WorldWideScience

Sample records for super-heavy cosmic radiation

  1. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays & Super-heavy Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Marzola, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We reanalyse the prospects for upcoming Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray experiments in connection with the phenomenology of Super-heavy Dark Matter. We identify a set of observables well suited to reveal a possible anisotropy in the High Energy Cosmic Ray flux induced by the decays of these particles, and quantify their performance via Monte Carlo simulations that mimic the outcome of near-future and next-generation experiments. The spherical and circular dipoles are able to tell isotropic and anisotropic fluxes apart at a confidence level as large as $4\\sigma$ or $5\\sigma$, depending on the Dark Matter profile. The forward-to-backward flux ratio yields a comparable result for relatively large opening angles of about 40~deg, but it is less performing once a very large number of events is considered. We also find that an actual experiment employing these observables and collecting 300~events at 60~EeV would have a $50\\%$ chance of excluding isotropy against Super-heavy Dark Matter at a significance of at least $3...

  2. Investigation on radiation shielding parameters of ordinary, heavy and super heavy concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishwaanath P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shielding of a reactor is required for protection of people and environment during normal operation and accidental situations. In the present paper we investigated the shielding parameters viz. mass attenuation coefficients, linear attenuation coefficients, tenth-value layer, effective atomic numbers, kerma relative to air and exposure buildup factors for gamma-ray for ordinary, heavy, and super heavy concretes. Macroscopic effective removal cross-sections for fast neutron had also been calculated. Ordinary concrete is economically suitable for mixture high energy gamma-ray and neutron as it has large weight fraction of low-Z as compared with super heavy concretes to slow down the neutron. Super heavy concretes are superior shielding for both reactor operation and accident situations. The study is useful for optimizing for shielding design and radiation protection in the reactors.

  3. Ultra - High Energy Cosmic Rays from decay of the Super Heavy Dark Matter Relics

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, A G

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we briefly discuss the problem of the origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in the framework of Top-Down models. We show that, for high energy of decays and in a wide range of spectra of injected protons, their extragalactic flux is consistent with the observed fluxes of cosmic rays in the energy range 0.1 E_{GZK}< E < 10E_{GZK}. For suitable energy and spectra of injected protons, the contribution of galactic sources is moderate, in this energy range, but it dominates at smaller and larger energies. In such models we can expect that at these energies the anisotropy of cosmic rays distribution over sky will be especially small. Some possible manifestations of decays of super massive particles such as, for example, primordial black holes with masses M_{pbh} ~ 10^{-5} g, are considered. In particular, we show that partial conversion of energy released during these decays at redshifts z ~ 1000 to Ly-alpha photons can delay the hydrogen recombination and distort the spectrum of fluctuations ...

  4. Hydrology and Cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mie

    and calibration. Yet, soil moisture measurements are traditionally provided on either point or kilometer scale from electromagnetic based sensors and satellite retrievals, respectively. Above the ground surface, the cosmic-ray neutron intensity (eV range) is inversely correlated to all hydrogen present...

  5. Cosmic Rays and Radiative Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Hartquist, T W; Falle, S A E G; Pittard, J M; Van Loo, S

    2011-01-01

    In the absence of magnetic fields and cosmic rays, radiative cooling laws with a range of dependences on temperature affect the stability of interstellar gas. For about four and a half decades, astrophysicists have recognised the importance of the thermal instablity for the formation of clouds in the interstellar medium. Even in the past several years, many papers have concerned the role of the thermal instability in the production of molecular clouds. About three and a half decades ago, astrophysicists investigating radiative shocks noticed that for many cooling laws such shocks are unstable. Attempts to address the effects of cosmic rays on the stablity of radiative media that are initially uniform or that have just passed through shocks have been made. The simplest approach to such studies involves the assumption that the cosmic rays behave as a fluid. Work based on such an approach is described. Cosmic rays have no effect on the stability of initially uniform, static media with respect to isobaric perturb...

  6. Cosmic Tachyon Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1999-01-01

    The equilibrium statistical mechanics of a background radiation of superluminal particles is investigated, based on a vectorial wave equation for tachyons of the Proca type. The partition function, the spectral energy density, and the various thermodynamic variables of an ideal Bose gas of tachyons in an open Robertson-Walker cosmology are derived. The negative mass square in the wave equation changes the frequency scaling in the Rayleigh-Jeans law, and there are also significant changes in the low temperature regime as compared to the microwave background, in particular in the caloric and thermal equations of state.

  7. Radiation from cosmic string standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olum; Blanco-Pillado

    2000-05-01

    We have simulated large-amplitude standing waves on an Abelian-Higgs cosmic string in classical lattice field theory. The radiation rate falls exponentially with wavelength, as one would expect from the field profile around a gauge string. Our results agree with those of Moore and Shellard, but not with those of Vincent, Antunes, and Hindmarsh. The radiation rate falls too rapidly to sustain a scaling solution via direct radiation of particles from string length. There is thus reason to doubt claims of strong constraints on cosmic string theories from cosmic ray observations.

  8. Galactic cosmic radiation environment models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.; Troung, A. G.

    2001-02-01

    Models of the radiation environment in free space and in near earth orbits are required to estimate the radiation dose to the astronauts for Mars, Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station missions, and to estimate the rate of single event upsets and latch-ups in electronic devices. Accurate knowledge of the environment is critical for the design of optimal shielding during both the cruise phase and for a habitat on Mars or the Moon. Measurements of the energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have been made for nearly four decades. In the last decade, models have been constructed that can predict the energy spectra of any GCR nuclei to an accuracy of better than 25%. Fresh and more accurate measurements have been made in the last year. These measurements can lead to more accurate models. Improvements in these models can be made in determining the local interstellar spectra and in predicting the level of solar modulation. It is the coupling of the two that defines a GCR model. This paper reviews of two of the more widely used models, and a comparison of their predictions with new proton and helium data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and spectra of beryllium to iron in the ~40 to 500 MeV/n acquired by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) during the 1997-98 solar minimum. Regressions equations relating the IMP-8 helium count rate to the solar modulation deceleration parameter calculated using the Climax neutron monitor rate have been developed and may lead to improvements in the predictive capacity of the models. .

  9. Electromagnetic radiation of superconducting cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozin, D. A.; Zadorozhna, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    Cosmic strings are relics of the early Universe which can be formed during the phase transitions of fields with spontaneously broken symmetry in the early Universe. Their existence finds support in modern superstrings theories, both in compactification models and in theories with extended additional dimensions. Strings can hold currents, effectively become electrically superconducting wires of astrophysical dimensions. Superconducting cosmic strings can serve as powerful sources of non-thermal radiation in wide energy range. Mechanisms of radiation are synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton and inverse-Compton on CMB photons radiation of electrons accelerated by bow shock wave, created by magnetosphere of relativistically moving string in intergalactic medium (IGM). Expected fluxes of radiation from the shocked plasma around superconducting cosmic strings are calculated for strings with various tensions and for different cases of their location. Possibilities of strings detection by existing facilities are estimated.

  10. Cosmic radiation exposure and persistent cognitive dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Vipan K.; Allen, Barrett D.; Caressi, Chongshan; Kwok, Stephanie; Chu, Esther; Tran, Katherine K.; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Giedzinski, Erich; Acharya, Munjal M.; Britten, Richard A.; Baulch, Janet E.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars mission will result in an inevitable exposure to cosmic radiation that has been shown to cause cognitive impairments in rodent models, and possibly in astronauts engaged in deep space travel. Of particular concern is the potential for cosmic radiation exposure to compromise critical decision making during normal operations or under emergency conditions in deep space. Rodents exposed to cosmic radiation exhibit persistent hippocampal and cortical based performance decrements using six independent behavioral tasks administered between separate cohorts 12 and 24 weeks after irradiation. Radiation-induced impairments in spatial, episodic and recognition memory were temporally coincident with deficits in executive function and reduced rates of fear extinction and elevated anxiety. Irradiation caused significant reductions in dendritic complexity, spine density and altered spine morphology along medial prefrontal cortical neurons known to mediate neurotransmission interrogated by our behavioral tasks. Cosmic radiation also disrupted synaptic integrity and increased neuroinflammation that persisted more than 6 months after exposure. Behavioral deficits for individual animals correlated significantly with reduced spine density and increased synaptic puncta, providing quantitative measures of risk for developing cognitive impairment. Our data provide additional evidence that deep space travel poses a real and unique threat to the integrity of neural circuits in the brain. PMID:27721383

  11. Cosmic radiation exposure and persistent cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Vipan K; Allen, Barrett D; Caressi, Chongshan; Kwok, Stephanie; Chu, Esther; Tran, Katherine K; Chmielewski, Nicole N; Giedzinski, Erich; Acharya, Munjal M; Britten, Richard A; Baulch, Janet E; Limoli, Charles L

    2016-10-10

    The Mars mission will result in an inevitable exposure to cosmic radiation that has been shown to cause cognitive impairments in rodent models, and possibly in astronauts engaged in deep space travel. Of particular concern is the potential for cosmic radiation exposure to compromise critical decision making during normal operations or under emergency conditions in deep space. Rodents exposed to cosmic radiation exhibit persistent hippocampal and cortical based performance decrements using six independent behavioral tasks administered between separate cohorts 12 and 24 weeks after irradiation. Radiation-induced impairments in spatial, episodic and recognition memory were temporally coincident with deficits in executive function and reduced rates of fear extinction and elevated anxiety. Irradiation caused significant reductions in dendritic complexity, spine density and altered spine morphology along medial prefrontal cortical neurons known to mediate neurotransmission interrogated by our behavioral tasks. Cosmic radiation also disrupted synaptic integrity and increased neuroinflammation that persisted more than 6 months after exposure. Behavioral deficits for individual animals correlated significantly with reduced spine density and increased synaptic puncta, providing quantitative measures of risk for developing cognitive impairment. Our data provide additional evidence that deep space travel poses a real and unique threat to the integrity of neural circuits in the brain.

  12. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  13. Search for Antihelium in the Cosmic Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streitmatter, R.E.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.;

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba Canada on July 16-17, 1992. Sixteen hours of data were taken. Measurements of multiple dE/dX, rigidity, and time of flight were used to search for antihelium in the cosmic radiation. A report on the r...

  14. Higher Dimensional Radiation Collapse and Cosmic Censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, S G

    2000-01-01

    We study the occurrence of naked singularities in the spherically symmetric collapse of radiation shells in a higher dimensional spacetime. The necessary conditions for the formation of a naked singularity or a black hole are obtained. The naked singularities are found to be strong in the Tipler's sense and thus violating cosmic censorship conjecture.

  15. From heavy nuclei to super-heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Theisen, C

    2003-01-01

    The existence of super-heavy nuclei has been predicted nearly fifty years ago. Due to the strong coulomb repulsion, the stabilisation of these nuclei is possible only through shell effects. The reasons for this fragile stability, as well as the theoretical predictions concerning the position of the island of stability are presented in the first part of this lecture. In the second part, experiments and experimental techniques which have been used to synthesize or search for super-heavy elements are described. Spectroscopic studies performed in very heavy elements are presented in the following section. We close this lecture with techniques that are currently being developed in order to reach the superheavy island and to study the structure of very-heavy nuclei.

  16. Study of Survival Probability of Super Heavy Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGNan; ZHAOEn-Guang; LIWen-Fei; LIJian-Feng; XUHu-Shan; ZUOWei; LIJun-Qing

    2003-01-01

    The survival probability of super heavy nuclei produced in cold fusion reactions is studied by using the standard Fermi gas level density formula and analyzed with fission and neutron evaporation characteristics predicted in different theoretical models. The level density formula used in this letter suppresses the ratio of neutron emission width to fission width, Гn/Гf. The dependence of Гn/Гf on the saddle point level density parameter and excitation energy is also investigated.

  17. Ionization history of the Universe as a test for Super Heavy Dark Matter particles

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, A G

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the possible distortions of the ionization history of the universe caused by an injection of non-thermal energy due to decays of hypothetical Super Heavy Dark Matter (SHDM) particles. These particles are usually considered as a possible source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) in the framework of the Top-Down model. Estimates of fraction of energy of decays converted to the UV range show that, for suitable parameters of SHDM particles, the significant distortions of power spectra of CMB anisotropy appear. Comparison with the observed power spectrum allows to restrict some properties of the SHDM particles. These decays can also increase of about 5 -- 10 times the degree of ionization of hydrogen at redshifts $z\\sim$ 10 -- 50 that essentially accelerates the formation of molecules $H_2$ and first stars during "dark ages".

  18. Cosmic radiation algorithm utilizing flight time tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katja Kojo, M.Sc.; Mika Helminen, M.Sc.; Anssi Auvinen, M.D.Ph.D. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Katja Kojo, M.Sc.; Anssi Auvinen, M.D.Ph.D. [Tampere Univ., School of Public Health (Finland); Gerhard Leuthold, D.Sc. [GSF - Research Center, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Cosmic radiation is considerably higher on cruising altitudes used in aviation than at ground level. Exposure to cosmic radiation may increase cancer risk among pilots and cabin crew. The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has recommended that air crew should be classified as radiation workers. Quantification of cosmic radiation doses is necessary for assessment of potential health effects of such occupational exposure. For Finnair cabin crew (cabin attendants and stewards), flight history is not available for years prior to 1991 and therefore, other sources of information on number and type of flights have to be used. The lack of systematically recorded information is a problem for dose estimation for many other flight companies personnel as well. Several cosmic radiation dose estimations for cabin crew have been performed using different methods (e.g. 2-5), but they have suffered from various shortcomings. Retrospective exposure estimation is not possible with personal portable dosimeters. Methods that employ survey data for occupational dose assessment are prone to non-differential measurement error i.e. the cabin attendants do not remember correctly the number of past flights. Assessment procedures that utilize surrogate measurement methods i.e. the duration of employment, lack precision. The aim of the present study was to develop an assessment method for individual occupational exposure to cosmic radiation based on flight time tables. Our method provides an assessment method that does not require survey data or systematic recording of flight history, and it is rather quick, inexpensive, and possible to carry out in all other flight companies whose past time tables for the past periods exist. Dose assessment methods that employ survey data are prone to random error i.e. the cabin attendants do not remember correctly the number or types of routes that they have flown during the past. Our method avoids this since survey data are not needed

  19. Cosmic radiation exposure at aircraft crew workplaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latocha, M.; Beck, P.; Rollet, S. [ARC Seibersdorf Research, Seibersdorf (Austria); Latocha, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    E.U.R.A.D.O.S. working group W.G.5. on air crew dosimetry coordinated research of some 24 international institutes to exchange experimental data and results of calculations of the radiation exposure in aircraft altitudes due to cosmic radiation. The purpose was to provide a data-set for all European Union Member States for the assessment of individual doses, the validity of different approaches, and to provide an input to technical recommendations by the Article 31 group of experts and the European Commission. The results of this work have been recently published and are available for the international community. The radiation protection quantity of interest is effective dose, E (ISO), but the comparison of measurement results and the results of calculations, is done in terms of the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent, H{sup *}(10). This paper gives an overview of the E.U.R.A.D.O.S. Aircraft Crew In-Flight Database which was implemented under the responsibility of A.R.C. Seibersdorf research. It discusses calculation models for air crew dose assessment comparing them with measurements contained in this database. Further it presents current developments using updated information of galactic cosmic radiation proton spectra and new results of the recently finalized European research project D.O.S.M.A.X. on dosimetry of aircraft crew at solar maximum. (authors)

  20. Anencephalus, drinking water, geomagnetism and cosmic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, V E

    1979-01-01

    The mortality rates from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in Canadian cities are shown to be strongly correlated with city growth rate and with horizontal geomagnetic flux, which is directly related to the intensity of cosmic radiation. They are also shown to have some association with the magnesium content of drinking water. Prior work with these data which showed associations with magnesium in drinking water, mean income, latitude and longitude was found to be inadequate because it dismissed the observed geographic associations as having little biological meaning, and because the important variables of geomagnetism and city growth rate were overlooked.

  1. Radiative Feedback Effects during Cosmic Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, David; Iliev, Ilian T.

    2016-10-01

    We present coupled radiation hydrodynamical simulations of the epoch of reionization, aimed at probing self-feedback on galactic scales. Unlike previous works, which assume a (quasi) homogeneous UV background, we self-consistently evolve both the radiation field and the gas to model the impact of previously unresolved processes such as spectral hardening and self-shielding. We find that the characteristic halo mass with a gas fraction half the cosmic mean, Mc (z), a quantity frequently used in semi-analytical models of galaxy formation, is significantly larger than previously assumed. While this results in an increased suppression of star formation in the early Universe, our results are consistent with the extrapolated stellar abundance matching models from Moster et al. 2013.

  2. Super-Heavy Dark Matter - Towards Predictive Scenarios from Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kannike, Kristjan; Raidal, Martti

    2016-01-01

    A generic prediction of the Coleman-Weinberg inflation is the existence of a heavy particle sector whose interactions with the inflaton, the lightest state in this sector, generate the inflaton potential at loop level. For typical interactions the heavy sector may contain stable states whose relic abundance is generated at the end of inflation by the gravity alone. This general feature, and the absence of any particle physics signal of dark matter so far, call for a paradigm shift in the dark sector physics. Accordingly, the dark matter is heavier than the inflaton, its existence follows from the inflaton dynamics, and its abundance today is naturally determined by the weakness of gravitational interaction. This implies that the super-heavy dark matter scenarios can be tested via the measurements of inflationary parameters and/or the CMB isocurvature perturbations and non-Gaussianities. We explicitly work out details of three Coleman-Weinberg inflation scenarios, study the systematics of super-heavy dark matt...

  3. Alpha radioactivity in heavy and super heavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P. [P G Department of Physics and Research Centre, Payyanur College, Payyanur 670 327 (India)], E-mail: drkpsanthosh@gmail.com; Sahadevan, Sabina; Biju, R.K. [P G Department of Physics and Research Centre, Payyanur College, Payyanur 670 327 (India)

    2009-07-01

    The alpha decay half lives and other characteristics of 190 even-even super heavy elements in the range 100{<=}Z{<=}120 has been determined within the Coulomb and Proximity Potential Model (CPPM). The computed Q values and log{sub 10}(T{sub 1/2}) values plotted against neutron number of parent nuclei were studied and it was found that neutron shell closures in the super heavy region occur at N=162 and N=184. The alpha decay half lives for parent nuclei with atomic number Z=106 onwards were compared with experimental data and are found to be in good agreement with each other. A semi-empirical formula for alpha decay half lives has been formulated by making least squares fit to the available experimental data. The new semi-empirical formula was used for calculating half lives of isotopes of nuclei in the chosen range 100{<=}Z{<=}120. These results when compared with the corresponding experimental half life values and the values calculated using GLDM and Viola-Seaborg systematics showed good agreement.

  4. Fission of super-heavy nuclei explored with Skyrme forces

    CERN Document Server

    Schindzielorz, N; Klüpfel, P; Reinhard, P -G; Hager, G

    2010-01-01

    We present a large scale survey of life-times for spontaneous fission in the regime of super-heavy elements (SHE), i.e. nuclei with Z=104-122. This is done on the basis of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model. The axially symmetric fission path is computed using a quadrupole constraint. Self-consistent cranking is used for the collective masses and associated quantum corrections. The actual tunneling probability is estimated by the WKB approximation. Three typical Skyrme forces are used to explore the sensitivity of the results. Benchmarks in the regime Z=104-108 show an acceptable agreement. The general systematics reflects nicely the islands of shell stabilization and the crossover from $\\alpha$-decay to fission for the decay chains from the region of Z/N=118/176.

  5. Remarks on the fission barriers of super-heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Physik, Frankfurt (Germany); Heinz, S.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J.; Muenzenberg, G.; Barth, W.; Dahl, L.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lang, R.; Lommel, B.; Runke, J.; Scheidenberger, C.; Tinschert, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Antalic, S. [Comenius University, Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Bratislava (Slovakia); Eberhardt, K.; Thoerle-Pospiech, P.; Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Grzywacz, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hamilton, J.H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nashville, TN (United States); Henderson, R.A.; Kenneally, J.M.; Moody, K.J.; Shaughnessy, D.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Miernik, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Miller, D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Morita, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Nishio, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Popeko, A.G.; Yeremin, A.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Roberto, J.B.; Rykaczewski, K.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Uusitalo, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2016-04-15

    Shell-correction energies of super-heavy nuclei are approximated by using Q{sub α} values of measured decay chains. Five decay chains were analyzed, which start at the isotopes {sup 285}Fl, {sup 294}118, {sup 291}Lv, {sup 292}Lv and {sup 293}Lv. The data are compared with predictions of macroscopic-microscopic models. Fission barriers are estimated that can be used to eliminate uncertainties in partial fission half-lives and in calculations of evaporation-residue cross-sections. In that calculations, fission probability of the compound nucleus is a major factor contributing to the total cross-section. The data also provide constraints on the cross-sections of capture and quasi-fission in the entrance channel of the fusion reaction. Arguments are presented that fusion reactions for synthesis of isotopes of elements 118 and 120 may have higher cross-sections than assumed so far. (orig.)

  6. Cosmic Radiation - An Aircraft Manufacturer's View

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, C

    1999-07-01

    The relevance and context of cosmic radiation to an aircraft maker Airbus Industrie are outlined. Some future developments in aircraft and air traffic are described, along with their possible consequences for exposure. (author)

  7. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: I. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using the explicit form of the functions to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies v 1≤ v≤ v 2 are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60-600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T=2.72548 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and σ, and the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the CMB radiation are obtained using the mean amplitude T amp=3.358 mK. It is shown that the Doppler shift leads to a renormalization of the radiation density constant a, the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, and the corresponding constants for the thermodynamic functions. The expressions for new astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant, and number density of CMB photons are obtained. The radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation for the monopole and dipole spectra at redshift z≈1089 are calculated.

  8. Design of a transition radiation detector for cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T.

    1975-01-01

    Transition radiation detectors consisting of sandwiches of plastic foam radiators and multiwire proportional chambers can be used to identify cosmic ray particles with energies gamma ? E/mc-squared is greater than 10 to the 3rd and to measure their energy in the region gamma is roughly equal to 10 to the 3rd

  9. Cosmic radiations; A la rencontre des rayons cosmiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-09-15

    Cosmic radiations were discovered one century ago, they were detected indirectly by their positive effect on the conductivity of the air through the ionization of atoms and molecules composing the air. The first measurement made on balloons showed that the ionization was increasing with altitude which discredited the idea that the radiations were coming from the earth itself. Other measurement campaigns showed that the cosmic radiations were very low at the equator which supported the idea that cosmic radiations were made up of charged particles that are deflected by the earth magnetic field. During the forties and the fifties the study of cosmic radiations led to the discovery of a broad range of particles: positrons, muons, pions, kaons and hyperons. The first observations on stratospheric balloons confirmed the origin of the showers of particles that had been detected with a series of ground detectors dispatched on a large area a few years before. These showers of particles are produced by primary cosmic rays mainly energetic protons colliding with nitrogen and oxygen atoms of the atmosphere. (A.C.)

  10. Water, air, Earth and cosmic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the origin of life, rocks are considered mainly for catalysis and adsorption-desorption processes. Here it is shown how some rocks evolve in energy and might induce synthesis of molecules of biological interest. Radioactive rocks are a source of thermal energy and water radiolysis producing molecular hydrogen, H2. Mafic and ultramafic rocks evolve in water and dissolved carbon dioxide releasing thermal energy and H2. Peridotites and basalts contain ferromagnesian minerals which transform through exothermic reactions with the generation of heat. These reactions might be triggered by any heating process such as radioactive decay, hydrothermal and subduction zones or post-shock of meteorite impacts. H2 might then be generated from endothermic hydrolyses of the ferromagnesian minerals olivine and pyroxene. In both cases of mafic and radioactive rocks, production of CO might occur through high temperature hydrogenation of CO2. CO, instead of CO2, was proven to be necessary in experiments synthesizing biological-type macromolecules with a gaseous mixture of CO, N2 and H2O. In the geological context, N2 is present in the environment, and the activation source might arise from cosmic radiation and/or radionuclides. Ferromagnesian and radioactive rocks might consequently be a starting point of an hydrothermal chemical evolution towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules. The two usually separate worlds of rocks and life are shown to be connected through molecular and thermodynamic chemical evolution. This concept has been proposed earlier by the author (Bassez J Phys: Condens Matter 15:L353-L361, 2003, 2008a, 2008b; Bassez Orig Life Evol Biosph 39(3-4):223-225, 2009; Bassez et al. 2011; Bassez et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 42(4):307-316, 2012, Bassez 2013) without thermodynamic details. This concept leads to signatures of prebiotic chemistry such as radionuclides and also iron and magnesium carbonates associated with serpentine and/or talc

  11. Water, Air, Earth and Cosmic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the origin of life, rocks are considered mainly for catalysis and adsorption-desorption processes. Here it is shown how some rocks evolve in energy and might induce synthesis of molecules of biological interest. Radioactive rocks are a source of thermal energy and water radiolysis producing molecular hydrogen, H2. Mafic and ultramafic rocks evolve in water and dissolved carbon dioxide releasing thermal energy and H2. Peridotites and basalts contain ferromagnesian minerals which transform through exothermic reactions with the generation of heat. These reactions might be triggered by any heating process such as radioactive decay, hydrothermal and subduction zones or post-shock of meteorite impacts. H2 might then be generated from endothermic hydrolyses of the ferromagnesian minerals olivine and pyroxene. In both cases of mafic and radioactive rocks, production of CO might occur through high temperature hydrogenation of CO2. CO, instead of CO2, was proven to be necessary in experiments synthesizing biological-type macromolecules with a gaseous mixture of CO, N2 and H2O. In the geological context, N2 is present in the environment, and the activation source might arise from cosmic radiation and/or radionuclides. Ferromagnesian and radioactive rocks might consequently be a starting point of an hydrothermal chemical evolution towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules. The two usually separate worlds of rocks and life are shown to be connected through molecular and thermodynamic chemical evolution. This concept has been proposed earlier by the author (Bassez J Phys: Condens Matter 15:L353-L361, 2003, 2008a, 2008b; Bassez Orig Life Evol Biosph 39(3-4):223-225, 2009; Bassez et al. 2011; Bassez et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 42(4):307-316, 2012, Bassez 2013) without thermodynamic details. This concept leads to signatures of prebiotic chemistry such as radionuclides and also iron and magnesium carbonates associated with serpentine and/or talc, which

  12. Galactic cosmic ray radiation levels in spacecraft on interplanetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, J. L.; Nealy, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Wood, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Langley Research Center Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) transport computer code (HZETRN) and the Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model, crew radiation levels inside manned spacecraft on interplanetary missions are estimated. These radiation-level estimates include particle fluxes, LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent within various organs of interest in GCR protection studies. Changes in these radiation levels resulting from the use of various different types of shield materials are presented.

  13. Cosmic Rays Induced Background Radiation on Board of Commercial Flights

    CERN Document Server

    Pinilla, S; Núñez, L A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the total integrated flux of cosmic radiation which a commercial aircraft is exposed to along specific flight trajectories. To study the radiation background during a flight and its modulation by effects such as altitude, latitude, exposure time and transient magnetospheric events, we perform simulations based on Magnetocosmics and CORSIKA codes, the former designed to calculate the geomagnetic effects on cosmic rays propagation and the latter allows us to simulate the development of extended air showers in the atmosphere. In this first work, by considering the total flux of cosmic rays from 5 GeV to 1 PeV, we obtained the expected integrated flux of secondary particles on board of a commercial airplane during the Bogot\\'a-Buenos Aires trip by point-to-point numerical integration.

  14. Gravitational Collapse of Radiating Dyon Solution and Cosmic Censorship Hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.D.Patil; S.S.Zade; A.N.Mohod

    2008-01-01

    @@ We investigate the possibifity of cosmic censorship violation in the gravitational collapse of radiating dyon solution.It is shown that the final outcome of the collapse depends sensitively on the electric and magnetic charge parameters.The graphs of the outer apparent horizon,inner Cauchy horizon for different values of parameters are drawn.

  15. Cosmic Radiation Fields: Sources in the early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Martin; Kneiske, Tanja; Horns, Dieter; Elsaesser, Dominik; Hauschildt, Peter

    The workshop "Cosmic Radiation Fields - Sources in the Early Universe" (CRF 2010) focuses on the connection between the extragalactic infrared background and sources in the early universe, in particular stars powered by dark matter burning (Dark Stars; DS). The workshop covers the following topics: the cosmic infrared background, formation of early stars, dark stars, effect of dark matter in the early universe, dark matter halos, primordial star formation rate, and reionization. Further information can be found on the conference webpage: http://www.desy.de/crf2010/. Organizing committee: Tanja Kneiske, Martin Raue, Dominik Elsaesser, Alexander Gewering-Peine, Peter Hausschildt, Dieter Horns, and Andreas Maurer.

  16. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, K.

    2013-03-15

    Cosmic radiation dose rates are considerably higher at cruising altitudes of airplanes than at ground level. Previous studies have found increased risk of certain cancers among aircraft cabin crew, but the results are not consistent across different studies. Despite individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment is important for evaluating the relation between cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk, only few previous studies have tried to develop an exposure assessment method. The evidence for adverse health effects in aircrews due to ionizing radiation is inconclusive because quantitative dose estimates have not been used. No information on possible confounders has been collected. For an occupational group with an increased risk of certain cancers it is very important to assess if the risk is related to occupational exposure. The goal of this thesis was to develop two separate retrospective exposure assessment methods for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. The methods included the assessment based on survey on flight histories and based on company flight timetables. Another goal was to describe the cancer incidence among aircraft cabin crew with a large cohort in four Nordic countries, i.e., Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Also the contribution of occupational as well as non-occupational factors to breast and skin cancer risk among the cabin crew was studied with case-control studies. Using the survey method of cosmic radiation exposure assessment, the median annual radiation dose of Finnish airline cabin crew was 0.6 milliSievert (mSv) in the 1960s, 3.3 mSv in the 1970s, and 3.6 mSv in the 1980s. With the flight timetable method, the annual radiation dose increased with time being 0.7 mSv in the 1960 and 2.1 mSv in the 1995. With the survey method, the median career dose was 27.9 mSv and with the timetable method 20.8 mSv. These methods provide improved means for individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment compared to studies where cruder

  17. A relationship between galactic cosmic radiation and tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengel, Sigrid; Aeby, Dominik; Grace, John

    2009-11-01

    Here, we investigated the interannual variation in the growth rings formed by Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) trees in northern Britain (55 degrees N, 3 degrees W) over the period 1961-2005 in an attempt to disentangle the influence of atmospheric variables acting at different times of year. Annual growth rings, measured along the north radius of freshly cut (frozen) tree discs and climatological data recorded at an adjacent site were used in the study. Correlations were based on Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients between the annual growth anomaly and these climatic and atmospheric factors. Rather weak correlations between these variables and growth were found. However, there was a consistent and statistically significant relationship between growth of the trees and the flux density of galactic cosmic radiation. Moreover, there was an underlying periodicity in growth, with four minima since 1961, resembling the period cycle of galactic cosmic radiation. * We discuss the hypotheses that might explain this correlation: the tendency of galactic cosmic radiation to produce cloud condensation nuclei, which in turn increases the diffuse component of solar radiation, and thus increases the photosynthesis of the forest canopy.

  18. Testing inflation with the cosmic background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R

    1994-01-01

    In inflation cosmologies, cosmic structure develops through the gravitational instability of the inevitable quantum noise in primordial scalar fields. I show how the acceleration of the universe defines the shape of the primordial spectrum of gravitational metric and scalar field fluctuations. I assess how we can determine the shape and overall amplitude over the five decades or so of spatial wavelengths we can probe, and use current data ... to show how far we are in this program. Broad-band power amplitudes are given for CMB anisotropy detections up to spring 1994 ... I show that COBE band-powers found with full Bayesian analysis of the 53,90,31 a+b GHz first year DMR (and FIRS) maps are in good agreement, and are essentially independent of spectral slope and degree of (sharp) signal-to-noise filtering. Further, after (smooth) optimal signal-to-noise filtering (\\ie Weiner-filtering), the different DMR maps reveal the same large scale features and correlation functions with little dependence upon slope. Howe...

  19. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Meier Matthias M.; Trompier François; Ambrozova Iva; Kubancak Jan; Matthiä Daniel; Ploc Ondrej; Santen Nicole; Wirtz Michael

    2016-01-01

    Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors) campaign ...

  20. Effects of microgravity and cosmic radiations on human T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pippia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In space living organisms, including cells, are affected by two new environmental conditions: microgravity and cosmic radiations. Several experiments in dedicated space missions and in simulated microgravity have shown that low gravity causes a dramatic depression of the mitogenic in vitro activation of T lymphocytes. The goal of this reserch was to determine in space (on board the International Space Station the ability of adherent monocytes to migrate, as well as to interact with T-cells. A reduced motility of the J-111 cells and changes in the structures of actin, tubulin and vinculin were observed. Moreover, we demonstrated that LFA-I/ICAM-I interactions occur in space and are dependent on activation time but show differences in number, arrangement and fluorescence intensity, depending on time and experimental conditions. In order to evaluate the effects of cosmic radiations on the gene expression in human T lymphocytes we exposed these cells to high quote cosmic radiation during two stratospheric balloon trans-mediterranean flights (BIRBA missions. The gene expression was analized by cDNA microarray hybridization technology. Activated T cells react to the ionizing stress by activating genes involved in cell cycle check-point, oxidative stress response, heat shock proteins production or by repressing denes involved in antigen recognition.

  1. Survival and compound nucleus probability of super heavy element Z = 117

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjunatha, H.C. [Government College for Women, Department of Physics, Kolar, Karnataka (India); Sridhar, K.N. [Government First grade College, Department of Physics, Kolar, Karnataka (India)

    2017-05-15

    As a part of a systematic study for predicting the most suitable projectile-target combinations for heavy-ion fusion experiments in the synthesis of {sup 289-297}Ts, we have calculated the transmission probability (T{sub l}), compound nucleus formation probabilities (P{sub CN}) and survival probability (P{sub sur}) of possible projectile-target combinations. We have also studied the fusion cross section, survival cross section and fission cross sections for different projectile-target combination of {sup 289-297}Ts. These theoretical parameters are required before the synthesis of the super heavy element. The calculated probabilities and cross sections show that the production of isotopes of the super heavy element with Z = 117 is strongly dependent on the reaction systems. The most probable reactions to synthetize the super heavy nuclei {sup 289-297}Ts are worked out and listed explicitly. We have also studied the variation of P{sub CN} and P{sub sur} with the mass number of projectile and target nuclei. This work is useful in the synthesis of the super heavy element Z = 117. (orig.)

  2. Radiative feedback and cosmic molecular gas: numerical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Margarita; Maio, Umberto

    2012-06-01

    We present the results from self-consistent numerical simulations of cosmic structure formation with a multifrequency radiative transfer scheme and non-equilibrium molecular chemistry of 13 primordial species (e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, H2, H?, D, D+, HD and HeH+), performed using the simulation code GADGET. We describe our implementation and we show tests for ionized sphere expansion in a static and dynamic density field around a central radiative source, and for cosmological abundance evolution coupled with the cosmic microwave background radiation. As a demonstrative application of radiative feedback on molecular gas, we also run cosmological simulations of early structure formation in a ˜1-Mpc sized box. Our tests agree well with analytical and numerical expectations. Consistent with other works, we find that ionization fronts from central sources can boost H2 fractions in shock-compressed gas. The tight dependence on H2 also leads to a corresponding boost of HD fractions. We see a strong lowering of the typical molecular abundances up to several orders of magnitude, which partially hinders further gas collapse of pristine neutral gas. This clearly suggests the need for reionized gas or metal cooling in the formation of the following generation of structures.

  3. Cosmic Radiation – A Legal and Medical Issue in Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Tomić-Petrović

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Research into the effects of different effects of radiation on human health has only recently been brought to light while the events in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have revived the interest in the research into the effects of ionizing radiation on organisms. The man has to live with radiation regardless of the risk. Protection efficiency is related with proper understanding of dangers coming from radiation and radiological contamination and protection methods. Knowledge in radiation protection is an important tool in the battle for survival on our planet. Our public today still seems insufficiently informed when it comes to hazards brought about by natural sources of radiation. Based on the published results it seems that the cosmic radiation hazard to passengers in contemporary air transport is nonexistent. Nevertheless, for some air crew categories (frequent intercontinental flights it is possible that annual absorbed doses are quite close to the doses absorbed by workers handling radiation sources, even the possibility of exceeding the prescribed levels is not inconceivable.

  4. Self-organization of cosmic radiation pressure instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1991-01-01

    Under some circumstances the absorption of radiation momentum by an absorbing medium opens the possibility of a dynamical instability, sometimes called 'mock gravity'. Here, a simplified abstract model is studied in which the radiation source is assumed to remain spatially uniform, there is no reabsorption or reradiated light, and no forces other than radiative pressure act on the absorbing medium. It is shown that this model displays the unique feature of being not only unstable, but also self-organizing. The structure approaches a statistical dynamical steady state which is almost independent of initial conditions. In this saturated state the absorbers are concentrated in thin walls around empty bubbles; as the instability develops the big bubbles get bigger and the small ones get crushed and disappear. A linear analysis shows that to first order the thin walls are indeed stable structures. It is speculated that this instability may play a role in forming cosmic large-scale structure.

  5. Hazards of cosmic radiation; Radiation cosmique: danger dans l'espace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J.M.; Dzitko, H

    2000-06-01

    The main limitations on long-distance space transport is neither the energy source nor the propulsion system but appears to be the protection of cosmonauts from radiation. Cosmic radiation is made up of protons (87%), alpha particles (12%) and heavy nuclei (1%), all these particles travel through interstellar space and come from the explosion of stars at the end of their life. The earth is protected from cosmic radiation by 3 natural shields: (i) the magnetic field generated by the solar wind, (ii) the earth magnetic field (magnetosphere), and (iii) the earth atmosphere, this elusive layer of air is equivalent to a 10 meter-high volume of water. Magnetosphere and atmosphere reduce the radiation dose by a factor 4000. According to a European directive (1996) air crews must be considered as radiation workers. (A.C.)

  6. Computation of cosmic radiation spectra and application to aircrew dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Song Jae

    2002-02-15

    Using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code FLUKA- 99, secondary cosmic radiation energy spectra and intensities of neutrons, protons, photons, electrons, and muons were calculated for different geographical latitude and longitude at the commercial jet's altitudes ranging from 27000 ft to 41000 ft. The Badhwar's proton model was used to construct the primary cosmic radiation spectrum and effect of the vertical cutoff rigidity was considered after spectra similar to those given in literature were resulted. By applying the effective dose conversion factors, a calculation tool for aircrew doses was developed. According to the resulting dose rate distribution, effective dose rate over North pole region is around three times of that over equator region due to the geomagnetical shielding effect. Illustrative assessments of aircrew doses were made for four distinctive routes of Korean airliners : Seoul - New York (USA), London (UK), Sydney (Australia) and Mumbai(India). The effective doses to aircrew incurred from a round trip were 0.047, 0.055, 0.018, and 0.018{mu}Sv, respectively. If aircrew work 500 hour s a year at the cruise altitude of a international airline, the individual dose would reach 2 mSv which is about the same size as the average annual dose of workers at a nuclear power plant.

  7. THE MYSTERY OF THE COSMIC DIFFUSE ULTRAVIOLET BACKGROUND RADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Richard Conn [Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Murthy, Jayant [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru (India); Overduin, James; Tyler, Joshua, E-mail: henry@jhu.edu, E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com, E-mail: joverduin@towson.edu, E-mail: 97tyler@cardinalmail.cua.edu [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1300-1700 Å) is deduced to originate only partially in the dust-scattered radiation of FUV-emitting stars: the source of a substantial fraction of the FUV background radiation remains a mystery. The radiation is remarkably uniform at both far northern and far southern Galactic latitudes and increases toward lower Galactic latitudes at all Galactic longitudes. We examine speculation that this might be due to interaction of the dark matter with the nuclei of the interstellar medium, but we are unable to point to a plausible mechanism for an effective interaction. We also explore the possibility that we are seeing radiation from bright FUV-emitting stars scattering from a ''second population'' of interstellar grains—grains that are small compared with FUV wavelengths. Such grains are known to exist, and they scatter with very high albedo, with an isotropic scattering pattern. However, comparison with the observed distribution (deduced from their 100 μm emission) of grains at high Galactic latitudes shows no correlation between the grains' location and the observed FUV emission. Our modeling of the FUV scattering by small grains also shows that there must be remarkably few such ''smaller'' grains at high Galactic latitudes, both north and south; this likely means simply that there is very little interstellar dust of any kind at the Galactic poles, in agreement with Perry and Johnston. We also review our limited knowledge of the cosmic diffuse background at ultraviolet wavelengths shortward of Lyα—it could be that our ''second component'' of the diffuse FUV background persists shortward of the Lyman limit and is the cause of the reionization of the universe.

  8. Probable projectile-target combinations for the synthesis of super heavy nucleus $^{286}$112

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P

    2014-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for the reactions of all the projectile-target combinations found in the cold valleys of $^{286}$112 have been studied using scattering potential as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential, so as to predict the most probable projectile-target combinations in heavy ion fusion reactions for the synthesis of super heavy nucleus $^{286}$112. While considering the nature of potential pockets and half lives of the colliding nuclei, the systems $^{82}$Ge + $^{204}$Hg, $^{80}$Ge + $^{206}$Hg and $^{78}$Zn + $^{208}$Pb found in the deep cold valley region and the systems $^{48}$Ca+$^{238}$U, $^{38}$S+$^{248}$Cm and $^{44}$Ar+$^{242}$Pu in the cold valleys are predicted to be the better optimal projectile-target combinations for the synthesis of super heavy nucleus $^{286}$112.

  9. A novel approach to the island of stability of super-heavy elements search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieloch A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that the cross section for super-heavy nuclei production of Z > 118 is dropping into the region of tens of femto barns. This creates a serious limitation for the complete fusion technique that is used so far. Moreover, the available combinations of the neutron to proton ratio of stable projectiles and targets are quite limited and it can be difficult to reach the island of stability of super heavy elements using complete fusion reactions with stable projectiles. In this context, a new experimental investigation of mechanisms other than complete fusion of heavy nuclei and a novel experimental technique are invented for our search of super- and hyper-nuclei. This contribution is focused on that technique.

  10. Probable Projectile-Target Combinations for the Synthesis of Super Heavy Nucleus 286112

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Santhosh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The fusion cross sections for the reactions of all the projectile-target combinations found in the cold valleys of 286112 have been studied using scattering potential as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential, so as to predict the most probable projectile-target combinations in heavy ion fusion reactions for the synthesis of super heavy nucleus 286112. While considering the nature of potential pockets and half lives of the colliding nuclei, the systems 82Ge + 204Hg, 80Ge + 206Hg and 78Zn + 208Pb found in the deep cold valley region and the systems 48Ca+238U, 38S+248Cm and 44Ar+242Pu in the cold valleys are predicted to be the better optimal projectile-target combinations for the synthesis of super heavy nucleus 286112.

  11. From heavy nuclei to super-heavy nuclei; Des noyaux lourds aux super-lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, Ch

    2003-01-01

    The existence of super-heavy nuclei has been predicted nearly fifty years ago. Due to the strong coulomb repulsion, the stabilisation of these nuclei is possible only through shell effects. The reasons for this fragile stability, as well as the theoretical predictions concerning the position of the island of stability are presented in the first part of this lecture. In the second part, experiments and experimental techniques which have been used to synthesize or search for super-heavy elements are described. Spectroscopic studies performed in very heavy elements are presented in the following section. We close this lecture with techniques that are currently being developed in order to reach the superheavy island and to study the structure of very-heavy nuclei. (author)

  12. Super-heavy dark matter – Towards predictive scenarios from inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannike, Kristjan [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Racioppi, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.racioppi@kbfi.ee [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Raidal, Martti [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2017-05-15

    A generic prediction of the Coleman–Weinberg inflation is the existence of a heavy particle sector whose interactions with the inflaton, the lightest state in this sector, generate the inflaton potential at loop level. For typical interactions the heavy sector may contain stable states whose relic abundance is generated at the end of inflation by the gravity alone. This general feature, and the absence of any particle physics signal of dark matter so far, motivates us to look for new directions in the dark sector physics, including scenarios in which dark matter is super-heavy. In this article we study the possibility that the dark matter is even heavier than the inflaton, its existence follows from the inflaton dynamics, and its abundance today is naturally determined by the weakness of gravitational interaction. This implies that the super-heavy dark matter scenarios can be tested via the measurements of inflationary parameters and/or the CMB isocurvature perturbations and non-Gaussianities. We explicitly work out details of three Coleman–Weinberg inflation scenarios, study the systematics of super-heavy dark matter production in those cases, and compute which parts of the parameter spaces can be probed by the future CMB measurements.

  13. Analysis of spatial autocorrelation patterns of heavy and super-heavy rainfall in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousta, Iman; Doostkamian, Mehdi; Haghighi, Esmaeil; Ghafarian Malamiri, Hamid Reza; Yarahmadi, Parvane

    2017-09-01

    Rainfall is a highly variable climatic element, and rainfall-related changes occur in spatial and temporal dimensions within a regional climate. The purpose of this study is to investigate the spatial autocorrelation changes of Iran's heavy and super-heavy rainfall over the past 40 years. For this purpose, the daily rainfall data of 664 meteorological stations between 1971 and 2011 are used. To analyze the changes in rainfall within a decade, geostatistical techniques like spatial autocorrelation analysis of hot spots, based on the Getis-Ord G i statistic, are employed. Furthermore, programming features in MATLAB, Surfer, and GIS are used. The results indicate that the Caspian coast, the northwest and west of the western foothills of the Zagros Mountains of Iran, the inner regions of Iran, and southern parts of Southeast and Northeast Iran, have the highest likelihood of heavy and super-heavy rainfall. The spatial pattern of heavy rainfall shows that, despite its oscillation in different periods, the maximum positive spatial autocorrelation pattern of heavy rainfall includes areas of the west, northwest and west coast of the Caspian Sea. On the other hand, a negative spatial autocorrelation pattern of heavy rainfall is observed in central Iran and parts of the east, particularly in Zabul. Finally, it is found that patterns of super-heavy rainfall are similar to those of heavy rainfall.

  14. Lyman α radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical impact of Lyman α (Lyα) radiation pressure on galaxy formation depends on the rate and duration of momentum transfer between Lyα photons and neutral hydrogen gas. Although photon trapping has the potential to multiply the effective force, ionizing radiation from stellar sources may relieve the Lyα pressure before appreciably affecting the kinematics of the host galaxy or efficiently coupling Lyα photons to the outflow. We present self-consistent Lyα radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of high-z galaxy environments by coupling the Cosmic Lyα Transfer code (COLT) with spherically symmetric Lagrangian frame hydrodynamics. The accurate but computationally expensive Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations are feasible under the one-dimensional approximation. The initial starburst drives an expanding shell of gas from the centre and in certain cases, Lyα feedback significantly enhances the shell velocity. Radiative feedback alone is capable of ejecting baryons into the intergalactic medium (IGM) for protogalaxies with a virial mass of Mvir ≲ 108 M⊙. We compare the Lyα signatures of Population III stars with 105 K blackbody emission to that of direct collapse black holes with a non-thermal Compton-thick spectrum and find substantial differences if the Lyα spectra are shaped by gas pushed by Lyα radiation-driven winds. For both sources, the flux emerging from the galaxy is reprocessed by the IGM such that the observed Lyα luminosity is reduced significantly and the time-averaged velocity offset of the Lyα peak is shifted redward.

  15. Alteration of Organic Compounds in Small Bodies and Cosmic Dusts by Cosmic Rays and Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Kaneko, Takeo; Mita, Hajime; Obayashi, Yumiko; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Sarker, Palash K.; Kawamoto, Yukinori; Okabe, Takuto; Eto, Midori; Kanda, Kazuhiro

    2012-07-01

    A wide variety of complex organic compounds have been detected in extraterrestrial bodies like carbonaceous chondrites and comets, and their roles in the generation of terrestrial life are discussed. It was suggested that organics in small bodies were originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts in dense cloud. Irradiation of frozen mixture of possible interstellar molecules including CO (or CH _{3}OH), NH _{3} and H _{2}O with high-energy particles gave complex amino acid precursors with high molecular weights [1]. Such complex organic molecules were taken in planetesimals or comets in the early solar system. In prior to the generation of the terrestrial life, extraterrestrial organics were delivered to the primitive Earth by such small bodies as meteorites, comets and space dusts. These organics would have been altered by cosmic rays and solar radiation (UV, X-rays) before the delivery to the Earth. We examined possible alteration of amino acids, their precursors and nucleic acid bases in interplanetary space by irradiation with high energy photons and heavy ions. A mixture of CO, NH _{3} and H _{2}O was irradiated with high-energy protons from a van de Graaff accelerator (TIT, Japan). The resulting products (hereafter referred to as CAW) are complex precursors of amino acids. CAW, amino acids (dl-Isovaline, glycine), hydantoins (amino acid precursors) and nucleic acid bases were irradiated with continuous emission (soft X-rays to IR; hereafter referred to as soft X-rays irradiation) from BL-6 of NewSUBARU synchrotron radiation facility (Univ. Hyogo). They were also irradiated with heavy ions (eg., 290 MeV/u C ^{6+}) from HIMAC accelerator (NIRS, Japan). After soft X-rays irradiation, water insoluble materials were formed. After irradiation with soft X-rays or heavy ions, amino acid precursors (CAW and hydantoins) gave higher ratio of amino acids were recovered after hydrolysis than free amino acids. Nucleic acid bases showed higher stability than free

  16. Galactic cosmic ray induced radiation dose on terrestrial exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias

    2013-01-01

    This past decade has seen tremendous advancements in the study of extrasolar planets. Observations are now made with increasing sophistication from both ground and space based instruments, and exoplanets are characterized with increasing precision. There is a class of particularly interesting exoplanets, falling in the habitable zone, which is defined as the area around a star where the planet is capable of supporting liquid water on its surface. Theoretical calculations also suggest that close-in exoplanets are more likely to have weaker planetary magnetic fields, especially in case of super earths. Such exoplanets are subjected to a high flux of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) due to their weak magnetic moments. GCRs are energetic particles of astrophysical origin, which strike the planetary atmosphere and produce secondary particles, including muons, which are highly penetrating. Some of these particles reach the planetary surface and contribute to the radiation dose. Along with the magnetic field, another fac...

  17. Far Infrared Spectrometry of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    I describe two experiments to measure the cosmic background radiation near 1 mm wavelength. The first was a ground-based search for spectral lines, made with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and an InSb detector. The second is a measurement of the spectrum from 3 to 18 cm{sup -1}, made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer. It is a polarizing Michelson interferometer, cooled in liquid helium, and operated with a germanium bolometer. I give the theory of operation, construction details, and experimental results. The first experiment was successfully completed but the second suffered equipment malfunction on its first flight. I describe the theory of Fourier transformations and give a new understanding of convolutional phase correction computations. I discuss for infrared bolometer calibration procedures, and tabulate test results on nine detectors. I describe methods of improving bolometer sensitivity with immersion optics and with conductive film blackening.

  18. Comparative Measurements of Cosmic Radiation Monitors for Aircrew Exposure Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getley, I. L.; Bennett, L. G. I.; Boudreau, M. L.; Lewis, B. J.; Green, A. R.; Butler, A.; Takada, M.; Nakamura, T.

    Various commercially available electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) have recently been flown on numerous scheduled airline flights in order to determine their viability as small, convenient monitors to measure cosmic radiation at altitude. Often, frequent flyers or airline crew will acquire such dosimeters and report the readings from their flights, without due regard for the mixed radiation field at altitude, which is different from the intended fields on land. A sampling of EPDs has been compared to two types of spectrometers, which measure the total radiation spectrum. The "HAWK" tissue equivalent proportional counter is considered a reference instrument and measures the total dose equivalent H*(10). The Liulin-4N and 4SN linear energy transfer spectrometers each have a silicon semiconductor-based PIN diode detector which provides an absorbed dose, D, but have been further developed to provide H*(10). A Thermo Electron FH41B and B-10, and EPD-N2, and several personal dosimeters (Fuji NRY-21 and NRF-20, and RADOS DIS-100) were also flown.

  19. Thick Galactic Cosmic Radiation Shielding Using Atmospheric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stanley O.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    NASA is concerned with protecting astronauts from the effects of galactic cosmic radiation and has expended substantial effort in the development of computer models to predict the shielding obtained from various materials. However, these models were only developed for shields up to about 120 g!cm2 in thickness and have predicted that shields of this thickness are insufficient to provide adequate protection for extended deep space flights. Consequently, effort is underway to extend the range of these models to thicker shields and experimental data is required to help confirm the resulting code. In this paper empirically obtained effective dose measurements from aircraft flights in the atmosphere are used to obtain the radiation shielding function of the earth's atmosphere, a very thick shield. Obtaining this result required solving an inverse problem and the method for solving it is presented. The results are shown to be in agreement with current code in the ranges where they overlap. These results are then checked and used to predict the radiation dosage under thick shields such as planetary regolith and the atmosphere of Venus.

  20. Comparative Measurements of Cosmic Radiation Monitors for Aircrew Exposure Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getley, I. L.; Bennett, L. G. I.; Boudreau, M. L.; Lewis, B. J.; Green, A. R.; Butler, A.; Takada, M.; Nakamura, T.

    Various commercially available electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) have recently been flown on numerous scheduled airline flights in order to determine their viability as small, convenient monitors to measure cosmic radiation at altitude. Often, frequent flyers or airline crew will acquire such dosimeters and report the readings from their flights, without due regard for the mixed radiation field at altitude, which is different from the intended fields on land. A sampling of EPDs has been compared to two types of spectrometers, which measure the total radiation spectrum. The “HAWK” tissue equivalent proportional counter is considered a reference instrument and measures the total dose equivalent H * (10). The Liulin-4N and 4SN linear energy transfer spectrometers each have a silicon semiconductor-based PIN diode detector which provides an absorbed dose, D, but have been further developed to provide H * (10). A Thermo Electron FH41B and B-10, and EPD-N2, and several personal dosimeters (Fuji NRY-21 and NRF-20, and RADOS DIS-100) were also flown.

  1. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Muller, R. A.; Smoot, G. F.; Tyson, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A 33-GHz airborne radiometer system has been developed to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 deg apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of plus or minus 1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 deg, reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, Calif.

  2. Galactic cosmic ray-induced radiation dose on terrestrial exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atri, Dimitra; Hariharan, B; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias

    2013-10-01

    This past decade has seen tremendous advancements in the study of extrasolar planets. Observations are now made with increasing sophistication from both ground- and space-based instruments, and exoplanets are characterized with increasing precision. There is a class of particularly interesting exoplanets that reside in the habitable zone, which is defined as the area around a star where the planet is capable of supporting liquid water on its surface. Planetary systems around M dwarfs are considered to be prime candidates to search for life beyond the Solar System. Such planets are likely to be tidally locked and have close-in habitable zones. Theoretical calculations also suggest that close-in exoplanets are more likely to have weaker planetary magnetic fields, especially in the case of super-Earths. Such exoplanets are subjected to a high flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) due to their weak magnetic moments. GCRs are energetic particles of astrophysical origin that strike the planetary atmosphere and produce secondary particles, including muons, which are highly penetrating. Some of these particles reach the planetary surface and contribute to the radiation dose. Along with the magnetic field, another factor governing the radiation dose is the depth of the planetary atmosphere. The higher the depth of the planetary atmosphere, the lower the flux of secondary particles will be on the surface. If the secondary particles are energetic enough, and their flux is sufficiently high, the radiation from muons can also impact the subsurface regions, such as in the case of Mars. If the radiation dose is too high, the chances of sustaining a long-term biosphere on the planet are very low. We have examined the dependence of the GCR-induced radiation dose on the strength of the planetary magnetic field and its atmospheric depth, and found that the latter is the decisive factor for the protection of a planetary biosphere.

  3. Biotropic Effect of Radiation Conditions on Orbital Cosmic Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsetlin, Vladimir; Ushakov, Igor; Gurieva, Tamar; Moisa, Svetlana; Zotin, Alexei; Lobanov, Alexei

    On the orbit of pilot orbital stations the crews undergo to low doses of chronic irradiation of cosmic radiation. The studying of radiobiological effects in different living systems were carried out in the ship’s side (OC “MIR” and ICS) and model surface experiments (power dose 200 mGy/day, density of neutron flow 30 particles/sm2 sec). It was shown that ionized radiation effects on embryonal development of Japanese quail embryo, inducing morphological disturbances in 12% of embryos. Many years ontogenesis (more 15 years of life in OC “MIR”) of microbial association evoked replacement of dominant types of micromycetes and bacterium and increasing of colony-formed units (CFU) in four orders. In laboratory low doses of γ-radiation induced the increasing of flight strain biomass of Aspergillus niger that corresponds to a radiation hormezis and also the increasing of radio-sensitivity. Moreover, under γ-neutron radiation were marked some deviations in morphology of supporting cell and numerous head falls of Aspergillus niger. The irradiation of Protozoa by low doses led to that spontaneous motion activity of spirostoms (Spirostomum ambiguum Ehbg.) accommodated in water processing by mixed γ-neutron radiation decreased twice that testified the fact that the definite factor of γ-neutron radiation effect is the changing of water medium state. In dry seeds of the highest plants wetting in water of preliminary low doses α-and γ-irradiation field in 100-300 times lower than geomagnetic one) the germination of seeds was higher approximately twice under γ-radiation. Low doses of γ-radiation decreased and α-radiation increased a negative influence of hypo-magnetic field on these processes. It was shown that hypomagnetic field occurred, in general, beneficial effect on the development of Planorbarius corneus: the portion of teratogenic effect is decreased, embryos initially occurred in hypomagnetic conditions were characterized by lowering mortality. Mobility

  4. High Precision Cosmology with the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhang, Marzieh

    In this thesis we investigate the two cosmic epochs of inflation and recombination, through their imprints on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. To probe the early universe we develop a map-based maximum-likelihood estimator to measure the amplitude of inflation-induced gravity waves, parametrized by r, from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps. Being optimal by construction, the estimator avoids E-B mixing, a possible source of contamination in the tiny B-mode detection, the target of many current and near future CMB experiments. We explore the leakage from the E- to the B-mode of polarization by using this estimator to study the linear response of the B-mode signal at different scales to variations in the E- mode power. Similarly, for various observational cases, we probe the dependence of r measurement on the signal from different scales of E and B polarization. The estimator is used to make forecasts for Spider-like and Planck-like experimental specifications and to investigate the sky-coverage optimization of the Spider-like case. We compare the forecast errors on r to the results from a similar multipole-based estimator which, by ignoring the mode-mixing, sets a lower limit on the achievable error on r. We find that an experiment with Spider-like specifications with fsky ˜ 0:02--0:2 could place a 2sigma r ≈ 0:014 bound (˜ 95% CL), which rises to 0:02 with an ℓ-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. For the Planck-like survey, a Galaxy-masked ( fsky = 0:75) sky would give 2sigmar ≈ 0:015, rising to ≈ 0:05 with the foreground residuals. We also use a novel information-based framework to compare how different generations of CMB experiments reveal information about the early universe, through their measurements of r. We also probe the epoch of recombination by investigating possible fluctuations in the free electron fraction Xe

  5. Constraining the cosmic radiation density due to lepton number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, Gianpiero [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Napoli Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Miele, Gennaro [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Napoli Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli Federico II Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Pastor, Sergio [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de València), Ed. Institutos de Investigación, Apdo. correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Pisanti, Ofelia [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Napoli Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli Federico II Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sarikas, Srdjan [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli Federico II Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) Föhringer Ring 6, 80802 München (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The cosmic energy density in the form of radiation before and during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is typically parameterized in terms of the effective number of neutrinos N{sub eff}, and it is a key parameters in cosmological models slightly more general than the successful minimal ΛCDM scenario. This quantity, in case of no extra degrees of freedom, depends upon the chemical potential and the temperature characterizing the three active neutrino distributions, as well as by their possible non-thermal features. We summarize here the results of a recent analysis to determine the BBN bound on N{sub eff} from primordial neutrino–antineutrino asymmetries, with a careful treatment of the dynamics of neutrino oscillations, and considering quite a wide range for the total lepton number in the neutrino sector, η{sub ν}=η{sub ν{sub e}}+η{sub ν{sub μ}}+η{sub ν{sub τ}} and the initial electron neutrino asymmetry η{sub ν{sub e}{sup in}}. Comparing these results with the forthcoming measurement of N{sub eff} by the Planck satellite will give insight on the nature of the radiation content of the universe.

  6. Aircrew Exposure from Cosmic Radiation on Commercial Airline Routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.J.; McCall, M.J.; Green, A.R.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Pierre, M.; Schrewe, U.J.; O' Brien, K.; Felsberger, E

    2001-07-01

    As a result of the recent recommendations of the ICRP 60, and in anticipation of possible regulation on occupational exposure of Canadian-based aircrew, an extensive study was carried out by the Royal Military College of Canada over a one-year period to measure the cosmic radiation at commercial jet altitudes. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter was used to measure the ambient total dose equivalent rate on 62 flight routes, resulting in over 20,000 data points at one-minute intervals at various altitudes and geomagnetic latitudes (i.e. which span the full cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field). These data were then compared to similar experimental work at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, using a different suite of equipment, to measure separately the low and high linear energy transfer components of the mixed radiation field, and to predictions with the LUIN transport code. All experimental and theoretical results were in excellent agreement. From these data, a semi-empirical model was developed to allow for the interpolation of the dose rate for any global position, altitude and date (i.e. heliocentric potential). Through integration of the dose rate function over a great circle flight path, a computer code was developed to provide an estimate of the total dose equivalent on any route worldwide at any period in the solar cycle. (author)

  7. Status of the low-energy super-heavy element facility at RIKEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schury, P., E-mail: schury@riken.jp [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Wada, M.; Ito, Y. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Arai, F. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); Kaji, D. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Kimura, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); Morimoto, K.; Haba, H. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Jeong, S. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Koura, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Miyatake, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Morita, K.; Reponen, M. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Ozawa, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); Sonoda, T.; Takamine, A. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Wollnik, H. [Dept. Chemistry and BioChemistry, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate nuclei produced via fusion–evaporation reactions, especially super-heavy elements (SHE), we have begun construction of a facility for conversion of fusion–evaporation residues (EVR) to low-energy beams. At the base of this facility is a small cryogenic gas cell utilizing a traveling wave RF-carpet, located directly following the gas-filled recoil ion separator GARIS-II, which will thermalize EVRs to convert them into ion beams amenable to ion trapping. We present here the results of initial studies of this small gas cell.

  8. Long lifetime components in the decay of excited super-heavy nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morjean M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For nuclear reactions in which super-heavy nuclei can be formed, the essential difference between the fusion process followed by fission and non-equilibrium processes leading to fission-like fragments is there action time. Quite probable non-equilibrium processes, characterized by very short reaction times, are highlighted thanks to mass-angle correlations. However, long lifetime components associated with fission following fusion have been observed with two independent experimental techniques, providing evidence for the formation of compound nuclei with Z = 120 and 124, followed by mass asymmetric fission.

  9. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedhelm Steinhilber; Jose A. Abreu; Jürg Beer; Irene Brunner; Marcus Christl; Hubertus Fischer; Ulla Heikkilä; Peter W. Kubik; Mathias Mann; Ken G. McCracken; Heinrich Miller; Hiroko Miyahara; Hans Oerter; Frank Wilhelms

    2012-01-01

    .... Cosmic-ray produced radionuclides, such as ¹⁰Be and ¹⁴C which are stored in polar ice cores and tree rings, offer the unique opportunity to reconstruct the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia...

  10. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  11. Comparison of codes assessing radiation exposure of aircraft crew due to galactic cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottollier-Depois, Jean-Francois [IRSN Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Beck, Peter; Latocha, Marcin [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, Vienna (Austria). Health and Environment Dept.; Mares, Vladimir; Ruehm, Werner [HMGU Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. of Radiation Protection; Matthiae, Daniel [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Koeln (Germany). Inst. of Aerospace Medicine; Wissmann, Frank [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The aim of this report is to compare the doses and dose rates calculated by various codes assessing radiation exposure of aircraft crew due to cosmic radiation. Some of the codes are used routinely for radiation protection purposes while others are purely for scientific use. The calculations were done using a set of representative, real flight routes around the globe. The results are presented in an anonymous way. This comparison is of major importance since a real determination of effective dose is not possible and, therefore, the different methods used to evaluate effective doses can be compared. Eleven codes have been used in this comparison exercise organised by EURADOS on harmonization of aircrew dosimetry practices in European countries. Some of these codes are based on simulations of the secondary field of cosmic radiation by Monte Carlo techniques; others use analytical solutions of the problem, while still others are mainly based on a fit to experimental data. The overall agreement between the codes, however, is better than 20 % from the median.

  12. Inside the Meteorite — Bacterial Spore Survival After Exposure to Galactic Cosmic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, R.; Berger, T.; Matthiä, D.; Okayasu, R.; Kato, T.; Kitamura, H.; Reitz, G.

    2010-04-01

    Based on their unique resistance to various space parameters, bacterial spores are one of the model systems used for astrobiological studies. In our research, we studied the response of Bacillus subtilis spores to the exposure of galactic cosmic radiation.

  13. Multilayer Polymeric Shielding to Protect Humans from Galactic Cosmic Radiation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Sub-topic X4.01, NASA has identified a need for advanced radiation-shielding materials and structures to protect humans from the hazards of galactic cosmic...

  14. Deformed Potential Energy of Super Heavy Element Z = 120 in a Generalized Liquid Drop Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bao-Qiu; MA Zhong-Yu; ZHU Zhi-Yuan; SONG Hong-Qiu; ZHAO Yao-Lin

    2005-01-01

    @@ The macroscopic deformed potential energy for super-heavy elements Z = 120 is determined within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM). The shell correction is calculated with the Strutinsky method and the microscopic single particle energies are derived from the shell model in an axially deformed Woods-Saxon potential with the same quasi-molecular shape. The total potential energy of a nucleus is calculated by the macro-microscopic method as the summation of the liquid-drop energy and the Strutinsky shell correction. The theory is adopted to describe the deformed potential energies in a set of cold reactions. The neck in the quasi-molecular shape is responsible to the deep valley of the fusion barrier due to shell corrections. In the cold fusion path, the doublehump fusion barrier is predicted by the shell correction and complete fusion events may occur. The results show that some of projectile-target combinations in the entrance channel, such as 50Ca+252Fm→ 302120* and 58Fe+244pu→ 302120*, favour the fusion reaction, which can be considered as candidates for the synthesis of super heavy nuclei Z = 120 and the former might be the best cold fusion reaction to produce the nucleus 302120among them.

  15. Evaluation of viscera and other tissues. [cosmic radiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J. T.; Kraft, L. M.; Lushbaugh, C. C.; Humason, G. L.; Hartroft, W. S.; Porta, E. A.; Bailey, O. T.; Greep, R. O.; Leach, C. S.; Laird, T.

    1975-01-01

    Histopathological findings in the lungs, livers, bone marrows, small intestines, gonads, kidneys, and other tissues of the four pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that survived the Apollo XVII flight were evaluated in the light of their immediate environment and as targets of HZE cosmic ray particles. Results of this study failed to disclose changes that could be ascribed to the HZE particle radiation. Decreased numbers of erythropoietic cells in the bone marrow of the flight mice were probably related to the increased oxygen pressure. The small intestine showed no changes. Ovaries and testes appeared normal. Two of the three surviving male flight mice displayed early stages of spermatogenesis, just as ground-based controls did at the same season. Abnormalities were also not found in the thyroid, parathyroids, adrenals, or kidneys. The status of the juxtaglomerular apparatus could not be evaluated. The lungs exhibited nonspecific slight reactions. A variety of incidental lesions were noted in the livers of both the flight mice and their controls. The heart muscle showed nothing that could be regarded as pathological. Sections of skeletal muscle examined were free from significant change.

  16. A Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Polarimeter Using Superconducting Bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Hanany, S; Johnson, B; Jones, T; Hull, J R; Ma, K B

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation are expected to significantly increase our understanding of the early universe. We present a design for a CMB polarimeter in which a cryogenically cooled half wave plate rotates by means of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing. The design is optimized for implementation in MAXIPOL, a balloon-borne CMB polarimeter. A prototype bearing, consisting of commercially available ring-shaped permanent magnet and an array of YBCO bulk HTS material, has been constructed. We measured the coefficient of friction as a function of several parameters including temperature between 15 and 80 K, rotation frequency between 0.3 and 3.5 Hz, levitation distance between 6 and 10 mm, and ambient pressure between 10^{-7} and 1 torr. The low rotational drag of the HTS bearing allows rotations for long periods of time with minimal input power and negligible wear and tear thus making this technology suitable for a future satellite mission.

  17. Radiative feedback and cosmic molecular gas: the role of different radiative sources

    CERN Document Server

    Maio, U; De Lucia, G; Borgani, S

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multifrequency radiative hydrodynamical chemistry simulations addressing primordial star formation and related stellar feedback from various populations of stars, stellar energy distributions (SEDs) and initial mass functions. Spectra for massive stars, intermediate-mass stars and regular solar-like stars are adopted over a grid of 150 frequency bins and consistently coupled with hydrodynamics, heavy-element pollution and non-equilibrium species calculations. Powerful massive population III stars are found to be able to largely ionize H and, subsequently, He and He$^+$, causing an inversion of the equation of state and a boost of the Jeans masses in the early intergalactic medium. Radiative effects on star formation rates are between a factor of a few and 1 dex, depending on the SED. Radiative processes are responsible for gas heating and photoevaporation, although emission from soft SEDs has minor impacts. These findings have implications for cosmic gas preheating, primordial direct-c...

  18. Radiative feedback and cosmic molecular gas: the role of different radiative sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio, Umberto; Petkova, Margarita; De Lucia, Gabriella; Borgani, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    We present results from multifrequency radiative hydrodynamical chemistry simulations addressing primordial star formation and related stellar feedback from various populations of stars, stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and initial mass functions. Spectra for massive stars, intermediate-mass stars and regular solar-like stars are adopted over a grid of 150 frequency bins and consistently coupled with hydrodynamics, heavy-element pollution and non-equilibrium species calculations. Powerful massive Population III stars are found to be able to largely ionize H and, subsequently, He and He+, causing an inversion of the equation of state and a boost of the Jeans masses in the early intergalactic medium. Radiative effects on star formation rates are between a factor of a few and 1 dex, depending on the SED. Radiative processes are responsible for gas heating and photoevaporation, although emission from soft SEDs has minor impacts. These findings have implications for cosmic gas preheating, primordial direct-collapse black holes, the build-up of `cosmic fossils' such as low-mass dwarf galaxies, the role of active galactic nuclei during reionization, the early formation of extended discs and angular-momentum catastrophe.

  19. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere and inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence, and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  20. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  1. Scientific results from the cosmic background explorer (COBE). [Information on cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C.L.; Boggess, N.W.; Cheng, E.S.; Hauser, M.G.; Kelsall, T.; Mather, J.C.; Moseley, S.H. Jr.; Shafer, R.A.; Silverberg, R.F. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Murdock, T.L. (General Research Corp., Danvers, MA (United States)); Smoot, G.F. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Weiss, R. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge (United States)); Wright, E.L. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has flown the COBE satellite to observe the Big Bang and the subsequent formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Data from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) show that the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background is that of a black body of temperature T = 2.73 [+-] 0.06 K, with no deviation from a black-body spectrum greater than 0.25% of the peak brightness. The data from the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) show statistically significant cosmic microwave background anisotropy, consistent with a scale-invariant primordial density fluctuation spectrum. Measurements from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) provide new conservation upper limits to the cosmic infrared background. Extensive modeling of solar system and galactic infrared foregrounds is required for further improvement in the cosmic infrared background limits. 104 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R., E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C., E-mail: krausesalles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nadya@ime.ib.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  3. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors campaign in the radiation field at aviation altitudes. This cooperation offered the opportunity to measure under the same space weather conditions and contributed to an independent quality control among the participating groups. The CONCORD flight campaign was performed with the twin-jet research aircraft Dassault Falcon 20E operated by the flight facility Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR. Dose rates were measured at four positions in the atmosphere in European airspace for about one hour at each position in order to obtain acceptable counting statistics. The analysis of the space weather situation during the measuring flights demonstrates that short-term solar activity did not affect the results which show a very good agreement between the readings of the instruments of the different institutes.

  4. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M.; Trompier, François; Ambrozova, Iva; Kubancak, Jan; Matthiä, Daniel; Ploc, Ondrej; Santen, Nicole; Wirtz, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors) campaign in the radiation field at aviation altitudes. This cooperation offered the opportunity to measure under the same space weather conditions and contributed to an independent quality control among the participating groups. The CONCORD flight campaign was performed with the twin-jet research aircraft Dassault Falcon 20E operated by the flight facility Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR). Dose rates were measured at four positions in the atmosphere in European airspace for about one hour at each position in order to obtain acceptable counting statistics. The analysis of the space weather situation during the measuring flights demonstrates that short-term solar activity did not affect the results which show a very good agreement between the readings of the instruments of the different institutes.

  5. The source of cosmic radiations; A la source des rayons cosmiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letessier-Selvon, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et Hautes Energies, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-11-15

    The existence of the GZD (Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin) limit comes from the fact that the cosmological diffuse background interacts with cosmological radiations and can reduce dramatically their energy. As a consequence cosmic radiations traveling over large intergalactic distances can not have an energy over 60*10{sup 18} eV (the GZK limit). Another consequence is that a cosmic radiation with an energy greater that the GZK limit comes necessarily from a region no more than 500 million light-years away. The Auger observatory that at term will cover a surface of 3000 km{sup 2} has been designed to study high energy cosmic radiations through the detection of the huge particle showers they trigger when interacting with particles from the upper part of the atmosphere. The first results of the Auger observatory shows three important things. First, the Auger detector's ability to detect is 30 times greater than that of previous experiments. Secondly, 27 events with an energy greater than the GZK limit have been detected and for 20 of them a very active galaxy is located in their incident direction within a distance of 300*10{sup 6} km, these galaxies are then highly suspected to be the source of very high energy cosmic radiations. Thirdly, the graph of the measured cosmic radiation flux shows a brutal drop around 60*10{sup 18} eV which is the GZK limit. (A.C.)

  6. Study of the Intensity Time Variations of the Cosmic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    different neutron multiplicities at Durham and Mt. Washington, and of the Pioneer 8 cosmic-ray telescope indicated the form of the modulation was different for the 11-year variation and for Forbush decreases during 1968-1970.

  7. Collisions of Rare Earth Nuclei - a New Reaction Route for Synthesis of Super Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, R K

    2012-01-01

    Theories have predicted an island of stability in the super heavy mass region with half lives ranging from a few seconds to a few thousands of years. Extensive efforts are being made experimentally to reach these nuclei in the region of Z = 110 and above with suitable combinations of proton and neutron numbers. However, the cross sections for production of these nuclei are seen to be in the range of a few pico barns or less, and pose great experimental challenges. We show in the present note that great advantages can be obtained by carrying out heavy ion reactions with suitable combinations of projectile and target nuclei in the rare earth region, that will lead to compound systems with very small excitation energy, and with better neutron/proton ratio for larger stability.

  8. Elements Discrimination in the Study of Super-Heavy Elements using an Ionization Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Wieloch, A; Péter, J; Lojek, K; Alamanos, N; Amar, N; Anne, R; Angélique, J C; Auger, G; Dayras, R; Drouart, A; Fontbonne, J M; Gillibert, A; Grévy, S; Hanappe, F; Hannachi, F; Hue, R; Khouaja, A; Legou, T; López-Martens, A; Liénard, E; Manduci, L; De Oliveira-Santos, F; Politi, G; Saint-Laurent, M G; Stodel, C; Stuttgé, L; Tillier, J; De Tourreil, R; Villari, A C C; Wieleczko, J P

    2004-01-01

    Dedicated ionization chamber was built and installed to measure the energy loss of very heavy nuclei at 2.7 MeV/u produced in fusion reactions in inverse kinematics (beam of 208Pb). After going through the ionization chamber, products of reactions on 12C, 18O targets are implanted in a Si detector. Their identification through their alpha decay chain is ambiguous when their half-life is short. After calibration with Pb and Th nuclei, the ionization chamber signal allowed us to resolve these ambiguities. In the search for rare super-heavy nuclei produced in fusion reactions in inverse or symmetric kinematics, such a chamber will provide direct information on the nuclear charge of each implanted nucleus.

  9. Fission half-lives of super-heavy nuclei in a microscopic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Warda, M

    2012-01-01

    A systematic study of 160 heavy and super-heavy nuclei is performed in the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach with the finite range and density dependent Gogny force with the D1S parameter set. We show calculations in several approximations: with axially symmetric and reflexion symmetric wave functions, with axially symmetric and non-reflexion symmetric wave functions and finally some representative examples with triaxial wave functions are also discussed. Relevant properties of the ground state and along the fission path are thoroughly analyzed. Fission barriers, Q$_\\alpha$-factors and lifetimes with respect to fission and $\\alpha$-decay as well as other observables are discussed. Larger configuration spaces and more general HFB wave functions as compared to previous studies provide a very good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Review of even element super-heavy nuclei and search for element 120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Physik, Frankfurt (Germany); Heinz, S.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J.; Barth, W.; Burkhard, H.G.; Dahl, L.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lang, R.; Lommel, B.; Runke, J.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schoett, H.J.; Tinschert, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Muenzenberg, G. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Antalic, S.; Saro, S. [Comenius University, Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Bratislava (Slovakia); Eberhardt, K.; Thoerle-Pospiech, P.; Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Grzywacz, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hamilton, J.H. [Vanderbuilt University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nashville, TN (United States); Henderson, R.A.; Kenneally, J.M.; Moody, K.J.; Shaughnessy, D.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Miernik, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Miller, D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Morita, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Nishio, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Popeko, A.G.; Yeremin, A.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Roberto, J.B.; Rykaczewski, K.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Uusitalo, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2016-06-15

    The reaction {sup 54}Cr + {sup 248}Cm was investigated at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI, Darmstadt, with the intention to study production and decay properties of isotopes of element 120. Three correlated signals were measured, which occurred within a period of 279ms. The heights of the signals correspond with the expectations for a decay sequence starting with an isotope of element 120. However, a complete decay chain cannot be established, since a signal from the implantation of the evaporation residue cannot be identified unambiguously. Measured properties of the event chain are discussed in detail. The result is compared with theoretical predictions. Previously measured decay properties of even element super-heavy nuclei were compiled in order to find arguments for an assignment from the systematics of experimental data. In the course of this review, a few tentatively assigned data could be corrected. New interpretations are given for results which could not be assigned definitely in previous studies. The discussion revealed that the cross-section for production of element 120 could be high enough so that a successful experiment seems possible with presently available techniques. However, a continuation of the experiment at SHIP for a necessary confirmation of the results obtained in a relatively short irradiation of five weeks is not possible at GSI presently. Therefore, we decided to publish the results of the measurement and of the review as they exist now. In the summary and outlook section we also present concepts for the continuation of research in the field of super-heavy nuclei. (orig.)

  11. Lower Bound on the Cosmic TeV Gamma-ray Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation in the GeV band. However, investigation on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation still remains sparse. Here, we report the lower bound on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background spectrum placed by the cumulative flux of individual detected extragalactic TeV sources including blazars, radio galaxies, and starburst galaxies. The current limit on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background above 0.1 TeV is obtained as $3\\times10^{-8} (E/100~{\\rm GeV})^{-0.6} \\exp(-E/2000~{\\rm GeV})~{\\rm [GeV/cm^2/s/sr]} < E^2dN/dE < 1\\times10^{-7} (E/100~{\\rm GeV})^{-0.5}~{\\rm [GeV/cm^2/s/sr]}$, where the upper bound is set by requirement that the cascade flux from the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation can not exceed the measured cosmic GeV gamma-ray background spectrum (Inoue & Ioka 2012). Two nearby blazars, Mrk 421 and Mrk 501, explain ~70% of the cumulative flux at 0.8-4 TeV, while extreme blaza...

  12. Cosmic rays and radiations from the cosmos; Rayons cosmiques et rayonnement du cosmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizot, E

    2005-12-01

    This document gathers a lot of recent information concerning cosmic radiations, it is divided into 4 parts. Part I: energy, mass and angular spectra of cosmic rays. Part II: general phenomenology of cosmic rays, this part deals with the standard model, the maximal energy of protons inside supernova remnants, nucleosynthesis of light elements, and super-bubbles. Part III: radiations from the cosmos, this part deals with high energy gamma rays, non-thermal radiation of super-bubbles, positron transport, and the Compton trail of gamma-ray bursts. Part IV: the Pierre Auger observatory (OPA), this part deals with the detection of gamma ray bursts at OPA, the measurement of anisotropy, and top-down models. (A.C.)

  13. The chemical composition of the cosmic radiation around the ankle and the related spectral indices

    CERN Document Server

    Codino, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Some recent measurements of the chemical composition of the cosmic radiation indicate that at the energy of 3 x 10 **18 eV, around the ankle, light cosmic ions dominate the spectrum as it occurs in the preknee energy region. Taking advantage of a recent theory of cosmic radiation which provides a quantitative explanation of the knee, the second knee and the ankle, the chemical composition of cosmic radiation is explicitly calculated giving individual ion spectra and ion fractions from 10 ** 12 eV to 5 x 10 ** 19 eV. The calculation assumes two components of the cosmic radiation feeding the ion flux at Earth: one originated in the disc volume and another one, called extradisc component, which from the disc boundaries traverses the Galaxy reaching the solar system. Data above 10 ** 17 eV collected during half century of experimentation by Auger, HiRes, Agasa, Akeno, Fly' s Eye, Yakutsk, Haverah Park and Volcano Ranch experiments are reviewed, examined and compared with the theoretical . The comparison between c...

  14. Ageing effects on image sensors due to terrestrial cosmic radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nampoothiri, G.G.; Horemans, M.L.R.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the “ageing” effect on image sensors introduced by neutrons present in natural (terrestrial) cosmic environment. The results obtained at sea level are corroborated for the first time with accelerated neutron beam tests and for various image sensor operation conditions. The results reveal

  15. THE MODULATION OF HEAVY NUCLEI IN THE PRIMARY COSMIC RADIATION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ntensities of the primary cosmic ray heavy nuclei, Z equal to or greater than 3, have been studied during several Forbush decreases. Fifteen...observed before, during or after four of the largest Forbush decreases that occurred in the last solar cycle. Examination of this data, together with that

  16. Isotope selective photodissociation of N-2 by the interstellar radiation field and cosmic rays

    OpenAIRE

    Heays, Alan N.; Visser, Ruud; Gredel, Roland; Ubachs, Wim; Lewis, Brenton R.; Gibson, Stephen T.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-01-01

    Photodissociation of 14N2 and 14N15N occurs in interstellar clouds, circumstellar envelopes, protoplanetary discs, and other environments due to UV radiation from stellar sources and the presence of cosmic rays. This source of N atoms initiates the formation of complex N-bearing species and influences their isotopic composition. To study the photodissociation rates of 14N15N by UV continuum radiation and both isotopologues in a field of cosmic ray induced photons. To determine the effect of t...

  17. The Cosmic Background Radiation circa nu2K

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Prunet, S; Ade, P; Balbi, A; Bock, J J; Borrill, J; Boscaleri, A; Coble, K; Crill, B P; De Bernardis, P; Farese, P; Ferreira, P; Ganga, K; Giacometti, M; Hanany, S; Hivon, E; Hristov, V V; Iacoangeli, A; Jaffe, A; Lange, A; Lee, A; Martinis, L; Masi, S; Mauskopf, P D; Melchiorri, A; Montroy, T; Netterfield, C B; Oh, S; Pascale, E; Piacentini, F; Rabii, B; Rao, S; Richards, P; Romeo, G; Ruhl, J E; Scaramuzzi, F; Sforza, D M; Smoot, G F; Stompor, R; Winant, C; Wu, P

    2000-01-01

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {omega_b,omega_{cdm},Omega_{tot}, Omega_\\Lambda,n_s,\\tau_C, \\sigma_8}. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature (Omega_{tot}=1.08\\pm 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (n_s=1.03\\pm 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates (omega_b=0.030\\pm 0.005 cf. 0.019\\pm 0.002). The CDM density is in th...

  18. Cosmic radiation dose measurements from the RaD-X flight campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Gronoff, Guillaume P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Hayes, Bryan M.; Lusby, Terry C.; Straume, Tore; Tobiska, W. Kent; Hands, Alex; Ryden, Keith; Benton, Eric; Wiley, Scott; Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard; Xu, Xiaojing

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission obtained measurements for improving the understanding of cosmic radiation transport in the atmosphere and human exposure to this ionizing radiation field in the aircraft environment. The value of dosimetric measurements from the balloon platform is that they can be used to characterize cosmic ray primaries, the ultimate source of aviation radiation exposure. In addition, radiation detectors were flown to assess their potential application to long-term, continuous monitoring of the aircraft radiation environment. The RaD-X balloon was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (34.5°N, 104.2°W) on 25 September 2015. Over 18 h of flight data were obtained from each of the four different science instruments at altitudes above 20 km. The RaD-X balloon flight was supplemented by contemporaneous aircraft measurements. Flight-averaged dosimetric quantities are reported at seven altitudes to provide benchmark measurements for improving aviation radiation models. The altitude range of the flight data extends from commercial aircraft altitudes to above the Pfotzer maximum where the dosimetric quantities are influenced by cosmic ray primaries. The RaD-X balloon flight observed an absence of the Pfotzer maximum in the measurements of dose equivalent rate.

  19. Further considerations of cosmic ray modulation of infra-red radiation in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding effects of ionisation in the lower atmosphere is a new interdisciplinary area, crossing traditionally distinct scientific boundaries. Following the paper of Erlykin et al. (Astropart. Phys. 57--58 (2014) 26--29) we develop the interpretation of observed changes in long-wave (LW) radiation (Aplin and Lockwood, Env. Res. Letts. 8, 015026 (2013)), by taking account of cosmic ray ionisation yields and atmospheric radiative transfer. To demonstrate this, we show that the thermal structure of the whole atmosphere needs to be considered along with the vertical profile of ionisation. Allowing for ionisation by all components of a cosmic ray shower and not just by the muons, reveals that the effect we have detected is certainly not inconsistent with laboratory observations of the LW absorption cross section. The analysis presented here, although very different from that of Erlykin et al., does come to the same conclusion that the events detected were not caused by individual cosmic ray primaries -- not b...

  20. Isotope selective photodissociation of N2 by the interstellar radiation field and cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Heays, Alan N; Gredel, Roland; Ubachs, Wim; Lewis, Brenton R; Gibson, Stephen T; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2014-01-01

    Photodissociation of 14N2 and 14N15N occurs in interstellar clouds, circumstellar envelopes, protoplanetary discs, and other environments due to UV radiation from stellar sources and the presence of cosmic rays. This source of N atoms initiates the formation of complex N-bearing species and influences their isotopic composition. To study the photodissociation rates of 14N15N by UV continuum radiation and both isotopologues in a field of cosmic ray induced photons. To determine the effect of these on the isotopic composition of more complex molecules. High-resolution photodissociation cross sections of N2 are used from an accurate and comprehensive quantum- mechanical model of the molecule based on laboratory experiments. A similarly high-resolution spectrum of H2 emission following interactions with cosmic rays has been constructed. The spectroscopic data are used to calculate dissociation rates which are input into isotopically differentiated chemical models, describing an interstellar cloud and a protoplane...

  1. Exploration of (super-)heavy elements using the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erler, Jochen

    2011-01-31

    Motivated by the steadily increasing number of known nuclei and nuclear properties, theories of nuclear structure are presently a field of intense research. This work concentrates on the self-consistent description of nuclei in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. The extrapolation of nuclear shell structure to the region of super-heavy elements (SHE) using the SHF model, the dependence on different parameterization and the influence of collective correlation will be studied. The general scope of this work are large scale calculation for a global survey of properties of SHE like binding energies, separation energies and decay characteristics and lifetimes. These calculations were done in a collaboration with the theory group of the GSI in Darmstadt and have the aim to develop a database of lifetimes and reaction rates for {alpha}, {beta}-decay and spontaneous fission in a very wide range with proton numbers 86 {<=} Z {<=} 120 and neutron numbers up to N {approx} 260 relevant for the astrophysical r-process. The results of this study for example predictions of a possible islands of very stable nuclei and information of favored decay mode for each nuclei are also applicable in the recent experimental synthesis of exotic SHE. For these calculation a framework to calculate {beta}-decay half-lives within the SHF model has been developed and the existing axial SHF code has been extended to compute {beta}-transition matrix elements and so to provide an estimation of half-lives. (orig.)

  2. Super-heavy electron material as metallic refrigerant for adiabatic demagnetization cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Piening, Boy; Jeevan, Hirale S; Bud'ko, Sergey L; Canfield, Paul C; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    Low-temperature refrigeration is of crucial importance in fundamental research of condensed matter physics, because the investigations of fascinating quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, superfluidity, and quantum criticality, often require refrigeration down to very low temperatures. Currently, cryogenic refrigerators with (3)He gas are widely used for cooling below 1 K. However, usage of the gas has been increasingly difficult because of the current worldwide shortage. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative methods of refrigeration. We show that a new type of refrigerant, the super-heavy electron metal YbCo2Zn20, can be used for adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, which does not require (3)He gas. This method has a number of advantages, including much better metallic thermal conductivity compared to the conventional insulating refrigerants. We also demonstrate that the cooling performance is optimized in Yb1-x Sc x Co2Zn20 by partial Sc substitution, with x ~ 0.19. The substitution induces chemical pressure that drives the materials to a zero-field quantum critical point. This leads to an additional enhancement of the magnetocaloric effect in low fields and low temperatures, enabling final temperatures well below 100 mK. This performance has, up to now, been restricted to insulators. For nearly a century, the same principle of using local magnetic moments has been applied for adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This study opens new possibilities of using itinerant magnetic moments for cryogen-free refrigeration.

  3. Towards Identification of Super Heavy Elements by Means of Mass Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schury, Peter; Ito, Yuta; Wada, Michiharu; Arai, Fumiya; Kaji, Daiya; Morimoto, Kouji; Morita, Kosuke; Sonoda, Tetsu; Katayama, Ichirou

    2014-09-01

    The present standard technique for determining the identity of Super Heavy Elements is by alpha-decay spectroscopy, wherein chains of alpha-decays to well-known species provide unique fingerprints to identify the parent nucleus. However, as advances in production capabilities bring us closer to the much-anticipated ``island of stability,'' decay spectroscopy will become less tenable. It is already seen that the heaviest elements, those above Z = 113, decay chains all terminate in spontaneous fission before reaching well-known nuclei. As the island of stability is more closely approached, alpha-decay will be replaced by beta-decay and spontaneous fission while half-lives become exceedingly long. To work towards overcoming the looming limitations in identification via decay spectroscopy, we have installed a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph coupled to the GARIS-II separator at RIKEN. The device has been proven to be highly efficient and capable of accurate high-precision mass measurements. In initial studies we will aim to make precision mass measurements of trans-uranium elements up through Lr to validate the device. We will describe the progress of this project and describe the long-range strategy.

  4. Fusion Barrier of Super-heavy Elements in a Generalized Liquid Drop Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENBao-Qiu; MAZhong-Yu

    2004-01-01

    The macroscopic deformed potential energies for super-heavy elements Z = 110,112,114,116,118 arc determined within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM). A quasi-molecular mechanism is introduced to describe the deformation of a nucleus in the GLDM and the shell model simultaneously. The macroscopic energy of a twocenter nuclear system in the GLDM includes the volume-, surface-, and Coulomb-energies, the proximity effect at each mass asymmetry, and accurate nuclear radius. The shell correction is calculated by the Strutinsky method and the microscopic single particle energies are derived from a shell model in an axially deformed Woods-Saxon potential with the quasi-molecular shape. The total potential energy of a nucleus can be calculated by the macro-microscopic method as the summation of the liquid-drop energy and the Strutinsky shell correction. The theory is applied to predict the fusion barriers of the cold reactions 64Ni + 208 spb → 272 110*, 70Zn + 208pb → 278 112*, 76Ge + 208seb → 284 114*,82Se + 208pb → 29 116*, 86Kr + 208pb → 294 118*. It is found that the neck in the quasi-molecular shape is responsible for the deep valley of the fusion barrier. In the cold fusion path, double-hump fusion barriers could be predicted by the shell corrections and complete fusion events may occur.

  5. Fusion Barrier of Super-heavy Elements in a Generalized Liquid Drop Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bao-Qiu; MA Zhong-Yu

    2004-01-01

    The macroscopic deformed potential energies for super-heavy elements Z = 110,112,114,116,118 are determined within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM). A quasi-molecular mechanism is introduced to describe the deformation of a nucleus in the GLDM and the shell model simultaneously. The macroscopic energy of a twocenter nuclear system in the GLDM includes the volume-, surface-, and Coulomb-energies, the proximity effect at each mass asymmetry, and accurate nuclear radius. The shell correction is calculated by the Strutinsky method and the microscopic single particle energies are derived from a shell model in an axially deformed Woods-Saxon potential with the quasi-molecular shape. The total potential energy of a nucleus can be calculated by the macro-microscopic method as the summation of the liquid-drop energy and the Strutinsky shell correction. The theory is applied to predict the fusion barriers of the cold reactions 64Ni + 208Pb → 272110*, 70Zn + 208Pb → 278112*, 76Ge + 208pb → 284114*,82Se + 208Pb → 290116*, 86Kr + 208Pb → 294118*. It is found that the neck in the quasi-molecular shape is responsible for the deep valley of the fusion barrier. In the cold fusion path, double-hump fusion barriers could be predicted by the shell corrections and complete fusion events may occur.

  6. Deformation Compensation of Ram Components of Super-heavy-duty CNC Floor Type Boring and Milling Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Fenghe; QIAO Lijun; XU Yaoling

    2012-01-01

    Ram is a very important component of super-heavy-duty computer numerical control (CNC) floor type boring-milling machine,and deformation of ram is a significant source causing errors in machining process.To compensate the deformation error of super-heavy-duty CNC floor type boring-milling machine,based on force analysis theory,the law and compensation measures of deformation of ram are researched.Based on the principle of torque (force) balance of the ram components,the formulas of compensation forces and compensation torques are derived,the relations between compensation forces (compensation torques)and the stroke distance of the ram are given.According to theoretical analysis results and the structural characteristics of super-heavy-duty CNC floor type boring and milling machine of TK6932,rods compensation,hydrostatic pressure compensation and wire rope compensation measures are taken to compensate the deformation error of ram.The experiments and computer simulation results show that the straightness of the ram at its overhanging end meets the national machinery industry standards.

  7. Correlations between neutrons and protons near Fermi surface and $Q_{\\alpha}$ of super-heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ning; Wu, Xizhen; Meng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The shell corrections and shell gaps in nuclei are systematically studied with the latest Weizs\\"acker-Skyrme (WS4) mass model. We find that most of asymmetric nuclei with (sub)-shell closures locate along the shell stability line (SSL), $N=1.37Z+13.5$, which might be due to a strong correlation between neutrons and protons near Fermi surface. The double magicity of nuclei $^{46}$Si and $^{78}$Ni is predicted according to the corresponding shell gaps, shell corrections and nuclear deformations. The unmeasured super-heavy nuclei $^{296}$118 and $^{298}$120, with relatively large shell gaps and shell corrections, also locate along the SSL, whereas the traditional magic nucleus $^{298}$Fl evidently deviates from the line. The $\\alpha$-decay energies of super-heavy nuclei with $Z=113-126$ are simultaneously investigated by using the WS4 model together with the radial basis function corrections. For super-heavy nuclei with large shell corrections, the smallest $\\alpha$-decay energy for elements $Z=116$, 117 and 11...

  8. Measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 6. 3 cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandolesi, N.; Calzolari, P.; Cortiglioni, S.; Morigi, G.

    1984-06-15

    We present results of a measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at a wavelength of 6.3 cm. We obtained the value T/sub CBR/ = 2.71 +- 0.20 K. This is in good agreement with, and has a smaller error than, any previous measurement at equal or longer wavelengths.

  9. Cosmic radiation in aviation: radiological protection of Air France aircraft crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmaris, G

    2016-06-01

    Cosmic radiation in aviation has been a concern since the 1960s, and measurements have been taken for several decades by Air France. Results show that aircraft crew generally receive 3-4 mSv y(-1) for 750 boarding hours. Compliance with the trigger level of 6 mSv y(-1) is achieved by route selection. Work schedules can be developed for pregnant pilots to enable the dose to the fetus to be kept below 1 mSv. Crew members are informed of their exposition and the potential health impact. The upcoming International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report on cosmic radiation in aviation will provide an updated guidance. A graded approach proportionate with the time of exposure is recommended to implement the optimisation principle. The objective is to keep exposures of the most exposed aircraft members to reasonable levels. ICRP also recommends that information about cosmic radiation be disseminated, and that awareness about cosmic radiation be raised in order to favour informed decision-making by all concerned stakeholders.

  10. Cosmic radiation during air travel: trends in exposure of aircrews and airline passengers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer RO; LSO

    2004-01-01

    An unfavourable effect of flying is the enhanced exposure of both passengers and aircrew to cosmic radiation at high altitudes. On the basis of a detailed survey on passengers arriving at or departing from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport in the 1988-1997 period, estimates of individual effective dose for

  11. A realistic treatment of geomagnetic Cherenkov radiation from cosmic ray air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Klaus; de Vries, Krijn D.; Scholten, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    We present a macroscopic calculation of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, based on currents obtained from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of air showers in a realistic geo-magnetic field. We discuss the importance of a correct

  12. A macroscopic description of coherent geo-magnetic radiation from cosmic-ray air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Werner, K.; Rusydi, F.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a macroscopic description of coherent electromagnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays due to the presence of the geo-magnetic field. This description offers it simple and direct insight in the relation between the properties of the air shower a

  13. Cosmic radiation and magnetic fields: Exposure assessment and health outcomes among airline flight crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Joyce Shealy

    Airline flight crews are chronically exposed to cosmic radiation and to magnetic fields generated by the aircraft's electrical system. Potential disease risks have been identified in health studies among commercial flight crews outside of the United States and among military pilots within the United States. The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify exposure to both cosmic radiation and magnetic fields onboard aircraft, (2) to develop a methodology for estimating career cosmic radiation doses to individual crew members, and (3) to compare mortality among United States commercial pilots and navigators with that of all occupational groups. Cosmic radiation equivalent doses to bone marrow and skeletal tissue were calculated on a flight-by-flight basis. Flight-by-flight calculations were used to develop an estimation methodology for cumulative (career) cosmic radiation doses. Magnetic fields were measured directly onboard aircraft during flight. Health outcomes among United States commercial pilots and navigators were investigated using proportional mortality ratios, proportional cancer mortality ratios, and mortality odds ratios. Based on the sample used in this study, the cosmic radiation equivalent dose to bone marrow and skeletal tissue associated with air travel ranges from 30 to 570 microsieverts per 100 flight hours (not including ground time) depending on altitude, latitude, phase of solar cycle, and flight duration. Magnetic field exposure appears to be characterized by frequencies between 100 and 800 hertz and varies in strength depending on stages of flight, location within the aircraft, and aircraft type. Based on limited measurements, maximum field strengths may increase from 0.6 microtesla in economy class to 1.2 microtesla in first class, suggesting that cockpit exposures may be higher. Potential synergistic effects of cosmic radiation and magnetic fields may be associated with certain cancers found in excess among flight crews, in particular

  14. The cosmic background radiation circa {nu}2K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, J. Richard; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Prunet, Simon

    2000-01-01

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {l_brace}{omega}{sub b}, {omega}{sub cdm}, {omega}{sub tot}, {omega}{sub {lambda}}, n{sub s}, {tau}{sub C}, {sigma}{sub 8}{r_brace}. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature ({omega}{sub tot} = 1.08 {+-} 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (n{sub s} 1.03 {+-} 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates ({omega}{sub b}-{omega}{sub b}h{sup 2} 0.030 {+-} 0.005 cf. 0.019 {+-} 0.002). The CDM density is in the expected range ({omega}{sub cdm} 0.17{+-}0.02). Even stranger is the CMB+LSS evidence that the density of the universe is dominated by unclustered energy akin to the cosmological constant ({omega}{sub {lambda}} = 0.66 {+-} 0.06), at the same level as that inferred from high redshift supernova observations. We also sketch the CMB+LSS implications for massive neutrinos.

  15. Radiation -- A Cosmic Hazard to Human Habitation in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ruthan; Pellish, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Radiation exposure is one of the greatest environmental threats to the performance and success of human and robotic space missions. Radiation permeates all space and aeronautical systems, challenges optimal and reliable performance, and tests survival and survivability. We will discuss the broad scope of research, technological, and operational considerations to forecast and mitigate the effects of the radiation environment for deep space and planetary exploration.

  16. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  17. Anisotropy in the cosmic radiation at TeV energy

    CERN Document Server

    Iuppa, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In recent years very important results were obtained from cosmic ray experiments about the arrival direction distribution of primaries in the TeV energy range. As most of these particles are charged nuclei, they are deflected by the magnetic field they pass through before reaching the Earth surface, the effect of the Lorentz force being inversely proportional to the particle energy. As far as the local interstellar medium is known, the gyroradius of a 10 TeV proton is expected to be only 100 a.u., small enough to make the arrival direction distribution isotropic. Since 1930s a "large scale" (90{\\deg}-120{\\deg}) anisotropy is known to exist, generally interpreted as the combined effect of sources far away and magnetic fields nearby. Nonetheless, in the last decade experiments like Tibet-ASg, Milagro, ARGO-YBJ and IceCube discovered structures as wide as 10{\\deg}-30{\\deg} all over the sky at ~ 10 TeV energy, what is unexplainable within the standard model of cosmic rays. In this paper a review of the most recen...

  18. High-energy cosmic-ray electrons - A new measurement using transition-radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T.

    1977-01-01

    A new detector for cosmic-ray electrons, consisting of a combination of a transition-radiation detector and a shower detector, has been constructed, calibrated at accelerator beams, and exposed in a balloon flight under 5 g/sq cm of atmosphere. The design of this instrument and the methods of data analysis are described. Preliminary results in the energy range 9-300 GeV are presented. The energy spectrum of electrons is found to be significantly steeper than that of protons, consistent with a long escape lifetime of cosmic rays in the galaxy.

  19. Natural radiation doses for cosmic and terrestrial components in Costa Rica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, Patricia [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Atomicas, Nucleares y Moleculares, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, San Jose (Costa Rica)]. E-mail: pmora@cariari.ucr.ac.cr; Picado, Esteban [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Atomicas, Nucleares y Moleculares, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, San Jose (Costa Rica); Minato, Susumu [Radiation Earth Science Laboratory, Yamaguchi-cho 9-6, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, 461-0024 (Japan)

    2007-01-15

    A study of external natural radiation, cosmic and terrestrial components, was carried out with in situ measurements using NaI scintillation counters while driving along the roads in Costa Rica for the period July 2003-July 2005. The geographical distribution of the terrestrial air-absorbed dose rates and the total effective dose rates (including cosmic) are represented on contour maps. Information on the population density of the country permitted the calculation of the per capita doses. The average effective dose for the total cosmic component was 46.88{+-}18.06 nSv h{sup -1} and the average air-absorbed dose for the terrestrial component was 29.52{+-}14.46 nGy h{sup -1}. The average total effective dose rate (cosmic plus terrestrial components) was 0.60{+-}0.18 mSv per year. The effective dose rate per capita was found to be 83.97 nSv h{sup -1} which gives an annual dose of 0.74 mSv. Assuming the world average for the internal radiation component, the natural radiation dose for Costa Rica will be 2.29 mSv annually.

  20. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhilber, Friedhelm; Abreu, Jose A; Beer, Jürg; Brunner, Irene; Christl, Marcus; Fischer, Hubertus; Heikkilä, Ulla; Kubik, Peter W; Mann, Mathias; McCracken, Ken G; Miller, Heinrich; Miyahara, Hiroko; Oerter, Hans; Wilhelms, Frank

    2012-04-17

    Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential for studies of the solar-terrestrial relationship. Cosmic-ray produced radionuclides, such as (10)Be and (14)C which are stored in polar ice cores and tree rings, offer the unique opportunity to reconstruct the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia. Although records from different archives basically agree, they also show some deviations during certain periods. So far most reconstructions were based on only one single radionuclide record, which makes detection and correction of these deviations impossible. Here we combine different (10)Be ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica with the global (14)C tree ring record using principal component analysis. This approach is only possible due to a new high-resolution (10)Be record from Dronning Maud Land obtained within the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica in Antarctica. The new cosmic radiation record enables us to derive total solar irradiance, which is then used as a proxy of solar activity to identify the solar imprint in an Asian climate record. Though generally the agreement between solar forcing and Asian climate is good, there are also periods without any coherence, pointing to other forcings like volcanoes and greenhouse gases and their corresponding feedbacks. The newly derived records have the potential to improve our understanding of the solar dynamics and to quantify the solar influence on climate.

  1. How Space Radiation Risk from Galactic Cosmic Rays at the International Space Station Relates to Nuclear Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts is a major obstacle for long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have thus been developed to evaluate radiation effects at the International Space Station (ISS) and in missions to the Moon or Mars. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes in such radiation transport affect predictions on the radiation risk from galactic cosmic rays. Taking into account effects of the geomagnetic field on the cosmic ray spectra, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on the radiation risk (represented by dose-equivalent) from galactic cosmic rays behind typical spacecraft materials. These results tell us how the radiation risk at the ISS is related to nuclear cross sections at different energies, and consequently how to most efficiently reduce the physical uncertainty in our predictions on the radiation risk at the ISS.

  2. High energy radiation from black holes gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Bright gamma-ray flares observed from sources far beyond our Milky Way Galaxy are best explained if enormous amounts of energy are liberated by black holes. The highest- energy particles in nature--the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays--cannot be confined by the Milky Way's magnetic field, and must originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Understanding these energetic radiations requires an extensive theoretical framework involving the radiation physics and strong-field gravity of black holes. In High Energy Radiation from Black Holes, Charles Dermer and Govind Menon present a systemat

  3. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation using COBE FIRAS instrument data

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Use formulas to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, enthalpy density, and internal energy density in the finite range of frequencies are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60 - 600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T = 2.728 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and the Stefan-Bol...

  4. Characterization of Silicon Photomultiplier Detectors using Cosmic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Favian; Castro, Juan; Niduaza, Rexavalmar; Wedel, Zachary; Fan, Sewan; Ritt, Stefan; Fatuzzo, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The silicon photomultiplier light detector has gained a lot of attention lately in fields such as particle physics, astrophysics, and medical physics. Its popularity stems from its lower cost, compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and its excellent ability to distinguish a quantized number of photons. They are normally operated at room temperature and biased above their breakdown voltages. As such, they may also exhibit properties that may hinder their optimal operation which include a thermally induced high dark count rate, after pulse effects, and cross talk from photons in nearby pixels. At this poster session, we describe our data analysis and our endeavor to characterize the multipixel photon counter (MPPC) detectors from Hamamatsu under different bias voltages and temperature conditions. Particularly, we describe our setup which uses cosmic rays to induce scintillation light delivered to the detector by wavelength shifting optical fibers and the use of a fast 1 GHz waveform sampler, the domino ring sampler (DRS4) digitizer board. Department of Education grant number P031S90007.

  5. Energy deposition study of low-energy cosmic radiation at sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Pushpa

    In this dissertation work, a computer simulation model based on the Geant4 simulation package has been designed and developed to study the energy deposition and track structures of cosmic muons and their secondary electrons in tissue-like materials. The particle interactions in a cubic water volume were first simulated. To analyze the energy deposition and tracks in small structures, with the intention of studying the energy localization in nanometric structures such as DNA, the chamber was sliced in three dimentions. Validation studies have been performed by comparing the results with experimental, theoretical, and other simulation results to test the accuracy of the simulation model. A human body phantom in sea-level muon environment was modeled to measure the yearly dose to a human from cosmic muons. The yearly dose in this phantom is about 22 millirems. This is close to the accepted value for the yearly dose from cosmic radiation at sea level. Shielding cosmic muons with a concrete slab from 0 to 2 meters increased the dose received by the body. This dissertation presents an extensive study on the interactions of secondary electrons created by muons in water. Index words. Radiation Dosimetry Simulation, Track Structures, Sea-Level muon Flux, Energy Deposition

  6. Shielding from cosmic radiation for interplanetary missions Active and passive methods

    CERN Document Server

    Spillantini, P; Durante, M; Müller-Mellin, R; Reitz, G; Rossi, L; Shurshakov, V; Sorbi, M

    2007-01-01

    Shielding is arguably the main countermeasure for the exposure to cosmic radiation during interplanetary exploratory missions. However, shielding of cosmic rays, both of galactic or solar origin, is problematic, because of the high energy of the charged particles involved and the nuclear fragmentation occurring in shielding materials. Although computer codes can predict the shield performance in space, there is a lack of biological and physical measurements to benchmark the codes. An attractive alternative to passive, bulk material shielding is the use of electromagnetic fields to deflect the charged particles from the spacecraft target. Active shielding concepts based on electrostatic fields, plasma, or magnetic fields have been proposed in the past years, and should be revised based on recent technological improvements. To address these issues, the European Space Agency (ESA) established a Topical Team (TT) in 2002 including European experts in the field of space radiation shielding and superconducting magn...

  7. Investigation of energy spectrum and nuclear interactions of primary cosmic radiation; Badanie widma energetycznego i oddzialywan jadrowych pierwotnego promieniowania kosmicznego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczynski, H. [Dept. of High Energy Physics, The H. Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    In the paper the JACEE experiment data analysis: energy spectra in the energy range 10{sup 12} - 10{sup 15} eV of different nuclides in cosmic radiation and some aspects of nuclear interactions at energy above 10{sup 12} eV/nucleon is presented. The data were compared with results of theory of cosmic radiation acceleration by striking waves arises from supernova stars explosions. In the interactions of cosmic radiation nuclei the short-lived particles production has been observed what agrees with long-distance component of cascades initiated by cosmic radiation interactions. In one case an interaction with asymmetric photons emission were observed 72 refs, 33 figs, 4 tabs

  8. Lyman-alpha radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Aaron; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical impact of Lyman-alpha (Ly{\\alpha}) radiation pressure on galaxy formation depends on the rate and duration of momentum transfer between Ly{\\alpha} photons and neutral hydrogen gas. Although photon trapping has the potential to multiply the effective force, ionizing radiation from stellar sources may relieve the Ly{\\alpha} pressure before appreciably affecting the kinematics of the host galaxy or efficiently coupling Ly{\\alpha} photons to the outflow. We present self-consistent Ly{\\alpha} radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of high-$z$ galaxy environments by coupling the Cosmic Ly{\\alpha} Transfer code (COLT) with spherically symmetric Lagrangian frame hydrodynamics. The accurate but computationally expensive Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations are feasible under the one-dimensional approximation. In certain cases Ly{\\alpha} feedback significantly enhances the velocity of the shell of gas expanding around a central source. Radiative feedback alone is capable of ejecting baryons into the i...

  9. On the Light Speed Anisotropy vs Cosmic Microwave Background Dipole: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Guidal, M; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kouznetsov, V; Kunne, Ronald Alexander; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of the Compton edge of the scattered electrons in GRAAL facility in European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole reveals up to 10 sigma variations larger than the statistical errors. We now show that the variations are not due to the frequency variations of the accelerator. The nature of Compton edge variations remains unclear, thus outlining the imperative of dedicated studies of light speed anisotropy.

  10. What is cosmic radiation?; Qu'est ce-que le rayonnement cosmique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The earth was indeed receiving ionizing radiations from the heavens. This cosmic radiation consists of particles travelling near the speed of light. It consists of two components, the first of which is permanent and of galactic origin, while the other is more sporadic, depending on the sun's activities. Natural land-based sources expose each of us to an average total dose of 2.4 mSv per year (source UNSCEAR). In addition, the human activities using ionizing radiation contribute to an average annual exposure of 1.4 mSv, originating primarily with medical activities ( radiodiagnostic and radiation therapy). Members of flights crew are subject to exposure. The total dose of cosmic radiation received is is directly proportional with the duration of exposure, and thus with the duration of the flight. Measurement taken on board aircraft during the 1990's showed that flight personnel (on long haul flights) receive an average dose of approximately the same magnitude as the one due to exposure to natural radioactivity in France. The damage caused by ionizing radiation depends on the quantity of energy released by radiation into the cells of each organ or tissue of the human body(exposure dose). For a given quantity of absorbed energy (dose expressed in Gray), the damage will vary according to the nature of the radiation and the affected organ. These effects are of two types: acute effects and deferred effects. Two measurements are essential for radiation protection: the measurements of the dose of radiation absorbed by the body and the assessment of the risk associated with the absorbed dose. Two units were thus created: the gray and the sievert. (N.C.)

  11. Mean-field studies of time reversal breaking states in super-heavy nuclei with the Gogny force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robledo, L. M., E-mail: luis.robledo@uam.es [Departamento Física Teórica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Recent progress on the description of time reversal breaking (odd mass and multi-quasiparticle excitation) states in super-heavy nuclei within a mean field framework and using several flavors of the Gogny interaction is reported. The study includes ground and excited states in selected odd mass isotopes of nobelium and mendelevium as well as high K isomeric states in {sup 254}No. These are two and four-quasiparticle excitations that are treated in the same self-consistent HFB plus blocking framework as the odd mass states.

  12. Airline pilot cosmic radiation and circadian disruption exposure assessment from logbooks and company records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajewski, Barbara; Waters, Martha A; Yong, Lee C; Tseng, Chih-Yu; Zivkovich, Zachary; Cassinelli, Rick T

    2011-06-01

    US commercial airline pilots, like all flight crew, are at increased risk for specific cancers, but the relation of these outcomes to specific air cabin exposures is unclear. Flight time or block (airborne plus taxi) time often substitutes for assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation. Our objectives were to develop methods to estimate exposures to cosmic radiation and circadian disruption for a study of chromosome aberrations in pilots and to describe workplace exposures for these pilots. Exposures were estimated for cosmic ionizing radiation and circadian disruption between August 1963 and March 2003 for 83 male pilots from a major US airline. Estimates were based on 523 387 individual flight segments in company records and pilot logbooks as well as summary records of hours flown from other sources. Exposure was estimated by calculation or imputation for all but 0.02% of the individual flight segments' block time. Exposures were estimated from questionnaire data for a comparison group of 51 male university faculty. Pilots flew a median of 7126 flight segments and 14 959 block hours for 27.8 years. In the final study year, a hypothetical pilot incurred an estimated median effective dose of 1.92 mSv (absorbed dose, 0.85 mGy) from cosmic radiation and crossed 362 time zones. This study pilot was possibly exposed to a moderate or large solar particle event a median of 6 times or once every 3.7 years of work. Work at the study airline and military flying were the two highest sources of pilot exposure for all metrics. An index of work during the standard sleep interval (SSI travel) also suggested potential chronic sleep disturbance in some pilots. For study airline flights, median segment radiation doses, time zones crossed, and SSI travel increased markedly from the 1990s to 2003 (P(trend) airline pilots, many of whom have been exposed to increasing cosmic radiation and circadian disruption from the 1990s through 2003. This assessment is likely to decrease exposure

  13. STARLIFE - An International Campaign to Study the Role of Galactic Cosmic Radiation in Astrobiological Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Ralf; Raguse, Marina; Leuko, Stefan; Berger, Thomas; Hellweg, Christine Elisabeth; Fujimori, Akira; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Horneck, Gerda

    2017-02-01

    In-depth knowledge regarding the biological effects of the radiation field in space is required for assessing the radiation risks in space. To obtain this knowledge, a set of different astrobiological model systems has been studied within the STARLIFE radiation campaign during six irradiation campaigns (2013-2015). The STARLIFE group is an international consortium with the aim to investigate the responses of different astrobiological model systems to the different types of ionizing radiation (X-rays, γ rays, heavy ions) representing major parts of the galactic cosmic radiation spectrum. Low- and high-energy charged particle radiation experiments have been conducted at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba, Japan. X-rays or γ rays were used as reference radiation at the German Aerospace Center (DLR, Cologne, Germany) or Beta-Gamma-Service GmbH (BGS, Wiehl, Germany) to derive the biological efficiency of different radiation qualities. All samples were exposed under identical conditions to the same dose and qualities of ionizing radiation (i) allowing a direct comparison between the tested specimens and (ii) providing information on the impact of the space radiation environment on currently used astrobiological model organisms.

  14. Gravitational Radiation from Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in Models with Large Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, B; Bleicher, M; Koch, Ben; Drescher, Hans-Joachim; Bleicher, Marcus

    2006-01-01

    The effects of classical gravitational radiation in models with large extra dimensions are investigated for ultra high energy cosmic rays (CRs). The cross sections are implemented into a simulation package (SENECA) for high energy hadron induced CR air showers. We predict that gravitational radiation from quasi-elastic scattering could be observed at incident CR energies above $10^9$ GeV for a setting with more than two extra dimensions. It is further shown that this gravitational energy loss can alter the energy reconstruction for CR energies $E_{\\rm CR}\\ge 5\\cdot 10^9$ GeV.

  15. Probing the Light Speed Anisotropy with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A L; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the angular fluctuations in the speed of light with respect to the apex of the dipole of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation using the experimental data obtained with GRAAL facility, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The measurements were based on the stability of the Compton edge of laser photons scattered on the 6 GeV monochromatic electron beam. The results enable to obtain a conservative constraint on the anisotropy in the light speed variations \\Delta c(\\theta)/c < 3 10^{-12}, i.e. with higher precision than from previous experiments.

  16. Rydberg atom detection of the temporal coherence of cosmic microwave background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tscherbul, Timur V

    2013-01-01

    Rydberg atoms immersed in cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherence effects on timescales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix, and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence intensities of the Rydberg atoms. A measurable fluorescence signal can be obtained with a cold trapped ensemble of 1e8 Rydberg atoms subject to 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB), allowing for novel insights into previously unexamined quantum coherence properties of CMB.

  17. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on the Radiation Hazard from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z. W.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays is a major obstacle in long duration human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. We find that, in deep space, cross sections between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/u usually have the largest effect on dose-equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between 0.85 and 1.2 GeV/u have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  18. Evaluation of exposure to cosmic radiation of flight crews of Lithuanian airlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morkŭnas, Gendrutis; Pilkyte, Laima; Ereminas, Darius

    2003-01-01

    In Lithuania the average annual effective dose due to cosmic radiation at the sea level is 0.38 mSv. The dose rate caused by cosmic radiation increases with altitude due to the decrease in attenuation of cosmic radiation by atmosphere. Dose rates at altitudes of commercial flights are tens times higher than those at the sea level. For this reason people who frequently fly receive higher doses which might even be subject to legal regulations. The European Council Directive (96/29/Euratom) on basic radiation safety standards requires that doses of aircrews members be assessed and the appropriate measures taken, depending on the assessment results. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential doses, which can be received by members of aircrews of Lithuanian Airlines. The assessment was done by performing measurements and calculations. Measurements were performed in flying aircrafts by thermoluminescent detectors, Geiger Muller counters and neutron rem counter. Such an approach lead to evaluation of doses due to directly ionizing particles and neutrons. Calculations were done with the help of the code CARI-6M. Such parameters as flight route, solar activity, duration and altitudes of flight were taken into account. Doses received during different flights and in different aircrafts were assessed. The results of measurements and calculations were compared and differences discussed. The results were also compared with the data obtained in other similar studies. It was found that the highest doses are received in flights to Paris, London, Amsterdam, and Frankfurt by aircraft B737. A number of flights causing annual doses higher than 1 mSv was estimated. Despite the fact that only European flights are operated by Lithuanian Airlines the dose of 1 mSv may be exceeded under some circumstances. If it happens some radiation protection measures shall be taken. These measures are also discussed.

  19. Lyman-alpha radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Radiation from the first stars and galaxies initiated the dramatic phase transition marking an end to the cosmic dark ages. The emission and absorption signatures from the Lyman-alpha transition of neutral hydrogen have been indispensable in extending the observational frontier for high-redshift galaxies into the epoch of reionization. Lyman-alpha radiative transfer provides clues about the processes leading to Lyman-alpha escape from individual galaxies and the subsequent transmission through the intergalactic medium. Cosmological simulations incorporating Lyman-alpha radiative transfer enhance our understanding of fundamental physics by supplying the inferred spectra and feedback on the gas. We discuss the dynamical impact of Lyman-alpha radiation pressure on galaxy formation throughout cosmic reionization with the first fully coupled Lyman-alpha radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. We self-consistently follow the chemistry, cooling, self-gravity, and ionizing radiation in protogalaxies and find that Lyman-alpha radiation pressure turns out to be dynamically important in several spherically symmetric simulations. As a case in point we apply our model to the COSMOS redshift 7 (CR7) galaxy at z = 6.6, which exhibits a +160 km/s velocity offset between the Lyman-alpha and HeII line peaks. We find that a massive black hole with a nonthermal Compton-thick spectrum is able to reproduce the observed Lyman-alpha signatures as a result of higher photon trapping and longer potential lifetime. We conclude with a general discussion of Lyman-alpha radiation in the first galaxies by considering simulations that cover the expected range of halo and source properties.

  20. The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) Facility onboard China's Future Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S N

    2014-01-01

    The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility is one of several space astronomy payloads of the cosmic lighthouse program onboard China's Space Station, which is planned for operation starting around 2020 for about 10 years. The main scientific objectives of HERD are indirect dark matter search, precise cosmic ray spectrum and composition measurements up to the knee energy, and high energy gamma-ray monitoring and survey. HERD is composed of a 3-D cubic calorimeter (CALO) surrounded by microstrip silicon trackers (STKs) from five sides except the bottom. CALO is made of about 10$^4$ cubes of LYSO crystals, corresponding to about 55 radiation lengths and 3 nuclear interaction lengths, respectively. The top STK microstrips of seven X-Y layers are sandwiched with tungsten converters to make precise directional measurements of incoming electrons and gamma-rays. In the baseline design, each of the four side SKTs is made of only three layers microstrips. All STKs will also be used for measuring the cha...

  1. Investigations of aircrews exposure to cosmic radiation - results, conclusions and suggestions

    CERN Document Server

    Bilski, P; Horwacik, T; Marczewska, B; Ochab, E; Olko, P

    2002-01-01

    In frame of a research project undertaken in collaboration with Polish airlines LOT, analysis of aircrews exposure to cosmic radiation has been performed. The applied methods included measurements of radiation doses with thermoluminescent detectors (MTS-N, MCP-N) and track detectors (CR-39) and also calculations of route doses with the CARI computer code. The obtained results indicate that aircrews of nearly all airplanes, with exception of these flying only on ATR aircraft, exceed regularly or may exceed in some conditions, effective doses of 1 mSv. In case of Boeing-767 aircrews such exceeding occurs always, independently of solar activity. Investigations revealed, that during these periods of the solar cycle, when intensity of cosmic radiation is high, exceeding of 6 mSv level is also possible. These results indicate, that according to Polish and European regulations it is necessary for airlines to provide regular estimations of radiation exposure of aircrews. Basing on the obtained results a system for pe...

  2. Cosmic Ray Test of Mini-drift Thick Gas Electron Multiplier Chamber for Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, S; Buck, B; Li, C; Ljubicic, T; Majka, R; Shao, M; Smirnov, N; Visser, G; Xu, Z; Zhou, Y

    2014-01-01

    A thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) chamber with an effective readout area of 10$\\times$10 cm$^{2}$ and a 11.3 mm ionization gap has been tested along with two regular gas electron multiplier (GEM) chambers in a cosmic ray test system. The thick ionization gap makes the THGEM chamber a mini-drift chamber. This kind mini-drift THGEM chamber is proposed as part of a transition radiation detector (TRD) for identifying electrons at an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) experiment. Through this cosmic ray test, an efficiency larger than 94$\\%$ and a spatial resolution $\\sim$220 $\\mu$m are achieved for the THGEM chamber at -3.65 kV. Thanks to its outstanding spatial resolution and thick ionization gap, the THGEM chamber shows excellent track reconstruction capability. The gain uniformity and stability of the THGEM chamber are also presented.

  3. Bursts of gravitational radiation from superconducting cosmic strings and the neutrino mass spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J. [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)]|[Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Cosmologia e Fisica Experimental de Altas Energias; Morejon Gonzalez, Danays [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2001-02-01

    Berezinsky, Hnatyk and Vilenkin showed that superconducting cosmic strings could be central engines for cosmological gamma-ray bursts and for producing the neutrino component of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A consequence of this mechanism would be that a detectable cusp-triggered gravitational wave burst should be release simultaneously with the {gamma}-ray surge. If contemporary measurements of both {gamma} and {nu} radiation could be made for any particular source, then the cosmological time-delay between them might be useful for putting unprecedently tight bounds on the neutrino mass spectrum. Such measurements could consistently verify or rule out the model since strictly correlated behaviour is expected for the duration of the event and for the time variability of the spectra. (author)

  4. Real-Time Aircraft Cosmic Ray Radiation Exposure Predictions from the NAIRAS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, C. J.; Tobiska, W.; Kress, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. There is also interest in extending NAIRAS to the LEO environment to address radiation hazard issues for the emerging commercial spaceflight industry. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. Real-time observations are required at a variety of locations within the geospace environment. The NAIRAS model is driven by real-time input data from ground-, atmospheric-, and space-based platforms. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions and observational data gaps were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. The focus of this talk is to present the current capabilities of the NAIRAS model, discuss future developments in aviation radiation modeling and instrumentation, and propose strategies and methodologies of bridging known gaps in current modeling and observational capabilities.

  5. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an effect apparently overlooked as yet. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this pol...

  6. Cosmic and solar radiation exposure for aircrew over a solar cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desormeaux, M. [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Over the past decade, extensive research has been performed at the Royal Military College of Canada to determine the radiation exposure of aircrew, and to assess the recommendation of the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) that aircrew should be considered as occupationally exposed workers. This research confirmed the ICRP findings and demonstrated that galactic cosmic radiation could be effectively predicted, which has led to the development of a semi-empirical computer model capable of predicting route doses over an entire solar cycle. Following ongoing validation, model improvement has been performed for short-haul and low-altitude flights, as well as flights done during solar minimum conditions. Furthermore, a model has also been proposed to account for the additional radiation exposure from solar particle events (SPEs). (author)

  7. Cosmic and solar radiation exposure for aircrew over a solar cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desormeaux, M. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-08-01

    Over the past decade, extensive research has been performed at the Royal Military College of Canada to determine the radiation exposure of aircrew, and to assess the recommendation of the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) that aircrew should be considered as occupationally exposed workers. This research confirmed the ICRP findings and demonstrated that galactic cosmic radiation could be effectively predicted, which has led to the development of a semi-empirical computer model capable of predicting route doses over an entire solar cycle. Following ongoing validation, model improvement has been performed for short-haul and low-altitude flights, as well as flights done during solar minimum conditions. Furthermore, a model has also been proposed to account for the additional radiation exposure from solar particle events (SPEs). (author)

  8. The Spectrumof the Cosmic Background Radiation: Early and RecentMeasurements from the White Mountain Research Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, G.F.

    1985-09-01

    The White Mountain Research Station has provided a support facility at a high, dry, radio-quiet site for measurements that have established the blackbody character of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This finding has confirmed the interpretation of the radiation as a relic of the primeval fireball and helped to establish the hot Big Bang theory as the standard cosmological model.

  9. Quantum collapse as a source of the seeds of cosmic structure during the radiation era

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Gabriel; Landau, Susana J.; Piccirilli, María Pía

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure, from a perfect isotropic and homogeneous Universe, has not been clearly explained by the standard version of inflationary models as the dynamics involved preserve the homogeneity and isotropy at all times. A proposal that attempts to deal with this problem, by introducing "the self-induced collapse hypothesis," has been introduced by D. Sudarsky and collaborators in previous papers. In all these works, the collapse of the wave function of the inflaton mode is restricted to occur during the inflationary period. In this paper, we analyze the possibility that the collapse happens during the radiation era. A viable model can be constructed under the condition that the inflaton field variable must be affected by the collapse while the momentum variable can or cannot be affected. Another condition to be fulfilled is that the time of collapse must be independent of k . However, when comparing with recent observational data, the predictions of the model cannot be distinguished from the ones provided by the standard inflationary scenario. The main reason for this arises from the requirement that primordial power spectrum obtained for the radiation era matches the amplitude of scalar fluctuations consistent with the latest cosmic microwave background observations. This latter constraint results in a limit on the possible times of collapse and ensures that the contribution of the inflaton field to the energy-momentum tensor is negligible compared to the contribution of the radiation fields.

  10. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Constraints on a Modified Chaplygin Gas Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dao-Jun; LI Xin-Zhou

    2005-01-01

    @@ A modified Chaplygin gas model of unifying dark energy and dark matter with the exotic equation of state p = Bρ- A/ρα , which can also explain the recent expansion of the universe, is investigated by means of constraining the location of the peak of the cosmic microwave background radiation spectrum. We find that the result of CMBR measurements does not exclude the nonzero value of parameter B, but allows it in the range -0.35 (<~) B (<~) 0.025.

  11. Estimates of cosmic radiation dose received by aircrew of DCTA’s flight test special group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Antonio Federico

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft crews are subjected to radiation doses of cosmic origin in the regular exercise of their functions. The present paper gives an estimate of typical doses received by crews of the Flight Test Special Group of DCTA (GEEV from July 2007 to November 2009. The dose estimates were performed using the CARI-6 and PCAIRE codes and were compared with each other and with values obtained by other authors in other regions of the globe, being analyzed from the standpoint of estimating radiobiological risk.

  12. Southern Hemisphere Measurement of the Anisotropy in the CosmicMicrowave Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, George F.; Lubin, Phil M.

    1979-06-01

    A recent measurement of the anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation from the southern hemisphere (Lima, Peru) is essentially in agreement with previous measurements from the northern hemisphere. The net anisotropy can be described as a first order spherical harmonic (Doppler) anisotropy of amplitude 3.1 {+-} 0.4 m{sup o}K with a quadrupole anisotropy of less than 1 m{sup o}K. In addition, measurements of the linear polarization yield an upper limit of 1 m{sup o}K, or one part in 3000, at 95% C.L. for the amplitudes of any spherical harmonic through third order.

  13. Study of the dosimetric characteristics of cosmic radiation at civil aviation altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, A; Rancati, T

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of the doses on solar activity for intermediate levels of the solar modulation parameter has been studied by means of simulations carried out by the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA. The vertical cut-off rigidities investigated lie between 0.4 and 6.1 GV. The calculated results show that the linear dependence proposed in a previous work, for the effective dose rate as a function of the solar modulation parameter, can be considered as an acceptable approximation. In addition, some dosimetric characteristics of cosmic radiation and some properties of the dosemeters in use for monitoring in the cosmic ray environment have been analysed with a view to simplifying measurements. The depth-dose curves in the ICRU sphere and the response of a tissue-equivalent ionisation chamber have been determined by the FLUKA code for a number of cosmic ray spectra. On the basis of the calculated results, it is concluded that a value of the depth, d, which would make the ambient dose equivalent a conservative predic...

  14. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: II. Extragalactic far infrared background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using formula to describe the average spectrum of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval at mean temperature T=18.5 K, the radiative and thermodynamic properties, such as the total emissivity, total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure are calculated. The value for the total intensity received in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval is equal to 13.6 nW m-2 sr-1. This value is about 19.4 % of the total intensity expected from the energy released by stellar nucleosynthesis over cosmic history. The radiative and thermodynamic functions of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation are calculated at redshift z=1.5.

  15. On the gravitational, dilatonic, and axionic radiative damping of cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Alessandra; Damour, Thibault

    1999-07-01

    We study the radiation reaction on cosmic strings due to the emission of dilatonic, gravitational and axionic waves. After verifying the (on average) conservative nature of the time-symmetric self-interactions, we concentrate on the finite radiation damping force associated with the half-retarded minus half-advanced ``reactive'' fields. We reexamine a recent proposal of using a ``local back reaction approximation'' for the reactive fields. Using dimensional continuation as a convenient technical tool, we find, contrary to previous claims, that this proposal leads to antidamping in the case of the axionic field, and to zero (integrated) damping in the case of the gravitational field. One gets normal positive damping only in the case of the dilatonic field. We propose to use a suitably modified version of the local dilatonic radiation reaction as a substitute for the exact (nonlocal) gravitational radiation reaction. The incorporation of such a local approximation to gravitational radiation reaction should allow one to complete, in a computationally nonintensive way, string network simulations and to give better estimates of the amount and spectrum of gravitational radiation emitted by a cosmologically evolving network of massive strings.

  16. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene as a base material for shielding cosmic radiation in aerospace applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Marlon A., E-mail: marlon@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Fisica Aplicada; Goncalez, Odair L. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (PG/CTE/ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnologias Espaciais

    2013-07-01

    Materials with high content of hydrogen have good properties of shielding against the effects of cosmic rays (CR) because are less effective than materials with high nuclear masses in the generation of secondary radiation. Beside the Aluminum, Polyethylene has been used as a reference and as a base material for composites applied in structures and in shielding of ionizing radiation for aerospace applications. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), pure and doped 10% by mass with cadmium chloride, had its shielding properties for CR evaluated in this paper. Methodology used was based in conventional radioactive sources employed on simple geometries experiments and then computational simulation for isotropic fluxes of cosmic-ray high energy particles. Transmission experiments were performed with a3.7GBq (100 mCi){sup 241}Am-Be neutron source and a set of conventional calibration gamma radiation sources. Samples were characterized according to their gamma total attenuation coefficients from 59 to 1,408 keV, dose deposition curve for {sup 60}Co gamma-rays, fast neutron transmission coefficient, generation and self-absorption of thermal neutrons as well as their generation of internal cascades of secondary electrons and gamma-rays by nuclear interactions of fast neutrons with shielding material. Main effects of the additive in the polyethylene base were the most effective removal of gamma radiation and of secondary electrons with energies below 200 keV, the reduction of the albedo as well as the thermal neutrons transmission. Dose reduction due to primary CR were not significant, since the largest contribution to the doses due to high energy ionizing particles transmitted and, also, due to secondary radiation with energy above 1 MeV produced in shielding. (author)

  17. The research and practice of boosting oil production by duplicated horizontal wells in thick super heavy oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiwu, Li; Yang Jing, Wangping; Ping, Yuan [Exploration and Development Research Institute of Liaohe Oilfield Company, PetroChina, P.R.China , 124010 (China)

    2011-07-01

    In the oil industry, the extraction of heavy oil and super heavy oil from reservoirs is difficult and production decline and sand production are some of the numerous challenges it faces. The aim of this paper is to show how secondary development can address these issues. A preliminary study was conducted and then a plan of secondary development was applied to M6 Block which is a massive extra-ultra heavy oil reservoir. The plan included 154 wells with 30 new horizontal wells. Results proved SAGD to be a good technique for high oil recovery results with improved production from M6 Block. After the implementation of the secondary development, oil recovery improved by 36.3%. This technique also solved the sand production problem. This study showed that secondary development can be a solution to obtain a better performance from heavy oil reservoirs and provides guidance to other similar reservoir.

  18. Small-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation and scattering by cloudy plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Peebles, P J E

    1998-01-01

    If the first stars formed soon after decoupling of baryons from the thermal cosmic background radiation (CBR), the radiation may have been last scattered in a cloudy plasma. We discuss the resulting small-scale anisotropy of the CBR in the limit where the plasma clouds are small compared to the mean distance between clouds along a line of sight. This complements the perturbative analysis valid for mildly nonlinear departures from homogeneity at last scattering. We conclude that reasonable choices for the cloud parameters imply CBR anisotropy consistent with the present experimental limits, in agreement with the perturbative approach. This means the remarkable isotropy of the CBR need not contradict the early small-scale structure formation predicted in some cosmogonies.

  19. Coherent dynamics of Rydberg atoms in cosmic-microwave-background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Rydberg atoms excited by cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherences on time scales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as slowly decaying (100 ps) quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence. An analytic model shows the dependence of the coherent dynamics on the energy splitting between atomic eigenstates, transition dipole moments, and coherence time of the radiation. Experimental detection of the fluorescence signal from a trapped ensemble of 108 Rydberg atoms is discussed, but shown to be technically challenging at present, requiring cosmic-microwave-background amplification somewhat beyond current practice.

  20. Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation in low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Akopova, A. B.; Magradze, N. V.; Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Integral linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation (CR) particles were measured on five Cosmos series spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO). Particular emphasis is placed on results of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite which carried a set of joint U.S.S.R.-U.S.A. radiation experiments involving passive detectors that included thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's), plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's), fission foils, nuclear photo-emulsions, etc. which were located both inside and outside the spacecraft. Measured LET spectra are compared with those theoretically calculated. Results show that there is some dependence of LET spectra on orbital parameters. The results are used to estimate the CR quality factor (QF) for the COSMOS 1887 mission.

  1. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  2. Introducing CoDa (Cosmic Dawn): Radiation-Hydrodynamics of Galaxy Formation in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocvirk, Pierre; Gillet, Nicolas; Shapiro, Paul; Aubert, Dominique; Iliev, Ilian; Romain, Teyssier; Yepes, Gustavo; Choi, Jun-hwan; Sullivan, David; Knebe, Alexander; Gottloeber, Stefan; D'Aloisio, Anson; Park, Hyunbae; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2015-08-01

    CoDa (Cosmic Dawn) is the largest fully coupled radiation hydrodynamics simulation of the reionization of the local Universe to date. It was performed using RAMSES-CUDATON running on 8192 nodes (i.e. 8192 GPUs) on the titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate a 64 h-1Mpc side box down to z=4.23. In this simulation, reionization proceeds self-consistently, driven by stellar radiation. We compare the simulation's reionization history, ionizing flux density, the cosmic star formation history and the CMB Thompson scattering optical depth with their observational values. Luminosity functions are also in rather good agreement with high redshift observations, although very bright objects (MAB1600 gas filaments present a sheathed structure, with a hot envelope surrounding a cooler core. They are however not able to self-shield, while regions denser than 10^-4.5 H atoms per comoving h^-3cm^3 are. Haloes below M ˜ 3.10^9 M⊙ are severely affected by the expanding, rising UV background: their ISM is quickly photo-heated to temperatures above our star formation threshold and therefore stop forming stars after local reionization has occured. Overall, the haloes between 10^(10-11) M⊙ dominate the star formation budget of the box for most of the Epoch of Reionization. Several additional studies will follow, looking for instance at environmental effects on galaxy properties, and the regimes of accretion.

  3. Characterization of the Cosmic Radiation Field at Flight Altitudes and Estimation of Aircrew Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jong Ho

    2004-02-15

    Cosmic radiation field at flight altitudes was simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code and the spectra of secondary particles were obtained from the simulation. The obtained particle spectra were converted into effective dose rates by means of appropriate sets of conversion coefficients. The result shows that higher dose rates are observed at the higher altitude than the lower, at the higher latitude than the lower, and at the solar minimum than the maximum. Also it is confirmed that CARI-6 used in the estimation of aircrew exposure along specific flights provides approximately the same doses as the results of FLUKA calculations. Accordingly, the route doses to the personnels on board due to cosmic radiation were calculated for Korean-based commercial international airline routes using CARI-6. Annual individual doses to aircrew and the collective effective dose of passengers were estimated by applying the calculated route doses to the flight schedules of aircrew and the air travel statistics of Korea. The result shows that the annual doses to aircrew exceed the annual dose limit of public and are comparable to those of the group of workers occupationally exposed. Therefore it is necessary to consider the aircrew as the occupational exposure group. Also the annual collective dose to 11 million Korean passengers in 2001 appeared to be 136 man-Sv.

  4. Aircrew Exposure To Cosmic Radiation Evaluated By Means Of Several Methods; Results Obtained In 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploc, Ondřej; Spurný, František; Jadrníčková, Iva; Turek, Karel

    2008-08-01

    Routine evaluation of aircraft crew exposure to cosmic radiation in the Czech Republic is performed by means of calculation method. Measurements onboard aircraft work as a control tool of the routine method, as well as a possibility of comparison of results measured by means of several methods. The following methods were used in 2006: (1) mobile dosimetry unit (MDU) type Liulin—a spectrometer of energy deposited in Si-detector; (2) two types of LET spectrometers based on the chemically etched track detectors (TED); (3) two types of thermoluminescent detectors; and (4) two calculation methods. MDU represents currently one of the most reliable equipments for evaluation of the aircraft crew exposure to cosmic radiation. It is an active device which measures total energy depositions (Edep) in the semiconductor unit, and, after appropriate calibration, is able to give a separate estimation for non-neutron and neutron-like components of H*(10). This contribution consists mostly of results acquired by means of this equipment; measurements with passive detectors and calculations are mentioned because of comparison. Reasonably good agreement of all data sets could be stated.

  5. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  6. Cosmic radiation measurements on the Foton-M4 satellite by passive detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strádi, Andrea; Pálfalvi, József K.; Szabó, Julianna; Pázmándi, Tamás; Ivanova, Olga A.; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.

    2017-02-01

    The Russian Foton spacecraft was designed to deliver scientific experiments to low Earth orbit and return them safely to the ground for further analysis. During the 44-d Foton-M4 satellite mission in 2014 several passive cosmic ray detectors were exposed outside (in a single holder) and inside (in 4 locations) the recoverable capsule to study the radiation field. The applied thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) are more sensitive to the particles with LET under 10 keV μm-1, while the solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) measure the particles having LET over this value. According to our measurements the average internal absorbed dose rate varied between 374-562 μGy/day for low LET radiation and 40-52 μGy/day for high LET radiation. Outside the capsule the dose rate was much higher, 1078 μGy/day for low LET radiation and 75 μGy/day for high LET radiation. Within the paper the obtained absorbed dose rates has been compared to those measured on the previous Foton-M flights, during the Bion-M1 mission and in the Columbus module of the International Space Station.

  7. Lunar radiation environment and space weathering from the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Baker, T.; Blake, B.; Case, A. W.; Cooper, J. F.; Golightly, M.; Jordan, A.; Joyce, C.; Kasper, J.; Kozarev, K.; Mislinski, J.; Mazur, J.; Posner, A.; Rother, O.; Smith, S.; Spence, H. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J.; Zeitlin, C.

    2012-03-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) measures linear energy transfer by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Mission in a circular, polar lunar orbit. GCR fluxes remain at the highest levels ever observed during the space age. One of the largest SEP events observed by CRaTER during the LRO mission occurred on June 7, 2011. We compare model predictions by the Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM) for both dose rates from GCRs and SEPs during this event with results from CRaTER. We find agreement between these models and the CRaTER dose rates, which together demonstrate the accuracy of EMMREM, and its suitability for a real-time space weather system. We utilize CRaTER to test forecasts made by the Relativistic Electron Alert System for Exploration (REleASE), which successfully predicts the June 7th event. At the maximum CRaTER-observed GCR dose rate (˜11.7 cGy/yr where Gy is a unit indicating energy deposition per unit mass, 1 Gy = 1 J/kg), GCRs deposit ˜88 eV/molecule in water over 4 billion years, causing significant change in molecular composition and physical structure (e.g., density, color, crystallinity) of water ice, loss of molecular hydrogen, and production of more complex molecules linking carbon and other elements in the irradiated ice. This shows that space weathering by GCRs may be extremely important for chemical evolution of ice on the Moon. Thus, we show comprehensive observations from the CRaTER instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter that characterizes the radiation environment and space weathering on the Moon.

  8. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian SAS-pilots 1960 to 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-02-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots employed by the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS). The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircraft in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project, be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for this work is the collection of old SAS time tables found in the SAS Museum at Fornebu Airport in Oslo, and information provided by members of the Pilots Associations.

  9. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian pilots flying aircraft not used by SAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-05-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots flying a great diversity of different aircrafts. Aircrafts that appear in the time-tables of the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS) have been treated in an earlier report. The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircrafts in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for the work in this report is information provided by several active pilots, members of the Pilots Associations, along with calculations performed using US Federal Aviation Administration`s computer code CARI-3N. 2 refs.

  10. Radiation Backgrounds at Cosmic Dawn: X-Rays from Compact Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Madau, Piero

    2016-01-01

    We compute the expected X-ray diffuse background and radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium (IGM) from X-ray binaries prior and during the epoch of reionization. The cosmic evolution of compact binaries is followed using a population synthesis technique that treats separately neutron stars and black hole binaries in different spectral states and is calibrated to reproduce the observed X-ray properties of galaxies at z6. Radiative transfer effects modulate the background spectrum, which shows a characteristic peak between 1 and 2 keV. While the filtering of X-ray radiation through the IGM slightly increases the mean excess energy per photoionization, it also weakens the radiation intensity below 1 keV, lowering the mean photoionization and heating rates. Numerical integration of the rate and energy equations shows that the contribution of X-ray binaries to the ionization of the bulk IGM is negligible, with the electron fraction never exceeding 1%. Direct HeI photoionizations are the main source of IGM ...

  11. New Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation Temperature at3.3 mm Wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witebsky, C.; Smoot, G.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S.D.

    1986-02-01

    We have measured the temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength in 1982, 1983, and 1984 as part of a larger project to determine the CBR temperature at five wavelengths from 12 cm to 3.3 mm (Smoot et al. 1985). The 3.3-mm measurements yield a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1{sigma} uncertainty of 20.12 K. This paper describes the instrument, the measurement techniques, and the data-analysis procedures used. Our result is in good agreement with recent measurements at comparable wavelengths by Meyer and Jura (1985) and by Peterson, Richards, and Timusk (1985), but it disagrees with the temperatures reported by Woody and Richards (1981).

  12. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7/sup 0/ +- 1.8/sup 0/ declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables.

  13. Hawking radiation via tunneling from the spacetime of a spinning cosmic string black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Jusufi, Kimet

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study Hawking radiation as a massless particles tunneling process across the event horizon from the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes pierced by an infinitely long spinning cosmic string and a global monopole. Applying the WKB approximation and using a generalized Painlev\\'e line element for stationary axisymmetric spacetimes, also by taking into account that the ADM mass of the black hole decreases due to the presence of topological defects, it is shown that the Hawking temperature remains unchanged for these black holes. The tunneling of charged massive particles from Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes is also studied, in both cases the tunneling rate is related to the change of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. The results extend the work of Parikh and Wilczek and are consistent with an underlying unitary theory.

  14. A Flat Universe from High-Resolution Maps of the Cosmic MicrowaveBackground Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Bernardis, P.; Ade, P.A.R.; Bock, J.J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill,J.; Boscaleri, A.; Coble, K.; Crill, B.P.; De Gasperis, G.; Farese, P.C.; Ferreira, P.G.; Ganga, K.; Giacometti, M.; Hivon, E.; Hristov, V.V.; Iacoangeli, A.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lange, A.E.; Martinis, L.; Masi, S.; Mason,P.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Melchiorri, A.; Miglio, L.; Montroy, T.; Netterfield,C.B.; Pascale, E.; Piacentini, F.; Pogosyan, D.; Prunet, S.; Rao, S.; Romeo, G.; Ruhl, J.E.; Scaramuzzi, F.; Sforna, D.; Vittorio, N.

    2000-04-28

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K Cosmic Microwave Background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole {ell}{sub peak} = (197 {+-} 6), with an amplitude DT{sub 200} = (69 {+-} 8){mu}K. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favored by standard inflationary scenarios.

  15. On climate response to changes in the cosmic ray flux and radiative budget

    CERN Document Server

    Shaviv, N J

    2004-01-01

    We examine the results linking cosmic ray flux (CRF) variations to global climate change. We then proceed to study various periods over which there are estimates for the radiative forcing, temperature change and CRF variations relative to today. These include the Phanerozoic as a whole, the Cretaceous, the Eocene, the Last Glacial Maximum, the 20th century, as well as the 11-yr solar cycle. This enables us to place quantitative limits on climate sensitivity to both changes in the CRF, Phi_CR, and the radiative budget, F, under equilibrium. Under the assumption that the CRF is indeed a climate driver, we find that the sensitivity to CRF variations is consistently fitted with mu := -Phi_0 (dT_global/ d Phi_CR) = 6.5 +/- 2.5 K (where Phi_0 is the CR energy flux today). Additionally, the sensitivity to radiative forcing changes is lambda := dT_global/ dF_0 = 0.35 +/- 0.09 K/(W/m^2), at the current temperature, while its temperature derivative is negligible with d lambda / dT_0 = 0.01 +/- 0.03 1/(W/m^2). If the ob...

  16. Cosmic radiation and mortality from cancer among male German airline pilots: extended cohort follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Gaël Paul; Blettner, Maria; Langner, Ingo; Zeeb, Hajo

    2012-06-01

    Commercial airline pilots are exposed to cosmic radiation and other specific occupational factors, potentially leading to increased cancer mortality. This was analysed in a cohort of 6,000 German cockpit crew members. A mortality follow-up for the years 1960-2004 was performed and occupational and dosimetry data were collected for this period. 405 deaths, including 127 cancer deaths, occurred in the cohort. The mortality from all causes and all cancers was significantly lower than in the German population. Total mortality decreased with increasing radiation doses (rate ratio (RR) per 10 mSv: 0.85, 95 % CI: 0.79, 0.93), contrasting with a non-significant increase of cancer mortality (RR per 10 mSv: 1.05, 95 % CI: 0.91, 1.20), which was restricted to the group of cancers not categorized as radiogenic in categorical analyses. While the total and cancer mortality of cockpit crew is low, a positive trend of all cancer with radiation dose is observed. Incomplete adjustment for age, other exposures correlated with duration of employment and a healthy worker survivor effect may contribute to this finding. More information is expected from a pooled analysis of updated international aircrew studies.

  17. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  18. Modeling of Aircrew Radiation Exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, M.; Lewis, B. J.; Boudreau, M.; Al Anid, H.; Bennett, L. G. I.

    The predictive code for aircrew radiation exposure (PCAIRE) was based on empirical correlations, which were developed from measurement flights during solar cycle 23, for the prediction of the ambient dose equivalent rates. To extend to the extremum conditions of solar modulation and altitude, bounding correlations have been further developed with the LUIN transport code and incorporated into the model. For interpolation between the bounding solar-cycle conditions, the new NASA solar modulation model has been used. The conversion ratio of effective dose to ambient dose equivalent, applied to the (measured) PCAIRE estimate for the legal regulation of aircrew exposure, was re-evaluated in this work to take into consideration the new ICRP-92 radiation weighting factors and different possible irradiation geometries of the source cosmic-radiation field. A computational analysis with MCNPX was used to estimate additional aircrew exposure that may result from sporadic solar particle events, considering the geostationary operational environmental satellite data. These predictions were compared to the ambient dose equivalent rates measured with a TEPC onboard an aircraft prior to and during the event, and were further compared to count rate data observed at various neutron monitors on the ground.

  19. Recent studies on the exposure of aircrew to cosmic and solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, D

    2002-07-01

    Investigations of the impact of cosmic and solar radiation on aircrew involve many challenges. The great variety of primary and secondary ionising and non-ionising radiation, the wide range of energies involved and the role played by the Earth's atmosphere and magnetic field and the Sun combine to produce a very complicated scenario. These factors are reflected in conditions on aviation routes where exposure to radiation varies with altitude, latitude and stage of solar cycle. The great increase in air travel and consequent rise in numbers of aircrew whose occupation requires them to work in this environment has prompted new concern about exposure risks at aviation altitudes. The situation has also been highlighted by the tendency for aircraft to fly at higher altitudes in recent years and by the 1990 recommendations of the ICRP that exposure of civil aircrew be considered as being occupational. These have recently been translated into a legal requirement in the European Union. Several studies have been completed using a very wide range of detectors on subsonic and supersonic routes and new investigations are underway. With the completion of the DOSMAX project in another three years or so, world data for a whole solar cycle will be more complete than ever before. Results indicate that for most routes investigated during solar minimum, aircrew are unlikely to receive doses in excess of 6 mSv.yr{sup -1}. (author)

  20. Epidemiological investigations of aircrew: an occupational group with low-level cosmic radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeb, Hajo; Hammer, Gaël P; Blettner, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Aircrew and passengers are exposed to low-level cosmic ionising radiation. Annual effective doses for flight crew have been estimated to be in the order of 2-5 mSv and can attain 75 mSv at career end. Epidemiological studies in this occupational group have been conducted over the last 15-20 years, usually with a focus on radiation-associated cancer. These studies are summarised in this note. Overall cancer risk was not elevated in most studies and subpopulations analysed, while malignant melanoma, other skin cancers and breast cancer in female aircrew have shown elevated incidence, with lesser risk elevations in terms of mortality. In some studies, including the large German cohort, brain cancer risk appears elevated. Cardiovascular mortality risks were generally very low. Dose information for pilots was usually derived from calculation procedures based on routine licence information, types of aircraft and routes/hours flown, but not on direct measurements. However, dose estimates have shown high validity when compared with measured values. No clear-cut dose-response patterns pointing to a higher risk for those with higher cumulative doses were found. Studies on other health outcomes have shown mixed results. Overall, aircrew are a highly selected group with many specific characteristics and exposures that might also influence cancers or other health outcomes. Radiation-associated health effects have not been clearly established in the studies available so far.

  1. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure from galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, M; Lewis, B J; Boudreau, M; Al Anid, H; Bennett, L G I

    2007-01-01

    Correlations have been developed for implementation into the semi-empirical Predictive Code for Aircrew Radiation Exposure (PCAIRE) to account for effects of extremum conditions of solar modulation and low altitude based on transport code calculations. An improved solar modulation model, as proposed by NASA, has been further adopted to interpolate between the bounding correlations for solar modulation. The conversion ratio of effective dose to ambient dose equivalent, as applied to the PCAIRE calculation (based on measurements) for the legal regulation of aircrew exposure, was re-evaluated in this work to take into consideration new ICRP-92 radiation-weighting factors and different possible irradiation geometries of the source cosmic-radiation field. A computational analysis with Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended Code was further used to estimate additional aircrew exposure that may result from sporadic solar energetic particle events considering real-time monitoring by the Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellite. These predictions were compared with the ambient dose equivalent rates measured on-board an aircraft and to count rate data observed at various ground-level neutron monitors.

  2. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on Space Radiation Exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Wei; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major hazard to space crews, especially in long duration human space explorations. For this reason, they will be protected by radiation shielding that fragments the GCR heavy ions. Here we investigate how sensitive the crew's radiation exposure is to nuclear fragmentation cross sections at different energies. We find that in deep space cross sections between about 0.2 and 1.2 GeV/u have the strongest effect on dose equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV/u are the most important at solar maximum'. On the other hand, at the location of the International Space Station, cross sections at_higher -energies, between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV /u at solar minimum and between about 1.7 and 3.4 GeV/u'at,solar maximum, are the most important This is. due-to the average geomagnetic cutoff for the ISS orbit. We also show the effect of uncertainties in the fragmentation cross sections on the elemental energy spectra behind shielding. These results help to focus the studies of fragmentation cross sections on the proper energy range in order to improve our predictions of crew exposures.

  3. Implementing Badhwar-O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray Model for the Analysis of Space Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; O'Neill, Patrick M.; Slaba, Tony C.

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, accurate energy spectrum of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is necessary. Characterization of the ionizing radiation environment is challenging because the interplanetary plasma and radiation fields are modulated by solar disturbances and the radiation doses received by astronauts in interplanetary space are likewise influenced. A model of the Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 (BO11) GCR environment, which is represented by GCR deceleration potential theta, has been derived by utilizing all of the GCR measurements from balloons, satellites, and the newer NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). In the BO11 model, the solar modulation level is derived from the mean international sunspot numbers with time-delay, which has been calibrated with actual flight instrument measurements to produce better GCR flux data fit during solar minima. GCR fluxes provided by the BO11 model were compared with various spacecraft measurements at 1 AU, and further comparisons were made for the tissue equivalent proportional counters measurements at low Earth orbits using the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code and various GCR models. For the comparison of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent calculations with the measurements by Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) at Gale crater on Mars, the intensities and energies of GCR entering the heliosphere were calculated by using the BO11 model, which accounts for time-dependent attenuation of the local interstellar spectrum of each element. The BO11 model, which has emphasized for the last 24 solar minima, showed in relatively good agreement with the RAD data for the first 200 sols, but it was resulted in to be less well during near the solar maximum of solar cycle 24 due to subtleties in the changing heliospheric conditions. By performing the error analysis of the BO11 model and the optimization in reducing overall uncertainty, the resultant BO13 model

  4. Research on Casting Technology for Super Heavy Anvil Block%特厚大砧座铸件的铸造技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙德润; 唐贤其; 宁德林; 杨晓兵

    2014-01-01

    Combined with the application of computer solidification simulation technology , the casting technology for super heavy anvil block are reseached , and the exported super heavy steel castings with thickness 2 350 mm which are needed the overall ultrasonic test are successfully completed .%结合计算机凝固模拟技术的应用,对厚大砧座铸钢件的铸造工艺及技术进行了研究,成功完成了厚度达到2350 mm且需要进行整体超声检测的外贸特厚大铸钢件的铸造。

  5. Extensions of Natural Radioactivity to 4th-Type and of the Periodic Table to Super-heavy Nuclei: Contribution of Raj K Gupta to Cold Nuclear Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    BirBikram Singh; Sushil Kumar; Sharma, Manoj K.; S K Patra

    2014-01-01

    We have studied here the contribution of Indian Scientists associated with Prof. Raj K. Gupta to cold nuclear phenomena during the last almost four decades, which led to the discovery of fourth kind of natural radioactivity (also known as Cluster Radioactivity, CR) and to the extension of periodic table to super heavy nuclei. It is exclusively pointed out how the Quantum Mechanical Fragmentation Theory (QMFT) advanced by Prof. Raj K. Gupta and Collaborators led to the disc...

  6. Cosmic Dawn (CoDa): the First Radiation-Hydrodynamics Simulation of Reionization and Galaxy Formation in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ocvirk, Pierre; Shapiro, Paul R; Aubert, Dominique; Iliev, Ilian T; Teyssier, Romain; Yepes, Gustavo; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Sullivan, David; Knebe, Alexander; Gottloeber, Stefan; D'Aloisio, Anson; Park, Hyunbae; Hoffman, Yehuda; Stranex, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic reionization by starlight from early galaxies affected their evolution, thereby impacting reionization, itself. Star formation suppression, for example, may explain the observed underabundance of Local Group dwarfs relative to N-body predictions for Cold Dark Matter. Reionization modelling requires simulating volumes large enough ~(100 Mpc)^3 to sample reionization "patchiness", while resolving millions of galaxy sources above ~10^8 Msun, combining gravitational and gas dynamics with radiative transfer. Modelling the Local Group requires initial cosmological density fluctuations pre-selected to form the well-known structures of the local universe today. Cosmic Dawn ("CoDa") is the first such fully-coupled, radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of reionization of the local universe. Our new hybrid CPU-GPU code, RAMSES-CUDATON, performs hundreds of radiative transfer and ionization rate-solver timesteps on the GPUs for each hydro-gravity timestep on the CPUs. CoDa simulated (91 Mpc)^3 with 4096^3 particles ...

  7. Single particle effects, Biostack, and risk evaluation - Studies on the radiation risk from Galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    The possible health risks posed by Galactic cosmic rays, especially the possible heightened cancer risk, are examined. The results of the Biostack studies of the biological effects of high-energy cosmic rays are discussed. The biological mechanisms involved in possible harm due to cosmic rays are considered.

  8. Isoscalar giant monopole resonance for drip-line and super heavy nuclei in the framework of a relativistic mean field formalism with scaling calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Biswal, S K

    2014-01-01

    We study the isoscalar giant monopole resonance for drip-lines and super heavy nuclei in the frame work of a relativistic mean field theory with scaling approach. The well known extended Thomas-Fermi approximation in the non-linear $\\sigma$-$\\omega$ model is used to estimate the giant monopole excitation energy for some selected light spherical nuclei starting from the region of proton to neutron drip-lines. The application is extended to super heavy region for Z=114 and 120, which are predicted by several models as the next proton magic number beyond Z=82. We compared the excitation energy obtained by four successful force parameters NL1, NL3, NL3$^*$ and FSUGold. The monopole energy decreases toward the proton and neutron drip-lines in an isotopic chain for lighter mass nuclei contrary to a monotonous decrease for super heavy isotopes. The maximum and minimum monopole excitation energies are obtained for nuclei with minimum and maximum isospin, respectively in an isotopic chain.

  9. An Instrument for Investigation of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at Intermediate Angular Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Jarosik, N.; Netterfield, C. B.; Page, L.; Wilkinson, D.

    1997-02-01

    We describe an off-axis microwave telescope for observations of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales between 0.5d and 3°. The receiver utilizes cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers and detects the total power in multiple 3 GHz wide channels. Both frequency and polarization information are recorded allowing discrimination between CMB radiation and potential foreground sources and allowing checks for systematic effects. The instrumental radiometric offset is small (~1 mK). Data are taken by rapidly sampling while sweeping the beam many beamwidths across the sky. After detection, a spatio-temporal filter is formed in software that optimizes the sensitivity in a multipole band in the presence of atmospheric fluctuations. Observations were made from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (SK), Canada, during the winter of 1993 with six channels between 27.6 and 34.0 GHz, in 1994 with 12 channels between 27.6 and 44.1 GHz, and in 1995 with six channels between 38.2 and 44.1 GHz. The performance of the instrument and assessment of the atmospheric noise at this site are discussed.

  10. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Power Spectrum as a Random Bit Generator for Symmetric and Asymmetric-Key Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    In this note, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation is shown to be capable of functioning as a Random Bit Generator, and constitutes an effectively infinite supply of truly random one-time pad values of arbitrary length. It is further argued that the CMB power spectrum potentially conforms to the FIPS 140-2 standard. Additionally, its applicability to the generation of a (n x n) random key matrix for a Vernam cipher is established.

  11. High-impedence NbSi TES sensors for studying the cosmic microwave background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Nones, Claudia; Benoit, Alain; Bergé, Laurent; Bideau, Aurelien; Camus, Philippe; Dumoulin, Louis; Monfardini, Alessandro; Rigaut, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are crucial in cosmology, because any proposed model of the universe must account for the features of this radiation. Of all CMB measurements that the scientific community has not yet been able to perform, the CMB B-mode polarization is probably the most challenging from the instrumental point of view. The signature of primordial gravitational waves, which give rise to a B-type polarization, is one of the goals in cosmology today and amongst the first objectives in the field. For this purpose, high-performance low-temperature bolometric cameras, made of thousands of pixels, are currently being developed by many groups, which will improve the sensitivity to B-mode CMB polarization by one or two orders of magnitude compared to the Planck satellite HFI detectors. We present here a new bolometer structure that is able to increase the pixel sensitivities and to simplify the fabrication procedure. This innovative device replaces delicate membrane-based s...

  12. Quantum collapse as source of the seeds of cosmic structure during the radiation era

    CERN Document Server

    León, Gabriel; Piccirilli, María Pía

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure, from a perfect isotropic and homogeneous Universe, has not been clearly explained by the standard version of inflationary models as the dynamics involved preserve the homogeneity and isotropy at all times. A proposal that attempts to deal with this problem, by introducing "the self-induced collapse hypothesis," has been introduced by D. Sudarsky and collaborators in previous papers. In all these works, the collapse of the wave function of the inflaton mode is restricted to occur during the inflationary period. In this paper, we analyse the possibility that the collapse happens during the radiation era. A viable model can be constructed under the condition that the inflaton field variable must be affected by the collapse while the momentum variable can or cannot be affected. Another condition to be fulfilled is that the time of collapse must be independent of $k$. However, when comparing with recent observational data, the predictions of the model cannot be disti...

  13. Long-term modulation of galactic cosmic radiation and its model for space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.

    1994-10-01

    As the human exploration of space has received new attention in the United States, studies find that exposure to space radiation could adversely impact the mission design. Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR), with its very wide range of charges and energies, is particularly important for a mission to Mars, because it imposes a stiff mass penalty for spacecraft shielding. Dose equivalent versus shielding thickness calculations, show a rapid initial drop on exposure with thickness, but an asymptotic behavior at a higher shielding thickness. Uncertainties in the radiobiology are largely unknown. For a fixed radiation risk, this leads to large uncertainties in shielding thickness for small uncertainties in estimated dose. In this paper we investigate the application of steady-state, spherically-symmetric diffusion-convection theory of solar modulation to individual measurements of differential energy spectra from 1954 to 1989 in order to estimate the diffusion coefficient, kappa(r,t), as a function of time. We have correlated the diffusion coefficient to the Climax neutron monitor rates and show that, if the diffusion coefficient can be separated into independent functions of space and time: kappa(r,t)=K(t) k0 beta Pk1 (r), where beta is the particle velocity and P the rigidity, then (i) The time dependent quantity 1/K(t), which is proportional to the deceleration potential, phi(r,t), is linearly related to the Climax neutron monitor counting rate. (ii) The coefficients obtained from hydrogen or helium intensity measurements are the same. (iii) There are different correlation functions for odd and even solar cycles. (iv) The correlation function for the Climax neutron monitor counting rate for given time, t, can be used to estimate mean deceleration parameter phi(t) to within +/- 15% with 90% confidence. We have shown that k(r,t) determined from hydrogen and/or helium data, can be used to fit the oxygen and iron differential energy spectra with a root mean square error of

  14. Dosimetry of cosmic radiation in the troposphere based on the measurements at the summit of Mt. Fuji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, H.; Yajima, K.; Yoshida, S. [National Insitute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Research Center for Radiation Protection

    2011-07-01

    Dose rate of cosmic-ray origin neutrons (abbreviated to ''cosmic neutrons'') at aviation altitude was estimated based on the measurements at Mt. Fuji. Cosmic neutrons were measured in a facility of the Mt. Fuji Weather Station located at the summit of Mt. Fuji, the highest mountain in Japan (3776m in altitude), in the summer of 2008 and 2009. The average of 1 cm ambient dose equivalent H*(10) for two measurements was verified by numerical model simulation and then used to empirically estimate the solar force field potential (FFP). The H*(10) rates at aviation altitude estimated from the measurements at Mt. Fuji were compared to those obtained in in-flight measurements onboard a civilian aircraft flying near Mt. Fuji at the time between the two measurements at the mountain. According to the results obtained, we expect that the empirical estimation based on the measurements at Mt. Fuji will work effectively for dosimetry of cosmic radiation in troposphere. (orig.)

  15. The Super Heavy Oil with Light Oil Viscosity Reduction%超稠油掺稀降黏实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志强; 刘德俊; 关丽; 魏思达; 丁晋晋

    2016-01-01

    With the continuous demand of energy,more and more light crude oil was consumed while conventional crude oil production decreased year by year.Therefore,heavy oil as the effective supplement of conventional crude oil was gradually concerned by people.And how to efficiently and economically transport super heavy oil attracted people's attention.A light oil-blending and transportation process for super-heavy oil used by an oil field were characterized.By using a RS300 viscometer and other instruments, the diesel-super heavy blend for the viscosity-temperature and rheological properties, solidifying temperature and stability were studied.The results show that the volume fraction of diesel up to 25%,diesel fuel blended with super heavy oil freezing point was low.And the blend had good fluidity,stability,as well as the process had good economical efficiency.When the volume fraction of diesel oil was further increased,the freezing point was not changed.%随着全球对能源需求的不断增加,轻质原油的消耗量日益增多,而常规原油的产量逐年减少,因此稠油作为常规原油有效的补充资源逐渐受到人们的关注,如何高效、经济地输送超稠油也引起了人们的重视.利用RS300 旋转流变仪及凝点温度计,对某油田掺柴后的超稠油进行了黏温特性、流变特性、凝点及稳定性实验.实验结果表明,柴油的体积分数达到 25%时,掺柴油的超稠油凝点较低,具有较好的流动性,且具有较好的稳定性.当进一步增加柴油的体积分数时,其凝点未发生变化.

  16. Analytic solutions in the dyon black hole with a cosmic string: Scalar fields, Hawking radiation and energy flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, H.S., E-mail: horacio.santana.vieira@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Centro de Ciências, Tecnologia e Saúde, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, CEP 58233-000, Araruna, PB (Brazil); Bezerra, V.B., E-mail: valdir@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Silva, G.V., E-mail: gislainevs@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Charged massive scalar fields are considered in the gravitational and electromagnetic field produced by a dyonic black hole with a cosmic string along its axis of symmetry. Exact solutions of both angular and radial parts of the covariant Klein–Gordon equation in this background are obtained, and are given in terms of the confluent Heun functions. The role of the presence of the cosmic string in these solutions is showed up. From the radial solution, we obtain the exact wave solutions near the exterior horizon of the black hole, and discuss the Hawking radiation spectrum and the energy flux. -- Highlights: •A cosmic string is introduced along the axis of symmetry of the dyonic black hole. •The covariant Klein–Gordon equation for a charged massive scalar field in this background is analyzed. •Both angular and radial parts are transformed to a confluent Heun equation. •The resulting Hawking radiation spectrum and the energy flux are obtained.

  17. Theoretical Evaluation of the Radiation Hazards from Cosmic Rays Within Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Robert

    1998-01-01

    We may summarize our efforts as follows: a. Improvement of our calculations of the radial dose distribution from delta rays ejected in the passage of heavy ions through matter through the application of new data to a previous calculation by Kobetich and Katz (1968). Supplementing this calculation, we have found the radial distribution of electron energy spectra and the radial distribution of microdosimetric quantities (Cucinotta et al, 1996, 1997). b. Extension of the Katz model of cellular survival to bacteria, to lethal mutations in C. Elegans in vivo, to mutation induction in vitro, to thindown in radiobiology (observed experimentally at GSI, Darmstadt, and there called "Darmstadt hooks", predicted by Katz theory years before GSI was constructed). c. Coupling the Katz theory of RBE to the NASA theory of the diffusion of heavy ion beams in matter to yield predictions of the effects for monoenergetic heavy ion beams as well as range modulated beams used for cancer therapy. Here we have directed attention to the role of "ion-kill" (the effects produced by heavy ions passing through the nucleus of a cell), responsible for increased RBE, decreased OER, and reduced repair. We predict that the use of beams of heavy ions in cancer therapy will create late effect problems for fractionated therapy. We highlight also the damage by "ion-kill", from single heavy ions in the cosmic rays, to the central nervous system in space flight. d. The coupling of Katz theory and the NASA theory of heavy ion diffusion and penetration through matter, and knowledge of the space radiation environment, has been applied to design of shielding, to the cell damage in space flight.

  18. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  19. Probing the cosmic x-ray and MeV gamma ray background radiation through the anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve a sensitivity better than 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV—although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors—angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  20. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure in Portuguese airline pilots: study of a possible correlation with oxidative biological markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo; Folgosa, Filipe; Soares, Paulo; Pereira, Alice S; Garcia, Raquel; Gestal-Otero, Juan Jesus; Tavares, Pedro; Gomes da Silva, Marco D R

    2013-05-01

    Several studies have sought to understand the health effects of occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. However, only few biologic markers or associations with disease outcomes have so far been identified. In the present study, 22 long- and 26 medium-haul male Portuguese airline pilots and 36 factory workers who did not fly regularly were investigated. The two groups were comparable in age and diet, were non-smokers, never treated with ionizing radiation and other factors. Cosmic radiation exposure in pilots was quantified based on direct monitoring of 51 flights within Europe, and from Europe to North and South America, and to Africa. Indirect dose estimates in pilots were performed based on the SIEVERT (Système informatisé d'évaluation par vol de l'exposition au rayonnement cosmique dans les transports aériens) software for 6,039 medium- and 1,366 long-haul flights. Medium-haul pilots had a higher cosmic radiation dose rate than long-haul pilots, that is, 3.3 ± 0.2 μSv/h and 2.7 ± 0.3 μSv/h, respectively. Biological tests for oxidative stress on blood and urine, as appropriate, at two time periods separated by 1 year, included measurements of antioxidant capacity, total protein, ferritin, hemoglobin, creatinine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Principal components analysis was used to discriminate between the exposed and unexposed groups based on all the biological tests. According to this analysis, creatinine and 8OHdG levels were different for the pilots and the unexposed group, but no distinctions could be made among the medium- and the long-haul pilots. While hemoglobin levels seem to be comparable between the studied groups, they were directly correlated with ferritin values, which were lower for the airline pilots.

  1. Pulsar Wind Nebulae with Bow Shocks: Non-thermal Radiation and Cosmic Ray Leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, A. M.; Amato, E.; Petrov, A. E.; Krassilchtchikov, A. M.; Levenfish, K. P.

    2017-07-01

    Pulsars with high spin-down power produce relativistic winds radiating a non-negligible fraction of this power over the whole electromagnetic range from radio to gamma-rays in the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). The rest of the power is dissipated in the interactions of the PWNe with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). Some of the PWNe are moving relative to the ambient ISM with supersonic speeds producing bow shocks. In this case, the ultrarelativistic particles accelerated at the termination surface of the pulsar wind may undergo reacceleration in the converging flow system formed by the plasma outflowing from the wind termination shock and the plasma inflowing from the bow shock. The presence of magnetic perturbations in the flow, produced by instabilities induced by the accelerated particles themselves, is essential for the process to work. A generic outcome of this type of reacceleration is the creation of particle distributions with very hard spectra, such as are indeed required to explain the observed spectra of synchrotron radiation with photon indices Γ≲ 1.5. The presence of this hard spectral component is specific to PWNe with bow shocks (BSPWNe). The accelerated particles, mainly electrons and positrons, may end up containing a substantial fraction of the shock ram pressure. In addition, for typical ISM and pulsar parameters, the e+ released by these systems in the Galaxy are numerous enough to contribute a substantial fraction of the positrons detected as cosmic ray (CR) particles above few tens of GeV and up to several hundred GeV. The escape of ultrarelativistic particles from a BSPWN—and hence, its appearance in the far-UV and X-ray bands—is determined by the relative directions of the interstellar magnetic field, the velocity of the astrosphere and the pulsar rotation axis. In this respect we review the observed appearance and multiwavelength spectra of three different types of BSPWNe: PSR J0437-4715, the Guitar and Lighthouse nebulae, and

  2. Extensions of Natural Radioactivity to 4th-Type and of the Periodic Table to Super-heavy Nuclei: Contribution of Raj K Gupta to Cold Nuclear Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BirBikram Singh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have studied here the contribution of Indian Scientists associated with Prof. Raj K. Gupta to cold nuclear phenomena during the last almost four decades, which led to the discovery of fourth kind of natural radioactivity (also known as Cluster Radioactivity, CR and to the extension of periodic table to super heavy nuclei. It is exclusively pointed out how the Quantum Mechanical Fragmentation Theory (QMFT advanced by Prof. Raj K. Gupta and Collaborators led to the discovery of unique phenomenon of CR along with the predictions leading to the synthesis of super heavy elements. We have also mentioned the development of dynamical theories based on QMFT, the Preformed Cluster Model(PCM and the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM, to study the ground and excited state decays of nuclei, respectively, by Gupta and Collaborators. It is matter of great honor and pride for us to bring out this study to enthuse the young researchers to come up with novel ideas and have inspiration from the scientific contributions of Prof. Raj K. Gupta who is coincidentally celebrating his platinum jubilee birthday anniversary this year.

  3. Cosmic Dawn (CoDa): the First Radiation-Hydrodynamics Simulation of Reionization and Galaxy Formation in the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocvirk, Pierre; Gillet, Nicolas; Shapiro, Paul R.; Aubert, Dominique; Iliev, Ilian T.; Teyssier, Romain; Yepes, Gustavo; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Sullivan, David; Knebe, Alexander; Gottlöber, Stefan; D'Aloisio, Anson; Park, Hyunbae; Hoffman, Yehuda; Stranex, Timothy

    2016-12-01

    Cosmic reionization by starlight from early galaxies affected their evolution, thereby impacting reionization itself. Star formation suppression, for example, may explain the observed underabundance of Local Group dwarfs relative to N-body predictions for cold dark matter. Reionization modelling requires simulating volumes large enough [˜ (100 Mpc)3] to sample reionization `patchiness', while resolving millions of galaxy sources above ˜108 M⊙ combining gravitational and gas dynamics with radiative transfer. Modelling the Local Group requires initial cosmological density fluctuations pre-selected to form the well-known structures of the Local Universe today. Cosmic Dawn (`CoDa') is the first such fully coupled, radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of reionization of the Local Universe. Our new hybrid CPU-GPU code, RAMSES-CUDATON, performs hundreds of radiative transfer and ionization rate-solver timesteps on the GPUs for each hydro-gravity timestep on the CPUs. CoDa simulated (91Mpc)3 with 40963 particles and cells, to redshift 4.23, on ORNL supercomputer Titan, utilizing 8192 cores and 8192 GPUs. Global reionization ended slightly later than observed. However, a simple temporal rescaling which brings the evolution of ionized fraction into agreement with observations also reconciles ionizing flux density, cosmic star formation history, CMB electron scattering optical depth and galaxy UV luminosity function with their observed values. Photoionization heating suppressed the star formation of haloes below ˜2 × 109 M⊙, decreasing the abundance of faint galaxies around MAB1600 = [-10, -12]. For most of reionization, star formation was dominated by haloes between 1010-1011 M⊙ , so low-mass halo suppression was not reflected by a distinct feature in the global star formation history. Intergalactic filaments display sheathed structures, with hot envelopes surrounding cooler cores, but do not self-shield, unlike regions denser than 100 .

  4. Cosmic Dawn (CoDa): the First Radiation-Hydrodynamics Simulation of Reionization and Galaxy Formation in the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocvirk, Pierre; Gillet, Nicolas; Shapiro, Paul R.; Aubert, Dominique; Iliev, Ilian T.; Teyssier, Romain; Yepes, Gustavo; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Sullivan, David; Knebe, Alexander; Gottlöber, Stefan; D'Aloisio, Anson; Park, Hyunbae; Hoffman, Yehuda; Stranex, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic reionization by starlight from early galaxies affected their evolution, thereby impacting reionization, itself. Star formation suppression, for example, may explain the observed underabundance of Local Group dwarfs relative to N-body predictions for Cold Dark Matter. Reionization modelling requires simulating volumes large enough [ ˜ (100 Mpc)3] to sample reionization "patchiness", while resolving millions of galaxy sources above ˜108 M⊙ , combining gravitational and gas dynamics with radiative transfer. Modelling the Local Group requires initial cosmological density fluctuations pre-selected to form the well-known structures of the local universe today. Cosmic Dawn ("CoDa") is the first such fully-coupled, radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of reionization of the local universe. Our new hybrid CPU-GPU code, RAMSES-CUDATON, performs hundreds of radiative transfer and ionization rate-solver timesteps on the GPUs for each hydro-gravity timestep on the CPUs. CoDa simulated (91Mpc)3 with 40963 particles and cells, to redshift 4.23, on ORNL supercomputer Titan, utilizing 8192 cores and 8192 GPUs. Global reionization ended slightly later than observed. However, a simple temporal rescaling which brings the evolution of ionized fraction into agreement with observations also reconciles ionizing flux density, cosmic star formation history, CMB electron scattering optical depth and galaxy UV luminosity function with their observed values. Photoionization heating suppressed the star formation of haloes below ˜2 × 109 M⊙ , For most of reionization, star formation was dominated by haloes between 1010 - 1011 M⊙ , so low-mass halo suppression was not reflected by a distinct feature in the global star formation history. Intergalactic filaments display sheathed structures, with hot envelopes surrounding cooler cores, but do not self-shield, unlike regions denser than 100 .

  5. Dark matter distribution in the universe and ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, P

    2000-01-01

    Two of the greatest mysteries of modern physics are the origin of the dark matter in the universe and the nature of the highest energy particles in the cosmic ray spectrum. We discuss here possible direct and indirect connections between these two problems, with particular attention to two cases: in the first we study the local clustering of possible sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) driven by the local dark matter overdensity. In the second case we study the possibility that UHECRs are directly generated by the decay of weakly unstable super heavy dark matter.

  6. Measurements of the high energy neutron component of cosmic radiation fields in aircraft using etched track dosemeters

    CERN Document Server

    Bartlett, D T; Tanner, R J; Steele, J D

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of the complex cosmic radiation field in aircraft at altitude are made with a passive survey meter comprising routine-use thermoluminescent detectors and etched track detectors. The energy dependence of response of the etched track detectors used to determine the neutron component has been characterized, partly, up to a neutron energy of 180 MeV. The neutron detectors are routinely calibrated in the CERN EC Ref.Field. The 15% determination level for total dose equivalent is 100 mu Sv. The evidence is that the passive survey meter provides a reliable determination of route dose. (41 refs).

  7. High-impedance NbSi TES sensors for studying the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nones, C.; Marnieros, S.; Benoit, A.; Bergé, L.; Bideaud, A.; Camus, P.; Dumoulin, L.; Monfardini, A.; Rigaut, O.

    2012-12-01

    Precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are crucial in cosmology because any proposed model of the universe must account for the features of this radiation. The CMB has a thermal blackbody spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K, i.e. the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9-mm wavelength. Of all CMB measurements that the scientific community has not yet been able to perform, the CMB B-mode polarization is probably the most challenging from the instrumental point of view. The signature of primordial gravitational waves, which give rise to a B-type polarization, is one of the goals in cosmology today and amongst the first objectives in the field. For this purpose, high-performance low-temperature bolometric cameras, made of thousands of pixels, are currently being developed by many groups, which will improve the sensitivity to B-mode CMB polarization by one or two orders of magnitude compared to the Planck satellite HFI detectors. We present here a new bolometer structure that is able to increase the pixel sensitivities and to simplify the fabrication procedure. This innovative device replaces delicate membrane-based structures and eliminates the mediation of phonons: the incoming energy is directly captured and measured in the electron bath of an appropriate sensor and the thermal decoupling is achieved via the intrinsic electron-phonon decoupling of the sensor at very low temperature. Reported results come from a 204-pixel array of NbxSi1-x transition edge sensors with a meander structure fabricated on a 2-inch silicon wafer using electron-beam co-evaporation and a cleanroom lithography process. To validate the application of this device to CMB measurements, we have performed an optical calibration of our sample in the focal plane of a dilution cryostat test bench. We have demonstrated a light absorption close to 20% and an optical noise equivalent power of about 7×10-16 W/√Hz, which is highly

  8. On the possibility of cosmic ray-induced ionizing radiation-powered life in subsurface environments in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a highly efficient mechanism developed by terrestrial life to utilize the energy from photons of solar origin for biological use. Subsurface regions are isolated from the photosphere, and consequently are incapable of utilizing this energy. This opens up the opportunity for life to cultivate alternative mechanisms in order to take advantage of other available energy sources. Studies have shown that in subsurface environments, life can use energy generated from geochemical and geothermal processes to sustain a minimal metabolism. Another mechanism is radiolysis, in which particles emitted by radioactive substances are indirectly utilized for metabolism. One such example is the bacterium fueled by radiation, found 2 miles deep in a South African mine, which consumes hydrogen formed from particles emitted by radioactive U, Th and K present in rock. An additional source of radiation in the subsurface environments is secondary particles, such as muons generated by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs). It ...

  9. A Macroscopic Description of Coherent Geo-Magnetic Radiation from Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Werner, K.; Caballero, Rogelio; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Nellen, Lukas; Sánchez, Federico A.; Valdés-Galicia, José F.

    2008-01-01

    In an air shower induced by a cosmic ray, due to the high velocities, most of the particles are concentrated in the relatively thin shower front, which, for obvious reasons, is called the 'pancake'. This pancake, which for the present discussion is assumed to be charge neutral, contains large

  10. Measurement of 0.25-3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada on 16-17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 ...

  11. A Macroscopic Description of Coherent Geo-Magnetic Radiation from Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Werner, K.; Caballero, Rogelio; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Nellen, Lukas; Sánchez, Federico A.; Valdés-Galicia, José F.

    2008-01-01

    In an air shower induced by a cosmic ray, due to the high velocities, most of the particles are concentrated in the relatively thin shower front, which, for obvious reasons, is called the 'pancake'. This pancake, which for the present discussion is assumed to be charge neutral, contains large number

  12. Interactions of cosmic superstrings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Mark G.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We develop methods by which cosmic superstring interactions can be studied in detail. These include the reconnection probability and emission of radiation such as gravitons or small string loops. Loop corrections to these are discussed, as well as relationships to (p; q)-strings. These tools should allow a phenomenological study of string models in anticipation of upcoming experiments sensitive to cosmic string radiation.

  13. Cosmic Radiation and Aircrew Exposure: Implementation of European Requirements in Civil Aviation, Dublin, 1-3 July 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Lee

    1999-03-01

    The European Union's Basic Safety Standards Directive (96/29/Euratom) lays down safety standards for the protection of workers and the general public against the effects of ionising radiations. Article 42 of the Directive deals with the protection of aircrew. It states that for crew of jet aircraft who are likely to be subject to exposure to more than 1 mSv y-1 appropriate measures must be taken, in particular: to assess the exposure of the crew concerned, to take into account the assessed exposure when organising working schedules with a view to reducing the doses of highly exposed aircrew, to inform concerned workers of the health risks involved in their work, to apply Article 10 to female aircrew. (The unborn child shall be treated like a member of the public.) This Directive must be transformed into national law of the 15 member states of the European Union by 13 May 2000. The European Commission and the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland sponsored this International Conference. The objective of this conference was to assist both the airline industry and the national regulatory organisations in identifying the means available to comply with the requirements of the Directive. Over 200 delegates attended the conference from more than 25 countries. The welcoming addresses were made by Mary Upton (Director of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland), Joe Jacob (Minister for State responsible for Nuclear Safety) and James Currie (Director-General for the Environment, Nuclear Safety and Civil Protection). Mr Currie stated that there was a need for political decisions to be based on good science, and that technological trends will lead to higher and longer flights, and therefore higher radiation doses. The first day concentrated on the scientific basis of measurement, calculation and monitoring of cosmic radiation. The first speaker, Dr Heinrich from the University of Siegen, Germany, talked about the physics of cosmic radiation fields. He pointed

  14. Atmospheric secondary charged cosmic radiation at a place of 11.5 GV geomagnetic cut-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcarate, I. N.

    2002-04-01

    An experiment performed with a balloon-borne plastic scintillator is described. The detector system was transported by a stratospheric balloon, that was launched from Reconquista, province of Santa Fe, Argentina, on 24 February 1992. The geomagnetic cut-off of the site was 11.5 GV. The energy-loss spectra of both the atmospheric gamma radiation ( for E^γ>= 4.15 MeV) and the charged component of the secondary cosmic radiation were alternatively measured at different altitudes, during the ascent of the balloon, and at ceiling altitude. The author analyzed the atmospheric gamma-ray spectrum in a previous paper ( Azcárate, 2000). It was necessary to perform the computation of the response of the detector to the charged radiation in order to explain , at least qualitatively, the energy-loss spectrum in the detector produced by this type of radiation. It is argued that at ceiling altitude the observed feature in the spectrum is produced mainly by relativistic muons falling horizontally upon the detector. The growth curve for the counting rate below this feature and the intensity of relativistic μ-mesons were also obtained. References : Azcárate, I.N., Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica, 36, 81, 2000.

  15. Influence of cosmic radiation on aerosol and cloud formation over short time periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondo, Torsten

    This thesis describes a study of Forbush decrease events. These are rapid decreases in the cosmic ray intensity in the Earth’s atmosphere, which are caused by a temporary increased magnetic shielding at Earth due to solar eruptions. The aim is to investigate how these transient ionization phenomena...... for cosmic rays. A list of the ionization change in the troposphere of the strongest Forbush decreases as compared to the ionization change over the solar cycle is calculated and indicates that only a few events induce ionization changes comparable to the solar cycle. Studies of recently available high...... gas concentration on aerosol and cloud optical properties over short time. The model is used to examine experimental efforts at DTU Space on the role of ions in nucleation, as well as it is used to investigate observational data on Forbush decreases in aerosols. The model confirms the existence...

  16. Small-scale primordial magnetic fields and anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedamzik, Karsten [Laboratoire de Univers et Particules, UMR5299-CNRS, Université de Montpellier II, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Abel, Tom, E-mail: karsten.jedamzik@um2.fr, E-mail: tabel@slac.stanford.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC/Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    It is shown that small-scale magnetic fields present before recombination induce baryonic density inhomogeneities of appreciable magnitude. The presence of such inhomogeneities changes the ionization history of the Universe, which in turn decreases the angular scale of the Doppler peaks and increases Silk damping by photon diffusion. This unique signature could be used to (dis)prove the existence of primordial magnetic fields of strength as small as B ≅ 10{sup −11} Gauss by cosmic microwave background observations.

  17. Measurement of the Radiation Energy in the Radio Signal of Extensive Air Showers as a Universal Estimator of Cosmic-Ray Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, Alexander; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin; Anastasi, Gioacchino Alex; Anchordoqui, Luis; Andringa, Sofia; Aramo, Carla; Arqueros, Fernando; Arsene, Nicusor; Asorey, Hernán Gonzalo; Assis, Pedro; Aublin, Julien; Avila, Gualberto; Awal, Nafiun; Badescu, Alina Mihaela; Baus, Colin; Beatty, Jim; Becker, Karl Heinz; Bellido, Jose A; Berat, Corinne; Bertaina, Mario Edoardo; Bertou, Xavier; Biermann, Peter; Billoir, Pierre; Blaess, Simon G; Blanco, Alberto; Blanco, Miguel; Blazek, Jiri; Bleve, Carla; Blümer, Hans; Boháčová, Martina; Boncioli, Denise; Bonifazi, Carla; Borodai, Nataliia; Brack, Jeffrey; Brancus, Iliana; Bretz, Thomas; Bridgeman, Ariel; Brogueira, Pedro; Buchholz, Peter; Bueno, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Buscemi, Mario; Caballero-Mora, Karen S; Caccianiga, Barbara; Caccianiga, Lorenzo; Candusso, Marina; Caramete, Laurentiu; Caruso, Rossella; Castellina, Antonella; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cazon, Lorenzo; Cester, Rosanna; Chavez, Alan G; Chiavassa, Andrea; Chinellato, Jose Augusto; Chudoba, Jiri; Cilmo, Marco; Clay, Roger W; Cocciolo, Giuseppe; Colalillo, Roberta; Coleman, Alan; Collica, Laura; Coluccia, Maria Rita; Conceição, Ruben; Contreras, Fernando; Cooper, Mathew J; Cordier, Alain; Coutu, Stephane; Covault, Corbin; Cronin, James; Dallier, Richard; Daniel, Bruno; Dasso, Sergio; Daumiller, Kai; Dawson, Bruce R; de Almeida, Rogerio M; de Jong, Sijbrand J; De Mauro, Giuseppe; Neto, Joao de Mello; De Mitri, Ivan; de Oliveira, Jaime; de Souza, Vitor; del Peral, Luis; Deligny, Olivier; Dhital, Niraj; Di Giulio, Claudio; Di Matteo, Armando; Diaz, Johana Chirinos; Castro, Mary Lucia Díaz; Diogo, Francisco; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Docters, Wendy; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Dorofeev, Alexei; Hasankiadeh, Qader Dorosti; Anjos, Rita dos; Dova, Maria Teresa; Ebr, Jan; Engel, Ralph; Erdmann, Martin; Erfani, Mona; Escobar, Carlos O; Espadanal, Joao; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Falcke, Heino; Fang, Ke; Farrar, Glennys; Fauth, Anderson; Fazzini, Norberto; Ferguson, Andrew P; Fick, Brian; Figueira, Juan Manuel; Filevich, Alberto; Filipčič, Andrej; Fratu, Octavian; Freire, Martín Miguel; Fujii, Toshihiro; García, Beatriz; Garcia-Gamez, Diego; Garcia-Pinto, Diego; Gate, Florian; Gemmeke, Hartmut; Gherghel-Lascu, Alexandru; Ghia, Piera Luisa; Giaccari, Ugo; Giammarchi, Marco; Giller, Maria; Głas, Dariusz; Glaser, Christian; Glass, Henry; Golup, Geraldina; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; Vitale, Primo F Gómez; González, Nicolás; Gookin, Ben; Gordon, Jacob; Gorgi, Alessio; Gorham, Peter; Gouffon, Philippe; Griffith, Nathan; Grillo, Aurelio; Grubb, Trent D; Guarino, Fausto; Guedes, Germano; Hampel, Matías Rolf; Hansen, Patricia; Harari, Diego; Harrison, Thomas A; Hartmann, Sebastian; Harton, John; Haungs, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heck, Dieter; Heimann, Philipp; Herve, Alexander E; Hill, Gary C; Hojvat, Carlos; Hollon, Nicholas; Holt, Ewa; Homola, Piotr; Hörandel, Jörg; Horvath, Pavel; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Huber, Daniel; Huege, Tim; Insolia, Antonio; Isar, Paula Gina; Jandt, Ingolf; Jansen, Stefan; Jarne, Cecilia; Johnsen, Jeffrey A; Josebachuili, Mariela; Kääpä, Alex; Kambeitz, Olga; Kampert, Karl Heinz; Kasper, Peter; Katkov, Igor; Keilhauer, Bianca; Kemp, Ernesto; Kieckhafer, Roger; Klages, Hans; Kleifges, Matthias; Kleinfeller, Jonny; Krause, Raphael; Krohm, Nicole; Kuempel, Daniel; Mezek, Gasper Kukec; Kunka, Norbert; Awad, Alaa Metwaly Kuotb; LaHurd, Danielle; Latronico, Luca; Lauer, Robert; Lauscher, Markus; Lautridou, Pascal; Coz, Sandra Le; Lebrun, Didier; Lebrun, Paul; de Oliveira, Marcelo Augusto Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle; Link, Katrin; Lopes, Luis; López, Rebeca; Casado, Aida López; Louedec, Karim; Lucero, Agustin; Malacari, Max; Mallamaci, Manuela; Maller, Jennifer; Mandat, Dusan; Mantsch, Paul; Mariazzi, Analisa; Marin, Vincent; Mariş, Ioana; Marsella, Giovanni; Martello, Daniele; Martinez, Humberto; Bravo, Oscar Martínez; Martraire, Diane; Meza, Jimmy Masías; Mathes, Hermann-Josef; Mathys, Sebastian; Matthews, James; Matthews, John; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurizio, Daniela; Mayotte, Eric; Mazur, Peter; Medina, Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Meissner, Rebecca; Mello, Victor; Melo, Diego; Menshikov, Alexander; Messina, Stefano; Micheletti, Maria Isabel; Middendorf, Lukas; Minaya, Ignacio A; Miramonti, Lino; Mitrica, Bogdan; Molina-Bueno, Laura; Mollerach, Silvia; Montanet, François; Morello, Carlo; Mostafá, Miguel; Moura, Celio A; Muller, Marcio Aparecido; Müller, Gero; Müller, Sarah; Navas, Sergio; Necesal, Petr; Nellen, Lukas; Nelles, Anna; Neuser, Jens; Nguyen, Phong H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, Mihai; Niechciol, Marcus; Niemietz, Lukas; Niggemann, Tim; Nitz, Dave; Nosek, Dalibor; Novotny, Vladimir; Nožka, Lyberis; Núñez, Luis; Ochilo, Livingstone; Oikonomou, Foteini; Olinto, Angela; Pacheco, Noelia; Selmi-Dei, Daniel Pakk; Palatka, Miroslav; Pallotta, Juan; Papenbreer, Philipp; Parente, Gonzalo; Parra, Alejandra; Paul, Thomas; Pech, Miroslav; Pękala, Jan; Pelayo, Rodrigo; Pepe, Iuri; Perrone, Lorenzo; Petermann, Emily; Peters, Christine; Petrera, Sergio; Petrov, Yevgeniy; Phuntsok, Jamyang; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pierog, Tanguy; Pieroni, Pablo; Pimenta, Mário; Pirronello, Valerio; Platino, Manuel; Plum, Matthias; Porcelli, Alessio; Porowski, Czeslaw; Prado, Raul Ribeiro; Privitera, Paolo; Prouza, Michael; Quel, Eduardo J; Querchfeld, Sven; Quinn, Sean; Rautenberg, Julian; Ravel, Olivier; Ravignani, Diego; Reinert, Darius; Revenu, Benoît; Ridky, Jan; Risse, Markus; Ristori, Pablo; Rizi, Vincenzo; de Carvalho, Washington Rodrigues; Rojo, Jorge Rubén Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, Maria Dolores; Rogozin, Dmytro; Rosado, Jaime; Roth, Markus; Roulet, Esteban; Rovero, Adrian; Saffi, Steven J; Saftoiu, Alexandra; Salazar, Humberto; Saleh, Ahmed; Greus, Francisco Salesa; Salina, Gaetano; Gomez, Jose Sanabria; Sánchez, Federico; Sanchez-Lucas, Patricia; Santos, Edivaldo Moura; Santos, Eva; Sarazin, Fred; Sarkar, Biswaijt; Sarmento, Raul; Sarmiento-Cano, Christian; Sato, Ricardo; Scarso, Carlos; Schauer, Markus; Scherini, Viviana; Schieler, Harald; Schmidt, David; Scholten, Olaf; Schoorlemmer, Harm; Schovánek, Petr; Schröder, Frank G; Schulz, Alexander; Schulz, Johannes; Schumacher, Johannes; Sciutto, Sergio; Segreto, Alberto; Settimo, Mariangela; Shadkam, Amir; Shellard, Ronald C; Sigl, Guenter; Sima, Octavian; Śmiałkowski, Andrzej; Šmída, Radomir; Snow, Gregory; Sommers, Paul; Sonntag, Sebastian; Sorokin, J; Squartini, Ruben; Srivastava, Yogendra N; Stanca, Denis; Stanič, Samo; Stapleton, James; Stasielak, Jaroslaw; Stephan, Maurice; Stutz, Anne; Suarez, Federico; Durán, Mauricio Suarez; Suomijärvi, Tiina; Supanitsky, A Daniel; Sutherland, Michael; Swain, John; Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Taborda, Oscar Alejandro; Tapia, Alex; Tepe, Andreas; Theodoro, Vanessa Menezes; Timmermans, Charles; Peixoto, Carlos J Todero; Toma, Gabriel; Tomankova, Lenka; Tomé, Bernardo; Tonachini, Aurelio; Elipe, Guillermo Torralba; Machado, Diego Torres; Travnicek, Petr; Trini, Marta; Ulrich, Ralf; Unger, Michael; Urban, Martin; Galicia, Jose F Valdés; Valiño, Ines; Valore, Laura; van Aar, Guus; van Bodegom, Patrick; Berg, Ad M van den; van Velzen, Sjoert; van Vliet, Arjen; Varela, Enrique; Cárdenas, Bernardo Vargas; Varner, Gary; Vasquez, Rafael; Vázquez, Jose R; Vázquez, Ricardo; Veberič, Darko; Verzi, Valerio; Vicha, Jakub; Videla, Mariela; Villaseñor, Luis; Vlcek, Brian; Vorobiov, Serguei; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wainberg, Oscar; Walz, David; Watson, Alan; Weber, Marc; Weidenhaupt, Klaus; Weindl, Andreas; Welling, Christoph; Werner, Felix; Widom, Allan; Wiencke, Lawrence; Wilczyński, Henryk; Winchen, Tobias; Wittkowski, David; Wundheiler, Brian; Wykes, Sarka; Yang, Lili; Yapici, Tolga; Yushkov, Alexey; Zas, Enrique; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zavrtanik, Marko; Zepeda, Arnulfo; Zimmermann, Benedikt; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zuccarello, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8 \\pm 0.7 (stat) \\pm 6.7 (sys) MeV for cosmic rays with an energy of 1 EeV arriving perpendicularly to a geomagnetic field of 0.24 G, scaling quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy. A comparison with predictions from state-of-the-art first-principle calculations shows agreement with our measurement. The radiation energy provides direct access to the calorimetric energy in the electromagnetic cascade of extensive air showers. Comparison with our result thus allows the direct calibration of any cosmic-ray radio detector against the well-established energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  18. Measurement of the Radiation Energy in the Radio Signal of Extensive Air Showers as a Universal Estimator of Cosmic-Ray Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Al Samarai, I; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allison, P; Almela, A; Alvarez Castillo, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Alves Batista, R; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anastasi, G A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Arsene, N; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Avila, G; Awal, N; Badescu, A M; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertaina, M E; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blaess, S G; Blanco, A; Blanco, M; Blazek, J; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Bretz, T; Bridgeman, A; Brogueira, P; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Cilmo, M; Clay, R W; Cocciolo, G; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; de Jong, S J; De Mauro, G; de Mello Neto, J R T; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Diaz, J C; Díaz Castro, M L; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q; Dos Anjos, R C; Dova, M T; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fratu, O; Freire, M M; Fujii, T; García, B; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Głas, D; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Golup, G; Gómez Berisso, M; Gómez Vitale, P F; González, N; Gookin, B; Gordon, J; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Johnsen, J A; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Kuempel, D; Kukec Mezek, G; Kunka, N; Kuotb Awad, A W; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Le Coz, S; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Leigui de Oliveira, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; Lopes, L; López, R; López Casado, A; Louedec, K; Lucero, A; Malacari, M; Mallamaci, M; Maller, J; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martinez, H; Martínez Bravo, O; Martraire, D; Masías Meza, J J; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meissner, R; Mello, V B B; Melo, D; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Müller, S; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nguyen, P H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, L; Núñez, L A; Ochilo, L; Oikonomou, F; Olinto, A; Pacheco, N; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Petrov, Y; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porcelli, A; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Reinert, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Rogozin, D; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Salesa Greus, F; Salina, G; Sanabria Gomez, J D; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sarmiento-Cano, C; Sato, R; Scarso, C; Schauer, M; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, D; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F G; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sigl, G; Sima, O; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sonntag, S; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanca, D; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suarez Durán, M; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tepe, A; Theodoro, V M; Timmermans, C; Todero Peixoto, C J; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torralba Elipe, G; Torres Machado, D; Travnicek, P; Trini, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valdés Galicia, J F; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; van Bodegom, P; van den Berg, A M; van Velzen, S; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Vargas Cárdenas, B; Varner, G; Vasquez, R; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vlcek, B; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Welling, C; Werner, F; Widom, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyński, H; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yang, L; Yapici, T; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zepeda, A; Zimmermann, B; Ziolkowski, M; Zuccarello, F

    2016-06-17

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8±0.7(stat)±6.7(syst)  MeV for cosmic rays with an energy of 1 EeV arriving perpendicularly to a geomagnetic field of 0.24 G, scaling quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy. A comparison with predictions from state-of-the-art first-principles calculations shows agreement with our measurement. The radiation energy provides direct access to the calorimetric energy in the electromagnetic cascade of extensive air showers. Comparison with our result thus allows the direct calibration of any cosmic-ray radio detector against the well-established energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  19. Measurement of the Radiation Energy in the Radio Signal of Extensive Air Showers as a Universal Estimator of Cosmic-Ray Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A. W.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Louedec, K.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Welling, C.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8 ±0.7 (stat)±6.7 (syst) MeV for cosmic rays with an energy of 1 EeV arriving perpendicularly to a geomagnetic field of 0.24 G, scaling quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy. A comparison with predictions from state-of-the-art first-principles calculations shows agreement with our measurement. The radiation energy provides direct access to the calorimetric energy in the electromagnetic cascade of extensive air showers. Comparison with our result thus allows the direct calibration of any cosmic-ray radio detector against the well-established energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  20. Graphite/Ultra-High Modulus Polyethylene Hybrid Fiber Composites with Epoxy and Polyethylene Matrices for Cosmic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the most significant technical challenges in long-duration space missions is that of protecting the crew from harmful radiation. Protection against such radiation on a manned Mars mission will be of vital importance both during transit and while on the surface of the planet. The development of multifunctional materials that serve as integral structural members of the space vehicle and provide the necessary radiation shielding for the crew would be both mission enabling and cost effective. Additionally, combining shielding and structure could reduce total vehicle mass. Hybrid laminated composite materials having both ultramodulus polyethylene (PE) and graphite fibers in epoxy and PE matrices could meet such mission requirements. PE fibers have excellent physical properties, including the highest specific strength of any known fiber. Moreover, the high hydrogen (H) content of polyethylene makes the material an excellent shielding material for cosmic radiation. When such materials are incorporated into an epoxy or PE matrix a very effective shielding material is expected. Boron (B) may be added to the matrix resin or used as a coating to further increase the shielding effectiveness due to B s ability to slow thermal neutrons. These materials may also serve as micrometeorites shields due to PE s high impact energy absorption properties. It should be noted that such materials can be fabricated by existing equipment and methods. It is the objective of this work therefore to: (a) perform preliminary analysis of the radiation transport within these materials; (b) fabricate panels for mechanical property testing before and after radiation exposure. Preliminary determination on the effectiveness of the combinations of material components on both shielding and structural efficiency will be made.

  1. Graphite/Ultra-High Modulus Polyethylene Hybrid Fiber Composites with Epoxy and Polyethylene Matrices for Cosmic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the most significant technical challenges in long-duration space missions is that of protecting the crew from harmful radiation. Protection against such radiation on a manned Mars mission will be of vital importance both during transit and while on the surface of the planet. The development of multifunctional materials that serve as integral structural members of the space vehicle and provide the necessary radiation shielding for the crew would be both mission enabling and cost effective. Additionally, combining shielding and structure could reduce total vehicle mass. Hybrid laminated composite materials having both ultramodulus polyethylene (PE) and graphite fibers in epoxy and PE matrices could meet such mission requirements. PE fibers have excellent physical properties, including the highest specific strength of any known fiber. Moreover, the high hydrogen (H) content of polyethylene makes the material an excellent shielding material for cosmic radiation. When such materials are incorporated into an epoxy or PE matrix a very effective shielding material is expected. Boron (B) may be added to the matrix resin or used as a coating to further increase the shielding effectiveness due to B s ability to slow thermal neutrons. These materials may also serve as micrometeorites shields due to PE s high impact energy absorption properties. It should be noted that such materials can be fabricated by existing equipment and methods. It is the objective of this work therefore to: (a) perform preliminary analysis of the radiation transport within these materials; (b) fabricate panels for mechanical property testing before and after radiation exposure. Preliminary determination on the effectiveness of the combinations of material components on both shielding and structural efficiency will be made.

  2. Identification of positrons and electrons in the cosmic radiation with the electromagnetic calorimeter ECAL for the AMS-02 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080883

    2011-07-19

    In May 2011 AMS-02 detector has been successfully installed on the International Space Station (ISS), where it will take data on cosmic radiation from 1 to 1000 GeV for at least 10 years. Among all scientific objectives of the experiment, one of the most important is the search for Dark Matter (DM), which constitutes 80% of the Universe matter, but its nature is still unknown. A DM signal can be identified by studying the combined fluxes of positrons, photons, antiprotons and antideuterium. Thanks to its high acceptance and its performances, AMS-02 detector can extend primary cosmic ray physics search to a new energy range with high accuracy. A key role for these measurements, in particular for the electromagnetic channels, is played by ECAL calorimeter. This subdetector has been developed to measure e− and e+ energy with an accuracy of few %. Thanks to its 3D shower reconstruction imaging capabilities, it also has a high separation power between electromagnetic and hadronic showers (e/p rejection), essent...

  3. Measurement of the Radiation Energy in the Radio Signal of Extensive Air Showers as a Universal Estimator of Cosmic-Ray Energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Garcia, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Mezek, G. Kukec; Kunka, N.; Awad, A. W. Kuotb; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Casado, A.; Louedec, K.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Nunez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanca, D.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Duran, M.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Welling, C.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynski, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8 +/- 0.7 (stat) +/- 6.7 (syst) MeV for cosmic rays with an energy o

  4. Measurement of the Radiation Energy in the Radio Signal of Extensive Air Showers as a Universal Estimator of Cosmic-Ray Energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allekotte, I.; Buitink, S.; Docters, W.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Messina, S.; Scholten, O.; van den Berg, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8 +/- 0.7 (stat) +/- 6.7 (syst) MeV for cosmic rays with an energy o

  5. Essential properties of the Difference Method for the Search of the Anisotropy of the Primary Cosmic Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlyuchenko, V P; Nikolskaya, N M; Erlykin, A D

    2015-01-01

    The methodical properties of the original difference method for the search of the anisotropy at the knee region of the primary cosmic radiation energy spectrum are analyzed. The main feature of the suggested method is a study of the difference in the EAS characteristics in different directions but not their intensity. It is shown that the method is stable to the random experimental errors and allows to separate the anomalies related to the laboratory coordinate system from the anomalies in the celestial coordinates. The method uses multiple scattering of the charge particles in the Galaxy magnetic fields to study the whole celestial sphere including the regions outside of the line of sight of the installation.

  6. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian SAS-pilots 1960 to 1994. Revised Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U

    1999-02-01

    The present report is a revised version of an earlier report (IFE/KR/E-96/008). The revision has been carried out since a completely new version of the computational tool has recently been released. All calculations have been redone. The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institute for Energy Technology (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots employed by the the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS). The result presented in this report (radiation dose rates for the different types of aircraft in the different years) were calculated with the most recent computer program for this purpose, the CARI-5E from the United States Civil Aviation Authority. The other major sources of information used as basis for this work is the collection of old SAS time tables found the the SAS Museum at Fornebu Airport in Oslo, and information provided by members of the Pilots Association in Norway.

  7. Cross-calibration of the Transition Radiation Detector of AMS-02 for an Energy Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Obermeier, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Since May 2011 the AMS-02 experiment is installed on the International Space Station and is observing cosmic radiation. It consists of several state-of-the-art sub-detectors, which redundantly measure charge and energy of traversing particles. Due to the long exposure time of AMS-02 of many years the measurement of momentum for protons and ions is limited systematically by the spatial resolution and magnetic field strength of the silicon tracker. The maximum detectable rigidity for protons is about 1.8~TV, for helium about 3.6~TV. We investigate the possibility to extend the range of the energy measurement for heavy nuclei ($Z\\geq2$) with the transition radiation detector (TRD). The response function of the TRD shows a steep increase in signal from the level of ionization at a Lorentz factor $\\gamma$ of about 500 to $\\gamma\\approx20000$, where the transition radiation signal saturates. For heavy ions the signal fluctuations in the TRD are sufficiently small to allow an energy measurement with the TRD beyond t...

  8. Radiological risk assessment of cosmic radiation at aviation altitudes (a trip from Houston Intercontinental Airport to Lagos International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschal Ikenna Enyinna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiological risk parameters associated with aircrew members traveling from Houston Intercontinental Airport to Lagos International Airport have been computed using computer software called EPCARD (version 3.2. The mean annual effective dose of radiation was computed to be 2.94 mSv/year. This result is above the standard permissible limit of 1 mSv/year set for the public and pregnant aircrew members but below the limit set for occupationally exposed workers. The Risk of cancer mortality and excess career time cancer risk computed ranged from 3.5 × 10−5 to 24.5 × 10−5 (with average of 14.7 × 10−5 and 7 × 10−4 to 49 × 10−4 (with average of 29.4 × 10−4 . Passengers and aircrew members should be aware of the extra cosmic radiation doses taken in during flights. All aircraft operators should monitor radiation doses incurred during aviation trips.

  9. The small contribution of molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation to the air-fluorescence yield of cosmic ray shower particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Samarai, Imen; Deligny, Olivier; Rosado, Jaime

    2016-10-01

    A small contribution of molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation to the air-fluorescence yield in the UV range is estimated based on an approach previously developed in the framework of the radio-detection of showers in the gigahertz frequency range. First, this approach is shown to provide an estimate of the main contribution of the fluorescence yield due to the de-excitation of the C 3Πu electronic level of nitrogen molecules to the B 3Πg one amounting to Y[ 337 ] =(6.05 ± 1.50) MeV-1 at 800 hPa pressure and 293 K temperature conditions, which compares well to previous dedicated works and to experimental results. Then, under the same pressure and temperature conditions, the fluorescence yield induced by molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation is found to be Y[330-400]MBR = 0.10 MeV-1 in the wavelength range of interest for the air-fluorescence detectors used to detect extensive air showers induced in the atmosphere by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. This means that out of ≃175 photons with wavelength between 330 and 400 nm detected by fluorescence detectors, one of them has been produced by molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation. Although small, this contribution is not negligible in regards to the total budget of systematic uncertainties when considering the absolute energy scale of fluorescence detectors.

  10. Detecting dark matter in the Milky Way with cosmic and gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Eric C.

    Over the last decade, experiments in high-energy astroparticle physics have reached unprecedented precision and sensitivity which span the electromagnetic and cosmic-ray spectra. These advances have opened a new window onto the universe for which little was previously known. Such dramatic increases in sensitivity lead naturally to claims of excess emission, which call for either revised astrophysical models or the existence of exotic new sources such as particle dark matter. Here we stand firmly with Occam, sharpening his razor by (i) developing new techniques for discriminating astrophysical signatures from those of dark matter, and (ii) by developing detailed foreground models which can explain excess signals and shed light on the underlying astrophysical processes at hand. We concentrate most directly on observations of Galactic gamma and cosmic rays, factoring the discussion into three related parts which each contain significant advancements from our cumulative works. In Part I we introduce concepts which are fundamental to the Indirect Detection of particle dark matter, including motivations, targets, experiments, production of Standard Model particles, and a variety of statistical techniques. In Part II we introduce basic and advanced modelling techniques for propagation of cosmic-rays through the Galaxy and describe astrophysical gamma-ray production, as well as presenting state-of-the-art propagation models of the Milky Way.Finally, in Part III, we employ these models and techniques in order to study several indirect detection signals, including the Fermi GeV excess at the Galactic center, the Fermi 135 GeV line, the 3.5 keV line, and the WMAP-Planck haze.

  11. Probing physics at extreme energies with cosmic ultra-high energy radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Günter Sigl

    2003-02-01

    The highest energy cosmic rays observed possess macroscopic energies and their origin is likely to be associated with the most energetic processes in the universe. Their existence triggered a flurry of theoretical explanations ranging from conventional shock acceleration to particle physics beyond the standard model (SM) and processes taking place at the earliest moments of our universe. Furthermore, many new experimental activities promise a strong increase of statistics at the highest energies and a combination with -ray and neutrino astrophysics will put strong constraints on these theoretical models. We give an overview over this quickly evolving research field with focus on testing new particle physics.

  12. Ralph A. Alpher, George Antonovich Gamow, and the Prediction of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The first prediction of the existence of "relict radiation" or radiation remaining from the "Big Bang" was made in 1948. This derived from the seminal dissertation work of Ralph A. Alpher. He was a doctoral student of George A. Gamow and developed several critical advances in cosmology in late 1946, 1947, and 1948. Alpher developed the ideas of "hot" big bang cosmology to a high degree of physical precision, and was the first to present the idea that radiation, not matter, predominated the ea...

  13. Control of the Earth's electric field intensity through solar wind modulation of galactic cosmic radiation: Support for a proposed atmospheric electrical sun-weather mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markson, R.

    1980-01-01

    The ionospheric potential and galactic cosmic radiation, found to be inversely correlated with the solar wind velocity are examined as being germane to weather modification. Since the ionospheric potential is proportional to the fair weather electric field intensity and cosmic radiation is the dominant source of atmospheric ionization, it is concluded that the Earth's overall electric field varies in phase with atmospheric ionization and that the latter is modulated by the solar wind. A proposed mechanism, in which solar control of ionizing radiation influences atmospheric electrification and thus possibly cloud physical processes is discussed. An experimental approach to critically test the proposed mechanism through comparison of the temporal variation of the Earth's electric field with conditions in the interplanetary medium is outlined.

  14. Analysis of the nature of excessive cosmic radiation in the area of the Brazilian magnetic anomaly at altitudes 250-500km, from Kosmos-225 satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychenko, L. V.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the region of anomalous cosmic radiation in the area of the Brazilian magnetic anomaly at the altitudes 250-500 km, using data measurements taken on the Kosmos-225 satellite (14-29 June 1968). The existence of a stable intensity anomaly discovered in the experiments on the second and third Soviet spacecraft-satellites is confirmed. The total vector of the geomagnetic field at different altitudes was compared with isoline maps. An altitude profile of the South Atlantic anomaly of radiation intensity was obtained, using data from the same instrument. The nature of the anomalies in cosmic radiation intensity over the regions of negative magnetic anomalies is discussed.

  15. Isotropic blackbody cosmic microwave background radiation as evidence for a homogeneous universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Timothy; Clarkson, Chris; Bull, Philip

    2012-08-03

    The question of whether the Universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic on the largest scales is of fundamental importance to cosmology but has not yet been answered decisively. Surprisingly, neither an isotropic primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) nor combined observations of luminosity distances and galaxy number counts are sufficient to establish such a result. The inclusion of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in CMB observations, however, dramatically improves this situation. We show that even a solitary observer who sees an isotropic blackbody CMB can conclude that the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic in their causal past when the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is present. Critically, however, the CMB must either be viewed for an extended period of time, or CMB photons that have scattered more than once must be detected. This result provides a theoretical underpinning for testing the cosmological principle with observations of the CMB alone.

  16. Effects of cosmic radiation on devices and embedded systems in aircrafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Adriane C.M.; Federico, Claudio A.; Pereira Junior, Evaldo C.F.; Goncalez, Odair L., E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: odairlelisgoncalez@gmail.com, E-mail: adriane.acm@hotmail.com, E-mail: evaldocarlosjr@gmail.com [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Modern avionics systems use new electronic technologies devices that, due to their high degree of sophistication and miniaturization, are more susceptible to the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly the effect called 'Single Event Effect' (SEE) produced by neutron. Studies regarding the effects of radiation on electronic systems for space applications, such as satellites and orbital stations, have already been in progress for several years. However, tolerance requirements and specific studies, focusing on testing dedicated to avionics, have caused concern and gained importance in the last decade as a result of the accidents attributed to SEE in aircraft. Due to the development of a higher ceiling, an increase in airflow and a greater autonomy of certain aircrafts, the problem regarding the control of ionizing radiation dose received by the pilots, the crew and sensitive equipment became important in the areas of occupational health, radiation protection and flight safety. This paper presents an overview of the effects of ionizing radiation on devices and embedded systems in aircrafts, identifying and classifying these effects in relation to their potential risks in each device class. The assessment of these effects in avionics is a very important and emerging issue nowadays, which is being discussed by groups of the international scientific community; however, in South America, groups working in this area are still unknown. Consequently, this work is a great contribution and significantly valuable to the area of aeronautical engineering and flight safety associated to the effects of radiation on electronic components embedded in aircraft. (author)

  17. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, J., E-mail: julianna.szabo@energia.mta.hu [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Palfalvi, J.K. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  18. The Small Contribution of Molecular Bremsstrahlung Radiation to the Air-Fluorescence Yield of Cosmic Ray Shower Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Samarai, I Al; Rosado, J

    2016-01-01

    A small contribution of molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation to the air-fluorescence yield in the UV range is estimated based on an approach previously developed in the framework of the radio-detection of showers in the gigahertz frequency range. First, this approach is shown to provide an estimate of the main contribution of the fluorescence yield due to the de-excitation of the C $^3\\Pi_{\\mathrm{u}}$ electronic level of nitrogen molecules to the B $^3\\Pi_{\\mathrm{g}}$ one amounting to $Y_{[337]}=(6.05\\pm 1.50)~$ MeV$^{-1}$ at 800 hPa pressure and 293 K temperature conditions, which compares well to previous dedicated works and to experimental results. Then, under the same pressure and temperature conditions, the fluorescence yield induced by molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation is found to be $Y_{[330-400]}^{\\mathrm{MBR}}=0.10~$ MeV$^{-1}$ in the wavelength range of interest for the air-fluorescence detectors used to detect extensive air showers induced in the atmosphere by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. This m...

  19. 超稠油高温调剖封窜技术%High Temperature Profile Control and Channel Blocking Sealing Technology for Super Heavy Oil Researviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝建玉

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic steam stimulation is a recovery method of super heavy oil in Liaohe oilfield. The porosity of Du84 block of Xinglongtai oilfield in super heavy oil reservoir is generally 25% to 30%, air permeability is generally higher than 1306 × 10-3 μm2. Because of its high porosity and high permeability, steam channeling easily occurs to cause that heat energy of the injected steam can not be fully utilized, which can reduce production effect of the steam injection well. Water cut in adjacent well after the steam channeling increases, temperature rises, which can affect the production or cause to shut in well. Steam channeling aggravates casing deformation or damage. The high temperature resistant plugging agent can effectively block high permeability layer, adjust the steam absorption difference between low permeability layer and high permeability layer, change the flow direction of injected steam, which can alleviate the steam channeling, eliminate interference among wells, expand the injected steam swept volume, improve cycle oil production.%蒸汽吞吐开采是辽河油田超稠油主要开采方式.曙光油田杜84块兴隆台超稠油油藏孔隙度一般为25%~30%,空气渗透率一般高于1306×10-3 μm2,具有高孔隙度,高渗透率的特点,极易发生汽窜,导致注入蒸汽热能不能充分利用,直接降低了注汽井生产效果,使油藏动用不均的矛盾加剧.邻井受窜后含水升高液量突升,温度升高,影响其生产效果或关井防喷.汽窜加剧油层套管变形或损坏.研制的耐高温堵剂有效封堵高渗透层,调整地层高低渗透层带间的吸汽差异,改变注入蒸汽的走向,达到缓解汽窜、消除井间干扰、扩大注入蒸汽波及体积、提高周期采油量的目的.

  20. Cosmic rays on earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allkofer, O.C.; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1984-01-01

    A data collection is presented that covers cosmic rays on earth. Included are all relevant data on flux and intensity measurements, energy spectra, and related data of all primary and secondary components of the cosmic radiation at all levels in the atmosphere, at sea level and underground. In those cases where no useful experimental data have been available, theoretical predictions were substituted.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Modeling of Galactic Cosmic Rays Using LRO/CRaTER and the EMMREM Model with Comparisons to Balloon and Airline Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    The current state of the Sun and solar wind, with uncommonly low densities and weak magnetic fields, has resulted in galactic cosmic ray fluxes that are elevated to levels higher than have ever before been observed in the space age. Given the continuing trend of declining solar activity, it is clear that accurate modeling of GCR radiation is becoming increasingly important in the field of space weather. Such modelling is essential not only in the planning of future manned space missions, but is also important for assessing the radiation risks to airline passengers, particularly given NASA's plans to develop supersonic aircraft that will fly at much higher altitudes than commercial aircraft and thus be more vulnerable to radiation from GCRs. We provide an analysis of the galactic cosmic ray radiation environment of Earth's atmosphere using measurements from the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) together with the Badhwar-O'Neil model and dose lookup tables generated by the Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM). Newly available measurements of atmospheric dose rates from instruments aboard commercial and research aircraft enable evaluation of the accuracy of the model in computing atmospheric dose rates. Additionally, a newly available dataset of balloon-based measurements, including simultaneous balloon launches from California and New Hampshire, provide an additional means of comparison to the model. When compared to the available observations of atmospheric radiation levels, the computed dose rates seem to be sufficiently accurate, falling within recommended radiation uncertainty limits.

  2. Response of TL dosemeters to cosmic radiation on board passenger aircraft

    CERN Document Server

    Bilski, P; Marczewska, B; Olko, P

    2002-01-01

    Measurements were performed with various LiF based TLDs on board seven Polish aircraft, flying long-distance or middle-distance routes. All of the /sup 7/LiF detectors used (various types of /sup 7 /LiF:Mg, Ti and /sup 7/LiF:Mg, Cu, P detectors), which measure the non-neutron component of the radiation field, produced consistent results. It was found that the characteristics of the TLD response (ratio of different detector responses, glow curve shapes) after doses of radiation at flying altitudes differ from those obtained after exposure at the CERN facility (CERF), suggesting a lower contribution of densely ionising radiation. The neutron induced TL signal was also more affected by the thickness of the holder, suggesting the presence of a softer neutron energy spectrum at flight altitudes. Further in-flight and CERF exposures of detectors are planned to resolve these issues. (5 refs).

  3. Atmospheric radiation modeling of galactic cosmic rays using LRO/CRaTER and the EMMREM model with comparisons to balloon and airline based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Townsend, L. W.; deWet, W. C.; Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Tobiska, W. K.; Shelton-Mur, K.; Yarborough, A.; Harvey, J.; Herbst, A.; Koske-Phillips, A.; Molina, F.; Omondi, S.; Reid, C.; Reid, D.; Shultz, J.; Stephenson, B.; McDevitt, M.; Phillips, T.

    2016-09-01

    We provide an analysis of the galactic cosmic ray radiation environment of Earth's atmosphere using measurements from the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) together with the Badhwar-O'Neil model and dose lookup tables generated by the Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM). This study demonstrates an updated atmospheric radiation model that uses new dose tables to improve the accuracy of the modeled dose rates. Additionally, a method for computing geomagnetic cutoffs is incorporated into the model in order to account for location-dependent effects of the magnetosphere. Newly available measurements of atmospheric dose rates from instruments aboard commercial aircraft and high-altitude balloons enable us to evaluate the accuracy of the model in computing atmospheric dose rates. When compared to the available observations, the model seems to be reasonably accurate in modeling atmospheric radiation levels, overestimating airline dose rates by an average of 20%, which falls within the uncertainty limit recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). Additionally, measurements made aboard high-altitude balloons during simultaneous launches from New Hampshire and California provide an additional comparison to the model. We also find that the newly incorporated geomagnetic cutoff method enables the model to represent radiation variability as a function of location with sufficient accuracy.

  4. Cosmic confusion

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J

    1994-01-01

    We propose to minimise the cosmic confusion between Gaussian and non Gaussian theories by investigating the structure in the m's for each multipole of the cosmic radiation temperature anisotropies. We prove that Gaussian theories are (nearly) the only theories which treat all the m's equally. Hence we introduce a set of invariant measures of ``m-preference'' to be seen as non-Gaussianity indicators. We then derive the distribution function for the quadrupole ``m-preference'' measure in Gaussian theories. A class of physically motivated toy non Gaussian theories is introduced as an example. We show how the quadrupole m-structure is crucial in reducing the confusion between these theories and Gaussian theories.

  5. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory and cosmic censorship violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniceto, Pedro; Pani, Paolo; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2016-05-01

    We construct exact, time-dependent, black hole solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with arbitrary dilaton coupling, a. For a = 1 this theory arises as the four-dimensional low-energy effective description of heterotic string theory. These solutions represent electrically charged, spherically symmetric black holes emitting or absorbing charged null fluids and generalize the Vaidya and Bonnor-Vaidya solutions of general relativity and of Einstein-Maxwell theory, respectively. The a = 1 case stands out as special, in the sense that it is the only choice of the coupling that allows for a time-dependent dilaton field in this class of solutions. As a by-product, when a = 1 we show that an electrically charged black hole in this theory can be overcharged by bombarding it with a stream of electrically charged null fluid, resulting in the formation of a naked singularity. This provides an example of cosmic censorship violation in an exact dynamical solution to low-energy effective string theory and in a case in which the total stress-energy tensor satisfies all energy conditions. When a ≠ 1, our solutions necessarily have a time-independent scalar field and consequently cannot be overcharged.

  6. The imprint of the cosmic supermassive black hole growth history on the 21 cm background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Takamitsu L; Perna, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    The redshifted 21 cm transition line of hydrogen tracks the thermal evolution of the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) at "cosmic dawn," during the emergence of the first luminous astrophysical objects (~100 Myr after the Big Bang) but before these objects ionized the IGM (~400-800 Myr after the Big Bang). Because X-rays, in particular, are likely to be the chief energy courier for heating the IGM, measurements of the 21 cm signature can be used to infer knowledge about the first astrophysical X-ray sources. Using analytic arguments and a numerical population synthesis algorithm, we argue that the progenitors of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) should be the dominant source of hard astrophysical X-rays---and thus the primary driver of IGM heating and the 21 cm signature---at redshifts $z 20$. An absence of such a signature in the forthcoming observational data would imply that SMBH formation occurred later (e.g. via so-called direct collapse scenarios), that it was not a common occurrence in early galaxies ...

  7. Contamination cannot explain the lack of large-scale power in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bunn, Emory F

    2008-01-01

    Several anomalies appear to be present in the large-angle cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy maps of WMAP. One of these is a lack of large-scale power. Because the data otherwise match standard models extremely well, it is natural to consider perturbations of the standard model as possible explanations. We show that, as long as the source of the perturbation is statistically independent of the source of the primary CMB anisotropy, no such model can explain this large-scale power deficit. On the contrary, any such perturbation always reduces the probability of obtaining any given low value of large-scale power. We rigorously prove this result when the lack of large-scale power is quantified with a quadratic statistic, such as the quadrupole moment. When a statistic based on the integrated square of the correlation function is used instead, we present strong numerical evidence in support of the result. The result applies to models in which the geometry of spacetime is perturbed (e.g., an ellipsoidal U...

  8. Spherical Shell Cosmological Model and Uniformity of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Vlahovic, Branislav

    2012-01-01

    Considered is spherical shell as a model for visible universe and parameters that such model must have to comply with the observable data. The topology of the model requires that motion of all galaxies and light must be confined inside a spherical shell. Consequently the observable universe cannot be defined as a sphere centered on the observer, rather it is an arc length within the volume of the spherical shell. The radius of the shell is 4.46 $\\pm$ 0.06 Gpc, which is for factor $\\pi$ smaller than radius of a corresponding 3-sphere. However the event horizon, defined as the arc length inside the shell, has the size of 14.0 $\\pm$ 0.2 Gpc, which is in agreement with the observable data. The model predicts, without inflation theory, the isotropy and uniformity of the CMB. It predicts the correct value for the Hubble constant $H_0$ = 67.26 $\\pm$ 0.90 km/s/Mpc, the cosmic expansion rate $H(z)$, and the speed of the event horizon in agreement with observations. The theoretical suport for shell model comes from gen...

  9. Constraints on AGN feedback from its Sunyaev-Zel'dovich imprint on the cosmic background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soergel, Bjoern; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Efstathiou, George; Puchwein, Ewald; Sijacki, Debora

    2017-06-01

    We derive constraints on feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGN) by setting limits on their thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) imprint on the cosmic microwave background. The amplitude of any SZ signature is small and degenerate with the poorly known sub-mm spectral energy distribution of the AGN host galaxy and other unresolved dusty sources along the line of sight. Here we break this degeneracy by combining microwave and sub-mm data from Planck with all-sky far-infrared maps from the AKARI satellite. We first test our measurement pipeline using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) redMaPPer catalogue of galaxy clusters, finding a highly significant detection (>20σ) of the SZ effect together with correlated dust emission. We then constrain the SZ signal associated with spectroscopically confirmed quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from SDSS data release 7 (DR7) and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR12. We obtain a low-significance (1.6σ) hint of an SZ signal, pointing towards a mean thermal energy of ≃5 × 1060 erg, lower than reported in some previous studies. A comparison of our results with high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations including AGN feedback suggests QSO host masses of M200c ˜ 4 × 1012 h-1 M⊙, but with a large uncertainty. Our analysis provides no conclusive evidence for an SZ signal specifically associated with AGN feedback.

  10. The effect of early radiation in N-body simulations of cosmic structure formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamek, Julian; Brandbyge, Jacob; Fidler, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Newtonian N-body simulations have been employed successfully over the past decades for the simulation of the cosmological large-scale structure. Such simulations usually ignore radiation perturbations (photons and massless neutrinos) and the impact of general relativity (GR) beyond the background...

  11. Impacts of the tensor couplings of $\\omega$ and $\\rho$ mesons and Coulomb exchange terms on super-heavy nuclei and their relation to symmetry energy

    CERN Document Server

    Liliani, N; Diningrum, J P; Sulaksono, A

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the effects of tensor coupling of $\\omega$ and $\\rho$ meson terms, Coulomb exchange term in local density approximation and various isoscalar-isovector coupling terms of relativistic mean field model on the properties of nuclear matter, finite nuclei, and super-heavy nuclei. We found that for the same fixed value of symmetry energy $J$ or its slope $L$ the presence of tensor coupling of $\\omega$ and $\\rho$ meson terms and Coulomb exchange term yields thicker neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb. We also found that the roles of tensor coupling of $\\omega$ and $\\rho$ meson terms, Coulomb exchange term in local density approximation and various isoscalar-isovector coupling terms on the bulk properties of finite nuclei varies depending on the corresponding nucleus mass. However, on average, tensor coupling terms play a significant role in predicting the bulk properties of finite nuclei in a quite wide mass range especially in binding energies. We also observed that for some particular nuclei, the ...

  12. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    cloud radiative properties. Thus, a moderate influence on atmospheric aerosol distributions from cosmic ray ionisation would have a strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. Historical evidence over the past 1000 years indicates that changes in climate have occurred in accord with variability...... in the Earth's radiation budget through trapping outgoing radiation and reflecting incoming radiation. If a physical link between these two features can be established, it would provide a mechanism linking solar activity and Earth's climate. Recent satellite observations have further revealed a correlation...... in cosmic ray intensities. Such changes are in agreement with the sign of cloud radiative forcing associated with cosmic ray variability as estimated from satellite observations....

  13. The effect of early radiation in N-body simulations of cosmic structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Julian; Brandbyge, Jacob; Fidler, Christian; Hannestad, Steen; Rampf, Cornelius; Tram, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Newtonian N-body simulations have been employed successfully over the past decades for the simulation of the cosmological large-scale structure. Such simulations usually ignore radiation perturbations (photons and massless neutrinos) and the impact of general relativity (GR) beyond the background expansion. This approximation can be relaxed and we discuss three different approaches that are accurate to leading order in GR. For simulations that start at redshift less than about 100, we find that the presence of early radiation typically leads to per cent-level effects on the numerical power spectra at large scales. Our numerical results agree across the three methods, and we conclude that all of the three methods are suitable for simulations in a standard cosmology. Two of the methods modify the N-body evolution directly, while the third method can be applied as a post-processing prescription.

  14. Self-organization of cosmic radiation pressure instability. II - One-dimensional simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.; Woods, Jorden

    1992-01-01

    The clustering of statistically uniform discrete absorbing particles moving solely under the influence of radiation pressure from uniformly distributed emitters is studied in a simple one-dimensional model. Radiation pressure tends to amplify statistical clustering in the absorbers; the absorbing material is swept into empty bubbles, the biggest bubbles grow bigger almost as they would in a uniform medium, and the smaller ones get crushed and disappear. Numerical simulations of a one-dimensional system are used to support the conjecture that the system is self-organizing. Simple statistics indicate that a wide range of initial conditions produce structure approaching the same self-similar statistical distribution, whose scaling properties follow those of the attractor solution for an isolated bubble. The importance of the process for large-scale structuring of the interstellar medium is briefly discussed.

  15. Radiation-damped profiles of extremely high column density neutral hydrogen: implications of cosmic reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2017-01-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line of sight mainly affects the far off-centre region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line centre can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half-maximum) as an effective line width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N_{H I}≲ 10^{21} { cm^{-2}}, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7 per cent errors. However, as the local column density reaches N_{H I}˜ 10^{22.3} { cm^{-2}}, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10 per cent overestimation in the red wing and a 20 per cent underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  16. Radiation Damped Profiles of Extremely High Column Density Neutral Hydrogen : Implications of Cosmic Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2016-09-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line-of-sight mainly affects the far off-center region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line-center can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half maximum) as an effective line-width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N HI ≲ 1021 cm-2, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7% errors. However, as the local column density reaches N HI ˜ 1022.3 cm-2, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10% overestimation in the red wing and a 20% underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  17. Ralph A. Alpher, George Antonovich Gamow, and the Prediction of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Alpher, Victor S

    2014-01-01

    The first prediction of the existence of "relict radiation" or radiation remaining from the "Big Bang" was made in 1948. This derived from the seminal dissertation work of Ralph A. Alpher. He was a doctoral student of George A. Gamow and developed several critical advances in cosmology in late 1946, 1947, and 1948. Alpher developed the ideas of "hot" big bang cosmology to a high degree of physical precision, and was the first to present the idea that radiation, not matter, predominated the early universal adiabatic expansion first suggested by A. Friedmann in the early 1920s. Alpher and Herman predicted the residual relic black-body temperature in 1948 and 1949 at around 5 K. However, to this day, this prediction, and other seminal ideas in big bang cosmology, have often been attributed erroneously to the better-known George A. Gamow. This article reviews some of the more egregious and even farcical errors in the scholarly literature about Ralph A. Alpher and his place in the history of big bang cosmology. Tw...

  18. Radiative transfer in a clumpy universe: IV. New synthesis models of the cosmic UV/X-ray background

    CERN Document Server

    Haardt, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We present improved synthesis models of the evolving spectrum of the UV/X-ray diffuse background, updating and extending our previous results. Five new main components are added to our radiative transfer code CUBA: (1) the sawtooth modulation of the background intensity from resonant line absorption in the Lyman series of cosmic hydrogen and helium; (2) the X-ray emission from obscured and unobscured quasars; (3) a piecewise parameterization of the distribution in redshift and column density of intergalactic absorbers that fits recent measurements of the mean free path of 1 ryd photons; (4) an accurate treatment of the photoionization structure of absorbers; and (5) the UV emission from star-forming galaxies at all redshifts. We provide tables of the predicted HI and HeII photoionization and photoheating rates for use, e.g., in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations of the Lya forest, and a new metallicity-dependent calibration to the UV luminosity density-star formation rate density relation. A "minimal cosm...

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of the Cherenkov radiation emitted by TeO{sub 2} crystal when crossed by cosmic muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, N., E-mail: nicola.casali@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Università degli studi dell' Aquila, Coppito (AQ) (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Bellini, F. [Sapienza Università di roma, P.le A. Moro 2, Roma (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, Roma (Italy); Dafinei, I. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [Museo Storico della Fisisca e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi“, Piazza del Viminale 1, Roma (Italy); Morganti, S.; Orio, F.; Pinci, D.; Vignati, M.; Voena, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-21

    TeO{sub 2} crystals are currently used as bolometric detectors in experiments searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te. The extreme rarity of the studied signal forces the experiments to reach an ultra low background level. The main background source is represented by α particles emitted by radioactive contaminants placed in the materials that compose and surround the detector. Recent measurements show that a particle discrimination in TeO{sub 2} bolometers detecting the light emitted by β/γ particles is possible, opening the possibility to make large improvements in the performance of experiments based on this kind of materials. In order to understand the nature of this light emission a measurement at room temperature with TeO{sub 2} crystals was performed. According to these results, the detected light was compatible with the Cherenkov emission, even though the scintillation hypothesis could not be discarded. In this work a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the Cherenkov radiation emitted by TeO{sub 2} crystal when crossed by cosmic muons was performed. The data from MC and the room temperature measurement are perfectly compatible and prove that the Cherenkov light is the only component of the light yield of TeO{sub 2} crystals.

  20. Energy spectrum and mass composition of primary cosmic radiation in the region above the knee from the GAMMA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Martirosov, R M; Vardanyan, H S; Erlykin, A D; Nikolskaya, N M; Gallant, Y A; Jones, L W; Babayan, H A

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the primary cosmic radiation in the energy range 1 - 100 PeV and the extensive air shower (EAS) characteristics obtained on the basis of the expanded data bank of the GAMMA experiment (Mt. Aragats, Armenia) are presented. With increased statistics we confirm our previous results on the energy spectrum. The spectral index above the knee is about -3.1, but at energies beyond 20 PeV a flattening of the spectrum is observed. The existence of the 'bump' at about 70 PeV is confirmed with a significance of more than 4{\\sigma}. In the energy range of 10 - 100 PeV the shower age becomes energy independent and we observe a direct proportionality of the EAS size to the primary energy. This suggests an approximately constant depth of the EAS maximum in this energy range. This is evidence in favour of an increasing average mass of primary particles at energies above 20 PeV. The additional source scenario, which is a possible explanation of the 'bump' in the spectrum, also leads to the conclusion of ...

  1. Measurements of the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation and diffuse galactic emission at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Mark; Benford, Richard; Meyer, Stephan; Muehlner, Dirk; Weiss, Rainer

    1988-01-01

    The results of a balloon-borne observing program to measure the large angular scale brightness distribution of the 2.7 K cosmic background radiation (CBR) at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are reported. A new determination of the dipole anisotropy of the CBR is found with 3.40 + or - 0.42 mK toward alpha = 12.1 + or - 0.24 hr, delta = - 23 + or - 5 deg in a 1.2 to 8/cm band and 4.7 + or - 1.4 mK toward alpha = 9.9 + 1.7 or - 1.1 hr, delta = - 38 + or - 21 deg between 5 and 18/cm, where the amplitudes are listed as thermodynamic temperatures. New estimates of the absolute temperature in these two bands of 2.86 + or - 0.26 K and 3.01 + or - 0.31 are obtained under the assumption that the CBR has a Planck spectrum. The diffuse Galactic emission is fitted by a secant distribution in Galactic latitude, and the resulting Galactic pole antenna temperatures are given. Maps of sky brightness, measurements of zodiacal emission, and measurements of fluctuations of the atmospheric emission which dominates the noise budget are also presented.

  2. Early results from the MIT millimeter and sub-millimeter balloon-borne anisotropy measurement. [of cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stephan S.; Cheng, Edward S.; Page, Lyman A.

    1991-01-01

    The MIT balloon-borne bolometric search for Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) anisotropies places the most stringent constraints to date on fluctuations in the CMBR. Four maps of half of the Northern Hemisphere at 1.8, 1.1, 0.63 and 0.44 mm wavelength, have a beam size of 3.8 deg with a 1 sigma sensitivity of less than 0.1 mK (thermodynamic) per FOV in each of the first two channels. Analysis of the sky map at 1.8 mm wavelength using a likelihood ratio test for galactic latitudes of 15 deg and greater yields a 95 percent confidence level (CL) upper limit on fluctuations of the CMBR at DeltaT/T less than or equal to 1.6 x 10 exp -5 with a statistical power of 92 percent for Gaussian fluctuations at a correlation angle of 13 deg. Between 3 deg and 22 deg, the upper limit for fluctuations is DeltaT/T less than or equal to 4.0 x 10 exp -5 (95 percent CL).

  3. A Bridge from Optical to Infrared Galaxies Explaining Local Properties, Predicting Galaxy Counts and the Cosmic Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Totani, T; Totani, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.

    2002-01-01

    We give an explanation for the origin of various properties observed in local infrared galaxies, and make predictions for galaxy counts and cosmic background radiation (CBR), by a new model extended from that for optical/near-infrared galaxies. Important new characteristics of this study are that (1) mass scale dependence of dust extinction is introduced based on the size-luminosity relation of optical galaxies, and that (2) the big grain dust temperature T_dust is calculated based on a physical consideration for energy balance, rather than using the empirical relation between T_dust and total infrared luminosity L_IR found in local galaxies, which has been employed in most of previous works. Consequently, the local properties of infrared galaxies, i.e., optical/infrared luminosity ratios, L_IR-T_dust correlation, and infrared luminosity function are outputs predicted by the model. Our model indeed reproduces these local properties reasonably well. We then found considerably different results for MIR-submm co...

  4. Estimation of occupational cosmic radiation exposure among airline personnel: Agreement between a job-exposure matrix, aggregate, and individual dose estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talibov, Madar; Salmelin, Raili; Lehtinen-Jacks, Susanna; Auvinen, Anssi

    2017-04-01

    Job-exposure matrices (JEM) are used for exposure assessment in occupational studies, but they can involve errors. We assessed agreement between the Nordic Occupational Cancer Studies JEM (NOCCA-JEM) and aggregate and individual dose estimates for cosmic radiation exposure among Finnish airline personnel. Cumulative cosmic radiation exposure for 5,022 airline crew members was compared between a JEM and aggregate and individual dose estimates. The NOCCA-JEM underestimated individual doses. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.37, proportion of agreement 64%, kappa 0.46 compared with individual doses. Higher agreement was achieved with aggregate dose estimates, that is annual medians of individual doses and estimates adjusted for heliocentric potentials. The substantial disagreement between NOCCA-JEM and individual dose estimates of cosmic radiation may lead to exposure misclassification and biased risk estimates in epidemiological studies. Using aggregate data may provide improved estimates. Am. J. Ind. Med. 60:386-393, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Results of Simulated Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) on Spectra Restraint Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Benjamin; Hussain, Sarosh; Waller, Jess

    2017-01-01

    Spectra or similar Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fabric is the likely choice for future structural space suit restraint materials due to its high strength-to-weight ratio, abrasion resistance, and dimensional stability. During long duration space missions, space suits will be subjected to significant amounts of high-energy radiation from several different sources. To insure that pressure garment designs properly account for effects of radiation, it is important to characterize the mechanical changes to structural materials after they have been irradiated. White Sands Test Facility (WSFTF) collaborated with the Crew and Thermal Systems Division at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to irradiate and test various space suit materials by examining their tensile properties through blunt probe puncture testing and single fiber tensile testing after the materials had been dosed at various levels of simulated GCR and SPE Iron and Proton beams at Brookhaven National Laboratories. The dosages were chosen based on a simulation developed by the Structural Engineering Division at JSC for the expected radiation dosages seen by space suit softgoods seen on a Mars reference mission. Spectra fabric tested in the effort saw equivalent dosages at 2x, 10x, and 20x the predicted dose as well as a simulated 50 year exposure to examine the range of effects on the material and examine whether any degradation due to GCR would be present if the suit softgoods were stored in deep space for a long period of time. This paper presents the results of this work and outlines the impact on space suit pressure garment design for long duration deep space missions.

  6. The Inhomogeneous Background of Hydrogen-Molecule Dissociating Radiation during Cosmic Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Iliev, Ilian T; Mellema, Garrelt; Pen, Ue-Li

    2008-01-01

    The first, self-consistent calculations are presented of the cosmological, H2-dissociating UV background produced during the epoch of reionization by the sources of reionization. Large-scale radiative transfer simulations of reionization trace the impact of all the ionizing starlight on the IGM from all the sources in our simulation volume down to dwarf galaxies of mass ~10^8 Msun, identified by very high-resolution N-body simulations, including the self-regulating effect of IGM photoheating on dwarf galaxy formation. The UV continuum emitted below 13.6 eV by each source is then transferred through the same IGM, attenuated by atomic H Lyman series resonance lines, to predict the evolution of the inhomogeneous radiation background in the Lyman-Werner bands of H2 between 11 and 13.6 eV. On average, the intensity of this Lyman-Werner background is found to rise to the threshold level at which dissociation suppresses H2 cooling and star formation inside minihalos, long before reionization is complete. Spatial var...

  7. An empirical approach to the measurement of the cosmic radiation field at jet aircraft altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Green, A R; Lewis, B J; Kitching, F; McCall, M J; Desormeaux, M; Butler, A A

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the Royal Military College of Canada have accumulated extensive dose measurements performed at jet altitudes on over 160 flights and with a wide variety of detectors including a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), a smart wide energy neutron detection instrument (SWENDI), bubble detectors, thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and an ion chamber. The summation of the individual low and high LET results from the latter equipment compared successfully to those from the TEPC on each flight. The data from these numerous worldwide flights have been encapsulated into a program that calculates the radiation dose for any flight in the world at any period in the solar cycle. This experimentally based program, Predictive Code for AIRcrew Exposure (PCAIRE) has been designed to be used by the airline industry to meet national dosimetry requirements. In Canada, for example, such a code can be used, supported by periodic measurements. With this latter requirement in mind and a desire to decrease equip...

  8. Development of approximate shielding calculation method for high energy cosmic radiation on LEO satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sin, M. W.; Kim, M. H. [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    To calculate total dose effect on semi-conductor devices in satellite for a period of space mission effectively, two approximate calculation models for a comic radiation shielding were proposed. They are a sectoring method and a chord-length distribution method. When an approximate method was applied in this study, complex structure of satellite was described into multiple 1-dimensional slabs, structural materials were converted to reference material(aluminum), and the pre-calculated dose-depth conversion function was introduced to simplify the calculation process. Verification calculation was performed for orbit location and structure geometry of KITSAT-1 and compared with detailed 3-dimensional calculation results and experimental values. The calculation results from approximate method were estimated conservatively with acceptable error. However, results for satellite mission simulation were underestimated in total dose rate compared with experimental values.

  9. The Inhomogeneous Background of H2 Dissociating Radiation During Cosmic Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Iliev, Ilian T; Mellema, Garrelt; Pen, Ue-Li

    2008-01-01

    The first, self-consistent calculations of the cosmological H_2 dissociating UV background produced during the epoch of reionization (EOR) by the sources of reionization are presented. Large-scale radiative transfer simulations of reionization trace the impact of all the ionizing starlight on the IGM from all the sources in our simulation volume down to dwarf galaxies of mass ~ 10^8 solar mass, identified by very high-resolution N-body simulations, including the self-regulating effect of IGM photoheating on dwarf galaxy formation. The UV continuum emitted below 13.6 eV by each source is then transferred through the same IGM, attenuated by atomic H Lyman series resonance lines, to predict the evolution of the inhomogeneous background in the Lyman-Werner band of H_2 between 11 and 13.6 eV.

  10. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: III. Galactic far-infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Using the three-component spectral model describing the FIRAS average continuum spectra, the exact analytical expressions for thermodynamic and radiative functions of Galactic far-infrared radiation are obtained. The COBE FIRAS instrument data in the 0.15-2.88 THz frequency interval at the mean temperatures of T1 = 17.72 K, T2 = 14 K and T3 = 6.73 K are used for calculating the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, total emissivity, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume and pressure for the warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components of the Galactic continuum spectra. The generalized Stefan-Boltzmann law for warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components is constructed. The temperature dependence of each component is determined by the formula IS-B(T) = σ‧T6. This result is important when we construct the cosmological models of radiative transfer that can be applied inside the Galaxy. Within the framework of the three-component spectral model, the total number of photons in our Galaxy and the total radiation power (total luminosity) emitted from a surface of the Galaxy are calculated. Their values are NGtotal = 1.3780 × 1068 and IGtotal(T) = 1.0482 × 1036 W. Other radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Galactic far-infrared radiation (photon gas) of the Galaxy are calculated. The expressions for astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant and number density of the Galactic far-infrared photons are obtained. We assume that the obtained analytical expressions for thermodynamic and radiative functions may be useful for describing the continuum spectra of the far-infrared radiation for other galaxies.

  11. Resistance of lichens to simulated galactic cosmic radiation: limits of survival capacity and biosignature detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre Noetzel, Rosa; Miller, Ana Z.; Cubero, Beatriz; Raguse, Marina; Meessen, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Space constitutes an extremely harmful environment for survival of terrestrial organisms. Amongst extremophiles on Earth, lichens are one of the most resistant organisms to harsh terrestrial environments, as well as some species of microorganisms, such as bacteria (Moeller et al., 2010), criptoendolithic cyanobacteria and lithic fungi (de los Ríos et al. 2004). To study the survival capacity of lichens to the harmful radiation environment of space, we have selected the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions (De la Torre et al. 2010) and to a simulated Mars environment (Sanchez et al., 2012). Samples were irradiated with four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation in the STARLIFE campaign: helium and iron ion doses (up to 2,000 Gy), X-ray doses (up to 5,000 Gy) and ultra-high γ-ray doses (from 6 to 113 kGy). Results on resistance of C. gyrosa to space-relevant ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by: (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PS II); (ii) epifluorescence microscopy; (iii) confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence showed no significant changes on the viability of C. gyrosa with increasing doses of helium and iron ions as well as X-rays. In contrast, γ-irradiation elicited significant dose-correlated effects as revealed by all applied techniques. Relevant is the presence of whewellite-like crystals, detected by FESEM on C. gyrosa thalli after high irradiation doses, which has been also identified in previous Mars simulation studies (Böttcher et al., 2014). These studies contribute to the better understanding of the adaptability of extremophile organisms to harsh environments, as well as to estimate the habitability of a planet's surface, like Mars; they will be important for planning experiments on the search of life

  12. Fluctuations of the cosmic background radiation appearing in the 10-dimensional cosmological model

    CERN Document Server

    Tomita, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We consider a cosmological model starting from (1) the(1+3+6)-dimensional space-times consisting of the outer space (the 3-dimensional expanding section) and the inner space (the 6-dimensional section) and reaching (2) the Friedmann model after the decoupling between the outer space and the inner space, and derive fluctuations of the background radiation appearing in the above 10-dimensional space-times. For this purpose we first derive the fluid-dynamical perturbations in the above 10-dimensional space-times, corresponding to two kinds of curvature perturbations (in the scalar mode) in the non-viscous case, and next study the quantum fluctuations in the scalar and tensor modes, appearing at the stage when the perturbations are within the horizon of the inflating outer space. Lastly we derive the wave-number dependence of fluctuations (the power spectrum) in the two modes, which formed at the above decoupling epoch and are observed in the Friedmann stage. It is found that it can be consistent with the observe...

  13. Radiation exposure due to cosmic rays and solar X-ray photons at various atmospheric heights in aviation range over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-07-01

    In this presentation we present our work on the continuous monitoring of radiation exposure in terms of effective dose rates, due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar X-rays at various altitudes within aviation range over India. As India belongs to equatorial region, there is negligible contribution from solar energetic particles (SEP). The calculation of cosmic ray counts as well as the solar X-ray photons are performed on the basis of the observation of various Dignity series balloon experiments on cosmic ray and solar high energy radiation studies, conducted by ICSP and Monte Carlo simulations performed with GEANT4 detector simulation software. The information on solar activity level from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES) are employed in the calculations. A program, which is done entirely in MATLAB is employed to update regularly in a website, where we show images of dose rate (μSv) distribution over India at four different heights within the aviation range (updating at an interval of 30 minutes) and the approximate dose rates thats should be experienced by a pilot in an entire flight time between pairs of stations distributed all over India.

  14. Galactic synchrotron radiation from radio to microwaves, and its relation to cosmic-ray propagation models: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Galactic synchrotron radiation observed from radio to microwaves is produced by cosmic-ray (CR) electrons propagating in magnetic fields (B-fields). The low-frequency foreground component separated maps by WMAP and Planck depend on the assumed synchrotron spectrum. The synchrotron spectrum varies for different line of sights as a result of changes on the CR spectrum due to propagation effects and source distributions. Our present knowledge of the CR spectrum at different locations in the Galaxy is not sufficient to distinguish various possibilities in the modeling. As a consequence uncertainties on synchrotron emission models complicate the foreground component separation analysis with Planck and future microwave telescopes. Hence, any advancement in synchrotron modeling is important for separating the different foreground components.The first step towards a more comprehensive understanding of degeneracy and correlation among the synchrotron model parameters is outlined in our Strong et al. 2011 and Orlando et al. 2013 papers. In the latter the conclusion was that CR spectrum, propagation models, B-fields, and foreground component separation analysis need to be studied simultaneously in order to properly obtain and interpret the synchrotron foreground. Indeed for the officially released Planck maps, we use only the best spectral model from our above paper for the component separation analysis.Here we present a collections of our latest results on synchrotron, CRs and B-fields in the context of CR propagation, showing also our recent work on B-fields within the Planck Collaboration. We underline also the importance of using the constraints on CRs that we obtain from gamma ray observations. Methods and perspectives for further studies on the synchrotron foreground will be addressed.

  15. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: III. Galactic far-infrared radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Using the three-component spectral model describing the FIRAS average continuum spectra, the analytical expressions for the temperature dependence of the thermodynamic and radiative functions of the galactic far-infrared radiation are obtained. The COBE FIRAS instrument data in the 0.15 - 2.88 THz frequency interval at the mean temperatures T = 17.72 K, T = 14 K, and T =6.73 K are used for calculating the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, total emissivity, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume and pressure for the warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components of the Galactic continuum spectra. The generalized Stefan-Boltzmann laws for the warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components are constructed. This result is important when we construct the cosmological models of radiative transfer in the inner Galaxy. Within the framework of the three- com...

  16. Search for Cosmic Particles with the Moon and LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Winchen, T; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Mitra, P; Mulrey, K; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Schellart, P; Scholten, O; Thoudam, S; Trinh, T N G; ter Veen, S

    2016-01-01

    The low flux of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) at the highest energies provides a challenge to answer the long standing question about their origin and nature. A significant increase in the number of detected UHECR is expected to be achieved by employing Earth's moon as detector, and search for short radio pulses that are emitted when a particle interacts in the lunar rock. Observation of these short pulses with current and future radio telescopes also allows to search for the even lower fluxes of neutrinos with energies above $10^{22}$ eV, that are predicted in certain Grand-Unifying-Theories (GUTs), and e.g. models for super-heavy dark matter (SHDM). In this contribution we present the initial design for such a search with the LOFAR radio telescope.

  17. Measurement of secondary radiation due to cosmic rays at the Pfotzer maximum near the Tropic of Cancer during different seasons and year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Ritabrata; Sarathi Pal, Partha; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Bhowmick, Debashis; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-07-01

    In an ongoing mission in Indian Centre for Space Physics, India, for the extraterrestrial X-ray observation, we send very light weight X-ray detectors in a quasi-regular basis from the region near the Tropic of Cancer on board small weather balloons. During its path through the atmosphere the payload measure the secondary radiation due to cosmic ray interaction with the atmosphere. We compare the data from different seasons of the year and over few years particularly at the Pfotzer maximum. We present the long duration variation of the location of the Pfotzer maximum, the radiation dose and the spectral properties of the secondary radiation at this region as well as the effect of the Solar condition during the observation.

  18. A map of the cosmic microwave background radiation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), showing the large-scale fluctuations (the quadrupole and octopole) isolated by an analysis done partly by theorists at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A recent analysis, in part by theorists working at CERN, suggests a new view of the cosmic microwave background radiation. It seems the solar system, rather than the universe, causes the radiation's large-scale fluctuations, similar to the bass in a song.

  19. Maps of Dust Infrared Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davis, Marc

    1998-06-01

    standard reddening law and use the colors of elliptical galaxies to measure the reddening per unit flux density of 100 μm emission. We find consistent calibration using the B-R color distribution of a sample of the 106 brightest cluster ellipticals, as well as a sample of 384 ellipticals with B-V and Mg line strength measurements. For the latter sample, we use the correlation of intrinsic B-V versus Mg2 index to tighten the power of the test greatly. We demonstrate that the new maps are twice as accurate as the older Burstein-Heiles reddening estimates in regions of low and moderate reddening. The maps are expected to be significantly more accurate in regions of high reddening. These dust maps will also be useful for estimating millimeter emission that contaminates cosmic microwave background radiation experiments and for estimating soft X-ray absorption. We describe how to access our maps readily for general use.

  20. 超稠油燃烧基础参数特征研究%Physical simulation research on basic parameters of in—situ combustion for super heavy oil reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程海清; 赵庆辉; 刘宝良; 吴拓; 彭旭

    2012-01-01

    针对超稠油油藏开展火烧油层技术可行性研究的需要,利用自行设计研制的火烧油层物理模拟实验装置,分别采用超稠油、特稠油、普通稠油开展了火烧油层燃烧基础参数物理模拟实验.对比了不同类型稠油门槛温度、燃料消耗量等燃烧基础参数,结合产出油组分及温度场发育特征,分析了超稠油燃烧基础参数特征.研究认为,超稠油油藏开展火烧油层试验是可行的,超稠油门槛温度、燃料消耗量等燃烧基础参数值均高于其他类型稠油;稠油火烧油层的驱油效率与黏度相关,黏度越大其燃料消耗量越大,其最终的驱油效率相对较低;火烧后原油性质发生了明显改善.%A physical simulation system has been designed and developed to study the feasibility of in - situ combustion for super heavy oil reservoirs. Physical simulation experiments have been carried out for the basic parameters of in - situ combustion by respectively using super heavy oil, extra heavy oil and conventional heavy oil. Basic combustion parameters such as threshold temperature and fuel consumption have been compared for different types of heavy oil. The parameter characteristics of super heavy oil combustion have been analyzed combining with produced oil composition and temperature field characteristics. It has been concluded that in - situ combustion is feasible for super heavy oil reservoirs, whose threshold temperature and fuel consumption are higher than other types of heavy oil. The displacement efficiency of in - situ combustion is related to oil viscosity. The higher the viscosity is, the bigger the fuel consumption is, and the lower the ultimate displacement efficiency will be. Crude oil properties have been substantially improved after in - situ combustion.

  1. Research of HDNS technology for shallow super heavy oil reservoir in Chunfeng Oilfield%春风油田浅层超稠油HDNS技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学忠; 席伟军; 沈海兵

    2013-01-01

    There are thinner layers and serious thermal loss in shallow super heavy oil reservoir in Chunfeng Oilfield on the west of Junggar Basin.Aiming at these difficult problems,this paper puts forward a HDNS thermal recovery technology which includes drilling horizontal wells,adding viscosity reducer,and injecting nitrogen gas and steam.Nitrogen gas can re-duce the thermal conductivity factor of rock and the heat loss of thin heavy oil reservoir along the top caprock.Upward o-verlapped N2 gas has heat preservation function for the formation.The viscosity reducer can effectively reduce viscosity of crude oil and significantly decrease the yield value of underground crude oil and the critical temperature of crude oil flow. As a result,production period is extended and periodic oil production is increased.The injection-production integration string and the high angle deviated pump technology for horizontal well were adopted.Using the HDNS technology,it is to form productivity of 61.7 ×104 t/a with a oil production rate of more than 3.0% in Chunfeng Oilfield.%针对准噶尔盆地西缘春风油田浅层超稠油油层薄、地层热损失严重的难题,提出了水平井、降黏剂、氮气、蒸汽强化热采方式(HDNS)。氮气降低岩石导热系数,降低薄层稠油油藏沿上部盖层的热量损失。地层内氮气向上超覆,起到地层保温作用。降黏剂有效降低原油黏度,大幅降低了地下原油屈服值和原油能够流动的临界温度,延长了生产周期,增加了周期产油量。配套了注采一体化管柱和水平井大斜度泵工艺。春风油田应用HDNS技术已经建成产能61.7×104 t/a,采油速度大于3%。

  2. First results from the microwave air yield beam experiment (MAYBE: Measurement of GHz radiation for ultra-high energy cosmic ray detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzi V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of microwave emission from an electron-beam induced air plasma performed at the 3 MeV electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Results include the emission spectrum between 1 and 15 GHz, the polarization of the microwave radiation and the scaling of the emitted power with respect to beam intensity. MAYBE measurements provide further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  3. Hydrology and Cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mie

    Processes like evapotranspiration and infiltration are closely linked to the wetness of the soil, and soil moisture is therefore a key variable for water balance studies. Catchment scale hydrological modeling is used for weather and climate prediction and for estimating fluxes and variables...... of the hydrological system important for managing the water resources. Soil moisture is highly variable in time and space, and the variability changes with scale. Soil moisture measurements at a scale comparable to the discretization of catchment scale models are therefore of great importance for validation...

  4. Technical Research on Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery of Thin Shallow Bed Super Heavy Oil High Water-Cut Wells%薄浅层超稠油高含水井微生物采油技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学忠

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at poor steam stimulation effect of high water-cut super heavy oil wells near edge water in west edge of Chunfeng Oilfield in Junggar Basin, the article researches microbial single well stimulation oil recovery technology. Microorganisms and oil-water interact with each other, have apparent effect upon crude oil viscosity reduction. Field Test of microbial single well stimulation at Pai6-Ping 48 well and Pai6-Ping49 well shows, oil production increases 25t/d, 2 727t in the stage. opening a new route of high water-cut super heavy oil cold production, having been popularized to the other 2 wells.%针对准噶尔盆地西缘春风油田靠近边水的高含水超稠油井蒸汽吞吐效果差的情况,开展了微生物单井吞吐采油技术研究。微生物与油水相互作用,对于原油降黏效果明显。排6-平48和排6-平49井微生物单井吞吐矿场试验,日增油25吨,阶段增油2727吨,开辟了高含水超稠油井冷采的新途径,已在另外两口井推广。

  5. Registration of the signal of a star and PCR sources optical radiation by means of the installation, aimed at the investigation of EAS of high energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Barnaveli, T T; Khaldeeva, I V; Chubenko, A P; Nesterova, N M; Barnaveli, T T

    2013-01-01

    With the help of the experimental installation aimed at the investigation of high energy cosmic rays (Tien-Shan high mountain laboratory) the signal of Solar and star optical radiation is registered. The signal is well provided statistically and possesses the strictly expressed maximum in the region of EAS sizes Ne 1.19 106 particles (primary energy Eo 1.33 1015 eV). This signal is the peak from gamma EAS, generated by gamma quanta from decay of pi zero mesons, photo produced by the Primary Cosmic Radiation (PCR) nuclei on the photons of stars and of PCR sources. The assumption is made, that exactly this process provides the main contribution in the formation of so called knee on the primary spectrum. Due to the universality and distinct maximum of this signal, its usage for independent and reliable calibration of the EAS installations, for the mutual calibration of these installations and, possibly, for the merger of experimental data obtained by means of these installations to increase the statistics, is pr...

  6. Simulating cosmic radiation absorption and secondary particle production of solar panel layers of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite with GEANT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiǧitoǧlu, Merve; Veske, Doǧa; Nilüfer Öztürk, Zeynep; Bilge Demirköz, Melahat

    2016-07-01

    All devices which operate in space are exposed to cosmic rays during their operation. The resulting radiation may cause fatal damages in the solid structure of devices and the amount of absorbed radiation dose and secondary particle production for each component should be calculated carefully before the production. Solar panels are semiconductor solid state devices and are very sensitive to radiation. Even a short term power cut-off may yield a total failure of the satellite. Even little doses of radiation can change the characteristics of solar cells. This deviation can be caused by rarer high energetic particles as well as the total ionizing dose from the abundant low energy particles. In this study, solar panels planned for a specific LEO satellite, IMECE, are analyzed layer by layer. The Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) database and GEANT4 simulation software are used to simulate the layers of the panels. The results obtained from the simulation will be taken in account to determine the amount of radiation protection and resistance needed for the panels or to revise the design of the panels.

  7. LiteBIRD: a small satellite for the study of B-mode polarization and inflation from cosmic background radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazumi, M.; Borrill, J.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M. A.; Fuke, H.; Ghribi, A.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Inoue, Y.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishino, H.; Karatsu, K.; Katayama, N.; Kawano, I.; Kibayashi, A.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, N.; Koga, K.; Komatsu, E.; Lee, A. T.; Matsuhara, H.; Matsumura, T.; Mima, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Morii, H.; Murayama, S.; Nagai, M.; Nagata, R.; Nakamura, S.; Natsume, K.; Nishino, H.; Noda, A.; Noguchi, T.; Ohta, I.; Otani, C.; Richards, P. L.; Sakai, S.; Sato, N.; Sato, Y.; Sekimoto, Y.; Shimizu, A.; Shinozaki, K.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, T.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takagi, Y.; Takei, Y.; Tomaru, T.; Uzawa, Y.; Watanabe, H.; Yamasaki, N.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yotsumoto, K.

    2012-09-01

    LiteBIRD [Lite (Light) satellite for the studies of B-mode polarization and Inflation from cosmic background Radiation Detection] is a small satellite to map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation over the full sky at large angular scales with unprecedented precision. Cosmological inflation, which is the leading hypothesis to resolve the problems in the Big Bang theory, predicts that primordial gravitational waves were created during the inflationary era. Measurements of polarization of the CMB radiation are known as the best probe to detect the primordial gravitational waves. The LiteBIRD working group is authorized by the Japanese Steering Committee for Space Science (SCSS) and is supported by JAXA. It has more than 50 members from Japan, USA and Canada. The scientific objective of LiteBIRD is to test all the representative inflation models that satisfy single-field slow-roll conditions and lie in the large-field regime. To this end, the requirement on the precision of the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, at LiteBIRD is equal to or less than 0.001. Our baseline design adopts an array of multi-chroic superconducting polarimeters that are read out with high multiplexing factors in the frequency domain for a compact focal plane. The required sensitivity of 1.8μKarcmin is achieved with 2000 TES bolometers at 100mK. The cryogenic system is based on the Stirling/JT technology developed for SPICA, and the continuous ADR system shares the design with future X-ray satellites.

  8. Characteristic recovery times of Forbush-type decreases in the cosmic radiation. I - Observations at earth at different energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Webber, W. R.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Data on 30 asymmetric Forbush decreases recorded by the IMP spacecraft at 1 AU and the Mt. Washington neutron monitor over the period 1972-84 are examined to characterize the recovery characteristics of cosmic rays after the events. The spacecraft data are concentrated at energies of 1.7 GV, while the terrestrial instruments recorded events at 5 GV. Attention is paid to the relative amplitudes of the recorded transient decreases, the characteristic recovery times, and the energy dependence of the amplitudes and recovery time. The recovery times were found to be equal at both energy levels, supporting a concept of energy independence for the recoveries. Also, no correlations were found between the recovery times and the occurrences of a solar magnetic field reversal or with phase in the solar modulation cycle. A time-dependent, two-dimensional model is defined, which expresses the cosmic ray particle distributions as a function of the decay of the disturbance, with a small dependence on the transport parameters of the cosmic rays.

  9. The discrimination between cosmic positrons and protons with the Transition Radiation Detector of the AMS experiment on the International Space Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millinger, Mark

    2012-10-08

    The aim of this thesis is the development and validation of a particle identification method with the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02 to allow for the determination of the positron fraction in the cosmic lepton flux. Independent measurements indicate that a significant amount of about 23% of the energy density in the universe consists of an unknown mass contribution, the so-called Dark Matter. The Neutralino, as the most popular Dark Matter particle candidate, may produce an additional signal in the spectrum of cosmic rays. The fraction of positrons in the cosmic lepton flux possibly contains such a Dark Matter signal at high particle momenta. The currently most precise measurements in the region of this excess are provided by the satellite-borne PAMELA and Fermi detectors. Momentumdependent systematic uncertainties, especially the mis-identification of protons as positrons, could imitate the signal. However, if this positron excess is produced by Dark Matter the fraction should decrease above a theoretical energy threshold to the expectations, based on particle propagation. The energy region measured up to now does not show such a progress. Due to its significantly increased event statistics and its capability to measure up to higher particle energies, this signature could be observed with AMS-02. The number of events, which can be recorded by a detector, is limited by the combination of aperture and observable solid angle, quantified by the geometrical acceptance, and the observation time. As the cosmic particle flux follows a power-law in particle momentum with exponent {gamma} {approx} -3, the observable momentum interval is thus constrained by statistics. Due to its large geometrical acceptance of about 0.5 m{sup 2}sr, its long observation time of at least 9 years and its high proton suppression factor of >or similar 10{sup 6} AMS-02 will record large and clean lepton samples and thus provide a precise measurement

  10. Simulating Cosmic Reionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlik, Andreas Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The first stars formed a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, when the Universe was only a small fraction of its present age. Their radiation transformed the previously cold and neutral hydrogen that filled intergalactic space into the hot and ionised cosmic plasma that is observed today. T

  11. Simulating Cosmic Reionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlik, Andreas Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The first stars formed a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, when the Universe was only a small fraction of its present age. Their radiation transformed the previously cold and neutral hydrogen that filled intergalactic space into the hot and ionised cosmic plasma that is observed today.

  12. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution ($\\sim1\\%$ for electrons and photons and $20\\%$ for nuclei) and a large geometry factor ($>3\\, m^2sr$ for electrons and diffuse photons and $>2\\, m^2sr$ for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray searches at energies between $\\sim10$ to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  13. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Lamperstorfer, Anna S.; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-05-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution (∼1% for electrons and photons and 20% for nuclei) and a large geometry factor (>3 m2 sr for electrons and diffuse photons and > [2]m2 sr for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic γ-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic γ-ray searches at energies between ∼ 10 to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  14. 100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic radiation: the role of Günther and Tegetmeyer in the development of the necessary instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. A. Fricke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic radiation by the Austrian physicist Victor Franz Hess (1883–1964, obtained onboard manned balloons, one of them launched up to an altitude of 5.3 km. His discovery earned him the Nobel Prize in 1936. The discovery follows in the context of the investigation of atmospheric electricity and of the newly discovered radioactivity, in particular with respect to γ rays. Starting from simple ionization chambers, the instruments were developed during an interplay between functional requirements, scientific progress and available manufacturing technologies.

    The authors of this contribution take this anniversary as an opportunity to describe the instrumentation used by Hess, as well as further developments in the instrumentation which took place in the decades following Hess' discovery. This manuscript also discusses details of the company who manufactured Hess' instrument, ''Günther & Tegetmeyer'' based in Braunschweig, Germany. This company did not only build instruments for Hess and the research on cosmic rays, but also for other scientific disciplines and for well-known researchers and discoverers.

  15. Spherical Orbifolds for Cosmic Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Harmonic analysis is a tool to infer cosmic topology from the measured astrophysical cosmic microwave background CMB radiation. For overall positive curvature, Platonic spherical manifolds are candidates for this analysis. We combine the specific point symmetry of the Platonic manifolds with their deck transformations. This analysis in topology leads from manifolds to orbifolds. We discuss the deck transformations of the orbifolds and give basis functions for the harmonic analysis as linear combinations of Wigner polynomials on the 3-sphere. They provide new tools for detecting cosmic topology from the CMB radiation.

  16. The TRIPLE LUX-A Experiment for BIOLAB/ISS- Combined Effects of Microgravity and Cosmic Radiation on the Oxidative Burst of Mammalian Macrophageal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, K.; Sromicki, J.; Hock, B.; Ullrich, O.

    2008-06-01

    Phagocytes, the prominent cells of innate immunity, are responsible for the removal of foreign invaders, apoptotic as well as cancer cells. In a flight experiment in the BIOLAB facility on the ISS we will investigate the combined effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation on the oxidative burst, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), of the macrophageal cell line NR8383. A chemiluminescence assay (luminol) is used to determine the amount of ROS during phagocytosis of zymosan in a kinetic approach. Ground control experiments for the TRIPLE LUX-A flight experiment on a fast rotating 2D clinostat showed that the selected cell line responds to simulated weightlessness by an increase of ROS production.

  17. Measurement of secondary cosmic radiation and calculation of associated dose conversion coefficients for humans; Messung sekundaerer kosmischer Strahlung und Berechnung der zugehoerigen Dosiskonversionskoeffizienten fuer den Menschen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmer, Gregor

    2012-04-11

    Due to secondary cosmic radiation (SCR), pilots and flight attendants receive elevated effective doses at flight altitudes. For this reason, since 2003 aircrew members are considered as occupationally exposed, in Germany. This work deals with the calculation of dose conversion coefficients (DCC) for protons, neutrons, electrons, positrons, photons and myons, which are crucial for estimation of effective dose from SCR. For the first time, calculations were performed combining Geant4 - a Monte Carlo code developed at CERN - with the voxel phantoms for the reference female and male published in 2008 by ICRP and ICRU. Furthermore, measurements of neutron fluence spectra - which contribute the major part to the effective dose of SCR - were carried out at the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (UFS) located at 2650 m above sea level nearby the Zugspitze mountain, Germany. These measured neutron spectra, and additionally available calculated spectra, were then folded with the DCC calculated in this work, and effective dose rates for different heights were calculated.

  18. First measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation at small angular scales from CAPMAP

    CERN Document Server

    Barkats, D; Farese, P; Fitzpatrick, L; Gaier, T C; Gunderson, J O; Hedman, M M; Hyatt, L; McMahon, J J; Samtleben, D; Staggs, S T; Vanderlinde, K W; Winstein, B

    2004-01-01

    Polarization results from the Cosmic Anisotropy Polarization MAPper (CAPMAP) experiment are reported. These are based upon 433 hours, after cuts, observing a 2 square degree patch around the North Celestial Pole (NCP) with four 90 GHz correlation polarimeters coupled to optics defining $4\\arcmin$ beams. The E-mode flat bandpower anisotropy within $\\ell=940^{+330}_{-300}$ is measured as 66$^{+69}_{-29} \\mu$K$^2$; the 95% Confidence level upper limit for B-mode power within $\\ell=1050^{+590}_{-520}$ is measured as 38 $\\mu$K$^2$.

  19. Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Steer, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    This article, written for Scolarpedia, provides a brief introduction into the subject of cosmic strings, together with a review of their main properties, cosmological evolution and observational signatures.

  20. Characteristics of large Forbush-type decreases in the cosmic radiation. II - Observations at different heliocentric radial distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, W. R.; Lockwood, J. A.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic ray data from IMP 8, Voyager 1 and 2, Pioneer 10 are used to investigate the heliocentric radial dependence of the characteristics of about 20 Forbush-type transient decreases which occurred from 1978 to 1984. These characteristics include the recovery time, the amplitude, and the time to decrease to minimum. It is found that the average recovery time is about 5 times longer at R = 30 AU than at 1 AU. The magnitudes of the transient decreases are observed to decrease about 1.5 percent/AU on average so that the magnitude of the decrease is half as great at R about 30 AU as at 1 AU. The time for the cosmic ray intensity to decrease to the minimum in the transient decrease is found to be greater at larger distances and is about 5 times longer at R = 30 AU than at 1 AU. The behavior of these effects as a function of radius is obviously related to the evolution of the disturbances causing the transient decreases as they propagate outward. A model of the Forbush-type decrease is proposed to explain the observed radial dependence of the recovery time and time to minimum of the decrease. The implications of these results for understanding the relationship between Forbush-type decreases and the 11-year variation are discussed.

  1. Dynamic Cosmic Strings, 1

    CERN Document Server

    Sjodin, K R P; Vickers, J A

    2001-01-01

    The field equations for a time dependent cylindrical cosmic string coupled togravity are reformulated in terms of geometrical variables defined on a2+1-dimensional spacetime by using the method of Geroch decomposition. Unlikethe 4-dimensional spacetime the reduced case is asymptotically flat. Anumerical method for solving the field equations which involves conformallycompactifying the space and including null infinity as part of the grid isdescribed. It is shown that the code reproduces the results of a number ofvacuum solutions with one or two degrees of freedom. In the final section theinteraction between the cosmic string and a pulse of gravitational radiation isbriefly described. This will be fully analysed in the sequel.

  2. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  3. Cosmic Magnification

    CERN Document Server

    Ménard, B

    2002-01-01

    I present the current status of the cosmic magnification produced by systematic amplification of background sources by large-scale structures. After introducing its principle, I focus on its interests for cosmology and underline its complementary aspect to cosmic shear and galaxy auto-correlations. I finally discuss recent investigations using higher-order statistics.

  4. Cosmic superstrings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2008-08-28

    Cosmic superstrings are expected to be formed at the end of brane inflation, within the context of brane-world cosmological models inspired from string theory. By studying the properties of cosmic superstring networks and comparing their phenomenological consequences against observational data, we aim to pin down the successful and natural inflationary model and get an insight into the stringy description of our Universe.

  5. A GPU-based Calculation Method for Near Field Effects of Cherenkov Radiation Induced by Ultra High Energy Cosmic Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Chen, Pisin

    2010-01-01

    The radio approach for detecting the ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos has become a mature field. The Cherenkov signals in radio detection are originated from the charge excess of particle showers due to Askaryan effect. The conventional way of calculating the Cherenkov pulses by making Fraunhofer approximation fails when the sizes of the elongated showers become comparable with the detection distances. We present a calculation method of Cherenkov pulses based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and attain a satisfying effeciency via the GPU- acceleration. Our method provides a straightforward way of the near field calculation, which would be important for ultra high energy particle showers, especailly the electromagnetic showers induced by the high energy leptons produced in the neutrino charge current interactions.

  6. [Cytogenetic effects in experimental exposure to the heavy charged particles of galactic cosmic radiation on the Kosmos-1129 biosatellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzgodina, L V; Maksimova, E N

    1982-01-01

    The experiment was carried out on lattice (Lactuca sativa) seeds flown in a biocontainer equipped with plastic detectors to record heavy charged particles (HCP). The purpose of the experiment was to determine the yield of aberrant cells as a result of irradiation, and to identify this effect as a function of HCP topography in the seed. The cytogenetic examination of flight seedlings revealed a significant difference between the seeds which were hit with HCP and those that remained intact. This indicates a significant contribution of the heavy component of galactic cosmic rediation into the radiobiological effect. The relationship between the radiobiological effect and the HCP topography in the seed was established: zones of the root and stem meristema proved to be most sensitive targets.

  7. The amplitude and spectral index of the large angular scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganga, Ken; Page, Lyman; Cheng, Edward; Meyer, Stephan

    1994-01-01

    In many cosmological models, the large angular scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background is parameterized by a spectral index, n, and a quadrupolar amplitude, Q. For a Harrison-Peebles-Zel'dovich spectrum, n = 1. Using data from the Far Infrared Survey (FIRS) and a new statistical measure, a contour plot of the likelihood for cosmological models for which -1 less than n less than 3 and 0 equal to or less than Q equal to or less than 50 micro K is obtained. Depending upon the details of the analysis, the maximum likelihood occurs at n between 0.8 and 1.4 and Q between 18 and 21 micro K. Regardless of Q, the likelihood is always less than half its maximum for n less than -0.4 and for n greater than 2.2, as it is for Q less than 8 micro K and Q greater than 44 micro K.

  8. Limits on the radiative decay of sterile neutrino dark matter from the unresolved cosmic and soft x-ray backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazajian, Kevork N.; Markevitch, Maxim; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Hickox, Ryan C.

    2007-03-01

    We present upper limits on line emission in the Cosmic X-ray background (CXB) that would be produced by decay of sterile neutrino dark matter. We employ the spectra of the unresolved component of the CXB in the Chandra Deep Fields North and South obtained with the Chandra CCD detector in the E=0.8 9keV band. The expected decay flux comes from the dark matter on the lines of sight through the Milky Way galactic halo. Our constraints on the sterile neutrino decay rate are sensitive to the modeling of the Milky Way halo. The highest halo mass estimates provide a limit on the sterile neutrino mass of msrocket-borne calorimeter by McCammon and collaborators.

  9. Mapping the Cosmic Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanetto, Steven

    The following sections are included: * A Brief History of Our Universe: From Soup to Galaxies * The Hidden Cosmic Dawn * The Solution: Flipping Spins * The Spin-Flip Transition as an Astronomical Tool * Foiled!: Early Cosmology with the Spin-Flip Transition * Spin-Flip Radiation Holds the Key to Observing the Cosmic Dawn * The Spin-Flip Background: The First Stars * The Spin-Flip Background: The First Black Holes * The Spin-Flip Background: The Epoch of Reionization * FM Radio Antennae as Cosmic Observatories * Piles and Tiles of Antennae: Mapping the Spin-Flip Background * Mountains to Scale: Challenges to Observing the Spin-Flip Background * Sound and Fury, Signifying Statistics * An Explosion of Telescopes * Dreams for the Future * An Unfinished Story

  10. Case study on the effect of cosmic radiation in embedded systems in aircraft; Estudo de caso sobre o efeito da radiacao cosmica em sistemas embarcados em aeronaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Adriane C.M.; Pereira, Marlon A., E-mail: adriane.acm@hotmail.com, E-mail: marlon@ieav.cta.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Federico, Claudio A.; Goncalez, Odair L., E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: odairl@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    High-energy neutrons generated from the interaction of cosmic radiation with atoms of the atmosphere, can cause adverse effects on avionics devices. These effects are referred to as 'Single Event Effects' (SEE) and may occur especially in aircraft onboard computers, from change the logic state of memory cells or functional interruptions, which could compromise flight safety. The effects of the SEE must first be evaluated and entered into the safety analysis process in order to determine the susceptibility to failures by SEE devices. SEE rate can be evaluated separately for thermal neutrons and fast neutrons with energy above 10 MeV. This paper presents an exploratory study of susceptibility to radiation to a specific type of SRAM memory, during periods of maximum and minimum solar, in situations of equatorial and polar flight in the typical flight altitude of existing aircraft and, at higher altitudes, near the maximum of Pfotzer. This study was conducted using estimates of particle flows employing the EXPACS QARM codes and evaluating the expected rate of SEE due to thermal neutrons and fast neutrons separately. The distribution in energy and the flow of neutrons inside the airplane are influenced by the total mass of the aircraft and this influence are also discussed.

  11. Cosmic radiation dosimetry onboard aircrafts at the brazilian airspace; Dosimetria da radiacao cosmica no interior de aeronaves no espaco aereo brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federico, Claudio Antonio

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is the establishment of a dosimetric system for the aircrew in the domestic territory. A technique to perform measurements of ambient dose equivalent in aircrafts was developed. An active detector was evaluated for onboard aircraft use, testing its adequacy to this specific type of measurement as well as its susceptibility to the magnetic and electromagnetic interferences. The equipment was calibrated in standard radiation beams and in a special field of the European Laboratory CERN, that reproduces with great proximity the real spectrum in aircraft flight altitudes; it was also tested in several flights, in an Brazilian Air Force's aircraft. The results were evaluated and compared with those obtained from several computational programs for cosmic radiation estimates, with respect to its adequacy for use in the South American region. The program CARI-6 was selected to evaluate the estimated averaged effective doses for the aircrew who operate in this region. A statistical distribution of aircrew effective doses in South America and Caribe was made, and the results show that a great part of this aircrew members are subjected to annual effective doses that exceed the dose limits for the members of the public. Additionally, a preliminary passive dosemeter, based in thermoluminescent detectors, was proposed; international collaborations with United Kingdom and Italy were established for joint measurements of the ambient equivalent doses in aircrafts. (author)

  12. Exploiting different active silicon detectors in the International Space Station: ALTEA and DOSTEL galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livo; Berger, Thomas; Burmeister, Sönke; Di Fino, Luca; Rizzo, Alessandro; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther

    2017-08-01

    The solar system exploration by humans requires to successfully deal with the radiation exposition issue. The scientific aspect of this issue is twofold: knowing the radiation environment the astronauts are going to face and linking radiation exposure to health risks. Here we focus on the first issue. It is generally agreed that the final tool to describe the radiation environment in a space habitat will be a model featuring the needed amount of details to perform a meaningful risk assessment. The model should also take into account the shield changes due to the movement of materials inside the habitat, which in turn produce changes in the radiation environment. This model will have to undergo a final validation with a radiation field of similar complexity. The International Space Station (ISS) is a space habitat that features a radiation environment inside which is similar to what will be found in habitats in deep space, if we use measurements acquired only during high latitude passages (where the effects of the Earth magnetic field are reduced). Active detectors, providing time information, that can easily select data from different orbital sections, are the ones best fulfilling the requirements for these kinds of measurements. The exploitation of the radiation measurements performed in the ISS by all the available instruments is therefore mandatory to provide the largest possible database to the scientific community, to be merged with detailed Computer Aided Design (CAD) models, in the quest for a full model validation. While some efforts in comparing results from multiple active detectors have been attempted, a thorough study of a procedure to merge data in a single data matrix in order to provide the best validation set for radiation environment models has never been attempted. The aim of this paper is to provide such a procedure, to apply it to two of the most performing active detector systems in the ISS: the Anomalous Long Term Effects in Astronauts (ALTEA

  13. Establishment of Korea-Russia bilateral research collaboration for studies on biological effects of cosmic ray and space radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Juwoon; Kim, Dongho; Choi, Jongil; Song, Beomseok; Kim, Jaekyung; Kang, Oilhyun; Lee, Yoonjong; Kim, Jinhong; Jo, Minho

    2011-04-15

    {Omicron} KAERI-IBMP joint workshop on countermeasure and application researches to space environments - Sharing of state-of-the-art researches on space radiobiology using bio-satellites (BION-M1, Photon-soil) and ISS module (Bio-risk) was conducted - Sharing and discussion of state-of-the-art researches on dosimetry of space radiation and its affect on organisms were conducted. {Omicron} Making a contract on KAERI-IBMP Joint Research using Bio-risk module - Contract on KAERI-IBMP Joint Research to evaluate effect of space environment (microgravity and space radiation) on fermentative fungi (Aspergillus oryzae), Algae (Nostoc sp.), and plant seeds (rice, Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon) was made in November, 2010. {Omicron} Discussion on new Joint Researches on evaluation of space radiation on organisms - Final step on Bion-M projects in terms of evaluation of physiological changes of lactic acid bacteria consumed by Mouse - Discussing new joint research on evaluation of physiological changes of primate by space radiation {Omicron} Establishment and management of the practical working group to invite a branch office of the IBMP in Korea - The system and the working group to implement cooperating researches between KAERI-IBMP on space radiation were established.

  14. Galactic cosmic radiation leads to cognitive impairment and increased aβ plaque accumulation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Cherry

    Full Text Available Galactic Cosmic Radiation consisting of high-energy, high-charged (HZE particles poses a significant threat to future astronauts in deep space. Aside from cancer, concerns have been raised about late degenerative risks, including effects on the brain. In this study we examined the effects of (56Fe particle irradiation in an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We demonstrated 6 months after exposure to 10 and 100 cGy (56Fe radiation at 1 GeV/µ, that APP/PS1 mice show decreased cognitive abilities measured by contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition tests. Furthermore, in male mice we saw acceleration of Aβ plaque pathology using Congo red and 6E10 staining, which was further confirmed by ELISA measures of Aβ isoforms. Increases were not due to higher levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP or increased cleavage as measured by levels of the β C-terminal fragment of APP. Additionally, we saw no change in microglial activation levels judging by CD68 and Iba-1 immunoreactivities in and around Aβ plaques or insulin degrading enzyme, which has been shown to degrade Aβ. However, immunohistochemical analysis of ICAM-1 showed evidence of endothelial activation after 100 cGy irradiation in male mice, suggesting possible alterations in Aβ trafficking through the blood brain barrier as a possible cause of plaque increase. Overall, our results show for the first time that HZE particle radiation can increase Aβ plaque pathology in an APP/PS1 mouse model of AD.

  15. Limits on the Radiative Decay of Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter from the Unresolved Cosmic and Soft X-ray Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Abazajian, Kevork N; Koushiappas, S M; Hickox, R C; Abazajian, Kevork N.; Markevitch, Maxim; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Hickox, Ryan C.

    2006-01-01

    We present upper limits on line emission in the Cosmic X-ray background (CXB) that would be produced by decay of sterile neutrino dark matter. We employ the spectra of the unresolved component of the CXB in the Chandra Deep Fields North and South obtained with the Chandra CCD detector in the E=0.8-9 keV band. The expected decay flux comes from the dark matter on the lines of sight through the Milky Way galactic halo. Our constraints on the sterile neutrino decay rate are sensitive to the modeling of the Milky Way halo. The highest halo mass estimates provide a limit on the sterile neutrino mass of m_s<2.9 keV in the Dodelson-Widrow production model, while the lowest halo mass estimates provide the conservative limit of m_s<5.7 keV (2-sigma). We also discuss constraints from a short observation of the softer (E<1 keV) X-ray background with a rocket-borne calorimeter by McCammon and collaborators.

  16. Anthocyanin-rich blueberry diets enhance protection of critical brain regions exposed to acute levels of 56Fe cosmic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protective effects of anthocyanin-rich blueberries on brain health are well documented and are particularly important under conditions of high oxidative stress which can lead to “accelerated aging”. One such scenario is exposure to space radiation, which consists of high-energy and -charge parti...

  17. Dosimetric investigations of cosmic radiation aboard the Kosmos-936 AES (joint Soviet-American experiment K-206)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. V.; Kovalyev, Y. Y.; Dudkin, V. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The Soviet and American parts of the experiment are described separately. Particular attention was given to the following problems: placement of the detectors; study of neutron radiation within the biosatellite; and studies of fragmentation of heavy nuclei on accelerators. Unified methods were developed for the calibration of Soviet and American detectors.

  18. Genetic effects of cosmic radiation on bacteriophage T4Br/+/ /On materials of biological experiment Soyuz-Apollo/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iurov, S.S. (Academy of Sciences, Institute of Biological Physics, Pushchino, USSR); Akoev, I.G. (Ministerstvo Zdravookhraneniia SSSR, Institut Mediko-Biologicheskikh Problem, Moscow, USSR)

    1979-01-01

    During the experiment Spore-ring Forming Fungi Biorhythm of the Apollo-Soyuz test project the Rhythm-1 apparatus contained a dried film culture of bacteriophage T4Br(+), growing cultures of Actinomyces and plastic nuclear particle detectors. The following were studied: the frequency of induction of r mutations in the bacteriophage film per 20,000 surviving particles, the spectrum of mutant types obtained (rI, rII, rIII), and the possible molecular mechanisms for the occurrence of rII mutants with due regard to the registered tracks of heavy nuclear particles. The studies showed that the local radiation due to heavy nuclear particle tracks plays a major role in space radiation damage.

  19. Modeling theoretical radiative-dynamic response of tropospheric clouds to cosmic ray changes associated with Forbush Decrease events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casazza, Marco; Alessio, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Forbush Decrease (FD) effects on cloud composition and structure are under study and the results are still controversial. Time-scales are of paramount importance for supporting either a 'microphysical hypothesis', which hypothesizes a relation between FD and cloud microphysical parameters variability, or a different one. A most controversial question is related to the time delay between FD and cloud structure modification. The timescales of a radiative-dynamical mechanism, investigated through a simple model, are compatible with the observed variability with respect to cloud structure. Thus the delayed modification on cloud structure has to be put in relation with solar radiation variability, being coherent with the observed statistically significant Total Solar Irradiance (TSI), temperature and baric field variations, while not supporting the 'microphysical hypothesis'.

  20. Experimental simulation of radiation damage of polymers in space applications by cosmic-ray-type high energy heavy ions and the resulting changes in optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, U. H.; Ensinger, W.

    2015-12-01

    Devices operating in space, e.g. in satellites, are being hit by cosmic rays. These include so-called HZE-ions, with High mass (Z) and energy (E). These highly energetic heavy ions penetrate deeply into the materials and deposit a large amount of energy, typically several keV per nm range. Serious damage is created. In space vehicles, polymers are used which are degraded under ion bombardment. HZE ion irradiation can experimentally be simulated in large scale accelerators. In the present study, the radiation damage of aliphatic vinyl- and fluoro-polymers by heavy ions with energies in the GeV range is described. The ions cause bond scission and create volatile small molecular species, leading to considerable mass loss of the polymers. Since hydrogen, oxygen and fluorine-containing molecules are created and these elements are depleted, the remaining material is carbon-richer than the original polymers and contains conjugated CC double bonds. This process is investigated by measuring the optical band gap with UV-Vis absorption spectrometry as a function of ion fluence. The results show how the optical band gaps shift from the UV into the Vis region upon ion irradiation for the different polymers.

  1. Experimental simulation of radiation damage of polymers in space applications by cosmic-ray-type high energy heavy ions and the resulting changes in optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, U.H.; Ensinger, W., E-mail: ensinger@ca.tu-darmstadt.de

    2015-12-15

    Devices operating in space, e.g. in satellites, are being hit by cosmic rays. These include so-called HZE-ions, with High mass (Z) and energy (E). These highly energetic heavy ions penetrate deeply into the materials and deposit a large amount of energy, typically several keV per nm range. Serious damage is created. In space vehicles, polymers are used which are degraded under ion bombardment. HZE ion irradiation can experimentally be simulated in large scale accelerators. In the present study, the radiation damage of aliphatic vinyl- and fluoro-polymers by heavy ions with energies in the GeV range is described. The ions cause bond scission and create volatile small molecular species, leading to considerable mass loss of the polymers. Since hydrogen, oxygen and fluorine-containing molecules are created and these elements are depleted, the remaining material is carbon-richer than the original polymers and contains conjugated CC double bonds. This process is investigated by measuring the optical band gap with UV–Vis absorption spectrometry as a function of ion fluence. The results show how the optical band gaps shift from the UV into the Vis region upon ion irradiation for the different polymers.

  2. High-energy Gamma Rays from the Milky Way: Three-dimensional Spatial Models for the Cosmic-Ray and Radiation Field Densities in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, T. A.; Jóhannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    High-energy γ-rays of interstellar origin are produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles with the diffuse gas and radiation fields in the Galaxy. The main features of this emission are well understood and are reproduced by existing CR propagation models employing 2D galactocentric cylindrically symmetrical geometry. However, the high-quality data from instruments like the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal significant deviations from the model predictions on few to tens of degrees scales, indicating the need to include the details of the Galactic spiral structure and thus requiring 3D spatial modeling. In this paper, the high-energy interstellar emissions from the Galaxy are calculated using the new release of the GALPROP code employing 3D spatial models for the CR source and interstellar radiation field (ISRF) densities. Three models for the spatial distribution of CR sources are used that are differentiated by their relative proportion of input luminosity attributed to the smooth disk or spiral arms. Two ISRF models are developed based on stellar and dust spatial density distributions taken from the literature that reproduce local near- to far-infrared observations. The interstellar emission models that include arms and bulges for the CR source and ISRF densities provide plausible physical interpretations for features found in the residual maps from high-energy γ-ray data analysis. The 3D models for CR and ISRF densities provide a more realistic basis that can be used for the interpretation of the nonthermal interstellar emissions from the Galaxy.

  3. On the Long-Term Variation of Galactic Cosmic Rays: Convection-Diffusion and Drift Modulations in the Heliosphere, Expected Radiation Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Lev

    On the basis of results obtained in our investigations of CR-SA hysteresis effects we determine the dimension of Heliosphere (modulation region), radial diffusion coefficient and other param-eters of convection-diffusion and drift mechanisms of cosmic ray (CR) long term variation in dependence of particles energy, level of solar activity (SA) and general solar magnetic field. This important information we obtain on the basis of CR and SA data in the past taking into account the theory of convection-diffusion and drift global modulation of galactic CR in the Heliosphere. By using these results and published regularly elsewhere predictions of expected sunspot number variation in near future and prediction of future next SA cycle we may made prediction of expected in near future (up to 10-12 years) long-term CR intensity variation. From other hand, we use estimated properties of connection between CR intensity long-term variation and some part of global climate change, controlled by solar activity through CR. We show that by this way we may made prediction of expected in near future (up to 10-12 years) radiation hazard from galactic CR in interplanetary space at different distances from the Sun (what is important for space probes and long-term missions to Mars and other planets and their satellites) and long-living objects on different orbits in the Earth's magnetosphere, as well as in the Earth's atmosphere (e.g. for airplanes at altitude about 10 km). Let us underline that in the last two cases become important to take into account also expected long-term changes in the planetary distribution of cutoff rigidities, which also influenced on observed galactic CR intensity, and corresponding radiation hazard.

  4. Project design for treatment of super heavy oil refinery wastewater by biological process%超稠油炼制污水生化处理工程设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡玉颖

    2011-01-01

    针对辽河石化稠油与超稠油加工污水高含油、高乳化、高CODCr、高NH3 -N及高悬浮物的特点,设计了以一级水解酸化、CAST、二级水解酸化、曝气生物滤池(BAF)为核心的生化处理工艺,出水达到《辽宁省污水综合排放标准》(DB 21/1627-2008)中第二类污染物新扩改一级标准.%Heavy oil and super heavy oil refinery wastewater from Liaohe Petrochemical Company is characterized by high degree of emulsification and high concentration of oil, CODCr, ammonia nitrogen and suspended solids. The project design of biochemical treatment process with primary hydrolysis acidification, CAST, secondary hydrolysis acidification and biological aerated filters (BAF) as its core is proposed by this paper. The effluent after treatment could reach to the first level of integrated wastewater discharge standard in Liaoning province( DB 21/1627-2008).

  5. Study of the contribution of the different components of atmospheric cosmic radiation in dose received by the aircraft crew; Avaliacao da contribuicao dos diferentes componentes da radiacao cosmica atmosferica na dose em tripulacoes de aeronaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Marlon A.; Prado, Adriane C.M., E-mail: adriane.acm@hotmail.com, E-mail: marlon@ieav.cta.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Federico, Claudio A.; Goncalez, Odair L., E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: odairl@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The crews and aircraft passengers are exposed to atmospheric cosmic radiation. The flow of this radiation is modulated by the solar cycle and space weather, varying with the geomagnetic latitude and altitude. This paper presents a study of the contributions of radiation in total ambient dose equivalent of the crews depending on flight altitude up to 20 km, during maximum and minimum solar and in equatorial and polar regions. The results of calculations of the particle flows generated by the EXPACS and QARM codes are used. The particles evaluated that contributing significantly in the ambient dose equivalent are neutrons, protons, electrons, positrons, alphas, photons, muons and charged pions. This review allows us to characterize the origin of the dose received by crews and also support a project of a dosimetric system suitable for this ionizing radiation field in aircraft and on the ground.

  6. On the Properties of Cosmic String Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Paul Henry

    1996-01-01

    When coupled with the prevailing ideas of cosmology, the standard model of particle physics implies that the early universe underwent a sequence of phase transitions. Such phase transitions can lead to topological defects such as magnetic monopoles, domain walls and cosmic strings. The formation and subsequent evolution of a network of cosmic strings may have played a key role in the development of the early universe. One of the most crucial elements in the evolution of the cosmic string network is the formation and decay of closed loops of cosmic string. After formation, the loops lose their energy by emitting gravitational radiation. This provides the primary energy loss mechanism for the cosmic string network. In addition, the cosmic string loops may display a number of observable features through which the cosmic string model may be constrained. In this dissertation a number of the key properties of cosmic string loops are investigated. A general method for determining the rates at which cosmic string loops radiate both energy and linear momentum is developed and implemented. Exact solutions for the radiation rates of a several new classes of loops are derived and used to test the validity of using the piecewise linear method on smooth loop trajectories. A large set of representative loop trajectories is produced using the method of loop fragmentation. These trajectories are analyzed to provide useful information on the properties of realistic cosmic string loops. The fraction of cosmic string loops which would collapse to form black holes is determined and used to place a new observational limit on the mass per unit length of cosmic strings.

  7. Cosmic Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kleman, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    The continuous 1D defects of an isotropic homogeneous material in an Euclidean 3D space are classified by a construction method, the Volterra process (VP). We employ the same method to classify the continuous 2D defects (which we call \\textit{cosmic forms}) of a vacuum in a 4D maximally symmetric spacetime. These defects fall into three different classes: i)- $m$-forms, akin to 3D space disclinations, related to ordinary rotations and analogous to Kibble's global cosmic strings (except that being continuous any deficit angle is allowed); ii)- $t$-forms, related to Lorentz boosts (hyperbolic rotations); iii)- $r$-forms, never been considered so far, related to null rotations. A detailed account of their metrics is presented. Their inner structure in many cases appears as a non-singular \\textit{core} separated from the outer part by a timelike hypersurface with distributional curvature and/or torsion, yielding new types of geometrical interactions with cosmic dislocations and other cosmic disclinations. Whereas...

  8. Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; van den Berg, Ad; Ebert, Ute

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms Cosmic rays are protons and heavier nuclei that constantly bombard the Earth's atmosphere with energies spanning a vast range from 109 to 1021 eV. At typical altitudes up to 10-20 km they initiate large particle cascades, called extensive air showers, that contain millions to billions of secondary particles depending on their initial energy. These particles include electrons, positrons, hadrons and muons, and are concentrated in a compact particle front that propagates at relativistic speed. In addition, the shower leaves behind a trail of lower energy electrons from ionization of air molecules. Under thunderstorm conditions these electrons contribute to the electrical and ionization processes in the cloud. When the local electric field is strong enough the secondary electrons can create relativistic electron run-away avalanches [1] or even non-relativistic avalanches. Cosmic rays could even trigger lightning inception. Conversely, strong electric fields also influence the development of the air shower [2]. Extensive air showers emit a short (tens of nanoseconds) radio pulse due to deflection of the shower particles in the Earth's magnetic field [3]. Antenna arrays, such as AERA, LOFAR and LOPES detect these pulses in a frequency window of roughly 10-100 MHz. These systems are also sensitive to the radiation from discharges associated to thunderstorms, and provide a means to study the interaction of cosmic ray air showers and the electrical processes in thunderstorms [4]. In this presentation we discuss the involved radiation mechanisms and present analyses of thunderstorm data from air shower arrays [1] A. Gurevich et al., Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992) [2] S. Buitink et al., Astropart. Phys. 33, 1 (2010) [3] H. Falcke et al., Nature 435, 313 (2005) [4] S. Buitink et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 467, 385 (2007)

  9. X-Ray Ccds for Space Applications: Calibration, Radiation Hardness, and Use for Measuring the Spectrum of the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith Charles

    1995-01-01

    This thesis has two distinct components. One concerns the physics of the high energy resolution X-ray charge coupled devices (CCD) detectors used to measure the cosmic X-ray background (XRB) spectrum. The other involves the measurements and analysis of the XRB spectrum and instrumental background with these detectors on board the advanced satellite for cosmology and astrophysics (ASCA). The XRB has a soft component and a hard component divided at ~2 keV. The hard component is extremely isotropic, suggesting a cosmological origin. The soft component is extremely anisotropic. A galactic component most likely dominates the soft band with X-ray line emission due to a hot plasma surrounding the solar system. ASCA is one of the first of a class of missions designed to overlap the hard and soft X-ray bands. The X-ray CCD's energy resolution allows us to spectrally separate the galactic and cosmological components. Also, the resolution offers the ability to test several specific cosmological models which would make up the XRB. I have concentrated on models for the XRB origin which include active galactic nuclei (AGN) as principal components. I use ASCA data to put spectral constraints on the AGN synthesis model for the XRB. The instrumental portion of this thesis concerns the development and calibration of the X-ray CCDs. I designed, built and operated an X-ray calibration facility for these detectors. It makes use of a reflection grating spectrometer to measure absolute detection efficiency, characteristic absorption edge strengths, and spectral redistribution in the CCD response function. Part of my thesis research includes a study of radiation damage mechanisms in CCDs. This work revealed radiation damage-induced degradation in the spectral response to X-rays. It also uncovered systematic effects which affect both data analysis and CCD design. I have developed a model involving trap energy levels in the CCD band gap structure. These traps reduce the efficiency in which

  10. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    in the Earth's radiation budget through trapping outgoing radiation and reflecting incoming radiation. If a physical link between these two features can be established, it would provide a mechanism linking solar activity and Earth's climate. Recent satellite observations have further revealed a correlation...... between cosmic ray flux and low cloud top temperature. The temperature of a cloud depends on the radiation properties determined by its droplet distribution. Low clouds are warm (> 273 K) and therefore consist of liquid water droplets. At typical atmospheric supersaturations (similar to1%) a liquid cloud...

  11. 胜利油田超稠油蒸汽驱汽窜控制技术%Steam channeling control in the steam flooding of super heavy oil reservoirs, Shengli Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹嫣镔; 刘冬青; 张仲平; 王善堂; 王全; 夏道宏

    2012-01-01

    In view of the severe steam channeling in the steam flooding of super heavy reservoir, lab experiment on steam channeling control were carried out. The combination of nitrogen foam and thermoset blocking agent was tested to seal steam channeling, in which thermoset blocking agent plugs big pore throats, while nitrogen foam adjusts steam absorption profile. The optimized foam formulation has a resistance factor of over 30 at 300 ℃, can plug low oil saturation areas selectively, and applies to the plugging of high permeability zones in super-heavy oil reservoirs. Thermoset blocking agent, which would consolidate at 120℃ in 4 h and consolidate at 150℃ in 2 h, can provide effective plugging during dynamic steam flooding. The best steam channeling control mode was determined using parallel tube model. By the combination of nitrogen foam and thermoset blocking agent, the recovery rate is 5.7% higher than the application of nitrogen foam only, with the overall sweeping efficiency reaching up to 60.8%. In 2011, the mode was used in the steam flooding in Shan-56 reservoir. The water cut drops 10.2%, the wellhead temperature of producer drops more than 15℃, the oil production of the well group increases over 28 tons per day, the valid period of a single cycle is up to 198 days, and the oil production increases 2 562 t, showing significant improvement in steam flooding.%针对超稠油油藏蒸汽驱过程中汽窜严重的问题,开展室内蒸汽驱汽窜控制技术研究,将氮气泡沫与热固性堵剂相结合封堵汽窜,热固性堵剂封堵大孔道,氮气泡沫调整蒸汽的吸汽剖面.优化后的泡沫剂体系300℃阻力因子达到30以上,且对低含油饱和度区域具有选择性封堵作用,适用于超稠油油藏条件下高渗透带的封堵;热固性堵剂在静态120℃可4h形成固结,150℃可2h有效固结,在蒸汽动态驱替过程中可形成有效封堵.利用双岩心管开展堵调工艺评价研究,结果表明,采用热固

  12. The new Internet tool: the information and evaluation system by flight, of exposure to cosmic radiation in the new air transports S.I.E.V.E.R.T; Un nouvel outil internet: le systeme d'information et d'evaluation par vol, de l'exposition au rayonnement cosmique dans les transports aeriens SIEVERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    In France, the public authorities put a new Internet tool at air companies disposal, in order they can evaluate the radiations doses received by their flying crews during their flights. This tool called information and evaluation system by flight of exposure to cosmic radiation in air transport (S.I.E.V.E.R.T.). (N.C.)

  13. Cosmic Ether

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1998-01-01

    A prerelativistic approach to particle dynamics is explored in an expanding Robertson-Walker cosmology. The receding galactic background provides a distinguished frame of reference and a unique cosmic time. In this context the relativistic, purely geometric space-time concept is criticized. Physical space is regarded as a permeable medium, the cosmic ether, which effects the world-lines of particles and rays. We study in detail a Robertson-Walker universe with linear expansion factor and negatively curved, open three-space; we choose the permeability tensor of the ether in such a way that the semiclassical approximation is exact. Galactic red-shifts depend on the refractive index of the ether. In the local Minkowskian limit the ether causes a time variation of mass, which scales inversely proportional to cosmic time. In the globally geodesic rest frames of galactic observers the ether manifests itself in an unbounded speed of signal transfer, in bifurcations of world-lines, and in time inversion effects.

  14. Simulation study on original characteristic spectrum of gamma radiation field cosmic-induced on lunabase rocks%月表岩石诱发γ辐射场原始谱特征模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵剑锟; 葛良全; 张庆贤; 卢贞瑞; 罗耀耀

    2015-01-01

    Background: With large differences in mass density, Basalt, KREEP and Dunite are representative and widely distributed on lunar surface. Cosmic-inducedg-ray is produced after energetic particles (Galactic Cosmic Rays, GCR; Solar Particle Event, SPE) impacting on lunabase rocks.Purpose:This study aims at discovering the factors of cosmic-inducedg-ray spectrum and then utilizing the gamma ray data for lunar exploration more efficiency.Methods: A Monte Carlo model for proton-induced gamma ray is designed for the FLUKA simulation software to research cosmic-induced gamma original spectrum. Data analysis is applied to find the relationship between the characteristic spectrum and the densities of lunabase rocks.Results: The model is appropriate to simulate cosmic-inducedg-ray original spectrum. A great variety of original spectrum characteristics, such as energies of main elements, positron annihilation peak and radiation balanced peak, are acquired.Conclusion: A positive correlation is found between mass density of lunabase rock and characteristic peak intensity. These researches for original spectrum can be applied to comparing different lunar gamma-ray spectrum and rock mass density mapping on lunar surface as a reference.%玄武岩、克里普岩、橄榄岩在月球表面广泛分布,并具有一定的代表性,并且岩石密度差异较大,高能粒子(Galactic Cosmic Rays, GCR;Solar Particle Event, SPE)与岩石相互作用后激发g射线。利用蒙特卡罗软件FLUKA开展了月表高能质子诱发g射线的研究,获取了月表多种成岩主元素的特征g射线能量峰、正电子湮灭峰和g辐射平衡峰等原始谱特征信息。通过数据分析表明特征峰强度与月表岩石密度呈正相关。原始谱特征的研究不仅可以为不同系列绕月g数据的对比研究提供参考,也可为在全月表面进行基于核辐射方法的岩石密度填图研究提供理论支撑。

  15. Cosmic rays: a review for astrobiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Franco; Szuszkiewicz, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    Cosmic rays represent one of the most fascinating research themes in modern astronomy and physics. Significant progress is being made toward an understanding of the astrophysics of the sources of cosmic rays and the physics of interactions in the ultrahigh-energy range. This is possible because several new experiments in these areas have been initiated. Cosmic rays may hold answers to a great number of fundamental questions, but they also shape our natural habitat and influence the radiation environment of our planet Earth. The importance of the study of cosmic rays has been acknowledged in many fields, including space weather science and astrobiology. Here, we concentrate on the astrobiological aspects of cosmic rays with regard to the enormous amount of new data available, some of which may, in fact, improve our knowledge about the radiation of cosmic origin on Earth. We focus on fluxes arriving at Earth and doses received, and will guide the reader through the wealth of scientific literature on cosmic rays. We have prepared a concise and self-contained source of data and recipes useful for performing interdisciplinary research in cosmic rays and their effects on life on Earth.

  16. Cosmic radioactivities

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M; Arnould, Marcel; Prantzos, Nikos

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclides with half-lives ranging from some years to billions of years presumably synthesized outside of the solar system are now recorded in ``live'' or ``fossil'' form in various types of materials, like meteorites or the galactic cosmic rays. They bring specific astrophysical messages the deciphering of which is briefly reviewed here, with special emphasis on the contribution of Dave Schramm and his collaborators to this exciting field of research. Short-lived radionuclides are also present in the Universe today, as directly testified by the gamma-ray lines emitted by the de-excitation of their daughter products. A short review of recent developments in this field is also presented.

  17. Cosmic radioactivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Marcel; Prantzos, Nikos

    1999-07-01

    Radionuclides with half-lives ranging from some years to billions of years presumably synthesized outside of the solar system are now recorded in "live" or "fossil" form in various types of materials, like meteorites or the galactic cosmic rays. They bring specific astrophysical messages, the deciphering of which is briefly reviewed here, with special emphasis on the contribution of Dave Schramm and his collaborators to this exciting field of research. Short-lived radionuclides are also present in the Universe today, as directly testified by the γ-ray lines emitted by the de-excitation of their daughter products. A short review of recent developments in this field is also presented.

  18. COSMIC monthly progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  19. Bremsstrahlung Energy Losses for Cosmic Ray Electrons and Positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, R

    2015-01-01

    Recently cosmic ray electrons and positrons, i.e. cosmic ray charged leptons, have been observed. To understand the distances from our solar system to the sources of such lepton cosmic rays, it is important to understand energy losses from cosmic electrodynamic fields. Energy losses for ultra-relativistic electrons and/or positrons due to classical electrodynamic bremsstrahlung are computed. The energy losses considered are (i) due to Thompson scattering from fluctuating electromagnetic fields in the background cosmic thermal black body radiation and (ii) due to the synchrotron radiation losses from quasi-static domains of cosmic magnetic fields. For distances to sources of galactic length proportions, the lepton cosmic ray energy must be lass than about a TeV.

  20. The Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J.; Kelsall, T.

    1980-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, planned for launch in 1985, will measure the diffuse infrared and microwave radiation of the universe over the entire wavelength range from a few microns to 1.3 cm. It will include three instruments: a set of microwave isotropy radiometers at 23, 31, 53, and 90 GHz, an interferometer spectrometer from 1 to 100/cm, and a filter photometer from 1 to 300 microns. The COBE satellite is designed to reach the sensitivity limits set by foreground sources such as the interstellar and interplanetary dust, starlight, and galactic synchrotron radiation, so that a diffuse residual radiation may be interpreted unambiguously as extragalactic

  1. Cosmic rays and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Fully updated for the second edition, this book introduces the growing and dynamic field of particle astrophysics. It provides an overview of high-energy nuclei, photons and neutrinos, including their origins, their propagation in the cosmos, their detection on Earth and their relation to each other. Coverage is expanded to include new content on high energy physics, the propagation of protons and nuclei in cosmic background radiation, neutrino astronomy, high-energy and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, sources and acceleration mechanisms, and atmospheric muons and neutrinos. Readers are able to master the fundamentals of particle astrophysics within the context of the most recent developments in the field. This book will benefit graduate students and established researchers alike, equipping them with the knowledge and tools needed to design and interpret their own experiments and, ultimately, to address a number of questions concerning the nature and origins of cosmic particles that have arisen in recent resea...

  2. Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Baylon cardiel, J L; Wallace, K C; Anderson, T B; Copley, M

    The cosmic-ray energetics and mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to measure cosmic-ray composition to the supernova energy scale of 10$^{15}$ eV in a series of ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) flights. The first flight is planned to be launched from Antarctica in December 2004. The goal is to observe cosmic-ray spectral features and/or abundance changes that might signify a limit to supernova acceleration. The particle ($\\{Z}$) measurements will be made with a timing-based charge detector and a pixelated silicon charge detector to minimize the effect of backscatter from the calorimeter. The particle energy measurements will be made with a transition radiation detector (TRD) for $\\{Z}$ > 3 and a sampling tungsten/scintillator calorimeter for $\\{Z}$ $\\geq$1 particles, allowing inflight cross calibration of the two detectors. The status of the payload construction and flight preparation are reported in this paper.

  3. Survey on the Monto Carlo Calculation of the Atmospheric Cosmic Radiation Field%空间辐射场蒙特卡罗模拟计算方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春娟; 陈军; 张伟华

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of the radiation environment caused by galactic cosmic rays with Monto Carlo method has been investigated. The model setup method and the variance reduction technics usually used in the calculation are analysized. The spectra of secondary particles resulting from interactions of primary galactic cosmic rays with the nuclei in the atmosphere calculated by Roesler with FLUKA code and by Anid with MCNPX code are discussed and compared to a large variety of experimental data. One method to assess the dose on arbitrary routes is proposed, and the properties of the radiation environment caused by galactic cosmic rays are discussed.%对利用蒙特卡罗方法对由银河宇宙射线引起的空间辐射场各成分进行计算的方法进行了调研,对计算模型的建立以及计算过程中通常使用的方差减小技术进行分析,给出了美国的Roesler等人利用FLUKA程序以及加拿大Anid等人利用MCNPX程序计算得到的由银河宇宙射线引起的空间辐射场各量值及其与实验结果的比较,验证了计算方法与计算模型的可靠性.对任意航线空间辐射场剂量分布预评估方法进行分析,给出了由银河宇宙射线引起的空间辐射场的基本特征.

  4. Cosmic ray escape from supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Gabici, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be accelerated at supernova remnants via diffusive shock acceleration. Though this mechanism gives fairly robust predictions for the spectrum of particles accelerated at the shock, the spectrum of the cosmic rays which are eventually injected in the interstellar medium is more uncertain and depends on the details of the process of particle escape from the shock. Knowing the spectral shape of these escaping particles is of crucial importance in order to assess the validity of the supernova remnant paradigm for cosmic ray origin. Moreover, after escaping from a supernova remnant, cosmic rays interact with the surrounding ambient gas and produce gamma rays in the vicinity of the remnant itself. The detection of this radiation can be used as an indirect proof of the fact that the supernova remnant was indeed accelerating cosmic rays in the past.

  5. The intergalactic propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Sarkar, Subir; /Oxford U., Theor. Phys.; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray nuclei (A = 1-56) from cosmologically distant sources through the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Various models for the injected composition and spectrum and of the cosmic infrared background are studied using updated photodisintegration cross-sections. The observational data on the spectrum and the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are jointly consistent with a model where all of the injected primary cosmic rays are iron nuclei (or a mixture of heavy and light nuclei).

  6. Dynamic Cosmic Strings Numerical evolution of excited Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Sperhake, U; Vickers, J A

    2001-01-01

    An implicit, fully characteristic, numerical scheme for solving the field equations of a cosmic string coupled to gravity is described. The inclusion of null infinity as part of the numerical grid allows us to apply suitable boundary conditions on the metric and matter fields to suppress unphysical divergent solutions. The code is tested by comparing the results with exact solutions, checking that static cosmic string initial data remain constant when evolved and undertaking a time dependent convergence analysis of the code. It is shown that the code is accurate, stable and exhibits clear second order convergence. The code is used to analyse the interaction between a Weber--Wheeler pulse of gravitational radiation with the string. The interaction causes the string to oscillate at frequencies inversely proportional to the masses of the scalar and vector fields of the string. After the pulse has largely radiated away the string continues to ring but the oscillations slowly decay and eventually the variables ret...

  7. Development of the cosmic ray techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, B.

    1982-12-01

    It has been found that most advances of cosmic-ray physics have been directly related to the development of observational techniques. The history of observational techniques is discussed, taking into account ionization chambers, refinements applied to ionization chambers to make them suitable for an effective use in the study of cosmic radiation, the Wulf-type electrometer, the electrometer designed by Millikan and Neher, the Geiger-Mueller counter, the experiment of Bothe and Kolhoerster, the coincidence circuit, and a cosmic-ray 'telescope'. Attention is given to a magnetic lens for cosmic rays, a triangular arrangement of Geiger-Mueller counters used to demonstrate the production of a secondary radiation, a stereoscopic cloud-chamber photograph of showers, the cloud-chamber picture which provided the first evidence of the positive electron, and arrangements for studying photon components, mu-mesons, and air showers.

  8. Cosmic rays, geomagnetic field and climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M.; Smart, D.

    The possibility of a connection between cosmic radiation and climate has intrigued scientists for the past several decades. The recent studies of Friis -Christensen and Svensmark has shown an observed variation of 3-4% of the global cloud cover between 1980 and 1995 that appeared to be directly correlated with the change in galactic cosmic radiation flux over the solar cycle. However, in studies of this type, not only the solar cycle modulation of cosmic radiation must be considered, but also the changes in the cosmic radiation impinging at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the long term evolution of the geomagnetic field. We present preliminary results of an on-going study of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities over a 400-year interval. These results show (1) the change in cutoff rigidity is sufficient large so that the change in cosmic radiation flux impacting the earth is approximately equal to the relative change in flux over a solar cycle, and (2) the changes in cutoff rigidity are non- uniform over the globe with both significant increases and decreases at mid-latitude locations.

  9. CMB distortions from superconducting cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sabancilar, Eray; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2012-05-01

    We reconsider the effect of electromagnetic radiation from superconducting strings on cosmic microwave background μ and y distortions and derive present (COBE-FIRAS) and future (PIXIE) constraints on the string tension, μs, and electric current, I. We show that absence of distortions of the cosmic microwave background in PIXIE will impose strong constraints on μs and I, leaving the possibility of light strings (Gμs≲10-18) or relatively weak currents (I≲10TeV).

  10. Earth's magnetic field as a radiator to detect cosmic ray electrons of energy greater than 10 to the 12th eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Stephens, S. A.

    1983-10-01

    Synchrotron emission by a high-energy electron in the geomagnetic field and its dependence upon different arrival directions over Palestine, Texas, where major balloon-borne experiments are being conducted, is studied. The dependence of detector response on the arrival direction of electron, the different criteria which are adopted to identify an electron event, the area of the detector, and the energy of the electron are discussed. An omnidirectional circular detector is used to examine whether it is possible to determine the energy of an electron without knowing its arrival direction. The collecting power of a detector is estimated as a function of the energy of electrons for different detector areas with different selection criteria, and this information is used to calculate the event rates expected by folding in the energy spectrum of cosmic ray electrons to show the viability of detecting cosmic ray electrons at energies greater than a few TeV.

  11. Search for 1/3e and 2/3e charged quarks in the cosmic radiation at 2750-m altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A. J.; Beauchamp, W. T.; Bowen, T.; Kalbach, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    A scintillation counter telescope consisting of eight liquid scintillation counters and four wide-gap spark chambers was used to search for particles with electric charge 1/3e and 2/3e in cosmic rays at 2750 m above sea level. No such particles were detected during the 1500-hr experimental run. Upper limits on the vertical fluxes are established, and estimates of the corresponding sea-level fluxes are made for comparison with previous results.

  12. Space Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R.

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses three kinds of space radiation, cosmic rays, Van Allen Belts, and solar plasma. Cosmic rays are penetrating particles that we cannot see, hear or feel, which come from distant stars. Van Allen Belts, named after their discoverer are great belts of protons and electrons that the earth has captured in its magnetic trap. Solar plasma is a gaseous, electrically neutral mixture of positive and negative ions that the sun spews out from convulsed regions on its surface.

  13. Microphysics of cosmic plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, Andrei; Cargill, Peter; Dendy, Richard; Wit, Thierry; Raymond, John

    2014-01-01

    This title presents a review of the detailed aspects of the physical processes that underlie the observed properties, structures and dynamics of cosmic plasmas. An assessment of the status of understanding of microscale processes in all astrophysical collisionless plasmas is provided. The topics discussed include  turbulence in astrophysical and solar system plasmas as a phenomenological description of their dynamic properties on all scales; observational, theoretical and modelling aspects of collisionless magnetic reconnection; the formation and dynamics of shock waves; and a review and assessment of microprocesses, such as the hierarchy of plasma instabilities, non-local and non-diffusive transport processes and ionisation and radiation processes.  In addition, some of the lessons that have been learned from the extensive existing knowledge of laboratory plasmas as applied to astrophysical problems are also covered.   This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in the areas of cosmi...

  14. 超大型空心钢锭翻转变形均匀性和压实效果研究%Research on Rotatory Deformation Uniformity and Compaction Effect of Super-heavy Hollow Steel Ingot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏; 马庆贤; 刘功梅

    2016-01-01

    20Mn5超大型空心钢锭在上平下V砧翻转芯轴拔长过程中采用普通V砧进行顺序翻转,锻件变形极不均匀且存在密集型疏松缺陷。通过DEFORM-3D数值模拟和理论推导,定量给出发散角和理论翻转角度与V砧角度和压下率的关系,提出不同压下率下的普通V砧翻转新工艺。数值模拟和物理试验结果表明,单砧压下时大圆角V砧和凸型V砧两种新型V砧的变形均匀性和压实效果均要优于普通V砧。翻转拔长模拟结果表明,不同压下率下凸型V砧、大圆角V砧和普通V砧翻转新工艺的变形均匀性和压实效果均要优于普通V砧顺序翻转,其中大圆角V砧翻转新工艺的变形均匀性最优,凸型V砧翻转新工艺的压实效果最优。研究结果可为国产大型筒体锻件空心钢锭锻造工艺规范的制定提供重要理论参考。%Sequenced rotation with ordinary V-shaped anvil is used in the upper flat and lower V-shaped anvils mandrel drawing process of 20Mn5 super-heavy hollow steel ingot, but the forging deforms unevenly and contains intensive porosities. By numerical simulation using DEFORM-3D and theoretical derivation, the relationship between divergence angle, theoretical rotation angle, V-shaped anvil angle and reduction rate is given quantificationally, and the new rotation processes with ordinary V-shaped anvil at different reduction rates are proposed. Numerical simulation and physical experiment results show that the deformation uniformity and compaction effect of big fillet V-shaped anvil and convex V-shaped anvil is better than that of ordinary V-shaped anvil for single press. Simulation results of rotatory drawing show the deformation uniformity and compaction effect of new rotation processes with convex V-shaped anvil, big fillet V-shaped anvil and ordinary V-shaped anvil is better than that of sequenced rotation with ordinary V-shaped anvil at different reduction rates, while the deformation

  15. Cosmogenic isotopes and neo-tectonics. Active tectonics and cosmic radiations: in situ generated cosmogenic nuclides; Isotopes cosmogeniques et neotectonique. Tectonique active et rayons cosmiques: les nucleides cosmogeniques produits in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siame, L.; Braucher, R.; Bourles, D.; Derrieux, F

    2009-06-15

    In situ generated cosmogenic nuclides ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl) allow to analyse and determine the velocity in landscape changes. The build-up of cosmogenic nuclides in surface rocks submitted to cosmic radiations is proportional to the geomorphological stability of the exposed surfaces. Thus the concentration of in situ generated cosmogenic nuclides depends on the duration of the exposure and on the denudation rate. In some favorable circumstances the method allows to estimate the age of surface exposure. For a given sample at a given depth, an infinity of time-denudation solutions can be calculated to explained the measured concentration. The use of multiple samples taken at different depths allows to solve this mathematical problem and to obtain a unique solution. (J.S.)

  16. ALICE Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Fernandez Tellez, A; Martinez Hernandez, M; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE underground cavern provides an ideal place for the detection of high energy atmospheric muons coming from cosmic ray showers. ACORDE detects cosmic ray showers by triggering the arrival of muons to the top of the ALICE magnet.

  17. The Non-Imaging CHErenkov (NICHE) Array: A TA/TALE extension using Cherenkov radiation to measure Cosmic Ray Composition to sub-PeV energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizmanic, John; Bergman, Douglas; Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Abu-Zayyad, Tareq; Belz, John; Thomson, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Co-sited with the Telescope Array (TA) Low Energy (TALE) extension, the Non-Imaging CHErenkov (NICHE) Array will measure the flux and nuclear composition evolution of cosmic rays (CRs) from below 1 PeV to 1 EeV in its eventual full deployment. NICHE will co-measure CR air showers with TA/TALE and will initially be deployed to observe events simultaneously with the TALE telescopes acting in imaging-Cherenkov mode, providing the first hybrid-Cherenkov (simultaneous imaging and non-imaging Cherenkov) measurements of CRs in the Knee region of the CR energy spectrum. NICHE uses easily deployable detectors to measure the amplitude and time-spread of the air-shower Cherenkov signal to achieve an event-by-event measurement of Xmax and energy, each with excellent resolution. First generation detectors are under construction and will form an initial prototype array (jNICHE) that will be deployed in early 2017 at the TA/TALE site. In this talk, the NICHE design, array performance, jNICHE development, and status will be discussed as well as NICHE's ability to measure the cosmic ray nuclear composition as a function of energy.

  18. Effects of Cosmic Strings on Free Streaming

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, T; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2006-01-01

    We study the effect of free streaming in a universe with cosmic strings with time-varying tension as well as with constant tension. Although current cosmological observations suggest that fluctuation seeded by cosmic strings cannot be the primary source of cosmic density fluctuation, some contributions from them are still allowed. Since cosmic strings actively produce isocurvature fluctuation, the damping of small scale structure via free streaming by dark matter particles with large velocity dispersion at the epoch of radiation-matter equality is less efficient than that in models with conventional adiabatic fluctuation. We discuss its implications to the constraints on the properties of particles such as massive neutrinos and warm dark matter.

  19. Cosmic rays on earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allkofer, O. C.; Grieder, P. K. F.

    Contents: Cosmic rays in the atmosphere: Charged hadron data. Neutron data. Gamma-ray data. Electron data. Muon data. Data on nuclei. Data on antiparticles. Cosmic rays at sea level: Muon data. Charged hadron data.Neutron data. Electron data. Gamma-ray data. Data on nuclei. Cosmic rays underground: Muon data. Neutrino data.

  20. CMB anisotropies generated by cosmic voids and great attractors. [Cosmic microwave background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Sanz, J.L. (Cantabria Univ., Santander (Spain). Dept. Fisica Moderna)

    1990-12-01

    A recent result, based on the potential approximation, concerning the effect of a non-static gravitational potential on the propagation of light, is used to study the influence of compensated and uncompensated non-linear structures on the cosmic microwave background radiation. We obtain the temperature profile as well as the deflection of the microwave photons produced by the cosmic voids and great attractors whose existence has recently been claimed in the literature. (author).

  1. A 3-Dimensional Analysis of the Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Resulting from Cosmic-Ray Interactions with the Interstellar Gas and Radiation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodroski, Thomas J.; Dwek, Eli (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contractor will provide support for the analysis of data under ADP (NRA 96-ADP- 09; Proposal No . 167-96adp). The primary task objective is to construct a 3-D model for the distribution of high-energy (20 MeV - 30 GeV) gamma-ray emission in the Galactic disk. Under this task the contractor will utilize data from the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, H I and CO surveys, radio-continuum surveys at 408 MHz, 1420 MHz, 5 GHz, and 19 GHz, the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIME) all-sky maps from 1 to 240 p, and ground-based B, V, J, H, and K photometry. The respective contributions to the gamma-ray emission from cosmic ray/matter interactions, inverse Compton scattering, and extragalactic emission will be determined.

  2. Study of diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma radiation using a spark chamber in the energy range 4 MeV--100 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavigne, J.M.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Agrinier, B.; Bonfand, E.; Parlier, B.; Rao, K.R.

    1982-10-15

    The Agathe Balloon experiment performed by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (C.E.A.) of Saclay and the Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements (C.E.S.R.) of Toulouse was launched in 1976 November and 1977 February in Brazil during a campaign organized by the Centre National d'Etudes Spatials (C.N.E.S.) and the Instituto de Pesquisas Espacias (I.N.P.E.). The total atmospheric and cosmic ..gamma..-ray flux for various energy ranges was found using flux measurements during the balloon's ascent. In each case, it was possible to deduce the flux values of the diffuse and atmospheric components.

  3. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  4. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  5. Anomalies of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Anders Kirstejn

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is the faint afterglow of the extreme conditions that existed shortly after Big Bang. The temperature of the CMB radiation across the sky is extremely uniform, yet tiny anisotropies are present, and have with recent satellite missions been mapped to very high...

  6. Clusters of Galaxies Shock Waves and Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Ryu, D; Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung

    2002-01-01

    Recent observations of galaxy clusters in radio and X-ray indicate that cosmic rays and magnetic fields may be energetically important in the intracluster medium. According to the estimates based on theses observational studies, the combined pressure of these two components of the intracluster medium may range between $10% \\sim 100 %$ of gas pressure, although their total energy is probably time dependent. Hence, these non-thermal components may have influenced the formation and evolution of cosmic structures, and may provide unique and vital diagnostic information through various radiations emitted via their interactions with surrounding matter and cosmic background photons. We suggest that shock waves associated with cosmic structures, along with individual sources such as active galactic nuclei and radio galaxies, supply the cosmic rays and magnetic fields to the intracluster medium and to surrounding large scale structures. In order to study 1) the properties of cosmic shock waves emerging during the larg...

  7. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  8. The Hard VHE Gamma-ray Emission in High-Redshift TeV Blazars: Comptonization of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Extended Jet?

    CERN Document Server

    Boettcher, Markus; Finke, Justin D

    2008-01-01

    Observations of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 250 GeV) gamma-ray emission from several blazars at z > 0.1 have placed stringent constraints on the elusive spectrum and intensity of the intergalactic infrared background radiation (IIBR). Correcting their observed VHE spectrum for gamma-gamma absorption even by the lowest plausible level of the IIBR provided evidence for a very hard (photon spectral index Gamma_{ph} 4 X 10^6) on kiloparsec scales along the jet.

  9. Cosmic Rays: studies and measurements before 1912

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, Alessandro [INFN and Università di Udine, Via delle Scienze 206, I-33100 Udine (Italy); LIP/IST Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-06-15

    The discovery of cosmic rays, a milestone in science, was based on the work by scientists in Europe and the New World and took place during a period characterised by nationalism and lack of communication. Many scientists that took part in this research a century ago were intrigued by the penetrating radiation and tried to understand the origin of it. Several important contributions to the discovery of the origin of cosmic rays have been forgotten; historical, political and personal facts might have contributed to their substantial disappearance from the history of science.

  10. Maria Montessori's Cosmic Vision, Cosmic Plan, and Cosmic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazzini, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This classic position of the breadth of Cosmic Education begins with a way of seeing the human's interaction with the world, continues on to the grandeur in scale of time and space of that vision, then brings the interdependency of life where each growing human becomes a participating adult. Mr. Grazzini confronts the laws of human nature in…

  11. Change of Primary Cosmic Radiation Nuclear Conposition in the Energy Range $10^{15} - 10^{17}$ eV as a Result of the Interaction with the Interstellar Cold Background of Light Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Barnaveli, T T; Khaldeeva, I V

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the updated arguments in favor of a simple model, explaining from the united positions all peculiarities of the Extensive Air Shower (EAS) hadron E_h(E_0) (and muon E_mu(E_0)) component energy fluxes dependence on the primary particle energy E_0 in the primary energy region 10^{15} - 10^{17} eV are represented. These peculiarities have shapes of consequent distinct deeps of a widths dE_h/E_h of the order of 0.2 and of relative amplitudes dL/L of the order of {0.1 - 1.0}, and are difficult to be explained via known astrophysical mechanisms of particle generation and acceleration. In the basis of the model lies the destruction of the Primary Cosmic Radiation (PCR) nuclei on some monochromatic background of interstellar space, consisting of the light particles of the mass in the area of 36 eV (maybe the component of a dark matter). The destruction thresholds of PCR different nuclear components correspond to the peculiarities of E_h(E_0). In this work the results of the recent treatment of large sta...

  12. Cosmic Microwave Background Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    The last decade of research in cosmology was connected with the ambitious experiments including space and ground base observations. Among the most impressive results of these investigations are the measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation like WMAP* and Planck. Exactly from the CMB studies, we have started the epoch of the precision cosmology when generally the values of cosmological parameters have been known and present research is devoted to improvement of the precision. These achievements are connected with both the creation of the new facilities in millimeter and submillimeter astronomy (e.g., satellites, receivers, antennas, computers) and development of the methods for the CMB data analysis. Actually, the process of data analysis contains several technical stages including 1. Registration of time-ordered data (TOD) 2. Pixelization of the CMB data - map preparation 3. Component separation 4. Map statistics analysis 5. Map - spherical harmonics transformation 6. C(l)-spectrum calculation and spectrum statistics analysis 7. Cosmological parameters estimation Starting from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) experiment using the so-called Quadrilateralized Sky Cube Projection (see [1-3]), the problem of the whole sky CMB pixelization has attracted great interest and many such schemes were developed. Let us note however that accurate pixelization of the CMB data on the sphere is very important but not the final step of analysis. Usually, the next step implies the determination of the coefficients of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the CMB signal for both anisotropy and polarization. This means that some of the pixelization schemes provide a very accurate map but are inconvenient for further decomposition. This also means that the choice of suitable pixelization schemes depends upon the general goals of the investigation. In this review, we consider several of the most popular sky map pixelization schemes and link them with the

  13. Cosmic perspectives in space physics

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Sukumar

    2000-01-01

    In the early years of the twentieth century, Victor Hess of Germany flew instruments in balloons and so discovered in 1912 that an extra-~errestial radiation of unknown origin is incident on the earth with an almost constant intensity at all times. These penetrating non­ solar radiations which were called Cosmic Rays by Millikan, USA, opened the new frontier of space physics and many leading scientists were attracted to it. At the end of World War II a number of space vehicles, e.g. stratospheric balloons, rockets and satellites were developed. In 1950 and onwards, these vehicles enabled spectacular advances in space physics and space astrophysics. New horizons were opened in the explorations of cosmic rays, the earth's magnetosphere, the Sun and the heliosphere, the moon and the planets. Using space-borne instruments, exciting discoveries were made of stars, and galaxies in the infra-red, ultra violet, x-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. In this text book these fascinating new findings are presented in depth a...

  14. Handbook of cosmic hazards and planetary defense

    CERN Document Server

    Allahdadi, Firooz

    2015-01-01

    Covers in a comprehensive fashion all aspects of cosmic hazards and possible strategies for contending with these threats through a comprehensive planetary defense strategy. This handbook brings together in a single reference work a rich blend of information about the various types of cosmic threats that are posed to human civilization by asteroids, comets, bolides, meteors, solar flares and coronal mass ejections, cosmic radiation and other types of threats that are only recently beginning to be understood and studied, such as investigation of the “cracks” in the protective shield provided by the Van Allen belts and the geomagnetosphere, of matter-antimatter collisions, orbital debris and radiological or biological contamination. Some areas that are addressed involve areas about which there is a good deal of information that has been collected for many decades by multiple space missions run by many different space agencies, observatories and scientific researchers. Other areas involving research and ...

  15. PRECISE COSMIC RAYS MEASUREMENTS WITH PAMELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The PAMELA experiment was launched on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. The apparatus was designed to conduct precision studies of charged cosmic radiation over a wide energy range, from tens of MeV up to several hundred GeV, with unprecedented statistics. In five years of continuous data taking in space, PAMELA accurately measured the energy spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and positrons, as well as protons, electrons and light nuclei, sometimes providing data in unexplored energetic regions. These important results have shed new light in several astrophysical fields like: an indirect search for Dark Matter, a search for cosmological antimatter (anti-Helium, and the validation of acceleration, transport and secondary production models of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Some of the most important items of Solar and Magnetospheric physics were also investigated. Here we present the most recent results obtained by the PAMELA experiment.

  16. COSMIC: A Regimen of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plus Dose-Escalated, Raster-Scanned Carbon Ion Boost for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Results of the Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: alexdjensen@gmx.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nikoghosyan, Anna V.; Lossner, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Centre, Heidelberg (Germany); Münter, Marc W.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dose-escalated carbon ion (C12) therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and other malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGTs) of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: COSMIC (combined treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with intensity modulated radiation therapy and carbon ions) is a prospective phase 2 trial of 24 Gy(RBE) C12 followed by 50 Gy IMRT in patients with pathologically confirmed MSGT. The primary endpoint is mucositis Common Terminology Criteria grade 3; the secondary endpoints are locoregional control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3; treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Between July 2010 and August 2011, 54 patients were accrued, and 53 were available for evaluation. The median follow-up time was 42 months; patients with microscopically incomplete resections (R1, n=20), gross residual disease (R2, n=17), and inoperable disease (n=16) were included. Eighty-nine percent of patients had ACC, and 57% had T4 tumors. The most common primary sites were paranasal sinus (34%), submandibular gland, and palate. At the completion of radiation therapy, 26% of patients experienced grade 3 mucositis, and 20 patients reported adverse events of the ear (38%). The most common observed late effects were grade 1 xerostomia (49%), hearing impairment (25%, 2% ipsilateral hearing loss), and adverse events of the eye (20%), but no visual impairment or loss of vision. Grade 1 central nervous system necrosis occurred in 6%, and 1 grade 4 ICA hemorrhage without neurologic sequelae. The best response was 54% (complete response/partial remission). At 3 years, the LC, PFS, and OS were 81.9%, 57.9%, and 78.4%, respectively. No difference was found regarding resection status. The

  17. Simulating the microdosimetry of cosmic electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Abel A.; Oliveira, Cassia F. Silva, E-mail: abel@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The human presence in space is a matter of concern especially regarding the deleterious effects of the cosmic radiation. Doses in astronauts during space missions must be closely monitored. On the other hand, the development of organic electronics with applications to the monitoring of physiological functions through the implant of electronic devices under the skin is coming to become a reality in the near future. Therefore, doses in astronauts can affect not only the biological tissue, but also the electronic one represented by silicon (Si). In some orbital regions around the Earth, cosmic electrons are predominant with energies ranging from keV to MeV. In this study, the lineal energy (LE) and the absorbed dose (AD) from cosmic electron flux based on the AE8MAX model are simulated for microscopic sites (radius = 1μm) of tissue equivalent material (TEM) and Si at a depth of 100 μm in the skin using the Monte Carlo N-Particle code for uncertainties < 10%. Cosmic electrons yielded LE decreasing with the energy of particles crossing the sites. Maximum values of LE were around 0.7 eV/μm for cosmic electron energies of 100 keV. LE for Si sites was up to 3.7 times higher than that for TEM ones, increasing with particle's energy. Maximum values of AD were around 54 μGy for TEM sites and 40 μGy for Si ones. (author)

  18. Beam Measurements of a CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01

    A striking correlation has recently been observed between global cloud cover and the flux of incident cosmic rays. The effect of natural variations in the cosmic ray flux is large, causing estimated changes in the Earth's energy radiation balance that are comparable to those attributed to greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. However a direct link between cosmic rays and cloud formation has not been unambiguously established. We therefore propose to experimentally measure cloud (water droplet) formation under controlled conditions in a test beam at CERN with a CLOUD chamber, duplicating the conditions prevailing in the troposphere. These data, which have never been previously obtained, will allow a detailed understanding of the possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds and confirm, or otherwise, a direct link between cosmic rays, global cloud cover and the Earth's climate. The measurements will, in turn, allow more reliable calculations to be made of the residual e...

  19. The near-infrared radiation background, gravitational wave background and star formation rate of Pop III and Pop II during cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Y P; Dai, Z G

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain the NIRB and SBGWs from the early stars, which are constrained by the observation of reionization and star formation rate. We study the transition from Pop III to Pop II stars via the star formation model of different population, which takes into account the reionization and the metal enrichment evolution. We calculate the two main metal pollution channels arising from the supernova-driven protogalactic outflows and "genetic channel". We obtain the SFRs of Pop III and Pop II and their NIRB and SBGWs radiation. We predict that the upper limit of metallicity in metal-enriched IGM (the galaxies whose polluted via "genetic channel") reaches $Z_{\\rm crit}=10^{-3.5}Z_{\\odot}$ at $z\\sim13$ ($z\\sim11$), which is consistent with our star formation model. We constrain on the SFR of Pop III stars from the observation of reionization. The peak intensity of NIRB is about $0.03-0.2~nW m^{-2}{sr}^{-1}$ at $\\sim 1 \\mu m$ for $z>6$. The prediction of NIRB signal is consistent with the metallicity evol...

  20. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  1. Light scattering by cosmic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, J.W.; Min, M.

    2008-01-01

    We define cosmic particles as particles outside the Earth. Two types of cosmic particles can be distinguished, namely liquid and solid particles. The solid particles are often called grains or cosmic dust particles. Cosmic particles occur in a great variety of astronomical objects and environments.

  2. Supermassive cosmic string compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Reina, Borja; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon, E-mail: josejuan.blanco@ehu.es, E-mail: borja.reina@ehu.es, E-mail: kepa.sousa@ehu.es, E-mail: jon.urrestilla@ehu.es [Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4d Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N = 1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  3. Supermassive Cosmic String Compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4D Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N=1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  4. Cosmic Strings and Superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Copeland, Edmund J

    2009-01-01

    Cosmic strings are predicted by many field-theory models, and may have been formed at a symmetry-breaking transition early in the history of the universe, such as that associated with grand unification. They could have important cosmological effects. Scenarios suggested by fundamental string theory or M-theory, in particular the popular idea of brane inflation, also strongly suggest the appearance of similar structures. Here we review the reasons for postulating the existence of cosmic strings or superstrings, the various possible ways in which they might be detected observationally, and the special features that might discriminate between ordinary cosmic strings and superstrings.

  5. Restrictive scenarios from Lorentz Invariance Violation to cosmic rays propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Huerta, H

    2016-01-01

    Lorentz Invariance Violation introduced as a generic modification to particle dispersion relations is used to study high energy cosmic ray attenuation processes. It is shown to reproduce the same physical effects for vacuum Cherenkov radiation, as in models with spontaneous breaking of Lorentz symmetry. This approximation is also implemented for the study of photon decay in vacuum, where stringent limits to the violation scale are derived from the direct observation of very high energy cosmic ray photon events on gamma telescopes. Photo production processes by cosmic ray primaries on photon background are also addressed, to show that Lorentz violation may turn off this attenuation process at energies above a well defined secondary threshold.

  6. Cosmic Neutrinos and Other Light Relics

    CERN Document Server

    Meyers, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological measurements of the radiation density in the early universe can be used as a sensitive probe of physics beyond the standard model. Observations of primordial light element abundances have long been used to place non-trivial constraints on models of new physics and to inform our understanding of the thermal history to the first few minutes of our present phase of expansion. Precision measurements of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization will drastically improve our measurement of the cosmic radiation density over the next decade. These improved measurements will either uncover new physics or place much more stringent constraints on physics beyond the standard model, while pushing our understanding of the early universe to much earlier times.

  7. Anomalies of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Anders Kirstejn

    the model itself and the derived cosmological parameters, upon which most of the current astronomy and cosmology rests. In order to ascertain whether the anomalies are the results of systematics from the instruments, incomplete data treatment, residuals from foregrounds affecting the measurement of the true......The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is the faint afterglow of the extreme conditions that existed shortly after Big Bang. The temperature of the CMB radiation across the sky is extremely uniform, yet tiny anisotropies are present, and have with recent satellite missions been mapped to very high...... accuracy. The information which the CMB provides has helped in creating the current standard cosmological model - the CDM model - and the theory of cosmic inflation as well as constrain a vast amount of cosmological parameters. The accuracy of observations of the CMB radiation is thus of extreme importance...

  8. Nonparametric Inference for the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Genovese, C R; Nichol, R C; Arjunwadkar, M; Wasserman, L; Genovese, Christopher R.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Arjunwadkar, Mihir; Wasserman, Larry

    2004-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), which permeates the entire Universe, is the radiation left over from just 380,000 years after the Big Bang. On very large scales, the CMB radiation field is smooth and isotropic, but the existence of structure in the Universe - stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies - suggests that the field should fluctuate on smaller scales. Recent observations, from the Cosmic Microwave Background Explorer to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Project, have strikingly confirmed this prediction. CMB fluctuations provide clues to the Universe's structure and composition shortly after the Big Bang that are critical for testing cosmological models. For example, CMB data can be used to determine what portion of the Universe is composed of ordinary matter versus the mysterious dark matter and dark energy. To this end, cosmologists usually summarize the fluctuations by the power spectrum, which gives the variance as a function of angular frequency. The spectrum's shape, and in particular the ...

  9. Habitability and cosmic catastrophes

    CERN Document Server

    Hanslmeier, Arnold; McKay, Christopher P

    2008-01-01

    Catastrophic cosmic events such as asteroid impacts appear in the range of some 100 million years and have drastically affected evolution. The author discusses whether and how such events could have occurred in recently found extrasolar planetary systems.

  10. Astrophysics: Cosmic jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andy

    2010-02-01

    In some galaxies, matter falling onto a supermassive black hole is ejected in narrow jets moving at close to the speed of light. New observations provide insight into the workings of these cosmic accelerators.

  11. Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Frampton, Paul H

    1998-01-01

    It is proposed that the highest energy $\\sim 10^{20}$eV cosmic ray primaries are protons, decay products of a long-lived progenitor whose high kinetic energy arises from decay of a distant (cosmological) superheavy particle, G. Such a scenario can occur in e.g. SU(15) grand unification and in some preon models, but is more generic; if true, these unusual cosmic rays provide a window into new physics.

  12. The cosmic messengers; Les messagers cosmiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizot, E. [Paris-7 Denis Diderot Univ., Lab. Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), 75 (France); Boratav, M. [Paris-6 Univ., Lab. de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies, 75 (France); Suomijarvi, T. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Stolarczyk, Th. [CEA Saclay, IRFU, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Degrange, B. [Ecole Polytechnique, CRNS/IN2P3, Lab. Leprince-Ringuet, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Sol, H. [Observatoire de Paris, CRNS/INSU, Lab. Univers et Theories, 92 - Meudon (France); Peter, P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, Physique Theorique, 75 (France); Jacquemont, G

    2009-01-15

    This series of brief articles, that are popular works, presents the issue of cosmic radiations: their origin and their detection on earth. The Pierre-Auger Observatory that detects atmospheric showers and the Antares detector that is the first underwater neutrino detector are described. Another article deals with the issue of dark matter and its detection. The last article deals with cosmology. (A.C.)

  13. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  14. Robustness of cosmic neutrino background detection in the cosmic microwave background

    CERN Document Server

    Audren, Benjamin; Cuesta, Antonio J; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Lesgourgues, Julien; Niro, Viviana; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Poulin, Vivian; Tram, Thomas; Tramonte, Denis; Verde, Licia

    2015-01-01

    The existence of a cosmic neutrino background can be probed indirectly by CMB experiments, not only by measuring the background density of radiation in the universe, but also by searching for the typical signatures of the fluctuations of free-streaming species in the temperature and polarisation power spectrum. Previous studies have already proposed a rather generic parametrisation of these fluctuations, that could help to discriminate between the signature of ordinary free-streaming neutrinos, or of more exotic dark radiation models. Current data are compatible with standard values of these parameters, which seems to bring further evidence for the existence of a cosmic neutrino background. In this work, we investigate the robustness of this conclusion under various assumptions. We generalise the definition of an effective sound speed and viscosity speed to the case of massive neutrinos or other dark radiation components experiencing a non-relativistic transition. We show that current bounds on these effectiv...

  15. Improving cosmic string network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Rummukainen, Kari; Tenkanen, Tuomas V. I.; Weir, David J.

    2014-08-01

    In real-time lattice simulations of cosmic strings in the Abelian Higgs model, the broken translational invariance introduces lattice artifacts; relativistic strings therefore decelerate and radiate. We introduce two different methods to construct a moving string on the lattice, and study in detail the lattice effects on moving strings. We find that there are two types of lattice artifact: there is an effective maximum speed with which a moving string can be placed on the lattice, and a moving string also slows down, with the deceleration approximately proportional to the exponential of the velocity. To mitigate this, we introduce and study an improved discretization, based on the tree-level Lüscher-Weisz action, which is found to reduce the deceleration by an order of magnitude, and to increase the string speed limit by an amount equivalent to halving the lattice spacing. The improved algorithm is expected to be very useful for 3D simulations of cosmic strings in the early Universe, where one wishes to simulate as large a volume as possible.

  16. Improving cosmic string network simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Tenkanen, Tuomas V I; Weir, David J

    2014-01-01

    In real-time lattice simulations of cosmic strings in the Abelian Higgs model, the broken translational invariance introduces lattice artefacts; relativistic strings therefore decelerate and radiate. We introduce two different methods to construct a moving string on the lattice, and study in detail the lattice effects on moving strings. We find that there are two types of lattice artefact: there is an effective maximum speed with which a moving string can be placed on the lattice, and a moving string also slows down, with the deceleration approximately proportional to the exponential of the velocity. To mitigate this, we introduce and study an improved discretisation, based on the tree-level L\\"{u}scher-Weisz action, which is found to reduce the deceleration by an order of magnitude, and to increase the string speed limit by an amount equivalent to halving the lattice spacing. The improved algorithm is expected to be very useful for 3D simulations of cosmic strings in the early universe, where one wishes to s...

  17. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays threshold in Randers-Finsler space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zhe; LI Xin

    2009-01-01

    Kinematics in Finsler space is used to study the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays particles through the cosmic microwave background radiation. We find that the GZK threshold is lifted dramatically in Randers-Finsler space. A tiny deformation of spacetime from Minkowskian to Finslerian allows more ultra-high energy cosmic rays particles to arrive at the earth. It is suggested that the lower bound of particle mass is related with the negative second invariant speed in Randers-Finsler space.

  18. Measurement of cosmic-ray muons with the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory, a network of smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, J.; BenZvi, S.; Bravo, S.; Jensen, K.; Karn, P.; Meehan, M.; Peacock, J.; Plewa, M.; Ruggles, T.; Santander, M.; Schultz, D.; Simons, A. L.; Tosi, D.

    2016-04-01

    Solid-state camera image sensors can be used to detect ionizing radiation in addition to optical photons. We describe the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory (DECO), an app and associated public database that enables a network of consumer devices to detect cosmic rays and other ionizing radiation. In addition to terrestrial background radiation, cosmic-ray muon candidate events are detected as long, straight tracks passing through multiple pixels. The distribution of track lengths can be related to the thickness of the active (depleted) region of the camera image sensor through the known angular distribution of muons at sea level. We use a sample of candidate muon events detected by DECO to measure the thickness of the depletion region of the camera image sensor in a particular consumer smartphone model, the HTC Wildfire S. The track length distribution is fit better by a cosmic-ray muon angular distribution than an isotropic distribution, demonstrating that DECO can detect and identify cosmic-ray muons despite a background of other particle detections. Using the cosmic-ray distribution, we measure the depletion thickness to be 26.3 ± 1.4 μm. With additional data, the same method can be applied to additional models of image sensor. Once measured, the thickness can be used to convert track length to incident polar angle on a per-event basis. Combined with a determination of the incident azimuthal angle directly from the track orientation in the sensor plane, this enables direction reconstruction of individual cosmic-ray events using a single consumer device. The results simultaneously validate the use of cell phone camera image sensors as cosmic-ray muon detectors and provide a measurement of a parameter of camera image sensor performance which is not otherwise publicly available.

  19. The response of clouds and aerosols to cosmic ray decreases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, J.; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Shaviv, N. J.;

    2016-01-01

    A method is developed to rank Forbush Decreases (FDs) in the galactic cosmic ray radiation according to their expected impact on the ionization of the lower atmosphere. Then a Monte Carlo bootstrap based statistical test is formulated to estimate the significance of the apparent response in physi......A method is developed to rank Forbush Decreases (FDs) in the galactic cosmic ray radiation according to their expected impact on the ionization of the lower atmosphere. Then a Monte Carlo bootstrap based statistical test is formulated to estimate the significance of the apparent response...

  20. Cosmic Rays and Climate

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2007-01-01

    Among the most puzzling questions in climate change is that of solar-climate variability, which has attracted the attention of scientists for more than two centuries. Until recently, even the existence of solar-climate variability has been controversial—perhaps because the observations had largely involved correlations between climate and the sunspot cycle that had persisted for only a few decades. Over the last few years, however, diverse reconstructions of past climate change have revealed clear associations with cosmic ray variations recorded in cosmogenic isotope archives, providing persuasive evidence for solar or cosmic ray forcing of the climate. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Although this remains a mystery, observations suggest that cloud cover may be influenced by cosmic rays, which are modulated by the solar wind and, on longer time scales, by the geomagnetic fiel...

  1. Constraints On Cosmic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mbonye, M R

    2003-01-01

    Observationally, the universe appears virtually critical. Yet, there is no simple explanation for this state. In this article we advance and explore the premise that the dynamics of the universe always seeks equilibrium conditions. Vacuum-induced cosmic accelerations lead to creation of matter-energy modes at the expense of vacuum energy. Because they gravitate, such modes constitute inertia against cosmic acceleration. On the other extreme, the would-be ultimate phase of local gravitational collapse is checked by a phase transition in the collapsing matter fields leading to a de Sitter-like fluid deep inside the black hole horizon, and at the expense of the collapsing matter fields. As a result, the universe succumbs to neither vacuum-induced run-away accelerations nor to gravitationally induced spacetime curvature singularities. Cosmic dynamics is self-regulating. We discuss the physical basis for these constraints and the implications, pointing out how the framework relates and helps resolve standing puzzl...

  2. A cosmic book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, P. J. E.; Silk, Joseph

    1988-10-01

    A system of assigning odds to the basic elements of cosmological theories is proposed in order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the theories. A figure of merit for the theories is obtained by counting and weighing the plausibility of each of the basic elements that is not substantially supported by observation or mature fundamental theory. The magnetized strong model is found to be the most probable. In order of decreasing probability, the ranking for the rest of the models is: (1) the magnetized string model with no exotic matter and the baryon adiabatic model; (2) the hot dark matter model and the model of cosmic string loops; (3) the canonical cold dark matter model, the cosmic string loops model with hot dark matter, and the baryonic isocurvature model; and (4) the cosmic string loops model with no exotic matter.

  3. Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, Asantha; Burgarella, Denis; Chary, Ranga; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Doré, Olivier; Fazio, Giovanni; Ferrara, Andrea; Gong, Yan; Santos, Mario; Silva, Marta; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper is a "Probe Class" mission concept for reionization studies of the universe. It will be capable of spectroscopic imaging observations between 0.7 to 6-7 microns in the near-Infrared. The primary observational objective is pioneering observations of spectral emission lines of interest throughout the cosmic history, but especially from the first generation of distant, faint galaxies when the universe was less than 800 million years old. With spectro-imaging capabilities, using a set of linear variable filters (LVFs), CDIM will produce a three-dimensional tomographic view of the epoch of reionization (EoR). CDIM will also study galaxy formation over more than 90% of the cosmic history and will move the astronomical community from broad-band astronomical imaging to low-resolution (R=200-300) spectro-imaging of the universe.

  4. A disintegrating cosmic string

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, J B

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple sandwich gravitational wave of the Robinson-Trautman family. This is interpreted as representing a shock wave with a spherical wavefront which propagates into a Minkowski background minus a wedge. (i.e. the background contains a cosmic string.) The deficit angle (the tension) of the string decreases through the gravitational wave, which then ceases. This leaves an expanding spherical region of Minkowski space behind it. The decay of the cosmic string over a finite interval of retarded time may be considered to generate the gravitational wave.

  5. Cosmic Sum Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays and show how it can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments and to constrain specific models.......We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays and show how it can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments and to constrain specific models....

  6. Gaining confidence on general relativity with cosmic polarization rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Alighieri, Sperello di Serego

    2016-01-01

    The theory of general relativity, for which we celebrate the centennial at this Symposium, is based on the Einstein equivalence principle. This principle could be violated through a pseudoscalar-photon interaction, which would also produce a rotation of the polarization angle for radiation traveling over very long distances. Therefore, if we could show that this cosmic polarization rotation does not exist, our confindence in general relativity would be greatly increased. We review here the astrophysical searches for cosmic polarization rotation, which have been made in the past 26 years using the polarization of radio galaxies and of the cosmic microwave background. So far no rotation has been detected within about 1 degree. We discuss current problems and future prospects for cosmic polarization rotation measurements.

  7. CO2 and viscosity breaker assisted steam huff and puff technology for horizontal wells in a super-heavy oil reservoir%超稠油水平井CO2与降黏剂辅助蒸汽吞吐技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兆敏; 鹿腾; 陶磊; 李宾飞; 张继国; 李敬

    2011-01-01

    为了改善超稠油油藏蒸汽吞吐开采效果,通过室内驱油实验研究水平井CO2与降黏剂辅助蒸汽驱驱油效率,利用数值模拟方法研究水平井CO2与降黏剂辅助蒸汽吞吐的降黏机理.研究证实:CO2与降黏剂辅助蒸汽驱驱油效率(80.8%)明显高于常规蒸汽驱驱油效率(65.4%);水平井CO2与降黏剂辅助蒸汽吞吐技术实现了降黏剂、CO2与蒸汽协同降黏作用的滚动接替,从而有效降低了注汽压力,扩大了蒸汽波及范围即扩大了降黏区域,提高了产油速度.根据温度分布和降黏机理的不同可将降黏区分成4个复合降黏区,即蒸汽复合降黏区、热水复合降黏区、低温水复合降黏区和CO2-降黏剂复合降黏区.矿场应用表明,水平井CO2与降黏剂辅助蒸汽吞吐技术在深部薄层超稠油油藏、深部厚层超稠油油藏和浅部薄层超稠油油藏开发过程中取得了显著的降黏增油效果.%In order to improve the recovery effect of steam huff and puff in a super-heavy oil reservoir, the displacement efficiency of CO2 and viscosity breaker assisted steam flooding was studied through in-lab displacement experiments. The viscosity reduction mechanism of CO2 and viscosity breaker assisted steam huff and puff for horizontal wells was realized by numerical simulation. The results show that the displacement efficiency of CO2 and viscosity breaker assisted steam flooding (80.8%) is higher than that of steam flooding (65.4%). The CO2 and viscosity breaker assisted steam huff and puff technology for horizontal wells realizes the rolling replacement of viscosity reduction of viscosity breaker, CO2 and steam, thus effectively reducing the steam injection pressure, expanding the steam sweep area, I.e., expanding the viscosity reduction region and improving oil production rate. The viscosity region can be divided into four compound viscosity reduction areas according to temperature distribution and viscosity reduction

  8. Cosmic expansion in extended quasidilaton massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Kar, Arjun; Lavrelashvili, George; Agarwal, Nishant; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Quasidilaton massive gravity offers a physically well-defined gravitational theory with nonzero graviton mass. We present the full set of dynamical equations governing the expansion history of the Universe, valid during radiation domination, matter domination, and a late-time self-accelerating epoch related to the graviton mass. The existence of self-consistent solutions constrains the amplitude of the quasidilaton field and the graviton mass, as well as other model parameters. We point out that the effective mass of gravitational waves can be significantly larger than the graviton mass, opening the possibility that a single theory can explain both the late-time acceleration of cosmic expansion and modifications of structure growth leading to the suppression of large-angle correlations observed in the cosmic microwave background.

  9. Cosmic Expansion in Extended Quasidilaton Massive Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Lavrelashvili, George; Agarwal, Nishant; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Quasidilaton massive gravity offers a physically well-defined gravitational theory with non-zero graviton mass. We present the full set of dynamical equations governing the expansion history of the universe, valid during radiation domination, matter domination, and a late-time self-accelerating epoch related to the graviton mass. The existence of self-consistent solutions constrains the amplitude of the quasi-dilaton field and the graviton mass, as well as other model parameters. We point out that the effective mass of gravitational waves can be significantly larger than the graviton mass, opening the possibility that a single theory can explain both the late-time acceleration of the cosmic expansion and modifications of structure growth leading to the suppression of large-angle correlations observed in the cosmic microwave background.

  10. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    This set of lectures provides an overview of the basic theory and phenomenology of the cosmic microwave background. Topics include a brief historical review; the physics of temperature and polarization fluctuations; acoustic oscillations of the primordial plasma; the space of inflationary cosmological models; current and potential constraints on these models from the microwave background; and constraints on inflation.

  11. Antarctic Cosmic Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duldig, Marc

    Cosmic ray observations related to Antarctica commenced in the austral summer of 1947-48 from sub-Antarctic Heard and Macquarie Islands and from the HMAS Wyatt Earp. Muon telescope observations from Mawson station Antarctica commenced in 1955. The International Geophysical Year was the impetus for the installation of a number of neutron monitors around Antarctica observing the lowest energy cosmic rays accessible by ground based instruments. In 1971 a new observatory was built at Mawson including the only underground muon telescope system at polar latitudes in either hemisphere. In the 1980s the South Pole Air Shower Experiment (SPASE) opened the highest energy cosmic ray window over Antarctica and this was followed by the in-ice neutrino experiment AMANDA. Over more than half a century cosmic ray astronomy has been undertaken from Antarctica and its surrounding regions and these observations have been critical to our growing understanding of nearby astrophysical structures. For example the Parker spiral magnetic field of the sun was confirmed through Mawson observations of a Solar flare induced Ground Level Enahncement in 1960 long before spacecraft were able to directly observe the interplanetary magnetic field. A summary of the Antarctic instrumental developments and the scientific advances that resulted will be presented.

  12. Cosmic rays and climate

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Inside the new chamber the CLOUD team will be able to recreate the conditions of any part of the atmosphere, from the polar stratosphere to the low level tropics (top). The new chamber safely in position in the East hall. Once carefully cleaned the chamber will be turned sideways onto its legs ready for the beam of 'cosmic rays' (bottom).

  13. Cosmology Quantized in Cosmic Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, M

    2004-06-03

    This paper discusses the problem of inflation in the context of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Cosmology. We show how, after a simple change of variables, to quantize the problem in a way which parallels the classical discussion. The result is that two of the Einstein equations arise as exact equations of motion and one of the usual Einstein equations (suitably quantized) survives as a constraint equation to be imposed on the space of physical states. However, the Friedmann equation, which is also a constraint equation and which is the basis of the Wheeler-deWitt equation, acquires a welcome quantum correction that becomes significant for small scale factors. We discuss the extension of this result to a full quantum mechanical derivation of the anisotropy ({delta} {rho}/{rho}) in the cosmic microwave background radiation, and the possibility that the extra term in the Friedmann equation could have observable consequences. To clarify the general formalism and explicitly show why we choose to weaken the statement of the Wheeler-deWitt equation, we apply the general formalism to de Sitter space. After exactly solving the relevant Heisenberg equations of motion we give a detailed discussion of the subtleties associated with defining physical states and the emergence of the classical theory. This computation provides the striking result that quantum corrections to this long wavelength limit of gravity eliminate the problem of the big crunch. We also show that the same corrections lead to possibly measurable effects on the CMB radiation. For the sake of completeness, we discuss the special case, {lambda} = 0, and its relation to Minkowski space. Finally, we suggest interesting ways in which these techniques can be generalized to cast light on the question of chaotic or eternal inflation. In particular, we suggest one can put an experimental lower bound on the distance to a universe with a scale factor very different from our own, by looking at its effects on our CMB

  14. Cosmic rays and terrestrial life: A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.

    2014-01-01

    “The investigation into the possible effects of cosmic rays on living organisms will also offer great interest.” - Victor F. Hess, Nobel Lecture, December 12, 1936 High-energy radiation bursts are commonplace in our Universe. From nearby solar flares to distant gamma ray bursts, a variety of physical processes accelerate charged particles to a wide range of energies, which subsequently reach the Earth. Such particles contribute to a number of physical processes occurring in the Earth system. A large fraction of the energy of charged particles gets deposited in the atmosphere, ionizing it, causing changes in its chemistry and affecting the global electric circuit. Remaining secondary particles contribute to the background dose of cosmic rays on the surface and parts of the subsurface region. Life has evolved over the past ∼3 billion years in presence of this background radiation, which itself has varied considerably during the period [1-3]. As demonstrated by the Miller-Urey experiment, lightning plays a very important role in the formation of complex organic molecules, which are the building blocks of more complex structures forming life. There is growing evidence of increase in the lightning rate with increasing flux of charged particles. Is there a connection between enhanced rate of cosmic rays and the origin of life? Cosmic ray secondaries are also known to damage DNA and cause mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. It is now possible to compute radiation doses from secondary particles, in particular muons and neutrons. Have the variations in cosmic ray flux affected the evolution of life on earth? We describe the mechanisms of cosmic rays affecting terrestrial life and review the potential implications of the variation of high-energy astrophysical radiation on the history of life on earth.

  15. Fingerprints of Galactic Loop I on the Cosmic Microwave Background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hao; Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    We investigate possible imprints of galactic foreground structures such as the "radio loops" in the derived maps of the cosmic microwave background. Surprisingly, there is evidence for these not only at radio frequencies through their synchrotron radiation, but also at microwave frequencies where...

  16. Fingerprints of Galactic Loop I on the Cosmic Microwave Background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hao; Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    We investigate possible imprints of galactic foreground structures such as the "radio loops" in the derived maps of the cosmic microwave background. Surprisingly, there is evidence for these not only at radio frequencies through their synchrotron radiation, but also at microwave frequencies where...... due to primordial gravitational waves from inflation....

  17. Some doubts concerning a link between cosmic ray fluxes and global cloudiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernthaler, Simon C.; Toumi, Ralf; Haigh, Joanna D.

    Svensmark and Friis-Christensen (1997, henceforth SFC) showed a strong correlation between cosmic ray flux and ISCCP total cloudiness between 1984 and 1990. They concluded that ionisation by cosmic rays, more prevalent at times of lower solar activity, might explain apparent correlations between solar activity and climate through changes in cloud radiative forcing. We have extended SFC's approach with a study of the different cloud types, restricting our analysis to the period 1985 to 1988 during which the ISCCP calibration is believed to be stable. We find no clear relationship between individual cloud types and cosmic ray flux. Inclusion of data at high latitudes decreases the amplitude of the apparent correlation although ionisation by cosmic rays is greatest at high latitudes. Thin high cloud shows an increase throughout the period such that the combined effect of the changes in cloud types suggests an almost monotonic increase in cloud radiative forcing between 1985 and 1988 which is not related to cosmic ray activity.

  18. Nuclear Physics Meets the Sources of the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncioli, Denise; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Winter, Walter

    2017-07-07

    The determination of the injection composition of cosmic ray nuclei within astrophysical sources requires sufficiently accurate descriptions of the source physics and the propagation - apart from controlling astrophysical uncertainties. We therefore study the implications of nuclear data and models for cosmic ray astrophysics, which involves the photo-disintegration of nuclei up to iron in astrophysical environments. We demonstrate that the impact of nuclear model uncertainties is potentially larger in environments with non-thermal radiation fields than in the cosmic microwave background. We also study the impact of nuclear models on the nuclear cascade in a gamma-ray burst radiation field, simulated at a level of complexity comparable to the most precise cosmic ray propagation code. We conclude with an isotope chart describing which information is in principle necessary to describe nuclear interactions in cosmic ray sources and propagation.

  19. Simulating Cosmic Reionization and Its Observable Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Paul

    2017-01-01

    I summarize recent progress in modelling the epoch of reionization by large- scale simulations of cosmic structure formation, radiative transfer and their interplay, which trace the ionization fronts that swept across the IGM, to predict observable signatures. Reionization by starlight from early galaxies affected their evolution, impacting reionization, itself, and imprinting the galaxies with a memory of reionization. Star formation suppression, e.g., may explain the observed underabundance of Local Group dwarfs relative to N-body predictions for Cold Dark Matter. I describe CoDa (''Cosmic Dawn''), the first fully-coupled radiation-hydrodynamical simulation of reionization and galaxy formation in the Local Universe, in a volume large enough to model reionization globally but with enough resolving power to follow all the atomic-cooling galactic halos in that volume. A 90 Mpc box was simulated from a constrained realization of primordial fluctuations, chosen to reproduce present-day features of the Local Group, including the Milky Way and M31, and the local universe beyond, including the Virgo cluster. The new RAMSES-CUDATON hybrid CPU-GPU code took 11 days to perform this simulation on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with 4096-cubed N-body particles for the dark matter and 4096-cubed cells for the atomic gas and ionizing radiation.

  20. Dual Phase Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Shurtleff, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A calculation based on flat spacetime symmetries shows how there can be two quantum phases. For one, extreme phase change determines a conventional classical trajectory and four-momentum, i.e. mass times four-velocity. The other phase occurs in an effective particle state, with the effective energy and momentum being the rate of change of the phase with respect to time and distance. A cosmic ray proton moves along a classical trajectory, but exists in an effective particle state with an effective energy that depends on the local gravitational potential. Assumptions are made so that a cosmic ray proton in an ultra-high energy state detected near the Earth was in a much less energetic state in interstellar space. A 300 EeV proton incident on the Earth was a 2 PeV proton in interstellar space. The model predicts such protons are in states with even more energy near the Sun than when near the Earth.

  1. Cosmic structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschinger, Edumund

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews the prevailing paradigm for how galaxies and larger structures formed in the universe: gravitational instability. Basic observational facts are summarized to motivate the standard cosmological framework underlying most detailed investigations of structure formation. The observed univers approaches spatial uniformity on scales larger than about 10(exp 26) cm. On these scales gravitational dynamics is almost linear and therefore relatively easy to relate to observations of large-scale structure. On smaller scales cosmic structure is complicated not only by nonlinear gravitational clustering but also by nonlinear nongravitational gas dynamical processes. The complexity of these phenomena makes galaxy formation one of the grand challenge problems of the physical sciences. No fully satisfactory theory can presently account in detail for the observed cosmic structure. However, as this article summarizes, significant progress has been made during the last few years.

  2. Understanding the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Jones, Bernard J T; Frenk, Carlos S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the characteristics and the time evolution of the cosmic web from redshift, z=2, to present time, within the framework of the NEXUS+ algorithm. This necessitates the introduction of new analysis tools optimally suited to describe the very intricate and hierarchical pattern that is the cosmic web. In particular, we characterize filaments (walls) in terms of their linear (surface) mass density. This is very good in capturing the evolution of these structures. At early times the cosmos is dominated by tenuous filaments and sheets, which, during subsequent evolution, merge together, such that the present day web is dominated by fewer, but much more massive, structures. We also show that voids are more naturally described in terms of their boundaries and not their centres. We illustrate this for void density profiles, which, when expressed as a function of the distance from void boundary, show a universal profile in good qualitative agreement with the theoretical shell-crossing framework of expandin...

  3. Cosmic rays and climate

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The current understanding of climate change in the industrial age is that it is predominantly caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, with relatively small natural contributions due to solar irradiance and volcanoes. However, palaeoclimatic reconstructions show that the climate has frequently varied on 100-year time scales during the Holocene (last 10 kyr) by amounts comparable to the present warming - and yet the mechanism or mechanisms are not understood. Some of these reconstructions show clear associations with solar variability, which is recorded in the light radio-isotope archives that measure past variations of cosmic ray intensity. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Estimated changes of solar irradiance on these time scales appear to be too small to account for the climate observations. This raises the question of whether cosmic rays may directly affect the climate, provi...

  4. Note on cosmic censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, F. J.

    1985-05-01

    A number of recent theorems by Krolak (1983) and Newman (1983) purport to prove cosmic censorship by showing that strong-curvature singularities must be hidden behind horizons. It is shown that the 'null strong-curvature' condition which Newman imposes on certain classes of null geodesics to restrict curvature growth in the space-time does not hold in many physically realistic space-times: it is not satisfied by any null geodesic in the relevant class in any open Friedmann cosmological model, nor does it hold for any null geodesic in the relevant class in maximal Schwarzschild space. More generally it is argued that the singularity predicted by the Penrose singularity theorem is unlikely to be of the type eliminated by Newman. Thus the Newman theorems are probably without physical significance. The Krolak theorems, although based on a physically significant definition of strong curvature singularity, are mathematically invalid, and this approach cannot be used to obtain a cosmic-censorship theorem.

  5. Cosmic Tidal Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Er, Xinzhong; Chen, Xuelei

    2015-01-01

    The gravitational coupling of a long wavelength tidal field with small scale density fluctuations leads to anisotropic distortions of the locally measured small scale matter correlation function. Since the local correlation function is statistically isotropic in the absence of such tidal interactions, the tidal distortions can be used to reconstruct the long wavelength tidal field and large scale density field in analogy with the cosmic microwave background lensing reconstruction. In this paper we present in detail a formalism for the cosmic tidal reconstruction and test the reconstruction in numerical simulations. We find that the density field on large scales can be reconstructed with good accuracy and the cross correlation coefficient between the reconstructed density field and the original density field is greater than 0.9 on large scales ($k\\lesssim0.1h/\\mathrm{Mpc}$). This is useful in the 21cm intensity mapping survey, where the long wavelength radial modes are lost due to foreground subtraction proces...

  6. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  7. Cosmic Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P

    2004-04-26

    Recently we proposed a new cosmic acceleration mechanism which was based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically owing plasma. In this paper we include some omitted details, and show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f({epsilon}) {proportional_to} 1/{epsilon}{sup 2}. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations.

  8. Cosmic Strings and Quintessence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段一士; 任继荣; 杨捷

    2003-01-01

    Using torsion two-form we present a new Lorentz gauge invariant U (1) topological field theory in Riemann-Cartan space-time manifold U4. By virtue of the decomposition theory of U(1) gauge potential and the φ-mapping topological current theory, it is proven that the U(1) complex scalar field φ(x) can be looked upon as the order parameter field in our Universe, and a set of zero points of φ(x) create the cosmic strings as the space-time defects in the early Universe. In the standard cosmology, this complex scalar order parameter field possesses negative pressure, provides an accelerating expansion of Universe, and be able to explain the inflation in the early Universe. Therefore this complex scalar field is not only the order parameter field created the cosmic strings in the early universe, but also reasonably behaves as the quintessence, the dark energy.

  9. Modeling cosmic void statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the internal structure and spatial distribution of cosmic voids is crucial when considering them as probes of cosmology. We present recent advances in modeling void density- and velocity-profiles in real space, as well as void two-point statistics in redshift space, by examining voids identified via the watershed transform in state-of-the-art ΛCDM n-body simulations and mock galaxy catalogs. The simple and universal characteristics that emerge from these statistics indicate the self-similarity of large-scale structure and suggest cosmic voids to be among the most pristine objects to consider for future studies on the nature of dark energy, dark matter and modified gravity.

  10. Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Agel, Jerome

    2000-08-01

    Foreword Freeman Dyson; Personal reflections Ann Druyan; Preface; Part I. Cosmic Perspective: 1. A transitional animal; 2. The Unicorn of Cetus; 3. A message from earth; 4. A message to earth; 5. Experiments in utopias; 6. Chauvinism; 7. Space exploration as a human enterprise I. The scientific interest; 8. Space exploration as a human enterprise II. The public interest; 9. Space exploration as a human enterprise III. The historical interest; Part II. The Solar System: 10. On teaching the first grade; 11. 'The ancient and legendary Gods of old'; 12. The Venus detective story; 13. Venus is hell; 14. Science and 'intelligence'; 15. The moons of Barsoom; 16. The mountains of Mars I. Observations from earth; 17. The mountains of Mars II. Observations from space; 18. The canals of Mars; 19. The lost pictures of Mars; 20. The Ice Age and the cauldron; 21. Beginnings and ends of the Earth; 22. Terraforming the plants; 23. The exploration and utlization of the solar system; Part III. Beyond the Solar System: 24. Some of my best friends are dolphins; 25. 'Hello, central casting? Send me twenty extraterrestrials'; 26. The cosmic connection; 27. Extraterrestrial life: an idea whose time has come; 28. Has the Earth been visited?; 29. A search strategy for detecting extraterrestrial intelligence; 30. If we succeed 31. Cables, drums, and seashells; 32. The night freight to the stars; 33. Astroengineering; 34. Twenty questions: a classification of cosmic civilisations; 35. Galactic cultural exchanges; 36. A passage to elsewhere; 37. Starfolk I. A Fable; 38. Starfolk II. A future; 39. Starfolk III. The cosmic Cheshire cats; Epilog David Morrison; Index.

  11. Cosmic microwave background theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, J R

    1998-01-06

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in -space are consistent with a DeltaT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are approximately (10(-5))2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Lambda cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 +/- 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 +/- 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 +/- 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 +/- 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Lambda and moderate constraints on Omegatot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant.

  12. Frontiers in Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Ringwald, Andreas; Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Dermer, Charles D.; Ringwald, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    This rapporteur review covers selected results presented in the Parallel Session HEA2 (High Energy Astrophysics 2) of the 10th Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 2003. The subtopics are: ultra high energy cosmic ray anisotropies, the possible connection of these energetic particles with powerful gamma ray bursts, and new exciting scenarios with a strong neutrino-nucleon interaction in the atmosphere.

  13. Cosmic ray modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of cosmic rays to and inside the heliosphere, encounter an outward moving solar wind with cyclic magnetic field fluctuation and turbulence, causing convection and diffusion in the heliosphere. Cosmic ray counts from the ground ground-based neutron monitors at different cut of rigidity show intensity changes, which are anti-correlated with sunspot numbers. They also lose energy as they propagate towards the Earth and experience various types of modulations due to different solar activity indices. In this work, we study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-2014 for Beijing, Moscow and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations located at different cut off rigidity. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for low cutoff rigidity as compared to high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station as compared to the high cut off rigidity station on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days does not show any significant dependence on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of different cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics, amplitude, phase.

  14. A Cosmic Microwave Background feature consistent with a cosmic texture

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, M.; Turok, N.; Vielva, P.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Hobson, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background provides our most ancient image of the Universe and our best tool for studying its early evolution. Theories of high energy physics predict the formation of various types of topological defects in the very early universe, including cosmic texture which would generate hot and cold spots in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We show through a Bayesian statistical analysis that the most prominent, 5 degree radius cold spot observed in all-sky images, which is otherw...

  15. On the complexity and the information content of cosmic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazza, F.

    2017-03-01

    The emergence of cosmic structure is commonly considered one of the most complex phenomena in nature. However, this complexity has never been defined nor measured in a quantitative and objective way. In this work, we propose a method to measure the information content of cosmic structure and to quantify the complexity that emerges from it, based on Information Theory. The emergence of complex evolutionary patterns is studied with a statistical symbolic analysis of the datastream produced by state-of-the-art cosmological simulations of forming galaxy clusters. This powerful approach allows us to measure how many bits of information is necessary to predict the evolution of energy fields in a statistical way, and it offers a simple way to quantify when, where and how the cosmic gas behaves in complex ways. The most complex behaviours are found in the peripheral regions of galaxy clusters, where supersonic flows drive shocks and large energy fluctuations over a few tens of million years. Describing the evolution of magnetic energy requires at least twice as large amount of bits as required for the other energy fields. When radiative cooling and feedback from galaxy formation are considered, the cosmic gas is overall found to double its degree of complexity. In the future, Cosmic Information Theory can significantly increase our understanding of the emergence of cosmic structure as it represents an innovative framework to design and analyse complex simulations of the Universe in a simple, yet powerful way.

  16. CMB Distortions from Superconducting Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2012-01-01

    We reconsider the effect of electromagnetic radiation from superconducting strings on cosmic microwave background (CMB) mu- and y-distortions and derive present (COBE-FIRAS) and future (PIXIE) constraints on the string tension, mu_s, and electric current, I. We show that absence of distortions of the CMB in PIXIE will impose strong constraints on mu_s and I, leaving the possibility of light strings (G mu_s < 10^{-18}) or relatively weak currents (I < 10 TeV).

  17. Canny Algorithm, Cosmic Strings and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danos, Rebecca J.; Brandenberger, Robert H.

    We describe a new code to search for signatures of cosmic strings in cosmic microwave anisotropy maps. The code implements the Canny algorithm, an edge detection algorithm designed to search for the lines of large gradients in maps. Such a gradient signature which is coherent in position-space is produced by cosmic strings via the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We test the power of our new code to set limits on the tension of the cosmic strings by analyzing simulated data, with and without cosmic strings. We compare maps with a pure Gaussian scale-invariant power spectrum with maps which have a contribution of a distribution of cosmic strings obeying a scaling solution. The maps have angular scale and angular resolution comparable to what current and future ground-based small-scale cosmic microwave anisotropy experiments will achieve. We present tests of the codes, indicate the limits on the string tension which could be set with the current code, and describe various ways to refine the analysis. Our results indicate that when applied to the data of ongoing cosmic microwave experiments such as the South Pole Telescope project, the sensitivity of our method to the presence of cosmic strings will be more than an order of magnitude better than the limits from existing analyses.

  18. Cosmic Ray Data in TRT Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Hance

    "I had a great day in August when I went into SR1," said Daniel Froidevaux, former project leader of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker, "not only had all SCT barrels arrived at CERN, but there were cosmic ray tracks seen in the TRT!" Daniel's excitement was mirrored by the rest of the TRT collaboration when, on July 29, the first cosmic ray tracks were seen in the barrel. Along with many others in the community, Daniel was quick to point out that this is the cumulative result of years of R&D, test beam work, and an intense installation and integration schedule. Indeed, the cosmic ray readout is only possible through the coordination of many efforts, from detector mechanics to module assembly, power and high voltage control, cooling, gas systems, electronics and cabling, data acquisition, and monitoring. "Many people have worked very hard on the the TRT, some of them for more than 10 years," said Brig Williams, the leader of the UPenn group responsible for much of the TRT front end electronics. He ...

  19. Gravitational Waves and Light Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Depies, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational wave signatures from cosmic strings are analyzed numerically. Cosmic string networks form during phase transistions in the early universe and these networks of long cosmic strings break into loops that radiate energy in the form of gravitational waves until they decay. The gravitational waves come in the form of harmonic modes from individual string loops, a "confusion noise" from galactic loops, and a stochastic background of gravitational waves from a network of loops. In this study string loops of larger size $\\alpha$ and lower string tensions $G\\mu$ (where $\\mu$ is the mass per unit length of the string) are investigated than in previous studies. Several detectors are currently searching for gravitational waves and a space based satellite, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), is in the final stages of pre-flight. The results for large loop sizes ($\\alpha=0.1$) put an upper limit of about $G\\mu<10^{-9}$ and indicate that gravitational waves from string loops down to $G\\mu \\approx...

  20. Key scientific problems from Cosmic Ray History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    Recently was published the monograph "Cosmic Ray History" by Lev Dorman and Irina Dorman (Nova Publishers, New York). What learn us and what key scientific problems formulated the Cosmic Ray History? 1. As many great discoveries, the phenomenon of cosmic rays was discovered accidentally, during investigations that sought to answer another question: what are sources of air ionization? This problem became interesting for science about 230 years ago in the end of the 18th century, when physics met with a problem of leakage of electrical charge from very good isolated bodies. 2. At the beginning of the 20th century, in connection with the discovery of natural radioactivity, it became apparent that this problem is mainly solved: it was widely accepted that the main source of the air ionization were α, b, and γ - radiations from radioactive substances in the ground (γ-radiation was considered as the most important cause because α- and b-radiations are rapidly absorbed in the air). 3. The general accepted wrong opinion on the ground radioactivity as main source of air ionization, stopped German meteorologist Franz Linke to made correct conclusion on the basis of correct measurements. In fact, he made 12 balloon flights in 1900-1903 during his PhD studies at Berlin University, carrying an electroscope to a height of 5500 m. The PhD Thesis was not published, but in Thesis he concludes: "Were one to compare the presented values with those on ground, one must say that at 1000 m altitude the ionization is smaller than on the ground, between 1 and 3 km the same amount, and above it is larger with values increasing up to a factor of 4 (at 5500 m). The uncertainties in the observations only allow the conclusion that the reason for the ionization has to be found first in the Earth." Nobody later quoted Franz Linke and although he had made the right measurements, he had reached the wrong conclusions, and the discovery of CR became only later on about 10 years. 4. Victor Hess, a

  1. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-11-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determines the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here, we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  2. Cosmic ray: Studying the origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabelski, J. [Cosmic Ray Laboratory, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Lodz (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations of the origin of cosmic rays are presented. Different methods are discussed: studies of cosmic gamma rays of energy from 30 MeV to about 10{sup 15} eV (since photons point to their places of origin), studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays (because it reflects source morphology), and studies of cosmic rays with energy above 1O{sup 19} eV (for these are the highest energies observed in nature). (author) 101 refs, 19 figs, 7 tabs

  3. Cosmic rays and molecular clouds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the cosmic-ray penetration into molecular clouds and with the related gamma--ray emission. High energy cosmic rays interact with the dense gas and produce neutral pions which in turn decay into two gamma rays. This makes molecular clouds potential sources of gamma rays, especially if they are located in the vicinity of a powerful accelerator that injects cosmic rays in the interstellar medium. The amplitude and duration in time of the cosmic--ray overdensity around a giv...

  4. Historical building stability monitoring by means of a cosmic ray tracking system

    CERN Document Server

    Zenoni, A; Donzella, A; Subieta, M; Baronio, G; Bodini, I; Cambiaghi, D; Lancini, M; Vetturi, D; Barnabà, O; Fallavollita, F; Nardò, R; Riccardi, C; Rossella, M; Vitulo, P; Zumerle, G

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic ray radiation is mostly composed, at sea level, by high energy muons, which are highly penetrating particles capable of crossing kilometers of rock. Cosmic ray radiation constituted the first source of projectiles used to investigate the intimate structure of matter and is currently and largely used for particle detector test and calibration. The ubiquitous and steady presence at the Earth's surface and the high penetration capability has motivated the use of cosmic ray radiation also in fields beyond particle physics, from geological and archaeological studies to industrial applications and civil security. In the present paper, cosmic ray muon detection techniques are assessed for stability monitoring applications in the field of civil engineering, in particular for static monitoring of historical buildings, where conservation constraints are more severe and the time evolution of the deformation phenomena under study may be of the order of months or years. As a significant case study, the monitoring o...

  5. Recent Super Heavy Element Experiments at GSI-SHIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyer, M.; Hofmann, S.; Heinz, S.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Ackermann, D.; Antalic, S.; Barth, W.; Burkhard, H. G.; Comas, V. F.; Dahl, L.; Eberhardt, K.; Henderson, R.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Kenneally, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Kratz, J. V.; Lang, R.; Leino, M.; Lommel, B.; Moody, K.; Munzenberg, G.

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of element 116 (Lv) in fusion-evaporation reactions of a 48Ca beam with 248Cm targets was studied at the velocity filter SHIP of GSI in Darmstadt. At excitation energies of the compound nuclei of 40.9 MeV, four decay chains were measured, which were assigned to the isotope 292Lv, and one chain, which was assigned to 293Lv. Measured cross-sections of (3.4 + 2.7 -1.6) pb and (0.9 + 2.1 -0.7) pb, respectively, and decay data of the chains agree with data measured previously at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in Dubna. We measured the velocity spectra of the 116 isotopes and transfer products which reveal the reaction type underlying the synthesis of the nuclei. The experience gained in this experiment will serve as a basis for future experiments to study still heavier elements at the velocity filter SHIP. Searches for element 120 in fusion-evaporation reactions of a 54Cr beam with 248Cm targets were studied later at SHIP and progress in the analysis will be discussed. The synthesis of element 116 (Lv) in fusion-evaporation reactions of a 48Ca beam with 248Cm targets was studied at the velocity filter SHIP of GSI in Darmstadt. At excitation energies of the compound nuclei of 40.9 MeV, four decay chains were measured, which were assigned to the isotope 292Lv, and one chain, which was assigned to 293Lv. Measured cross-sections of (3.4 + 2.7 -1.6) pb and (0.9 + 2.1 -0.7) pb, respectively, and decay data of the chains agree with data measured previously at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in Dubna. We measured the velocity spectra of the 116 isotopes and transfer products which reveal the reaction type underlying the synthesis of the nuclei. The experience gained in this experiment will serve as a basis for future experiments to study still heavier elements at the velocity filter SHIP. Searches for element 120 in fusion-evaporation reactions of a 54Cr beam with 248Cm targets were studied later at SHIP and progress in the analysis will be discussed. S. Antalic and S. Saro were supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under Contract No. APVV-20-006205. The work by Livermore scientists was performed under the auspices of the USDoE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. High Spin Isomers and Super Heavy Elements (SHE) Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Domitian G.

    2010-04-01

    To get closer to the SHE-Island the new radioactive beams are proposed for future fusion reaction. We suggest something different : to use the advantage of High Spin Isomer States, by tacking into account the importance of the G (spin-isospin cupling) suggested by Ripka 1.

  7. Atmospheric ionization and cosmic rays: studies and measurements before 1912

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic rays, a milestone in science, was based on the work by scientists in Europe and the New World and took place during a period characterised by nationalism and lack of communication. Many scientists that took part in this research a century ago were intrigued by the penetrating radiation and tried to understand the origin of it. Several important contributions to the discovery of the origin of cosmic rays have been forgotten; historical, political and personal facts might have contributed to their substantial disappearance from the history of science.

  8. Model-independent constraints on the cosmic opacity

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Alcaniz, J S

    2012-01-01

    We use current measurements of the expansion rate $H(z)$ and cosmic background radiation bounds on the spatial curvature of the Universe to impose cosmological model-independent constraints on cosmic opacity. To perform our analyses, we compare opacity-free distance modulus from $H(z)$ data with those from two supernovae Ia compilations, namely, the Union2 and Sloan Digital Sky Survey samples. The influence of different SNe Ia light-curve fitters (SALT2 and MLCS2K2) on the results is also discussed. We find that these fitters present a significant conflict, with the MLCS2K2 method being incompatible with a flat and transparent universe.

  9. Cosmic ray abundance measurements with the CAKE balloon experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchini, S; Giacomelli, G; Manzoor, S; Medinaceli, E; Patrizii, L; Togo, V

    2005-01-01

    We present the results from the CAKE (Cosmic Abundance below Knee Energy) balloon experiment which uses nuclear track detectors. The final experiment goal is the determination of the charge spectrum of CR nuclei with Z $>$ 30 in the primary cosmic radiation. The detector, which has a geometric acceptance of $\\sim$ 1.7 m$^2$sr, was exposed in a trans-mediterranean stratospheric balloon flight. Calibrations of the detectors used (CR39 and Lexan), scanning strategies and algorithms for tracking particles in an automatic mode are presented. The present status of the results is discussed

  10. 1912 – 2012: a century of studying cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    One year ago, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer was docked to the International Space Station. This state-of-the-art tool for studying cosmic rays has revolutionised methods of detecting cosmic radiation, which was discovered barely a century ago.   Victor Francis Hess (in the basket), back from his balloon flight in August 1912. Source: American Physical Society. Exactly one hundred years ago, the Austrian-American physicist Victor Francis Hess discovered cosmic rays. The researcher observed the phenomenon while on board a balloon; he found that at an altitude of 1,000 to 5,000 metres, the wires of his Wulf electrometer (a tool used to measure radiation) showed an increase in electrical charge. Hess had just proven the existence of ionising radiation coming from outside the Earth’s atmosphere. Twenty years or so later, the invention of the Geiger-Müller counter enabled physicists to study the properties of the rays more precisely. One century later, cosmic rays and the ques...

  11. The Emergence of Cosmic Education. Spotlight: Cosmic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Sr. Christina Marie

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the influence of Hindu, Moslem, and Buddhist metaphysics on Maria Montessori's own pedagogical philosophy of Cosmic Education, which she regarded as the core of all learning experiences, after her visit to India. Considers the relationship between Montessori's ideas of child development and Cosmic Education, and the effect of Indian…

  12. Cosmic ray energetics and mass (CREAM) calibrating a cosmic ray calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ganel, O; Ahn, S H; Alford, R; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Liu, L; Lutz, L; Malinin, A; Schindhelm, E; Wang, J Z; Wu, J; Beatty, J J; Coutu, S; Minnick, S A; Nutter, S; Duvernois, M A; Choi, M J; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Park, I H; Swordy, S P

    2002-01-01

    CREAM is slated to fly as the first NASA ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) payload in late 2003. On this 60-plus-day flight CREAM is expected to collect more direct high-energy cosmic ray events than the current world total. With three such flights CREAM is expected to have a proton energy reach above 5*10/sup 14/ eV, probing near 100 Te V for the predicted kink in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. With a transition radiation detector (TRD) above a sampling tungsten /scintillator calorimeter, an in-flight cross-calibration of the absolute energy scale becomes possible with heavy ions. We report on results from a 2001 beam test of the calorimeter in an SPS beam at the European High Energy Physics lab (CERN) and on the planned in- flight calibration. (7 refs).

  13. Composition of Primary Cosmic-Ray Nuclei at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Gahbauer, F; Hoppner, C; Hörandel, J R; Ichimura, M; Müller, D; Romero-Wolf, A

    2008-01-01

    The TRACER instrument (``Transition Radiation Array for Cosmic Energetic Radiation'') has been developed for direct measurements of the heavier primary cosmic-ray nuclei at high energies. The instrument had a successful long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica in 2003. The detector system and measurement process are described, details of the data analysis are discussed, and the individual energy spectra of the elements O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe (nuclear charge Z=8 to 26) are presented. The large geometric factor of TRACER and the use of a transition radiation detector make it possible to determine the spectra up to energies in excess of 10$^{14}$ eV per particle. A power-law fit to the individual energy spectra above 20 GeV per amu exhibits nearly the same spectral index ($\\sim$ 2.65 $\\pm$ 0.05) for all elements, without noticeable dependence on the elemental charge Z.

  14. Wormhole cosmic censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Ureña-López, L. Arturo; Miranda, Galaxia

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the properties of a Kerr-like wormhole supported by phantom matter, which is an exact solution of the Einstein-phantom field equations. It is shown that the solution has a naked ring singularity which is unreachable to null geodesics falling freely from the outside. Similarly to Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship, that states that all naked singularities in the Universe must be protected by event horizons, here we conjecture from our results that a naked singularity can also be fully protected by the intrinsic properties of a wormhole's throat.

  15. Cosmic baldness and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchapakesan, N.; Lohiya, D.

    1985-04-01

    The stability of the de Sitter metric and the relevance of the initial state of a domain which approaches a de Sitter universe asymptotically are investigated analytically, adapting the one-dimensional wave equation with effective potential derived by Khanal and Panchapakesan (1981), for the perturbations of the de Sitter-Schwarzschild metric, to the de Sitter case. It is demonstrated that initial nonspherical perturbations do not increase exponentially with time but rather decay, the frozen modes exponentially and the backscattered perturbations of finite angular momentum l as t to the -(2l - l). It is concluded that the cosmic horizon is stable and has no hair. 14 references.

  16. Wormhole cosmic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, G

    1995-01-01

    We construct regular multi-wormhole solutions to a gravitating \\sigma model in three space-time dimensions, and extend these solutions to cylindrical traversable wormholes in four and five dimensions. We then discuss the possibility of identifying wormhole mouths in pairs to give rise to Wheeler wormholes. Such an identification is consistent with the original field equations only in the absence of the \\sigma-model source, but with possible naked cosmic string sources. The resulting Wheeler wormhole space-times are flat outside the sources and may be asymptotically Minkowskian.

  17. Pulsars: Cosmic Permanent 'Neutromagnets'?

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We argue that pulsars may be spin-polarized neutron stars, i.e. cosmic permanent magnets. This would simply explain several observational facts about pulsars, including the 'beacon effect' itself i.e. the static/stable misalignment of rotational and magnetic axes, the extreme temporal stability of the pulses and the existence of an upper limit for the magnetic field strength - coinciding with the one observed in "magnetars". Although our model admittedly is speculative, this latter fact seems to us unlikely to be pure coincidence.

  18. Garden of cosmic speculation

    CERN Document Server

    Jencks, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This book tells the story of one of the most important gardens in Europe, created by the architectural critic and designer Charles Jencks and his late wife, the landscape architect and author Maggie Keswick. The Garden of Cosmic Speculation is a landscape that celebrates the new sciences of complexity and chaos theory and consists of a series of metaphors exploring the origins, the destiny and the substance of the Universe. The book is illustrated with year-round photography, bringing the garden's many dimensions vividly to life.

  19. Discovery of cosmic fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshev, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This is the first book to present the fascinating new results on the largest fractal structures in the universe. It guides the reader, in a simple way, to the frontiers of astronomy, explaining how fractals appear in cosmic physics, from our solar system to the megafractals in deep space. It also offers a personal view of the history of the idea of self-similarity and of cosmological principles, from Plato's ideal architecture of the heavens to Mandelbrot's fractals in the modern physical cosmos. In addition, this invaluable book presents the great fractal debate in astronomy (after Luciano Pi

  20. Optical and Ionization Basic Cosmic Ray Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Julian; Andrade, Diego A.; Araujo, Aurora C.; Arceo, Luis; Cervantes, Carlos A.; Molina, Jorge A.; Palacios, Luz R.

    2014-03-01

    There are drift tubes, operating in the Geiger mode, to detect ionization radiation and there are Cerenkov radiation detectors based on photomultiplier tubes. Here is the design, the construction, the operation and the characterization of a hybrid detector that combines both a drift tube and a Cerenkov detector, used mainly so far to detect cosmic rays. The basic cell is a structural Aluminum 101.6 cm-long, 2.54 cm X 2.54 cm-cross section, 0.1 cm-thick tube, interiorly polished to mirror and slightly covered with TiCO2, and filed with air, and Methane-Ar at different concentrations. There is a coaxial 1 mil Tungsten wire Au-coated at +700 to +1200 Volts electronically instrumented to read out in both ends; and there is in each end of the Aluminum tube a S10362-11-100U Hamamatsu avalanche photodiode electronically instrumented to be read out simultaneously with the Tungsten wire signal. This report is about the technical operation and construction details, the characterization results and potential applications of this hybrid device as a cosmic ray detector element. CONACYT, Mexico.

  1. Cosmic Ray ^3He Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmic ray ^3He/^4He observations, including a new measurement at ~65 MeV/nucleon from ISEE-3, are compared with interstellar propagation and solar modulation models in an effort to understand the origin of cosmic ray He nuclei.

  2. Self--gravitating cosmic rings

    OpenAIRE

    Clément, Gérard

    1998-01-01

    The classical Einstein--Maxwell field equations admit static horizonless wormhole solutions with only a circular cosmic string singularity. We show how to extend these static solutions to exact rotating asymptotically flat solutions. For a suitable range of parameter values, these solutions describe charged or neutral rotating closed cosmic strings, with a perimeter of the order of their Schwarzschild radius.

  3. Environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2013; Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung im Jahr 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    The report on the environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2013 covers the natural radiation exposure due to radon, food, cosmic and terrestric radiation and the radiation exposure due to nuclear medicine nuclear facilities, mining, industry household and fallout. Special issues are the occupational radiation exposure the medical radiation exposure and the exposure to non-ionizing radiation.

  4. Evidence for extra radiation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, J.

    2012-01-01

    during the marginalisation process, and we demonstrate that the effect is related to the fact that cosmic microwave background (CMB) data constrain N_eff only indirectly via the redshift of matter-radiation equality. Once present CMB data are combined with external information about, e.g., the Hubble...

  5. George's cosmic treasure hunt

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Lucy; Parsons, Gary

    2009-01-01

    George and Annie explore the galaxy in this cosmic adventure from Stephen Hawking and Lucy Hawking, complete with essays from Professor Hawking about the latest in space travel. George is heartbroken when he learns that his friend Annie and her father are moving to the US. Eric has a new job working for the space program, looking for signs of life in the Universe. Eric leaves George with a gift—a book called The User’s Guide to the Universe. But Annie and Eric haven’t been gone for very long when Annie believes that she is being contacted by aliens, who have a terrible warning for her. George joins her in the US to help her with her quest—and before he knows it, he, Annie, Cosmos, and Annie’s annoying cousin Emmett have been swept up in a cosmic treasure hunt, spanning the whole galaxy and beyond. Lucy Hawking's own experiences in zero-gravity flight and interviews with astronauts at Cape Kennedy and the Johnson Space Center lend the book a sense of realism and excitement that is sure to fire up ima...

  6. Note on cosmic censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipler, F.J.

    1985-05-01

    A number of recent theorems by Krolak and Newman purport to prove cosmic censorship by showing that ''strong curvature'' singularities must be hidden behind horizons. It is proved that Newman's ''null, strong curvature'' condition, which is imposed on certain classes of null geodesics to restrict curvature growth in the space-time, does not hold in many physically realistic space-times: it is not satisfied by any null geodesic in the relevant class in any open Friedmann cosmological model, nor does it hold for any null geodesic in the relevant class in maximal Schwarzschild space. More generally, it is argued that the singularity predicted by the Penrose singularity theorem is unlikely to be of the type eliminated by Newman. Thus the Newman theorems are probably without physical significance. The Krolak theorems, although based on a physically significant definition of strong curvature singularity, are mathematically invalid, and this approach cannot be used to obtain a cosmic censorship theorem. (author).

  7. Evolution Of Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Vanchurin, V

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of finite loops and infinite strings as a part of a complete cosmic string network. We give dynamical arguments showing that the structures on infinite strings should obey a scaling law. We perform a simulation of the network which uses functional forms for the string position and thus is exact to the limits of computer arithmetic. The effective box size of our simulation is at least two orders of magnitude larger than what was previously reached. Our results confirm that the wiggles on the strings obey a scaling law described by universal power spectrum. The average distance between long strings also scales accurately with the time. Production functions of string loops do not show scaling. With low intercommutation probability p the true scaling régime is not reached until very late cosmic times, which makes it difficult to simulate such evolutions. Via the expansion of the box technique, we were able to reach scaling with a wide range of p. The physical correlation ...

  8. Cosmic particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimbardo, Gaetano; Perri, Silvia [Universita della Calabria, Dipartimento di Fisica, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The most popular mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays, which is thought to operate in supernova remnant shocks as well as at heliospheric shocks, is the diffusive shock acceleration, which is a Fermi mechanism based on normal diffusion. On the other hand, in the last few years it has been shown that the transport of plasma particles in the presence of electric and magnetic turbulence can be superdiffusive rather than normal diffusive. The term 'superdiffusive' refers to the mean square displacement of particle positions growing superlinearly with time, as compared to the normal linear growth. In particular, superdiffusion is characterized by a non Gaussian statistical process called Levy random walk. We show how diffusive shock acceleration is modified by superdiffusion, and how this yields new predictions for the cosmic ray spectral index, for the acceleration time, and for the spatial profile of energetic particles. A comparison with observations of particle acceleration at heliospheric shocks and at supernova remnant shocks is done. We discuss how superdiffusive shock acceleration allows to explain the observations of hard ion spectra at the solar wind termination shock detected by Voyager 2, of hard radio spectra due to synchrotron emission of electrons accelerated at supernova remnant shocks, and how it can help to explain the observations of 'thin rims' in the X-ray synchrotron emission.

  9. Genuine cosmic hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastor, David; Ray, Sourya; Traschen, Jennie

    2017-02-01

    We show that asymptotically future de Sitter (AFdS) spacetimes carry ‘genuine’ cosmic hair; information that is analogous to the mass and angular momentum of asymptotically flat spacetimes and that characterizes how an AFdS spacetime approaches its asymptotic form. We define new ‘cosmological tension’ charges associated with future asymptotic spatial translation symmetries, which are analytic continuations of the ADM mass and tensions of asymptotically planar AdS spacetimes, and which measure the leading anisotropic corrections to the isotropic, exponential de Sitter expansion rate. A cosmological Smarr relation, holding for AFdS spacetimes having exact spatial translation symmetry, is derived. This formula relates cosmological tension, which is evaluated at future infinity, to properties of the cosmology at early times, together with a ‘cosmological volume’ contribution that is analogous to the thermodynamic volume of AdS black holes. Smarr relations for different spatial directions imply that the difference in expansion rates between two directions at late times is related in a simple way to their difference at early times. Hence information about the very early universe can be inferred from cosmic hair, which is potentially observable in a late time de Sitter phase. Cosmological tension charges and related quantities are evaluated for Kasner–de Sitter spacetimes, which serve as our primary examples.

  10. L3 + Cosmics Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE4 %title\\\\ \\\\The L3+C experiment takes advantage of the unique properties of the L3 muon spectrometer to get an accurate measurement of cosmic ray muons 30 m underground. A new muon trigger, readout and DAQ system have been installed, as well as a scintillator array covering the upper surfaces of the L3 magnet for timing purposes. The acceptance amounts to 200 $m^2 sr$. The data are collected independently in parallel with L3 running. In spring 2000 a scintillator array will be installed on the roof of the SX hall in order to estimate the primary energy of air showers associated with events observed in L3+C.\\\\ \\\\The cosmic ray muon momentum spectrum, the zenith angular dependence and the charge ratio are measured with high accuracy between 20 and 2000 GeV/c. The results will provide new information about the primary composition, the shower development in the atmosphere, and the inclusive pion and kaon (production-) cross sections (specifically the "$\\pi$/K ratio") at high energies. These data will also hel...

  11. Age of old objects constraints on cosmic opacity

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Dantas, M A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, it is proposed a cosmological model independent method to constrain the cosmic opacity. As an approach never seen before in literature, we use the ages of 32 old passive galaxies distributed over the redshift interval $0.11 < z < 1.84$ and of 9 extremely old globular clusters in M31 galaxy to obtain opacity free luminosity distance. By comparing them to the 580 distance moduli of supernovae from the so-called Union 2.1 compilation we put limits on the cosmic opacity parametrized by $\\tau(z) = \\epsilon z/(1+z)$ (for $\\epsilon =0$ the transparent universe is recovered). Considering the cosmic background radiation constraints on the spatial curvature of the Universe no significant deviation from transparency is verified.

  12. Restrictions from Lorentz invariance violation on cosmic ray propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Huerta, H.; Pérez-Lorenzana, A.

    2017-03-01

    Lorentz invariance violation introduced as a generic modification to particle dispersion relations is used to study high energy cosmic ray attenuation processes. It is shown to reproduce the same physical effects for vacuum Cherenkov radiation, as in some particular models with spontaneous breaking of Lorentz symmetry. This approximation is also implemented for the study of photon decay in vacuum, where stringent limits to the violation scale are derived from the direct observation of very high energy cosmic ray photon events on gamma telescopes. Photo production processes by cosmic ray primaries on photon background are also addressed, to show that Lorentz violation may turn off this attenuation process at energies above a well-defined secondary threshold.

  13. Cosmics cosmological initial conditions and microwave anisotropy codes

    CERN Document Server

    Bertschinger, E

    1995-01-01

    COSMICS is a package of fortran programs useful for computing transfer functions and microwave background anisotropy for cosmological models, and for generating gaussian random initial conditions for nonlinear structure formation simulations of such models. Four programs are provided: {\\bf linger\\_con} and {\\bf linger\\_syn} integrate the linearized equations of general relativity, matter, and radiation in conformal Newtonian and synchronous gauge, respectively; {\\bf deltat} integrates the photon transfer functions computed by the linger codes to produce photon anisotropy power spectra; and {\\bf grafic} tabulates normalized matter power spectra and produces constrained or unconstrained samples of the matter density field. Version 1.0 of COSMICS is available at http://arcturus.mit.edu/cosmics/ . The current release gives fortran-77 programs that run on workstations and vectorized supercomputers. Unix makefiles are included that make it simple to build and test the package. A future release will include portable...

  14. The bispectrum of matter perturbations from cosmic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Regan, Donough

    2014-01-01

    We present the first calculation of the bispectrum of the matter perturbations induced by cosmic strings. The calculation is performed in two different ways: the first uses the unequal time correlators (UETCs) of the string network - computed using a Gaussian model previously employed for cosmic string power spectra. The second approach uses the wake model, where string density perturbations are concentrated in sheet-like structures whose surface density grows with time. The qualitative and quantitative agreement of the two gives confidence to the results. An essential ingredient in the UETC approach is the inclusion of compensation factors in the integration with the Green's function of the matter and radiation fluids, and we show that these compensation factors must be included in the wake model also. We also present a comparison of the UETCs computed in the Gaussian model, and those computed in the unconnected segment model (USM) used by the standard cosmic string perturbation package CMBACT. We compare nu...

  15. Cosmic rays and global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlykin, A.D. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sloan, T. [Lancaster University (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A.W. [Durham University (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds could contribute to global warming. The argument is that the observed increased solar activity during the last century caused a decrease in the ionization due to cosmic rays since the lower energy cosmic particles are deflected by the magnetic field created by the increasing solar wind. This would lead to a decrease in cloud cover allowing more heating of the earth by the sun. Meteorological data combined to solar activity observations and simulations show that any effect of solar activity on clouds and the climate is likely to be through irradiance rather than cosmic rays. Since solar irradiance transfers 8 orders of magnitude more energy to the atmosphere than cosmic rays it is more plausible that this can produce a real effect. The total contribution of variable solar activity to global warming is shown to be less than 14% of the total temperature rise. (A.C.)

  16. Is the Cosmic Microwave Background a Shell Around Us? or are the Microwaves Everywhere in the Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John

    2015-01-01

    A: The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation fills the universe and travels in all directions. As we see it from here in satellite maps, it is about equally bright in all directions, and thats one of the main reasons we know its cosmic.

  17. Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paykari, Paniez; Starck, Jean-Luc Starck

    2012-03-01

    About 400,000 years after the Big Bang the temperature of the Universe fell to about a few thousand degrees. As a result, the previously free electrons and protons combined and the Universe became neutral. This released a radiation which we now observe as the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The tiny fluctuations* in the temperature and polarization of the CMB carry a wealth of cosmological information. These so-called temperature anisotropies were predicted as the imprints of the initial density perturbations which gave rise to the present large-scale structures such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies. This relation between the present-day Universe and its initial conditions has made the CMB radiation one of the most preferred tools to understand the history of the Universe. The CMB radiation was discovered by radio astronomers Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson in 1965 [72] and earned them the 1978 Nobel Prize. This discovery was in support of the Big Bang theory and ruled out the only other available theory at that time - the steady-state theory. The crucial observations of the CMB radiation were made by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite [86]- orbited in 1989-1996. COBE made the most accurate measurements of the CMB frequency spectrum and confirmed it as being a black-body to within experimental limits. This made the CMB spectrum the most precisely measured black-body spectrum in nature. The CMB has a thermal black-body spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K: the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9mmwavelength. The results of COBE inspired a series of ground- and balloon-based experiments, which measured CMB anisotropies on smaller scales over the next decade. During the 1990s, the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum (see Figure 5.1) was measured with increasing sensitivity and by 2000 the BOOMERanG experiment [26] reported

  18. Winds, Clumps, and Interacting Cosmic Rays in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Gallagher, J S; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2013-01-01

    We construct a family of models for the evolution of energetic particles in the starburst galaxy M82 and compare them to observations to test the calorimeter assumption that all cosmic ray energy is radiated in the starburst region. Assuming constant cosmic ray acceleration efficiency with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations as a function of energy. Cosmic rays are injected with Galactic energy distributions and electron-to-proton ratio via type II supernovae at the observed rate of 0.07/yr. From the cosmic ray spectra, we predict the radio synchrotron and \\gamma-ray spectra. To more accurately model the radio spectrum, we incorporate a multiphase interstellar medium in the starburst region of M82. Our model interstellar medium is highly fragmented with compact dense molecular clouds and dense photoionized gas, both embedded in a hot, low density medium in overall pressure equilibrium. The spectra predicted by this one-zone model are...

  19. Astrophysical Uncertainties in the Cosmic Ray Electron and Positron Spectrum From Annihilating Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Simet, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a number of experiments have been conducted with the goal of studying cosmic rays at GeV to TeV energies. This is a particularly interesting regime from the perspective of indirect dark matter detection. To draw reliable conclusions regarding dark matter from cosmic ray measurements, however, it is important to first understand the propagation of cosmic rays through the magnetic and radiation fields of the Milky Way. In this paper, we constrain the characteristics of the cosmic ray propagation model through comparison with observational inputs, including recent data from the CREAM experiment, and use these constraints to estimate the corresponding uncertainties in the spectrum of cosmic ray electrons and positrons from dark matter particles annihilating in the halo of the Milky Way.

  20. Influence of cosmic radiationon lymphocyte micronucleus,serum lipid peroxide and antioxidation capacity inaircrew members

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This study looks into the influence of cosmic radiation at high altitudes on human bodies. Results reveal that the cytokinesis-block micronuclei (CBMN) and conventional cultured micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes, serum levels of lipid peroxide, superoxide dismutase, and the total antioxidation capacity by chemical colorimetry all increased significantly in aircrew members. There exists a linear relationship between the CBMN and the average annual effective doses of radiation received or the average annual flying hours. With both of them, a trend shows that the serum lipid peroxide levels increase as well. Either the lipid peroxide or CBMN can sensitively reflect the recent changes in flight load. These findings indicate that cosmic radiation impairs the stability of chromosomes and genome, and induces lipid oxidative damage in aircrews; Lymphocyte CBMN and serum lipid peroxide can be used as monitoring indicators in the cosmic radiation protection for aircrew members.

  1. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    CERN Document Server

    Recchia, S; Morlino, G

    2016-01-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfven waves, that in turn determine the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the impli...

  2. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, Philipp P

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important in the Universe and their effects contain the key to many astrophysical phenomena that are otherwise impossible to understand. This book presents an up-to-date overview of this fast-growing topic and its interconnections to plasma processes, astroparticle physics, high energy astrophysics, and cosmic evolution. The phenomenology and impact of magnetic fields are described in diverse astrophysical contexts within the Universe, from galaxies to the filaments and voids of the intergalactic medium, and out to the largest redshifts. The presentation of mathematical formulae is accessible and is designed to add insight into the broad range of topics discussed. Written for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics and related disciplines, this volume will inspire readers to devise new ways of thinking about magnetic fields in space on galaxy scales and beyond.

  3. Cosmic Ray Antimatter

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, space-born experiments have delivered new measurements of high energy cosmic-ray (CR) antiprotons and positrons, opening new frontiers in energy reach and precision. While being a promising discovery tool for new physics or exotic astrophysical phenomena, an irreducible background of antimatter comes from CR collisions with interstellar matter in the Galaxy. Understanding this irreducible source or constraining it from first principles is an interesting challenge: a game of hide-and-seek where the objective is to identify the laws of basic particle physics among the forest of astrophysical uncertainties. I describe an attempt to obtain such understanding, combining information from a zoo of CR species including massive nuclei and relativistic radioisotopes. I show that: (i) CR antiprotons most likely come from CR-gas collisions; (ii) positron data is consistent with, and suggestive of the same astrophysical production mechanism responsible for antiprotons and dominated by proton-proton c...

  4. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Aled

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a brief review of current theory and observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB. New predictions for cosmological defect theories and an overview of the inflationary theory are discussed. Recent results from various observations of the anisotropies of the microwave background are described and a summary of the proposed experiments is presented. A new analysis technique based on Bayesian statistics that can be used to reconstruct the underlying sky fluctuations is summarised. Current CMB data is used to set some preliminary constraints on the values of fundamental cosmological parameters $Omega$ and $H_circ$ using the maximum likelihood technique. In addition, secondary anisotropies due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are described.

  5. Acceleration of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhko, E [Yu.G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Ave., 677980 Yakutsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: berezhko@ikfia.ysn.ru

    2008-07-15

    Cosmic ray (CR) origin problem is briefly discussed. It is argued that CRs with energies up to 10{sup 17} eV are produced in galactic supernova remnants, whereas ultra high energy CRs are extragalactic. CR composition strongly changes within the transition from galactic to extragalactic CR component, therefore precise measurements of CR composition at energies 10{sup 17} - 10{sup 19} eV are needed for the reliable determination of this transition. The possible sources of extragalactic CRs are briefly discussed. It is argued that CR acceleration at the shock created by the expanding cocoons around active galactic nuclei has to be considered as a prime candidate for the sources of extragalactic CRs.

  6. Cosmic string loop shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the shapes of cosmic string loops found in large-scale simulations of an expanding-universe string network. The simulation does not include gravitational back reaction, but we model that process by smoothing the loop using Lorentzian convolution. We find that loops at formation consist of generally straight segments separated by kinks. We do not see cusps or any cusp-like structure at the scale of the entire loop, although we do see very small regions of string that move with large Lorentz boosts. However, smoothing of the string almost always introduces two cusps on each loop. The smoothing process does not lead to any significant fragmentation of loops that were in non-self-intersecting trajectories before smoothing.

  7. Simulating Cosmic Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, D H; Hernquist, L E; Weinberg, David H.; Katz, Neal; Hernquist, Lars

    1997-01-01

    We describe cosmological simulation techniques and their application to studies of cosmic structure formation, with particular attention to recent hydrodynamic simulations of structure in the high redshift universe. Collisionless N-body simulations with Gaussian initial conditions produce a pattern of sheets, filaments, tunnels, and voids that resembles the observed large scale galaxy distribution. Simulations that incorporate gas dynamics and dissipation form dense clumps of cold gas with sizes and masses similar to the luminous parts of galaxies. Models based on inflation and cold dark matter predict a healthy population of high redshift galaxies, including systems with star formation rates of 20 M_{\\sun}/year at z=6. At z~3, most of the baryons in these models reside in the low density intergalactic medium, which produces fluctuating Lyman-alpha absorption in the spectra of background quasars. The physical description of this ``Lyman-alpha forest'' is particularly simple if the absorption spectrum is viewe...

  8. Cosmic Light EDU kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    In 2015 we celebrate the International Year of Light, a great opportunity to promote awareness about the importance of light coming from the Cosmos and what messages it is bringing to mankind. In parallel a unique moment to attract the attention of stakeholders on the dangers of light pollution and its impact in our lives and our pursuit of more knowledge. In this presentation I want to present one of the conrnerstones of IYL2015, a partnership between the Galileo Teacher Training Program, Universe Awareness and Globe at Night, the Cosmic Light EDU kit. The aim of this project is to assemble a core set of tools and resources representing our basic knowledge pilars about the Universe and simple means to preserve our night sky.

  9. On Strong Cosmic Censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Isenberg, James

    2015-01-01

    For almost half of the one hundred year history of Einstein's theory of general relativity, Strong Cosmic Censorship has been one of its most intriguing conjectures. The SCC conjecture addresses the issue of the nature of the singularities found in most solutions of Einstein's gravitational field equations: Are such singularities generically characterized by unbounded curvature? Is the existence of a Cauchy horizon (and the accompanying extensions into spacetime regions in which determinism fails) an unstable feature of solutions of Einstein's equations? In this short review article, after briefly commenting on the history of the SCC conjecture, we survey some of the progress made in research directed either toward supporting SCC or toward uncovering some of its weaknesses. We focus in particular on model versions of SCC which have been proven for restricted families of spacetimes (e.g., the Gowdy spacetimes), and the role played by the generic presence of Asymptotically Velocity Term Dominated behavior in th...

  10. Cosmic ray synergies

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    In laboratories, cosmic rays have been the subject of scientific research for many years. A more recent development is their appearance in schools, as educational tools. A recent workshop at CERN, organised by ASPERA in collaboration with EPPOG and EPPCN, had the goal of bringing together ideas and initiatives with a view to setting up a future common project.   Presentation at the workshop on 15 October. In research, as in education, you can sometimes get things done more rapidly and easily by joining forces. For roughly the past decade, physicists have been taking their particle detectors to secondary schools. “The challenge now is to bring all of these existing projects together in a network,” says Arnaud Marsollier, in charge of communication for the ASPERA network and organiser of the workshop. The workshop held on Friday, 15 October was attended by representatives of major European educational projects and members of the European Particle Physics Communication Network...

  11. Genuine Cosmic Hair

    CERN Document Server

    Kastor, David; Traschen, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    We show that asymptotically future deSitter (AFdS) spacetimes carry 'genuine' cosmic hair; information that is analogous to the mass and angular momentum of asymptotically flat spacetimes and that characterizes how an AFdS spacetime approaches its asymptotic form. We define new 'cosmological tension' charges associated with future asymptotic spatial translation symmetries, which are analytic continuations of the ADM mass and tensions of asymptotically planar AdS spacetimes, and which measure the leading anisotropic corrections to the isotropic, exponential deSitter expansion rate. A cosmological Smarr relation, holding for AFdS spacetimes having exact spatial translation symmetry, is derived. This formula relates cosmological tension, which is evaluated at future infinity, to properties of the cosmology at early times, together with a 'cosmological volume' contribution that is analogous to the thermodynamic volume of AdS black holes. Smarr relations for different spatial directions imply that the difference i...

  12. THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, James C.; Michael Shull, J.; Snow, Theodore P.; Stocke, John [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 391-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Ebbets, Dennis [Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., 1600 Commerce Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Heap, Sara H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 681, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Leitherer, Claus; Sembach, Kenneth [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Savage, Blair D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Siegmund, Oswald H. W. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Spencer, John; Alan Stern, S. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Welsh, Barry [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009 May, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F{sub {lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle modes) in 1%-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (2009 September-2011 June) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is nine times than sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of 2011 June. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Ly{alpha} absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the He II reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  13. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Snow, Theodore P.; Spencer, John; Stern, S. Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V; Andrews, John; Morse, Jon

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F(sub lambda) approximates 1.0 X 10(exp -14) ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  14. Test particle trajectories near cosmic strings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farook Rahaman; Subenoy Chakraborty; K Maity

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the motion of test particle in the gravitational field of cosmic strings in different situations using the Hamilton–Jacobi (H–J) formalism. We have discussed the trajectories near static cosmic string, cosmic string in Brans–Dicke theory and cosmic string in dilaton gravity.

  15. A cosmic microwave background feature consistent with a cosmic texture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M; Turok, N; Vielva, P; Martínez-González, E; Hobson, M

    2007-12-07

    The Cosmic Microwave Background provides our most ancient image of the universe and our best tool for studying its early evolution. Theories of high-energy physics predict the formation of various types of topological defects in the very early universe, including cosmic texture, which would generate hot and cold spots in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We show through a Bayesian statistical analysis that the most prominent 5 degrees -radius cold spot observed in all-sky images, which is otherwise hard to explain, is compatible with having being caused by a texture. From this model, we constrain the fundamental symmetry-breaking energy scale to be (0) approximately 8.7 x 10(15) gigaelectron volts. If confirmed, this detection of a cosmic defect will probe physics at energies exceeding any conceivable terrestrial experiment.

  16. Preheating of the Universe by cosmic rays from primordial supernovae at the beginning of cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Sazonov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    The 21-cm signal from the cosmic reionization epoch can shed light on the history of heating of the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) at z~30-10. It has been suggested that X-rays from the first accreting black holes could significantly heat the Universe at these early epochs. Here we propose another IGM heating mechanism associated with the first stars. As known from previous work, the remnants of powerful supernovae (SNe) ending the lives of massive Population III stars could readily expand out of their host dark matter minihalos into the surrounding IGM, aided by the preceeding photoevaporation of the halo's gas by the UV radiation from the progenitor star. We argue that during the evolution of such a remnant a significant fraction of the SN kinetic energy can be put into low-energy (E<30 MeV) cosmic rays that will eventually escape into the IGM. These subrelativistic cosmic rays could propagate through the Universe and heat the IGM by ~10-100 K by z~15, before more powerful reionization/heating mec...

  17. Radiation events in astronomical CCD images

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, A. R.; McDonald, R. J.; Hurley, D. L.; Holland, S. E.; Groom, D. E.; Brown, W E; Gilmore, D. K.; Stover, R.J.; Wei, M.

    2001-01-01

    The remarkable sensitivity of depleted silicon to ionizing radiation is a nuisance to astronomers. "Cosmic rays" degrade images because of struck pixels, leading to modified observing strategies and the development of algorithms to remove the unwanted artifacts. In the new-generation CCD's with thick sensitive regions, cosmic-ray muons make recognizable straight tracks and there is enhanced sensitivity to ambient gamma radiation via Compton-scattered electrons ("worms"). Beta emitters i...

  18. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Hae Youn; Park, Hong Sook

    2001-03-01

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated.

  19. Test of Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) Process for Super Heavy Oil Exploitation in Fengcheng Field by Pair of Horizontal Wells%风城超稠油双水平井蒸汽辅助重力泄油开发试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍进; 桑林翔; 樊玉新; 魏新春; 邱敏; 王景

    2012-01-01

    The super heavy oil in Fengcheng field is characterized by high viscosity, shallow burial depth, difficult of eonventional exploitatiun and low degree of recovery'. In 2008 and 2009, Wellblock Zhong-32 and Zhong-37 were successively as pilot areas in this field for SAGD process by pair of horizontal wells, integrated with the foreign experienees from analogous reservoirs exploitation and the characteris- tics of this reservoir. However, the unreasonable circulating preheating pressure differential control and string structure in real production caused poor connectivity in horizontal sections, low producing degree, easy steam breakthrough and high fluctuation of production. In this paper, 3D geologic modeling for studying the reservoir petrophysical property and barrier distribution is adopted to improve effect of SAGD development, finely recognize the geological tbatures of resm'voir. Furthermore, the key t~gulation technology for the SAGD circulafng pre- heating stage is confirmed to be the pressure differential controlling. The dynamic balance among the liquid-withdrawing capacity of steam chamber, the steam injection and recovery percent is the guidance tor production stage by SAGD process. So, such a SAGD technology for regulation and control is suitable for the whole pilot area.%风城油田超稠油黏度大、埋藏浅,常规开采难度大,采出程度低。借鉴国外类似油藏开发的经验,结合油藏自身特点,运用双水平井蒸汽辅助重力泄油(SAGD)开发技术,建立了重32、重37井区SAGD试验区。在实际生产中由于循环预热压差控制和管柱结构不合理,导致水平段连通性差,动用程度低,极易汽窜,生产波动大。为了提高开发效果,以强化精细地质研究为前提,应用三维地质建模研究储集层物性及隔层空间分布,精细认识油藏地质特点;对SAGD循环预热阶段进行总结梳理,认识到预热阶段核心调控技术是压差控制

  20. Is it possible to obtain cosmic accelerated expansion through energy transfer between different energy densities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Recai

    2017-03-01

    The equation of state of an energy density may be significantly modified by coupling it to another energy density. In the light of this observation we check the possibility of producing cosmic accelerated expansion in this way. In particular we consider the case where matter is converted to radiation (or vice versa by particle physics processes). We find that cosmic accelerated expansion can be obtained in this way only if an intermediate state with negative equation of state forms during the conversion.