2) levels as the growth of B. weihenstephanensis to the infective dose of 10(5) CFU g(-1) in such atmospheres takes a shorter time. Significant consumption of dissolved O(2) only occurred when growth shifted from the lag to the exponential phase and growth generally transitioned from the exponential to the stationary phase when the dissolved O(2) levels fell below ca. 75 ppb. Diarrhoeal enterotoxin production (determined via detection of the L2 component of haemolytic BL) was similar for growth under initial headspace O(2) levels of 1-20.9%, and was only reduced when growth took place under vacuum packaging. The reduction in L2 production when growth took place under vacuum was most probably related to the low final cell densities observed under this condition. Both growth and L2 production were inhibited over a 32-day incubation period at 7 °C by 40% CO(2) irrespective of the headspace or dissolved O(2) levels. The results illustrate the importance of residual O(2) and CO(2) on the shelf-stability and safety of modified atmosphere packaged potato based ready-to-eat food products with regards to B. weihenstephanensis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry in comparison to rpoB gene sequencing for species identification of bloodstream infection staphylococcal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, T; De Carolis, E; Fiori, B; Sanguinetti, M; D'Inzeo, T; Fadda, G; Posteraro, B

    2011-01-01

    As a result of variable expression of biochemical characters, misidentification by conventional phenotypic means often occurs with clinical isolates belonging to Staphylococcus species. Therefore, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of 450 blood isolates of the most relevant staphylococcal species, using sequence analysis of the rpoB gene as the reference method. A correct species identification by MALDI-TOF was obtained in 99.3% (447/450), with only three isolates being misidentified. In addition, MALDI-TOF correctly identified all the staphylococcal subspecies studied, including Staphylococcus capitis subsp. capitis and subsp. urealyticus, Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. urealyticus, Staphylococcus hominis subsp. novobiosepticus and subsp. hominis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus, Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. schleiferi and Staphylococcus sciuri subsp. sciuri. Thus, MALDI-TOF MS-based species identification of staphylococci can be routinely achieved without any substantial costs for consumables or the time needed for labour-intensive DNA sequence analysis. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  14. Electrochemical immunoassay for the carcinoembryonic antigen based on the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with an octahedral Cu2O-gold nanocomposite and staphylococcal protein for signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhen; Xu, Wei; Chen, Shuai; Chen, Jun; Qiu, Jing Fu; Li, Chao Rui

    2018-04-24

    The authors describe an electrochemical immunoassay for ultrasensitive direct determination of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). A nanocomposite consisting of octahedral Cu2O nanocrystals covered with gold nanoparticles was utilized to modify a glassy carbon electrode which gives a strongly enhanced chronoamperometric signal for H 2 O 2 which is used as an electrochemical probe. The morphology and elemental composition of the the nanocomposite was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, staphylococcal protein A was placed on the electrode for efficient capture of antibody to further enhance the sensitivity of the assay. Under optimal conditions and at a typical working voltage of -0.4 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), the response covers the 2 pg·mL -1 to 20 ng·mL -1 CEA concentration range with a 200 fg·mL -1 lower detection limit. The method was successfully applied to the determination of CEA in (spiked) human serum. Graphical abstract Schematic of the fabrication of an electrochemical immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection the carcinoembryonic antigen. The sensor is based on the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with an octahedral Cu 2 O-gold nanocomposite and staphylococcal protein A for signal amplification.

  15. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Brenda A; Coleman, David C; Deasy, Emily C; Brennan, Gráinne I; O' Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Leggett, Bernadette; Leonard, Nola; Shore, Anna C

    2015-01-01

    staphylococcal species-specific characteristics were identified in relation to antimicrobial resistance genes and phenotypes, SCCmec and ACME.

  16. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda A McManus

    staphylococcal species-specific characteristics were identified in relation to antimicrobial resistance genes and phenotypes, SCCmec and ACME.

  17. The role of the Staphylococcal VraTSR regulatory system on vancomycin resistance and vanA operon expression in vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nadia K; Yin, Shaohui; Boyle-Vavra, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Vancomycin is often the preferred treatment for invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. With the increase in incidence of MRSA infections, the use of vancomycin has increased and, as feared, isolates of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) have emerged. VRSA isolates have acquired the entercoccal vanA operon contained on transposon (Tn) 1546 residing on a conjugal plasmid. VraTSR is a vancomycin and β-lactam-inducible three-component regulatory system encoded on the S. aureus chromosome that modulates the cell-wall stress response to cell-wall acting antibiotics. Mutation in vraTSR has shown to increase susceptibility to β-lactams and vancomycin in clinical VISA strains and in recombinant strain COLVA-200 which expresses a plasmid borne vanA operon. To date, the role of VraTSR in vanA operon expression in VRSA has not been demonstrated. In this study, the vraTSR operon was deleted from the first clinical VRSA strain (VRS1) by transduction with phage harvested from a USA300 vraTSR operon deletion strain. The absence of the vraTSR operon and presence of the vanA operon were confirmed in the transductant (VRS1Δvra) by PCR. Broth MIC determinations, demonstrated that the vancomycin MIC of VRS1Δvra (64 µg/ml) decreased by 16-fold compared with VRS1 (1024 µg/ml). The effect of the vraTSR operon deletion on expression of the van gene cluster (vanA, vanX and vanR) was examined by quantitative RT-PCR using relative quantification. A 2-5-fold decreased expression of the vanA operon genes occured in strain VRS1Δvra at stationary growth phase compared with the parent strain, VRS1. Both vancomycin resistance and vancomycin-induced expression of vanA and vanR were restored by complementation with a plasmid harboring the vraTSR operon. These findings demonstrate that expression in S. aureus of the horizontally acquired enterococcal vanA gene cluster is enhanced by the staphylococcal three-component cell wall stress regulatory

  18. Claudin-4 Overexpression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with Hypomethylation and Is a Potential Target for Modulation of Tight Junction Barrier Function Using a C-Terminal Fragment of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Litkouhi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Claudin-4, a tight junction (TJ protein and receptor for the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE, is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. Previous research suggests DNA methylation is a mechanism for claudin-4 overexpression in cancer and that C-CPE acts as an absorption-enhancing agent in claudin-4expressing cells. We sought to correlate claudin-4 overexpression in EOC with clinical outcomes and TJ barrier function, investigate DNA methylation as a mechanism for overexpression, and evaluate the effect of C-CPE on the TJ. METHODS: Claudin-4 expression in EOC was quantified and correlated with clinical outcomes. Claudin-4 methylation status was determined, and claudin-4-negative cell lines were treated with a demethylating agent. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to calculate junctional (paracellular resistance (Rb in EOC cells after claudin-4 silencing and after C-CPE treatment. RESULTS: Claudin4 overexpression in EOC does not correlate with survival or other clinical endpoints and is associated with hypomethylation. Claudin-4 overexpression correlates with Rb and C-CPE treatment of EOC cells significantly decreased Rb in a dose- and claudin-4-dependent noncytotoxic manner. CONCLUSIONS: C-CPE treatment of EOC cells leads to altered TJ function. Further research is needed to determine the potential clinical applications of C-CPE in EOC drug delivery strategies.

  19. Bacteroides fragilis Enterotoxin Induces Formation of Autophagosomes in Endothelial Cells but Interferes with Fusion with Lysosomes for Complete Autophagic Flux through a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-, AP-1-, and C/EBP Homologous Protein-Dependent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Su Hyuk; Jeon, Jong Ik; Myung, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young-Jeon; Kim, Jung Mogg

    2017-10-01

    Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin (BFT), a virulence factor of enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF), plays an essential role in mucosal inflammation. Although autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of diverse infectious diseases, little is known about autophagy in ETBF infection. This study was conducted to investigate the role of BFT in the autophagic process in endothelial cells (ECs). Stimulation of human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) with BFT increased light chain 3 protein II (LC3-II) conversion from LC3-I and protein expression of p62, Atg5, and Atg12. In addition, BFT-exposed ECs showed increased indices of autophagosomal fusion with lysosomes such as LC3-lysosome-associated protein 2 (LAMP2) colocalization and the percentage of red vesicles monitored by the expression of dual-tagged LC3B. BFT also upregulated expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and inhibition of CHOP significantly increased indices of autophagosomal fusion with lysosomes. BFT activated an AP-1 transcription factor, in which suppression of AP-1 activity significantly downregulated CHOP and augmented autophagosomal fusion with lysosomes. Furthermore, suppression of Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) significantly inhibited the AP-1 and CHOP signals, leading to an increase in autophagosomal fusion with lysosomes in BFT-stimulated ECs. These results suggest that BFT induced accumulation of autophagosomes in ECs, but activation of a signaling pathway involving JNK, AP-1, and CHOP may interfere with complete autophagy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmarie eGaupp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria’s interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host.

  1. Host Adaptation of Staphylococcal Leukocidins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, M

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human and animal pathogen of global importance and has the capacity to cause disease in distinct host populations, using a large arsenal of secreted proteins to evade the host immune response. Amongst the immune evasion proteins of S. aureus, secreted cytotoxins play a

  2. Detection of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type XI carrying highly divergent mecA, mecI, mecR1, blaZ, and ccr genes in human clinical isolates of clonal complex 130 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shore, Anna C

    2011-08-01

    Methicillin resistance in staphylococci is mediated by penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP 2a), encoded by mecA on mobile staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements. In this study, two clonal complex 130 (CC130) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from patients in Irish hospitals were identified that were phenotypically PBP 2a positive but lacked mecA by conventional PCR and by DNA microarray screening. The isolates were identified as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus using the GeneXpert real-time PCR assay. Whole-genome sequencing of one isolate (M10\\/0061) revealed a 30-kb SCCmec element encoding a class E mec complex with highly divergent blaZ-mecA-mecR1-mecI, a type 8 cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) complex consisting of ccrA1-ccrB3, an arsenic resistance operon, and flanking direct repeats (DRs). The SCCmec element was almost identical to that of SCCmec type XI (SCCmec XI) identified by the Sanger Institute in sequence type 425 bovine MRSA strain LGA251 listed on the website of the International Working Group on the Classification of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome Elements. The open reading frames (ORFs) identified within SCCmec XI of M10\\/0061 exhibited 21 to 93% amino acid identity to ORFs in GenBank. A third DR was identified ca. 3 kb downstream of SCCmec XI, indicating the presence of a possible SCC remnant. SCCmec XI was also identified in the second CC130 MRSA isolate by PCR and sequencing. The CC130 MRSA isolates may be of animal origin as previously reported CC130 S. aureus strains were predominantly from bovine sources. The highly divergent nature of SCCmec XI relative to other SCCmec elements indicates that it may have originated in another taxon.

  3. Attenuated Escherichia coli strains expressing the colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) and a detoxified heat-labile enterotoxin (LThK63) enhance clearance of ETEC from the lungs of mice and protect mice from intestinal ETEC colonization and LT-induced fluid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Wyatt; Boedeker, Edgar C

    2013-03-15

    Although enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections are important causes of infantile and traveler's diarrhea there is no licensed vaccine available for those at-risk. Our goal is to develop a safe, live attenuated ETEC vaccine. We used an attenuated E. coli strain (O157:H7, Δ-intimin, Stx1-neg, Stx2-neg) as a vector (ZCR533) to prepare two vaccine strains, one strain expressing colonization factor antigen I (ZCR533-CFA/I) and one strain expressing CFA/I and a detoxified heat-labile enterotoxin (ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63) to deliver ETEC antigens to mucosal sites in BALB/c mice. Following intranasal and intragastric immunization with the vaccine strains, serum IgG and IgA antibodies were measured to the CFA/I antigen, however, only serum IgG antibodies were detected to the heat-labile enterotoxin. Intranasal administration of the vaccine strains induced respiratory and intestinal antibody responses to the CFA/I and LT antigens, while intragastric administration induced only intestinal antibody responses with no respiratory antibodies detected to the CFA/I and LT antigens. Mice immunized intranasally with the vaccine strains showed enhanced clearance of wild-type (wt) ETEC bacteria from the lungs. Mice immunized intranasally and intragastrically with the vaccine strains were protected from intestinal colonization following oral challenge with ETEC wt bacteria. Mice immunized intragastrically with the ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63 vaccine strain had less fluid accumulate in their intestine following challenge with ETEC wt bacteria or with purified LT as compared to the sham mice indicating that the immunized mice were protected from LT-induced intestinal fluid accumulation. Thus, mice intragastrically immunized with the ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63 vaccine strain were able to effectively neutralize the activity of the LT enterotoxin. However, no difference in intestinal fluid accumulation was detected in the mice immunized intranasally with the vaccine strain as compared to the sham

  4. Influence of Host Interleukin-10 Polymorphisms on Development of Traveler's Diarrhea Due to Heat-Labile Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Travelers from the United States Who Are Visiting Mexico▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jose; DuPont, Herbert L.; Lee, Stephanie A.; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Paredes, Mercedes; Mohamed, Jamal A.; Armitige, Lisa Y.; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Okhuysen, Pablo C.

    2008-01-01

    Up to 60% of U.S. visitors to Mexico develop traveler's diarrhea (TD), mostly due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that produce heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Distinct single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter have been associated with high, intermediate, or low production of IL-10. We conducted a prospective study to investigate the association of SNPs in the IL-10 promoter and the occurrence of TD in ETEC LT-exposed travelers. Sera from U.S. travelers to Mexico collected on arrival and departure were studied for ETEC LT seroconversion by using cholera toxin as the antigen. Pyrosequencing was performed to genotype IL-10 SNPs. Stools from subjects who developed diarrhea were also studied for other enteropathogens. One hundred twenty-one of 569 (21.3%) travelers seroconverted to ETEC LT, and among them 75 (62%) developed diarrhea. Symptomatic seroconversion was more commonly seen in subjects who carried a genotype producing high levels of IL-10; it was seen in 83% of subjects with the GG genotype versus 54% of subjects with the AA genotype at IL-10 gene position −1082 (P, 0.02), in 71% of those with the CC genotype versus 33% of those with the TT genotype at position −819 (P, 0.005), and in 71% of those with the CC genotype versus 38% of those with the AA genotype at position −592 (P, 0.02). Travelers with the GCC haplotype were more likely to have symptomatic seroconversion than those with the ATA haplotype (71% versus 38%; P, 0.002). Travelers genetically predisposed to produce high levels of IL-10 were more likely to experience symptomatic ETEC TD. PMID:18579697

  5. Influence of host interleukin-10 polymorphisms on development of traveler's diarrhea due to heat-labile enterotoxin-producing Escherichia coli in travelers from the United States who are visiting Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jose; DuPont, Herbert L; Lee, Stephanie A; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Paredes, Mercedes; Mohamed, Jamal A; Armitige, Lisa Y; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Okhuysen, Pablo C

    2008-08-01

    Up to 60% of U.S. visitors to Mexico develop traveler's diarrhea (TD), mostly due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that produce heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Distinct single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter have been associated with high, intermediate, or low production of IL-10. We conducted a prospective study to investigate the association of SNPs in the IL-10 promoter and the occurrence of TD in ETEC LT-exposed travelers. Sera from U.S. travelers to Mexico collected on arrival and departure were studied for ETEC LT seroconversion by using cholera toxin as the antigen. Pyrosequencing was performed to genotype IL-10 SNPs. Stools from subjects who developed diarrhea were also studied for other enteropathogens. One hundred twenty-one of 569 (21.3%) travelers seroconverted to ETEC LT, and among them 75 (62%) developed diarrhea. Symptomatic seroconversion was more commonly seen in subjects who carried a genotype producing high levels of IL-10; it was seen in 83% of subjects with the GG genotype versus 54% of subjects with the AA genotype at IL-10 gene position -1082 (P, 0.02), in 71% of those with the CC genotype versus 33% of those with the TT genotype at position -819 (P, 0.005), and in 71% of those with the CC genotype versus 38% of those with the AA genotype at position -592 (P, 0.02). Travelers with the GCC haplotype were more likely to have symptomatic seroconversion than those with the ATA haplotype (71% versus 38%; P, 0.002). Travelers genetically predisposed to produce high levels of IL-10 were more likely to experience symptomatic ETEC TD.

  6. Characterization of a novel arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec composite island with significant homology to Staphylococcus epidermidis ACME type II in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genotype ST22-MRSA-IV.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shore, Anna C

    2011-05-01

    The arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) is prevalent among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates of sequence type 8 (ST8) and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) type IVa (USA300) (ST8-MRSA-IVa isolates), and evidence suggests that ACME enhances the ability of ST8-MRSA-IVa to grow and survive on its host. ACME has been identified in a small number of isolates belonging to other MRSA clones but is widespread among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This study reports the first description of ACME in two distinct strains of the pandemic ST22-MRSA-IV clone. A total of 238 MRSA isolates recovered in Ireland between 1971 and 2008 were investigated for ACME using a DNA microarray. Twenty-three isolates (9.7%) were ACME positive, and all were either MRSA genotype ST8-MRSA-IVa (7\\/23, 30%) or MRSA genotype ST22-MRSA-IV (16\\/23, 70%). Whole-genome sequencing and comprehensive molecular characterization revealed the presence of a novel 46-kb ACME and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) composite island (ACME\\/SCCmec-CI) in ST22-MRSA-IVh isolates (n=15). This ACME\\/SCCmec-CI consists of a 12-kb DNA region previously identified in ACME type II in S. epidermidis ATCC 12228, a truncated copy of the J1 region of SCCmec type I, and a complete SCCmec type IVh element. The composite island has a novel genetic organization, with ACME located within orfX and SCCmec located downstream of ACME. One PVL locus-positive ST22-MRSA-IVa isolate carried ACME located downstream of SCCmec type IVa, as previously described in ST8-MRSA-IVa. These results suggest that ACME has been acquired by ST22-MRSA-IV on two independent occasions. At least one of these instances may have involved horizontal transfer and recombination events between MRSA and CoNS. The presence of ACME may enhance dissemination of ST22-MRSA-IV, an already successful MRSA clone.

  7. Optimizing Two-Color Semiconductor Nanocrystal Immunoassays in Single Well Microtiter Plate Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Russ Algar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous detection of two analytes, chicken IgY (IgG and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB, in the single well of a 96-well plate is demonstrated using luminescent semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystal (NC tracers. The NC-labeled antibodies were prepared via sulfhydryl-reactive chemistry using a facile protocol that took

  8. Food irradiation and bacterial toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranter, H.S.; Modi, N.K.; Hambleton, P.; Melling, J.; Rose, S.; Stringer, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors' findings indicate that irradiation confers no advantage over heat processing in respect of bacterial toxins (clostridium botulinum, neurotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin A). It follows that irradiation at doses less than the ACINF recommended upper limit of 10 kGy could not be used to improve the ambient temperature shelf life on non-acid foods. (author)

  9. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    Radium 226 Page 34 Nitrogen mustard (HN) Lassa Polonium 210 Phosgene oxime (CX) Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) ( Food Poisoning...sample preparation. Diverse solid or liquid samples including environmental, biological, geological, industrial, forensic, food , thin coatings...Thallium 201 Hydrogen cyanide (AC) FUNGI Thorium 232 Cyanogen chloride (CK) Aflatoxin Lead 210 Arsine (SA) Bacillus Sodium 22

  10. Analysis of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec in Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus sciuri: identification of a novel ccr gene complex with a newly identified ccrA allotype (ccrA7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushibara, Noriko; Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2011-06-01

    Methicillin resistance in staphylococci is conferred by the acquisition in its chromosome of the mecA gene, which is located on a mobile genetic element called staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). Genetic type of SCCmec is defined by combination of mec gene complex class and cassette chromosome recombinase gene (ccr) allotype. In this study, we analyzed genetic diversity of the SCCmec in 11 Staphylococcus haemolyticus strains and a Staphylococcus sciuri strain, which were recently isolated from clinical specimens in Bangladesh. Among these strains, only two S. haemolyticus strains were proved to have the known types of SCCmec, that is, SCCmec V (class C2 mec-ccrC) and VII (class C1 mec-ccrC). Five S. haemolyticus strains were assigned two unique mec-ccr gene complexes combination; that is, class C1 mec-ccrA4B4 (four isolates) and class A mec-ccrC (one isolate). In the remaining four S. haemolyticus strains with class C1 mec, no known ccr allotypes could be detected. A single S. sciuri strain with class A mec complex carried a ccrA gene belonging to a novel allotype designated ccrA7, together with ccrB3. The ccrA7 gene in the S. sciuri strain showed 61.7%-82.7% sequence identity to the ccrA gene sequences published so far, and 75.3% identity to ccrA3, which is a component of the type 3 ccr complex (ccrA3-ccrB3) in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The results of the present study indicated that mec gene complex and ccr genes in coagulase-negative staphylococci are highly divergent, and distinct from those of common methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Identification of the novel ccrA7 allotype combined with ccrB3 suggested an occurrence of recombination between different ccr complexes in nature.

  11. Staphylococcal Blood Stream Infections in Cancer Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All blood culture samples received from patients suspected of having ... previously reported by Silvia et al.[2] All the CoNS ... Braunwald E, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, Jameson JL, et al., editor. Harrison's Manual of Medicine. 17th ed.

  12. methicillin resistance in staphylococcal isolates from

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a virulent that mortality and morbidility, especially to patients in critical care areas (9). MRSA can (and does in some cases] also contribute to an increased length of hospital stay and healthcare costs. Infections with methicillin— organism causes significant resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  13. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-07-16

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated.

  14. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome hos voksne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Jensen, Thøger Gorm

    2010-01-01

    parts of her body. The bullae ruptured easily and left a erythematous base. The histopathological changes were characteristic for adult SSSS. The patient was well-treated with intravenous dicloxacillin, topical antibiotic and antiseptic treatment. The patient had marked thrombocytosis, but no interest...

  15. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carr...

  16. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Other factors, such as environmental surface contamination, may also be considered. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. PMID:26311356

  17. NEW POSSIBILITIES OF STAPHYLOCOCC INFECTION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Matyushkina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Staphylococcus cause wide range of diseases ranging from mild skin infections to severe neuroinfections. So far, it is one of the four most common causes of nosocomial infections. Emergence and widespread resistance to various forms of medicines for staphylococci is more characteristic than for any other bacteria species. Therefore there is a need to develop new drugs to combat the pathogen, which can be used for effective treatment of infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus. At the Department of General Chemistry and Polymers Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University different metal (Mg, Co bis (citrate germanates (stanates - coordination compounds have been synthesized. Their molecules contain three bioactive components, such as citric acid residue (H4Citr; ions Ge4+ or Sn4+; Mg2+ or Co2+: [Mg(H2O6][Ge(HCitr2]·4H2O (germacit; [Co(H2O6][Ge(HCitr2]·4H2O (gercocit; [Mg(H2O6][Sn(HCitr2]·4H2O (stanmacit; [Co(H2O6][Sn(HCitr2]·4H2O (stancocit. Screening studies have shown that these compounds have neurotropic properties and both show antistaphylococcal activity. The aim of research is the investigation of influence of new coordinative metal compounds, namely germacit, gercocit, stanmacit and stancocit on Staphylococcus aureus different strains’ growth in case of their separate and combined administration with benzylpenicillin-sodium on nutrient broth. Materials and methods. Experiments were performed on Staphylococcus aureus АТСС 25923, Staphylococcus aureus 2781, Staphylococcus aureus Kunda strains. We determined minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC for metal complexes, benzylpenicillin sodium and antibacterial activity in the joint application of biologically active compounds at the same concentrations and benzylpenicillin sodium (BPN in nutrient broth. Results’ accounting was performed using the values of optical density slurries in units of Mac Farland (McF. Experiments were carried out 3-5 reps. Results were treated statistically using computer programs Microsoft Excel 2007. Results. Gercocit (final concentration of 400 µg/ml and BPN (final concentration of 0.05 and 0.025 µg/ml combined administration suppressed the growth of S. aureus ATCC 25923 at 81.08%. Potentiation effect has been observed. Concomitant administration of gercocit in concentration of 800.0 µg/ml and BPN in 10.0 µg/ml significantly suppressed the growth of S. aureus Kunda culture at 84.64%, but the combined effect of compounds on S. aureus 2781 was at the level of influence of gercocit. Combined stancocit and BPN administration failed to reveal the significant growth inhibition of S. aureus ATCC 25923 and S. aureus 2781 strains. Stancocit in concentration of 800.0 µg/ml and BPN in 10.0 µg/ml inhibited the growth of compatible strain S. aureus Kunda on 76, 43%. Conclusion. The suppression of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus aureus Kunda strains growth has been observed in case of germanium coordinative compounds with cobalt and citric acid combined administration with BPN in greater extent pertaining each compound separate use (the effect of potentiation. Both stancocit and BPN combined administration resulted in potentiation of their effect against Staphylococcus aureus Kunda. Substitution of stanum on germanium led to decrease in the activity of antistaphylococcal compounds. Thus, we can conclude that the considered coordination compounds are promising antistaphylococc drugs and require further study to combined application of the known antibiotics to treat infections caused by resistant strains of pathogens.

  18. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F.; Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S.; Hambleton, P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neutotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author)

  19. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, S A; Bailey, N E; Stringer, M F [Campden Food and Drink Research Association, Chipping Campden (UK); Modi, N K; Tranter, H S [Porton International plc., London (UK); Hambleton, P [Centre for Applied Microbiological Research, Porton Down (UK)

    1988-10-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author).

  20. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F.; Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S.; Hambleton, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author)

  1. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F. (Campden Food and Drink Research Association, Chipping Campden (UK)); Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S. (Centre for Applied Micobiological Research, Porton Down, (UK)); Hambleton, P. (Porton International plc, London (UK))

    1989-09-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neutotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author).

  2. Evaluación de estrategias de control frente a biopelículas de "Staphylococcus aureus" potencialmente presentes en la industria pesquera

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez Sánchez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacterial agents causing foodborne diseases in humans worldwide, due to the ingestion of food containing staphylococcal enterotoxins. Spain is one of the largest producers and consumers of fishery products in the European Union. However, S. aureus is repeatedly detected in these products as a consequence of cross-contamination from food handlers and food contact surfaces. Biofilm formation also provides S. aureus a high tolerance to biocides allowing ...

  3. Presença de Staphylococcus spp. produtores de enterotoxinas e da toxina da síndrome do choque tóxico em manipuladores de queijo de cabra Presence of Staphylococcus strains producer of enterotoxins and toxic shock toxin syndrome isolated from goat's cheese handlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Rapini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Agruparam-se 167 cepas de Staphylococcus, isoladas de diferentes sítios (fossas nasais, orofaringe, palma das mãos e leitos subungueais, de dois manipuladores de queijos de leite de cabra, em pools (45, de acordo com a similaridade da espécie e o local de origem, e testou-se o seu potencial de produção de enterotoxinas (SE A, B, C e D, e da toxina da síndrome do choque tóxico (TSST-1. Constatou-se que 62,2% dos pools foram capazes de produzir, de forma individual ou associada, SEA (33,3%; SEB (46,7%; SEC (8,9%; SED (4,4% e TSST-1 (4,4%. Dos pools enterotoxigênicos, 96,4% corresponderam a espécies coagulase negativa (Staphylococcus epidermidis e Staphylococcus cohnii. A capacidade de produção de SE e de TSST-1 pelas cepas de Staphylococcus spp. isoladas dos manipuladores, além de reafirmar sua importância na transmissão de intoxicações de origem alimentar, enfatiza a necessidade imprescindível da adoção de condutas higiênicas e sanitárias durante a manipulação do alimento.A total of 167 strains of Staphylococcus isolated from nasal cavities, oropharynx, palm of hands and subunguial of two goat's cheese handlers were collected. The strains were pooled (45 according to the species similarity and place of origin and tested for the production of enterotoxins (SE A, B, C, D and toxic shock toxin syndrome (TSST-1. It was observed that 62.2% of the pools presented the capacity to produce, individually or in association, SEA (33.3%; SEB (46.7%; SEC (8.9%; SED (4.4% and TSST-1 (4.4%. From the enterotoxigenic pools, 96.4% corresponded to species negative coagulase (Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus cohnii. The capacity to produce SE and TSST-1 by Staphylococcus spp. strains isolated from food handlers reaffirms its hole on the transmission of food poisoning, beyond emphasizing the indispensable necessity of the adoption of satisfactory hygienic and sanitary procedures during the food manufacture.

  4. Corruption of human follicular B-lymphocyte trafficking by a B-cell superantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhis, Gwenoline; Viau, Muriel; Badr, Gamal; Richard, Yolande; Zouali, Moncef

    2012-05-09

    Protein A (SpA) of Staphylococcus aureus is known to target the paratope of immunoglobulins expressing V(H)3 genes, and to delete marginal zone B cells and B-1a in vivo. We have discovered that SpA endows S. aureus with the potential to subvert B-cell trafficking in the host. We found that SpA, whose Fc-binding site has been inactivated, binds essentially to naïve B cells and induces a long-lasting decrease in CXCR4 expression and in B-cell chemotaxis to CXCL12. Competition experiments indicated that SpA does not interfere with binding of CXCR4 ligands and does not directly bind to CXCR4. This conclusion is strongly supported by the inability of SpA to modulate clathrin-mediated CXCR4 internalization, which contrasts with the potent effect of anti-immunoglobin M (IgM) antibodies. Microscopy and biochemical experiments confirmed that SpA binds to the surface IgM/IgD complex and induces its clathrin-dependent internalization. Concomitantly, the SpA-induced signaling leads to protein kinase C-dependent CXCR4 downmodulation, suggesting that SpA impairs the recycling of CXCR4, a postclathrin process that leads to either degradation into lysozomes or de novo expression at the cell surface. In addition to providing novel insight into disruption of B-cell trafficking by an infectious agent, our findings may have therapeutic implications. Because CXCR4 has been associated with cancer metastasis and with certain autoimmune diseases, SpA behaves as an evolutionary tailored highly specific, chemokine receptor inhibitor that may have value in addition to conventional cytotoxic therapy in patients with various malignancies and immune-mediated diseases.

  5. A Survey and Evaluation of Department of Defense Women's Immunity to Bacterial Superantigens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ulrich, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The common Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes produce toxins, such as SEB, that cause diseases ranging from food poisoning to an acute, life-threatening toxic-shock syndrome...

  6. Prevalence of toxin genes among the clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and its clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Deodhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus causes a variety of infections, ranging from a mild skin infection to blood stream infections and deep seated infections. As Stapylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB has the tendency to cause endovascular and metastatic infections, complications can occur at almost all sites of the body. Hence, SAB is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in spite of appropriate antimicrobial treatment. The virulence in S. aureus is determined by the presence of adhesins and toxins, which behave like superantigens (SAgs and leads to a massive release of proinflammatory cytokines causing overwhelming inflammatory response leading to endothelial leakage, hemodynamic shock, multiorgan failure, and possibly death. Materials and Methods: One year prospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in southern part of India included all patients with SAB. Clinical details were filled according to. All isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR for enterotoxin profiling. Results: A total of 101 patients of SAB were identified which comprises of 61 (60.4% patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA and 40 (39.6% patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Most common predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, severe organ dysfunction, shock, tachycardia, and leukocytosis. Two-third of the isolates had at least one enterotoxin, most prevalent was sea; 28% and 27% (P - value = 0.001 MSSA isolates had seg and sei; whereas, 38.6% (P - value < 0.001 of MRSA isolates were found to have sea. The most common enterotoxin associated with mortality was sei, which comprised of 38% of all mortality. Conclusion: In SAB, the significant predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, presence of multiorgan dysfunction, and shock. Although overall significance between the enterotoxin and shock could not be demonstrated, it successfully

  7. Prevalence of Toxin Genes among the Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and its Clinical Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deodhar, Divya; Varghese, George; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; John, James; Rebekah, Grace; Janardhanan, Jeshina; Jeyaraman, Ranjith; Jasmine, Sudha; Mathews, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes a variety of infections, ranging from a mild skin infection to blood stream infections and deep seated infections. As Stapylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) has the tendency to cause endovascular and metastatic infections, complications can occur at almost all sites of the body. Hence, SAB is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in spite of appropriate antimicrobial treatment. The virulence in S. aureus is determined by the presence of adhesins and toxins, which behave like superantigens (SAgs) and leads to a massive release of proinflammatory cytokines causing overwhelming inflammatory response leading to endothelial leakage, hemodynamic shock, multiorgan failure, and possibly death. One year prospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in southern part of India included all patients with SAB. Clinical details were filled according to. All isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for enterotoxin profiling. A total of 101 patients of SAB were identified which comprises of 61 (60.4%) patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 40 (39.6%) patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Most common predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, severe organ dysfunction, shock, tachycardia, and leukocytosis. Two-third of the isolates had at least one enterotoxin, most prevalent was sea; 28% and 27% (P - value = 0.001) MSSA isolates had seg and sei; whereas, 38.6% (P - value < 0.001) of MRSA isolates were found to have sea. The most common enterotoxin associated with mortality was sei, which comprised of 38% of all mortality. In SAB, the significant predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, presence of multiorgan dysfunction, and shock. Although overall significance between the enterotoxin and shock could not be demonstrated, it successfully demonstrated the difference of enterotoxin between MSSA and MRSA.

  8. Prevalence, antibiotic-resistance properties and enterotoxin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Three-hundred milk-based infant foods were collected and immediately transferred to the laboratory. ... and entFM (55.5 %) were the most commonly detected enterotoxigenic genes. Bacteria showed the ... conditions like pasteurization and sterilization. [2,3]. ... spaghetti, noodle, milk powder and infant formula.

  9. Prevalence, antibiotic-resistance properties and enterotoxin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    milk-based infant foods in Iran, represent an important public health issue which should be considered ... Keywords: Prevalence, Bacillus cereus, Antibiotic resistance, Enterotoxigenic genes, Milk-based infant food. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science ..... and cereals collected in Korea.

  10. An outbreak of food poisoning due to egg yolk reaction-negative Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, N; Kawamura, A; Masuda, T; Akiyama, M

    2001-03-20

    An outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning due to an egg yolk (EY) reaction-negative strain occurred in Japan. Twenty-one of 53 dam construction workers who ate boxed lunches prepared at their company cafeteria became ill, and eight required hospital treatment. The outbreak showed a typical incubation time (1.5-4 h with a median time of 2.7 h) and symptoms (vomiting and diarrhea) of staphylococcal food poisoning. Staphylococcus aureus, which produces staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) A, was isolated from four fecal specimens of eight patients tested. Scrambled egg in the boxed lunches contained 20-40 ng/g of SEA, and 3.0 x 10(9)/g of viable S. aureus cells that produced this toxin. All isolates from patients and the food were EY reaction-negative, coagulase type II, and showed the same restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern. We concluded that the outbreak was caused by scrambled egg contaminated with EY reaction-negative S. aureus. In Japan, outbreaks of staphylococcal food poisoning are mainly caused by EY reaction-positive S. aureus, and EY reaction-negative colonies grown on agar plates containing EY are usually not analyzed further for detection of S. aureus. The present outbreak suggested that EY reaction-negative isolates should be subjected to further analysis to detect the causative agents of staphylococcal food poisoning.

  11. Manufacturing of a novel double-function ssDNA aptamer for sensitive diagnosis and efficient neutralization of SEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighian, Hamid; Halabian, Raheleh; Amani, Jafar; Heiat, Mohammad; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2018-05-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is an enterotoxin produced mainly by Staphylococcus aureus. In recent years, it has become the most prevalent compound for staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) around the world. In this study, we isolate new dual-function single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers by using some new methods, such as the Taguchi method, by focusing on the detection and neutralization of SEA enterotoxin in food and clinical samples. For the asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (PCR) optimization of each round of systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), we use Taguchi L9 orthogonal arrays, and the aptamer mobility shift assay (AMSA) is used for initial evaluation of the protein-DNA interactions on the last SELEX round. In our investigation the dissociation constant (K D ) value and the limit of detection (LOD) of the candidate aptamer were found to be 8.5 ± 0.91 of nM and 5 ng/ml using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In the current study, the Taguchi and mobility shift assay methods were innovatively harnessed to improve the selection process and evaluate the protein-aptamer interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on employing these two methods in aptamer technology especially against bacterial toxin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic resistance and molecular analysis of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from cow's milk and dairy products in northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira-Filho, Vladimir M; Luz, Isabelle S; Campos, Ana Paula F; Silva, Wellington M; Barros, Maria Paloma S; Medeiros, Elizabeth S; Freitas, Manuela F L; Mota, Rinaldo A; Sena, Maria J; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C

    2014-04-01

    This work aimed to assess the clonal distribution among 94 strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from cow's milk, raw cheese, and a milking machine in 12 dairy farms in northeast Brazil, by analyzing different typing methods and detecting resistance and toxigenic profiles. For the first time, isolates of this region were assessed simultaneously by the polymorphism of the 3'-end coa gene and 16S-23S rDNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, antibiotic resistance phenotyping, and toxigenic arsenal. Although pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns showed a wider variation (discriminatory index 0.83) than the PCR-based methods, the internal transcribed spacer-PCR proved to be a useful and inexpensive procedure for conducting epidemiological surveys of S. aureus on a regional scale. Each dairy farm had its own resistance profile, and in two herds, 63% of the strains were multiresistant, probably due to the indiscriminate use of antibiotics in bovine mastitis treatment. No methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains were detected in this study; however, 93.6% of S. aureus strains harbored variable profiles of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes seg, seh, sei, and sej. Transcriptional analysis revealed that 53.3% of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes actually transcribed, pointing out the food poisoning risk of these dairy products to consumers in the region. Based on the detection of the most prevalent clones in a herd or region, appropriate antibiotic therapy and specific immunization can be used for the treatment and control of staphylococcal mastitis.

  13. Use of the Real Time xCelligence System for Purposes of Medical Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam Feliks; Janczura, Adriana; Smutnicka, Danuta; Mączyńska, Beata; Anna, Secewicz; Nowicka, Joanna; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Gościniak, Grażyna

    2012-09-28

    Roche's xCelligence impedance-measuring instrument is one of a few commercially available systems of such type. According to the best knowledge of authors, instrument was tested so far only for eukaryotic cell research. The aim of this work was to estimate xCELLigence suitability for the microbiological tests, including (i) measurement of morphological changes in eukaryotic cells as a result of bacterial toxin activity, (ii) measurement of bacterial biofilm formation and (iii) impact of antiseptics on the biofilm structure. To test the infuence of bacterial LT enterotoxin on eukaryotic cell lines, Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line and reference strain Escherichia coli ATTC 35401 were used. To investigate Roche's instrument ability to measure biofilm formation and impact of antiseptics on its development, Staphylococcus aureus ATTC6538 reference strain was used. The data generated during the experiments indicate excellent ability of xCelligence instrument to detect cytopathic effect caused by bacterial LT endotoxin and to detect staphylococcal biofilm formation. However, interpretation of the results obtained during real-time measurement of antiseptic's bactericidal activity against staphylococcal biofilm, caused many difficulties. xCelligence instrument can be used for real-time monitoring of morphological changes in CHO cells treated with bacterial LT enterotoxin and for real-time measurement of staphylococcal biofilm formation in vitro. Further investigation is necessary to confirm suitability of system to analyze antiseptic's antimicrobial activity against biofilm in vitro.

  14. Identification of Staphylococcus spp. isolated during the ripening process of a traditional minas cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. Borelli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The population dynamics of Staphylococcus spp. was studied during the ripening of Canastra Minas cheese at three farms located in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The presence of coagulase (coa, thermonuclease (nuc, and enterotoxin (sea, seb, sec, and sed genes was investigated in Staphylococcus strains isolated during the 60-day cheese-ripening period. The presence of the staphylococcal enterotoxins A, C, and D was also investigated in the cheese samples. Cheese samples that were matured for 0, 7, 15, 30, and 45 days presented staphylococci counts from 10³ to 10(8cfu/g. All isolates considered coagulase-positive by physiological tests had the coa gene. However, no association was observed between the results obtained with biochemical tests and those obtained by PCR using gene-specific primers for coagulase-negative strains. Coagulase and thermonuclease genes occurred simultaneously in 41.3% of Staphylococcus spp. tested. None of the investigated Staphylococcus strains expressed enterotoxins SEA, SEB, SEC, and SED. Enterotoxins A, C, and D were not detected in any of the cheese samples.

  15. Subinhibitory concentrations of perilla oil affect the expression of secreted virulence factor genes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhang Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathogenicity of staphylococcus aureus is dependent largely upon its ability to secrete a number of virulence factors, therefore, anti-virulence strategy to combat S. aureus-mediated infections is now gaining great interest. It is widely recognized that some plant essential oils could affect the production of staphylococcal exotoxins when used at subinhibitory concentrations. Perilla [Perilla frutescens (L. Britton], a natural medicine found in eastern Asia, is primarily used as both a medicinal and culinary herb. Its essential oil (perilla oil has been previously demonstrated to be active against S. aureus. However, there are no data on the influence of perilla oil on the production of S. aureus exotoxins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of perilla oil against S. aureus strains. Hemolysis, tumour necrosis factor (TNF release, Western blot, and real-time RT-PCR assays were performed to evaluate the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of perilla oil on exotoxins production in S. aureus. The data presented here show that perilla oil dose-dependently decreased the production of α-toxin, enterotoxins A and B (the major staphylococcal enterotoxins, and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1 in both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The production of α-toxin, SEA, SEB, and TSST-1 in S. aureus was decreased by perilla oil. These data suggest that perilla oil may be useful for the treatment of S. aureus infections when used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics, which can increase exotoxins production by S. aureus at subinhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, perilla oil could be rationally applied in food systems as a novel food preservative both to inhibit the growth of S. aureus and to repress the production of exotoxins, particularly staphylococcal enterotoxins.

  16. Housefly (Musca domestica as Carrier of Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in Broiler Farms in Iran: Is it Important for Public Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Rashki Ghalehnoo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the last decade, the prevalence of insect borne diseases due to contaminated food as well as the outbreaks of diseases due to enterotoxin-producing Staphylococcus aureus (ETSA strains has increased. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the prevalence rate, enterotoxigenecity, and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus isolated from M. domestica collected from the residential areas of nine districts broiler farms in Zabol, Iran. Materials and Methods: The flies were captured with a sterile nylon net and washed twice with distilled water. The contents were streaked onto selective media and S. aureus was identified using the conventional biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using CLSI guideline. Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs, SEA, SEB, SEC and SED, was detected by the reverse passive latex agglutination (PRLA method. Coagulase typing was performed with coagulase typing kit. Results: A total of 87 (17% S. aureus was isolated from 450 samples. The ability to synthesize staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs was determined in 62 of 87 (71% isolates. SE type B was the most common enterotoxin found in the isolated S. aureus (45%, followed by SE type A (26%, SE type C (5%, SE type D (8%, SEA + SEC (7% and SEA + SEB (7%. Among the antibiotic tested, Penicillin was the most resistant antibiotic tested. Sixty seven percent of isolates belonged to coagulase type III, VI, VII, VIII, IV, and V. Conclusions: Our results suggest that S. aureus, including ETSA, is being carried by house flies such as M. domestica and may contribute to the spread of pathogenic isolates, with an impact on public health.

  17. Enterotoxigenic coagulase positive Staphylococcus in milk and milk products, lben and jben, in northern Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendahou, Abdrezzak; Abid, Mohammed; Bouteldoun, Nadine; Catelejine, Dierick; Lebbadi, Mariam

    2009-04-30

    The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of enterotoxin genes (sea-seo) in Coagulase Positive Staphylococcus (CPS) isolated from unpasteurized milk and milk products. These results were compared with the results obtained by using the detection kit SET-RPLA for the specific detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA-SED). Eighty-one samples of milk and milk products were analyzed for the presence of Staphylococcus strains. Forty-six coagulase positive Staphylococcus isolates were tested for the production of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA-SED) by using the reversed passive latex agglutination method. The strains were also tested for the presence of se genes (sea-seo) by polymerase chain reaction. One or more classical enterotoxin products (SEA-SED) were observed in 39% of the strains tested, while se genes were detected in 56.5%. SEA and sea were most commonly detected. For newly discovered se genes among CPS isolates tested in this study, except the seh gene which was revealed in four isolates (8.7 %), none of the strains harbored any of the other se genes (see, seg, sei, sej, sek, sel, sem, seo and sen). The finding of a pathogen such as staphylococci-producing SEs and containing se genes in milk and milk products in northern Morocco may indicate a problem for public health in this region. The presence of enterotoxigenic strains in food does not always necessarily mean that the toxin will be produced. For that reason, the combination of both methods (RPLA and PCR) is a guarantee for success in diagnostic analysis tests.

  18. [Routes of pathogenic staphylococcal contamination of slaughter poultry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, L; Zakhartsev, Ts; Baĭl'ozov, D

    1977-01-01

    The contamination of birds with pathogenic staphylococci was followed up during their slaughter handling and trimming at two poultry-dressing houses. It was found that water cooling and evisceration were mostly contributing to contamination. Taking part in the dissemination of Staphylococcus infection were also the female workers on the slaughter belt, especially those that had wounds on their hands. Studied were the properties of a total of 881 strains of staphylococci, 43.35 per cent of them being defined as Staph. aureus, and 56.64 per cent--as Staph. edidermidis.

  19. Staphylococcal Proteases Aid in Evasion of the Human Complement System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that presents severe health care concerns due to the prevalence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New treatment strategies are urgently needed, which requires an understanding of disease causation mechanisms. Complement is one of the first...

  20. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  1. Staphylococcal disease in Africa: another neglected 'tropical' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, Mathias; Abdullah, Salim; Alabi, Abraham; Alonso, Pedro; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Fuhr, Günther; Germann, Anja; Kern, Winfried V.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mandomando, Inacio; Mellmann, Alexander C.; Pluschke, Gerd; Rieg, Siegbert; Ruffing, Ulla; Schaumburg, Frieder; Tanner, Marcel; Peters, Georg; von Briesen, Hagen; von Eiff, Christof; von Müller, Lutz; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2013-01-01

    The term 'neglected tropical diseases' predominantly refers to single-entity, mostly parasitic diseases. However, a considerable morbidity and mortality burden is carried by patients infected with Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative bacilli that are prevalent all over the world, yet have impact in

  2. Staphylococcal disease in Africa : another neglected 'tropical' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, Mathias; Abdullah, Salim; Alabi, Abraham; Alonso, Pedro; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Fuhr, Guenther; Germann, Anja; Kern, Winfried V.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mandomando, Inacio; Mellmann, Alexander C.; Pluschke, Gerd; Rieg, Siegbert; Ruffing, Ulla; Schaumburg, Frieder; Tanner, Marcel; von Briesen, Hagen; von Eiff, Christof; von Mueller, Lutz; Grobusch, Martin P.; Peters, Georg

    The term 'neglected tropical diseases' predominantly refers to single-entity, mostly parasitic diseases. However, a considerable morbidity and mortality burden is carried by patients infected with Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative bacilli that are prevalent all over the world, yet have impact in

  3. Staphylococcal Immune Evasion Proteins: Structure, Function, and Host Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koymans, Kirsten J; Vrieling, Manouk; Gorham, Ronald D; van Strijp, Jos A G

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a successful human and animal pathogen. Its pathogenicity is linked to its ability to secrete a large amount of virulence factors. These secreted proteins interfere with many critical components of the immune system, both innate and adaptive, and hamper proper immune functioning. In recent years, numerous studies have been conducted in order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction of evasion molecules with the host immune system. Structural studies have fundamentally contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms of action of the individual factors. Furthermore, such studies revealed one of the most striking characteristics of the secreted immune evasion molecules: their conserved structure. Despite high-sequence variability, most immune evasion molecules belong to a small number of structural categories. Another remarkable characteristic is that S. aureus carries most of these virulence factors on mobile genetic elements (MGE) or ex-MGE in its accessory genome. Coevolution of pathogen and host has resulted in immune evasion molecules with a highly host-specific function and prevalence. In this review, we explore how these shared structures and genomic locations relate to function and host specificity. This is discussed in the context of therapeutic options for these immune evasion molecules in infectious as well as in inflammatory diseases.

  4. The evolutionary pathway of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome element

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Indrakova, A.; Mašlaňová, I.; Kováčová, Viera; Doškař, J.; Pantůček, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 11 (2016), s. 1195-1203 ISSN 0006-3088 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : coagulase-negative staphylococci * aureus st398 * maximum-likelihood * genome sequence Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.759, year: 2016

  5. 21 CFR 866.2050 - Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2050... through use of the bacteria's susceptibility to destruction by the virus. Test results are used...

  6. Clinical consequences of using PNA-FISH in Staphylococcal bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laub, R R; Knudsen, Inge Jenny Dahl

    2014-01-01

    To optimize patient treatment and rational use of antimicrobials, it is important to provide fast information on findings in blood-cultures (BCs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) on positive BCs conta...

  7. Incidence of hoof lameness and associated staphylococcal wound ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hoof is the commonest site of lameness in horses; the condition is exacerbated by infection resulting from contaminants which are very common in their environment. This study determined the incidence of hoof lameness of horses in Obollo-Afor market. Relationship between lameness and sex, type of lameness, level of ...

  8. Strategies for prevention and treatment of staphylococcal biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Rikke Louise

    Biofilm formation by bacteria that colonize biomedical implants cause infections that cannot be eradicated by antibiotic therapy. Bacteria in biofilms are tolerant to every antibiotic known today, and this tolerance is partly due to their low metabolic activity, the occurrence of persister cells...... in biofilms. Innovative biomaterials may at best delay biofilm formation and an important question in this context is to understand how the material can contribute to more successful antibiotic treatment by not providing the cues that trigger the onset of antibiotic tolerance in the attached bacteria...... treatments that more effectively tackle biofilm infections. We have explored how the combination of antibiotic therapy with matrix-targeting enzymes can enhance the efficacy of antibiotics. The matrix composition is highly variable among different bacterial species, and this strategy will not produce a one...

  9. Repurposing ebselen for treatment of multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar Thangamani; Waleed Younis; Mohamed N. Seleem

    2015-01-01

    Novel antimicrobials and new approaches to developing them are urgently needed. Repurposing already-approved drugs with well-characterized toxicology and pharmacology is a novel way to reduce the time, cost, and risk associated with antibiotic innovation. Ebselen, an organoselenium compound, is known to be clinically safe and has a well-known pharmacology profile. It has shown potent bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus, including methic...

  10. Staphylococcal milk poisoning in calves | Ngatia | Kenya Veterinarian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty out of 89 dairy calves fed on unsold raw milk returned from the fresh milk market, became sick within one hour after consuming the milk. The main clinical signs observed were sudden collapse, bloating, tetany, and diarrhea, seven of the sick calves died and two were submitted for necropsy. Postmortem findings ...

  11. SANITARY EVALUATION OF MILK PRODUCTS IN MOUNTAIN DAIRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mioni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available between 2006 and 2007 881 samples of “malga” (little mountain dairies milk products were analysed to estimate their hygienic characteristics. Several samples showed high counts for Escherichia coli and coagulase-positive staphylococci, while Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. were absent in all of the samples; 0,9% of cheese samples, 4,1% of butter samples and 4,7% of “ricotta” samples were positive for Listeria monocytogenes, so as 14,7% of cheese samples for staphylococcal enterotoxins.

  12. Effect of atopic skin stressors on natural moisturizing factors and cytokines in healthy adult epidermis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, K A; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2018-01-01

    : To explore the effect of selected exogenous skin stressors on NMF and skin cytokines levels in healthy adult epidermis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 40 healthy volunteers (18-49 years) were exposed to hard, soft, and chlorinated water, 0.5% SLS, house dust mite, cat allergen, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB...... of various skin cytokines in healthy individuals. Our data highlight environmental factors that might play a role in AD pathophysiology, but needs confirmation in AD patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  13. The application of alkaline and acidic electrolyzed water in the sterilization of chicken breasts and beef liver

    OpenAIRE

    Shimamura, Yuko; Shinke, Momoka; Hiraishi, Miki; Tsuchiya, Yusuke; Masuda, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The sterilization effect of a combination treatment with alkaline electrolyzed water (AlEW) and strong acidic electrolyzed water (StAEW) on fresh chicken breasts and beef liver was evaluated. Samples (1, 5, and 10?g) were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis NBRC3313, Escherichia coli ATCC 10798, Staphylococcus aureus FDA209P, and S.?aureus C?29 [staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) productive strain] and subjected to a dipping combination treatment (4?C and 25?C for 3?min) with AlEW...

  14. Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from artisanal sausages for application as starter cultures in meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentini, Angela Maria; Sawitzki, Maristela Cortez; Bertol, Teresinha Marisa; Sant'anna, Ernani S

    2009-01-01

    Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from artisanal sausages for application as starter cultures in meat products Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus strains AD1 and U5 isolated from natural fermented sausages was investigated as starter cultures in fermented sausages produced in the South Region of Brazil. The study demonstrated that the Staphylococcus xylosus strains AD1 and U5 showed significant growth during fermentation, stability over freeze-dried process, negative reaction for staphylococcal enterotoxins and viability for using as a single-strain culture or associated with lactic acid bacteria for production of fermented sausages.

  15. Serologic test systems development. Progress report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, G.C.; Clinard, E.H.; Bartlett, M.L.; Petersen, P.M.; Sanders, W.M.; Payne, R.J.; Martinez, E.

    1978-01-01

    Work has continued on the development and application of the Enzyme-Labeled Antibody (ELA) test to the USDA needs. Results on trichinosis, brucellosis, and staphylococcal enterotoxin A detection are very encouraging. A field test for trichinosis detection is being worked out in cooperation with Food Safety and Quality Service personnel. Work is in progress with the Technicon Instrument Corporation to develop a modification of their equipment to automatically process samples by the ELA procedure. An automated ELA readout instrument for 96-well trays has been completed and is being checked out.

  16. BACTERIA STAPHYLOCOCCUS SPP. IZOLATED FROM MASTITIS OF SHEEP AND THEIR ENTEROTOXIGENIC PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Zigo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In our study was followed occurrence of staphylococcal mastitis in herd of 350 sheep during one lactation season. We found, the bacteria S. schleiferi was identified in 88 from all 204 isolates. In high number were identified also S. caprae (33, S. chromogenes (21, S. aureus (19, S. epidermidis (17, respectively. Important was occurrence S. intermedius, S. simulans, S. xylosus a S. warneri, too. The Staphylococcuss spp. caused latent and subclinical forms of mastitis predominantly, showed into subacute mastitis (26.5%. Acute mastitis was determined in 7.8 %. Eight bacteria S. aureus, two S. chromogenes, and two S. epidermidis produced staphylococcal enterotoxins.doi: 10.5219/171

  17. Poor survival of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on inanimate objects in the public spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domon, Hisanori; Uehara, Yoshio; Oda, Masataka; Seo, Hiromi; Kubota, Noriko; Terao, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus on shopping baskets in Osaka Prefecture, Japan. Multilocus sequence typing was performed to determine the genotypes of S. aureus isolates, and then a polymerase chain reaction method was used to detect staphylococcal enterotoxins and antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, desiccation tolerance of S. aureus isolates was evaluated in vitro. Forty-six (6.2%) S. aureus isolates were collected from 740 shopping baskets, though only one MRSA strain was identified. In multilocus sequence typing findings, ten sequence types and 24 singletons were classified, which were divided into ten clonal complexes and six singletons. The most frequent staphylococcal enterotoxin gene was seg (30.4%). Our in vitro findings demonstrated that 70% of the S. aureus isolates, including the MRSA strain, became undetectable at 12 h after desiccation at an appropriate cell density, while the others remained viable for up to 24 h. Thus, it is difficult for MRSA organisms to survive on dry surfaces found in public areas. We speculated that inanimate objects in the community are unlikely to be a potential source for transmission of MRSA and that S. aureus on such objects outside of hospital settings is not a public health threat. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effect of food-related stress conditions and loss of agr and sigB on seb promoter activity in S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihto, Henna-Maria; Stephan, Roger; Engl, Christoph; Chen, John; Johler, Sophia

    2017-08-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) causes staphylococcal food poisoning and is produced in up to ten times higher quantities than other major enterotoxins. While Staphylococcus aureus growth is often repressed by competing flora, the organism exhibits a decisive growth advantage under some stress conditions. So far, data on the influence of food-related stressors and regulatory mutations on seb expression is limited and largely based on laboratory strains, which were later reported to harbor mutations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of stress and regulatory mutations on seb promoter activity. To this end, transcriptional fusions were created in two strains, USA300 and HG003, carrying different seb upstream sequences fused to a blaZ reporter. NaCl, nitrite, and glucose stress led to significantly decreased seb promoter activity, while lactic acid stress resulted in significantly increased seb promoter activity. Loss of agr decreased seb promoter activity and loss of sigB increased promoter activity, with the magnitude of change depending on the strain. These results demonstrate that mild stress conditions encountered during food production and preservation can induce significant changes in seb promoter activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of the enterotoxigenic genes (sei,sej) in Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis milk in the West Azerbaijan of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmady, Malahat; Kazemi, Sahar

    2013-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major causative pathogen of clinical and subclinical mastitis of dairy domestic ruminants. This organism produces a variety of extracellular toxins and virulence factors such as enterotoxin SEI and SEJ that contribute to its pathogenic potential. In this study 25 S. aureus isolates obtained from four dairy herds of Urmia region which is located in West Azerbaijan province in Iran. The tested isolates were identified on the basis of the cultural and biochemical properties, as well as amplification of the aroA gene which is specific for S. aureus . All isolates were also analyzed for the presence of the SEI ( sei ) and SEJ ( sej ) encoding genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Seven positive isolates were detected for sei , but sej gene was not detected in any of the total number of 25 isolates. The present study revealed that the PCR amplification of the aroA gene could be used as a powerful tool for identification of S. aureus from the cases of bovine mastitis. Results of the present study also showed that the strains of S. aureus which cause mastitis can potentially produce enterotoxin SEI. Overall, our results suggest that it is of special importance to follow the presence of enterotoxin-producing S. aureus in other dairy products, especially for protecting the consumers from staphylococcal food poisoning.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a controversial food-borne pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergelidis, D; Angelidis, A S

    2017-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of severe healthcare-associated (HA) infections. Although during the last decade the incidence of HA invasive infections has dropped, the incidence of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections has risen among the general population. Moreover, CA-MRSA, livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) and HA-MRSA (HA-MRSA) can be found in foods intended for human consumption. Several studies from different geographical areas have reported the presence of enterotoxin genes in several MRSA food isolates. Molecular typing studies have revealed genetic relatedness of these enterotoxigenic isolates with isolates incriminated in human infections. The contamination sources for foods, especially animal-origin foods, may be livestock as well as humans involved in animal husbandry and food-processing. Under favourable environmental conditions for growth and enterotoxin production, enterotoxigenic S. aureus isolates present in foods can cause staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP), irrespective of the contamination origin. Owing to the typically moderate clinical manifestations of SFP, the S. aureus strains responsible for SFP (cases or outbreaks) are frequently either not identified or not further characterized. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is rarely performed, because administration of antimicrobial therapy is not required in the vast majority of cases. Staphylococcal food poisoning is the result of consumption of foods with preformed enterotoxins. Hence, similar to methicillin-sensitive enterotoxigenic S. aureus, enterotoxigenic MRSA can also act as food-borne pathogens upon favourable conditions for growth and enterotoxin production. The severity of the intoxication is not related to the antimicrobial resistance profile of the causative S. aureus strain and therefore MRSA food-borne outbreaks are not expected to be more severe. This review evaluates the potential of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus

  1. Effect of High Pressure and Heat on Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Margosch

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the inactivation of microorganisms by high pressure treatment is a subject of intense investigations, the effect of high pressure on bacterial toxins has not been studied so far. In this study, the influence of combined pressure/temperature treatment (0.1 to 800 MPa and 5 to 121 °C on bacterial enterotoxins was determined. Therefore, heat-stable enterotoxin (STa of cholera toxin (CT from Vibrio cholerae, staphylococcal enterotoxins A-E, haemolysin BL (HBL from Bacillus cereus, and Escherichia coli (STa were subjected to different treatment schemes. Structural alterations were monitored in enzyme immunoassays (EIAs. Cytotoxicity of the pressure treated supernatant of toxigenic B. cereus DSM 4384 was investigated with Vero cells. High pressure of 200 to 800 MPa at 5 °C leads to a slight increase of the reactivity of the STa of E. coli. However, reactivity decreased at 800 MPa and 80 °C to (66±21 % after 30 min and to (44±0.3 % after 128 min. At ambient pressure no decrease in EIA reactivity could be observed after 128 min. Pressurization (0.1 to 800 MPa of heat stable monomeric staphylococcal toxins at 5 and 20 °C showed no effect. A combined heat (80 °C and pressure (0.1 to 800 MPa treatment lead to a decrease in the immuno-reactivity to 20 % of its maximum. For cholera toxin a significant loss in latex agglutination was observable only at 80 °C and 800 MPa for holding times higher than 20 min. Interestingly, the immuno-reactivity of B. cereus HBL toxin increased with the increase of pressure (182 % at 800 MPa, 30 °C, and high pressure showed only minor effects on cytotoxicity to Vero cells. Our results indicate that pressurization can increase inactivation observed by heat treatment, and combined treatments may be effective at lower temperatures and/or shorter incubation time.

  2. Detection of Methicillin Resistance and Various Virulence Factors in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Nasal Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Türk Dağı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococus aureus can be found as a commensal on skin and nasal flora or it may cause local and invasive infections. S. aureus has a large number of virulence factors. Aims: To investigate the methicillin resistance and frequency of various virulence factors in S. aureus nasal isolates. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Nasal samples collected from university students were cultured in media. S. aureus was identified by conventional methods and the Staphyloslide latex test (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, USA. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted, and the methicillin resistance was determined. The mecA, nuc, pvl and staphylococcal toxin genes were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: S. aureus was isolated in 104 of 600 (17.3% nasal samples. In total, 101 (97.1% S. aureus isolates were methicillin-sensitive and the remaining 3 (2.9% were methicillin-resistant. Furthermore, all but five isolates carried at least one staphylococcal enterotoxin gene, with seg being predominant. The tst and eta genes were determined in 29 (27.9%, and 3 (2.9% isolates, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates harbored see, etb, and pvl genes. Conclusion: A moderate rate of S. aureus carriage and low frequency of MRSA were detected in healthy students. S. aureus isolates had a high prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and the tst gene. In this study, a large number of virulence factors were examined in S. aureus nasal isolates, and the data obtained from this study can be used for monitoring the prevalence of virulence genes in S. aureus strains isolated from nasal carriers.

  3. Survey and properties of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Japanese-style desserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Yuko; Kidokoro, Shiho; Murata, Masatsune

    2006-07-01

    We surveyed the contamination of 315 Japanese- and western-style desserts and 247 human hands by Staphylococcus aureus and other staphylococcal bacteria. The most frequently isolated staphylococcal bacterium was S. warneri, followed by S. aureus. Only 1.9% of western-style desserts were contaminated by S. aureus strains, while 19.4% and 13.0% of Japanese-style desserts and human hands respectively were contaminated. Ninety-four isolates of S. aureus were characterized as to their biological properties and enterotoxigenicity. Although staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the cultured broth of all S. aureus isolates, the reversed passive latex agglutination method and the polymerase chain reaction showed only 39 (41.5%) and 40 (42.6%) samples respectively as SE-positive. The predominant type of SE was SEB (67.5%), and eight strains produced SEA. None of the S. aureus strains had penicillin-binding protein 2', showing that methicillin-resistant S. aureus was not present in the samples.

  4. Molecular analysis of the interaction between Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin and Claudins

    OpenAIRE

    Protze, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Claudins are essential constituents of Tight Junctions (TJs) and responsible for maintenance of these cell-cell contacts. Binding of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin’s C-terminal domain (cCPE) to the extracellular loop 2 (EZS2) of claudins, especially Cld3, Cld4 and Cld6-Cld9 causes a reversible opening of TJs. Thus, a structure-function analysis of this system is relevant for biomedical application, since cCPE could be used to enhance paracellular drug uptake. Furthermore cCPE respectivel...

  5. Genetic mapping of the regulator gene determining enterotoxin synthesis in Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, N.I.; Livanova, L.F.; Shaginyan, I.A.; Motin, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    Data on the genetic mapping of mutation tox-7 (the mutation affecting the synthesis of the cholera toxin) were obtained by conjugation crosses between the atoxigenic donor strain Vibrio cholerae Eltor and the toxigenic recipient strain V. cholera classica. The molecular and genetic analysis of the Tox - recombinants indicated that, when the synthesis of the cholera toxin is disrupted in these strains, the tox-7 mutation (which impairs the regulator gene tox) is gained. Close linkage between the tox-7 and pur-63 mutations was established (during the selection procedure there was 81.1% combined transfer with respect to marker pur-63 situated in the donor strain chromosome more proximal than mutation tox-7). The markers were localized in the following order in the region under investigation: asp-cys-nal-pur-61-trp-his-pur-63-tox-7-ile

  6. Staphylococcus enterotoxin A modulates interleukin 15-induced signaling and mitogenesis in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerwien, J; Kaltoft, K; Nielsen, M

    1998-01-01

    the anti-mitogenic effect of SEA on cytokine-induced proliferation and the pro-mitogenic effect of PMA. In contrast, inhibitors of PP1, PP2A, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) are unable to inhibit the effects of SEA. In a SEA "non...

  7. Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin B Effects in Vitro: A Potential Protein Therapeutic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    5). Inherent characteristics of edema toxin and other procaryotic adenylate cyclases from Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Yersinia...by mouse peritoneal macrophages: the role of cellular cyclic AMP. Immunology 64:719–724. 12. Krakauer, T. 1999. Induction of CC chemokines in human

  8. HEALTH AND HYGIENIC CONDITIONS OF EWE'S MILK PROCESSING FROM THE ASPECT OF FOOD SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Pukáčová

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Totally, 47 strains of S. aureus and 578 coagulase negative staphylococci were detected in samples from raw ewe milk. The 35 out 47 isolates of S. aureus from ewe milk were positive for the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes: sea(4 %, sec (48 % a sed (48 %. Staphylococcus epidermis (33.04%, Staphylococcus caprae (21.28% were more prevalent. Staphylococcus chromogenes (7.44 %, Staphylococcus hominis (7.09%, Staphylococcus xylosus (6,92 %, a Staphylococcus warneri (6.40 % were isolated also in ewes milk. Staphylococcus haemolyticus (3.11 %, Staphylococcus capitis (2.94 %, Staphylococcus simulans (2.08 % and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (1.73 % were isolated very rarely from the taken individual milk ewe samples. Sporadically, only in few cases, the others coagulase negative staphylococci were isolated (Staphylococcus cohnii cohnii, Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus closii, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, Staphylococcus auricularis and Staphylococcus equorum.   doi:10.5219/24

  9. Technical University of Denmark Microbiological contaminants in food in the European Union in 2004-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helwigh, Birgitte; Korsgaard, Helle; Grønlund, Anne Christine Jørgensen

    (Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria, Yersinia, verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC), Brucella)and non-zoonotic microbiological contaminants (histamine, Enterobacter sakazakii and staphylococcal enterotoxins) in food to the zoonoses database at the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Norway...... also been excluded from the detailed analyses of the microbiological contaminants in Chapter 3. Initially, 86% of the reported samples were assumed to be representative of the occurrence of microbiological contaminants in domestically produced food. However, when samples without specific sampling unit...... and figures alone. For some foodstuffs, the occurrence of microbiological contaminants increased along the food production chain, which indicates either cross-contamination during production or microbiological growth during shelf-life. For other foodstuffs, the occurrence of microbiological contaminants...

  10. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). Here, we investigate SE-mediated interactions between nonmalignant T cells and malignant T-cell lines established from skin and blood of CTCL patients....... The malignant CTCL cells express MHC class II molecules that are high-affinity receptors for SE. Although treatment with SE has no direct effect on the growth of the malignant CTCL cells, the SE-treated CTCL cells induce vigorous proliferation of the SE-responsive nonmalignant T cells. In turn, the nonmalignant...... T cells enhance proliferation of the malignant cells in an SE- and MHC class II-dependent manner. Furthermore, SE and, in addition, alloantigen presentation by malignant CTCL cells to irradiated nonmalignant CD4(+) T-cell lines also enhance proliferation of the malignant cells. The growth...

  11. Heterogeneity and phylogenetic relationships of community-associated methicillin-sensitive/resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in healthy dogs, cats and their owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, M T; Fu, S Y; Lo, Y P; Huang, T M; Cheng, M M; Chou, C C

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the distribution of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes (se) and the molecular features of community-associated methicillin-sensitive/resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MSSA/MRSA) isolates in the nostrils of healthy pets and their owners. A total of 114 Staph. aureus isolates were identified from 1563 nasal swab samples, and CA-MRSA accounted for 20·2% (n = 23) of the total identified isolates. CA-MRSA isolates (91·3%, 21/23) harboured higher percentage of se than did CA-MSSA isolates (58·2%, 53/91) (P human bond caused by CA-staphylococci in the commonwealth and the need to take cautions worldwide. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Diversity and enterotoxigenicity of Staphylococcus spp. associated with domiati cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharoud, Walid M; Spano, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    A total of 87 samples of fresh and stored Domiati cheese (an Egyptian soft cheese) were examined for the presence of Staphylococcus spp. Fifteen Staphylococcus isolates identified as S. aureus (2 isolates), S. xylosus (4), S. caprae (4), and S. chromogenes (5) were recovered from 15 cheese samples. The S. aureus isolates were resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin, and one isolate was also resistant to tetracycline. S. aureus isolates harbored classical staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes (sea and seb) and recently characterized SE-like genes (selg, seli, selm, and selo). One S. aureus isolate contained a single SE gene (sea), whereas another isolate contained five SE genes (seb, selg, seli, selm, and selo). These results suggest that Domiati cheese is a source for various Staphylococcus species, including S. aureus strains that could be enterotoxigenic.

  13. Molecular detection of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to temperature in milk and its products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutejo, Stephani Valentina Harda; Amarantini, Charis; Budiarso, Tri Yahya

    2017-11-01

    Contamination of Staphylococcus aureus on milk can cause intoxication and infection by Staphylococcal enterotoxin. It has nuc gene, coding thermonuclease enzyme (TNase) that is responsible for nature of resistance in the heating process. This study was conducted to identify nuc gene of as S. aureus isolated from milk and its products like ultra-high temperature, sterile milk, sweetened condensed milk, formula milk, café/milk street traders and fresh milk. Biochemical identification was conducted by using carbohydrate fermentation tests and confirmed by API Staph. Molecular confirmation by amplification of nuc gene using PCR. Based on the results of confirmation using API Staph, all isolates were confirmed as S. aureus with index determinant percentage of 97%. An amplicon product of 270 bp was gained in all isolates. It is concluded that isolate of S. aureus has nuc gene.

  14. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Yonezawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan.

  15. Chemical composition of fennel essential oil and its impact on Staphylococcus aureus exotoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jiazhang; Li, Hongen; Su, Hongwei; Dong, Jing; Luo, Mingjing; Wang, Jianfeng; Leng, Bingfeng; Deng, Yanhong; Liu, Juxiong; Deng, Xuming

    2012-04-01

    In this study, fennel oil was isolated by hydrodistillation, and the chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectral analysis. The antimicrobial activity of fennel oil against Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated by broth microdilution. A haemolysis assay, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) release assay, western blot, and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR were applied to investigate the influence of fennel oil on the production of S. aureus virulence-related exoproteins. The data show that fennel oil, which contains a high level of trans-anethole, was active against S. aureus, with MICs ranging from 64 to 256 μg/ml. Furthermore, fennel oil, when used at subinhibitory concentrations, could dose-dependently decrease the expression of S. aureus exotoxins, including α-toxin, Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1).

  16. Toxins as biological weapons for terror-characteristics, challenges and medical countermeasures: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Tamar; Eisenkraft, Arik; Bar-Haim, Erez; Kassirer, Michael; Aran, Adi Avniel; Fogel, Itay

    2016-01-01

    Toxins are hazardous biochemical compounds derived from bacteria, fungi, or plants. Some have mechanisms of action and physical properties that make them amenable for use as potential warfare agents. Currently, some toxins are classified as potential biological weapons, although they have several differences from classic living bio-terror pathogens and some similarities to manmade chemical warfare agents. This review focuses on category A and B bio-terror toxins recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Botulinum neurotoxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B, Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin, and ricin. Their derivation, pathogenesis, mechanism of action, associated clinical signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed in detail. Given their expected covert use, the primary diagnostic challenge in toxin exposure is the early detection of morbidity clusters, apart from background morbidity, after a relatively short incubation period. For this reason, it is important that clinicians be familiar with the clinical manifestations of toxins and the appropriate methods of management and countermeasures.

  17. Monoclonal Antibodies and Toxins—A Perspective on Function and Isotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Kei Chow

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibody therapy remains the only effective treatment for toxin-mediated diseases. The development of hybridoma technology has allowed the isolation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs with high specificity and defined properties, and numerous mAbs have been purified and characterized for their protective efficacy against different toxins. This review summarizes the mAb studies for 6 toxins—Shiga toxin, pertussis toxin, anthrax toxin, ricin toxin, botulinum toxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB—and analyzes the prevalence of mAb functions and their isotypes. Here we show that most toxin-binding mAbs resulted from immunization are non-protective and that mAbs with potential therapeutic use are preferably characterized. Various common practices and caveats of protection studies are discussed, with the goal of providing insights for the design of future research on antibody-toxin interactions.

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies and Toxins—A Perspective on Function and Isotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Siu-Kei; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Antibody therapy remains the only effective treatment for toxin-mediated diseases. The development of hybridoma technology has allowed the isolation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high specificity and defined properties, and numerous mAbs have been purified and characterized for their protective efficacy against different toxins. This review summarizes the mAb studies for 6 toxins—Shiga toxin, pertussis toxin, anthrax toxin, ricin toxin, botulinum toxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)—and analyzes the prevalence of mAb functions and their isotypes. Here we show that most toxin-binding mAbs resulted from immunization are non-protective and that mAbs with potential therapeutic use are preferably characterized. Various common practices and caveats of protection studies are discussed, with the goal of providing insights for the design of future research on antibody-toxin interactions. PMID:22822456

  19. Monoclonal antibodies and toxins--a perspective on function and isotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Siu-Kei; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-06-01

    Antibody therapy remains the only effective treatment for toxin-mediated diseases. The development of hybridoma technology has allowed the isolation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high specificity and defined properties, and numerous mAbs have been purified and characterized for their protective efficacy against different toxins. This review summarizes the mAb studies for 6 toxins--Shiga toxin, pertussis toxin, anthrax toxin, ricin toxin, botulinum toxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)--and analyzes the prevalence of mAb functions and their isotypes. Here we show that most toxin-binding mAbs resulted from immunization are non-protective and that mAbs with potential therapeutic use are preferably characterized. Various common practices and caveats of protection studies are discussed, with the goal of providing insights for the design of future research on antibody-toxin interactions.

  20. Prevalence and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin resistant strains, isolated from bulk can milk and raw milk products in pastoral communities of South-West Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiimwe, Benon B; Baldan, Rossella; Trovato, Alberto; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2017-06-13

    Staphylococcus aureus strains are now regarded as zoonotic agents. In pastoral settings where human-animal interaction is intimate, multi-drug resistant microorganisms have become an emerging zoonotic issue of public health concern. The study of S. aureus prevalence, antimicrobial resistance and clonal lineages in humans, animals and food in African settings has great relevance, taking into consideration the high diversity of ethnicities, cultures and food habits that determine the lifestyle of the people. Little is known about milk carriage of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) and their virulence factors in Uganda. Here, we present the prevalence of MRSA in bulk can milk and raw milk products in pastoral communities of south-west Uganda. We also present PFGE profiles, spa-types, as well as frequency of enterotoxins genes. S. aureus was identified by the coagulase test, susceptibility testing by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and E-test methods and MRSA by detection of the mecA gene and SCCmec types. The presence of Panton - Valentine Leucocidin (PVL) genes and staphylococcal enterotoxins was determined by PCR, while genotyping was by PFGE and spa typing. S. aureus were isolated from 30/148 (20.3%) milk and 11/91(12%) sour milk samples. mecA gene carriage, hence MRSA, was detected in 23/41 (56.1%) of the isolates, with 21 of the 23 (91.3%) being SCCmec type V; while up to 30/41 (73.2%) of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Only five isolates carried the PVL virulence gene, while PFGE typing revealed ten clusters (ranging from two seven isolates each) that comprised 83% of the sample, and only eight isolates with unique pulsotypes. The largest PFGE profile (E) consisted of seven isolates while t7753, t1398, and t2112 were the most common spa-types. Thirty seven of the 41 strains (90.2%) showed at least one of the eight enterotoxin genes tested, with sem 29 (70.7%), sei 25 (61%) and seg 21 (51.2%) being the most frequently observed genes. This

  1. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Virulence-Associated Gene Profile Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Retail Ready-to-Eat Food in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Yu, Shubo; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Wu, Shi; Rong, Dongli

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the subtypes and virulence profiles of 69 Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from retail ready-to-eat food in China. The isolates were analyzed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of important virulence factor genes, including the staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes ( sea , seb , sec , sed , see , seg , seh , sei , sej ), the exfoliative toxin genes ( eta and etb ), the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 gene ( tst ), and the Panton-Valentine leucocidin-encoding gene ( pvl ). The isolates encompassed 26 different sequence types (STs), including four new STs (ST3482, ST3484, ST3485, ST3504), clustered in three clonal complexes and 17 singletons. The most prevalent STs were ST1, ST6, and ST15, constituting 34.8% of all isolates. Most STs (15/26, 57.7%) detected have previously been associated with human infections. All 13 toxin genes examined were detected in the S. aureus isolates, with 84.1% of isolates containing toxin genes. The three most prevalent toxin genes were seb (36.2%), sea (33.3%), and seg (33.3%). The classical SE genes ( sea - see ), which contribute significantly to staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP), were detected in 72.5% of the S. aureus isolates. In addition, pvl , eta , etb , and tst were found in 11.6, 10.1, 10.1, and 7.2% of the S. aureus isolates, respectively. Strains ST6 carrying sea and ST1 harboring sec-seh enterotoxin profile, which are the two most common clones associated with SFP, were also frequently detected in the food samples in this study. This study indicates that these S. aureus isolates present in Chinese ready-to-eat food represents a potential public health risk. These data are valuable for epidemiological studies, risk management, and public health strategies.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance and prevalence of CvfB, SEK and SEQ genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from paediatric patients with bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bing-Shao; Huang, Yan-Mei; Chen, Yin-Shuang; Dong, Hui; Mai, Jia-Liang; Xie, Yong-Qiang; Zhong, Hua-Min; Deng, Qiu-Lian; Long, Yan; Yang, Yi-Yu; Gong, Si-Tang; Zhou, Zhen-Wen

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ) is one of the most frequently isolated pathogens in neonatal cases of early and late-onset sepsis. Drug resistance profiles and carriage of toxin genes may affect the treatment and outcome of an infection. The present study aimed to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns and frequencies of the toxin-associated genes conserved virulence factor B (CvfB), staphylococcal enterotoxin Q (SEQ) and staphylococcal enterotoxin K (SEK) among S. aureus isolates recovered from paediatric patients with bloodstream infections (BSIs) in Guangzhou (China). Of the 53 isolates, 43.4% were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and resistance rates to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin of 92.5, 66.0, 62.3, 13.2, 20.8 and 1.9% were recorded, respectively. However, no resistance to nitrofurantoin, dalfopristin/quinupristin, rifampicin, gentamicin, linezolid or vancomycin was detected. Resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline in the MRSA group was significantly higher than that in the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) group. No significant differences in antimicrobial resistance patterns were noted between two age groups (≤1 year and >1 year). The proportion of S. aureus isolates positive for CvfB, SEQ and SEK was 100, 34.0 and 35.8%, respectively, with 24.5% (13/53) of strains carrying all three genes. Compared with those in MSSA isolates, the rates of SEK, SEQ and SEK + SEQ carriage among MRSA isolates were significantly higher. Correlations were identified between the carriage of SEQ, SEK and SEQ + SEK genes and MRSA (contingency coefficient 0.500, 0.416, 0.546, respectively; Pstudy clarified the characteristics of BSI-associated S. aureus and enhanced the current understanding of the pathogenicity and treatment of MRSA.

  3. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Virulence-Associate