WorldWideScience

Sample records for super lhc accelerators

  1. The super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, Michelangelo L

    2010-01-01

    We review here the prospects of a long-term upgrade programme for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN laboratory's new proton-proton collider. The super-LHC, which is currently under evaluation and design, is expected to deliver of the order of ten times the statistics of the LHC. In addition to a non-technical summary of the principal physics arguments for the upgrade, I present a pedagogical introduction to the technological challenges on the accelerator and experimental fronts, and a review of the current status of the planning.

  2. LHC Dipoles Accelerate

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Andrezej Siemko (left), Peter Sievers (centre), and Lucio Rossi (right), have the exciting challenge of preparing and testing 2000 magnets for the LHC. The LHC is going to require a lot of powerful magnets by the time it begins operation in 2006. More specifically, it is going to need 130 special magnets, 400 quadrupoles, and a whopping 1250 dipoles! Preparing and testing these magnets for the conditions they will encounter in the LHC is not an easy task. But evaluation of the most recently received magnet, from the German company Noell, is showing that while the monumental task of receiving and testing nearly 2000 magnets is going to be exhausting, the goals are definitely attainable. At the moment and over the next year, pre-series magnets (the magnets that CERN uses to fine tune performance) are arriving slowly (90 in total will arrive), but by 2003 the rate of series magnet arrival will accelerate to 9 per week, that's over 450 in a single year! And working with these magnets when they arrive is tough. ...

  3. HL-LHC Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    The tentative schedule, key ingredients, as well as progress of pertinent R&D and component prototypes for the LHC luminosity upgrade, "HL-LHC," are reviewed. Also alternative scenarios based on performance-improving consolidations (PICs) instead of a full upgrade are discussed. Tentative time schedules and expected luminosity evolutions for the different scenarios are sketched. The important role of HL-LHC development as a step towards a future HE-LHC or VHE-LHC is finally highlighted. Presented at "Higgs & Beyond" Conference Tohoku University, Sendai 7 June 2013.

  4. Post-LHC accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    The design and practicality of future accelerators, such as hadron colliders and neutrino factories being considered to supercede the LHC, will depend greatly on the choice of superconducting magnets. Various possibilities will be reviewed and discussed, taking into account recent progress and projected improvements in magnet design and conductor development along with the recommendations from the 2001 Snowmass workshop

  5. SuperB Progress Reports Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Biagini, Maria Enrica; Boscolo, M; Buonomo, B; Demma, T; Drago, A; Esposito, M; Guiducci, S; Mazzitelli, G; Pellegrino, L; Preger, M A; Raimondi, P; Ricci, R; Rotundo, U; Sanelli, C; Serio, M; Stella, A; Tomassini, S; Zobov, M; Bertsche, K; Brachman, A; Cai, Y; Chao, A; Chesnut, R; Donald, M.H; Field, C; Fisher, A; Kharakh, D; Krasnykh, A; Moffeit, K; Nosochkov, Y; Pivi, M; Seeman, J; Sullivan, M.K; Weathersby, S; Weidemann, A; Weisend, J; Wienands, U; Wittmer, W; Woods, M; Yocky, G; Bogomiagkov, A; Koop, I; Levichev, E; Nikitin, S; Okunev, I; Piminov, P; Sinyatkin, S; Shatilov, D; Vobly, P; Bosi, F; Liuzzo, S; Paoloni, E; Bonis, J; Chehab, R; Le Meur, G; Lepercq, P; Letellier-Cohen, F; Mercier, B; Poirier, F; Prevost, C; Rimbault, C; Touze, F; Variola, A; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L; Jeremie, A; Baylac, M; Bourrion, O; De Conto, J M; Gomez, Y; Meot, F; Monseu, N; Tourres, D; Vescovi, C; Chanci, A; Napoly, O; Barber, D P; Bettoni, S; Quatraro, D

    2010-01-01

    This report details the present status of the Accelerator design for the SuperB Project. It is one of four separate progress reports that, taken collectively, describe progress made on the SuperB Project since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008.

  6. LHC Accelerator Fault Tracker - First Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonio, Andrea; Roderick, Chris; Schmidt, Ruediger; Todd, Benjamin; Wollmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Availability is one of the key performance indicators of LHC operation, being directly correlated with integrated luminosity production. An effective tool for availability tracking is a necessity to ensure a coherent capture of fault information and relevant dependencies on operational modes and beam parameters. At the beginning of LHC Run 2 in 2015, the Accelerator Fault Tracking (AFT) tool was deployed at CERN to track faults or events affecting LHC operation. Information derived from the AFT is crucial for the identification of areas to improve LHC availability, and hence LHC physics production. For the 2015 run, the AFT has been used by members of the CERN Availability Working Group, LHC Machine coordinators and equipment owners to identify the main contributors to downtime and to understand the evolution of LHC availability throughout the year. In this paper the 2015 experience with the AFT for availability tracking is summarised and an overview of the first results as well as an outlook to future develo...

  7. Demineralised water cooling in the LHC accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Peón-Hernández, G

    2002-01-01

    In spite of the LHC accelerator being a cryogenic machine, it remains nevertheless a not negligible heat load to be removed by conventional water-cooling. About 24MW will be taken away by demineralised water cooled directly by primary water from the LHC cooling towers placed at the even points. This paper describes the demineralised water network in the LHC tunnel including pipe diameters, lengths, water speed, estimated friction factor, head losses and available supply and return pressures for each point. It lists all water cooled equipment, highlights the water cooled cables as the most demanding equipment followed by the radio frequency racks and cavities, and by the power converters. Their main cooling requirements and their positions in the tunnel are also presented.

  8. Electron cloud in the CERN accelerators (PS, SPS, LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iadarola, G; Rumolo, G

    2013-01-01

    Several indicators have pointed to the presence of an Electron Cloud (EC) in some of the CERN accelerators, when operating with closely spaced bunched beams. In particular, spurious signals on the pick ups used for beam detection, pressure rise and beam instabilities were observed at the Proton Synchrotron (PS) during the last stage of preparation of the beams for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), as well as at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Since the LHC has started operation in 2009, typical electron cloud phenomena have appeared also in this machine, when running with trains of closely packed bunches (i.e. with spacings below 150ns). Beside the above mentioned indicators, other typical signatures were seen in this machine (due to its operation mode and/or more refined detection possibilities), like heat load in the cold dipoles, bunch dependent emittance growth and degraded lifetime in store and bunch-by-bunch stable phase shift to compensate for the energy loss due to the electron cloud. An overview of the electron cloud status in the different CERN machines (PS, SPS, LHC) will be presented in this paper, with a special emphasis on the dangers for future operation with more intense beams and the necessary countermeasures to mitigate or suppress the effect. (author)

  9. Super High Energy Colliding Beam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    This lecture presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evolution of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 kilometer tunnel of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachie in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particle.

  10. LHC Report: Even accelerators need a break

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The LHC technical stop is in full swing, with a lot of essential maintenance work on the accelerator services, such as electricity distribution, cooling, ventilation, cryogenic systems, access and safety systems, vacuum, cranes and lifts, being crammed into the few weeks before the start of the 2011 run in February.   Team changing a magnet in the SPS accelerator.  In addition to the maintenance work a number of modifications are being made to the accelerator for 2011. These include the installation of small solenoids to combat the build-up of electrons inside the vacuum chamber with the increasing proton beam intensity; the replacement of a number of UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) installations, which are vital to ensuring the continuity of the electrical supply to essential systems such as the cryogenics; the installation of additional capacitors on the QPS (Quench Protection system) to prepare for a possible increase in beam energy in 2011; the completion of the programme to repla...

  11. The versatile link, a common project for super-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Luis; Dris, Stefanos; Gerardin, Alexandre; Huffman, Todd; Issever, Cigdem; Pacheco, Alberto Jimenez; Jones, Mark; Kwan, Simon; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lian, Zhijun; Liu, Tiankuan; /CERN /Oxford U. /Fermilab /Taipei, Computing Ctr. /Southern Methodist U.

    2009-07-01

    Radiation tolerant, high speed optoelectronic data transmission links are fundamental building blocks in today's large scale High Energy Physics (HEP) detectors, as exemplified by the four experiments currently under commissioning at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), see for example. New experiments or upgrades will impose even more stringent demands on these systems from the point of view of performance and radiation tolerance. This can already be seen from the developments underway for the Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC) project, a proposed upgrade to the LHC aiming at increasing the luminosity of the machine by factor of 10 to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and thus providing a better chance to see rare processes and improving statistically marginal measurements. In the past, specific data transmission links have been independently developed by each LHC experiment for data acquisition (DAQ), detector control as well as trigger and timing distribution (TTC). This was justified by the different types of applications being targeted as well as by technological limitations preventing one single solution from fitting all requirements. However with today's maturity of optoelectronic and CMOS technologies it is possible to envisage the development of a general purpose optical link which can cover most transmission applications: a Versatile Link. Such an approach has the clear advantage of concentrating the development effort on one single project targeting an optical link whose final functionality will only result from the topology and configuration settings adopted.

  12. Nonlinear predictive control in the LHC accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, E; Cristea, S; Casas, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a nonlinear model-based control strategy in a real challenging process. A predictive controller based on a nonlinear model derived from physical relationships, mainly heat and mass balances, has been developed and commissioned in the inner triplet heat exchanger unit (IT-HXTU) of the large hadron collider (LHC) particle accelerator at European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). The advanced regulation\\ maintains the magnets temperature at about 1.9 K. The development includes a constrained nonlinear state estimator with a receding horizon estimation procedure to improve the regulator predictions.

  13. CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Upgrade Studies for Super-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilki, Burak

    2011-01-01

    When the Large Hadron Collider approaches Super-LHC conditions above a luminosity of 10 34 cm -2 s -1 , the scintillator tiles of the CMS Hadron Endcap calorimeters will lose their efficiencies. As a radiation hard solution, the scintillator tiles are planned to be replaced by quartz plates. In order to improve the efficiency of the photodetection, various methods were investigated including radiation hard wavelength shifters, p-terphenyl or 4% gallium doped zinc oxide. We constructed a 20 layer calorimeter prototype with pTp coated plates of size 20 cm x 20 cm, and tested the hadronic and the electromagnetic capabilities at the CERN H2 beam-line. The beam tests revealed a substantial light collection increase with pTp or ZnO:Ga deposited quartz plates. Here we report on the current R and D for a viable endcap calorimeter solution for CMS with beam tests and radiation damage studies.

  14. CERN-LHC accelerator superconducting magnet. Development and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Sasaki, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    CERN-LHC accelerator superconducting magnets and a cooperative work for interaction region quadrupole magnets are introduced. The accelerator commissioning and the incident happened during the commissioning in 2008 is also briefly discussed. (author)

  15. Upgrading the ATLAS barrel tracker for the super-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed to increase the luminosity of the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN by an order of magnitude, with the upgraded machine dubbed super-LHC. The ATLAS experiment will require a new tracker for this high-luminosity operation due to radiation damage and event density. In order to cope with the order of magnitude increase in pile-up backgrounds at the higher luminosity, an all-silicon tracker is being designed. The new strip detector will use significantly shorter strips than the current silicon tracker in order to minimize the occupancy. As the increased luminosity will mean a corresponding increase in radiation dose, a new generation of extremely radiation-hard silicon detectors is required. An R and D program is underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation hardness. New front-end electronics and readout systems are being designed to cope with the higher data rates. The challenges facing the sensors and the cooling and mechanical support will be discussed. A possible tracker layout will be described.

  16. Characterization and performance optimization of radiation monitoring sensors for high energy physics experiments at the CERN LHC and Super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, Julien

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the matter originating from the universe, a new particle accelerator named the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been built at CERN. The radiation environment generated by the hadrons collisions in the high energy physics experiments of the LHC will be complex and locally very intense. For monitoring this complex radiation field, dosimeters have been installed in the LHC experiments. In previous study, RadFET dosimeters and PIN diodes have been characterized for their use in the particle accelerator. However, even if the RadFETs sensors have been already extensively characterized, their radiation response can be affected by their package. Depending on the material and the geometry, the package can induce errors in the dose measurement. In this thesis, a complete study has been carried out in order to evaluate its influence. Concerning the PIN diodes, the readout protocol used for the LHC is no longer valuable for the Super-LHC. Therefore, a complete study on their radiation response has been p...

  17. The HL-LHC accelerator physics challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2014-01-01

    We review the conceptual baseline of the HL-LHC project, putting into perspective the main beam physics challenges of this new collider in comparison with the existing LHC, and the series of solutions and possible mitigation measures presently envisaged.

  18. The HL-LHC Accelerator Physics Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartoukh, S.; Zimmermann, F.

    The conceptual baseline of the HL-LHC project is reviewed, putting into perspective the main beam physics challenges of this new collider in comparison with the existing LHC, and the series of solutions and possible mitigation measures presently envisaged.

  19. The HL-LHC accelerator physics challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual baseline of the HL-LHC project is reviewed, putting into perspective the main beam physics challenges of this new collider in comparison with the existing LHC, and the series of solutions and possible mitigation measures presently envisaged.

  20. SuperB Progress Report for Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Buonomo, B.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Esposito, M.; Guiducci, S.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.A.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Rotundo, U.; Sanelli, C.; Serio, M.; Stella, A.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, K.; Brachman, A.; /SLAC /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Orsay, LAL /Annecy, LAPP /LPSC, Grenoble /IRFU, SPP, Saclay /DESY /Cockroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /U. Liverpool /CERN

    2012-02-14

    This report details the progress made in by the SuperB Project in the area of the Collider since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008. With this document we propose a new electron positron colliding beam accelerator to be built in Italy to study flavor physics in the B-meson system at an energy of 10 GeV in the center-of-mass. This facility is called a high luminosity B-factory with a project name 'SuperB'. This project builds on a long history of successful e+e- colliders built around the world, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The key advances in the design of this accelerator come from recent successes at the DAFNE collider at INFN in Frascati, Italy, at PEP-II at SLAC in California, USA, and at KEKB at KEK in Tsukuba Japan, and from new concepts in beam manipulation at the interaction region (IP) called 'crab waist'. This new collider comprises of two colliding beam rings, one at 4.2 GeV and one at 6.7 GeV, a common interaction region, a new injection system at full beam energies, and one of the two beams longitudinally polarized at the IP. Most of the new accelerator techniques needed for this collider have been achieved at other recently completed accelerators including the new PETRA-3 light source at DESY in Hamburg (Germany) and the upgraded DAFNE collider at the INFN laboratory at Frascati (Italy), or during design studies of CLIC or the International Linear Collider (ILC). The project is to be designed and constructed by a worldwide collaboration of accelerator and engineering staff along with ties to industry. To save significant construction costs, many components from the PEP-II collider at SLAC will be recycled and used in this new accelerator. The interaction region will be designed in collaboration with the particle physics detector to guarantee successful mutual use. The accelerator collaboration will consist of several groups at present

  1. The Super-B project accelerator status

    CERN Document Server

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R; Boscolo, M; Demma, T; Drago, A; Esposito, M; Guiducci, S; Marcellini, F; Mazzitelli, G; Preger, M; Raimondi, P; Sanelli, C; Serio, M; Stecchi, A; Stella, A; Tomassini, S; Zobov, M; Bertsche, K; Brachmann, A; Cai, Y; Chao, A; DeLira, A; Donald, M; Fisher, A; Kharakh, D; Krasnykh, A; Li, N; MacFarlane, D; Nosochkov, Y; Novokhatski, A; Pivi, M.; Seeman, J; Sullivan, M; Wienands, U; Weisend, J; Wittmer, W; Koop, I; Levichev, E; Nikitin, S; Piminov, P; Sinyatkin, S; Shatilov, D; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L; Jeremie, A; Baylac, M; DeConto, J M; Gomez, Y; Meot, F; Monseu, N; Tourres, D; Bonis, J.; Chehab, R; Le Meur, G; Mercier, B; Poirier, F; Prevost, C; Rimbault, C; Touze, F; Variola, A; Chance, A; Napoly, O; Bosi, F; Liuzzo, S; Paoloni, E; Bettoni, S

    2010-01-01

    The SuperB project is an international effort aiming at building in Italy a very high luminosity e+e- (1036 cm-2 sec-1) asymmetric collider at the Y(4S) energy in the cm. The accelerator design has been extensively studied and changed during the past year. The present design, based on the new collision scheme, with large Piwinski angle and the use of “crab waist” sextupoles already successfully tested at the DANE -Factory at LNF Frascati, provides larger flexibility, better dynamic aperture and spin manipulation sections in the Low Energy Ring (LER) for longitudinal polarization of the electron beam at the Interaction Point (IP). The Interaction Region (IR) has been further optimized in terms of apertures and reduced backgrounds in the detector. The injector complex design has been also updated. A summary of the project status will be presented in this paper

  2. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] and LHC [Large Hadron Collider] experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs

  3. 2008 LHC Open Days: Super(-conducting) events and activities

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Superconductivity will be one of the central themes of the programme of events and discovery activities of the forthcoming LHC Open Days on 5 and 6 April. Visitors will be invited to take part in a range of activities, experiments and exchanges all about this amazing aspect of the LHC project. Why superconductivity? Simply because it’s the principle on which the very operation of the LHC is based. At the heart of the LHC magnets lie 7000 kilometres of superconducting cables, each strand containing between 6000 and 9000 filaments of the superconducting alloy niobium-titanium in a copper coating. These cables, cooled to a temperature close to absolute zero, are able to conduct electricity without resistance. 12000 amp currents - an intensity some 30000 times greater than that of a 100 watt light bulb - pass through the cables of the LHC magnets.   Programme:   BLDG 163 (Saturday 5 and Sunday 6 April): See weird and wonderful experiments with your own eyes In the workshop where the 2...

  4. Baseline review of the U.S. LHC Accelerator project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Review of the U.S. Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Accelerator project was conducted February 23--26, 1998, at the request of Dr. John R. O'Fallon, Director, Division of High Energy Physics, Office of Energy Research, U.S. DOE. This is the first review of the U.S. LHC Accelerator project. Overall, the Committee found that the U.S. LHC Accelerator project effort is off to a good start and that the proposed scope is very conservative for the funding available. The Committee recommends that the project be initially baselined at a total cost of $110 million, with a scheduled completion data of 2005. The U.S. LHC Accelerator project will supply high technology superconducting magnets for the interaction regions (IRs) and the radio frequency (rf) straight section of the LHC intersecting storage rings. In addition, the project provides the cryogenic support interface boxes to service the magnets and radiation absorbers to protect the IR dipoles and the inner triplet quadrupoles. US scientists will provide support in analyzing some of the detailed aspects of accelerator physics in the two rings. The three laboratories participating in this project are Brookhaven National Laboratory, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Committee was very impressed by the technical capabilities of the US LHC Accelerator project team. Cost estimates for each subsystem of the US LHC Accelerator project were presented to the Review Committee, with a total cost including contingency of $110 million (then year dollars). The cost estimates were deemed to be conservative. A re-examination of the funding profile, costs, and schedules on a centralized project basis should lead to an increased list of deliverables. The Committee concluded that the proposed scope of US deliverables to CERN can be readily accomplished with the $110 million total cost baseline for the project. The current deliverables should serve as

  5. Run II of the LHC: The Accelerator Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In 2015 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) starts its Run II operation. After the successful Run I at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV in the 2010-2013 period, a first long shutdown (LS1) was mainly dedicated to the consolidation of the LHC magnet interconnections, to allow the LHC to operate at its design beam energy of 7 TeV. Other key accelerator systems have also been improved to optimize the performance reach at higher beam energies. After a review of the LS1 activities, the status of the LHC start-up progress is reported, addressing in particular the status of the LHC hardware commissioning and of the training campaign of superconducting magnets that will determine the operation beam energy in 2015. Then, the plans for the Run II operation are reviewed in detail, covering choice of initial machine parameters and strategy to improve the Run II performance. Future prospects of the LHC and its upgrade plans are also presented.

  6. LHC Report: Rehearsing the LHC accelerator systems for the Run 2 start-up with beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez

    2015-01-01

    While the commissioning of the superconducting circuits is ongoing, great care is also being taken to make sure that the other key LHC accelerator systems are qualified for beam. Since spring 2014, small-scale integration tests on the accelerator systems have been scheduled and carried out successfully to exercise them fully and thoroughly debug their multiple interfaces. The LHC Operations team leads this activity in tight collaboration with the equipment experts and the essential support of the Accelerator Controls group. The tests start once individual system qualification has been performed by the equipment owners and they are ready to be handed over to operations. These tests performed by Operations are called dry runs – dry because they are performed without beam – and they are carried out from the CERN Control Centre (CCC) using the same high-level software applications that will be used during beam operation. The dry runs are the first step towards a global integration test ...

  7. A Wideroee pre-accelerator for the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.; Alonso, J.; Behrsing, G.; Clark, D.; Grunder, H.; Olivier, M.; Spence, D.; Yourd, R.

    1976-01-01

    Plans to upgrade both the Bevatron vacuum system and the SuperHILAC ion sources and injectors have been formulated. A proposed new pre-accelerator based on an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton and a Wideroee linac is presented

  8. Radiation-hard semiconductor detectors for SuperLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzzi, Mara; Al-Ajili, A A; Alexandrov, P; Alfieri, G; Allport, Philip P; Andreazza, A; Artuso, M; Assouak, S; Avset, B S; Barabash, L; Baranova, E; Barcz, A; Basile, A; Bates, R; Belova, N; Betta, G F D; Biagi, S F; Bilei, G M; Bisello, D; Blue, A; Blumenau, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bondarenko, G B; Borchi, E; Borrello, L; Bortoletto, D; Boscardin, M; Bosisio, L; Bowcock, T J V; Brodbeck, T J; Broz, J; Brukhanov, A; Brzozowski, A; Buda, M; Buhmann, P; Buttar, C; Campabadal, F; Campbell, D; Candelori, A; Casse, G; Cavallini, A; Chilingarov, A G; Chren, D; Cindro, V; Citterio, M; Collins, P; Coluccia, R; Contarato, D; Coutinho, J; Creanza, D; Cunningham, W; Cvetkov, V; Davies, G; Dawson, I; De Palma, M; Demina, R; Dervan, P; Dierlamm, A; Dittongo, S; Dobrzanski, L; Dolezal, Z; Dolgolenko, A; Eberlein, T; Eremin, V; Fall, C; Fasolo, F; Ferbel, T; Fizzotti, F; Fleta, C; Focardi, E; Forton, E; Franchenko, S; Fretwurst, E; Gamaz, F; García-Navarro, J E; García, C; Gaubas, E; Genest, M H; Gill, K A; Giolo, K; Glaser, M; Gössling, C; Golovine, V; Gorelov, I; Goss, J; Gouldwell, A; Grégoire, G; Gregori, P; Grigoriev, E; Grigson, C; Grillo, A; Groza, A; Guskov, J; Haddad, L; Harding, R; Härkönen, J; Hauler, F; Hayama, S; Hoeferkamp, M; Honniger, F; Horazdovsky, T; Horisberger, R P; Horn, M; Houdayer, A; Hourahine, B; Hruban, A; Hughes, G; Ilyashenko, Yu S; Irmscher, K; Ivanov, A; Jarasiunas, K; Jin, T; Jones, B K; Jones, R; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kalinina, E; Kaminski, P; Karpenko, A; Karpov, A; Kazlauskiene, V; Kazukauskas, V; Khivrich, V; Khomenkov, V P; Kierstead, J A; Klaiber Lodewigs, J M; Kleverman, M; Klingenberg, R; Kodys, P; Kohout, Z; Korjenevski, S; Kowalik, A; Kozlowski, R; Kozodaev, M; Kramberger, G; Krasel, O; Kuznetsov, A; Kwan, S; Lagomarsino, S; Lari, T; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lastovetsky, V F; Latino, G; Latushkin, S T; Lazanu, I; Lazanu, S; Lebel, C; Leinonen, K; Leroy, C; Li, Z; Lindström, G; Lindström, L; Linhart, V; Litovchenko, A P; Litovchenko, P G; Litvinov, V; Lo Giudice, A; Lozano, M; Luczynski, Z; Luukka, Panja; Macchiolo, A; Mainwood, A; Makarenko, L F; Mandic, I; Manfredotti, C; Martí i García, S; Marunko, S; Mathieson, K; Melone, J; Menichelli, D; Meroni, C; Messineo, A; Miglio, S; Mikuz, M; Miyamoto, J; Moll, M; Monakhov, E; Moscatelli, F; Mozzanti, A; Murin, L; Naoumov, D; Nava, F; Nossarzhevska, E; Nummela, S; Nysten, J; Olivero, P; O'Shea, V; Palviainen, T; Paolini, C; Parkes, C; Passeri, D; Pein, U; Pellegrini, G; Perera, L; Petasecca, M; Piatkowski, B; Piemonte, C; Pignatel, G U; Pinho, N; Pintilie, I; Pintilie, L; Polivtsev, L; Polozov, P; Popa, A I; Popule, J; Pospísil, S; Pucker, G; Radicci, V; Rafí, J M; Ragusa, F; Rahman, M; Rando, R; Röder, R; Rohe, T; Ronchin, S; Rott, C; Roy, A; Roy, P; Ruzin, A; Ryazanov, A; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sakalauskas, S; Scaringella, M; Schiavulli, L; Schnetzer, S; Schumm, B; Sciortino, S; Scorzoni, A; Segneri, G; Seidel, S; Seiden, A; Sellberg, G; Sellin, P J; Sentenac, D; Sevilla, S G; Shipsey, I; Sícho, P; Sloan, T; Solar, M; Son, S; Sopko, B; Spencer, N; Stahl, J; Stavitski, I; Stolze, D; Stone, R; Storasta, J; Strokan, N; Strupinski, W; Sudzius, M; Surma, B; Suuronen, J; Suvorov, A; Svensson, B G; Tipton, P; Tomasek, M; Troncon, C; Tsvetkov, A; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Tuuva, T; Tylchin, M; Uebersee, H; Uher, J; Ullán, M; Vaitkus, J V; Vanni, P; Velthuis, J; Verbitskaya, E; Verzellesi, G; Vrba, V; Wagner, G; Wilhelm, I; Worm, S; Wright, V; Wunstorf, R; Zabierowski, P; Zaluzhny, A; Zavrtanik, M; Zen, M; Zhukov, V; Zorzi, N; de Boer, Wim

    2005-01-01

    An option of increasing the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN to 10/sup 35/ cm-/sup 2/s-/sup 1/ has been envisaged to extend the physics reach of the machine. An efficient tracking down to a few centimetres from the interaction point will be required to exploit the physics potential of the upgraded LHC. As a consequence, the semiconductor detectors close to the interaction region will receive severe doses of fast hadron irradiation and the inner tracker detectors will need to survive fast hadron fluences of up to above 10 /sup 16/ cm-/sup 2/. The CERN-RD50 project "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" has been established in 2002 to explore detector materials and technologies that will allow to operate devices up to, or beyond, this limit. The strategies followed by RD50 to enhance the radiation tolerance include the development of new or defect engineered detector materials (SiC, GaN, Czochralski and epitaxial silicon, oxygen enriched Flo...

  9. Wideroe pre-accelerator for the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.; Alonso, J.; Behrsing, G.; Clark, D.; Grunder, H.; Olivier, M.; Spence, D.; Yourd, R.

    1976-09-01

    In 1971 the Bevatron successfully accelerated low-intensity heavy ion beams up to neon to energies of 2.1 GeV/amu. More recently, beams up to argon have been accelerated using the SuperHILAC as an injector to the Bevatron--the Bevalac concept. With increasing scientific interest in high-energy high-intensity beams of heavier ions, plans to upgrade both the Bevatron vacuum system and the SuperHILAC ion sources and injectors have been formulated. A proposed new pre-accelerator based on an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton and a Wideroe linac is presented. The Wideroe linac uses the design concepts established at UNILAC, modified for frequency and energy requirements. U 7 + from the ion source is accelerated from 12 keV/amu to 113 keV/amu and stripped to a mean charge state acceptable to the first tank of the SuperHILAC. The expected intensity improvement over the present pressurized injector is a factor of 100 at the highest masses. The physical modeling of the Wideroe linac structure will be kept to a minimum. Computer models predicting the characteristics of the structure have improved to the point where the probability of satisfactory performance is high

  10. Preliminary accelerator plans for maximizing the integrated LHC luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Ruggiero, F; Ostojic, R; Scandale, Walter; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Wenninger, J

    2006-01-01

    A working group on "Proton Accelerators for the Future" (PAF) has been created in May 2005 by the CERN direction to elaborate a baseline scenario of the possible development and upgrade of the present Proton Accelerator Complex. This report is the result of the investigation conducted until the end of 2005, in close connection with the working group on "Physics Opportunities with Future Proton Accelerators" (POFPA) and is consistent with their recommendations. Focused on the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity for the LHC experiments, a scenario of evolution is proposed, subject to further refinement using the future experience of commissioning and running-in the collider and its injector complex. The actions to be taken in terms of consolidation, R & D and improvement are outlined. The benefits for other types of physics are mentioned and will be investigated in more detail in the future.

  11. LHC 2008 lectures
    The LHC: an accelerator of science

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, CERN will be switching on the greatest physics experiment ever undertaken. The Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, is a particle accelerator that will provide many answers to our questions about the Universe - What is the reason for mass? Where is the invisible matter in the Universe hiding? What is the relationship between matter and antimatter? Will we have to use a theory claiming more than four dimensions? … and what about "time" ? To understand better the raison d’être of the LHC, this gigantic, peerless scientific instrument and all the knowledge it can bring to us, members of the general public are invited to a series of lectures at the Globe of Science and Innovation. Thursday 8 May 2008 at 8.00 p.m. « Comment fonctionne l’Univers ? Ce que le LHC peut nous apprendre » Alvaro de Rujula, CERN physicist Thursday 15 May 2008 at 8.00 p.m. – « Une nouvelle vision du monde » Jean-Pierre Luminet, Director of...

  12. Longitudinal Bunch Position Control for the Super-B Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsche, Kirk; Rivetta, Claudio; Sullivam, Michael K.; SLAC; Drago, Alessandro; Frascati

    2009-01-01

    The use of normal conducting cavities and an ion-clearing gap will cause a significant RF accelerating voltage gap transient and longitudinal phase shift of the individual bunches along the bunch train in both rings of the SuperB accelerator. Small relative centroid position shifts between bunches of the colliding beams will have a large adverse impact on the luminosity due to the small β* y at the interaction point (IP). We investigate the possibility of minimizing the relative longitudinal position shift between bunches by reducing the gap transient in each ring and matching the longitudinal bunch positions of the two rings at the IP using feedback/feedforward techniques in the LLRF. The analysis is conducted assuming maximum use of the klystron power installed in the system

  13. Discovery Mondays - 'The LHC: an accelerator of science'

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Is the LHC about to turn the theories of the infinitesimally small on their heads? Whether or not this proves to be the case, physicists hope that the 27-kilometre-long accelerator due to be commissioned at the end of 2007 will shake up the Standard Model. This theory, which describes elementary particles and forces, leaves many questions unanswered. The LHC and its experiments have been designed to shed light on them. Unresolved questions include how elementary particles acquire mass and why their masses differ. The disappearance of antimatter from our Universe is another such mystery. Physicists want to know what matter was like just after the Big Bang and what the dark matter in the Universe could be: only 5% of the matter of the Universe is visible, and the effects of gravity indicate the presence of another type of matter that cannot be seen by the instruments available today. The theory of supersymmetry, which predicts that each particle has a corresponding superparticle, could go some way towards exp...

  14. Quench simulations for superconducting elements in the LHC accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, F.; Schmidt, R.

    2000-08-01

    The design of the protection system for the superconducting elements in an accelerator such as the large Hadron collider (LHC), now under construction at CERN, requires a detailed understanding of the thermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic processes during a quench. A numerical program (SPQR - simulation program for quench research) has been developed to evaluate temperature and voltage distributions during a quench as a function of space and time. The quench process is simulated by approximating the heat balance equation with the finite difference method in presence of variable cooling and powering conditions. The simulation predicts quench propagation along a superconducting cable, forced quenching with heaters, impact of eddy currents induced by a magnetic field change, and heat transfer through an insulation layer into helium, an adjacent conductor or other material. The simulation studies allowed a better understanding of experimental quench data and were used for determining the adequate dimensioning and protection of the highly stabilised superconducting cables for connecting magnets (busbars), optimising the quench heater strip layout for the main magnets, and studying quench back by induced eddy currents in the superconductor. After the introduction of the theoretical approach, some applications of the simulation model for the LHC dipole and corrector magnets are presented and the outcome of the studies is compared with experimental data.

  15. N=4 super-Yang-Mills in LHC superspace part I: classical and quantum theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicherin, Dmitry [LAPTH, Université de Savoie,CNRS, B.P. 110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Sokatchev, Emery [LAPTH, Université de Savoie,CNRS, B.P. 110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,CH -1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2017-02-10

    We present a formulation of the maximally supersymmetric N=4 gauge theory in Lorentz harmonic chiral (LHC) superspace. It is closely related to the twistor formulation of the theory but employs the simpler notion of Lorentz harmonic variables. They parametrize a two-sphere and allow us to handle efficiently infinite towers of higher-spin auxiliary fields defined on ordinary space-time. In this approach the chiral half of N=4 supersymmetry is manifest. The other half is realized non-linearly and the algebra closes on shell. We give a straightforward derivation of the Feynman rules in coordinate space. We show that the LHC formulation of the N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory is remarkably similar to the harmonic superspace formulation of the N=2 gauge and hypermultiplet matter theories. In the twin paper https://arxiv.org/abs/1601.06804 we apply the LHC formalism to the study of the non-chiral multipoint correlation functions of the N=4 stress-tensor supermultiplet.

  16. Super-Acceleration in the Flaring Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, Marco, E-mail: marco.tavani@inaf.it

    2013-10-15

    The Crab Nebula continues to surprise us. The Crab system (energized by a very powerful pulsar at the center of the Supernova Remnant SN1054) is known to be a very efficient particle “accelerator” which can reach PeV energies. Today, new surprising data concerning the gamma-ray flares produced by the Crab Nebula challenge models of particle acceleration. The total energy flux from the Crab has been considered for many decades substantially stable at X-ray and gamma-ray energies. However, this paradigm was shattered by the AGILE discovery and Fermi confirmation in September 2010 of transient gamma-ray emission from the Crab. Indeed, we can state that four major flaring gamma-ray episodes have been detected by AGILE and Fermi during the period mid-2007/2012. During these events, transient particle acceleration occurs in a regime which apparently violates the MHD conditions and synchrotron cooling constraints. This fact justifies calling “super-acceleration” the mechanism which produces the “flaring Crab phenomenon”. Radiation between 50 MeV and a few GeV is emitted with a quite hard spectrum within a short timescale (hours-days), with no obvious relation with simultaneous optical and X-ray emissions in the inner Nebula. “Super-acceleration” implies overcoming synchrotron cooling by strong (and “parallel”) electric fields most likely produced by magnetic field reconnection within the pulsar wind outflow. This acceleration appears to be very efficient and, remarkably, limited by radiation reaction. It is not clear at the moment where in the Nebula this phenomenon occurs. An intense observational program is now focused on the Crab Nebula to resolve its most challenging mystery.

  17. Super-acceleration from massless, minimally coupled phi sup 4

    CERN Document Server

    Onemli, V K

    2002-01-01

    We derive a simple form for the propagator of a massless, minimally coupled scalar in a locally de Sitter geometry of arbitrary spacetime dimension. We then employ it to compute the fully renormalized stress tensor at one- and two-loop orders for a massless, minimally coupled phi sup 4 theory which is released in Bunch-Davies vacuum at t=0 in co-moving coordinates. In this system, the uncertainty principle elevates the scalar above the minimum of its potential, resulting in a phase of super-acceleration. With the non-derivative self-interaction the scalar's breaking of de Sitter invariance becomes observable. It is also worth noting that the weak-energy condition is violated on cosmological scales. An interesting subsidiary result is that cancelling overlapping divergences in the stress tensor requires a conformal counterterm which has no effect on purely scalar diagrams.

  18. Design, fabrication and cold tests of a super ferric octupole corrector for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Tabares, L.; Calero, J.; Laurent, G.; Russenschuck, S.; Siegel, N.; Traveria, M.; Aguirre, P.; Etxeandia, J.; Garcia, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the corrections scheme of the LHC it is planed to install octupole corrector magnets in the short straight section of the lattice. Initially these correctors were distributed windings on the cold bore tube nested in the tuning quadrupoles. The latter being suppressed a new compact super ferric design was chosen for the octupole prototype, suitable for a two-in-one configuration. This prototype was designed by CERN and CEDEX/Spain, built at INDAR/Spain and tested at CEDEX. The paper reports on the design of the prototype, describes the fabrication and assembly and presents the measurement results. Special interest has been taken to design a simple and compact magnet, easy to fabricate and training free below nominal field. First results show the feasibility of the solution wich will be finally confirmed by magnetic measurement. (Author) 4 refs

  19. Development of radiation tolerant semiconductor detectors for the Super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Moll, M; Al-Ajili, A A; Alfieri, G; Allport, P P; Artuso, M; Assouak, S; Avset, B S; Barabash, L; Barcz, A; Bates, R; Biagi, S F; Bilei, G M; Bisello, D; Blue, A; Blumenau, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bondarenko, G B; Borchi, E; Borrello, L; Bortoletto, D; Boscardin, M; Bosisio, L; Bowcock, T J V; Brodbeck, T J; Broz, J; Bruzzi, M; Brzozowski, A; Buda, M; Buhmann, P; Buttar, C; Campabadal, F; Campbell, D; Candelori, A; Casse, G; Cavallini, A; Charron, S; Chilingarov, A; Chren, D; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Coluccia, R; Contarato, D; Coutinho, J; Creanza, D; Cunningham, W; Betta, G F D; Dawson, I; de Boer, Wim; De Palma, M; Demina, R; Dervan, P; Dittongo, S; Dolezal, Z; Dolgolenko, A; Eberlein, T; Eremin, V; Fall, C; Fasolo, F; Fizzotti, F; Fleta, C; Focardi, E; Forton, E; Fretwurst, E; García, C; García-Navarro, J E; Gaubas, E; Genest, M H; Gill, K A; Giolo, K; Glaser, M; Gössling, C; Golovine, V; Sevilla, S G; Gorelov, I; Goss, J; Bates, A G; Grégoire, G; Gregori, P; Grigoriev, E; Grillo, A A; Groza, A; Guskov, J; Haddad, L; Härkönen, J; Hauler, F; Hoeferkamp, M; Honniger, F; Horazdovsky, T; Horisberger, Roland Paul; Horn, M; Houdayer, A; Hourahine, B; Hughes, G; Ilyashenko, Yu S; Irmscher, K; Ivanov, A; Jarasiunas, K; Johansen, K M H; Jones, B K; Jones, R; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kalinina, E; Kaminski, P; Karpenko, A; Karpov, A; Kazlauskiene, V; Kazukauskas, V; Khivrich, V; Khomenkov, V; Kierstead, J A; Klaiber Lodewigs, J; Klingenberg, R; Kodys, P; Kohout, Z; Korjenevski, S; Koski, M; Kozlowski, R; Kozodaev, M; Kramberger, G; Krasel, O; Kuznetsov, A; Kwan, S; Lagomarsino, S; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lastovetsky, V F; Latino, G; Lazanu, S; Lazanu, I; Lebedev, A; Lebel, C; Leinonen, K; Leroy, C; Li Z; Lindström, G; Linhart, V; Litovchenko, A P; Litovchenko, P G; Lo Giudice, A; Lozano, M; Luczynski, Z; Luukka, P; Macchiolo, A; Makarenko, L F; Mandic, I; Manfredotti, C; Manna, N; Garcia, S Mi; Marunko, S; Mathieson, K; Melone, J; Menichelli, D; Messineo, A; Metcalfe, J; Miglio, S; Mikuz, M; Miyamoto, J; Monakhov, E; Moscatelli, F; Naoumov, D; Nossarzhevska, E; Nysten, J; Olivero, P; OShea, V; Palviainen, T; Paolini, C; Parkes, C; Passeri, D; Pein, U; Pellegrini, G; Perera, L; Petasecca, M; Piemonte, C; Pignatel, G U; Pinho, N; Pintilie, I; Pintilie, L; Polivtsev, L; Polozov, P; Popa, A; Popule, J; Pospísil, S; Pozza, A; Radicci, V; Rafí, J M; Rando, R; Röder, R; Rohe, T; Ronchin, S; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruzin, A; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sakalauskas, S; Scaringella, M; Schiavulli, L; Schnetzer, S; Schumm, B; Sciortino, S; Scorzoni, A; Segneri, G; Seidel, S; Seiden, A; Sellberg, G; Sellin, P J; Sentenac, D; Shipsey, I; Sícho, P; Sloan, T; Solar, M; Son, S; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Spencer, N; Stahl, J; Stolze, D; Stone, R; Storasta, J; Strokan, N; Sudzius, M; Surma, B; Suvorov, A; Svensson, B G; Tipton, P; Tomasek, M; Tsvetkov, A; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Tuuva, T; Tylchin, M; Uebersee, H; Uher, J; Ullán, M; Vaitkus, J V; Velthuis, J; Verbitskaya, E; Vrba, V; Wagner, G; Wilhelm, I; Worm, S; Wright, V; Wunstorf, R; Yiuri, Y; Zabierowski, P; Zaluzhny, A; Zavrtanik, M; Zen, M; Zhukov, V; Zorzi, N

    2005-01-01

    The envisaged upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN towards the Super-LHC (SLHC) with a 10 times increased luminosity of 10challenges for the tracking detectors of the SLHC experiments. Unprecedented high radiation levels and track densities and a reduced bunch crossing time in the order of 10ns as well as the need for cost effective detectors have called for an intensive R&D program. The CERN RD50 collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" is working on the development of semiconductor sensors matching the requirements of the SLHC. Sensors based on defect engineered silicon like Czochralski, epitaxial and oxygen enriched silicon have been developed. With 3D, Semi-3D and thin detectors new detector concepts have been evaluated and a study on the use of standard and oxygen enriched p-type silicon detectors revealed a promising approach for radiation tolerant cost effective devices. These and other most recent advancements of the RD50 ...

  20. Compact X-ray source at STF (Super Conducting Accelerator Test Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakawa, J

    2012-01-01

    KEK-STF is a super conducting linear accelerator test facility for developing accelerator technologies for the ILC (International Linear Collider). We are supported in developing advanced accelerator technologies using STF by Japanese Ministry (MEXT) for Compact high brightness X-ray source development. Since we are required to demonstrate the generation of high brightness X-ray based on inverse Compton scattering using super conducting linear accelerator and laser storage cavity technologies by October of next year (2012), the design has been fixed and the installation of accelerator components is under way. The necessary technology developments and the planned experiment are explained.

  1. Powering and Machine Protection of the Superconducting LHC Accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Zerlauth, M; Schmidt, R

    2004-01-01

    A very large number of magnets, both superconducting and conventional copper conductor magnets, are installed in the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) for the guidance of the two proton beams around the circumference. In total, the LHC counts 1614 different electrical circuits with 1712 power converters for DC powering of the superconducting and normal conducting magnets. Besides the electrical circuits connecting main magnets for bending and focusing of the two counter-rotating beams, the demandin...

  2. Flat bunch creation and acceleration: a possible path for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing the collider luminosity by replacing bunches having Gaussian line-charge distribution with flat bunches, but with same beam-beam tune shift at collision, has been studied widely in recent years. But, creation of 'stable' flat bunches (and their acceleration) using a multiple harmonic RF system has not been fully explored. Here, we review our experience with long flat bunches in the barrier RF buckets at Fermilab.We presentsome preliminary results from beam dynamics simulations and recent beam studies in the LHC injectors to create stable flat bunches using double harmonic RF systems. The results deduced from these studies will be used to model the necessary scheme for luminosity upgrade in the LHC. We have also described a viable (and economical) way for creation and acceleration of flat bunches in the LHC. The flat bunch scheme may have many advantages over the LHC baseline scenario, particularly because of the reduced momentum spread of the bunch for increased intensities.

  3. Status of superconducting magnet development (SSC, RHIC, LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanderer, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarize recent superconducting accelerator magnet construction and test activities at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSC), the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (LHC), and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven (RHIC). Future plan are also presented

  4. Status of superconducting magnet development (SSC, RHIC, LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanderer, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent superconducting accelerator magnet construction and test activities at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSC), the Large Hardon Collider at CERN (LHC), and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven (RHIC). Future plans are also presented

  5. Powering and Machine Protection of the Superconducting LHC Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zerlauth, M

    2004-01-01

    A very large number of magnets, both superconducting and conventional copper conductor magnets, are installed in the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) for the guidance of the two proton beams around the circumference. In total, the LHC counts 1614 different electrical circuits with 1712 power converters for DC powering of the superconducting and normal conducting magnets. Besides the electrical circuits connecting main magnets for bending and focusing of the two counter-rotating beams, the demanding requirements on the quality of the magnetic fields require a large number of circuits for corrector magnets distributed around the circumference. In total, more than 10000 magnets will need to be connected to the power converters via a large inventory of electrical components such as normal conducting cables and tubes, energy extraction systems, current feedthroughs and superconducting busbars. Depending on the complexity and importance of these electrical circuits and their components, various systems will interact for...

  6. The influence of polycarboxylate-type super-plasticizers on alkali-free liquid concrete accelerators performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenkang; Yin, Haibo; Wang, Shuyin; He, Zhifeng

    2017-04-01

    Through studying on the setting times, cement mortar compressive strength and cement mortar compressive strength ratio, the influence of alkali-free liquid accelerators polycarboxylate-type super-plasticizers on the performance of alkali-free liquid accelerators in cement-based material was investigated. The results showed that the compatibility of super-plasticizers and alkali-free liquid accelerators was excellent. However, the dosage of super-plasticizers had a certain impact on the performance of alkali-free liquid accelerators as follows: 1) the setting times of alkali-free liquid accelerators was in the inverse proportional relationship to the dosage of super-plasticizers; 2)the influence of super-plasticizers dosage on the cement mortar compressive strength of alkali-free liquid accelerators was related to the types of accelerators, where exist an optimum super-plasticizers dosage for cement mortar compressive strength at 28d; 3)the later cement mortar compressive strength with alkali-free liquid accelerators were decreasing with the increment of the super-plasticizers dosage. In the practical application of alkali-free liquid accelerators and super-plasticizer, the dosage of super-plasticizer must be determined by dosage optimization test results.

  7. Noise evaluation of silicon strip super-module with ABCN250 readout chips for the ATLAS detector upgrade at the High Luminosity LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todome, K., E-mail: todome@hep.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Jinnouchi, O. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Clark, A.; Barbier, G.; Cadoux, F.; Favre, Y.; Ferrere, D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Iacobucci, G.; La Marra, D.; Perrin, E.; Weber, M. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Ikegami, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Takubo, Y.; Unno, Y. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Takashima, R. [Department of Science Education, Kyoto University of Education, Kyoto 612-8522 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Tojo, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Kono, T. [Ochadai Academic Production, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1, Otsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); and others

    2016-09-21

    Toward High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the whole ATLAS inner tracker will be replaced, including the semiconductor tracker (SCT) which is the silicon micro strip detector for tracking charged particles. In development of the SCT, integration of the detector is the important issue. One of the concepts of integration is the “super-module” in which individual modules are assembled to produce the SCT ladder. A super-module prototype has been developed to demonstrate its functionality. One of the concerns in integrating the super-modules is the electrical coupling between each module, because it may increase intrinsic noise of the system. To investigate the electrical performance of the prototype, the new Data Acquisition (DAQ) system has been developed by using SEABAS. The electric performance of the super-module prototype, especially the input noise and random noise hit rate, was investigated by using SEABAS system.

  8. Magnet R and D for the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlay, S.A.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gupta, R.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Harrison, M.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lietzke, A.F.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Nobrega, F.; Novitsky, I.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmazle, J.; Stanek, R.; Turrioni, D.; Wanderer, P.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, the US DOE established the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) with the goal of developing a technology base for future upgrades of the LHC. The focus of the magnet program, which is a collaboration of three US laboratories, BNL, FNAL and LBNL, is on development of high gradient quadrupoles using Nb 3 Sn superconductor. Other program components address issues regarding magnet design, radiation-hard materials, long magnet scale-up, quench protection, fabrication techniques and conductor and cable R and D. This paper presents an overall view of the program with emphasis on the current quadrupole project and outlines the long-term goals of the program

  9. Quench simulations for superconducting elements in the LHC accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnemann, F

    2000-01-01

    The design of he protection system for he superconducting elements in an accel- erator such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC),now under construction at CERN, requires a detailed understanding of the hermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic pro- cesses during a quench.A numerical program (SPQR -Simulation Program for Quench Research)has been developed o evaluate temperature and voltage dis ri- butions during a quench as a func ion of space and ime.The quench process is simulated by approximating the heat balance equation with the finite di fference method in presence of variable cooling and powering conditions.The simulation predicts quench propagation along a superconducting cable,forced quenching with heaters,impact of eddy curren s induced by a magnetic field change,and heat trans- fer hrough an insulation layer in o helium,an adjacen conductor or other material. The simulation studies allowed a better understanding of experimental quench data and were used for determining the adequ...

  10. Super and ferric: the first HL-LHC component is ready

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Although the actual installation phase in the tunnel will only start in 2024, the first magnet – a sextupole – of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is ready and working according to specifications. This first component is also rather unique as, unlike the superconducting magnets currently used in the LHC, it relies on a “superferric” heart.   An expert in the LASA Laboratory (INFN Milan, Italy) works on assembling the first sextupole corrector of the HL-LHC. (Image: INFN Milan) Although the name might sound completely unfamiliar, superferric magnets were first proposed in the 1980s as a possible solution for high-energy colliders. However, many technical problems had to be overcome before the use of superferric magnets could become a reality. In its final configuration, the HL-LHC will have 36 superferric corrector magnets, of which 4 will be quadrupoles, 8 sextupoles and 24 higher order magnets. In superferric (or “iron-dominated”) magne...

  11. Installation of wireless LAN system into the SuperKEKB accelerator tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Masako; Satoh, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    We have installed a wireless LAN system of the accelerator control network into the accelerator tunnel for SuperKEKB, which is the upgrade plan of the KEKB B-factory project. The wireless LAN system is used for the construction and maintenance of the accelerator components. The leaky coaxial cable (LCX) antennas are installed into the arc sections of SuperKEKB tunnel, and the collinear antennas are installed into the straight sections and the injector Linac. We have selected the LCX and collinear antennas with good radiation hardness of more than 1 MGy. After the installation, we evaluated the wireless LAN system and obtained the good network speed performance in the whole tunnel area. (author)

  12. Dark Matter and Super Symmetry: Exploring and Explaining the Universe with Simulations at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsche, Oliver [Fermilab

    2016-07-10

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, is one of the largest machines on this planet. It is built to smash protons into each other at unprecedented energies to reveal the fundamental constituents of our universe. The 4 detectors at the LHC record multi-petabyte datasets every year. The scientific analysis of this data requires equally large simulation datasets of the collisions based on the theory of particle physics, the Standard Model. The goal is to verify the validity of the Standard Model or of theories that extend the Model like the concepts of Supersymmetry and an explanation of Dark Matter. I will give an overview of the nature of simulations needed to discover new particles like the Higgs boson in 2012, and review the different areas where simulations are indispensable: from the actual recording of the collisions to the extraction of scientific results to the conceptual design of improvements to the LHC and its experiments.

  13. Development of C-band Accelerating Section for SuperKEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Kamitani, T; Ikeda, M; Kakihara, K; Ohsawa, S; Oogoe, T; Sugimura, T; Takatomi, T; Yamaguchi, S; Yokoyama, K

    2004-01-01

    For the luminosity upgrade of the present KEK B-factory to SuperKEKB, the injector linac has to increase the positron acceleration energy from 3.5 to 8.0 GeV. In order to double the acceleration field gradient from 21 to 42 MV/m, design studies on C-band accelerator module has started in 2002. First prototype 1-m long accelerating section has been fabricated based upon a design which is half scale of the present S-band section. High power test of the C-band section has been performed at a test stand and later at an accelerator module in the KEKB injector linac. In a beam acceleration test, a field gradient of 41 MV/m is achieved with 43 MW RF power from a klystron. This paper report on the recent status of the high-power test and also the development of a second prototype section.

  14. Design, simulation, fabrication, and preliminary tests of 3D CMS pixel detectors for the super-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koybasi, Ozhan; /Purdue U.; Bortoletto, Daniela; /Purdue U.; Hansen, Thor-Erik; /SINTEF, Oslo; Kok, Angela; /SINTEF, Oslo; Hansen, Trond Andreas; /SINTEF, Oslo; Lietaer, Nicolas; /SINTEF, Oslo; Jensen, Geir Uri; /SINTEF, Oslo; Summanwar, Anand; /SINTEF, Oslo; Bolla, Gino; /Purdue U.; Kwan, Simon Wing Lok; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The Super-LHC upgrade puts strong demands on the radiation hardness of the innermost tracking detectors of the CMS, which cannot be fulfilled with any conventional planar detector design. The so-called 3D detector architectures, which feature columnar electrodes passing through the substrate thickness, are under investigation as a potential solution for the closest operation points to the beams, where the radiation fluence is estimated to reach 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. Two different 3D detector designs with CMS pixel readout electronics are being developed and evaluated for their advantages and drawbacks. The fabrication of full-3D active edge CMS pixel devices with p-type substrate has been successfully completed at SINTEF. In this paper, we study the expected post-irradiation behaviors of these devices with simulations and, after a brief description of their fabrication, we report the first leakage current measurement results as performed on wafer.

  15. Superconducting link bus design for the accelerator project for upgrade of LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobrega, F.; Brandt, J.; Cheban, S.; Feher, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kashikhin, V.; Peterson, T.

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Project for Upgrade of LHC (APUL) is a U.S. project participating in and contributing to CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) upgrade program. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory was developing sub-systems for the upgrade of the LHC final focus magnet systems. Part of the upgrade called for various lengths of superconducting power transmission lines known as SC Links which were up to 100 m long. The SC Link electrically connects the current leads in the Distribution Feed Boxes to the interaction region magnets. The SC Link is an extension of the magnet bus housed within a cryostat. The present concept for the bus consists of 22 power cables, 4 x 13 kA, 2 x 7 kA, 8 x 2.5 kA and 8 x 0.6 kA bundled into one bus. Different cable and strand possibilities were considered for the bus design including Rutherford cable. The Rutherford cable bus design potentially would have required splices at each sharp elbow in the SC Link. The advantage of the round bus design is that splices are only required at each end of the bus during installation at CERN. The round bus is very flexible and is suitable for pulling through the cryostat. Development of the round bus prototype and of 2 splice designs is described in this paper. Magnetic analysis and mechanical test results of the 13 kA cable and splices are presented.

  16. A silicon strip module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade in the super LHC collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S., E-mail: Sergio.Gonzalez.Sevilla@cern.ch [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Barbier, G. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Anghinolfi, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cadoux, F.; Clark, A. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Dabrowski, W.; Dwuznik, M. [AGH University of Sceince and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Ferrere, D. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Garcia, C. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); Ikegami, Y. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hara, K. [University of Tsukuba, School of Pure and Applied Sciences, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Jakobs, K. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Kaplon, J. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Koriki, T. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Lacasta, C. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); La Marra, D. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Marti i Garcia, S. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); Parzefall, U. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pohl, M. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Terada, S. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-04-21

    The ATLAS detector is a general purpose experiment designed to fully exploit the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a nominal luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. It is expected that after several years of successful data-taking, the LHC physics program will be extended by increasing the peak luminosity by one order of magnitude. For ATLAS, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of the Inner Detector (ID), since the current tracker will not provide the required performance due to cumulated radiation damage and a dramatic increase in the detector occupancy. In this paper, a proposal of a double-sided silicon micro-strip module for the short-strip region of the future ATLAS ID is presented. The expected thermal performance based upon detailed FEA simulations is discussed. First electrical results from a prototype version of the next generation readout front-end chips are also shown.

  17. Restart of the LHC. CERN and the accelerators. The world machine illustratively explained; Neustart des LHC. CERN und die Beschleuniger. Die Weltmaschine anschaulich erklaert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauschild, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The development of the European research center for particle physics CERN, the standard model of elementary-particle physics, the detection of the W and Z bosons with the SPS collider, the principles of particle accelerators, the way to the LHC. (HSI)

  18. A silicon strip module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade in the super LHC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Parzefall, U; Clark, A; Ikegami, Y; Hara, K; Garcia, C; Jakobs, K; Dwuznik, M; Terada, S; Barbier, G; Koriki, T; Lacasta, C; Unno, Y; Anghinolfi, F; Cadoux, F; Garcia, S M I; Ferrere, D; La Marra, D; Pohl, M; Dabrowski, W; Kaplon, J

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is a general purpose experiment designed to fully exploit the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a nominal luminosity of 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1). It is expected that after several years of successful data-taking, the LHC physics program will be extended by increasing the peak luminosity by one order of magnitude. For ATLAS, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of the Inner Detector (ID), since the current tracker will not provide the required performance due to cumulated radiation damage and a dramatic increase in the detector occupancy. In this paper, a proposal of a double-sided silicon micro-strip module for the short-strip region of the future ATLAS ID is presented. The expected thermal performance based upon detailed FEA simulations is discussed. First electrical results from a prototype version of the next generation readout front-end chips are also shown. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. N=4 super-Yang-Mills in LHC superspace. Part II: Non-chiral correlation functions of the stress-tensor multiplet

    CERN Document Server

    Chicherin, Dmitry

    2017-03-09

    We study the multipoint super-correlation functions of the full non-chiral stress-tensor multiplet in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory in the Born approximation. We derive effective supergraph Feynman rules for them. Surprisingly, the Feynman rules for the non-chiral correlators differ only slightly from those for the chiral correlators. We rely on the formulation of the theory in Lorentz harmonic chiral (LHC) superspace elaborated in the twin paper \\cite{PartI}. In this approach only the chiral half of the supersymmetry is manifest. The other half is realized by nonlinear and nonlocal transformations of the LHC superfields. However, at Born level only the simple linear part of the transformations is relevant. It corresponds to effectively working in the self-dual sector of the theory. Our method is also applicable to a wider class of supermultiplets like all the half-BPS operators and the Konishi multiplet.

  20. SUPER-FMIT, an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Holmes, J.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Mann, F.M.; Miles, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    The SUPER-FMIT facility is proposed as an advanced accelerator based neutron source for high flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. There, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1 ampere beam of 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high flux (> 10 14 n/cm 2 -s) testing in SUPER-FMIT would be 14 liters, about a factor of 30 larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35 MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1.0 amperes or more. Such a large increase can be accomplished by acceleration of multiple beams of molecular deuterium ions (D 2 +) to 70 MeV in a common accelerator sructure. The availability of multiple beams and large total current allows great variety in the testing that can be done. For example, fluxes greater than 10 16 n/cm 2 -s, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring of spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved

  1. R&D Studies of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Readout Electronics for super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, H

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters are high precision, high sensitivity and high granularity detectors designed to provide precision measurements of electrons, photons, jets and missing transverse energy. 180,000 signals are digitized and processed real-time on detector, to provide energy and time deposited in each detector element at every occurrence of the L1-trigger. A luminosity upgrade (x10) of the LHC will occur around 2016. The current readout electronics will have to be upgraded to sustain the higher radiation levels. A completely innovative readout scheme is being developed. The frontend readout will send out data continuously at each bunch crossing through highspeed radiation resistant optical links. The data (100Gbps each board) will be processed real-time with the possibility of implementing trigger algorithms for clusters and electron/photon identification at a much higher granularity than what currently implemented. We present here an overview of the R&D activities and architectural s...

  2. Super-ASSET: A technique for measuring and correcting accelerator structure misalignments at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, F.J.; Assmann, R.; Minty, M.G.; Raimondi, P.; Stupakov, G.

    1998-07-01

    Transverse wakefield kicks from misaligned accelerating structures in the SLC linac contribute significantly to emittance growth. If these kicks could be measured directly, it would be possible to align and/or steer the beam to a kick-free trajectory. In the Accelerator Structure Test Facility at SLAC, ASSET, the kicks due to a drive bunch are measured with a witness bunch at varying bunch separations. In ASSET, the first bunch is discarded and only the second bunch is measured. Super-ASSET is an extension of this technique where both bunches are accelerated down the entire linac together and a sum trajectory of both bunches is measured with beam position monitors (BPMs). The trajectory of the second, kicked bunch can be calculated by subtracting the orbit of the first bunch, measured alone, from the sum trajectory. This paper discusses BPM response issues and the expected resolution of this technique together with alignment and steering strategies

  3. First Assessment of Reliability Data for the LHC Accelerator and Detector Cryogenic System Components

    CERN Document Server

    Perinic, G; Alonso-Canella, I; Balle, C; Barth, K; Bel, J F; Benda, V; Bremer, J; Brodzinski, K; Casas-Cubillos, J; Cuccuru, G; Cugnet, M; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Dufay-Chanat, L; Fabre, C; Ferlin, G; Fluder, C; Gavard, E; Girardot, R; Haug, F; Herblin, L; Junker, S; Klabi , T; Knoops, S; Lamboy, J P; Legrand, D; Metselaar, J; Park, A; Perin, A; Pezzetti, M; Penacoba-Fernandez, G; Pirotte, O; Rogez, E; Suraci, A; Stewart, L; Tavian, L J; Tovar-Gonzalez, A; Van Weelderen, R; Vauthier, N; Vullierme, B; Wagner, U

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryogenic system comprises eight independent refrigeration and distribution systems that supply the eight 3.3 km long accelerator sectors with cryogenic refrigeration power as well as four refrigeration systems for the needs of the detectors ATLAS and CMS. In order to ensure the highest possible reliability of the installations, it is important to apply a reliability centred approach for the maintenance. Even though large scale cryogenic refrigeration exists since the mid 20th century, very little third party reliability data is available today. CERN has started to collect data with its computer aided maintenance management system (CAMMS) in 2009, when the accelerator has gone into normal operation. This paper presents the reliability observations from the operation and the maintenance side, as well as statistical data collected by the means of the CAMMS system.

  4. Leak-tightness assessment of demountable joints for the super fluid helium system of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, J.C.; Poncet, A.; Trilhe, P.

    1994-01-01

    The future high energy accelerator LHC presently considered at CERN, will make heavy use of demountable cryogenic joints operating at superfluid helium temperatures (1.8 K). These joints will be required for connecting the cryomagnets to their feeding lines, helium safety valves to cold masses, both on their measuring benches and eventually in their final installation set-up. The very large size of the future machine and, consequently, the large number of cryogenic joints imply that their reliability in leak tightness be very high, in particular after extreme loading conditions such as the high helium pressures resulting from superconducting magnet quenches. For these reasons, a test set-up has been especially built at CERN to reproduce these conditions, and to assess the leak tightness reliability of commercially available joints. A description of the facility is presented, together with the first test results

  5. Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The talk summarizes the principles of particle acceleration and addresses problems related to storage rings like LEP and LHC. Special emphasis will be given to orbit stability, long term stability of the particle motion, collective effects and synchrotron radiation.

  6. R&D Studies of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Readout Electronics for super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, H

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters are high precision, high sensitivity and high granularity detectors, total about 180,000 signals are digitized and processed real-time on detector, to provide energy and time deposited in each detector element at every occurrence of the L1-trigger. A luminosity upgrade (x10) of the LHC will occur ~2017, the current readout electronics will have to be upgraded to sustain the higher radiation levels. A completely innovative readout scheme is being developed. The front-end readout will send out data continuously at each bunch crossing through high speed radiation resistant optical links, the data will be processed real-time with the possibility of implementing trigger algorithms. This article is an overview of the R&D activities and architectural studies the ATLAS LAr collaboration is developing: front-end analog and mixed-signal ASIC design, radiation resistance optical-links in SOS, high-speed back-end processing units based on FPGA architectures and power supply d...

  7. Development of a new Silicon Tracker at CMS for Super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pesaresi, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Tracking is an essential requirement for any high energy particle physics experiment. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) employs an all silicon tracker, the largest of its kind, for the precise measurement of track momentum and vertex position. With approximately 10 million detector channels in the strip tracker alone, the analogue non-sparsified readout system has been designed to handle the large data volumes generated at the 100 kHz Level 1 (L1) trigger rate. Fluctuations in the event rate are controlled using buffers whose occupancies are constantly monitored to prevent overflows, otherwise causing loss of synchronisation and data. The status of the tracker is reported by the APV emulator (APVe), which has now been successfully commissioned within the silicon strip tracker readout system. The APVe plays a crucial role in the synchronisation of the tracker by deterministic calculation of the front end buffer occupancy and by monitoring the status of the Front End Dr...

  8. Data acquisition, storage and control architecture for the SuperNova Acceleration Probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosser, Alan; Fermilab; Cardoso, Guilherme; Chramowicz, John; Marriner, John; Rivera, Ryan; Turqueti, Marcos; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The SuperNova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) instrument is being designed to collect image and spectroscopic data for the study of dark energy in the universe. In this paper, we describe a distributed architecture for the data acquisition system which interfaces to visible light and infrared imaging detectors. The architecture includes the use of NAND flash memory for the storage of exposures in a file system. Also described is an FPGA-based lossless data compression algorithm with a configurable pre-scaler based on a novel square root data compression method to improve compression performance. The required interactions of the distributed elements with an instrument control unit will be described as well

  9. Wall-Current-Monitor based Ghost and Satellite Bunch Detection in the CERN PS and the LHC Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhagen, R J; Belleman, J; Bohl, T; Damerau, H

    2012-01-01

    While most LHC detectors and instrumentation systems are optimised for a nominal bunch spacing of 25 ns, the LHC RF cavities themselves operate at the 10th harmonic of the maximum bunch frequency. Due to the beam production scheme and transfers in the injector chain, part of the nominally ‘empty’ RF buckets may contain particles, referred to as ghost or satellite bunches. These populations must be accurately quantified for high-precision experiments, luminosity calibration and control of parasitic particle encounters at the four LHC interaction points. This contribution summarises the wall-current-monitor based ghost and satellite bunch measurements in CERN’s PS and LHC accelerators. Instrumentation set-up, post-processing and achieved performance are discussed.

  10. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and installation of pipelines for the LHC accelerator tunnel

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply and installation of pipelines for the LHC accelerator tunnel. Following a market survey carried out among 92 firms in fifteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2682/ST/LHC) was sent on 7 September 2001 to seven firms, seven consortia consisting of two firms and three consortia consisting of four firms, in twelve Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received 11 tenders from five firms and six consortia in ten Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with RENCO (IT), the lowest compliant bidder, for the supply and installation of pipelines for the LHC accelerator tunnel for a total amount of 21 995 304 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: IT - 100%.

  11. A large scale flexible real-time communications topology for the LHC accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Lauckner, R J; Ribeiro, P; Wijnands, Thijs

    1999-01-01

    The LHC design parameters impose very stringent beam control requirements in order to reach the nominal performance. Prompted by the lack of accurate models to predict field behaviour in superconducting magnet systems the control system of the accelerator will provide flexible feedback channels between monitors and magnets around the 27 Km circumference machine. The implementation of feedback systems composed of a large number of sparsely located elements presents some interesting challenges. Our goal was to find a topology where the control loop requirements: number and distribution of nodes, latency and throughput could be guaranteed without compromising the flexibility. Our proposal is to federate a number of well known technologies and concepts, namely ATM, WorldFIP and RTOS, into a general framework. (6 refs).

  12. Accelerator physics studies on the effects from an asynchronous beam dump onto the LHC experimental region collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Boccone, V; Bruce, R; Cerutti, F; Rossi, A; Vlachoudis, V; Mereghetti, A; Faus-Golfe, A

    2012-01-01

    Asynchronous beam aborts at the LHC are estimated to occur on average once per year. Accelerator physics studies of asynchronous dumps have been performed at different beam energies and beta-stars. The loss patterns are analyzed in order to identify the losses in particular on the Phase 1 Tertiary Collimators (TCT), since their tungsten-based active jaw insert has a lower damage threshold than the carbon-based other LHC collimators. Settings of the tilt angle of the TCTs are discussed with the aim of reducing the thermal loads on the TCT themselves.

  13. Mechanical studies towards a silicon micro-strip super module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade at the high luminosity LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, G; Cadoux, F; Clark, A; Favre, Y; Ferrere, D; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Iacobucci, G; Marra, D La; Perrin, E; Seez, W; Endo, M; Hanagaki, K; Hara, K; Ikegami, Y; Nakamura, K; Takubo, Y; Terada, S; Jinnouchi, O; Nishimura, R; Takashima, R

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that after several years of data-taking, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics programme will be extended to the so-called High-Luminosity LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will be increased up to 5 × 10 34  cm −2  s −1 . For the general-purpose ATLAS experiment at the LHC, a complete replacement of its internal tracking detector will be necessary, as the existing detector will not provide the required performance due to the cumulated radiation damage and the increase in the detector occupancy. The baseline layout for the new ATLAS tracker is an all-silicon-based detector, with pixel sensors in the inner layers and silicon micro-strip detectors at intermediate and outer radii. The super-module (SM) is an integration concept proposed for the barrel strip region of the future ATLAS tracker, where double-sided stereo silicon micro-strip modules (DSM) are assembled into a low-mass local support (LS) structure. Mechanical aspects of the proposed LS structure are described

  14. The LHC demystified or how to dispel misconceptions about the accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    As the start-up of the LHC approaches, some people are worried about the possible dangers posed by such a powerful machine. Here are a few key points to reassure them... Drawing done by Rafel Carreras published in his book «  quand l’énergie devient matière... » This book explains particle physics and the notions of scale and energy in a simple and entertaining way. It is available in French at the CERN reception (only 5 CHF).Does your neighbour think that the LHC’s collisions will transform the pays de Gex into a huge Emmental cheese? Do you get strange e-mails warning you that you’re going to be sucked into black holes in the accelerator? Of course you know that it’s all just pure fantasy, but do you know how to reply? You can start by reading the following explanations: You are not going to be destroyed by a Big Bang... The LHC’s beams do indeed contain a lot of energy, equivalent to a TGV travelling at 150 km per ho...

  15. Displacement measurements in the cryogenically cooled dipoles of the new CERN-LHC particle accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Inaudi, D; Scandale, Walter; Pérez, J G; Billan, J; Redaelli, S

    2001-01-01

    The LHC will use the most advanced superconducting magnet and accelerator technologies ever employed. One of the main challenges in this new machine resides in the design and production of the superconducting dipoles used to steer the particles around the 27 km underground tunnel. These so-called cryodipoles are composed of an external vacuum tube and an insert, appropriately named the cold mass, that contains the particle tubes, the superconducting coil and will be cooled using superfluid helium to 1.9 K. The particle beam must be placed inside the magnetic field with a submillimeter accuracy; this requires in turn that the relative displacements between the vacuum tube and the cold-mass must be monitored with accuracy. Due to the extreme condition environmental conditions (the displacement measurement must be made in vacuum and between two points with a temperature difference of more than 200 degrees C) no adequate existing monitoring system was found for this application. It was therefore decided to develo...

  16. The Real-Time Data Analysis and Decision System for Particle Flux Detection in the LHC Accelerator at CERN.

    CERN Document Server

    Zamantzas, C; Dehning, B

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is an accelerator unprecedented in terms of beam energy, particle production rate and also in the potential of self-destruction. Its operation requires a large variety of instrumentation, not only for the control of the beams, but also for the protection of the complex hardware systems. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has to prevent the superconducting magnets from becoming normal conducting and protect the machine components against damages making it one of the most critical elements for the protection of the LHC. For its operation, the system requires 3600 detectors to be placed at various locations around the 27 km ring. The measurement system is sub-divided to the tunnel electronics, which are responsible for acquiring, digitising and transmitting the data, and the surface electronics, which receive the data via 2 km optical data links, process, analyze, store and issue warning...

  17. Chamonix 2016: setting the future course for the LHC and the accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Performance Workshop took place in Chamonix between Tuesday, 25 and Thursday, 28 January. The programme included a review of the machine’s performance in 2015, a forward look at Run 2, and discussion of the status of the LHC injectors upgrade (LIU) and HL-LHC projects. The final session was dedicated to the 2019-2020 long shutdown (LS2).   The 2016 LHC Performance Workshop participants. Last year was the first year of operations following the major maintenance work of the 2013 – 2014 long shutdown (LS1). It was a tough but ultimately successful year. An analysis of operations and efficiency was performed with the aim of identifying possible improvements for 2016. The performance of key systems – e.g. machine protection, collimation, RF, transverse damper, magnetic circuits and beam diagnostics – has been good but nonetheless efforts are still being made to provide, for example, better reliability, improved functionality and monitoring. A number of c...

  18. Milky Way's super-efficient particle accelerators caught in the act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Thanks to a unique "ballistic study" that combines data from ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have now solved a long-standing mystery of the Milky Way's particle accelerators. They show in a paper published today on Science Express that cosmic rays from our galaxy are very efficiently accelerated in the remnants of exploded stars. ESO PR Photo 23a/09 The rim of RCW 86 ESO PR Photo 23b/09 DSS + insert, annotated ESO PR Photo 23c/09 DSS image ESO PR Video 23a/09 Zoom-in RCW 86 During the Apollo flights astronauts reported seeing odd flashes of light, visible even with their eyes closed. We have since learnt that the cause was cosmic rays -- extremely energetic particles from outside the Solar System arriving at the Earth, and constantly bombarding its atmosphere. Once they reach Earth, they still have sufficient energy to cause glitches in electronic components. Galactic cosmic rays come from sources inside our home galaxy, the Milky Way, and consist mostly of protons moving at close to the speed of light, the "ultimate speed limit" in the Universe. These protons have been accelerated to energies exceeding by far the energies that even CERN's Large Hadron Collider will be able to achieve. "It has long been thought that the super-accelerators that produce these cosmic rays in the Milky Way are the expanding envelopes created by exploded stars, but our observations reveal the smoking gun that proves it", says Eveline Helder from the Astronomical Institute Utrecht of Utrecht University in the Netherlands, the first author of the new study. "You could even say that we have now confirmed the calibre of the gun used to accelerate cosmic rays to their tremendous energies", adds collaborator Jacco Vink, also from the Astronomical Institute Utrecht. For the first time Helder, Vink and colleagues have come up with a measurement that solves the long-standing astronomical quandary of whether or not stellar explosions produce enough

  19. Super-Resolution of Plant Disease Images for the Acceleration of Image-based Phenotyping and Vigor Diagnosis in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Togami, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Norio

    2017-11-06

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones) are a very promising branch of technology, and they have been utilized in agriculture-in cooperation with image processing technologies-for phenotyping and vigor diagnosis. One of the problems in the utilization of UAVs for agricultural purposes is the limitation in flight time. It is necessary to fly at a high altitude to capture the maximum number of plants in the limited time available, but this reduces the spatial resolution of the captured images. In this study, we applied a super-resolution method to the low-resolution images of tomato diseases to recover detailed appearances, such as lesions on plant organs. We also conducted disease classification using high-resolution, low-resolution, and super-resolution images to evaluate the effectiveness of super-resolution methods in disease classification. Our results indicated that the super-resolution method outperformed conventional image scaling methods in spatial resolution enhancement of tomato disease images. The results of disease classification showed that the accuracy attained was also better by a large margin with super-resolution images than with low-resolution images. These results indicated that our approach not only recovered the information lost in low-resolution images, but also exerted a beneficial influence on further image analysis. The proposed approach will accelerate image-based phenotyping and vigor diagnosis in the field, because it not only saves time to capture images of a crop in a cultivation field but also secures the accuracy of these images for further analysis.

  20. Super-Resolution of Plant Disease Images for the Acceleration of Image-based Phenotyping and Vigor Diagnosis in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Yamamoto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones are a very promising branch of technology, and they have been utilized in agriculture—in cooperation with image processing technologies—for phenotyping and vigor diagnosis. One of the problems in the utilization of UAVs for agricultural purposes is the limitation in flight time. It is necessary to fly at a high altitude to capture the maximum number of plants in the limited time available, but this reduces the spatial resolution of the captured images. In this study, we applied a super-resolution method to the low-resolution images of tomato diseases to recover detailed appearances, such as lesions on plant organs. We also conducted disease classification using high-resolution, low-resolution, and super-resolution images to evaluate the effectiveness of super-resolution methods in disease classification. Our results indicated that the super-resolution method outperformed conventional image scaling methods in spatial resolution enhancement of tomato disease images. The results of disease classification showed that the accuracy attained was also better by a large margin with super-resolution images than with low-resolution images. These results indicated that our approach not only recovered the information lost in low-resolution images, but also exerted a beneficial influence on further image analysis. The proposed approach will accelerate image-based phenotyping and vigor diagnosis in the field, because it not only saves time to capture images of a crop in a cultivation field but also secures the accuracy of these images for further analysis.

  1. The High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC: Physics and Technology Challenges for the Accelerator and the Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Burkhard

    2016-04-01

    In the second phase of the LHC physics program, the accelerator will provide an additional integrated luminosity of about 2500/fb over 10 years of operation to the general purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS. This will substantially enlarge the mass reach in the search for new particles and will also greatly extend the potential to study the properties of the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC in 2012. In order to meet the experimental challenges of unprecedented pp luminosity, the experiments will need to address the aging of the present detectors and to improve the ability to isolate and precisely measure the products of the most interesting collisions. The lectures gave an overview of the physics motivation and described the conceptual designs and the expected performance of the upgrades of the four major experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, along with the plans to develop the appropriate experimental techniques and a brief overview of the accelerator upgrade. Only some key points of the upgrade program of the four major experiments are discussed in this report; more information can be found in the references given at the end.

  2. Charged vector particle tunneling from a pair of accelerating and rotating and 5D gauged super-gravity black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javed, Wajiha; Ali, Riasat [University of Education, Division of Science and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Abbas, G. [The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Department of Mathematics, Bahawalpur (Pakistan)

    2017-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the quantum tunneling process for charged vector particles through the horizons of more generalized black holes by using the Proca equation. For this purpose, we consider a pair of charged accelerating and rotating black holes with Newman-Unti-Tamburino parameter and a black hole in 5D gauged super-gravity theory, respectively. Further, we study the tunneling probability and corresponding Hawking temperature for both black holes by using the WKB approximation. We find that our analysis is independent of the particles species whether or not the background black hole geometries are more generalized. (orig.)

  3. Latin American collaboration to the CERN-LHC accelerator assembly and its projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Summary of Latin American (LA) scientists main contributions to the construction of a heavy ion detector assembly currently operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva,Switzerland is given with description of the provided support for posterior data analysis. This joint effort highlights the much needed recognition of LA as a technologically emerging region. It has also shown a net benefit in development of science for our region. Details are given on the LHC-Alice experiment where several LA countries have contributed with innovative technological solutions. These include the ability to build part of the numerous detectors, including the central barrel as well as acquired knowledge on aspects concerning high energy dosimetry and radiation damage. (Author)

  4. Accelerator Magnet Quench Heater Technology and Quality Control Tests for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2132435; Seifert, Thomas

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) foresees the installation of new superconducting Nb$_{3}$Sn magnets. For the protection of these magnets, quench heaters are placed on the magnet coils. The quench heater circuits are chemically etched from a stainless steel foil that is glued onto a flexible Polyimide film, using flexible printed circuit production technology. Approximately 500 quench heaters with a total length of about 3000 m are needed for the HL-LHC magnets. In order to keep the heater circuit electrical resistance in acceptable limits, an approximately 10 µm-thick Cu coating is applied onto the steel foil. The quality of this Cu coating has been found critical in the quench heater production. The work described in this thesis focuses on the characterisation of Cu coatings produced by electrolytic deposition, sputtering and electron beam evaporation. The quality of the Cu coatings from different manufacturers has been assessed for instance by ambient temperature electrica...

  5. Latin American collaboration to the CERN-LHC accelerator assembly and its projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.

    2016-10-01

    Summary of Latin American (LA) scientists main contributions to the construction of a heavy ion detector assembly currently operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva,Switzerland is given with description of the provided support for posterior data analysis. This joint effort highlights the much needed recognition of LA as a technologically emerging region. It has also shown a net benefit in development of science for our region. Details are given on the LHC-Alice experiment where several LA countries have contributed with innovative technological solutions. These include the ability to build part of the numerous detectors, including the central barrel as well as acquired knowledge on aspects concerning high energy dosimetry and radiation damage. (Author)

  6. Cryogenic systems for the HEB accelerator of the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramovich, S.; Yuecel, A.

    1994-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics related to the Superconducting Super Collider: Cryogenic system -- general requirements; cryogenic system components; heat load budgets and refrigeration plant capacities; flow and thermal characteristics; process descriptions; cryogenic control instrumentation and value engineering trade-offs

  7. Assembly and Test of SQ01b, a Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet for the LHC Accelerator Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferracin, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bartlett, S. E.; Bordini, B.; Carcagno, R.H.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Feher, S.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Lamm, M.J.; Lietzke, A.F.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Sylvester, C.D.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Velev, G.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kashikhin, V.V.

    2006-06-01

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) consists of four US laboratories (BNL, FNAL, LBNL, and SLAC) collaborating with CERN to achieve a successful commissioning of the LHC and to develop the next generation of Interaction Region magnets. In 2004, a large aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn racetrack quadrupole magnet (SQ01) has been fabricated and tested at LBNL. The magnet utilized four subscale racetrack coils and was instrumented with strain gauges on the support structure and directly over the coil's turns. SQ01 exhibited training quenches in two of the four coils and reached a peak field in the conductor of 10.4 T at a current of 10.6 kA. After the test, the magnet was disassembled, inspected with pressure indicating films, and reassembled with minor modifications. A second test (SQ01b) was performed at FNAL and included training studies, strain gauge measurements and magnetic measurements. Magnet inspection, test results, and magnetic measurements are reported and discussed, and a comparison between strain gauge measurements and 3D finite element computations is presented

  8. Assembly and Test of SQ01b, a Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet for the LHC Accelerator Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferracin, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bartlett, S. E.; Bordini, B.; Carcagno, R.H.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Feher, S.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Lamm, M.J.; Lietzke, A.F.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Sylvester, C.D.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Velev, G.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kashikhin, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) consists of four US laboratories (BNL, FNAL, LBNL, and SLAC) collaborating with CERN to achieve a successful commissioning of the LHC and to develop the next generation of Interaction Region magnets. In 2004, a large aperture Nb 3 Sn racetrack quadrupole magnet (SQ01) has been fabricated and tested at LBNL. The magnet utilized four subscale racetrack coils and was instrumented with strain gauges on the support structure and directly over the coil's turns. SQ01 exhibited training quenches in two of the four coils and reached a peak field in the conductor of 10.4 T at a current of 10.6 kA. After the test, the magnet was disassembled, inspected with pressure indicating films, and reassembled with minor modifications. A second test (SQ01b) was performed at FNAL and included training studies, strain gauge measurements and magnetic measurements. Magnet inspection, test results, and magnetic measurements are reported and discussed, and a comparison between strain gauge measurements and 3D finite element computations is presented

  9. Expected damage to accelerator equipment due to the impact of the full LHC beam: beam instrumentation, experiments and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, Florian

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the biggest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world, designed to collide two proton beams with particle momentum of 7 TeV/c each. The stored energy of 362MJ in each beam is sufficient to melt 500 kg of copper or to evaporate about 300 liter of water. An accidental release of even a small fraction of the beam energy can cause severe damage to accelerator equipment. Reliable machine protection systems are necessary to safely operate the accelerator complex. To design a machine protection system, it is essential to know the damage potential of the stored beam and the consequences in case of a failure. One (catastrophic) failure would be, if the entire beam is lost in the aperture due to a problem with the beam dumping system. This thesis presents the simulation studies, results of a benchmarking experiment, and detailed target investigation, for this failure case. In the experiment, solid copper cylinders were irradiated with the 440GeV proton beam delivered by the ...

  10. 4-13 kA DC current transducers enabling accurate in-situ calibration for a new particle accelerator project, LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, G

    2005-01-01

    CERN's next generation particle accelerator, the large hadron collider (LHC) requires accurate current measurement up to 13 kA to enable current tracking between individual power converters. DC current transducers (DCCTs) have been developed to allow in-situ calibrations to 10/sup -6/ uncertainty. This paper describes the principle, design and initial evaluations.

  11. LHC Report: Back in operation

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With the machine back in their hands since Friday, 4 March, the LHC operators are now performing the powering tests on the magnets. This is a crucial step before receiving the first beams and restarting Run 2 for physics.   A Distribution Feed-Box (DFB) brings power to the LHC magnets and maintains the stability of the current in the superconducting circuits. The LHC was the last machine to be handed back to operators after the completion of maintenance work carried out during the Year-End Technical Stop (YETS) that had started on 14 December 2015. During the eleven weeks of scheduled maintenance activities, several operations took place in all the accelerators and beam lines. They included the maintenance in several points of the cryogenic system, the replacement of 18 magnets in the Super Proton Synchrotron; an extensive campaign to identify and remove thousands of obsolete cables; the replacement of the LHC beam absorbers for injection (TDIs) that are used to absorb the SPS b...

  12. Little band at big accelerators: Heavy ion physics from AGS to LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukraft, J.

    2001-01-01

    The field of ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics, which started some 10 years ago at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS with fixed target experiments, has entering today a new era with the recent (July 2000) start-up of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC and preparations well under way for a new large heavy ion experiment at the Large Hadron Collider LHC. This overview, which is the combined write-up of talks given at this conference [1] and in [2], will sketch a rough picture of the heavy ion program at current and future machines and concentrate on a few important topics, in particular the question if current results show any of the signs predicted for the phase transition between normal hadronic matter and the Quark-Gluon Plasma

  13. Some LHC milestones...

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    October 1995 The LHC technical design report is published. This document details the operation and the architecture of the future accelerator. November 2000 The first of the 1232 main dipole magnets for the LHC are delivered. May 2005 The first interconnection between two magnets of the accelerator is made. To carry out the 1700 interconnections of the LHC, 123 000 operations are necessary. February 2006 The new CERN Control Centre, which combines all the control rooms for the accelerators, the cryogenics and the technical infrastructure, starts operation. The LHC will be controlled from here. October 2006 Construction of the largest refrigerator in the world is complete. The 27 km cryogenic distribution line inside the LHC tunnel will circulate helium in liquid and gas phases to provide cryogenic conditions for the superconducting magnets of the accelerator. November 2006 Magnet production for the LHC is complete. The last of t...

  14. Design, construction and start up by Air Liquide of two 18 kW at 45 K helium refrigerators for the new CERN accelerator (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Dauguet, P; Delcayre, F; Ghisolfi, A; Gistau-Baguer, Guy M; Guerin, C A; Hilbert, B; Marot, G; Monneret, E

    2004-01-01

    CERN in Switzerland is presently building a new particle accelerator labeled as the LHC. This 27 km accelerator will, for the first time at such a large scale, operate at cryogenic temperatures with superconducting magnets and radio-frequency cavities. For that purpose, Air Liquide has designed, constructed and started up two custom designed refrigerators. The cryogenic power of each of these refrigerators is equivalent to 18 kW at 4.5 K. In order to produce the cryogenic power requested by the LHC accelerator at the different temperature levels with a very high efficiency, a custom design thermodynamic cycle has been chosen. This cycle, the major components of the refrigerators and the results obtained during the reception tests of the refrigerators are presented in this paper.

  15. Accelerating cross-validation with total variation and its application to super-resolution imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Obuchi

    Full Text Available We develop an approximation formula for the cross-validation error (CVE of a sparse linear regression penalized by ℓ1-norm and total variation terms, which is based on a perturbative expansion utilizing the largeness of both the data dimensionality and the model. The developed formula allows us to reduce the necessary computational cost of the CVE evaluation significantly. The practicality of the formula is tested through application to simulated black-hole image reconstruction on the event-horizon scale with super resolution. The results demonstrate that our approximation reproduces the CVE values obtained via literally conducted cross-validation with reasonably good precision.

  16. CERN Technical training 2008 - Learning for the LHC: Special Workshop demonstrating reliability with accelerated testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Larry Edson’s workshop will show examples of quantitative reliability predictions based upon accelerated testing and demonstrates that reliability testing during the prototyping phase will help ascertain product shortcomings. When these weak points are addressed and the redesigned product is re-tested, the reliability of that product will become much higher. These methodologies successfully used in industry might be exceedingly useful also for component development in particle physics where reliability is of utmost importance. This training will provide participants with the skills necessary to demonstrate reliability requirements using accelerated testing methods. The workshop will focus on accelerated test design that employs increased stress levels. This approach has the advantage of reducing test time, sample size and test facility resources. The methodologies taught are applicable to all types of stresses, spanning the electro...

  17. CERN Technical training 2008 - Learning for the LHC: Special Workshop demonstrating reliability with accelerated testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Larry Edson’s workshop will show examples of quantitative reliability predictions based upon accelerated testing and demonstrate that reliability testing during the prototyping phase will help ascertain product shortcomings. When these weak points are addressed and the redesigned product is re-tested, the reliability of that product will become much higher. These methodologies successfully used in industry might be exceedingly useful also for component development in particle physics where reliability is of the utmost importance. This training will provide participants with the skills necessary to demonstrate reliability requirements using accelerated testing methods. The workshop will focus on accelerated test design that employs increased stress levels. This approach has the advantage of reducing test time, sample size and test facility resources. The methodologies taught are applicable to all types of stresses, spanning the elec...

  18. CERN Technical training 2008 - Learning for the LHC: Special workshop demonstrating reliability with accelerated testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Larry Edson’s workshop will show examples of quantitative reliability predictions based upon accelerated testing and demonstrate that reliability testing during the prototyping phase will help ascertain product shortcomings. When these weak points are addressed and the redesigned product is re-tested, the reliability of that product will become much higher. These methodologies successfully used in industry might be exceedingly useful also for component development in particle physics where reliability is of the utmost importance. This training will provide participants with the skills necessary to demonstrate reliability requirements using accelerated testing methods. The workshop will focus on accelerated test design that employs increased stress levels. This approach has the advantage of reducing test time, sample size and test facility resources. The methodologies taught are applicable to all types of stresses, spanning the elec...

  19. SuperB Progress Report for Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, B.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Pous, E.; /Barcelona U.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; /Bergen U.; Asgeirsson, D.; /British Columbia U.; Cheng, C.H.; Chivukula, A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.G.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; /Caltech; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; McElrath, B.; /CERN; Andreassen, R.; Meadows, B.; Sokoloff, M.; /Cincinnati U.; Blanke, M.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Lesiak, T.; /Cracow, INP /DESY /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Glasgow U. /Indiana U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol. /KEK, Tsukuba /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Lisbon, IST /Ljubljana U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Maryland U. /MIT /INFN, Milan /McGill U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Notre Dame U. /PNL, Richland /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Orsay, LAL /Orsay, LPT /INFN, Pavia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Queen Mary, U. of London /Regensburg U. /Republica U., Montevideo /Frascati /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rutherford /Sassari U. /Siegen U. /SLAC /Southern Methodist U. /Tel Aviv U. /Tohoku U. /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Uppsala U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Wayne State U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-14

    SuperB is a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measurements that can be made at SuperB play a pivotal role in understanding the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples for using the interplay between measurements to discriminate New Physics models are discussed in this document. SuperB is a Super Flavour Factory, in addition to studying large samples of B{sub u,d,s}, D and {tau} decays, SuperB has a broad physics programme that includes spectroscopy both in terms of the Standard Model and exotica, and precision measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. In addition to performing CP violation measurements at the {Upsilon}(4S) and {phi}(3770), SuperB will test CPT in these systems, and lepton universality in a number of different processes. The multitude of rare decay measurements possible at SuperB can be used to constrain scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model. In terms of other precision tests of the Standard Model, this experiment will be able to perform precision over

  20. SuperB Progress Report for Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, B.; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.

    2012-01-01

    SuperB is a high luminosity e + e - collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measurements that can be made at SuperB play a pivotal role in understanding the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples for using the interplay between measurements to discriminate New Physics models are discussed in this document. SuperB is a Super Flavour Factory, in addition to studying large samples of B u,d,s , D and τ decays, SuperB has a broad physics programme that includes spectroscopy both in terms of the Standard Model and exotica, and precision measurements of sin 2 θ W . In addition to performing CP violation measurements at the Υ(4S) and φ(3770), SuperB will test CPT in these systems, and lepton universality in a number of different processes. The multitude of rare decay measurements possible at SuperB can be used to constrain scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model. In terms of other precision tests of the Standard Model, this experiment will be able to perform precision over-constraints of the unitarity triangle through

  1. Development and applications of super high energy collider accelerators. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelaziz, E M [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evaluation of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab, and the large harden collider (LHD) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 Kilometer tunnel of the large electron positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 Kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachile in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particles. 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Development and applications of super high energy collider accelerators. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evaluation of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab, and the large harden collider (LHD) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 Kilometer tunnel of the large electron positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 Kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachile in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particles. 12 figs., 1 tab

  3. CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC! : AXEL-2003  -  Introduction to Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    AXEL-2003 is a course given at CERN within the framework of the Technical Training Programme. The course will present an introduction to particle accelerators. Known in the past as the PS Complex Operation Course (or the "PS Shutdown Course"), and organised by the ex-PS division until last year, it is now organised as a joint venture between the AB division and Technical Training, and open to a wider CERN community. The AXEL-2003 course series is designed for technicians who are operating an accelerator, or whose work is closely linked to accelerators, but it is open to all people (technicians, engineers, physicists) interested in this field. The course does not require any prior knowledge on accelerators. However, some basic knowledge on trigonometry, matrices and differential equations, and some basic notions of magnetism would be an advantage. The course and the course supports will be in English, with questions and answers also in French. Lectures will be recorded and available online via the Web Lectu...

  4. 6 March 2013 - Committee for Employment and Learning, Northern Ireland Legislative Assembly, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in the LHC tunnel and visiting the LHCb experiment at LHC Point 8. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers with Vice-Chair T. Buchanan.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    6 March 2013 - Committee for Employment and Learning, Northern Ireland Legislative Assembly, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in the LHC tunnel and visiting the LHCb experiment at LHC Point 8. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers with Vice-Chair T. Buchanan.

  5. Estimated characteristics modification of silicon detectors due to their use at the LHC-accelerator and in AMS space conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, I.; Lazanu, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this talk, the phenomenological model developed by the authors in previous papers has been used to evaluate the degradation induced in high resistivity silicon detectors by pion and proton irradiation at the future accelerator facilities or by cosmic protons considering the continuous irradiation for ten years of work. The equations governing the degradation of the lattice are explicitly considered. The damage has been analysed at the microscopic level (defects production and their evolution toward equilibrium) and at the macroscopic level (only the changes in the leakage current of the p-n junction was considered). The rates of production of primary defects, as well as their evolution toward equilibrium have been evaluated considering explicitly irradiation field of the specified applications, by the type of the projectile particle and its energy. The influence of these defects on the leakage current density has been compared with experimental data from the literature, and predictions for the LHC radiation fields, as well as for space missions in the near Earth orbits have been done, in the frame of the Schokley-Read-Hall model. (authors)

  6. 7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  7. LHC Supertable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, M.; Lahey, T.E.; Lamont, M.; Mueller, G.J.; Teixeira, D.D.; McCrory, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    LHC operations generate enormous amounts of data. This data is being stored in many different databases. Hence, it is difficult for operators, physicists, engineers and management to have a clear view on the overall accelerator performance. Until recently the logging database, through its desktop interface TIMBER, was the only way of retrieving information on a fill-by-fill basis. The LHC Supertable has been developed to provide a summary of key LHC performance parameters in a clear, consistent and comprehensive format. The columns in this table represent main parameters that describe the collider operation such as luminosity, beam intensity, emittance, etc. The data is organized in a tabular fill-by-fill manner with different levels of detail. Particular emphasis was placed on data sharing by making data available in various open formats. Typically the contents are calculated for periods of time that map to the accelerator's states or beam modes such as Injection, Stable Beams, etc. Data retrieval and calculation is triggered automatically after the end of each fill. The LHC Supertable project currently publishes 80 columns of data on around 100 fills. (authors)

  8. Accelerators and superconductivity: A marriage of convenience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.

    1987-01-01

    This lecture deals with the relationship between accelerator technology in high-energy-physics laboratories and the development of superconductors. It concentrates on synchrotron magnets, showing how their special requirements have brought about significant advances in the technology, particularly the development of filamentary superconducting composites. Such developments have made large superconducting accelerators an actuality: the Tevatron in routine operation, the Hadron Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA) under construction, and the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the conceptual design stage. Other applications of superconductivity have also been facilitated - for example medical imaging and small accelerators for industrial and medical use. (orig.)

  9. Electronic system of the RPC Muon Trigger in CMS experiment at LHC accelerator (Elektroniczny system trygera mionowego RPC w eksperymencie CMS akceleratora LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bialkowska, H

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents implementation of distributed, multichannel electronic measurement system for RPC - based Muon Trigger in the CMS experiment at LHC. The introduction shortly describes the research aims of LHC and shows the metrological requirements for CMS - good spatial and time resolution, and possibility to estimate multiple physical parameters from registered collisions of particles. Further the paper describes RPC Muon Trigger consisting of 200 000 independent channels for position measurement. The first part of the paper presents the functional structure of the system in the context of requirements put by the CMS experiment, like global triggering system and data acquisition. The second part describes the hardware solutions used in particular parts of the RPC detector measuremnt system and shows some test results. The paper has a digest and overview nature.

  10. Computer graphic of LHC in the tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    A computer-generated image of the LHC particle accelerator at CERN in the tunnel originally built for the LEP accelerator that was closed in 2000. The cross-section of an LHC superconducting dipole magnet is also seen.

  11. LHC synchronization test successful

    CERN Multimedia

    The synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system and the rest of CERN's accelerator chain was successfully achieved last weekend. Tests began on Friday 8 August when a single bunch of a few particles was taken down the transfer line from the SPS accelerator to the LHC. After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered about 3 kilometres around the LHC itself on the first attempt. On Saturday, the test was repeated several times to optimize the transfer before the operations group handed the machine back for hardware commissioning to resume on Sunday. The anti-clockwise synchronization systems will be tested over the weekend of 22 August.Picture:http://lhc-injection-test.web.cern.ch/lhc-injection-test/

  12. Digital Signal Processing Applications and Implementation for Accelerators Digital Notch Filter with Programmable Delay and Betatron Phase Adjustment for the PS, SPS and LHC Transverse Dampers

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, V

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC project and the modifications of the SPS as its injector, I present the concept of global digital signal processing applied to a particle accelerator, using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology. The approach of global digital synthesis implements in numerical form the architecture of a system, from the start up of a project and the very beginning of the signal flow. It takes into account both the known parameters and the future evolution, whenever possible. Due to the increased performance requirements of today's projects, the CAE design methodology becomes more and more necessary to handle successfully the added complexity and speed of modern electronic circuits. Simulation is performed both for behavioural analysis, to ensure conformity to functional requirements, and for time signal analysis (speed requirements). The digital notch filter with programmable delay for the SPS Transverse Damper is now fully operational with fixed target and LHC-type beams circulating in t...

  13. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  14. SuperB Progress Reports - Physics

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, B.; Ramon, M.; Pous, E.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Asgeirsson, D.; Cheng, C.H.; Chivukula, A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.G.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; Heinemeyer, S.; McElrath, B.; Andreassen, R.; Meadows, B.; Sokoloff, M.; Blanke, M.; Lesiak, T.; Shindou, T.; Ronga, F.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Rama, M.; Bossi, F.; Guido, E.; Patrignani, C.; Tosi, S.; Davies, C.; Lunghi, E.; Haisch, U.; Hurth, T.; Westhoff, S.; Crivellin, A.; Hofer, L.; Goto, T.; Brown, David Nathan; Branco, G.C.; Zupan, J.; Herrero, M.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.; Simi, G.; Tackmann, F.J.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Lindemann, D.M.; Robertson, S.H.; Duling, B.; Gemmler, K.; Gorbahn, M.; Jager, S.; Paradisi, P.; Straub, D.M.; Bigi, I.; Asner, D.M.; Fast, J.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Morandin, M.; Rotondo, M.; Ben-Haim, E.; Arnaud, N.; Burmistrov, L.; Kou, E.; Perez, A.; Stocchi, A.; Viaud, B.; Domingo, F.; Piccinini, F.; Manoni, E.; Batignani, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Neri, N.; Walsh, J.; Bevan, A.; Bona, M.; Walker, C.; Weiland, C.; Lenz, A.; Gonzalez-Sprinberg, G.; Faccini, R.; Renga, F.; Polosa, A.; Silvestrini, L.; Virto, J.; Ciuchini, M.; Lubicz, V.; Tarantino, C.; Wilson, F.F.; Carpinelli, M.; Huber, T.; Mannel, T.; Graham, M.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Santoro, V.; Sekula, S.; Shougaev, K.; Soffer, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Gambino, P.; Mussa, R.; Nardecchia, M.; Stal, O.; Bernabeu, J.; Botella, F.; Jung, M.; Lopez March, N.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Pich, A.; Lozano, M.A.Sanchis; Vidal, J.; Vives, O.; Banerjee, S.; Roney, J.M.; Petrov, A.A.; Flood, K.

    2010-01-01

    SuperB is a high luminosity e+e- collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measure...

  15. Higgs physics at LHC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The large hadron collider (LHC) and its detectors, ATLAS and CMS, are being built to study TeV scale physics, and to fully understand the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. The Monte-Carlo simulation results for the standard model and minimal super symmetric standard model Higgs boson searches and ...

  16. LHC brochure (Italian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  17. LHC brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  18. LHC brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  19. LHC brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  20. LHC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  1. LHC brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  2. LHC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070305

    2014-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  3. LHC Brochure (german version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Vanoli, C.

    2006-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  4. LHC brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  5. LHC brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  6. LHC brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  7. Accelerator magnet R/D in the perspective of a LHeC and HE-LHC, synergy or competition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottura, L.; Auchmann, B.; Bajko, M.; Ballarino, A.; Borgnolutti, F.; Ferracin, P.; Fessia, P.; Karppinen, M.; Kirby, G.; Oberli, L.; Perez, J.C.; Rossi, L.; Rijk, G. de; Russenschuck, S.; Smekens, D.; Todesco, E.; Tommasini, D.

    2012-01-01

    Beyond HL-LHC, CERN has a number of physics options that offer potential and challenges. This contribution dwells on the long-term projects HE-LHC and LHeC to put the magnet research and development at CERN (resistive and superconducting, slow and fast) in a long-term perspective. In particular synergies and parallel road-maps will be highlighted. We will show how the on-going development (2012-2015) on low-field, high-field, and low-loss magnets can be used towards longer term objectives. (authors)

  8. Accelerator Magnet R&D in the Perspective of a LHeC and HE-LHC - Synergy or Competion?

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Bajko, M; Ballarino, A; Borgnolutti, F; Ferracin, P; Fessia, P; Karppinen, M; Kirby, G; Oberli, L; Perez, J C; Rossi, L; De Rijk, G; Russenschuck, S; Smekens, D; Todesco, E; Tommasini, D

    2012-01-01

    Beyond HL-LHC, CERN has a number of physics options that offer potential and challenges. This contribution dwells on the long-term projects HE-LHC and LHeC to put the magnet R&D at CERN (resistive and superconducting, slow and fast) in a long-term perspective. In particular synergies and parallel roadmaps will be highlighted. We will show how the on-going development (2012-2015) on low-field, high-field, and low-loss magnets can be used towards longer term objectives.

  9. LHC Supertable

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, M; Lamont, M; Muller, GJ; Teixeira, D D; McCrory, ES

    2011-01-01

    LHC operations generate enormous amounts of data. This data is being stored in many different databases. Hence, it is difficult for operators, physicists, engineers and management to have a clear view on the overall accelerator performance. Until recently the logging database, through its desktop interface TIMBER, was the only way of retrieving information on a fill-by-fill basis. The LHC Supertable has been developed to provide a summary of key LHC performance parameters in a clear, consistent and comprehensive format. The columns in this table represent main parameters that describe the collider’s operation such as luminosity, beam intensity, emittance, etc. The data is organized in a tabular fill-by-fill manner with different levels of detail. Particular emphasis was placed on data sharing by making data available in various open formats. Typically the contents are calculated for periods of time that map to the accelerator’s states or beam modes such as Injection, Stable Beams, etc. Data retrieval and ...

  10. LHC Report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    During last week the commissioning effort has been devoted to beam development work, required to accelerate beams with nominal bunch intensity to 3.5 TeV. Significant progress has been done with the commissioning of the systems required to control the beam size and bunch length during the ramp and accelerate the beam with reproducible characteristics. The setting-up of the collimation system for the operation with higher intensity is presently ongoing with the aim of delivering physics with nominal bunch intensity towards the end of next week. For more information about the LHC and a video of the presentation recently done by LHC operators, please visit: http://lpcc.web.cern.ch/LPCC/ http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=2687

  11. LHC physics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binoth, T

    2012-01-01

    "Exploring the phenomenology of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, LHC Physics focuses on the first years of data collected at the LHC as well as the experimental and theoretical tools involved...

  12. Acceleration and support post deformation measurements during surface and tunnel transport of a LHC Short Straight Section

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2004-01-01

    This technical note is a complement to the technical note [1]. The former technical note dealt with the experimental modal analysis and the road transport with transport restraints and special suspension. The present note describes the measured accelerations and support post deformations during road transport at reduced speed without end restraints or special suspension. This note also reports the accelerations and support post deformations during handling and tunnel transport with the dedicated tunnel vehicle. The measured accelerations are compared with the specified acceleration limits.

  13. HL-LHC alternatives

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; White, S

    2014-01-01

    The HL-LHC parameters assume unexplored regimes for hadron colliders in various aspects of accelerator beam dynamics and technology. This paper reviews three alternatives that could potentially improve the LHC performance: (i) the alternative filling scheme 8b+4e, (ii) the use of a 200 MHz RF system in the LHC and (iii) the use of proton cooling methods to reduce the beam emittance (at top energy and at injection). The alternatives are assessed in terms of feasibility, pros and cons, risks versus benefits and the impact on beam availability.

  14. Tracking detectors for the sLHC, the LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut F W

    2005-01-01

    The plans for an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to the Super-LHC (sLHC) are reviewed with special consideration of the environment for the inner tracking system. A straw-man detector upgrade for ATLAS is presented, which is motivated by the varying radiation levels as a function of radius, and choices for detector geometries and technologies are proposed, based on the environmental constraints. A few promising technologies for detectors are discussed, both for sensors and for the associated front-end electronics. On-going research in silicon detectors and in ASIC technologies will be crucial for the success of the upgrade.

  15. Beam Scraping in the SPS for LHC Injection Efficiency and Robustness Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Letnes, Paul/LPA; Myrheim, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be the world's most powerful accelerator when it is commissioned in fall 2008. Operation of the LHC will require injection of very high intensity beams. Fast transverse beam scrapers have been installed in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) injector to detect and, if necessary, remove transverse beam tails. This will help to both diagnose and prevent beam quenches in the LHC. Scraping of a high intensity beam at top energy can potentially damage the scraper jaws. This has been studied with Monte Carlo simulations to find energy deposition and limits for hardware damage. Loss maps from scraping have been generated both with machine studies and tracking simulations. Time dependent Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) measurements have shown several interesting details about the beam. An analytical model of time dependent losses is compared with beam measurements and demonstrates that beam scraping can be used to estimate the beam size. Energy deposition simulations also give the ...

  16. SPS Beam Steering for LHC Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab; Bartosik, Hannes [CERN; Cornelis, Karel [CERN; Norderhaug Drøsdal, Lene [CERN; Goddard, Brennan [CERN; Kain, Verena [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Papaphilippou, Yannis [CERN; Wenninger, Jorg [CERN

    2014-07-01

    The CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerates beams for the Large Hadron Collider to 450 GeV. In addition it produces beams for fixed target facilities which adds complexity to the SPS operation. During the run 2012-2013 drifts of the extracted beam trajectories have been observed and lengthy optimizations in the transfer lines were performed to reduce particle losses in the LHC. The observed trajectory drifts are consistent with the measured SPS orbit drifts at extraction. While extensive studies are going on to understand, and possibly suppress, the source of such SPS orbit drifts the feasibility of an automatic beam steering towards a “golden” orbit at the extraction septa, by means of the interlocked correctors, is also being investigated. The challenges and constraints related to the implementation of such a correction in the SPS are described. Simulation results are presented and a possible operational steering strategy is proposed.

  17. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  18. arXiv Analytical methods for vacuum simulations in high energy accelerators for future machines based on LHC performances

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Ida; Chiggiato, Paolo

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC), currently in the design phase, will address many outstanding questions in particle physics. The technology to succeed in this 100 km circumference collider goes beyond present limits. Ultra-high vacuum conditions in the beam pipe is one essential requirement to provide a smooth operation. Different physics phenomena as photon-, ion- and electron- induced desorption and thermal outgassing of the chamber walls challenge this requirement. This paper presents an analytical model and a computer code PyVASCO that supports the design of a stable vacuum system by providing an overview of all the gas dynamics happening inside the beam pipes. A mass balance equation system describes the density distribution of the four dominating gas species $\\text{H}_2, \\text{CH}_4$, $\\text{CO}$ and $\\text{CO}_2$. An appropriate solving algorithm is discussed in detail and a validation of the model including a comparison of the output to the readings of LHC gauges is presented. This enables the eval...

  19. Construction of cold mass assembly for full-length dipoles for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.; Cottingham, J.; Garber, M.

    1986-10-01

    Four of the initial six 17m long demonstration dipole magnets for the proposed Superconducting Super Collider have been constructed, and the first one is now being tested. This paper describes the magnet design and construction of the cold mass assembly. The magnets are cold iron (and cold bore) 1-in-1 dipoles, wound with partially keystoned current density-graded high homogeneity NbTi cable in a two-layer cos θ coil of 40 mm inner diameter. The magnetic length is 16.6 m. The coil is prestressed by 15 mm wide stainless steel collars, and mounted in a circular, split iron yoke of 267 mm outer diameter, supported by a cylindrical yoke (and helium) containment vessel of stainless steel. The magnet bore tube assembly incorporates superconducting sextupole trim coils produced by an industrial, automatic process akin to printed circuit fabrication

  20. LHC magnet string in 1994

    CERN Multimedia

    1994-01-01

    On 6-7 December 1994, a string of powerful superconducting magnets for CERN's next particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), ran successfully at 8.36 tesla for 24 hours. This magnetic field is 100 000 times that of the Earth and is required to keep beams of protons travelling on the correct circular path over 27 km at 7 TeV in the new LHC accelerator.

  1. Machine Protection and Interlock Systems for Circular Machines - Example for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the protection of circular particle accelerators from accidental beam losses. Already the energy stored in the beams for accelerators such as the TEVATRON at Fermilab and Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN could cause serious damage in case of uncontrolled beam loss. With the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the energy stored in particle beams has reached a value two orders of magnitude above previous accelerators and poses new threats with respect to hazards from the energy stored in the particle beams. A single accident damaging vital parts of the accelerator could interrupt operation for years. Protection of equipment from beam accidents is mandatory. Designing a machine protection system requires an excellent understanding of accelerator physics and operation to anticipate possible failures that could lead to damage. Machine protection includes beam and equipment monitoring, a system to safely stop beam operation (e.g. extraction of the beam towards a dedicated beam dump block o...

  2. Mobilizing for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    A follow-up report on the incident that occurred in LHC Sector 3-4 was published on 5 December. It confirms that the accelerator will be restarted in the summer of 2009. From now until then, the teams will be pulling out all the stops to repair the sector and enhance the operational safety of the machine.

  3. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  4. RF Power Generation in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, O C; Valuch, D

    2003-01-01

    The counter-rotating proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be captured and then accelerated to their final energies of 2 x 7 TeV by two identical 400 MHz RF systems. The RF power source required for each beam comprises eight 300 kW klystrons. The output power of each klystron is fed via a circulator and a waveguide line to the input coupler of a single-cell super-conducting (SC) cavity. Four klystrons are powered by a 100 kV, 40A AC/DC power converter, previously used for the operation of the LEP klystrons. A five-gap thyratron crowbar protects the four klystrons in each of these units. The technical specification and measured performance of the various high-power elements are discussed. These include the 400MHz/300kW klystrons with emphasis on their group delay and the three-port circulators, which have to cope with peak reflected power levels up to twice the simultaneously applied incident power of 300 kW. In addition, a novel ferrite loaded waveguide absorber, used as termination for port No...

  5. Ultimate-gradient accelerators physics and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Skrinsky, Aleksander Nikolayevich

    1995-01-01

    As introduction, the needs and ways for ultimate acceleration gradients are discussed briefly. The Plasma Wake Field Acceleration is analized in the most important details. The structure of specific plasma oscillations and "high energy driver beam SP-plasma" interaction is presented, including computer simulation of the process. Some pratical ways to introduce the necessary mm-scale bunching in driver beam and to arrange sequential energy multiplication are dicussed. The influence of accelerating beam particle - plasma binary collisions is considered, also. As applications of PWFA, the use of proton super-colliders beams (LHC and Future SC) to drive the "multi particle types" accelerator, and the arrangements for the electron-positron TeV range collider are discussed.

  6. LHC Injection Beam Quality During LHC Run I

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079186; Kain, Verena; Stapnes, Steinar

    The LHC at CERN was designed to accelerate proton beams from 450 GeV to 7 TeV and collide them in four large experiments. The 450 GeV beam is extracted from the last pre-accelerator, the SPS, and injected into the LHC via two 3 km long transfer lines, TI 2 and TI 8. The injection process is critical in terms of preservation of beam quality and machine protection. During LHC Run I (2009-2013) the LHC was filled with twelve high intensity injections per ring, in batches of up to 144 bunches of 1.7*10^11 protons per bunch. The stored beam energy of such a batch is already an order of magnitude above the damage level of accelerator equipment. Strict quality and machine protection requirements at injection have a significant impact on operational efficiency. During the first years of LHC operation, the injection phase was identified as one of the limiting factors for fast LHC turnaround time. The LHC Injection Quality Check (IQC) software framework was developed as a part of this thesis to monitor the beam quality...

  7. The LHC in numbers

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    What makes the LHC the biggest particle accelerator in the world? Here are some of the numbers that characterise the LHC, and their equivalents in terms that are easier for us to imagine.   Feature Number Equivalent Circumference ~ 27 km   Distance covered by beam in 10 hours ~ 10 billion km a round trip to Neptune Number of times a single proton travels around the ring each second 11 245   Speed of protons first entering the LHC 299 732 500 m/s 99.9998 % of the speed of light Speed of protons when they collide 299 789 760 m/s 99.9999991 % of the speed of light Collision temperature ~ 1016 °C ove...

  8. ATLAS Tracker Upgrade: Silicon Strip Detectors for the sLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    To extend the physics potential of the Large Hadron Colider (LHC) at CERN, upgrades of the accelerator complex and the detectors towards the Super-LHC (sLHC) are foreseen. The upgrades, separated in Phase-1 and Phase-2, aim at increasing the luminosity while leaving the energy of the colliding particles (7 TeV per proton beam) unchanged. After the Phase-2 upgrade the instantaneous luminosity will be a factor of 5-10 higher than the design luminosity of the LHC. Due to the increased track rate and extreme radiation levels for the tracking detectors, upgrades of the detectors are necessary. At ATLAS, one of the two general purpose detectors at the LHC, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracker. This article describes the plans for the Phase-2 upgrade of the silicon strip detector of ATLAS. Radiation hard n-in-p silicon detectors with shorter strips than currently installed in ATLAS are planned. Results of measurements with these sensors and plans for module designs will be discussed.

  9. LHC report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    This week's Report, by Gianluigi Arduini,  will be included in the LHC Physics Day, dedicated to the reviews of the LHC physics results presented at ICHEP 2010. Seehttp://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=102669 

  10. Support for the LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Butin, François; Gastal, M; Lacarrère, D; Macina, D; Perrot, A L; Tsesmelis, E; Wilhelmsson, M; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Experimental Area Teams have been put in place and charged with the general co-ordination and management of the LHC experimental areas and of the zones in the LHC tunnel hosting near-beam detectors of the experiments. This organization is responsible for the in situ co-ordination of work with the aim of providing a structure that enables the experiment collaborations and accelerator groups to carry out their work effectively and safely. This presentation will review some key elements in the support given to the LHC experimental areas and, given the track record and successful implementation during the LHC installation and commissioning phase, will argue that such an organization structure will be required also for the period of LHC exploitation for physics.

  11. Silicon detectors operating beyond the LHC collider conditions: scenarios for radiation fields and detector degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, I.; Lazanu, S.

    2004-01-01

    Particle physics makes its greatest advances with experiments at the highest energies. The way to advance to a higher energy regime is through hadron colliders, or through non-accelerator experiments, as for example the space astroparticle missions. In the near future, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be operational, and beyond that, its upgrades: the Super-LHC (SLHC) and the hypothetical Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). At the present time, there are no detailed studies for future accelerators, except those referring to LHC. For the new hadron collider LHC and some of its updates in luminosity and energy, the silicon detectors could represent an important option, especially for the tracking system and calorimetry. The main goal of this paper is to analyse the expected long-time degradation of the silicon as material and for silicon detectors, during continuous radiation, in these hostile conditions. The behaviour of silicon in relation to various scenarios for upgrade in energy and luminosity is discussed in the frame of a phenomenological model developed previously by the authors and now extended to include new mechanisms, able to explain and give solutions to discrepancies between model predictions and detector behaviour after hadron irradiation. Different silicon material parameters resulting from different technologies are considered to evaluate what materials are harder to radiation and consequently could minimise the degradation of device parameters in conditions of continuous long time operation. (authors)

  12. LHC status report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Following the great success of the first 3.5 TeV collisions in all four LHC experiments on 30 March, the focus of the LHC commissioning teams has turned to consolidating the beam injection and acceleration procedures.   During the last two weeks, the operators have adopted a cycle of beam commissioning studies by day and the preparation and delivery of collisions during the night shifts. The injection and acceleration processes for the beams are by now well established and almost all feedback systems, which are an essential ingredient for establishing reliable and safe machine operation, have been commissioned. Thanks to special current settings for the quadrupoles that are situated near the collision points, the LHC luminosity at high energy has been increased by a factor of 5 in three of the four experiments. Similar improvements are under way for the fourth experiment. The next steps include adjustments of the LHC machine protection and collimation devices, which will ensure 'stable beam' co...

  13. R&D for Future Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Research & development for future accelerators are reviewed. First, I discuss colliding hadron beams, in particular upgrades to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This is followed by an overview of new concepts and technologies for lepton ring colliders, with examples taken from VEPP-2000, DAFNE-2, and Super-KEKB. I then turn to recent progress and studies for the multi-TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Some generic linear-collider research, centered at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility, is described next. Subsequently, I survey the neutrino factory R&D performed in the framework of the US feasibility study IIa, and I also comment on a novel scheme for producing monochromatic neutrinos from an electron-capture beta beam. Finally, I present innovative ideas for a high-energy muon collider and I consider recent experimental progress on laser and plasma acceleration.

  14. LHC Magnet test failure

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "On Tueday, March 22, a Fermilab-built quadrupole magnet, one of an "inner triplet" of three focusing magnets, failed a high-pressure test at Point 5 in the tunnel of the LHC accelerator at CERN. Since Tuesday, teams at CERN and Fermilab have worked closely together to address the problem and have identified the cause of the failure. Now they are at work on a solution.:" (1 page)

  15. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Raich, Uli

    2011-10-04

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN†, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)‡. The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam posi...

  16. Determination of beam intensity and position in a particle accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, G

    2011-01-01

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors...

  17. The super collider revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Pato, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors suggest a revised version of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) that employs the planned SSC first stage machine as an injector of 0.5 TeV protons into a power laser accelerator. The recently developed Non-linear Amplification of Inverse Bremsstrahlung Acceleration (NAIBA) concept dictates the scenario of the next stage of acceleration. Post Star Wars lasers, available at several laboratories, can be used for the purpose. The 40 TeV CM energy, a target of the SSC, can be obtained with a new machine which can be 20 times smaller than the planned SSC

  18. The LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The LHC will use the latest technologies on an enormous scale. 8000 superconducting magnets will keep the beams on track. The entire 27 km ring will be cooled by 700 000 litres of liquid helium to a temperature of -271 degrees Celsius , making the LHC the world's largest superconducting installation. Conventional superconducting wire will form the magnet coils, while high-temperature superconductors will carry a total of 2 300 000 amperes from the power supplies into the magnet cryostat

  19. LHC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Preparations for the LHC proton collider to be built in CERN's LEP tunnel continue to make good progress. In particular development work for the high field superconducting magnets to guide the almost 8 TeVproton beams through the 'tight' curve of the 27-kilometre ring are proceeding well, while the magnet designs and lattice configuration are evolving in the light of ongoing experience. At the Evian LHC Experiments meeting, this progress was covered by Giorgio Brianti

  20. Plan of SPS to LHC transfer tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    This diagram shows the LHC and the SPS pre-accelerator (in blue) and the transfer lines that will connect them (in red). Spanning the France-Swiss border (shown by green crosses), the 27-km LHC tunnel will receive a beam that has been pre-accelerated to 450 GeV in the smaller SPS storage ring. The transfer lines will remove each beam from the SPS and inject them into the LHC where they will be accelerated to the full energy of 7 TeV.

  1. LHC computing (WLCG) past, present, and future

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, I G

    2016-01-01

    The LCG project, and the WLCG Collaboration, represent a more than 10-year investment in building and operating the LHC computing environment. This article gives some of the history of how the WLCG was constructed and the preparations for the accelerator start-up. It will discuss the experiences and lessons learned during the first 3 year run of the LHC, and will conclude with a look forwards to the planned upgrades of the LHC and the experiments, discussing the implications for computing.

  2. LHC Report: Ion Age

    CERN Multimedia

    John Jowett for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    Commissioning this new and almost unprecedented mode of collider operation is a major challenge both for the LHC and its injector chain. Moreover, it has to be done very quickly to achieve a whole series of physics goals, requiring modifications of the LHC configuration, in a very short time. These include a switch of the beam directions halfway through the run, polarity reversals of the ALICE spectrometer magnet and Van der Meer scans.    The Linac3 team kept the lead source running throughout the end-of-year technical stop, and recovery of the accelerator complex was very quick. New proton and lead beams were soon ready, with a bunch filling pattern that ensures they will eventually match up in the LHC. The LEIR machine has even attained a new ion beam intensity record.  On Friday 11 January the first single bunches o...

  3. The LHC detectors and the first CMS data

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the subsystems of a generic LHC detector and explains how the values of the detector parameters were selected. The design of the LHC detectors follows from the requirement of confronting electroweak symmetry breaking in a decisive fashion. The LHC accelerator also meets those requirements.

  4. LHC: Collisions on course for 2007

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    In the LHC tunnel and caverns, a particle accelerator and detectors are rapidly taking shape. At last week's Council meeting, delegates took stock of the year's progress towards first collisions in 2007.

  5. The LHC personnel safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninin, P.; Valentini, F.; Ladzinski, T.

    2011-01-01

    Large particle physics installations such as the CERN Large Hadron Collider require specific Personnel Safety Systems (PSS) to protect the personnel against the radiological and industrial hazards. In order to fulfill the French regulation in matter of nuclear installations, the principles of IEC 61508 and IEC 61513 standard are used as a methodology framework to evaluate the criticality of the installation, to design and to implement the PSS.The LHC PSS deals with the implementation of all physical barriers, access controls and interlock devices around the 27 km of underground tunnel, service zones and experimental caverns of the LHC. The system shall guarantee the absence of personnel in the LHC controlled areas during the machine operations and, on the other hand, ensure the automatic accelerator shutdown in case of any safety condition violation, such as an intrusion during beam circulation. The LHC PSS has been conceived as two separate and independent systems: the LHC Access Control System (LACS) and the LHC Access Safety System (LASS). The LACS, using off the shelf technologies, realizes all physical barriers and regulates all accesses to the underground areas by identifying users and checking their authorizations.The LASS has been designed according to the principles of the IEC 61508 and 61513 standards, starting from a risk analysis conducted on the LHC facility equipped with a standard access control system. It consists in a set of safety functions realized by a dedicated fail-safe and redundant hardware guaranteed to be of SIL3 class. The integration of various technologies combining electronics, sensors, video and operational procedures adopted to establish an efficient personnel safety system for the CERN LHC accelerator is presented in this paper. (authors)

  6. LHC Report: machine development

    CERN Multimedia

    Rogelio Tomás García for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    Machine development weeks are carefully planned in the LHC operation schedule to optimise and further study the performance of the machine. The first machine development session of Run 2 ended on Saturday, 25 July. Despite various hiccoughs, it allowed the operators to make great strides towards improving the long-term performance of the LHC.   The main goals of this first machine development (MD) week were to determine the minimum beam-spot size at the interaction points given existing optics and collimation constraints; to test new beam instrumentation; to evaluate the effectiveness of performing part of the beam-squeezing process during the energy ramp; and to explore the limits on the number of protons per bunch arising from the electromagnetic interactions with the accelerator environment and the other beam. Unfortunately, a series of events reduced the machine availability for studies to about 50%. The most critical issue was the recurrent trip of a sextupolar corrector circuit –...

  7. The LHC superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

    1999-01-01

    The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

  8. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  9. The LHC access system LACS and LASS

    CERN Document Server

    Ninin, P

    2005-01-01

    The LHC complex is divided into a number of zones with different levels of access controls.Inside the interlocked areas, the personnel protection is ensured by the LHC Access System.The system is made of two parts:the LHC Access Safety System and the LHC Access Control System. During machine operation,the LHC Access Safety System ensures the collective protection of the personnel against the radiation hazards arising from the operation of the accelerator by interlocking the LHC key safety elements. When the beams are off, the LHC Access Control System regulates the access to the accelerator and its many subsystems.It allows a remote, local or automatic operation of the access control equipment which verifies and identifies all users entering the controlled areas.The global architecture of the LHC Access System is now designed and is being validated to ensure that it meets the safety requirements for operation of the LHC.A pilot installation will be tested in the summer 2005 to validate the concept with the us...

  10. LHC milestone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    At the December meeting of CERN's Council, the Organization's Governing Body, the delegates from the 16 Member States unanimously agreed that the LHC proton-proton collider proposed for the 27-kilometre LEP tunnel is the 'right machine for the advance of the subject and of the future of CERN'

  11. LHC Create

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    LHC Create is an upcoming 2-day workshop held at IdeaSquare in November. Participants from CERN and IPAC school of design will compete to design an exhibit that explains why CERN does what it does. The winner will have their exhibit fully realised and made available to experiments, institutes, and tourism agencies around the world.

  12. RF system for the super conducting proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchi, Y.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the several types of RF sources used for proton liner accelerators. Also we discus the undesirable characteristics of super-conducting cavities, and the influence of the large beam loading for an accelerating field. We propose the RF system for the super-conducting proton linear accelerators using the Diacrode or IOT taking these effects into account. (author)

  13. Super jackstraws and super waterwheels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jin-Ho

    2007-01-01

    We construct various new BPS states of D-branes preserving 8 supersymmetries. These include super Jackstraws (a bunch of scattered D- or (p, q)-strings preserving supersymmetries), and super waterwheels (a number of D2-branes intersecting at generic angles on parallel lines while preserving supersymmetries). Super D-Jackstraws are scattered in various dimensions but are dynamical with all their intersections following a common null direction. Meanwhile, super (p, q)-Jackstraws form a planar static configuration. We show that the SO(2) subgroup of SL(2, R), the group of classical S-duality transformations in IIB theory, can be used to generate this latter configuration of variously charged (p, q)-strings intersecting at various angles. The waterwheel configuration of D2-branes preserves 8 supersymmetries as long as the 'critical' Born-Infeld electric fields are along the common direction

  14. Super differential forms on super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konisi, Gaku; Takahasi, Wataru; Saito, Takesi.

    1994-01-01

    Line integral on the super Riemann surface is discussed. A 'super differential operator' which possesses both properties of differential and of differential operator is proposed. With this 'super differential operator' a new theory of differential form on the super Riemann surface is constructed. We call 'the new differentials on the super Riemann surface' 'the super differentials'. As the applications of our theory, the existency theorems of singular 'super differentials' such as 'super abelian differentials of the 3rd kind' and of a super projective connection are examined. (author)

  15. LHC Olympics flex physicists' brains

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Physicists from around the world met at CERN to strengthen their data-deciphering skills at the second LHC Olympics workshop. Physicists gather for the second LHC Olympics workshop. Coinciding with the kick-off of the winter Olympics in Turin, more than 70 physicists gathered at CERN from across the globe for the second LHC Olympics workshop on 9-10 February. Their challenge, however, involved brains rather than brawn. As the switch-on date for the LHC draws near, scientists excited by the project want to test and improve their ability to decipher the unprecedented amount of data that the world's biggest and most powerful particle accelerator is expected to generate. The LHC Olympics is a coordinated effort to do just that, minus the gold, silver and bronze of the athletics competition. 'In some ways, the LHC is not a precision instrument. It gives you the information that something is there but it's hard to untangle and interpret what it is,' said University of Michigan physicist Gordy Kane, who organiz...

  16. The LHC at level best

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    On 10 March, a team of CERN surveyors descended into the LHC tunnel. Their aim: to take measurements of the height of the LHC magnets to see how geological shifts might be affecting the machine and to take reference positions of the machine before the interconnects are opened.    CERN surveyors take levelling measurements of the LHC magnets during LS1. The LHC tunnel is renowned for its geological stability: set between layers of sandstone and molasse, it has allowed the alignment of the world’s largest accelerators to be within sub-millimetre precision. But even the most stable of tunnels can be affected by geological events. To ensure the precise alignment of the LHC, the CERN survey team performs regular measurements of the vertical position of the magnets (a process known as “levelling”). Over the past month, the team has been taking measurements of the LHC before the temperature of the magnets reaches 100 K, beyond which there may be some mechanic...

  17. Last cast for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first major contract signed for the LHC is drawing to a close. Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre (a member of the Arcelor Group) has just completed production of 50,000 tonnes of steel sheets for the accelerator's superconducting magnet yokes, in what has proved to be an exemplary partnership with CERN. Philippe Lebrun, Head of the AT Department, Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader, and Lucio Rossi, Head of the AT-MAS Group, in front of the last batch of steel for the LHC at Cockerill Sambre. It was a bright red-letter day at the end of May, when Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre of the Arcelor Group marked the completion of one of the largest contracts for the LHC machine by casting the last batch of steel sheets for the LHC superconducting magnet yokes in the presence of LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans, AT Department Head Philippe Lebrun, Magnets and Superconductors (AT-MAS) Group Leader Lucio Rossi and Head of the AT-MAS Group's components centre Francesco Bertinelli. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the acc...

  18. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  19. How elementary paticles are discovered. From the cyclotron to the LHC - an expedition through the world of the particle accelerators; Wie man Elementarteilchen entdeckt. Vom Zyklotron zum LHC - ein Streifzug durch die Welt der Teilchenbeschleuniger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytag, Carl; Osterhage, Wolfgang W.

    2016-07-01

    This book explains the physical foundations and the technology of the elementary-particle research and describes the particle accelerators, the detector, and their concerted acting. On some milestones of the research - from the production of transuranium elements via the discovery of exotic mesons until the Higgs particle - the way from theory via the experiment to the research result is shown.

  20. Super families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, N.; Maldonado, R.H.C.

    1989-01-01

    The study on phenomena in the super high energy region, Σ E j > 1000 TeV revealed events that present a big dark spot in central region with high concentration of energy and particles, called halo. Six super families with halo were analysed by Brazil-Japan Cooperation of Cosmic Rays. For each family the lateral distribution of energy density was constructed and R c Σ E (R c ) was estimated. For studying primary composition, the energy correlation with particles released separately in hadrons and gamma rays was analysed. (M.C.K.)

  1. 14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

  2. 2 March 2012 - US Google Management Team Executive Chairman E. Schmidt visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers and Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    2 March 2012 - US Google Management Team Executive Chairman E. Schmidt visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers and Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  3. 9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

  4. LHC progress report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Last weekend saw a record physics fill with a tenfold increase in instantaneous luminosity (event rate from collisions), marking an important milestone for the LHC. This physics fill did not only establish luminosities above 1.1 x 1028 cm-2 s-1 in all four experiments but was also kept in "stable beam" mode for a new record length of 30 hours. The particle physics experiments were able to more than double the total number of events so far recorded at 3.5 TeV.   The LHC screen indicating that squeezed stable beams have been achieved for the first time. The very successful weekend had been preceded by hard work on the accelerator side. A factor 5 improvement in luminosity was achieved by "squeezing" (reducing) the beam sizes at all four interaction points. This process, one of the most complex stages in the operation of the accelerator, was finalised the week before. Once the machine is "squeezed", the experimental insertions become aperture bot...

  5. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Operations of the SuperHILAC, the Bevatron/Bevalac, and the 184-inch Synchrocyclotron during the period from October 1977 to September 1978 are discussed. These include ion source development, accelerator facilities, the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System, and Bevelac biomedical operations

  6. The first LHC insertion quadrupole

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An important milestone was reached in December 2003 at the CERN Magnet Assembly Facility. The team from the Accelerator Technology - Magnet and Electrical Systems group, AT-MEL, completed the first special superconducting quadrupole for the LHC insertions which house the experiments and major collider systems. The magnet is 8 metres long and contains two matching quadrupole magnets and an orbit corrector, a dipole magnet, used to correct errors in quadrupole alignment. All were tested in liquid helium and reached the ultimate performance criteria required for the LHC. After insertion in the cryostat, the superconducting magnet will be installed as the Q9 quadrupole in sector 7-8, the first sector of the LHC to be put in place in 2004. Members of the quadrupole team, from the AT-MEL group, gathered around the Q9 quadrupole at its inauguration on 12 December 2003 in building 181.

  7. Considerations on Energy Frontier Colliders after LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2016-11-15

    Since 1960’s, particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics, 29 total have been built and operated, 7 are in operation now. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics. This paper largely follows previous study [1] and the presenta ion given at the ICHEP’2016 conference in Chicago [2].

  8. LHC Report: a record start for LHC ion operation

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    After the technical stop, the LHC switched over to ion operation, colliding lead-ions on lead-ions. The recovery from the technical stop was very smooth, and records for ion luminosity were set during the first days of ion operation.   The LHC technical stop ended on the evening of Friday, 11 November. The recovery from the technical stop was extremely smooth, and already that same evening ion beams were circulating in the LHC. ‘Stable beams’ were declared the same night, with 2 x 2 bunches of ions circulating in the LHC, allowing the experiments to have their first look at ion collisions this year. However, the next step-up in intensity – colliding 170 x 170 bunches – was postponed due to a vacuum problem in the PS accelerator, so the collisions on Sunday, 13 November were confined to 9 x 9 bunches. The vacuum problem was solved, and on the night of Monday, 14 November, trains of 24 lead bunches were injected into the LHC and 170 x 170 bunches were brough...

  9. Status of the LHCf apparatus at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Castellini, G; D’Alessandro, R; Faus, A; Fukui, K; Haguenauer, M; Itow, Y; Kasahara, K; Macina, D; Mase, T; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Menjo, H; Mizuishi, M; Muraki, Y; Papini, P; Perrot, A L; Ricciarini, S; Sako, T; Shimizu, Y; Taki, K; Tamura, T; Torii, S; Tricomi, A; Turner, W C; Velasco, J; Viciani, A; Yoshida, K

    2009-01-01

    The LHCf experiment at the LHC accelerator is ready for data taking. Both the LHCf detectors have been successfully tested and installed in their running configuration. The status of the apparatus, control software and some results of the last beam test at the SPS accelerator are presented in this work.

  10. Rejuvenating CERN's Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In the coming years and especially in 2005, CERN's accelerators are going to receive an extensive renovation programme to ensure they will perform reliably and effectively when the LHC comes into service.

  11. LHC Startup

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067853

    2008-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider will commence operations in the latter half of 2008. The plans of the LHC experiments ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are described. The scenario for progression of luminosity and the strategies of these 4 experiments to use the initial data are detailed. There are significant measurements possible with integrated luminosities of 1, 10 and 100 pb^-1. These measurements will provide essential calibration and tests of the detectors, understanding of the Standard Model backgrounds and a first oportunity to look for new physics.

  12. Plans for the upgrade of the LHC injectors

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R; Goddard, B; Hanke, K; Meddahi, M; Vretenar, M

    2011-01-01

    The LHC injectors upgrade (LIU) project has been launched at the end of 2010 to prepare the CERN accelerator complex for reliably providing beam with the challenging characteristics required by the high luminosity LHC until at least 2030. Based on the work already started on Linac4, PS Booster, PS and SPS, the LIU project coordinates studies and implementation, and interfaces with the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project which looks after the upgrade of the LHC itself, expected by the end of the present decade. The anticipated beam characteristics are described, as well as the status of the studies and the solutions envisaged for improving the injector performances.

  13. Hybrid beams in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The first proton-ion beams were successfully circulated in the LHC a couple of weeks ago. Everything went so smoothly that the LHC teams had planned the first p-Pb collisions for Wednesday, 16 November. Unfortunately, a last-minute problem with a component of the PS required for proton acceleration prevented the LHC teams from making these new collisions. However, the way is open for a possible physics run with proton-lead collisions in 2012.   Members of the LHC team photographed when the first hybrid beams got to full energy. The proton and lead beams are visible on the leftmost screen up on the wall (click to enlarge the photo). The technical challenge of making different beams circulate in the LHC is by no means trivial. Even if the machine is the same, there are a number of differences when it is operated with beams of protons, beams of lead or beams of proton and lead. Provided that the beams are equal, irrespective of whether they consist of protons or lead nuclei, they revolve at the...

  14. The LHC and its successors

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Not too long before the first long technical stop of the LHC, engineers and physicists are already working on the next generation of accelerators: HL-LHC and LHeC. The first would push proton-proton collisions to an unprecedented luminosity rate; the second would give a second wind to electron-proton collisions.   The ring-ring configuration of the LHeC would need this type of magnets, currently being studied for possible future use. In one year, the LHC will begin to change. During the first long shutdown, from December 2012 to late 2014, the machine will go through a first phase of major upgrades, with the objective of running at 7 TeV per beam at the beginning of 2015. With this long technical stop and the two others that will follow (in 2018 and 2022), a new project will see the light of day. Current plans include the study of something that looks more like a new machine rather than a simple upgrade: the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). Much more powerful than the current machine, the HL-...

  15. Beam-gas Background Observations at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00214737; The ATLAS collaboration; Alici, Andrea; Lazic, Dragoslav-Laza; Alemany Fernandez, Reyes; Alessio, Federico; Bregliozzi, Giuseppe; Burkhardt, Helmut; Corti, Gloria; Guthoff, Moritz; Manousos, Athanasios; Sjoebaek, Kyrre; D'Auria, Saverio

    2017-01-01

    Observations of beam-induced background at LHC during 2015 and 2016 are presented in this paper. The four LHC experiments use the non-colliding bunches present in the physics-filling pattern of the accelerator to trigger on beam-gas interactions. During luminosity production the LHC experiments record the beam-gas interactions using dedicated background monitors. These data are sent to the LHC control system and are used to monitor the background levels at the experiments during accelerator operation. This is a very important measurement, since poor beam-induced background conditions can seriously affect the performance of the detectors. A summary of the evolution of the background levels during 2015 and 2016 is given in these proceedings.

  16. Japanese contributions to CERN-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takahiko; Shintomi, Takakazu; Kimura, Yoshitaka

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at CERN, Geveva, to study frontier researches of particle physics. The LHC is the biggest superconducting accelerator using the most advanced cryogenics and applied superconductivities. The accelerator and large scale detectors for particle physics experiments are being constructed by collaboration with European countries and also by participation with non-CERN countries worldwide. In 1995, the Japanese government decided to take on a share in the LHC project with funding and technological contributions. KEK contributes to the development of low beta insertion superconducting quadrupole magnets and of components of the ATLAS detector by collaboration with university groups. Some Japanese companies have received contracts for technically key elements such as superconducting cable, cold compressor, nonmagnetic steel, polyimide film, and so on. An outline of the LHC project and Japanese contributions are described. (author)

  17. LHC Report: focus on luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The intensity ramp-up of the LHC beams resumed last Friday after the main powering system of the PS accelerator was put back in service.    The image above shows the last twenty four hours of fill #4947 in the machine. The LHC operations team kept the beams of this fill in the machine for a record 35 and a half hours.  Beams are back in the LHC. On Friday, the accelerator resumed the intensity ramp-up, reaching 1752 bunches per beam last week-end. The intensity ramp-up was interrupted on 20 May because of a problem with the PS’s main power supply (see box). A steady increase in the total number of bunches per beam is required to check out all aspects of beam operation and make sure the LHC is fully safe before the nominal number of bunches per beam can be brought into collision. At present, four intensity steps have been completed: 313, 601, 889, and 1177 bunches per beam. The qualification of the next step with 1752 bunches is in progress. At every s...

  18. Black Holes at the LHC: Progress since 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Chan

    2008-01-01

    We review the recent noticeable progresses in black hole physics focusing on the up-coming super-collider, the LHC. We discuss the classical formation of black holes by particle collision, the greybody factors for higher dimensional rotating black holes, the deep implications of black hole physics to the 'energy-distance' relation, the security issues of the LHC associated with black hole formation and the newly developed Monte-Carlo generators for black hole events.

  19. Status and prospects from the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkings, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the status of the CERN Large Hadron Collider and associated experiments as of July 2010. After a brief discussion of the progress in accelerator and experiment commissioning, the LHC physics landscape is presented, together with a selection of the experimental results achieved so far. Finally the prospects for the 2010-11 LHC physics run are reviewed, with an emphasis on possible discoveries in the Higgs and supersymmetry sectors.

  20. The whole world behind the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The LHC Board, which includes representatives of the non-Member State organisations directly involved in the construction of the LHC accelerator and representatives of CERN, held its fourth meeting on Monday 21 May 2001. From left to right: 1st row, A. Yamamoto (KEK, Japan), P. Pfund (FNAL, United States), L. Maiani (CERN Director-General), L. Evans (LHC Project Leader), F. Dupont (IN2P3, France), D.D. Bhawalkar (CAT, India) ; 2nd row, P. Brossier (CEA, France), N. Tyurin (IHEP, Russia), A. Skrinsky (BINP, Russia), A. Astbury (TRIUMF, Canada), P. Lebrun (LHC Division Leader, CERN); 3rd row, T. Taylor (Deputy Division Leader LHC Division, CERN), A. Shotter (TRIUMF, Canada), P. Bryant (LHC, CERN), K. Hübner (Director for Accelerators, CERN), J. van der Boon (Director of Administration, CERN). Although Canada, the United States, India, Japan and the Russian Federation are not members of CERN, they are all playing an active part in the construction of the LHC through important technical and financial co...

  1. Links between astroparticle physics and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinfold, James L

    2005-01-01

    Research into the fundamental nature of matter at the high energy frontier takes place in three main areas: accelerator-based particle physics, high energy astrophysics, and the cosmology of the early universe. As a consequence the study of astroparticle physics can have significant implications for collider physics at the LHC. Likewise, the LHC project provides the laboratory to perform measurements of great importance for cosmic ray astrophysics and cosmology. This paper reviews some of the important synergistic links between astroparticle and LHC physics. (topical review)

  2. Decaying Dark Matter at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a few scenarios with decaying Dark Matter and their prospect for detection at the LHC. First we present a simple minimal scenario, where Dark Matter is produced from the decay of a heavier colored or EW charged scalar via the FIMP or SuperWIMP mechanisms, then we discuss supersymmetric scenarios with RPV and gravitino DM, in particular a scenario allowing for simultaneous generation of DM and baryogenesis at a (relatively) low scale.

  3. Chasseurs de Higgs au LHC - A la Recherche des l'Origines

    CERN Multimedia

    Yves Sirois

    To increase understanding of the LHC, why scientists collaborate on this experiment and what they hope to achieve with the LHC. A 51 slide presentation in French for a general audience. Delivered at the "Cité des Sciences" in Paris, "Rencontres du Ciel et de l'Espace," November, 2010 This presentation covers the following topics: - The LHC --what it is --what it looks like --where it is located --the international nature of CERN & experiment collaborations --the experiments - Accelerators --a brief history on accelerators --what accelerators can do - The scientific goals of the LHC - Particle Physics in General --history & the basics - Impact on Technology and Society - First LHC Results - Concluding remarks

  4. Operating experiences on the co-generation system (CGS) as an uninterruptible power source (UPS) for the super-sized accelerator facility, RIBF of RIKEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinawa, Tadashi; Yano, Yasushige

    2011-01-01

    The RI Beam Factory (RIBF) of RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, which succeeded in extracting first beam on December 28th 2006 as scheduled, is currently conducting nuclear physics experiments. The RIBF has six accelerators, one of which is the world's biggest and most powerful superconducting ring cyclotron (SRC). The accelerators require not only a huge amount of electricity but also a reliable power supply for the He-cryogenic system, vacuum system and superconducting magnet systems. For this purpose, the co-generation system (CGS) was introduced. A gas turbine generates 6.5 MW of power from liquid natural gas (LNG) and supplies it to the systems mentioned above as an uninterruptible power source (UPS). By utilizing gas heat exhaust from the gas turbine, the CGS will also supply cooled water to the cooling system of the RIBF accelerators as well as to the air-conditioning system for the bending. The CGS plant was completed on the 1st floor of the RIBF accelerator building and it began operating in April 2003. This paper covers the merits and demerits. (author)

  5. The Super Patalan Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the super Patalan numbers, a generalization of the super Catalan numbers in the sense of Gessel, and prove a number of properties analagous to those of the super Catalan numbers. The super Patalan numbers generalize the super Catalan numbers similarly to how the Patalan numbers generalize the Catalan numbers.

  6. Warmer amps for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    CERN is working together with an Italian company to develop superconducting cables that can function at temperatures of up to 25 K (-248°C). This will make it possible to move LHC magnet power supplies out of the tunnel, protecting them from exposure to the showers of very high-energy particles produced by the accelerator.   Figure 1: devices of this type, which measure approximately 10 metres in length, are inserted between the accelerating magnets at different points along the LHC. When it comes to consuming electricity, the magnets that steer particles through large accelerators can be characterised with just one word: greedy. For the LHC, the total current can reach 1.5 million amps. At the present time, this current is brought in via copper cables of up to 10 cm in diameter. In the tunnel, these cables connect the current leads - which provide the transition between the ambient-temperature cables and the magnets in their bath of superfluid helium - to the power supply. In the a...

  7. An Improved Cllimation System for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Bertarelli, A; Braun, H; Brugger, M; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Bruno, L; Calatroni, S; Chiaveri, Enrico; Dehning, Bernd; Ferrari, A; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Jeanneret, J B; Jiménez, M; Kain, V; Lamont, M; Mayer, M; Métral, Elias; Perret, R; Redaelli, S; Risselada, Thys; Robert-Démolaize, G; Sösler, S; Ruggiero, F; Schmidt, R; Schulte, Daniel; Sievers, P; Vlachoudis, V; Vos, L; Vossenberg, Eugène B; Wenninger, J; Ajguirei, I L; Baishev, I S; Kurochkin, I; Tsutsui, H; Kaltchev, D I

    2004-01-01

    The handling of the high-intensity LHC beams in a super-conducting environment requires a high-robustness collimation system with unprecedented cleaning efficiency. For gap closures down to 2.2 mm no beam instabilities must be induced from the collimator impedance. A difficult trade-off between collimator robustness, cleaning efficiency and collimator impedance is encountered. The conflicting LHC requirements are resolved with a phased approach, relying on low Z collimators for maximum robustness and hybrid metallic collimators for maximum performance. Efficiency is further enhanced with an additional cleaning close to the insertion triplets. The machine layouts have been adapted to the new requirements. The LHC collimation hardware is presently under design and has entered into the prototyping and early testing phase. Plans for collimator tests with beam are presented.

  8. LHC beampipe section

    CERN Multimedia

    A short section of the LHC beam-pipe including beam screen. In the LHC, particles circulate under vacuum. The vacuum chamber can be at room temperature (for example, in the experimental areas), or at cryogenic temperature, in the superconductive magnets. This piece is located in the superconductive magnets. The outer pipe is the vacuum chamber, which is in contact with the magnets, at cryogenic temperature (1.9K). It is called the “cold bore”. The inner tube is the beam screen. Its main goal is to protect the magnets from the heat load coming from the synchrotron radiation. Indeed, when high energy protons’ trajectory is bent, photons are emitted by the beam. They are intercepted by the beam screen. The temperature of the beam screen is kept between 5 and 20K by a circulation of gaseous helium in the small pipes on both sides of the beam screen. As those surfaces are at cryogenic temperature. The residual gas present in the accelerator is sticking on the surfaces. This phenomenon called “adsorption”...

  9. Vacuum system for LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, O.

    1995-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is planned at CERN will be housed in the tunnel of the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) and will store two counter-rotating proton beams with energies of up to 7 TeV in a 27 km accelerator/storage ring with superconducting magnets. The vacuum system for the LHC will be at cryogenic temperatures (between 1.9 and 20 K) and will be exposed to synchrotron radiation emitted by the protons. A stringent limitation on the vacuum is given by the energy deposition in the superconducting coils of the magnets due to nuclear scattering of the protons on residual gas molecules because this may provoke a quench. This effect imposes an upper limit to a local region of increased gas density (e.g. a leak), while considerations of beam lifetime (100 h) will determine more stringent requirements on the average gas density. The proton beam creates ions from the residual gas which may strike the vacuum chamber with sufficient energy to lead to a pressure 'run-away' when the net ion induced desorption yield exceeds a stable limit. These dynamic pressure effects will be limited to an acceptable level by installing a perforated 'beam screen' which shields the cryopumped gas molecules at 1.9 K from synchrotron radiation and which also absorbs the synchrotron radiation power at a higher and, therefore, thermodynamically more efficient temperature. (author)

  10. LIGHT and LUMINOSITY, from Einstein to LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Prof. ROSSI, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    After an introduction on the concept of light in physics, this talk will focus on CERN’s High Luminosity LHC project, aiming at extending the discovery potential of CERN’s flagship accelerator by increasing its “luminosity” (ie the number of particles that can be squeezed inside the accelerator to maximize the number of collisions). To achieve this objective, many new technologies are being developed at CERN and many collaborating institutes worldwide, especially in the field of superconductivity. Lucio Rossi, the main speaker, is the head of the HL-LHC project, based at CERN. Giorgio Apollinari, Director for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) will speak through a videoconference from Fermilab (USA). The event is webcast live and will be followed by Fermilab and other institutes in the USA.

  11. Big advance towards the LHC upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The LHC is currently the world’s most powerful accelerator. With its technical achievements it has already set world records. However, big science looks very far ahead in time and is already preparing already for the LHC’s magnet upgrade, which should involve a 10-fold increase of the collision rates toward the end of the next decade. The new magnet technology involves the use of an advanced superconducting material that has just started to show its potential.   The first Long Quadrupole Shell (LQS01) model during assembly at Fermilab. The first important step in the qualification of the new technology for use in the LHC was achieved at the beginning of December when the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) – a consortium of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Fermilab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory founded by US Department Of Energy (DOE) in 2003 – successfully tested the first long focussing magnet th...

  12. Does One Need a 4.5 K Screen in Cryostats of Superconducting Accelerator Devices Operating in Superfluid Helium? Lessons from the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph; Tavian, L

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large proj...

  13. LHC(ATLAS, CMS, LHCb) Run 2 commissioning status

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Stephanie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    After a very successful run-1, the LHC accelerator and the LHC experiments had undergone intensive consolidation, maintenance and upgrade activities during the last 2 years in what has become known as Long-Shutdown-1 (LS1). LS1 ended in February this year, with beams back in the LHC since Easter. This talk will give a summary on the major shutdown activities of ATLAS, CMS and LHCb and review the status of commissioning for run-2 physics data taking.

  14. Analysis of the Dependability of the LHC Quench Detection System During LHC Run 2 and Further System Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Podzorny, Tomasz; Calcoen, Daniel; Denz, Reiner; Siemko, Andrzej; Spasic, Jelena; Steckert, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The quench detection system (QDS) of the LHC superconducting circuits is an essential part of the LHC machine protection and ensures the integrity of key elements of the accelerator. The large amount of hardwired and software interlock channels of the QDS requires a very high system dependability in order to reduce the risk of affecting the successful operation of the LHC. This contribution will present methods and tools for systematic fault tracking and analysis, and will discuss recent resu...

  15. Development and Optimisation of the SPS and LHC beam diagnostics based on Synchrotron Radiation monitors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081364; Roncarolo, Federico

    Measuring the beam transverse emittance is fundamental in every accelerator, in particular for colliders, where its precise determination is essential to maximize the luminosity and thus the performance of the colliding beams.
 Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is a versatile tool for non-destructive beam diagnostics, since its characteristics are closely related to those of the source beam. At CERN, being the only available diagnostics at high beam intensity and energy, SR monitors are exploited as the proton beam size monitor of the two higher energy machines, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The thesis work documented in this report focused on the design, development, characterization and optimization of these beam size monitors. Such studies were based on a comprehensive set of theoretical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments. A powerful simulation tool has been developed combining conventional softwares for SR simulation and optics design, thus allowing t...

  16. A super soliton connection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurses, M.; Oguz, O.

    1985-07-01

    Integrable super non-linear classical partial differential equations are considered. A super s1(2,R) algebra valued connection 1-form is constructed. It is shown that curvature 2-form of this super connection vanishes by virtue of the integrable super equations of motion. A super extension of the AKNS scheme is presented and a class of super extension of the Lax hierarchy and super non-linear Schroedinger equation are found. O(N) extension and the Baecklund transformations of the above super equations are also considered. (author)

  17. Keeping the LHC in power

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The critical safety equipment around the LHC, including the machine protection systems, is connected to Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS).  In case of mains failure, the UPS systems continue to power, for a limited time, these critical systems and ensure a safe shutdown of the accelerator. This week, work began to upgrade and replace over 100 UPS systems in the LHC.   The new UPS installations. For the LHC, even a perturbation on the mains is more than just an inconvenience: it often results in beam dumps and, in some cases, requires an energy extraction from superconducting circuits. When this occurs, machine protection systems, and in particular the Quench Protection System, must remain active to correctly carry out the shutdown procedure. With the UPS systems, 10 minutes of crucial power can be provided to the protection systems during this critical phase. There are currently two UPS systems in place in each one of the 32 LHC UPS zones. Originally one was used as a backup if ...

  18. Helium II heat transfer in LHC magnets : polyimide cable insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, Tiemo

    2017-01-01

    Today’s large particle accelerators like the LHC at CERN are using superconducting materials as a construction material for magnets. These magnets need to be cooled constantly to temperatures below the critical surface of the superconducting material. In the LHC this is achieved by using liquid

  19. Working on an LHC dipole end-cap

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    A metal worker constructs an end-cap for an LHC dipole magnet. These magnets will be used to bend the proton beams around the LHC, which is due to start up in 2008. The handmade prototype seen here will be used to make a mold from which the final set of components will be made for the accelerator.

  20. HL-LHC updates in Japan

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    At a recent meeting in Japan, updates on the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project were presented, including the progress made so far and the deadlines still to be met for the upgraded machine to be operational from 2020.   New magnets made with advanced superconductor Nb3Sn in the framework of the HL-LHC project. These magnets are currently under construction at CERN by the TE-MSC group. The LHC is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, and in 2015 it will reach yet another new record for the energy of its colliding beams. One key factor of its discovery potential is its ability to produce collisions described in mathematical terms by the parameter known as “luminosity”. In 2025, the HL-LHC project will allow the total number of collisions in the LHC to increase by a factor of 10. The first step in this rich upgrade programme is the delivery of the Preliminary Design Report (PDR), which is also a key milestone of the HiLumi LHC Design Study partly fund...

  1. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  2. Superconducting magnet development for the LHC upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    LHC is now delivering proton and heavy ion collisions at the highest energy. Upgrading the LHC beyond its design performance is a long term program that started during the LHC construction, with some fundamental R and D programs. The upgrade program is based on a vigorous superconductor and magnet R and D, aimed at increasing the field in accelerator magnets from 8 T to 12 T for the luminosity upgrade, with the scope of increasing the collider luminosity by a factor 5 to 10 from 2022. The upgrade program might continue with the LHC energy upgrade, which would require magnets producing field in the range of 16-20 T. The results obtained so far and the future challenges are discussed together with the possible plan to reach the goals. (author)

  3. Literature in Focus Perspectives on LHC Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Library invites you to a book presentation, a Literature in Focus event. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be the world’s largest, highest energy and highest intensity particle accelerator. This is a timely book with several perspectives on the hoped-for discoveries from the LHC. This book provides an overview of the techniques that will be crucial for finding new physics at the LHC, as well as perspectives on the importance and implications of the discoveries. Among the accomplished contributors to this book are leaders and visionaries in the field of particle physics beyond the Standard Model, including two Nobel Laureates (Steven Weinberg and Frank Wilczek). With its blend of popular and technical contents, the book will have wide appeal, not only to physical scientists but also to those in related fields. Perspectives on LHC Physics (World Scientific Publishing) Gordon Kane and Aaron Pierce (eds.) Tuesday 12 August, 4.30pm Council Chamber Refresh...

  4. First beam splashes at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    After a two-year shutdown, the first beams of Run 2 circulated in the LHC last Sunday. On Tuesday, the LHC operators performed dedicated runs to allow some of the experiments to record their first signals coming from particles splashed out when the circulating beams hit the collimators. Powerful reconstruction software then transforms the electronic signals into colourful images.     “Splash” events are used by the experiments to test their numerous subdetectors and to synchronise them with the LHC clock. These events are recorded when the path of particles travelling in the LHC vacuum pipe is intentionally obstructed using collimators – one-metre-long graphite or tungsten jaws that are also used to catch particles that wander too far from the beam centre and to protect the accelerator against unavoidable regular and irregular beam losses. The particles sprayed out of the collision between the beam and the collimators are mostly muons. ATLAS and CMS&...

  5. Electromagnetic and mechanical design of a 56 mm aperture mode dipole for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbaeck, J.; Ikaeheimo, J.; Jaervi, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project is proposed as the future extension of the CERN accelerator complex. The LHC requires twin aperture superconducting dipoles of highest possible field to guide the proton beams in the existing LEP tunnel of 26.7 km circumference. This paper describes the electromagnetic and mechanical design of a 56 mm aperture model dipole for the LHC

  6. CERN confident of LHC start-up in 2007

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    "Delegates attending the 140th meeting of CERN Council heard a confident report from the Laboratory about the scheduled start-up of the world's highest energy particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collier (LHC), in 2007." (1 page)

  7. Big Bang test delayed at CERN's LHC until 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    Atkins, William

    2007-01-01

    "Scientists at the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator and collider will postpone a test that could help solve the mystery of what happened a few nanoseconds after the Big Bang." (1 page)

  8. Spring 
start-up for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A new schedule for the commissioning of the LHC was presented to the Council at its Session in June. The start-up of the accelerator is scheduled for May 2008, to allow all technical problems to be resolved.

  9. Taiwan links up to world's first LHC computing grid project

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Taiwan's Academia Sinica was linked up to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Computing Grid Project last week to work jointly with 12 other countries to construct the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator" (1/2 page).

  10. The surveyors get the measure of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first to start work in the LHC tunnel, the surveyors are precisely marking out the positions of the future accelerator's magnets. A total of 7000 reference points will have to be marked out over two years.

  11. Crystals in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Bent crystals can be used to deflect charged particle beams. Their use in high-energy accelerators has been investigated for almost 40 years. Recently, a bent crystal was irradiated for the first time in the HiRadMat facility with an extreme particle flux, which crystals would have to withstand in the LHC. The results were very encouraging and confirmed that this technology could play a major role in increasing the beam collimation performance in future upgrades of the machine.   UA9 bent crystal tested with a laser. Charged particles interacting with a bent crystal can be trapped in channelling states and deflected by the atomic planes of the crystal lattice (see box). The use of bent crystals for beam manipulation in particle accelerators is a concept that has been well-assessed. Over the last three decades, a large number of experimental findings have contributed to furthering our knowledge and improving our ability to control crystal-particle interactions. In modern hadron colliders, su...

  12. Slice of LHC dipole wiring

    CERN Multimedia

    Dipole model slice made in 1994 by Ansaldo. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. 50’000 tonnes of steel sheets are used to make the magnet yokes that keep the wiring firmly in place. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the accelerator's weight and, placed side by side, stretch over 20 km!

  13. LHC technical data goes mobile

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2010-01-01

    The Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS), which has been in use at CERN for many years, has recently been enhanced with an innovative new feature for managing and exploiting existing information regarding the LHC: a system to read the barcodes on the LHC components and easily obtain data and information on the many thousands of items of equipment that make up the accelerator. The feature will eventually be made available for any other scientific instrumentation located at CERN.   Example of a magnet's barcode Systems like CERN's CMMS, which is based on an Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) system from Infor, are today standard practice in organizations managing large volumes of information about their facilities. However, the way in which CERN has adapted its system is rather unique: the CMMS not only manages the manufacturing, installation, maintenance and disposal of the components of CERN’s infrastructure but now has the potential to provide equipment information interact...

  14. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  15. Accelerating News Issue 3

    CERN Document Server

    Kahle, K; Tanguy, C; Wildner, E

    2012-01-01

    This summer saw CERN announce to a worldwide audience the discovery of a Higgs-like boson, so this issue takes a look at the machine behind the discovery, the LHC, as well as future plans for a possible Higgs factory in the form of LEP3. Looking ahead too are European strategies for particle physics and accelerator-based neutrino physics. In addition, taking stock of the work so far, HiLumi LHC and EuCARD showcase their latest results.

  16. The Super DREAM Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigmans, Richard [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Despite the fact that DOE provided only a fraction of the requested funds, the goals we defined in the proposal on which award ER41783 was based were essentially all met. This was partially due to the fact that other funding agencies, which supported our collaborators (especially from Italy and Korea) contributed as well, and partially due to the effective solutions that were developed to compensate for the fact that the detector we had proposed to build had to be scaled down. The performance of the SuperDREAM calorimeter is better than anything that has been built or proposed so far. This has of course not gone unnoticed in the scientific community. Scientists who are preparing experiments for the proposed new generation of particle accelerators (FCCee, CPEC,..) are all very seriously considering the technology developed in this project. Several new collaborations have formed which aim to adapt the dual-readout calorimeter principles to the demands of a 4 environment. Preliminary measurements using silicon photomultipliers as light sensors have already been carried out. This type of readout would make it possible to operate this detector in a magnetic field, and it would also allow for a longitudinal segmentation into electromagnetic and hadronic sections, if so desired. In addition, SiPM readout would eliminate the need for “forests” of fibers sticking out of the rear end of the calorimeter (Figure 1), and obtain an arbitrary fine lateral segmentation, which might be very important for recognizing electrons inside jets. The improvements in our understanding of the fundamental structure of matter and the forces that govern its behavior have always hinged on the availability of detectors that make it possible to explore the possibilities of new, more powerful particle accelerators to the fullest extent. We believe that the SuperDREAM project has created a quantum leap in detector technology, which may turn out to be crucially important for future discoveries in

  17. LHC opening delayed, operating schedule extended

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will reportedly reopen in October rather than this summer [...]. The $ 6.5 billion particle accelerator has 1'232 superconducting dipole magnets out of a total of more than 1'700 large magnets" (0.5 page)

  18. LHC Availability 2017: Standard Proton Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; Walsh, David John; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period from restart to the end of standard proton physics in 2017. This covers the whole standard proton physics production period. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  19. Safe LHC beam commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uythoven, J.; Schmidt, R.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the large amount of energy stored in magnets and beams, safety operation of the LHC is essential. The commissioning of the LHC machine protection system will be an integral part of the general LHC commissioning program. A brief overview of the LHC Machine Protection System will be given, identifying the main components: the Beam Interlock System, the Beam Dumping System, the Collimation System, the Beam Loss Monitoring System and the Quench Protection System. An outline is given of the commissioning strategy of these systems during the different commissioning phases of the LHC: without beam, injection and the different phases with stored beam depending on beam intensity and energy. (author)

  20. The LHC machine Exhibition Lepton-Photon 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The LHC will enable the study of proton-proton and ion-ion collisions. The existing chain of injectors (LINAC, booster, PS, SPS) will provide the necessary particles. The LHC superconducting magnets will generate the highest magnetic fields ever reached in an accelerator of this scale. The dipoles and quadrupoles will be interconnected so as to form a continuous cryogenic "pipe" installed in the 27 km-long LEP/LHC tunnel with its separate cryoline. The superconducting RF accelerating cavities, along with the beam cleaning and beam dump systems, will complete the machine.

  1. LHC? Of course we’ve heard of the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Well, more or less. After its first outing in Meyrin (see last Bulletin issue), our street poll hits the streets of Divonne-les-Bains and the corridors of the University of Geneva. While many have heard of the LHC, the raison d’être of this "scientific whatsit" often remains a mystery.On first questioning, the "man-in-the-street" always pleads ignorance. "Lausanne Hockey Club?" The acronym LHC is not yet imprinted on people’s minds. "Erm, Left-Handed thingamajig?" But as soon as we mention the word "CERN", the accelerator pops straight into people’s minds. Variously referred to as "the circle" or "the ring", it makes you wonder whether people would have been so aware of the LHC if it had been shaped like a square. Size is another thing people remember: "It’s the world’s biggest. Up to now…" As for its purpose, well that’s another kettle of fish. &...

  2. LHC Report: Beams are back in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The LHC has shaken itself awake after the winter break, and, as the snow melts on the lower slopes, the temperature in the magnets has dropped to a chilly 1.9 K once more.   Following the cool-down, the last few weeks have seen an intense few tests of the magnets, power supplies and associated protection systems. These tests, referred to as hardware commissioning, have been completed in record time. At the same time the other accelerator systems have been put through the preparatory machine checkout. In parallel, the injectors (LINAC2, Booster, PS and SPS) have also come out of the technical stop in order to prepare to deliver beam to the LHC very early in the season. Of particular note here was the remarkably seamless transition to POPS, the PS's new main power supply system. All this work culminated in the LHC taking beam again for the first time in 2011 on Saturday, 19 February. The careful preparation paid off, with circulating beams being rapidly re-established. There then followed a programme ...

  3. High Luminosity LHC: challenges and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Brüning, O.; Buffat, X.; Cai, Y.; Carver, L. R.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Iadarola, G.; Li, K.; Lechner, A.; Medina Medrano, L.; Métral, E.; Nosochkov, Y.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pieloni, T.; Qiang, J.; Redaelli, S.; Romano, A.; Rossi, L.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Schenk, M.; Tambasco, C.; Tomás, R.; Valishev, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. The dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  4. Snapshots to shed light on LHC performance

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the impressive size and unprecedented power of the LHC, it is all too easy to overlook the smaller devices that have the difficult task of monitoring the new accelerator. You don't have to stand too far back from the big picture to see examples of clever technology inside the LHC. One of the undulators installed in the LHC tunnel can be seen on the right of the photo. From right to left, back row: Lucio Rossi (group leader, MCS), Davide Tommasini (conceptual design, MCS), Thierry Tenaglia (integration design,TS-MME), Remo Maccaferri (project leader, MCS) and Hans Kummer (MCS/ME); front row: Gilles Trachez (MCS-ME) and Bruno Meunier (FSU-AT12). In contrast to the usual articles about the LHC's big number statistics, examples of clever problem-solving found in beam monitoring machinery show that smaller things can be beautiful too. The design of the LHC accelerator brought new challenges for monitoring the shape of the particle beam, known as the beam profile. The size of the beam shrinks as higher energi...

  5. LHC Highlights, from dream to reality

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The idea of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was born in the early 1980s. Although LEP (CERN’s previous large accelerator) was still under construction at that time, scientists were already starting to think about re-using the 27-kilometre ring for an even more powerful machine. Turning this ambitious scientific plan into reality proved to be an immensely complex task. Civil engineering work, state-of-the-art technologies, a new approach to data storage and analysis: many people worked hard for many years to accomplish all this.   Here are some of the highlights: 1984. A symposium organized in Lausanne, Switzerland, is the official starting point for the LHC. LHC prototype of the two beam pipes (1992). 1989. The first embryonic collaborations begin. 1992. A meeting in Evian, France, marks the beginning of the LHC experiments. 1994. The CERN Council approves the construction of the LHC accelerator. 1995. Japan becomes an Observer of CERN and announces a financial contribution to ...

  6. High Luminosity LHC: Challenges and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11–12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb 3 Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. As a result, the dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  7. Press Conference: LHC Restart, Season 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    PRESS BRIEFING ON THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER (LHC) RE-START, SEASON 2 AT CERN, GLOBE OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION Where :   http://cern.ch/directions   at the Globe of Science and Innovation When : Thursday, 12 March from 2.30 to 3.30pm - Open seating as from 2.15pm Speakers : CERN’s Director General, Rolf Heuer and Director of Accelerators, Frédérick Bordry, and representatives of the LHC experiments Webcast : https://webcast.web.cern.ch/webcast/ Dear Journalists, CERN is pleased to invite you to the above press briefing which will take place on Thursday 12 March, in the Globe of Science and Innovation, 1st floor, from 2.30 to 3.30pm. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is ready to start up for its second three-year run. The 27km LHC is the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world operating at a temperature of -217 degrees Centigrade and powered to a current of 11,000 amps. Run 2 of the LHC follows a two-year technical s...

  8. Radiation Levels around the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mala, P; Calviani, M; Nordt, A

    2013-01-01

    This work discuss on the radiation levels measured around the LHC machine during the 2012 operational year. The doses and particle fluences are measured primarily by RadMon detectors – about 300 RadMons are installed around the accelerator – and by thermoluminescent detectors. In addition, BLMs, IG5/PMI ionisation chambers as well as FGCs can be used for corresponding cumulated dose evaluations. The probability of SEE depends directly on the high-energy hadron (HEH) fluence, so this is the main parameter that is calculated based on RadMons counts.

  9. LHC gets the ball rolling

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A technique involving a small ball with a transmitter embedded inside it has been successfully tested in Sector 7-8. The ball is sent through the LHC beam pipes to check the LHC interconnections. The multidisciplinary team responsible for the RF ball project to check the interconnections. From left to right: Rhodri Jones (AB/BI), Eva Calvo (AB/BI), Francesco Bertinelli (AT/MCS), Sonia Bartolome Jimenez (TS/IC), Sylvain Weisz (TS/IC), Paul Cruikshank (AT/VAC), Willemjan Maan (AT/VAC), Alain Poncet (AT/MCS), Marek Gasior (AB/BI). During the tests the ball is inserted very carefully into the vacuum chamber.A game of ping-pong at the LHC? On 13 September a rather unusual test was carried out in Sector 7-8 of the accelerator. A ball just a bit smaller than a ping-pong ball was carefully introduced into one of the accelerator’s two vacuum pipes, where it travelled 800 metres in the space of a few mi...

  10. Switch on to the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The LHC is preparing to collide beams at 3.5 TeV for the first time ever! Be part of the event and follow live what goes on at the world’s most powerful particle accelerator by connecting to LHC1. Hereafter we give you a key to understand the display as well as a typical event display from the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Click on the image to enlarge it 1. This is the energy of beams. 1 TeV=1000 GeV. The LHC set the energy world’s record of 3.48 TeV per beam, today, 19 March 2010. 2. Intensity of, respectively, B1 (blue) and B2 (red). 3. The information in these boxes can vary. Operators display the graphs that are relevant to the specific operation. 4. Most of the flags are set automatically. They provide a quick summary of the machine status. In order to have collisions the ‘Stable Beams’ flag must be set to green. 5. Here operators write down their messages to the experiments. Often, they write the ongoing activity, followed by the plan for the coming hou...

  11. The LHC on an envelope

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The series of envelopes featuring CERN issued this summer was a huge success. The French postal services of the Pays de Gex will shortly be launching the second set of pre-paid envelopes issued in collaboration with the Laboratory this year, this time highlighting the LHC. Five thousand envelopes describing the accelerator’s capabilities will go on sale on 12 November, and some of the packs will even contain a small sample of the cables from the heart of the LHC magnets. The sets of ten pre-paid envelopes will tell you everything about CERN’s flagship accelerator, from its astounding technical capabilities to its spin-offs in the fields of technology and human resources. Each envelope will feature a different attribute or spin-off of the LHC. People will be invited to consult CERN’s public website for more detailed explanations if they want to know more. The new envelopes will be available from five post offices in the Pays ...

  12. The LHC in an envelope

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The series of envelopes featuring CERN issued this summer was a huge success. The French postal services of the Pays de Gex will shortly be launching the second set of pre-paid envelopes issued in collaboration with the Laboratory this year, this time highlighting the LHC. Five thousand envelopes describing the accelerator’s capabilities will go on sale on 12 November, and some of the packs will even contain a small sample of the cables from the heart of the LHC magnets. The sets of ten pre-paid envelopes will tell you everything about CERN’s flagship accelerator, from its astounding technical capabilities to its spin-offs in the fields of technology and human resources. Each envelope will feature a different attribute or spin-off of the LHC. People will be invited to consult CERN’s public website for more detailed explanations if they want to know more. The new envelopes will be available from five post offices in the Pays de Gex (Ferney-Voltaire, Prévessin...

  13. Super power generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.; Johnson, D.L.; McDaniel, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    PROTO II, a super power generator, is presently undergoing testing at Sandia Laboratories. It has operated with an 80 ns, 50 ns, 35 ns, and 20 ns positive output pulse high voltage mode and achieved total current rates of rise of 4 x 10 14 A/s. The two sided disk accelerator concept using two diodes has achieved voltages of 1.5 MV and currents of 4.5 MA providing a power exceeding 6 TW in the electron beam and 8 TW in the transmission lines. A new test bed named MITE (Magnetically Insulated Transmission Experiment) was designed and is now being tested. The pulse forming lines are back to back short pulse Blumleins which use untriggered water switching. Output data showing a ten ns half width power pulse peaking above one terrawatt were obtained. MITE is a module being investigated for use in the Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator and will be used to test the effects of short pulses propagating down vacuum transmission lines

  14. LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikova, Elena; Damerau, Heiko; Funken, Anne; Gilardoni, Simone; Goddard, Brennan; Hanke, Klaus; Kobzeva, Lelyzaveta; Lombardi, Alessandra; Manglunki, Django; Mataguez, Simon; Meddahi, Malika; Mikulec, Bettina; Rumolo, Giovanni; Scrivens, Richard; Vretenar, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    A massive improvement program of the LHC injector chain is presently being conducted under the LIU project. For the proton chain, this includes the replacement of Linac2 with Linac4 as well as all necessary upgrades to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the Proton Synchrotron (PS) and Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), aimed at producing beams with the challenging High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) parameters. Regarding the heavy ions, plans to improve the performance of Linac3 and the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) are also pursued under the general LIU program. The full LHC injection chain returned to operation after Long Shutdown 1, with extended beam studies taking place in Run 2. A general project Cost and Schedule Review also took place in March 2015, and several dedicated LIU project reviews were held to address issues awaiting pending decisions. In view of these developments, 2014 and 2015 have been key years to define a number of important aspects of the final LIU path. This paper will describe the reviewed LI...

  15. Electron cloud buildup studies for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160803; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    Electron clouds can develop in accelerators operating with positively charged particles. The con- sequences of e-cloud related effects are very important for the operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and for the design of future accelerators including the LHC luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). High electron densities are generated by an interaction between the beam and the confining chamber. Primary electrons, that can be generated through various mecha- nisms, are accelerated by the beam and impinge on the chamber walls, thereby extracting more electrons from the material. Furthermore they also deposit their kinetic energy in the process, which has to be compensated by the cooling system. Especially in cryogenic environments, as it is the case for a large part of the LHC, high heat loads can pose a serious problem. In order to improve the understanding of the electron cloud, simulation studies are performed with the code PyECLOUD, developed at CERN. The work of the first half of the project is desc...

  16. The status of the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Selph, F.B.

    1976-01-01

    The SuperHILAC is an Alvarez linear accelerator designed to accelerate all ions to a maximum energy of 8.5 MeV/u. Duplication of effort is made possible by the utilization of a technique known as timeshare - two different ion beams are accelerated independently through the same linac structure. Recent operating experience is reviewed. Also discussed are recent major improvements which have been made to the accelerator, and a proposed improvement which will increase reliability and beam intensity for the very heavy ions (A > approximately 84) by adding a third injector of improved design

  17. Towards LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    As plans for the LHC proton collider to be built in CERN's 27-kilometre LEP tunnel take shape, interest widens to bring in the experiments exploiting the big machine. The first public presentations of 'expressions of interest' for LHC experiments featured from 5-8 March at Evian-les-Bains on the shore of Lake Geneva, some 50 kilometres from CERN, at the special Towards the LHC Experimental Programme' meeting

  18. The LHC Superconducting RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the largest high energy physics laboratory worldwide, is constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the existing 27 km circumference LEP (Large Electron Positron) collider tunnel. For the LHC, superconducting cavities, operating at 4.5 K, will provide the required acceleration field for ramping the beam energy up to 7 TeV and for keeping the colliding proton beams tightly bunched. Superconducting cavities were chosen, not only because of their high acceleration field leading to a small contribution to the machine impedance, but also because of their high stored energy which minimises the effects of periodic transient beam loading associated with the high beam intensity (0.5 A). There will be eight single-cell cavities per beam, each delivering 2 MV (5.3 MV/m) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industrial firms, using niobium on copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A complete cavity prototype assembly in...

  19. Acceleration of the LHC commissioning tests

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The quadrupole and main dipole circuits have been powered up to 10,200 amps in Sector 4-5. Sector 5-6 is currently being cooled and will be the next to undergo electrical tests, which will be stepped up over the next few weeks.

  20. Remote Inspection, Measurement and Handling for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kershaw, K; Coin, A; Delsaux, F; Feniet, T; Grenard, J L; Valbuena, R

    2007-01-01

    Personnel access to the LHC tunnel will be restricted to varying extents during the life of the machine due to radiation, cryogenic and pressure hazards. The ability to carry out visual inspection, measurement and handling activities remotely during periods when the LHC tunnel is potentially hazardous offers advantages in terms of safety, accelerator down time, and costs. The first applications identified were remote measurement of radiation levels at the start of shut-down, remote geometrical survey measurements in the collimation regions, and remote visual inspection during pressure testing and initial machine cool-down. In addition, for remote handling operations, it will be necessary to be able to transmit several real-time video images from the tunnel to the control room. The paper describes the design, development and use of a remotely controlled vehicle to demonstrate the feasibility of meeting the above requirements in the LHC tunnel. Design choices are explained along with operating experience to-dat...

  1. The 27-km circular path of the LHC tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    AC-DI-MM

    1994-01-01

    This aerial view of the CERN site shows the path of the 27-km circumference tunnel that housed the LEP accelerator and now contains the accelerator for CERN's new flagship project, the LHC. The ring stretches from Geneva airport, which can be seen on the lower left, to the French countryside.

  2. The physics behind LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    What do physicists want to discover with experiments at the LHC? What is the Higgs boson? What are the new phenomena that could be observed at the LHC?I will try to answer these questions using language accessible also to non-experts. Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  3. The LHC Collimator Controls Architecture - Design and beam tests

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Gander, P; Jonker, M; Lamont, M; Losito, R; Masi, A; Sobczak, M

    2007-01-01

    The LHC collimation system will require simultaneous management by the LHC control system of more than 500 jaw positioning mechanisms in order to ensure the required beam cleaning and machine protection performance in all machine phases, from injection at 450 GeV to collision at 7 TeV. Each jaw positionis a critical parameter for the machine safety. In this paper, the architecture of the LHC collimator controls is presented. The basic design to face the accurate control of the LHC collimators and the interfaces to the other components of LHC Software Application and control infrastructures are described. The full controls system has been tested in a real accelerator environment in the CERN SPS during beam tests with a full scale collimator prototype. The results and the lessons learned are presented.

  4. Fast Beam Current Change Monitor for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kral, Jan

    Stringent demands on the LHC safety and protection systems require improved methods of detecting fast beam losses. The Fast Beam Current Transformer (FBCT) is a measurement instrument, providing information about bunch-to-bunch intensity of the accelerated beam. This thesis describes the development of a new protection system based on the FBCT signal measurements. This system, the Fast Beam Current Change Monitor (FBCCM), measures the FBCT signal in a narrow frequency band and computes time derivation of the beam signal magnitude. This derivation is proportional to the beam losses. When the losses exceed a certain level, the FBCCM requests a beam dump in order to protect the LHC. The LHC protection will be ensured by four FBCCMs which will be installed into the LHC in July 2014. Six FBCCMs have been already constructed and their characteristics were measured with satisfactory results. The FBCCMs were tested by a laboratory simulation of the real LHC environment.

  5. The LHC is safe

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2008-01-01

    Concerns have been expressed from time to time about the safety of new high-energy colliders, and the LHC has been no exception. The LHC Safety Assessment Group (LSAG)(*) was asked last year by the CERN management to review previous LHC safety analyses in light of additional experimental results and theoretical understanding. LSAG confirms, updates and extends previous conclusions that there is no basis for any conceivable threat from the LHC. Indeed, recent theoretical and experimental developments reinforce this conclusion. In this Colloquium, the basic arguments presented by LSAG will be reviewed. Cosmic rays of much higher effective centre-of-mass energies have been bombarding the Earth and other astronomical objects for billions of years, and their continued existence shows that the Earth faces no dangers from exotic objects such as hypothetical microscopic black holes that might be produced by the LHC - as discussed in a detailed paper by Giddings and Mangano(**). Measurements of strange particle produc...

  6. Particles are back in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2016-01-01

    The LHC has introduced beam for the first time since the year-end technical stop began in December 2015.   CERN Management and LHC operators applaud as the first beam circulates in the LHC, on Friday 25 March.   On Friday, the LHC opened its doors to allow particles to travel around the ring for the first time since the year-end technical stop (YETS) began in December 2015. At 10:30 a.m., a first bunch was circulating and by midday the beam was circulating in both directions. Progress over the weekend has been good and low intensity beam has already been taken to 6.5 TeV and through the squeeze. Last week, the LHC underwent the final phase of preparation before beam -known as the machine checkout. During this phase all the systems of the LHC are put through their paces without beam. A key part of the process is driving the magnetic circuits, radiofrequency accelerating cavities, collimators, transverse dampers etc. repeatedly through the nominal LHC cycle. A fu...

  7. The first LHC sector is fully interconnected

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Sector 7-8 is the first sector of the LHC to become fully operational. All the magnets, cryogenic line, vacuum chambers and services are interconnected. The cool down of this sector can soon commence. LHC project leader Lyn Evans, the teams from CERN's AT/MCS, AT/VAC and AT/MEL groups, and the members of the IEG consortium celebrate the completion of the first LHC sector. The 10th of November was a red letter day for the LHC accelerator teams, marking the completion of the first sector of the machine. The magnets of sector 7-8, together with the cryogenic line, the vacuum chambers and the distribution feedboxes (DFBs) are now all completely interconnected. Sector 7-8 has thus been closed and is the first LHC sector to become operational. The interconnection work required several thousand electrical, cryogenic and insulating connections to be made on the 210 interfaces between the magnets in the arc, the 30 interfaces between the special magnets and the interfaces with the cryogenic line. 'This represent...

  8. LHC Report: The machine under maintenance

    CERN Multimedia

    Katy Foraz for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC Christmas break started on 12 December. Since then, teams have been working hard to complete all the maintenance work planned to ensure the reliable operation of the LHC in 2012.   Installation of shielding at Point 1. The maintenance work is being carried out on key infrastructure such as the cooling, ventilation, electricity and safety systems. Maintenance work is being carried out not just in the LHC but also across the whole accelerator complex, which makes planning the work even more complicated. At the time of going to print, 50% of the cryogenics system maintenance has been finished, which, according to the schedule, will allow the LHC teams to start cooling down the first sectors next week to have the entire machine cold by the end of February. A lot of activity is going on in order to mitigate the effects of radiation on equipment installed in the LHC tunnel and underground areas during 2012 operation. To this end, teams have installed additional shielding at Point 1 (see ph...

  9. LHC Power Converters: A Precision Game

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The LHC test-bed, String 2, is close to commissioning and one important element to get a first chance to prove what it can do is the power converter system. In String 2 there are 16 converters, in the full LHC there will be almost 1800. This article takes a look at what is so special about the power converters for the LHC. The 13 000 Amps power converters with the watercooled cables going to the String 2 feedboxes. The LHC's superconducting magnets will be the pinnacle of high technology. But to work, they'll need the help of high-precision power converters to supply them with extremely stable DC current. Perfection will be the name of the game, with an accuracy of just 1-2 parts per million (ppm) required. LEP, for the sake of comparison, could live with 10-20 ppm. The LHC's power converters will be very different from those of LEP or the SPS since the new accelerator's magnets are mostly superconducting. That means that they require much higher currents at a lower voltage since superconductors have no re...

  10. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Mobs, Esma Anais

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark blue line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  11. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Christiane Lefèvre

    2008-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  12. Accelerating News Issue 5

    CERN Document Server

    Szeberenyi, A

    2013-01-01

    In this spring issue, we look at developments towards higher luminosity and higher energy colliders. We report on the technology developed for the remote powering of the LHC magnets and studies of diagnostics based on higher order mode port signals. We also inform you about the main outcome of the TIARA survey on market needs for accelerator scientists.

  13. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Haffner, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  14. Accelerator update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    When the Accelerator Conference, combined International High Energy and US Particle versions, held in Dallas in May, was initially scheduled, progress nearby for the US Superconducting Supercollider was high on the preliminary agenda. With the SSC voted down by Congress in October 1993, this was no longer the case. However the content of the meeting, in terms of both its deep implications for ambitious new projects and the breadth of its scope, showed that the worldwide particle accelerator field is far from being moribund. A traditional feature of such accelerator conferences is the multiplicity of parallel sessions. No one person can attend all sessions, so that delegates can follow completely different paths and emerge with totally different impressions. Despite this overload, and despite the SSC cancellation, the general picture is one of encouraging progress over a wide range of major new projects throughout the world. At the same time, spinoff from, and applications of, accelerators and accelerator technology are becoming increasingly important. Centrestage is now CERN's LHC proton-proton collider, where a test string of superconducting magnets is operating over long periods at the nominal LHC field of 8.36 tesla or more. The assignment of the underground areas in the existing 27- kilometre LEP tunnel is now quasidefinitive (see page 3). For CERN's existing big machine, the LEP electron-positron collider, ongoing work concentrates on boosting performance using improved optics and bunch trains. But the main objective is the LEP2 scheme using superconducting accelerating cavities to boost the beam energy (see page 6). After some initial teething problems, production and operation of these cavities appears to have been mastered, at least under test conditions. A highlight at CERN last year was the first run with lead ions (December 1994, page 15). Handling these heavy particles with systems originally designed for protons calls for ingenuity. The SPS

  15. Accelerator update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-15

    When the Accelerator Conference, combined International High Energy and US Particle versions, held in Dallas in May, was initially scheduled, progress nearby for the US Superconducting Supercollider was high on the preliminary agenda. With the SSC voted down by Congress in October 1993, this was no longer the case. However the content of the meeting, in terms of both its deep implications for ambitious new projects and the breadth of its scope, showed that the worldwide particle accelerator field is far from being moribund. A traditional feature of such accelerator conferences is the multiplicity of parallel sessions. No one person can attend all sessions, so that delegates can follow completely different paths and emerge with totally different impressions. Despite this overload, and despite the SSC cancellation, the general picture is one of encouraging progress over a wide range of major new projects throughout the world. At the same time, spinoff from, and applications of, accelerators and accelerator technology are becoming increasingly important. Centrestage is now CERN's LHC proton-proton collider, where a test string of superconducting magnets is operating over long periods at the nominal LHC field of 8.36 tesla or more. The assignment of the underground areas in the existing 27- kilometre LEP tunnel is now quasidefinitive (see page 3). For CERN's existing big machine, the LEP electron-positron collider, ongoing work concentrates on boosting performance using improved optics and bunch trains. But the main objective is the LEP2 scheme using superconducting accelerating cavities to boost the beam energy (see page 6). After some initial teething problems, production and operation of these cavities appears to have been mastered, at least under test conditions. A highlight at CERN last year was the first run with lead ions (December 1994, page 15). Handling these heavy particles with systems originally designed for protons calls for ingenuity. The SPS has managed

  16. Electron-cloud simulation results for the SPS and recent results for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.T.F.

    2002-01-01

    We present an update of computer simulation results for some features of the electron cloud at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and recent simulation results for the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We focus on the sensitivity of the power deposition on the LHC beam screen to the emitted electron spectrum, which we study by means of a refined secondary electron (SE) emission model recently included in our simulation code

  17. Simulation of interactions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckeck, Guenter [Munich Univ. (Germany). Physics Faculty

    2016-11-01

    The LHC Run-2 is planned to continue until end of 2018 and should increase the data volume by at least a factor 5 compared to Run-1. A corresponding increase of the simulated data volume is required in order to analyze and interpret the recorded data. This will allow us to determine with much better precision the properties of the Higgs Boson and either find new particles as predicted by 'New Physics' theories or further increase the constraints on these models. Using SuperMUC to simulate events will be a crucial component to reach these goals. Active development of the simulation software is ongoing in order to make the workflow more flexible and better parallelizable for smaller work-units. Adapting the software for Intel/Mic architectures is an important goal, though presumably more in the long-term after LHC Run-2 (Run-3 is planned to start in 2021). We would hope that ''SuperMUC Next Generation'' provides Intel/Mic architecture extensions.

  18. The LHC cryogenic operation for first collisions and physics run

    CERN Document Server

    Brodzinski, K; Benda, V; Bremer, J; Casas-Cubillos, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Ferlin, G; Fernandez Penacoba, G; Perin, A; Pirotte, O; Soubiran, M; Tavian, L; van Weelderen, R; Wagner, U

    2011-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryogenic system was progressively and successfully run for the LHC accelerator operation period starting from autumn 2009. The paper recalls the cryogenic system architecture and main operation principles. The system stability during magnets powering and availability periods for high energy beams with first collisions at 3.5 TeV are presented. Treatment of typical problems, weak points of the system and foreseen future consolidations will be discussed.

  19. Commissioning of the cryogenics of the LHC long straight sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perin, A.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Claudet, S.; Darve, C.; Ferlin, G.; Millet, F.; Parente, C.; Rabehl, R.; Soubiran, M.; van Weelderen, R.; Wagner, U.

    2010-01-01

    The LHC is made of eight circular arcs interspaced with eight Long Straight Sections (LSS). Most powering interfaces to the LHC are located in these sections where the particle beams are focused and shaped for collision, cleaning and acceleration. The LSSs are constituted of several unique cryogenic devices and systems like electrical feed-boxes, standalone superconducting magnets, superconducting links, RF cavities and final focusing superconducting magnets. This paper presents the cryogenic commissioning and the main results obtained during the first operation of the LHC Long Straight Sections.

  20. Measurements at LHC and their relevance for cosmic ray physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Many LHC measurements are already used to improve hadronic interaction models used in cosmic ray analyses. This already had a positive effect on the model dependence of crucial data analyses. Some of the data and the model tuning is reviewed. However, the LHC still has a lot more potential to provide crucial information. Since the start of Run2 the highest accelerator beam energies are reached and no further increase can be expected for a long time. First data of Run2 are published and the fundamental performance of cosmic ray hadronic interaction models can be scrutinized. The relevance of LHC data in general for cosmic ray data analyses is demonstrated.

  1. Commissioning of the Cryogenics of the LHC Long Straight Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Claudet, S; Darve, C; Ferlin, G; Millet, F; Parente, C; Rabehl, R; Soubiran, M; van Weelderen, R; Wagner, U

    2010-01-01

    The LHC is made of eight circular arcs interspaced with eight Long Straight Sections (LSS). Most powering interfaces to the LHC are located in these sections where the particle beams are focused and shaped for collision, cleaning and acceleration. The LSSs are constituted of several unique cryogenic devices and systems like electrical feed-boxes, standalone superconducting magnets, superconducting links, RF cavities and final focusing superconducting magnets. This paper presents the cryogenic commissioning and the main results obtained during the first operation of the LHC Long Straight Sections.

  2. The Commissioning of the LHC Technical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Saban, R; Baggiolini, V; Ballarino, A; Barbero-Soto, E; Bellesia, B; Bordry, Frederick; Bozzini, D; Casas-Lino, M-P; Chareyre, V; Claudet, S; Coelingh, G-J; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Fehér, S; Flora, R; Gruwé, M; Kain, V; Kirby, G; Koratzinos, M; Lauckner, R; Le Naour, S; Mess, K-H; Millet, F; Montabonnet, V; Nisbet, D; Perea-Solano, B; Pojer, M; Principe, R; Rabehl, R; Rijllart, A; Redaelli, S; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Schmidt, R; Serio, L; Siemko, A; Solfaroli-Camillocci, M; Thiesen, H; Venturini, W; Vergara-Fernandez, A; Verweij, A; Zerlauth, M

    2007-01-01

    The LHC is an accelerator with unprecedented complexity where the energy stored in magnets and the beams exceeds other accelerators by one-to-two orders of magnitude. To ensure a safe and efficient machine start-up without being plagued by technical problems, a phase of "hardware commissioning" was introduced: a thorough commissioning of technical systems without beam. This activity started in June 2005 with the commissioning of individual systems, followed by operating a full sector, one eighth of the machine; the commissioning is expected to last until spring 2008 when commissioning with beam will start. The LHC architecture allows the commissioning of each of the eight sectors independently from the others, before the installation of other sectors is complete. An important effort went into the definition of the programme and the organization of the coordination in the field, as well as in the preparation of the tools to record and analyze test results. This paper discusses the experience with this approach...

  3. LHC Report: LHC hit the target!

    CERN Multimedia

    Enrico Bravin for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    Last week, the accumulated integrated luminosity reached the target value for 2016 of 25 fb-1 in both ATLAS and CMS.   The integrated luminosity delivered to ATLAS and CMS reached (and already passed!) 25 fb-1– the target for the whole year! Tuesday, 30 August was just a regular day for the 2016 LHC run. However,  on that day, the integrated luminosity delivered to ATLAS and CMS reached 25 fb-1 – the target for the whole year! How did we get here? A large group of committed scientists and technical experts work behind the scenes at the LHC, ready to adapt to the quirks of this truly impressive machine. After the push to produce as many proton-proton collisions as possible before the summer conferences, several new ideas and production techniques (such as Bunch Compression Multiple Splitting, BCMS) have been incorporated in the operation of LHC in order to boost its performance even further. Thanks to these improvements, the LHC was routinely operated with peak luminos...

  4. The LHC babies

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    With the machine restart and first collisions at 3.5 TeV, 2009 and 2010 were two action-packed years at the LHC. The events were a real media success, but one important result that remained well hidden was the ten births in the LHC team over the same period. The mothers – engineers, cryogenics experts and administrative assistants working for the LHC – confirm that it is possible to maintain a reasonable work-life balance. Two of them tell us more…   Verena Kain (left) and Reyes Alemany (right) in the CERN Control Centre. With the LHC running around the clock, LHC operations engineers have high-pressure jobs with unsociable working hours. These past two years, which will undoubtedly go down in the annals of CERN history, the LHC team had their work cut out, but despite their high-octane professional lives, several female members of the team took up no less of a challenge in their private lives, creating a mini-baby-boom by which the LHC start-up will also be remembe...

  5. Silicon Strip Detectors for the ATLAS sLHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Miñano, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is continuing to deliver an ever-increasing luminosity to the experiments, plans for an upgraded machine called Super-LHC (sLHC) are progressing. The upgrade is foreseen to increase the LHC design luminosity by a factor ten. The ATLAS experiment will need to build a new tracker for sLHC operation, which needs to be suited to the harsh sLHC conditions in terms of particle rates. In order to cope with the increase in pile-up backgrounds at the higher luminosity, an all silicon detector is being designed. To successfully face the increased radiation dose, a new generation of extremely radiation hard silicon detectors is being designed. The left part of figure 1 shows the simulated layout for the ATLAS tracker upgrade to be installed in the volume taken up by the current ATLAS pixel, strip and transition radiation detectors. Silicon sensors with sufficient radiation hardness are the subject of an international R&D programme, working on pixel and strip sensors. The...

  6. LHC preparations change gear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    After the formal approval by CERN Council in December (January, page 1) of the LHC protonproton collider for CERN's 27- kilometre LEP tunnel, preparations for the new machine change gear. Lyndon Evans becomes LHC Project Leader, and CERN's internal structure will soon be reorganized to take account of the project becoming a definite commitment. On the experimental side, the full Technical Proposals for the big general purpose ATLAS and CMS detectors were aired at a major meeting of the LHC Committee at CERN in January. These Technical Proposals are impressive documents each of some several hundred pages. (Summaries of the detector designs will appear in forthcoming issues of the CERN Courier.) The ALICE heavy ion experiment is not far behind, and plans for other LHC experiments are being developed. Playing an important role in this groundwork has been the Detector Research and Development Committee (DRDC), founded in 1990 to foster detector development for the LHC experimental programme and structured along the lines of a traditional CERN Experiments Committee. Established under the Director Generalship of Carlo Rubbia and initially steered by Research Director Walter Hoogland, the DRDC has done sterling work in blazing a trail for LHC experiments. Acknowledging that the challenge of LHC experimentation needs technological breakthroughs as well as specific detector subsystems, DRDC proposals have covered a wide front, covering readout electronics and computing as well as detector technology. Its first Chairman was Enzo larocci, succeeded in 1993 by Michal Turala. DRDC's role was to evaluate proposals, and make recommendations to CERN's Research Board for approval and resource allocation, not an easy task when the LHC project itself had yet to be formally approved. Over the years, a comprehensive portfolio of detector development has been built up, much of which has either led to specific LHC detector subsystems for traditional detector tasks

  7. Super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Alice

    1990-01-01

    A super Riemann surface is a particular kind of (1,1)-dimensional complex analytic supermanifold. From the point of view of super-manifold theory, super Riemann surfaces are interesting because they furnish the simplest examples of what have become known as non-split supermanifolds, that is, supermanifolds where the odd and even parts are genuinely intertwined, as opposed to split supermanifolds which are essentially the exterior bundles of a vector bundle over a conventional manifold. However undoubtedly the main motivation for the study of super Riemann surfaces has been their relevance to the Polyakov quantisation of the spinning string. Some of the papers on super Riemann surfaces are reviewed. Although recent work has shown all super Riemann surfaces are algebraic, some areas of difficulty remain. (author)

  8. CERN reacts to increased costs to completion of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Aspects of LHC construction. The CERN Council, where the representatives of the 20 Member States of the Organization decide on scientific programmes and financial resources, held its 120th session on 14 December under the chairmanship of Prof. Maurice Bourquin (CH). CERN adjusts to the LHC Director-General, Luciano Maiani, stressed that CERN was now fully engaged in the LHC and outlined the first moves to react to the increased cost to completion of the LHC. The new accelerator is an extremely complex, high-tech project which CERN is building under very severe conditions. However, the technical challenges are solved and industrial production of accelerator elements, and installation are starting. Professor Maiani said that 2001 had been a very hard but decisive year for CERN. An important milestone had been passed during this meeting with the approval of the LHC dipole magnets contract, the last major contract for the accelerator. The new costs to completion of the LHC project are now clear. A first propos...

  9. Highlights of LHC experiments – Part I

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00072301; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The superb performance of the LHC accelerator in 2016, in both live time and peak luminosity, has provided a large data sample of collisions at 13 TeV. Excellent performances of the ATLAS and LHCb detectors, together with highly performant offline and analysis systems, mean that a wealth of results are already available from 13 TeV data. Selected highlights are reported here.

  10. Cold dark matter and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, Marco; Hinchliffe, Ian; Tovey, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The recent determination of the dark matter density in the universe by the WMAP satellite has brought new attention to the interplay of results from particle physics experiments at accelerators and from cosmology. In this paper we discuss the prospects for finding direct evidence for a candidate dark matter particle at the LHC and the measurements which would be crucial for testing its compatibility with the cosmology data. (topical review)

  11. The LHC string2 supervision system

    CERN Document Server

    Mayya, Y S; Sicard, Claude Henri

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the supervision system for the LHC Prototype Full-Cell also known as String 2. The supervision application is based on a commercial package targeted to industrial controls, but because of the complexity and the specifics of such a system, integration with custom components is necessary in order to merge the industrial requirements with the specificity of the accelerator controls.

  12. Conference: STANDARD MODEL @ LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    HCØ institute Universitetsparken 5 DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø Denmark Room: Auditorium 2 STANDARD MODEL @ LHC Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center 10-13 April 2012 This four day meeting will bring together both experimental and theoretical aspects of Standard Model phenomenology at the LHC. The very latest results from the LHC experiments will be under discussion. Topics covered will be split into the following categories:     * QCD (Hard,Soft & PDFs)     * Vector Boson production     * Higgs searches     * Top Quark Physics     * Flavour physics

  13. The Lhc beam commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redarelli, S.; Bailey, R.

    2008-01-01

    The plans for the Lhc proton beam commissioning are presented. A staged commissioning approach is proposed to satisfy the request of the Lhc experiments while minimizing the machine complexity in early commissioning phases. Machine protection and collimation aspects will be tackled progressively as the performance will be pushed to higher beam intensities. The key parameters are the number of bunches, k b , the proton intensity pe bunch, N, and the β in the various interaction points. All together these parameters determine the total beam power and the complexity of the machine. We will present the proposed trade off between the evolution of these parameters and the Lhc luminosity performance.

  14. Supermanifolds and super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    The theory of super Riemann surfaces is rigorously developed using Rogers' theory of supermanifolds. The global structures of super Teichmueller space and super moduli space are determined. The super modular group is shown to be precisely the ordinary modular group. Super moduli space is shown to be the gauge-fixing slice for the fermionic string path integral

  15. Calculus super review

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Get all you need to know with Super Reviews! Each Super Review is packed with in-depth, student-friendly topic reviews that fully explain everything about the subject. The Calculus I Super Review includes a review of functions, limits, basic derivatives, the definite integral, combinations, and permutations. Take the Super Review quizzes to see how much you've learned - and where you need more study. Makes an excellent study aid and textbook companion. Great for self-study!DETAILS- From cover to cover, each in-depth topic review is easy-to-follow and easy-to-grasp - Perfect when preparing for

  16. Algebra & trigonometry super review

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Get all you need to know with Super Reviews! Each Super Review is packed with in-depth, student-friendly topic reviews that fully explain everything about the subject. The Algebra and Trigonometry Super Review includes sets and set operations, number systems and fundamental algebraic laws and operations, exponents and radicals, polynomials and rational expressions, equations, linear equations and systems of linear equations, inequalities, relations and functions, quadratic equations, equations of higher order, ratios, proportions, and variations. Take the Super Review quizzes to see how much y

  17. The New SPS Extraction Channel for LHC and CNGS

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Schröder, G; Weterings, W; Uythoven, J

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and CERN Neutrino to Gran Sasso (CNGS) projects require the construction of a new fast-extraction system in the long straight section LSS4 of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. A conventional DC septum magnet will be used, in conjunction with the installation of horizontal and vertical extraction bumpers, main quadrupoles with enlarged apertures, extraction kicker magnets and additional hardware protection, instrumentation, controls and electronics. The extraction channel must be able to accept the bright LHC proton beam at 450 GeV/c, and also the high intensity, large emittance fixed target CNGS proton beam at the nominal 400 GeV/c extraction momentum. This paper describes the extraction channel to be installed in 2003, and shows how the requirements for both the LHC and CNGS project can be met.

  18. The Latest from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    In SM18 six magnets have been cold tested with good results. It has also been a good week for cyostating with five more magnets completed. In sector 3-4 interconnection work and welding has started in the area damaged on 19 September last year. Interconnection work is also ongoing on the replacement magnet for the faulty dipole removed from sector 1-2. Three separate teams are now working in the three sectors to install the new DN200 pressure release nozzles. In total 27 magnets have been completed so far, with 34 nozzles welded. A new study is also underway to include a similar pressure release system for both the stand-alone magnets (SAMs) and the triplet magnets. All about Chamonix At the public session of the LHCC (the LHC experiments committee) held Wednesday, 18 February Steve Myers, Director for Accelerators and Technology, reviewed the discussions on the LHC at the Chamonix workshop. He explained the scenarios being studied to implement the machine consolidation measures and resume operation. The ...

  19. LHC Report: plumbing new heights

    CERN Multimedia

    John Jowett for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    Following the end of the arduous 2015 proton run on 4 November, the many teams working on the LHC and its injector complex are naturally entitled to a calmer period before the well-earned end-of-year break. But that is not the way things work.       The CCC team after stable heavy-ion beams are declared in the LHC. Instead, the subdued frenzy of setting up the accelerators for a physics run has started again, this time for heavy-ion beams, with a few additional twists of the time-pressure knob. In this year’s one-month run, the first week was devoted to colliding protons at 2.51 TeV per beam to provide reference data for the subsequent collisions of lead nuclei (the atomic number of lead is Z=82, compared to Z=1 for protons) at the unprecedented energy of 5.02 TeV in the centre of mass per nucleon pair. The chain of specialised heavy-ion injectors, comprising the ECR ion source, Linac3 and the LEIR ring, with its elaborate bunch-forming and c...

  20. Machine protection: availability for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apollonio, A.

    2015-01-01

    Machine availability is a key indicator for the performance of the next generation of particle accelerators. Availability requirements need to be carefully considered during the design phase to achieve challenging objectives in different fields, as e.g. particle physics and material science. For existing and future High-Power facilities, such as ESS (European Spallation Source) and HL-LHC (High-Luminosity LHC), operation with unprecedented beam power requires highly dependable Machine Protection Systems (MPS) to avoid any damage-induced downtime. Due to the high complexity of accelerator systems, finding the optimal balance between equipment safety and accelerator availability is challenging. The MPS architecture, as well as the choice of electronic components, have a large influence on the achievable level of availability. In this thesis novel methods to address the availability of accelerators and their protection systems are presented. Examples of studies related to dependable MPS architectures are given in the thesis, both for Linear accelerators (Linac4, ESS) and circular particle colliders (LHC and HL-LHC). A study of suitable architectures for interlock systems of future availability-critical facilities is presented. Different methods have been applied to assess the anticipated levels of accelerator availability. The thesis presents the prediction of the performance (integrated luminosity for a particle collider) of LHC and future LHC up- grades, based on a Monte Carlo model that allows reproducing a realistic timeline of LHC operation. This model does not only account for the contribution of MPS, but extends to all systems relevant for LHC operation. Results are extrapolated to LHC run 2, run 3 and HL-LHC to derive individual system requirements, based on the target integrated luminosity. (author)

  1. submitter LHC@Home: a BOINC-based volunteer computing infrastructure for physics studies at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco, Javier; Cameron, David; Crouch, Matthew; De Maria, Riccardo; Field, Laurence; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hermes, Pascal; Høimyr, Nils; Kaltchev, Dobrin; Karastathis, Nikos; Luzzi, Cinzia; Maclean, Ewen; McIntosh, Eric; Mereghetti, Alessio; Molson, James; Nosochkov, Yuri; Pieloni, Tatiana; Reid, Ivan D; Rivkin, Lenny; Segal, Ben; Sjobak, Kyrre; Skands, Peter; Tambasco, Claudia; Van der Veken, Frederik; Zacharov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The LHC@Home BOINC project has provided computing capacity for numerical simulations to researchers at CERN since 2004, and has since 2011 been expanded with a wider range of applications. The traditional CERN accelerator physics simulation code SixTrack enjoys continuing volunteers support, and thanks to virtualisation a number of applications from the LHC experiment collaborations and particle theory groups have joined the consolidated LHC@Home BOINC project. This paper addresses the challenges related to traditional and virtualized applications in the BOINC environment, and how volunteer computing has been integrated into the overall computing strategy of the laboratory through the consolidated LHC@Home service. Thanks to the computing power provided by volunteers joining LHC@Home, numerous accelerator beam physics studies have been carried out, yielding an improved understanding of charged particle dynamics in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its future upgrades. The main results are highlighted i...

  2. LHC@Home: a BOINC-based volunteer computing infrastructure for physics studies at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Javier; Cai, Yunhai; Cameron, David; Crouch, Matthew; Maria, Riccardo De; Field, Laurence; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hermes, Pascal; Høimyr, Nils; Kaltchev, Dobrin; Karastathis, Nikos; Luzzi, Cinzia; Maclean, Ewen; McIntosh, Eric; Mereghetti, Alessio; Molson, James; Nosochkov, Yuri; Pieloni, Tatiana; Reid, Ivan D.; Rivkin, Lenny; Segal, Ben; Sjobak, Kyrre; Skands, Peter; Tambasco, Claudia; Veken, Frederik Van der; Zacharov, Igor

    2017-12-01

    The LHC@Home BOINC project has provided computing capacity for numerical simulations to researchers at CERN since 2004, and has since 2011 been expanded with a wider range of applications. The traditional CERN accelerator physics simulation code SixTrack enjoys continuing volunteers support, and thanks to virtualisation a number of applications from the LHC experiment collaborations and particle theory groups have joined the consolidated LHC@Home BOINC project. This paper addresses the challenges related to traditional and virtualized applications in the BOINC environment, and how volunteer computing has been integrated into the overall computing strategy of the laboratory through the consolidated LHC@Home service. Thanks to the computing power provided by volunteers joining LHC@Home, numerous accelerator beam physics studies have been carried out, yielding an improved understanding of charged particle dynamics in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its future upgrades. The main results are highlighted in this paper.

  3. CERN confirms LHC schedule

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The CERN Council held its 125th session on 20 June. Highlights of the meeting included confirmation that the LHC is on schedule for a 2007 start-up, and the announcement of a new organizational structure in 2004.

  4. CERN recognises LHC suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN has just presented the first awards recognising LHC suppliers. The Russian institute BINP, the Belgian firm Cockerill-Sambre and the US company Wah-Chang are the recipients of the first 'Golden Hadrons'.

  5. LHC Luminosity Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091107; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Papotti, Giulia

    This thesis adresses several approaches with the common goal of assessing, understanding and improving the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). To better exploit existing margins for maximum luminosity while fulfilling the requirements of the LHC experiments, new techniques for luminosity levelling are studied and developed to an operational state, such as changing the crossing angle or $\\beta^*$ (beam size) at the interaction points with the beams in collisions. In 2017 LHC operation, the crossing angle reduction in collisions improved the integrated luminosity by $\\mathrm{\\sim} 2\\,\\mathrm{fb^{-1}}$ ($\\mathrm{\\sim} 4\\,\\mathrm{\\%}$ of the yearly production). For additional diagnostics, a new method for measuring beam sizes and orbits for each circulating bunch using the luminosity measurement during beam separation scans is shown. The results of these Emittance Scans improved the understanding of the LHC luminosity reach and of the orbit offsets introduced by beam-beam long-range effects.

  6. LHC: seven golden suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The fourth CERN Golden Hadron awards saw seven of the LHC's best suppliers receive recognition for the high quality of their work, compliance with delivery deadlines, flexibility and adaptability to the demanding working conditions of the project. The representatives of the seven companies which received awards during the Golden Hadron ceremony, standing with Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader. 'The Golden Hadron awards are a symbol of our appreciation of not only the quality and timely delivery of components but also the collaborative and flexible way the firms have contributed to this very difficult project,' said Lyn Evans, head of the LHC project. The awards went to Kemppi-Kempower (Finland), Metso Powdermet (Finland), Transtechnik (Germany), Babcock Noell Nuclear (Germany), Iniziative Industriali (Italy), ZTS VVU Kosice (Slovakia), and Jehier (France). Babock Noell Nuclear (BNN) successfully produced one-third (416 cold dipole masses) of the LHC's superconducting dipole magnets, one of the most critical an...

  7. 27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  8. 8 October 2013 - Rolex Director- General G. Marini in the ATLAS Control Room with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and ATLAS Collaboration Senior Physicist C. Rembser; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1. Were also present from the Directorate: S. Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure; from the ATLAS Collaboration: Technische Universitaet Dortmund (DE) J. Jentzsch and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (US) G. Piacquadio.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    8 October 2013 - Rolex Director- General G. Marini in the ATLAS Control Room with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and ATLAS Collaboration Senior Physicist C. Rembser; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1. Were also present from the Directorate: S. Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure; from the ATLAS Collaboration: Technische Universitaet Dortmund (DE) J. Jentzsch and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (US) G. Piacquadio.

  9. Gas Condensates onto a LHC Type Cryogenic Vacuum System Subjected to Electron Cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    Baglin, V

    2004-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the gas desorbed via photon stimulated molecular desorption or electron stimulated molecular desorption will be physisorbed onto the beam screen held between 5 and 20 K. Studies of the effects of the electron cloud onto a LHC type cryogenic vacuum chamber have been done with the cold bore experiment (COLDEX) installed in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Experiments performed with gas condensates such as H2, H2O, CO and CO2 are described. Implications for the LHC design and operation are discussed.

  10. LHC rap: a global phenomenon

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Do you think the LHC is super duper fly? Does it make you want to compose some slick rhymes and bust out some killer beats? It did for one CERN rapper, and the results have become a YouTube smash hit! Katie McAlpine will sing for the CMS party on 24 September, and for the ATLAS Fest on 4 October.The Large Hadron Rap, to give it its full name, is the brainchild of AlpineKat, AKA Katie McAlpine, who is currently working for ATLAS e-News and outreach. To date, the YouTube video rap has been viewed more than 2.5 million times, to say nothing of the media coverage. Featured in newspapers around the world, including the New York Times in the US, The Telegraph in the UK and Geneva’s very own Matin Bleu, the rap is officially a sensation! Katie wrote the inspired (and pretty accurate) physics lyrics during her commute on the number 56 bus between Geneva and CERN. After obtaining permission to film in the experiment caverns and tunnel,...

  11. LHC First Beam 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    Tuura, L

    2008-01-01

    The CMS Centre played a major part in the LHC First Beam Event on September 10th 2008: it was a central point for CMS, hosting journalists from all over the world and providing live link-ups to collaborating institutes as well as, of course, monitoring events as they happened at Point 5. It was also a venue for celebration as the beam completed circuits of the LHC in both directions, passing successfully through the detector (Courtesy of Lassi Tuura)

  12. submitter LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Shuji

    2001-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is under construction at the CERN Laboratory in Switzerland. Four experiments (ATLAS, CMS, LHCb, ALICE) will try to study the new physics by LHC from 2006. Its goal to explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces. The PDF file of the transparency is located on http://www-atlas.kek.jp/sub/documents/lepsymp-stanaka.pdf.

  13. Future of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dova, Maria-Teresa; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC aims to provide a total integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 from p-p collisions at  14 TeV over the course of 10 years. The upgraded ATLAS detector must be able to cope well with increased occupancies and data rates. The large data samples at the High-Luminosity LHC will enable precise measurements of the Higgs boson and other Standard Model particles, as well as searches for new phenomena BSM.

  14. La cellule d'essais du LHC fonctionne avec succès pendant 24h

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1994-01-01

    On 6 and 7 December a string of powerful superconducting magnets for CERN's next particle accelerator the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ran successfully at 8.36 Tesla for 24 hours. 8.36 Tesla is the magnetic field required to accelerate protons to the required energy for LHC and this result demonstrates that the key technical choices made for the construction of the LHC magnets were correct. The test magnets have shown that they can operate reliably under the same working conditions as the future accelerator.

  15. Calibration of Super-Kamiokande using an electron LINAC The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Nakahata, M; Hayakawa, T

    1999-01-01

    In order to calibrate the Super-Kamiokande experiment for solar neutrino measurements, a linear accelerator (LINAC) for electrons was installed at the detector. LINAC data were taken at various positions in the detector volume, tracking the detector response in the variables relevant to solar neutrino analysis. In particular, the absolute energy scale is now known with less than 1% uncertainty.

  16. LHC Report: astounding availability

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Apollonio for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is off to an excellent start in 2016, having already produced triple the luminosity of 2015. An important factor in the impressive performance so far this year is the unprecedented machine availability.   LHC integrated luminosity in 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2016 and the prediction of the 2016 performance foreseen at the start of the year. Following the 2015-2016 end of year shutdown, the LHC restarted beam operation in March 2016. Between the restart and the first technical stop (TS1) in June, the LHC's beam intensity was successively increased, achieving operation with 2040 bunches per beam. The technical stop on 7-8 June was shortened to maximise the time available for luminosity production for the LHC experiments before the summer conferences. Following the technical stop, operation resumed and quickly returned to the performance levels previously achieved. Since then, the LHC has been running steadily with up to 2076 bunches per beam. Since the technical stop, a...

  17. A beam radiation monitor based on CVD diamonds for SuperB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.

    2013-08-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond particle detectors are in use in the CERN experiments at LHC and at particle accelerator laboratories in Europe, USA and Japan mainly as beam monitors. Nowadays it is considered a proven technology with a very fast signal read-out and a very high radiation tolerance suitable for measurements in high radiation environment zones i.e. near the accelerators beam pipes. The specific properties of CVD diamonds make them a prime candidate for measuring single particles as well as high-intensity particle cascades, for timing measurements on the sub-nanosecond scale and for beam protection systems in hostile environments. A single-crystalline CVD (scCVD) diamond sensor, read out with a new generation of fast and high transition frequency SiGe bipolar transistor amplifiers, has been tested for an application as radiation monitor to safeguard the silicon vertex tracker in the SuperB detector from excessive radiation damage, cumulative dose and instantaneous dose rates. Test results with 5.5 MeV alpha particles from a 241Am radioactive source and from electrons from a 90Sr radioactive source are presented in this paper.

  18. The Bevalac accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacal, A.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are the characteristics of the Bevatron and SuperHilac heavy ion accelerators in a very general manner. Some aspects of their application in the field of biological medicine and some of the interesting results obtained in experiments on nuclear physics are mentioned. (Author). 20 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  19. LHC detectors trigger/DAQ at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sphicas, Paris

    1998-01-01

    At its design luminosity, the LHC will deliver hundreds of millions of proton-proton interactions per second. Storage and computing limitations limit the number of physics events that can be recorded to about 100 per second. The selection will be carried out by the Trigger and data acquisition systems of the experiments. This lecture will review the requirements, architectures and various designs currently considered.

  20. LHC Report: LHC smashes collision records

    CERN Multimedia

    Sarah Charley

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is now producing more than a billion proton-proton collisions per second.   The LHC is colliding protons at a faster rate than ever before: approximately 1 billion times per second. Since April 2016, the LHC has delivered more than 30 inverse femtobarns (fb-1) to both ATLAS and CMS. This means that around 2.4 quadrillion (2.4 million billion) collisions have been seen by each of the experiments this year. The inverse femtobarn is the unit of measurement for integrated luminosity, indicating the cumulative number of potential collisions. This compares with the total of 33.2 fb-1 produced between 2010 and 2015. The unprecedented performance this year is the result of both the incremental increases in collision rate and the sheer amount of time the LHC has been up and running. This comes after a slow start-up in 2015, when scientists and engineers still needed to learn how to operate the machine at a much higher energy. “With more energy, the machine is much more sen...

  1. Electron clouds in high energy hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor

    2013-08-29

    The formation of electron clouds in accelerators operating with positrons and positively charge ions is a well-known problem. Depending on the parameters of the beam the electron cloud manifests itself differently. In this thesis the electron cloud phenomenon is studied for the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) conditions, and for the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-100 as a part of the FAIR complex in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the FAIR conditions the extensive use of slow extraction will be made. After the acceleration the beam will be debunched and continuously extracted to the experimental area. During this process, residual gas electrons can accumulate in the electric field of the beam. If this accumulation is not prevented, then at some point the beam can become unstable. Under the SPS and LHC conditions the beam is always bunched. The accumulation of electron cloud happens due to secondary electron emission. At the time when this thesis was being written the electron cloud was known to limit the maximum intensity of the two machines. During the operation with 25 ns bunch spacing, the electron cloud was causing significant beam quality deterioration. At moderate intensities below the instability threshold the electron cloud was responsible for the bunch energy loss. In the framework of this thesis it was found that the instability thresholds of the coasting beams with similar space charge tune shifts, emittances and energies are identical. First of their kind simulations of the effect of Coulomb collisions on electron cloud density in coasting beams were performed. It was found that for any hadron coasting beam one can choose vacuum conditions that will limit the accumulation of the electron cloud below the instability threshold. We call such conditions the ''good'' vacuum regime. In application to SIS-100 the design pressure 10{sup -12} mbar corresponds to the good vacuum regime. The transition to the bad vacuum

  2. High Precision Current Control for the LHC Main Power Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Thiesen, H; Hudson, G; King, Q; Montabonnet, V; Nisbet, D; Page, S

    2010-01-01

    Since restarting at the end of 2009, the LHC has reached a new energy record in March 2010 with the two 3.5 TeV beams. To achieve the performance required for the good functioning of the accelerator, the currents in the main circuits (Main Bends and Main Quadrupoles) must be controlled with a higher precision than ever previously requested for a particle accelerator at CERN: a few parts per million (ppm) of nominal current. This paper describes the different challenges that were overcome to achieve the required precision for the current control of the main circuits. Precision tests performed during the hardware commissioning of the LHC illustrate this paper.

  3. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajec- tory and orbit measurement system of the PS dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors (BPMs) and an analogue signal processing chain to acquire the trajectory of one single particle bunch out of many, over two consecutive turns at a maximum rate of once every 5ms. The BPMs were in good condition, however the electronics was aging and ...

  4. WS_2-Super P nanocomposites anode material with enhanced cycling stability for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jianfeng; Wang, Xin; Li, Jiayin; Cao, Liyun; Xu, Zhanwei; Wei, Hao

    2016-01-01

    WS_2-Super P nanocomposites are prepared for lithium battery anodes by a simple two-step process consisting of hydrothermal and sulfide reduction reactions. The addition of Super P (50 nm) as a conductive addictive is beneficial for decreasing the size of nanocomposites and improving their dispersibility, which could accelerate the insertion/extraction reaction between WS_2-Super P nanocomposite electrode and electrolyte. Compared to the pure WS_2, the WS_2-Super P nanocomposites exhibit highly improved electrochemical performance with initial discharge capacity of 421 mAh g"−"1, high initial Coulombic efficiency (81%), low charge transfer impedance (53 Ω) and good retentive capacity of 389 mAh g"−"1 after 200th cycles. The much improved electrochemical performance can be attributed to the incorporation of Super P, which facilitates the interface charge transfer and Li"+ diffusion. - Graphical abstract: The addition of Super P (50 nm) is beneficial for decreasing the size of WS_2-Super P nanocomposites, improving their dispersibility, accelerating the Li"+ transportation and the insertion/extraction reaction. The WS_2-Super P nanocomposites show higher cycling stability and rate performances than pure WS_2. - Highlights: • WS_2-Super P nanocomposites are prepared for LIBs anodes with good performances. • Super P as a conductive addictive is added into the WS_2 nanosheets. • The incorporation of Super P is beneficial for decreasing the size of composites. • Super P were embedded in WS_2 nanosheets for improving their dispersibility.

  5. Electronics for LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, Francois

    1995-01-01

    Full text: A major effort is being mounted to prepare the way handling the high interaction rates expected from CERN's new LHC proton-proton collider (see, for example, November, page 6). September saw the First Workshop on Electronics for LHC Experiments, organized by Lisbon's Particle Physics Instrumentation Laboratory (LIP) on behalf of CERN's LHC Electronics Review Board (LERB - March, page 2). Its purpose was not only for the LERB to have a thorough review of ongoing activities, but also to promote cross fertilization in the engineering community involved in electronics design for LHC experiments. The Workshop gathered 187 physicists and engineers from 20 countries including USA and Japan. The meeting comprised six sessions and 82 talks, with special focus on radiation-hard microelectronic processes, electronics for tracking, calorimetry and muon detectors, optoelectronics, trigger and data acquisition systems. Each topic was introduced by an invited speaker who reviewed the requirements set by the particular detector technology at LHC. At the end of each session, panel discussions were chaired by each invited speaker. Representatives from four major integrated circuit manufacturers covered advanced radiation hard processes. Two talks highlighted the importance of obsolescence and quality systems in the long-lived and demanding environment of LHC. The Workshop identified areas and encouraged efforts for rationalization and common developments within and between the different detector groups. As a result, it will also help ensure the reliability and the long term maintainability of installed equipment. The proceedings of the Workshop are available from LIP Lisbon*. The LERB Workshop on Electronics for LHC Experiments will become a regular event, with the second taking place in Hungary, by Lake Balaton, from 23-27 September 1996. The Hungarian institutes KFKIRMKI have taken up the challenge of being as successful as LIP Lisbon in the organization

  6. Performance of the Protection System for Superconducting Circuits during LHC Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Denz, R; Charifoulline, Z; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Steckert, J

    2011-01-01

    The protection system for superconducting magnets and bus-bars is an essential part of the LHC machine protection and ensures the integrity of substantial elements of the accelerator. Due to the large amount of hardwired and software interlock channels the dependability of the system is a critical parameter for the successful operation of the LHC.

  7. Radiation protection issues after 20 years of LHC operation

    CERN Document Server

    Forkel-Wirth, D.; Roesler, S.; Theis, C.; Ulrici, L.; Vincke, H.; Vincke, Hz.

    2011-01-01

    Since November 2009, the LHC commissioning progresses very well, both with proton and lead beams. It will continue in 2011 and nominal LHC operation is expected to be attained in 2013. In parallel, plans for various LHC upgrades are under discussion, suggesting a High-Luminosity (HL) upgrade first and a High-Energy (HE) upgrade in a later state. Whereas the upgrade in luminosity would require the modification of only some few key accelerator components like the inner triplets, the upgrade in beam energy from 7 TeV to 16.5 TeV would require the exchange of all dipoles and of numerous other accelerator components. The paper gives an overview of the radiation protection issues related to the dismantling of LHC components prior to the installation of the HE-LHC components, i.e. after about 20 years of LHC operation. Two main topics will be discussed: (i) the exposure of workers to ionizing radiation during the dismantling of dipoles, inner triplets or collimators and experiments and (ii) the production, condition...

  8. Transverse emittance measurement and preservation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Maria

    2016-06-20

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation are discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constraints of various systems such as tune measurement precision and powering limitations of the LHC superconducting circuits into account. With sinusoidal k-modulation record low beta function measurement uncertainties in the LHC have been reached. 2015 LHC beta function and β*, which is the beta function at the collision point, measurements with k-modulation will be presented. Wire scanners and synchrotron light monitors are presently used in the LHC to measure the transverse beam size. Accuracy and limitations of the LHC transverse profile monitors are discussed. During the 2012 LHC proton run it was found that wire scanner photomultiplier saturation added significant uncertainty on all measurements. A large discrepancy between emittances from wire scanners and luminosity was discovered but not solved. During Long Shutdown 1 the wire scanner system was upgraded with new photomultipliers. A thorough study of LHC wire scanner measurement precision in 2015 is presented

  9. Nonlinear Super Integrable Couplings of Super Classical-Boussinesq Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuzhi Xing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear integrable couplings of super classical-Boussinesq hierarchy based upon an enlarged matrix Lie super algebra were constructed. Then, its super Hamiltonian structures were established by using super trace identity. As its reduction, nonlinear integrable couplings of the classical integrable hierarchy were obtained.

  10. Acoustic measurements in the collimation region of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deboy, D; Baccigalupi, C; Burkart, F; Cauchi, M; Derrez, C S; Lendaro, J; Masi, A; Spiezia, G; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01

    The LHC accelerator at CERN has the most advanced collimation system ever being installed. The collimators intercept unavoidable particle losses and therefore are essential to avoid beam induced quenches of the superconducting magnets. In addition, they provide passive machine protection against mis-kicked beams. During material robustness tests on a LHC collimator prototype in 2004 and 2006, vibration and acoustic measurements have shown that a beam impact detection system should be feasible using accelerometers and microphones as sensors in the LHC. Recently, such sensors have been installed close to the primary collimators in the LHC tunnel. First analyses of raw data show that the system is sensitive enough to detect beam scraping on collimators. Therefore, the implementation of a sophisticated acousticmonitoring system is under investigation. It may be useful not only to detect beam impacts on primary collimators in case of failure, but also to derive further information on beam losses that occur during ...

  11. Beam Loss Patterns at the LHC Collimators Measurements & Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Böhlen, Till Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) detects particle losses of circulating beams and initiates an emergency extraction of the beam in case that the BLM thresholds are exceeded. This protection is required as energy deposition in the accelerator equipment due to secondary shower particles can reach critical levels; causing damage to the beam-line components and quenches of superconducting magnets. Robust and movable beam line elements, so-called collimators, are the aperture limitations of the LHC. Consequently, they are exposed to the excess of lost beam particles and their showers. Proton loss patterns at LHC collimators have to be determined to interpret the signal of the BLM detectors and to set adequate BLM thresholds for the protection of collimators and other equipment in case of unacceptably increased loss rates. The first part of this work investigates the agreement of BLM detector measurements with simulations for an LHC-like collimation setup. The setup consists ...

  12. A Beam Quality Monitor for LHC Beams in the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Papotti, G

    2008-01-01

    The SPS Beam Quality Monitor (BQM) system monitors the longitudinal parameters of the beam before extraction to the LHC to prevent losses and degradation of the LHC luminosity by the injection of low quality beams. It is implemented in two priority levels. At the highest level the SPS-LHC synchronization and global beam structure are verified. If the specifications are not met, the beam should be dumped in the SPS before extraction. On the second level, individual bunch position, length and stability are checked for beam quality assessment. Tolerances are adapted to the mode of operation and extraction to the LHC can also be inhibited. Beam parameters are accessed by acquiring bunch profiles with a longitudinal pick up and fast digital oscilloscope. The beam is monitored for instabilities during the acceleration cycle and thoroughly checked a few ms before extraction for a final decision on extraction interlock. Dedicated hardware and software components implementing fast algorithms are required. In this pape...

  13. An improved scattering routine for collimation tracking studies at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tambasco, Claudia; Salvachua Ferrando, Maria Belen; Cavoto, Gianluca

    The present Master thesis work has been carried out at CERN in the framework of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Collimation project. The LHC accelerates proton beams up to 7 TeV colliding in the experiment detectors installed in four points of the accelerator ring. The LHC is built to store a energy of 360MJ for each beam. The energy deposition induced by local beam losses could quench the superconducting magnets located around the accelerator beam pipes. To prevent and keep under control dangerous beam losses, an efficient collimation system is required. In addition, the achievable LHC beam intensity is related to the beam loss rate and, consequently, to the cleaning efficiency of the collimation system. Collimation studies at LHC are carried out also by means of simulations by using SixTrack, a dedicated simulation tool that tracks a large numbers of particles for many turns around the ring. The SixTrack code includes a scattering routine to model proton interactions with the material of the collimators j...

  14. LHC physics results and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Kono, Takanori; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This talk presents the latest results from LHC Run-2 as of May 2018 which include Standard Model measurements, Higgs boson properties and beyond Standard Model search results. The prospects for future LHC runs are also shown.

  15. Commissioning of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The LHC construction is now approaching the end and it is now time to prepare for commissioning with beam. The behavior of a proton storage ring is much different to that of LEP, which profited from strong radiation damping to keep the beam stable. Our last experience with a hadron collider at CERN goes back more than 15 years when the proton-antiproton collider last operated. Ppbar taught us a lot about the machine physics of bunched beam proton storage rings and was essential input for the design of the LHC. After a short presentation of where we stand today with machine installation and hardware commissioning, I will discuss the main machine physics issues that will have to be dealt with in the LHC.

  16. Electronics at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Geoffrey

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the electronic readout systems planned for use in the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the LHC will be given, with an emphasis on the motivations for the designs adopted and major technologies to be employed, specially those which are specific to LHC. At its design luminosity, the LHC will deliver hundreds of millions of proton-proton interactions per second. Storage and computing limitations limit the number of physics events that can be recorded to about 100 per second. The selection will be carried out by the Trigger and data acquisition systems of the experiments. This lecture will review the requirements, architectures and various designs currently considered. Introduction. Structure of gauge theories. The QED and QCD examples. Chiral theories. The electroweak theory. Spontaneous symmetry breaking. The Higgs machanism.Gauge boson and fermion masses. Yukawa coupling. Charges current couplings. The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and CP violation. neutral current couplings. the Clashow-Iliopoul...

  17. LHC bending magnet coil

    CERN Multimedia

    A short test version of coil of wire used for the LHC dipole magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair.

  18. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LHC experiments have closed the most important gap in our understanding of fundamental interactions, confirming that such interactions between elementary particles can be described by quantum field theory, more specifically by a renormalizable gauge theory. This theory is a priori valid for arbitrarily high energy scales and does not require an ultraviolet completion. Yet, when trying to apply the concrete knowledge of quantum field theory to actual LHC physics - in particular to the Higgs sector and certain regimes of QCD - one inevitably encounters an intricate maze of phenomenological know-how, common lore and other, often historically developed intuitions about what works and what doesn’t. These lectures cover three aspects to help understand LHC results in the Higgs sector and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model: they discuss the many facets of Higgs physics, which is at the core of this significantly expanded second edition; then QCD, to the deg...

  19. UFOs in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grob, Laura [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) localized and recurring beam losses have been observed, which usually persist for several hundred microseconds. With increasing beam energy these losses were found to pose a serious risk to the machine availability, as some of these events can cause quenches in the superconducting magnets. The current understanding is that these losses are caused by falling microparticles that interact with the proton beam. To describe these so-called UFOs (unidentified falling objects) and their dynamics, a model was developed starting from the approach that only gravitational and electrostatic forces act on a neutrally charged particle. However, the model's results cannot reproduce the actual data from the LHC's beam loss monitors (BLMs), which indicates a more complex UFO dynamic. Experimental studies and further analysis of the BLM data are planned to investigate the UFO dynamics in greater detail and to understand origins and release mechanisms for microparticles in the LHC beam pipe.

  20. Taiwan links up to world's 1st LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Taiwan's Academia Sinica was linked up to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Computing Grid Project to work jointly with 12 other countries to construct the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator

  1. Accelerator Division annual report, January 1976--September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerator operations of the Bevatron/Bevalac, the SuperHILAC, and the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron are described. The PEP storage ring is described. The superconducting accelerator (ESCAR) construction is reported, and experiments in heavy ion fusion are described

  2. New accelerator ideas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, providing higher particle beam energies meant building bigger accelerators. It is now universally accepted that with the current generation of accelerator projects either under construction (such as LEP at CERN) or proposed (such as the Superconducting Super Collider in the US), conventional techniques are reaching their practical limit. With the growing awareness that progress in particle physics requires new methods to accelerate particles, workshops and study groups are being set up across the world to search for ideas for the machines of tomorrow

  3. New accelerator ideas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1985-05-15

    In the past, providing higher particle beam energies meant building bigger accelerators. It is now universally accepted that with the current generation of accelerator projects either under construction (such as LEP at CERN) or proposed (such as the Superconducting Super Collider in the US), conventional techniques are reaching their practical limit. With the growing awareness that progress in particle physics requires new methods to accelerate particles, workshops and study groups are being set up across the world to search for ideas for the machines of tomorrow.

  4. Superconducting magnets for particle large accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircher, F.

    1994-01-01

    The different accelerator types (linear, circular) and the advantages of using superconductivity in particle accelerator are first reviewed. Characteristics of some large superconducting accelerators (Tevatron, HERA, RHIC, LHC CERN) are presented. The design features related to accelerator magnets are reviewed: magnet reproducibility, stability, field homogeneity, etc. and the selected design characteristics are discussed: manufacturing method, winding, shielding, cryostat. CEA involvement in this domain mainly addressing quadrupoles, is presented together with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN. Characteristics and design of detector magnets are also described. 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Cryogenics will cool LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the investigation into the cryogenic regulating line (QRL) performed by the LHC laboratory are presented. It is projected that eight cryogenic units located in five places around the LHC ring will provide superconducting magnets by liquid helium through eight cryogenic regulating lines of 3.2 km each. All QRL zones remain to be independent. CERN uses three test units with the aim of the certification of chosen constructions and verification of their thermal and mechanical efficiency before starting full-scale production [ru

  6. LHC-ILC synergy

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini M

    2006-01-01

    I will begin by making a few general comments on the synergy between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which will go in action in 2007 and the International Linear Collider (ILC) which is under planning. I will then focus on the synergy between the LHC and the PLC option at the ILC, which is expected to be realised in the later stages of the ILC program. In this I will cover the possible synergy in the Higgs sector (with and without CP violation), in the determination of the anomalous vector boson couplings and last but not the least, in the search for extra dimensions and radions.

  7. The LHC detector challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Virdee, Tejinder S

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN, scheduled to come online in 2007, is a multi-TeV proton-proton collider with vast detectors. Two of the more significant detectors for LHC are ATLAS and CMS. Currently, both detectors are more than 65% complete in terms of financial commitment, and the experiments are being assembled at an increasing pace. ATLAS is being built directly in its underground cavern, whereas CMS is being assembled above ground. When completed, both detectors will aid researchers in determining what lies at the high-energy frontier, in particular the mechanism by which particles attain mass. (Edited abstract).

  8. LHC beampipe interconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Particle beams circulate for around 10 hours in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During this time, the particles make four hundred million revolutions of the machine, travelling a distance equivalent to the diameter of the solar system. The beams must travel in a pipe which is emptied of air, to avoid collisions between the particles and air molecules (which are considerably bigger than protons). The beam pipes are pumped down to an air pressure similar to that on the surface of the moon. Much of the LHC runs at 1.9 degrees above absolute zero. When material is cooled, it contracts. The interconnections must absorb this contraction whilst maintaining electrical connectivity.

  9. Exotic highly ionising particles at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    De Roeck, A; Mermod, P; Milstead, D; Sloan, T

    2012-01-01

    The experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are able to discover or set limits on the production of exotic particles with TeV-scale masses possessing values of electric and/or magnetic charge such that they appear as highly ionising particles (HIPs). In this paper the sensitivity of the LHC experiments to HIP production is discussed in detail. It is shown that a number of different detection methods are required to investigate as fully as possible the charge-mass range. These include direct detection as the HIPs pass through detectors and, in the case of magnetically charged objects, the so-called induction method with which monopoles which stop in accelerator and detector material could be observed. The benefit of using complementary approaches to HIP detection is discussed.

  10. Scientific Opportunity: the Tevatron and the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The press makes much of the competition between CERN’s LHC and Fermilab’s Tevatron in the search for the Higgs boson. This competitive aspect is real, and probably adds spice to the scientific exploration, but for us such reporting often feels like spilling the entire pepper shaker over a fine meal. The media’s emphasis on competition obscures the more important substance of our long-standing collaboration in scientific discovery.   Our laboratories and our communities have worked together for decades. Europeans have contributed greatly to the Tevatron’s many successes, including the discovery of the top quark, the discovery of fast oscillations in the decay of strange B mesons and the many searches for new phenomena. Americans have contributed to many programs at CERN, notably the extraordinary precision measurements of LEP, and more recently construction of the LHC accelerator and detectors. Fermilab scientists played a vital role throughout 2009 in...

  11. The LHC and its electrotechnical challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordry, F.

    2010-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the CERN, the European organization for nuclear research, this article presents the LHC, the Large Hadron Collider, the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world. The project somehow started in 1984 and relies on several technological challenges which are herein described: superconducting magnets (their characteristics and cryogenic operation), operation security with particularly high energies stored in magnets and beams, LHC electricity supply (electric circuits with high time constant, a required precision and reproducibility of the magnetic field during all the operation phases, importance of power converters). Then the author evokes the starting procedures, some serious damages which occurred, and the restart of the operation period with spectacular results in terms of beam energy. Future experiments and expected results are also evoked

  12. First Experience with the LHC Cryogenic Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Vauthier, N; Balle, Ch; Casas-Cubillos, J; Ciechanowski, M; Fernandez-Penacoba, G; Fortescue-Beck, E; Gomes, P; Jeanmonod, N; Lopez-Lorente, A; Suraci, A

    2008-01-01

    The LHC under commissioning at CERN will be the world's largest superconducting accelerator and therefore makes extensive use of cryogenic instruments. These instruments are installed in the tunnel and therefore have to withstand the LHC environment that imposes radiation-tolerant design and construction. Most of the instruments require individual calibration; some of them exhibit several variants as concerns measuring span; all relevant data are therefore stored in an Oracle® database. Those data are used for the various quality assurance procedures defined for installation and commissioning, as well as for generating tables used by the control system to configure automatically the input/output channels. This paper describes the commissioning of the sensors and the corresponding electronics, the first measurement results during the cool-down of one machine sector; it discusses the different encountered problems and their corresponding solutions.

  13. LHC Report: No beams but still busy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC finished with beams for 2011 on Wednesday 7 December after a pretty good year of operation. The cryogenics team has emptied the magnets of helium for the winter technical stop and a full maintenance programme has started. The LHC is running long operational years at present with only a few short technical stops during operation with beam. This leaves very little time for much-needed maintenance and upgrades. Thus, the hardware teams involved have to take full advantage of the time available during the winter stop.   The Engineering Department is planning and coordinating the maintenance and repair activities for the whole accelerator complex. The list of planned interventions is truly impressive! There is a lot of work that involves the essential technical infrastructure systems (electricity, cooling, ventilation). Cryogenics have established a full programme aimed at maintaining and improving their already good level of availability. Other systems undergoing maintenance include: vacu...

  14. LHC Report: No beams but still busy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The LHC finished with beams for 2011 on Wednesday 7 December after a pretty good year of operation. The cryogenics team has emptied the magnets of helium for the winter technical stop and a full maintenance programme has started. The LHC is running long operational years at present with only a few short technical stops during operation with beam. This leaves very little time for much-needed maintenance and upgrades. Thus, the hardware teams involved have to take full advantage of the time available during the winter stop.   The Engineering Department is planning and coordinating the maintenance and repair activities for the whole accelerator complex. The list of planned interventions is truly impressive! There is a lot of work that involves the essential technical infrastructure systems (electricity, cooling, ventilation). Cryogenics have established a full programme aimed at maintaining and improving their already good level of availability. Other systems undergoing maintenance include: vacu...

  15. Beam-Beam Interaction, Electron Cloud and Intrabeam Scattering for Proton Super-bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggiero, F; Rumolo, Giovanni; Papaphilippou, Y

    2003-01-01

    Super-bunches are long bunches with a flat longitudinal profile, which could potentially increase the LHC luminosity in a future upgrade. We present example parameters and discuss a variety of issues related to such superbunches, including beam-beam tune shift, tune footprints, crossing schemes, luminosity, intrabeam scattering, and electron cloud. We highlight the benefits, disadvantages and open questions.

  16. Super periodic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammd; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of super periodic potential (SPP) of arbitrary order n, n ∈I+, in one dimension. General theory of wave propagation through SPP of order n is presented and the reflection and transmission coefficients are derived in their closed analytical form by transfer matrix formulation. We present scattering features of super periodic rectangular potential and super periodic delta potential as special cases of SPP. It is found that the symmetric self-similarity is the special case of super periodicity. Thus by identifying a symmetric fractal potential as special cases of SPP, one can obtain the tunnelling amplitude for a particle from such fractal potential. By using the formalism of SPP we obtain the close form expression of tunnelling amplitude of a particle for general Cantor and Smith-Volterra-Cantor potentials.

  17. NETL Super Computer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NETL Super Computer was designed for performing engineering calculations that apply to fossil energy research. It is one of the world’s larger supercomputers,...

  18. LHC Commissioning and First Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, S

    2010-01-01

    A description is given of the repair of the LHC after the accident of September 2008. The LHC hardware and beam commissioning and initial operation are reviewed both in terms of beam and hardware performance. The implemented machine protection measures and their impact on LHC operation are presented.

  19. LHC challenges and upgrade options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruning, O [CERN AB/ABP, Y03600, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)], E-mail: Oliver.Bruning@cern.ch

    2008-05-15

    The presentation summarizes the key parameters of the LHC collider. Following a discussion of the main challenges for reaching the nominal machine performance the presentation identifies options for increasing the operation tolerances and the potential performance reach of the LHC by means of future hardware upgrades of the LHC and its injector complex.

  20. LHC challenges and upgrade options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruning, O

    2008-01-01

    The presentation summarizes the key parameters of the LHC collider. Following a discussion of the main challenges for reaching the nominal machine performance the presentation identifies options for increasing the operation tolerances and the potential performance reach of the LHC by means of future hardware upgrades of the LHC and its injector complex

  1. Reliability of the Quench Protection System for the LHC Superconducting Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Vergara-Fernández, A; Rodríguez-Mateos, F

    2003-01-01

    The huge energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could potentially cause severe damage when the superconducting state disappears (quench) if precautions are not taken. Most of the superconducting elements in this accelerator require protection in case of resistive transition. The reliability of the Quench Protection System will have a very important impact on the overall LHC performance. Existing high energy accelerators were conceived as prototypes whose main objective was not the e...

  2. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  3. LHC Report: Summer temperatures in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC experiments have finished their data-taking period before the summer conferences. The machine has already delivered substantially more collisions to the experiments this year than in the whole of 2011. The LHC has now started a six-day Machine Development period, which will be followed by the second Technical Stop of the year.   The number of collisions delivered to the experiments is expressed in integrated luminosity. In 2011, the integrated luminosity delivered to both ATLAS and CMS was around 5.6 fb-1. On Monday 18 June, experiments finished taking data before the summer conferences and the integrated luminosity for 2012 so far is about 6.6 fb-1, well above the unofficial target of 5 fb-1. The LHC’s performance over the last week of running was so efficient that the injection kicker magnets – which heat up due to the circulating beam – did not have time to cool down between the subsequent fills. As the time constants for warming up and cooli...

  4. The BRAN luminosity detectors for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matis, H.S.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bravin, E. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Miyamoto, R. [European Spallation Source, ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2017-03-11

    This paper describes the several phases which led, from the conceptual design, prototyping, construction and tests with beam, to the installation and operation of the BRAN (Beam RAte of Neutrals) relative luminosity monitors for the LHC. The detectors have been operating since 2009 to contribute, optimize and maintain the accelerator performance in the two high luminosity interaction regions (IR), the IR1 (ATLAS) and the IR5 (CMS). The devices are gas ionization chambers installed inside a neutral particle absorber 140 m away from the Interaction Points in IR1 and IR5 and monitor the energy deposited by electromagnetic showers produced by high-energy neutral particles from the collisions. The detectors have the capability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity at the 40 MHz bunch rate, as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation during the nominal LHC operation. The devices have operated since the early commissioning phase of the accelerator over a broad range of luminosities reaching 1.4×10{sup 34} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} with a peak pileup of 45 events per bunch crossing. Even though the nominal design luminosity of the LHC has been exceeded, the BRAN is operating well. After describing how the BRAN can be used to monitor the luminosity of the collider, we discuss the technical choices that led to its construction and the different tests performed prior to the installation in two IRs of the LHC. Performance simulations are presented together with operational results obtained during p-p operations, including runs at 40 MHz bunch rate, Pb-Pb operations and p-Pb operations.

  5. A slice through a prototype LHC bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This slice through a prototype LHC magnet clearly shows the superconducting cable in several blocks around the central hole – the beam pipe in which the LHC’s accelerated beams will travel. Magnet design is crucial to the LHC’s success and this sample is among the first to be built to the final cable configuration.

  6. CERN confident of LHC start-up in 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Vanden Broeck, Renilde

    2007-01-01

    "Delegates attending the 140th meeting of CERN Council today heard a confident report from the Laboratory about the scheduled start-up of the world's highest energy particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collier (LHC) in 2007. (1/2 page)

  7. CERN confident of LHC start-up in 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Delegates attending the 140th meeting of CERN Council today heard a confident report from the Laboratory about the scheduled start-up of the world's highest energy particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2007." (1/2 page)

  8. LHC Operation: Past and Future (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    After a successful first running period, LHC is now well into a two year shutdown for extensive consolidation. A pedagogical overview of the machine, its operating principles, its systems and underlying accelerator physics is presented. Performance past and future is discussed. (These lectures will be presented in three parts.)

  9. Le collisionneur LHC dans la tourmente: retard important en perspective

    CERN Multimedia

    Sacco, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Bad news for particle physicist community: LHC, the biggest protons collider in the world, will not probably work in 2007. Supports of the superconductive magnetic quadrupoles, intended to focus the beams of protons in the accelerator, have just broken during preliminary tests. (1,5page)

  10. LHC Starts the Search for Sparticles in April

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The long expected CERN Large Hadron Collider will become operational somewhere this spring, and physicists all around the world can hardly wait to see what new discoveries it will bring. For example, whether the LHC accelerating particles towards each other at speeds close to that of light are able to prove the supersymmetry theory or not.

  11. CERN: LHC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    With test magnets for CERN's LHC proton-proton collider regularly attaining field strengths which show that 10 Tesla is not forbidden territory, attention turns to why and where quenches happen. If 'training' can be reduced, superconducting magnets become easier to commission

  12. Fully transparent LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Thanks to the first real signals received from the LHC while in operation before the incident, the experiments are now set to make the best use of the data they have collected. Report from the LHCC open session.The September open session of the LHCC (LHC Experiments Committee) came just a few days after the incident that occurred at the LHC. The packed auditorium was a testament to the huge interest raised by Lyn Evans’ talk about the status of the machine and the plans for the future. After being told that the actual consequences of the incident will be clear only once Sector 3-4 has been warmed up, the audience focussed on the reports from the experiments. For the first time, the reports showed performance results of the various detectors with particles coming from the machine and not just from cosmic rays or tests and simulations. "The first days of LHC beam exceeded all expectations and the experiments made extensive and rapid use of the data they collected", says ...

  13. Higgs physics at LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Unal, G

    2006-01-01

    This is a review of Higgs physics at LHC. The topics covered are the search of the Standard Model Higgs boson (with emphasis on the low mass region), the measurements of the Higgs boson properties (mass, width, spin, CP and couplings) and the Higgs sector of the MSSM.

  14. LHC: forwards and onwards

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Following the recent incident in Sector 3-4, which has brought the start-up of the LHC to a halt, the various teams are working hard to establish the cause, evaluate the situation and plan the necessary repairs. The LHC will be started up again in spring 2009 following the winter shutdown for the maintenance of all the CERN installations. The LHC teams are at work on warming up Sector 3-4 and establishing the cause of the serious incident that occurred on Friday, 19 September. Preliminary investigations suggest that the likely cause of the problem was a faulty electrical connection between two magnets. The connections probably melted, leading to a mechanical failure and a large leak of helium into the tunnel. However, the teams will not be able to carry out a full evaluation and assess the repairs needed until the sector has been warmed up again and inspected. "We are not worried about repairing the magnets as spare parts are available", said Lyn Evans, the LHC Project Leade...

  15. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance.

  16. CERN: LHC magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-08-15

    With test magnets for CERN's LHC proton-proton collider regularly attaining field strengths which show that 10 Tesla is not forbidden territory, attention turns to why and where quenches happen. If 'training' can be reduced, superconducting magnets become easier to commission.

  17. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance

  18. JAERI 20 MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Kineo; Harada, Kichinosuke

    1977-01-01

    Accelerators have been developed as the experimental apparatuses for the studies on nuclei and elementary particles. One direction of the development is the acceleration of protons and electrons to more and more high energy, and another direction is the acceleration of heavy ions up to uranium to several MeV up to several hundreds MeV. However recently, accelerators are used as the useful tools for the studies in wider fields. There are electrostatic acceleration and high frequency acceleration in ion acceleration, and at present, super-large accelerators are high frequency acceleration type. In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, it was decided in 1975 to construct an electrostatic accelerator of tandem type in order to accelerate heavy ions. In case of the electrostatic acceleration, the construction is relatively simple, the acceleration of heavy ions is easy, the property of the ion beam is very good, and the energy is stable. Especially, the tandem type is convenient for obtaining high energy. The tandem accelerator of 20 MV terminal voltage was ordered from the National Electrostatics Corp., USA, and is expected to be completed in 1978. The significance of heavy ion acceleration in the development and research of atomic energy, tandem van de Graaff accelerators, the JAERI 20MV tandem accelerator, and the research project with this accelerator are described. (Kako, I.)

  19. ATLAS. LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In Greek mythology, Atlas was a Titan who had to hold up the heavens with his hands as a punishment for having taken part in a revolt against the Olympians. For LHC, the ATLAS detector will also have an onerous physics burden to bear, but this is seen as a golden opportunity rather than a punishment. The major physics goal of CERN's LHC proton-proton collider is the quest for the long-awaited£higgs' mechanism which drives the spontaneous symmetry breaking of the electroweak Standard Model picture. The large ATLAS collaboration proposes a large general-purpose detector to exploit the full discovery potential of LHC's proton collisions. LHC will provide proton-proton collision luminosities at the aweinspiring level of 1034 cm2 s~1, with initial running in at 1033. The ATLAS philosophy is to handle as many signatures as possible at all luminosity levels, with the initial running providing more complex possibilities. The ATLAS concept was first presented as a Letter of Intent to the LHC Committee in November 1992. Following initial presentations at the Evian meeting (Towards the LHC Experimental Programme') in March of that year, two ideas for generalpurpose detectors, the ASCOT and EAGLE schemes, merged, with Friedrich Dydak (MPI Munich) and Peter Jenni (CERN) as ATLAS cospokesmen. Since the initial Letter of Intent presentation, the ATLAS design has been optimized and developed, guided by physics performance studies and the LHC-oriented detector R&D programme (April/May, page 3). The overall detector concept is characterized by an inner superconducting solenoid (for inner tracking) and large superconducting air-core toroids outside the calorimetry. This solution avoids constraining the calorimetry while providing a high resolution, large acceptance and robust detector. The outer magnet will extend over a length of 26 metres, with an outer diameter of almost 20 metres. The total weight of the detector is 7,000 tonnes. Fitted with its end

  20. Off-momentum collimation and cleaning in the energy ramp in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Quaranta, Elena; Giulini Castiglioni Agosteo, Stefano Luigi Maria

    This Master thesis work has been carried out at CERN in the framework of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Collimation project. The LHC is a two-beam proton collider, built to handle a stored energy of 360MJ for each beam. Since the energy deposition from particle losses could quench the superconducting magnets, a system of collimators has been installed in two cleaning insertions in the ring and in the experimental areas. The achievable LHC beam intensity is directly coupled to the beam loss rate and, consequently, to the cleaning eciency of the collimation system. This study analyses the collimation cleaning performance in dierent scenarios inside the accelerator. First, simulations are performed of the transverse losses in the LHC collimation system during the acceleration process. The results are compared with data taken during a dedicated session at the LHC machine. Simulations are also performed to predict the collimation eciency during future operation at higher energy. Furthermore, an investigation of t...

  1. Accelerators and storage rings. TS Workshop 2005. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciriani, P.; Magnin, B.; Oliveira, R. de; Chevalley, J.; Artoos, K.; Bertone, C.; Minginette, P.; Corso, J.P.; Grillot, S.; Weisz, S.; Prodon, S.; Sakkinen, J.; Foraz, K.; Funken, A.; Bangert, N.; Hakulinen, T.; Boncompagni, Y.; Delamare, C.; Folch, R.; Poehler, M.; Bertarelli, A.; Martel, C.; Butin, F.; Osborne, J.; Evrard, S.; Lacarrere, D.; Gayde, J.C.; Renaglia, T.; Batz, M.; Tsesmelis, E.; Wijnands, T.; Perrot, A.L.; Gastal, M.; Atieh, S.; Cherif, A.; Costa Pinto, P.; Calatroni, S.; Ninin, P.; Battistin, M.; Arnau Izquierdo, G.; Favre, G.; Mathot, S.; Mainaud, H.; Podevin, C.; Jones, M.; Stowisek, J.; Roy, S.; Sanchez-Corral, E.; Petit, S.; Martel, P.; Colloca, C.; Van Der Bij, E.; Vadon, M.; Kahle, K.; Principe, R.; Macina, D.; Schmidt, R.; Ridewood, J.; Lopez-Hernandez, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the workshop. This workshop was dedicated to the status of the technical support of the LHC (large hadron collider) in CERN. The different issues concern: -) the installation of the equipment in the LHC tunnel (super-conducting magnets, cold boxes, PS magnets...), -) underground logistics, -) the installation of experimental areas, -) the new CERN control center, and -) special technologies. (A.C.)

  2. Accelerators and storage rings. TS Workshop 2005. Book of Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciriani, P.; Magnin, B.; Oliveira, R. de; Chevalley, J.; Artoos, K.; Bertone, C.; Minginette, P.; Corso, J.P.; Grillot, S.; Weisz, S.; Prodon, S.; Sakkinen, J.; Foraz, K.; Funken, A.; Bangert, N.; Hakulinen, T.; Boncompagni, Y.; Delamare, C.; Folch, R.; Poehler, M.; Bertarelli, A.; Martel, C.; Butin, F.; Osborne, J.; Evrard, S.; Lacarrere, D.; Gayde, J.C.; Renaglia, T.; Batz, M.; Tsesmelis, E.; Wijnands, T.; Perrot, A.L.; Gastal, M.; Atieh, S.; Cherif, A.; Costa Pinto, P.; Calatroni, S.; Ninin, P.; Battistin, M.; Arnau Izquierdo, G.; Favre, G.; Mathot, S.; Mainaud, H.; Podevin, C.; Jones, M.; Stowisek, J.; Roy, S.; Sanchez-Corral, E.; Petit, S.; Martel, P.; Colloca, C.; Van Der Bij, E.; Vadon, M.; Kahle, K.; Principe, R.; Macina, D.; Schmidt, R.; Ridewood, J.; Lopez-Hernandez, L.A

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the workshop. This workshop was dedicated to the status of the technical support of the LHC (large hadron collider) in CERN. The different issues concern: -) the installation of the equipment in the LHC tunnel (super-conducting magnets, cold boxes, PS magnets...), -) underground logistics, -) the installation of experimental areas, -) the new CERN control center, and -) special technologies. (A.C.)

  3. Physics and technical development of accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    About 90 registered participants delivered more than 40 scientific papers. A great part of these presentations were of general interest about running projects such as CIME accelerator at Ganil, IPHI (high intensity proton injector), ESRF (European source of synchrotron radiation), LHC (large hadron collider), ELYSE accelerator at Orsay, AIRIX, and VIVITRON tandem accelerator. Other presentations highlighted the latest technological developments of accelerator components: superconducting cavities, power klystrons, high current injectors..

  4. Polycrystalline CdTe detectors: A luminosity monitor for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Placidia, M.; Schmicklera, H.

    2003-01-01

    The luminosity at the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider must be continuously monitored in order to provide an adequate tool for the control and optimization of the collision parameters and the beam optics. At both sides of the interaction points absorbers are installed to protect the super-conducting accelerator elements from quenches caused by the deposited energy of collision products. The luminosity detectors will be installed in the copper core of these absorbers to measure the electromagnetic and hadronic showers caused by neutral particles that are produced at the proton-proton collision in the interaction points. The detectors have to withstand extreme radiation levels (108 Gy/yr at the design luminosity) and their long-term operation has to be assured without requiring human intervention. In addition the demand for bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurements, i.e. 40 MHz detection speed, puts severe constraints on the detectors. Polycrystalline CdTe detectors have a high potential to fulfill the requirements and are considered as LHC luminosity monitors. In this paper the interaction region is shown and the characteristics of the CdTe detectors are presented

  5. Polycrystalline CdTe detectors: A luminosity monitor for the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Placidia, M.; Schmicklera, H.

    2003-09-01

    The luminosity at the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider must be continuously monitored in order to provide an adequate tool for the control and optimization of the collision parameters and the beam optics. At both sides of the interaction points absorbers are installed to protect the super-conducting accelerator elements from quenches caused by the deposited energy of collision products. The luminosity detectors will be installed in the copper core of these absorbers to measure the electromagnetic and hadronic showers caused by neutral particles that are produced at the proton-proton collision in the interaction points. The detectors have to withstand extreme radiation levels (108 Gy/yr at the design luminosity) and their long-term operation has to be assured without requiring human intervention. In addition the demand for bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurements, i.e. 40 MHz detection speed, puts severe constraints on the detectors. Polycrystalline CdTe detectors have a high potential to fulfill the requirements and are considered as LHC luminosity monitors. In this paper the interaction region is shown and the characteristics of the CdTe detectors are presented.

  6. Status of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Lyndon R.

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), due to be commissioned in 2007, will provide particle physics with the first laboratory tool to access the energy frontier above 1 TeV. In order to achieve this, protons must be accelerated and stored at 7 TeV, colliding with an unprecedented luminosity of 10 34 cm -2 s -1 The 8.3 Tesla guide field is obtained using conventional NbTi technology cooled to below the lambda point of helium. The machine is now well into its installation phase, with first beam injection foreseen for spring 2007. A brief status report is given and future prospects are discussed. (orig.)

  7. The short straight sections for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergot, J.B.; Coussy, E.; Dambre, P.; Ollivier, Y.; Reynet, D.; Vincent, D.; Rohmig, P.

    1999-01-01

    In 1995 a close collaboration between CERN, CEA and CNRS has been established for the design, proto-typing and follow-up of industrial series production of a sub-assembly of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this frame, the design office of IPN's Accelerator R and D group has in charge one of these contracts concerning the 386 Short Straight Sections (SSS) and particularly: - the cryostat design; - the study of procedures and tool assembly; - the construction of two prototypes during the year 1999; - the industrialization and the production follow-up for the series SSS. This collaboration will last until the year 2004. (authors)

  8. Commissioning the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, F.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Perin, A.; Riddone, G.; Serio, L.; Soubiran, M.; Tavian, L.; CERN; Ronayette, L.; GHMFL, Grenoble; Rabehl, R.; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The LHC machine, composed of eight sectors with superconducting magnets and accelerating cavities, requires a complex cryogenic system providing high cooling capacities (18 kW equivalent at 4.5 K and 2.4 W at 1.8 K per sector produced in large cold boxes and distributed via 3.3-km cryogenic transfer lines). After individual reception tests of the cryogenic subsystems (cryogen storages, refrigerators, cryogenic transfer lines and distribution boxes) performed since 2000, the commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector has been under way since November 2006. After a brief introduction to the LHC cryogenic system and its specificities, the commissioning is reported detailing the preparation phase (pressure and leak tests, circuit conditioning and flushing), the cool-down sequences including the handling of cryogenic fluids, the magnet powering phase and finally the warm-up. Preliminary conclusions on the commissioning of the first LHC sector will be drawn with the review of the critical points already solved or still pending. The last part of the paper reports on the first operational experience of the LHC cryogenic system in the perspective of the commissioning of the remaining LHC sectors and the beam injection test

  9. Development and optimization of the LHC and the SPS beam diagnostics based on synchrotron radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trad, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the beam transverse emittance is fundamental in every accelerator, in particular for colliders, where its precise determination is essential to maximize the luminosity and thus the performance of the colliding beams. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is a versatile tool for non-destructive beam diagnostics, since its characteristics are closely related to those of the source beam. At CERN, being the only available diagnostics at high beam intensity and energy, SR monitors are exploited as the proton beam size monitor of the two higher energy machines, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The thesis work documented in this report focused on the design, development, characterization and optimization of these beam size monitors. Such studies were based on a comprehensive set of theoretical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments. A powerful simulation tool has been developed combining conventional softwares for SR simulation and optics design, thus allowing the description of an SR monitor from its source up to the detector. The simulations were confirmed by direct observations, and a detailed performance studies of the operational SR imaging monitor in the LHC, where different techniques for experimentally validating the system were applied, such as cross-calibrations with the wire scanners at low intensity (that are considered as a reference) and direct comparison with beam sizes de-convoluted from the LHC luminosity measurements. In 2015, the beam sizes to be measured with the further increase of the LHC beam energy to 7 TeV will decrease down to ∼190 μm. In these conditions, the SR imaging technique was found at its limits of applicability since the error on the beam size determination is proportional to the ratio of the system resolution and the measured beam size. Therefore, various solutions were probed to improve the system's performance such as the choice of one light polarization, the reduction of

  10. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  11. Performing the Super Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallionpaa, Maria

    2016-01-01

    can empower performers by producing super instrument works that allow the concert instrument to become an ensemble controlled by a single player. The existing instrumental skills of the performer can be multiplied and the qualities of regular acoustic instruments extended or modified. Such a situation......The genre of contemporary classical music has seen significant innovation and research related to new super, hyper, and hybrid instruments, which opens up a vast palette of expressive potential. An increasing number of composers, performers, instrument designers, engineers, and computer programmers...... have become interested in different ways of “supersizing” acoustic instruments in order to open up previously-unheard instrumental sounds. Super instruments vary a great deal but each has a transformative effect on the identity and performance practice of the performing musician. Furthermore, composers...

  12. Thin Film Coatings for Suppressing Electron Multipacting in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Costa Pinto, P; Chiggiato, P; Neupert, H; Shaposhnikova, E N; Taborelli, M; Vollenberg, W; Yin Vallgren, C

    2011-01-01

    Thin film coatings are an effective way for suppressing electron multipacting in particle accelerators. For bakeable beam pipes, the TiZrV Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) developed at CERN can provide a Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) of 1.1 after activation at 180oC (24h). The coating process was implemented in large scale to coat the long straight sections and the experimental beam pipes for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For non bakeable beam pipes, as those of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), CERN started a campaign to develop a coating having a low SEY without need of in situ heating. Magnetron sputtered carbon thin films have shown SEY of 1 with marginal deterioration when exposed in air for months. This material is now being tested in both laboratory and accelerator environment. At CERN’s SPS, tests with electron cloud monitors attached to carbon coated chambers show no degradation of the coating after two years of operation interleaved with a total of 3 months of air exposure during shutdown periods...

  13. 2008 LHC Open Days LHC magnets on display

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years you’ve probably seen many of the 15 m long blue LHC dipole magnets being ferried around the site. Most of them are underground now, but on the LHC Open Days on 5 and 6 April the magnets will also play a central role on the surface. Installation of one of the LHC dipole magnets on the Saint-Genis roundabout on 7 March. The LHC dipole testing facility with several magnets at various stages of testing. The 27 km ring of the LHC consists of 1232 double-aperture superconducting dipole magnets, 360 short straight sections (SSS) and 114 special SSS for the insertion regions. On the Open Day, you will be able to "Follow the LHC magnets" through different stages around the site, culminating in their descent into the tunnel. Discover all the many components that have to be precisely integrated in the magnet casings, and talk to the engine...

  14. The LHC Physics Centre at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    As the LHC goes on line for its first exploration of the new high-energy frontier, CERN is also getting ready to enhance the support it provides for the analysis and interpretation of the emerging data.    The LHC Physics Centre at CERN (LPCC) has started up over the past couple of months, beginning with a series of initiatives ranging from Workshops to lectures for students. More details about the LPCC will be featured in a forthcoming Bulletin article. In the meantime, you can consult the LPCC web page, now available at http://cern.ch/lpcc. This offers the high energy physics community a portal to the LPCC's activities, as well as to useful resources, tools and information about the LHC physics programme, the progress of accelerator operations, relevant workshops and events around the world, and much more. The LPCC will shortly begin issuing a weekly bulletin of its own, distributed by e-mail. Members of the CERN physics community and subscribers to the CERN Bulletin will receive the ...

  15. LHC interaction region quadrupole cryostat design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, T.H.; Darve, Ch.; Huang, Y.; Page, T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The cryostat of a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Interaction Region (IR) quadrupole magnet consists of all components of the inner triplet except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, to house all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be able to be manufactured at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course of their expected operating lifetime. This paper describes the current LHC IR inner triplet quadrupole magnet cryostats being designed and manufactured at Fermilab as part of the US-LHC collaboration, and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems

  16. The LHC's suppliers come up trumps

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Four of the LHC Project's most exceptional suppliers have just been honoured in the fifth Golden Hadron awards ceremony. For the first time, a CERN team was among the prize-winners. The CERN main workshop (Mechanical and Materials Engineering group, TS/MME) received the Golden Hadron Award at the prize-giving ceremony held at the Globe. From left to right, Saïd Atieh (TS/MME), Vincent Vuillemin (TS/MME group leader), Michel Caccioppoli (TS/MME), Lyn Evans (LHC Project Leader), Marc Polini (TS/MME-MS section leader), Jean-Luc Gayraud (Cegelec), Jean-Paul Bacher (TS/MME-AS section leader) and Paolo Ciriani (head of the TS Department). Flexible, responsive, committed... all fitting adjectives to describe the recipients of the fifth Golden Hadron awards. The prizes, designed to honour the LHC Project's best suppliers, were awarded to a total of four suppliers, including two that are involved in the final accelerator assembly work: proof, if it were needed, that the project has now entered its final phase. Drak...

  17. LHC forward physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartiglia, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Royon, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States). et al.

    2015-10-02

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. The report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  18. LHC Forward Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, K.

    2016-10-17

    The goal of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the rich field of forward physics, with a special attention to the topics that can be studied at the LHC. The report starts presenting a selection of the Monte Carlo simulation tools currently available, chapter 2, then enters the rich phenomenology of QCD at low, chapter 3, and high, chapter 4, momentum transfer, while the unique scattering conditions of central exclusive production are analyzed in chapter 5. The last two experimental topics, Cosmic Ray and Heavy Ion physics are presented in the chapter 6 and 7 respectively. Chapter 8 is dedicated to the BFKL dynamics, multiparton interactions, and saturation. The report ends with an overview of the forward detectors at LHC. Each chapter is correlated with a comprehensive bibliography, attempting to provide to the interested reader with a wide opportunity for further studies.

  19. LHC, Astrophysics and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Auriemma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the impact on cosmology of recent results obtained by the LHC (Large Hadron Collider experiments in the 2011-2012 runs, respectively at √s = 7 and 8 TeV. The capital achievement of LHC in this period has been the discovery of a spin-0 particle with mass 126 GeV/c2, very similar to the Higgs boson of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Less exciting, but not less important, negative results of searches for Supersymmetric particles or other exotica in direct production or rare decays are discussed in connection with particles and V.H.E. astronomy searches for Dark Matter.

  20. Raspberry Pi super cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Andrew K

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a step-by-step, tutorial-based approach which will teach you how to develop your own super cluster using Raspberry Pi computers quickly and efficiently.Raspberry Pi Super Cluster is an introductory guide for those interested in experimenting with parallel computing at home. Aimed at Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, this book is a primer for getting your first cluster up and running.Basic knowledge of C or Java would be helpful but no prior knowledge of parallel computing is necessary.

  1. MPI@LHC Talk.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00392933; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Draft version of talk for MPI@LHC, regarding the topic of "Monte Carlo Tuning @ ATLAS". The talk introduces the event generator chain, concepts of tuning, issues/problems with over tuning, and then proceeds to explain 3(4) tunes performed at ATLAS. A 4th tune known as A15-MG5aMC@NLO(-TTBAR) is also included, but is awaiting note approval.

  2. The LHC on Google

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Where in the world could the LHC outdo Barack Obama in the popularity stakes? On Google, of course! The famous search engine has just published its Top Ten "most popular" and "fastest rising" searches for 2008 in each of 34 countries. Surprise, surprise, the term "Large Hadron Collider" was the 6th fastest rising topic in the United Kingdom and the 10th fastest in New Zealand. In the UK, "Large Hadron Collider" even beat "Obama" into 7th place!

  3. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2012-01-01

    When we try to advance from a solid knowledge of field theory to LHC physics we usually encounter a frustrating problem: in particular Higgs physics and QCD techniques appear as a impenetrable granite block of phenomenological know-how, common lores, and historically grown intuition what works and what does not. I hope this lecture can drill a few holes into the rock and put you into a position to digest advanced writeups as well as some first research papers on the topic.

  4. The LHC project

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    At the halfway point in the construction of the LHC, the project is now moving from the design and procurement phase to the installation phase, which officially started on 1st March. An overview of the progress of the project is given and the final schedule for installation and commissioning is discussed. The talk will be given in English but questions can be taken in French.

  5. LHC Report: Beam on

    CERN Multimedia

    Rossano Giachino for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The powering tests described in the last edition of the Bulletin were successfully finished at the end of the first week of March opening the way for 4 TeV operations this year. The beam was back in the machine on Wednesday 14 March. The first collisions at 4 TeV are scheduled for the first week of April.   The first beam of 2012 is dumped after making a few rounds in the LHC. The magnet powering tests were followed by the machine checkout phase. Here the operations team in collaboration with the equipment groups performs a sequence of tests to ensure the readiness of the LHC for beam. The tests include driving all the LHC systems – beam dump, injection, collimation, RF, power converters, magnet circuits, vacuum, interlocks, controls, timing and synchronization – through the operational cycle. The “checkout phase” is really a massive de-bugging exercise, which is performed with the objective of ensuring the proper functioning of the whole machine and t...

  6. LHC Report: imaginative injectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierre Freyermuth for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    A new bunch injection scheme from the PS to the SPS allowed the LHC to achieve a new peak luminosity record.   Figure 1: PSB multi-turn injection principle: to vary the parameters during injection with the aim of putting the newly injected beam in a different region of the transverse phase-space plan. The LHC relies on the injector complex to deliver beam with well-defined bunch populations and the necessary transverse and longitudinal characteristics – all of which fold directly into luminosity performance. There are several processes taking place in the PS Booster (PSB) and the Proton Synchrotron (PS) acting on the beam structure in order to obtain the LHC beam characteristics. Two processes are mainly responsible for the beam brightness: the PSB multi-turn injection and the PS radio-frequency (RF) gymnastics. The total number of protons in a bunch and the transverse emittances are mostly determined by the multi-turn Booster injection, while the number of bunches and their time spacin...

  7. LHC Report: Rocky XIV

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC has been in luminosity production mode for the last couple of weeks. Peak luminosities have ranged between 6 and a record 7.74 x 1033 cm -2 s-1. Integrated luminosities per fill have been healthy, with 170 inverse picobarn per fill reached on five occasions in the last two weeks.  The total integrated luminosity for the year has passed 14 inverse femtobarns.   Injected bunch currents have peaked at an average of  1.69 x 1011 protons per bunch on average - a remarkable achievement for both the injectors and the LHC: the injectors to be able to produce good quality beam at these intensities; the LHC for being able to cope with these intensities without excessive losses. Peak performance from day to day depends strongly on the beam sizes and bunch intensities delivered by the injectors. It is a continual challenge to keep the Booster, PS and SPS optimally tuned while they deliver beams to their other wide range of users. Despite the excel...

  8. Slice of the LHC prototype beam tubes in dipole magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    A slice of the LHC accelerator prototype beam tubes surrounded by magnets. The LHC will accelerate two proton beams in opposite directions. The high bending and accelerating fields needed can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC will be the largest superconducting installation ever built, a unique challenge for CERN and its industrial partners. About dipole magnets: There will be 1232 dipole magnets in the LHC, used to guide the particles around the 27 km ring. Dipole magnets must have an extremely uniform field, which means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. The temperature is measured to five thousandths of a degree, the current to one part in a million. The current creating the magnetic field will pass through superconducting wires at up to 12 500 amps, about 30 000 times the current flowing ...

  9. Status of Resistive Magnets in the LHC Injectors Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Tommasini, D; Thonet, P; Bauche, J; Zickler, T; Newborough, A; Sgobba, S; Lopez, R

    2010-01-01

    About 4650 normal conducting magnets are presently installed in the CERN accelerators complex, more than 3000 of them belonging to the LHC injector chain and 163 installed in the LHC. The oldest magnets have been in operation for 50 years, and some of them are submitted to aggressive conditions, either in terms of radiation, extreme water cooling conditions or temperature. The smallest magnets in the linacs weigh a few kilograms, whilst each of the main magnets of the Proton Synchrotron weighs 33 tons. The paper reviews the status of these magnets and gives some examples of findings and relevant recent actions undertaken to ensure their reliable operation in the coming years.

  10. The super-resolution debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Rachel

    2018-05-01

    In the quest for nanoscopy with super-resolution, consensus from the imaging community is that super-resolution is not always needed and that scientists should choose an imaging technique based on their specific application.

  11. From the LHC Reference Database to the Powering Interlock System

    CERN Document Server

    Dehavay, C; Schmidt, R; Veyrunes, E; Zerlauth, M

    2003-01-01

    The protection of the magnet powering system for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) currently being built at CERN is a major challenge due to the unprecedented complexity of the accelerator. The Powering Interlock System of the LHC will have to manage more than 1600 DC circuits for magnet powering, different in their structure, complexity and importance to the accelerator. For the coherent description of such complex system, a Reference Database as unique source of the parameters of the electrical circuits has been developed. The information, introduced via a generic circuit description language, is first used for installing the accelerator and making all electrical connections. The data is then used for tests and commissioning. During operation, the Powering Interlock System manages all critical functions. It consists of 36 PLC based controllers dis tributed around the machine and requires a flexible and transparent way of configuration, since each controller manages different numbers and types of electrical ci...

  12. Identifying Galactic Cosmic Ray Origins With Super-TIGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    deNolfo, Georgia; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Christian, E. R.; Mitchell, J. W.; Hams, T.; Link, J. T.; Sasaki, M.; Labrador, A. W.; Mewaldt, R. A.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Super-TIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) is a new long-duration balloon-borne instrument designed to test and clarify an emerging model of cosmic-ray origins and models for atomic processes by which nuclei are selected for acceleration. A sensitive test of the origin of cosmic rays is the measurement of ultra heavy elemental abundances (Z > or equal 30). Super-TIGER is a large-area (5 sq m) instrument designed to measure the elements in the interval 30 TIGER builds on the heritage of the smaller TIGER, which produced the first well-resolved measurements of elemental abundances of the elements Ga-31, Ge-32, and Se-34. We present the Super-TIGER design, schedule, and progress to date, and discuss the relevance of UH measurements to cosmic-ray origins.

  13. LHC luminosity upgrade detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; de Roeck, Albert; Bortoletto, Daniela; Wigmans, Richard; Riegler, Werner; Smith, Wesley H

    2006-01-01

    LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm -2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: • Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) • Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector developments (lectures 2-4) • Electronics, trigger and data acquisition challenges (lecture 5) Note: the much more ambitious LHC energy upgrade will not be covered

  14. LHC Report: First collisions soon

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    On the evening of Friday 16 March beams were accelerated in the LHC at 4 TeV for the first time: a new world record! According to the schedule for the machine restart it will take another three weeks before the stable beams mode – the requirement for the detectors to start taking data – is achieved.   During the beam commissioning period the equipment teams make sure that their systems – beam instrumentation, radio frequency, beam interlock, feedback on orbit and tune, etc. – are working flawlessly with beam. Confidence in the correct functioning of all the magnets, their settings and their alignment is obtained by detailed measurements of the optics and the physical aperture. The optics measurements include the beta* of the squeezed beam at the centre of the experiments where the collisions will soon take place. This year the aim is to have a smaller beta* of 60 cm for the ATLAS and CMS experiments. As a reminder, smaller values of beta* mean thinner and m...

  15. Latest news from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Over the past two weeks the LHC operations team has focused on pushing the LHC’s performance into new territory in terms of stored beam power. Moving to 25 bunches per beam with almost nominal bunch intensities at the end of July implied operation with a stored energy in each beam of more than 1 MJ. This corresponds to the current record for stored beam energy in existing hadron accelerators (e.g. CERN’s SPS and Fermilab’s Tevatron) and it marks an energy regime where a sudden loss of beam or operational errors can result in serious damage to equipment: an energy of 1 MJ is sufficient to melt 2 kg of copper. Extreme care and a thorough optimization of all operational procedures are therefore required in making this important transition in the machine’s performance.   The focus of the past two weeks has been on optimizing the operational procedures and the machine protection systems, with the aim of gaining experience with the reliability and reproducibility of...

  16. Frames in super Hilbert modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Rashidi-Kouchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we define super Hilbert module and investigate frames in this space. Super Hilbert modules are  generalization of super Hilbert spaces in Hilbert C*-module setting. Also, we define frames in a super Hilbert module and characterize them by using of the concept of g-frames in a Hilbert C*-module. Finally, disjoint frames in Hilbert C*-modules are introduced and investigated.

  17. LHC goes global

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-15

    As CERN's major project for the future, the LHC sets a new scale in world-wide scientific collaboration. As well as researchers and engineers from CERN's 19 European Member States, preparations for the LHC now include scientists from several continents. Some 50 per cent of the researchers involved in one way or another with preparations for the LHC experimental programme now come from countries which are not CERN Member States. Underlining this enlarged international involvement is the recent decision by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Science and Culture ('Monbusho') to accord CERN a generous contribution of five billion yen (about 65 million Swiss francs) to help finance the construction of the LHC. This money will be held in a special fund earmarked for construction of specific LHC components and related activities. To take account of the new situation, CERN is proposing to set up a totally new 'Associate State' status. This is foreseen as a flexible bilateral framework which will be set up on a case-by-case basis to adapt to different circumstances. This proposal was introduced to CERN Council in June, and will be further discussed later this year. These developments reflect CERN's new role as a focus of world science, constituting a first step towards a wider level of international collaboration. At the June Council session, as a first step, Japan was unanimously elected as a CERN Observer State, giving them the right to attend Council meetings. Introducing the topic at the Council session, Director General Chris Llewellyn Smith sketched the history of Japanese involvement in CERN research. This began in 1957 and has gone on to include an important experiment at the LEAR low energy antiproton ring using laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms, the new Chorus neutrino experiment using an emulsion target, and a major contribution to the Opal experiment at the LEP electronpositron collider. In welcoming the development, many Council delegates looked

  18. LHC goes global

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    As CERN's major project for the future, the LHC sets a new scale in world-wide scientific collaboration. As well as researchers and engineers from CERN's 19 European Member States, preparations for the LHC now include scientists from several continents. Some 50 per cent of the researchers involved in one way or another with preparations for the LHC experimental programme now come from countries which are not CERN Member States. Underlining this enlarged international involvement is the recent decision by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Science and Culture ('Monbusho') to accord CERN a generous contribution of five billion yen (about 65 million Swiss francs) to help finance the construction of the LHC. This money will be held in a special fund earmarked for construction of specific LHC components and related activities. To take account of the new situation, CERN is proposing to set up a totally new 'Associate State' status. This is foreseen as a flexible bilateral framework which will be set up on a case-by-case basis to adapt to different circumstances. This proposal was introduced to CERN Council in June, and will be further discussed later this year. These developments reflect CERN's new role as a focus of world science, constituting a first step towards a wider level of international collaboration. At the June Council session, as a first step, Japan was unanimously elected as a CERN Observer State, giving them the right to attend Council meetings. Introducing the topic at the Council session, Director General Chris Llewellyn Smith sketched the history of Japanese involvement in CERN research. This began in 1957 and has gone on to include an important experiment at the LEAR low energy antiproton ring using laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms, the new Chorus neutrino experiment using an emulsion target, and a major contribution to the Opal experiment at the LEP electronpositron collider. In welcoming the

  19. Search for third generation squarks at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of searches of ATLAS and CMS experiments for third generation squark production in the context of supersymmetry. In many scenarios of supersymmetry the super-partners of the bottom and top quark are the lightest squarks. These particles could therefore be the first sparticles observed at the LHC. The ATLAS and CMS experiments have a wide variety of searches sensitive to third generation squark production that have been conducted with the 2011 data sets. Their results are interpreted in simplified models where limits on different production and decay channels of stop and sbottom quarks have been set. (author)

  20. Silicon Detectors for the sLHC - an Overview of Recent RD50 Results

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    It is foreseen to significantly increase the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN around 2018 by upgrading the LHC towards the sLHC (Super-LHC). Due to the radiation damage to the silicon detectors used, the physics experiment will require new tracking detectors for sLHC operation. All-silicon central trackers are being studied in ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, with extremely radiation hard silicon sensors on the innermost layers. The radiation hardness of these new sensors must surpass the one of LHC detectors by roughly an order of magnitude. Within the CERN RD50 collaboration, a massive R&D programme is underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Among the R&D topics are the development of new sensor types like 3D silicon detectors designed for the extreme radiation levels of the sLHC. We will report on the recent results obtained by RD50 from tests of several detector technologies and silicon materials at radiation levels corresponding to SLHC fluences. Based on ...

  1. Status of the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Selph, F.B.

    1976-09-01

    The SuperHILAC is an Alvarez linear accelerator designed to accelerate all ions to a maximum energy of 8.5 MeV/u. It functions as an essential part of two research programs of national importance--first, as a supplier of beams for research at less than 10 MeV/u, secondly as an injector for the Bevalac facility, for nuclear physics and medical research at energies greater than 200 MeV/u. This duplication of effort from a single accelerator is made possible by the utilization of a technique known as timeshare--two different ion beams are accelerated independently through the same linac structure. Recent operation has been in the mass range 12 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 136. Usually, a heavy ion (A greater than 40) is delivered to the SuperHILAC experimental area for nuclear physics experiments while concurrently delivering a lighter ion (A less than or equal to 40) to the Bevatron for further acceleration (max. 2.5 GeV/u) to be used in experiments exploring the physics of very high energy heavy ions, in investigations of radiation biology, and in preclinical tests as a tool for cancer treatment. Recent operating experience is reviewed. Also discussed are recent major improvements which have been made to the accelerator, and a proposed improvement which will increase reliability and beam intensity for the very heavy ions (A greater than or equal to 84) by adding a third injector of improved design

  2. Handbook of Super 8 Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzer, Ronnie, Ed.

    This handbook is designed for anyone interested in producing super 8 films at any level of complexity and cost. Separate chapters present detailed discussions of the following topics: super 8 production systems and super 8 shooting and editing systems; budgeting; cinematography and sound recording; preparing to edit; editing; mixing sound tracks;…

  3. Super-resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution, the process of obtaining one or more high-resolution images from one or more low-resolution observations, has been a very attractive research topic over the last two decades. It has found practical applications in many real world problems in different fields, from satellite...

  4. Superconducting Super Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, M.L.

    1986-04-01

    The scientific need for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is outlined, along with the history of the development of the SSC concept. A brief technical description is given of each of the main points of the SSC conceptual design. The construction cost and construction schedule are discussed, followed by issues associated with the realization of the SSC. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Super Refractory Status Epilepticus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    et al did retrospective cohort study from 1 January st. 1994 to 31 March 1998 at Presbyterian Medical. Centre in Columbia, to determine the frequency, risk factors and impact on the outcome of RSE. They found out that 69% of seizures recurred after. Key Words: Super refractory status epilepticus, Zambia. Medical Journal of ...

  6. Optimal Super Dielectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    plate capacitor will reduce the net field to an unprecedented extent. This family of materials can form materials with dielectric values orders of... Capacitor -Increase Area (A)............8 b. Multi-layer Ceramic Capacitor -Decrease Thickness (d) .......10 c. Super Dielectric Material-Increase...circuit modeling, from [44], and B) SDM capacitor charge and discharge ...................................................22 Figure 15. Dielectric

  7. SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemetz, R.; Selph, F.; Barnes, A.C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief discussion is given of improvements, operations, and research programs at the SuperHILAC. Improvements were made in beam injection, ion sources, and computer control systems. The research efficiency ranged between 70 and 90 percent during most of the year

  8. Restart of the LHC. New physics. The particle physics behind the world machine illustratively explained; Neustart des LHC. Neue Physik. Die Teilchenphysik hinter der Weltmaschine anschaulich erklaert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knochel, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The ascertainment of scientific virgin territory by means of the LHC ar CERN, the study of actual questions of cosmology and astrophysics like dark matter and dark energy by means of the LHC, the presently existing anomalies in the data with regards to new phenomena together with statistical methods for the correct estimation of such observations, the supplement of other experiments for the LHC experiments, the Higgs boson, supersymmetry, higher dimensions, the study of quantum gravity in accelerator experiments with regards to the string theory. (HSI)

  9. LHC Report: Out of the clouds

    CERN Multimedia

    Giovanni Rumolo, Giovanni Iadarola and Hannes Bartosik for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    In order for the LHC to deliver intense proton beams to the experiments, operators have to perform “scrubbing” of the beam pipes. This operation is necessary to reduce the formation of electron clouds, which would generate instabilities in the colliding beams.   Electron clouds are generated in accelerators running with positively charged particles when electrons - produced by the ionisation of residual molecules in the vacuum or by the photoelectric effect from synchrotron radiation - are accelerated by the beam field and hit the surface of the vacuum chamber producing other electrons. This avalanche-like process can result in the formation of clouds of electrons. Electron clouds are detrimental to the beam for a few reasons. First, the electrons impacting the walls desorb molecules and degrade the ultra-high vacuum in the beam chamber. Furthermore, they interact electromagnetically with the beam, leading to the oscillation and expansion of the particle bunches. This increases...

  10. Overview of SSC accelerator requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.

    1992-03-01

    This paper will present a general overview of the requirements of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) accelerators. Each accelerator in the injector chain will be discussed separately, followed by a discussion of the collider itself. In conclusion, the top level requirements of the overall accelerator system will be presented. For each accelerator, the primary operating parameters will be presented in tabular form. A brief narrative discussion of the principal technical features of each machine will be given. Finally, the principal technical design challenges for the machine will be noted, together with the currently planned solution to these challenges

  11. Site-specific design of the super collider in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughton, C.; Nelson, P.P.; Lundin, T.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper outlines the scope of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) in Texas, underground works and present the current accelerator layout. After a brief overview of the site geotechnical characteristics, emphasis will be placed upon the possibilities for the incorporation of mechanical excavation technology into the construction of the various underground structures

  12. Site-specific design of the super collider in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughton, C.; Nelson, P.P.; Lundin, T.K.

    1990-06-01

    This paper will outline the scope of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), underground works and present the current accelerator layout. After a brief overview of the site geotechnical characteristics, emphasis will be placed upon the possibilities for the incorporation of mechanical excavation technology into the construction of the various underground structures. 5 figs

  13. SSC accelerator availability allocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, K.T.; Franciscovich, J.

    1991-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) operational availability is an area of major concern, judged by the Central Design Group to present such risk that use of modern engineering tools would be essential to program success. Experience has shown that as accelerator beam availability falls below about 80%, efficiency of physics experiments degrades rapidly due to inability to maintain adequate coincident accelerator and detector operation. For this reason, the SSC availability goal has been set at 80%, even though the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory accelerator, with a fraction of the SSC's complexity, has only recently approached that level. This paper describes the allocation of the top-level goal to part-level reliability and maintainability requirements, and it gives the results of parameter sensitivity studies designed to help identify the best approach to achieve the needed system availability within funding and schedule constraints. 1 ref., 12 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Ionization front accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.

    1975-01-01

    In a recently proposed linear collective accelerator, ions are accelerated in a steep, moving potential well created at the head of an intense relativistic electron beam. The steepness of the potential well and its motion are controlled by the external ionization of a suitable background gas. Calculations concerning optimum choices for the background gas and the ionization method are presented; a two-step photoionization process employing Cs vapor is proposed. In this process, a super-radiant light source is used to excite the gas, and a UV laser is used to photoionize the excited state. The appropriate line widths and coupled ionization growth rate equations are discussed. Parameter estimates are given for a feasibility experiment, for a 1 GeV proton accelerator, and for a heavy ion accelerator (50 MeV/nucleon uranium). (auth)

  15. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Roeck, Albert de; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+$\\alpha_s$ uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new

  16. Golden Hadron awards for the LHC's top suppliers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The following firms have been selected to receive a GOLDEN HADRON AWARD 2003, in recognition of their outstanding achievement: JDL TECHNOLOGIES, Belgium "in producing automatic cable inspection systems", FURUKAWA ELECTRIC COMPANY, Japan "in producing high quality superconducting cable", IHI Corporation, Japan, and LINDE KRYOTECHNIK, Switzerland "in producing novel 1.8 K refrigeration units based on advanced cold compressor technology" for the Large Hadron Collider.Photos 01, 02: Recipients of the 2003 Golden Hadron awards at the presentation ceremony on 16 May.Photo 03: LHC project leader Lyn Evans updates the award recipients on work for CERN's new accelerator.Photo 04: René Joannes of JDL Technologies (left) receives a Golden Hadron award from LHC project leader Lyn Evans.Shinichiro Meguro, managing director of Furukawa Electric Company, receives a Golden Hadron award from LHC project leader Lyn Evans.Photo 06: Kirkor Kurtcuoglu of Linde Kryotechnik (left) and Motoki Yoshinaga, associate director of IHI...

  17. A word from the DG - Major progress for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The return to work after the summer holiday period has been marked by significant progress in the installation of the LHC machine and its detectors. At the beginning of the month, the one thousandth superconducting magnet was positioned in the accelerator tunnel. Passing this symbolic milestone is a testament to the successful efforts of the hundreds of LHC collaborators who are working day and night to install the machine in time, and I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate them. Despite the significant technical and organisational difficulties associated with different types of activities being carried out in parallel in a tunnel where space is limited, the LHC installation teams have achieved remarkable feats. As a result, the delays incurred owing to the problems encountered with the cryogenic distribution line in 2004 have been partly recouped. The cryoline is almost complete, with seven out of eight sectors accepted while installation of the eighth is expected to be completed at the...

  18. SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC INSERTION REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLEN, E.; ANERELLA, M.; COZZOLINO, J.; GANETIS, G.; GHOSH, A.; GUPTA, R.; HARRISON, M.; JAIN, A.; MARONE, A.; MURATORE, J.; PLATE, S.; SCHMALZLE, J.; WANDERER, P.; WU, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    Dipole bending magnets are required to change the horizontal separation of the two beams in the LHC. In Intersection Regions (IR) 1, 2, 5, and 8, the beams are brought into collision for the experiments located there. In IR4, the separation of the beams is increased to accommodate the machine's particle acceleration hardware. As part of the US contribution to the LHC Project, BNL is building the required superconducting magnets. Designs have been developed featuring a single aperture cold mass in a single cryostat, two single aperture cold masses in a single cryostat, and a dual aperture cold mass in a single cryostat. All configurations feature the 80 mm diameter, 10 m long superconducting coil design used in the main bending magnets of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider recently completed at Brookhaven. The magnets for the LHC, to be built at Brookhaven, are described and results from the program to build two dual aperture prototypes are presented

  19. Novel Materials for Collimators at LHC and its Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108536; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Garlasche, Marco; Gentini, Luca; Gradassi, Paolo; Guinchard, Michael; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Sacristan De Frutos, Oscar; Carra, Federico; Quaranta, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Collimators for last-generation particle accelerators like the LHC, must be designed to withstand the close interaction with intense and energetic particle beams, safely operating over an extended range of temperatures in harsh environments, while minimizing the perturbing effects, such as instabilities induced by RF impedance, on the circulating beam. The choice of materials for collimator active components is of paramount importance to meet these requirements, which are to become even more demanding with the increase of machine performances expected in future upgrades, such as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). Consequently, a farreaching R&D program has been launched to develop novel materials with excellent thermal shock resistance and high thermal and electrical conductivity, replacing or complementing materials used for present collimators. Molybdenum Carbide - Graphite and Copper-Diamond composites have been so far identified as the most promising materials. The manufacturing methods, properties and...

  20. Protection of the LHC against Unsynchronised Beam Aborts

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Carlier, E; Uythoven, J; Wenninger, J; Weterings, W

    2006-01-01

    An unsynchronised beam abort in the LHC could damage downstream accelerator components, in particular the extraction septum magnets, the experimental low-beta triplet magnet apertures and the tertiary collimators. Although the LHC beam dumping system includes design features to minimise their frequency, such unsynchronised aborts cannot be excluded. A system of protection devices comprising fixed and moveable diluters and collimators will protect the downstream LHC aperture from the misdirected bunches in case of such a failure. The sources of unsynchronised aborts are described, together with the requirements and design of the protection devices and their expected performance. The accompanying operational requirements and envisaged solutions are discussed, in particular the problem of ensuring the local orbit at the protection devices.

  1. Detector and System Developments for LHC Detector Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Rohne, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2015-05-12

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Physics program and the consequent improvement of the LHC accelerator performance set important challenges to all detector systems. This PhD thesis delineates the studies and strategies adopted to improve two different types of detectors: the replacement of precision trackers with ever increasingly performing silicon detectors, and the improvement of large gaseous detector systems by optimizing their gas mixtures and operation modes. Within the LHC tracker upgrade programs, the ATLAS Insertable B-layer (IBL) is the first major upgrade of a silicon-pixel detector. Indeed the overall ATLAS Pixel Detector performance is expected to degrade with the increase of luminosity and the IBL will recover the performance by adding a fourth innermost layer. The IBL Detector makes use of new pixel and front-end electronics technologies as well as a novel thermal management approach and light support and service structures. These innovations required complex developments and Quality Ass...

  2. Design of the Beam Loss Monitoring System for the LHC Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, E B; Effinger, E; Ferioli, G; González, J L; Gschwendtner, E; Guaglio, Gianluca; Hodgson, M; Prieto, V; Zamantzas, C

    2004-01-01

    The beam loss monitoring (BLM) system of the LHC is one of the most critical elements for the protection of the LHC. It must prevent the super conducting magnets from quenches and the machine components from damages, caused by beam losses. It helps in the identification of the loss mechanism by measuring the loss pattern. Special detectors will be used for the setup and control of the collimators. Furthermore, it will be an important tool during machine setup and studies. The specification requirements of the BLM system include a very high reliability.

  3. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jingyu; et al.

    2015-07-12

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  4. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jingyu; Chai, Weiping; Chen, Fusan; Chen, Nian; Chou, Weiren; Dong, Haiyi; Gao, Jie; Han, Tao; Leng, Yongbin; Li, Guangrui; Gupta, Ramesh; Li, Peng; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Baiqi; Liu, Yudong; Lou, Xinchou; Luo, Qing; Malamud, Ernie; Mao, Lijun; Palmer, Robert B.; Peng, Quanling; Peng, Yuemei; Ruan, Manqi; Sabbi, GianLuca; Su, Feng; Su, Shufang; Stratakis, Diktys; Sun, Baogeng; Wang, Meifen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Liantao; Wang, Xiangqi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Ming; Xing, Qingzhi; Xu, Qingjin; Xu, Hongliang; Xu, Wei; Witte, Holger; Yan, Yingbing; Yang, Yongliang; Yang, Jiancheng; Yuan, Youjin; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Zheng, Shuxin; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Zian; Zou, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  5. Philippe Lebrun, Head of the AT Department, Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader, and Lucio Rossi, Head of the AT-MAS Group, in front of the last batch of steel for the LHC at Cockerill Sambre.

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Casting the last batch of steel sheets for the LHC superconducting magnet yokes. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the accelerator's weight and, if placed side by side, would stretch over 20 km !

  6. RF upgrade program in LHC injectors and LHC machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, E.

    2012-01-01

    The main themes of the RF upgrade program are: the Linac4 project, the LLRF-upgrade and the study of a tuning-free wide-band system for PSB, the upgrade of the SPS 800 MHz amplifiers and beam controls and the upgrade of the transverse dampers of the LHC. Whilst LHC Splice Consolidation is certainly the top priority for LS1, some necessary RF consolidation and upgrade is necessary to assure the LHC performance for the next 3- year run period. This includes: 1) necessary maintenance and consolidation work that could not fit the shorter technical stops during the last years, 2) the upgrade of the SPS 200 MHz system from presently 4 to 6 cavities and possibly 3) the replacement of one LHC cavity module. On the longer term, the LHC luminosity upgrade requires crab cavities, for which some preparatory work in SPS Coldex must be scheduled during LS1. (author)

  7. Real-Time Schottky Measurements in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2241943; Aune, D.

    The accelerator complex at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is a diverse collection of machines, tailored for different energy ranges, and concatenated in order to accelerate/decelerate particle beams. Leading up to CERN’s flagship accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), every accelerator in the chain boosts the particles to higher energies before they are injected into the next machine in the sequence. The LHC is a circular synchrotron accelerator consisting of two 27-kilometer vacuum tubes equipped with superconducting magnets and accelerating RF cavities in order to increase the energy of the particles along the way. Inside the vacuum tubes, two counter-rotating high-energy particle beams travel at velocities close to the speed of light before they are made to collide inside particle detectors at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. As the particles are accelerated, they experience various external and internal forces. RF cavities are used to boost the speed of the particles an...

  8. Deformations of super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninnemann, H.

    1992-01-01

    Two different approaches to (Konstant-Leites-) super Riemann surfaces are investigated. In the local approach, i.e. glueing open superdomains by superconformal transition functions, deformations of the superconformal structure are discussed. On the other hand, the representation of compact super Riemann surfaces of genus greater than one as a fundamental domain in the Poincare upper half-plane provides a simple description of super Laplace operators acting on automorphic p-forms. Considering purely odd deformations of super Riemann surfaces, the number of linear independent holomorphic sections of arbitrary holomorphic line bundles will be shown to be independent of the odd moduli, leading to a simple proof of the Riemann-Roch theorem for compact super Riemann surfaces. As a further consequence, the explicit connections between determinants of super Laplacians and Selberg's super zeta functions can be determined, allowing to calculate at least the 2-loop contribution to the fermionic string partition function. (orig.)

  9. Deformations of super Riemann surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninnemann, H [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    1992-11-01

    Two different approaches to (Konstant-Leites-) super Riemann surfaces are investigated. In the local approach, i.e. glueing open superdomains by superconformal transition functions, deformations of the superconformal structure are discussed. On the other hand, the representation of compact super Riemann surfaces of genus greater than one as a fundamental domain in the Poincare upper half-plane provides a simple description of super Laplace operators acting on automorphic p-forms. Considering purely odd deformations of super Riemann surfaces, the number of linear independent holomorphic sections of arbitrary holomorphic line bundles will be shown to be independent of the odd moduli, leading to a simple proof of the Riemann-Roch theorem for compact super Riemann surfaces. As a further consequence, the explicit connections between determinants of super Laplacians and Selberg's super zeta functions can be determined, allowing to calculate at least the 2-loop contribution to the fermionic string partition function. (orig.).

  10. LNV Higgses at LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiezza, Alessio; Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    Lepton number is a fundamental symmetry that can be probed at the LHC. Here, we study the Higgs sector of theories responsible for neutrino mass generation. After a brief discussion of simple see-saw scenarios, we turn to theories where heavy Majorana neutrino mass is protected by a gauge symmetry and focus on the Left-Right symmetric theory. There, the SM-like Higgs boson can decay to a pair of heavy neutrinos and provide enough information to establish the origin of neutrino mass.

  11. Thermometry for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhler, S.; Junquera, T.; Thermeau, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The LHC project will use about 8000 thermometers to control the temperature of magnets. These thermometers will be operated at a temperature ranging from 1.6 K to 300 K and their calibration should be better than 0.25%. A small cryogenic thermometer calibration facility has been designed and tested. To select the cryogenic temperature sensors, an irradiation program is being performed to expose at high neutron fluences (>10 15 n/cm 2 ) the following thermometers: carbon resistors, Ge, thin film, RhFe and Pt. The resistance shifts under radiation of the different sensors at liquid helium are presented. (authors)

  12. QCD probes at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Da Silveira, G. Gil

    2018-01-01

    The LHC experiments have reported new results with respect to the dynamics of the strong interactions in $pp$, $p$A, and AA collisions over the past years. In proton-proton collisions, the data analyses have focused in exploring the nature of underlying events and double parton scattering at high energies. For large systems, the heavy-ion collisions have provided new insights on physics aspects related to azimuthal correlations, jet quenching, and particle production, such as antiprotons. This Letter reports the recent results from the ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb Collaborations on these various topics and highlights its relevant findings for the high-energy community.

  13. CERN and the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Cramer, J G

    1992-01-01

    CERN, a high-energy physics laboratory in Europe, is planning to build a more powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadronic Collider. The US spreads its accelerators around the country while most of Europe's research is conducted at and around CERN.

  14. Stephen Myers - More collaboration for accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Stephen Myers has been appointed Director of Accelerators and Technology. His highest priority is to get the LHC running this year, but beyond that he also has the difficult task of balancing resources between non-LHC physics, new projects and consolidation of the existing accelerators. Stephen Myers, previous head of the Accelerator and Beams (AB) Department, will now oversee all the accelerator and technology activities at CERN, including the Beams, Technology and Engineering departments, in the re-established position of Director of Accelerators and Technology. "There are several good reasons to have a single person responsible for the CERN accelerators and technology," said Myers. "Most importantly, this will allow closer collaboration between the three departments and provide the structure for possible redeployment of resources. There will, of course, be regular meetings between the heads of department and myself, and if proble...

  15. First LHC beam in 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Impressions from the ATLAS control room while waiting for the very first 2017 LHC beams, from the traditional croissants in the morning to the "beam splashes" in the evening. The shift crew, online experts, run coordinators and management are looking forward to the next steps of the LHC restart.

  16. Status of the LHC machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faugeras, P.

    1997-01-01

    The report represents itself a set of diagrams, characterizing: the LHC main parameters for proton-proton collisions and lead ion collisions, parameters of SC dipole and quadrupole magnets and outlines of their designs, LHC cryogenic systems, injection complex and detectors [ru

  17. Le futur du project LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Heyoka

    2007-01-01

    Since 2004, and specitally during the long study in 2005, we used the results of the LHC Project to evaluate differents parameters of the machiene (LHC). The final choices for the design of the machine are based partly on these results. (1,5 page)

  18. First LHC beam in 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Impressions from the ATLAS control room while waiting for the very first 2017 LHC beams, from the traditional croissants in the morning to the "beam splashes" in the evening. The shift crew, online experts, run coordinators and management are looking forward the next steps of the LHC restart.

  19. Massively parallel computing and the search for jets and black holes at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halyo, V., E-mail: vhalyo@gmail.com; LeGresley, P.; Lujan, P.

    2014-04-21

    Massively parallel computing at the LHC could be the next leap necessary to reach an era of new discoveries at the LHC after the Higgs discovery. Scientific computing is a critical component of the LHC experiment, including operation, trigger, LHC computing GRID, simulation, and analysis. One way to improve the physics reach of the LHC is to take advantage of the flexibility of the trigger system by integrating coprocessors based on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) or the Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture into its server farm. This cutting edge technology provides not only the means to accelerate existing algorithms, but also the opportunity to develop new algorithms that select events in the trigger that previously would have evaded detection. In this paper we describe new algorithms that would allow us to select in the trigger new topological signatures that include non-prompt jet and black hole-like objects in the silicon tracker.

  20. EUROv Super Beam Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracos, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

  1. Super-insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerold, J.

    1985-01-01

    The invention concerns super-insulation, which also acts as spacing between two pressurized surfaces, where the crossing bars in at least two layers are provided, with interposed foil. The super-insulation is designed so that it can take compression forces and limits thermal radiation and thermal conduction sufficiently, where the total density of heat flow is usually limited to a few watts per m 2 . The solution to the problem is characterized by the fact that the bars per layer are parallel and from layer to layer they are at an angle to each other and the crossover positions of the bars of different layers are at fixed places and so form contact columns. The basic idea is that bars crossing over each other to support compression forces are used so that contact columns are formed, which are compressed to a certain extent by the load. (orig./PW) [de

  2. SuperSegger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stylianidou, Stella; Brennan, Connor; Nissen, Silas B

    2016-01-01

    -colonies with many cells, facilitating the analysis of cell-cycle dynamics in bacteria as well as cell-contact mediated phenomena. This package has a range of built-in capabilities for characterizing bacterial cells, including the identification of cell division events, mother, daughter, and neighboring cells......Many quantitative cell biology questions require fast yet reliable automated image segmentation to identify and link cells from frame-to-frame, and characterize the cell morphology and fluorescence. We present SuperSegger, an automated MATLAB-based image processing package well......-suited to quantitative analysis of high-throughput live-cell fluorescence microscopy of bacterial cells. SuperSegger incorporates machine-learning algorithms to optimize cellular boundaries and automated error resolution to reliably link cells from frame-to-frame. Unlike existing packages, it can reliably segment micro...

  3. Super-Lagrangians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyl, L.M.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that the Einstein, Weyl, supergravity and superconformal theories are special cases of gauge transformations in SU(4vertical-barN). This group is shown to contain SU(2,2) x SU(N) x U(1) for its commuting or Bose part, and to contain 8N supersymmetry generators for its anticommuting or Fermi part. Using the electromagnetic Lagrangian as a model, a super-Lagrangian is constructed for vector potentials. Invariance is automatic in free space, but, in the presence of matter, restrictions on the supersymmetry transformations are necessary. The Weyl action and the Einstein cosmological field equations are obtained in the appropriate limits. Finally, a super-Lagrangian is constructed from nongeometric principles which includes the Dirac Lagrangian and except for a sum over symmetry indices resembles the electron-electromagnetic Lagrangian

  4. Ten out of ten for LHC decapole magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN's Albert Ijspeert (left) and Avinash Puntambekar of the Indian CAT laboratory with the ten Indian decapole magnets on the test bench. Tests will be carried out by the LHC-MTA group. A batch of 10 superconducting decapole magnets for the LHC has just arrived at CERN from India. These will be used to correct for slight imperfections in the dipole magnets that will steer proton beams around CERN's new accelerator. All magnets have slight imperfections in the fields they produce, and in the LHC dipoles these will be corrected for using sextupoles and decapoles. The sextupoles were the first LHC magnets to be given the production green-light following successful tests of pre-series magnets last year (Bulletin 21/2000, 22 May 2000). Now it is the turn of pre-series decapoles to go on trial at CERN. Of the LHC's 1232 dipole magnets, half will use sextupole correctors only and the other half will use both sextupoles and decapoles. That means that a total of 616 pairs of decapoles are needed. Like the sextupole...

  5. 5th report from the LHC performance workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Bulletin's correspondent from Chamonix

    2012-01-01

    The morning session on Friday 10 February - the final day of the workshop - saw further examination of the challenges of the High Luminosity LHC and included a look at the state of R&D for the new magnets required for the high luminosity interaction regions. There was then an entertaining look at even more distant future. Possible future projects under consideration include the Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) which foresees colliding 60 GeV electrons with 7 TeV protons, and the High Energy LHC (HE-LHC) in which the beam energy of the LHC is increased from 7 to 16.5 TeV. Serious technological challenges exist for both these options. In the afternoon Steve Myers, CERN's Director for Accelerators and Technology, presented a summary of the workshop recommendations. In brief, the LHC should operate at 4 TeV in 2012 with the key priorities being: delivering enough luminosity to ATLAS and CMS to allow them to independently discover or exclude the Higgs; the proton-Lead ion run; and machine deve...

  6. Protection against Accidental Beam Losses at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Protection of the LHC against uncontrolled beam losses is of prime importance due to the very high stored beam energy. For nominal beam intensities, each of the two 7 TeV/c proton beams has a stored energy of 360 MJ threatening to damage accelerator equipment. At injection a number of passive beam absorbers must be correctly positioned and specific procedures have been proposed to ensure safe injection of high intensity. The LHC beam dump block being the only LHC element that can safety absorb the full LHC beam, it is essential that the beams are extracted unto the dump block in case of emergency. The failure time constants extend from 100 microseconds to few seconds depending on the equipment. Failures must be detected at a sufficiently early stage and transmitted to the beam interlock system that triggers the beam dumping system. To ensure safe operation the machine protection system uses a variety of systems to detect such failures. The strategy for protection of the LHC will be illustrated, with emphasis ...

  7. Section of LHC beampipe

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A short section of the LHC beampipe including beam screen. Particle beams circulate for around 10 hours in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During this time, the particles make four hundred million revolutions of the machine, travelling a distance equivalent to the diameter of the solar system. The beams must travel in a pipe which is emptied of air, to avoid collisions between the particles and air molecules (which are considerably bigger than protons). The beam pipes are pumped down to an air pressure similar to that on the surface of the moon. Emptying the air from the two 27 km long Large Hadron Collider beam-pipes is equivalent in volume to emptying the nave of the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. Initially, the air pressure is reduced by pumping. Then, cold sections of the beam-pipe are further emptied using the temperature gradient across special beam-screens inside the tube where particles travel. The warm sections are emptied using a coating called a getter that works like molecular fly-paper. This va...

  8. CERN: LHC progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The push for CERN's next major project, the LHC proton collider to be built in the 27-kilometre LEP tunnel, is advancing on a wide front. For the machine itself, there has been considerable progress in the detailed design. While the main thrust is for proton-proton collisions, heavy ions are also on the LHC collision menu. On the experimental side, proposals are coming into sharper focus. For the machine, the main aim is for the highest possible proton collision energies and collision rates in the confines of the existing LEP tunnel, and the original base design looked to achieve these goals in three collision regions. Early discussions on the experimental programme quickly established that the most probable configuration would have two collision regions rather than three. This, combined with hints that the electronics of several detectors would have to handle several bunch crossings at a time, raised the question whether the originally specified bunch spacing of 15 ns was still optimal

  9. LHC Power Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Pedersen, J

    1999-01-01

    The power distribution for the LHC machine and its experiments will be realised making extensive use of the existing infrastructure for the LEP. The overall power requirement is approximately the same, about 125 MW. The load distribution will however change. The even points will loose in importance and the points 1 and 5 will, due to the installation of ATLAS and CMS, gain. A thorough reorganisation of the 18 kV distribution will thus be necessary. Due to the important cryogenic installations required for the LHC, the 3.3 kV distribution system, supplying mainly cryogenic compressors, will be extended with a number of new substations. The important number of new surface buildings, underground caverns and other underground structures all will receive general service installations: Lighting and power. The new injection tunnels will require complete installations: A.C. supplies for the power converters and for general service, and D.C. cabling for the magnets of the beam line. Special safe power installations ar...

  10. LHC Capabilities for Quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushanko, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of the charmonium and bottomonium resonances in nucleus-nucleus collisions provides crucial information on high-density QCD matter. First, the suppression of quarkonia production is generally agreed to be one of the most direct probes of quark-gluon plasma formation. The observation of anomalous J/$\\psi$ suppression at the CERN-SPS and at RHIC is well established but the clarification of some important remaining questions requires equivalent studies of the $\\Upsilon$ family, only possible at the LHC energies. Second, the production of heavy-quarks proceeds mainly via gluon-gluon fusion processes and, as such, is sensitive to saturation of the gluon density at low-x in the nucleus. Measured departures from the expected vacuum quarkonia cross-sections in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC will thus provide valuable information not only on the thermodynamical state of the produced partonic medium, but also on the initial-state modifications of the nuclear parton distribution functions. The capabilities ...

  11. LHC Report: Rocky Recovery

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The last technical stop finished on Friday 8 July, but the machine returned to its pre-stop performance level over a week later.   Efficiency of LHC fills between 16 July and 20 July, 2011. The cryogenics team had the entire ring cold by Saturday morning and the usual post-technical stop tests with circulating beams started soon after. Unfortunately, they were interrupted by a major perturbation to CERN’s electrical network caused by an impressive thunderstorm that swept over the Pays de Gex. There were major knock-on effects, including the loss of cooling to the cryogenics and an inevitable recovery period once normal service had been re-established. The beams were circulating again by Tuesday afternoon and the post-technical stop checks continued, beefed up with further tests to address a number of issues related to the power cut.  Before the stop, the LHC had managed to get 1380 bunches per beam into collisions and the plan was to ramp back up relatively quickly to this leve...

  12. Accelerator physics issues at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.F.

    1993-05-01

    Realization of the design energy and luminosity goals of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will require proper resolutions of a number of challenging problems in accelerator physics. The status of several salient issues in the design of the SSC will be reviewed and updated in this paper. The emphasis will be on the superconducting accelerators

  13. Minimal Super Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antola, M.; Di Chiara, S.; Sannino, F.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce novel extensions of the Standard Model featuring a supersymmetric technicolor sector (supertechnicolor). As the first minimal conformal supertechnicolor model we consider N=4 Super Yang-Mills which breaks to N=1 via the electroweak interactions. This is a well defined, economical......, between unparticle physics and Minimal Walking Technicolor. We consider also other N =1 extensions of the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. The new models allow all the standard model matter fields to acquire a mass....

  14. LHC beam stability and feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhagen, Ralph

    2007-07-20

    This report presents the stability and the control of the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) two beam orbits and their particle momenta using beam-based feedback systems. The aim of this report is to contribute to a safe and reliable LHC commissioning and machine operation. The first part of the analysis gives an estimate of the expected sources of orbit and energy perturbations that can be grouped into environmental sources, machine-inherent sources and machine element failures: the slowest perturbation due to ground motion, tides, temperature fluctuations of the tunnel and other environmental influences are described in this report by a propagation model that is both qualitatively and quantitatively supported by geophone and beam motion measurements at LEP and other CERN accelerators. The second part of this analysis deals with the control of the two LHC beams' orbit and energy through automated feedback systems. Based on the reading of the more than 1056 beam position monitors (BPMs) that are distributed over the machine, a central global feedback controller calculates new deflection strengths for the more than 1060 orbit corrector magnets (CODs) that are suitable to correct the orbit and momentum around their references. this report provides an analysis of the BPMs and CODs involved in the orbit and energy feedback. The BPMs are based on a wide-band time normaliser circuit that converts the transverse beam position reading of each individual particle bunch into two laser pulses that are separated by a time delay and transmitted through optical fibres to an acquisition card that converts the delay signals into a digital position. A simple error model has been tested and compared to the measurement accuracy of LHC type BPMs, obtained through beam-based measurements in the SPS. The average beam position is controlled through 1060 superconducting and individually powered corrector dipole magnets. The proposed correction in 'time-domain' consists of a

  15. LHC beam stability and feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhagen, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the stability and the control of the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) two beam orbits and their particle momenta using beam-based feedback systems. The aim of this report is to contribute to a safe and reliable LHC commissioning and machine operation. The first part of the analysis gives an estimate of the expected sources of orbit and energy perturbations that can be grouped into environmental sources, machine-inherent sources and machine element failures: the slowest perturbation due to ground motion, tides, temperature fluctuations of the tunnel and other environmental influences are described in this report by a propagation model that is both qualitatively and quantitatively supported by geophone and beam motion measurements at LEP and other CERN accelerators. The second part of this analysis deals with the control of the two LHC beams' orbit and energy through automated feedback systems. Based on the reading of the more than 1056 beam position monitors (BPMs) that are distributed over the machine, a central global feedback controller calculates new deflection strengths for the more than 1060 orbit corrector magnets (CODs) that are suitable to correct the orbit and momentum around their references. this report provides an analysis of the BPMs and CODs involved in the orbit and energy feedback. The BPMs are based on a wide-band time normaliser circuit that converts the transverse beam position reading of each individual particle bunch into two laser pulses that are separated by a time delay and transmitted through optical fibres to an acquisition card that converts the delay signals into a digital position. A simple error model has been tested and compared to the measurement accuracy of LHC type BPMs, obtained through beam-based measurements in the SPS. The average beam position is controlled through 1060 superconducting and individually powered corrector dipole magnets. The proposed correction in 'time-domain' consists of a proportional

  16. The miniature accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The image that most people have of CERN is of its enormous accelerators and their capacity to accelerate particles to extremely high energies. But thanks to some cutting-edge studies on beam dynamics and radiofrequency technology, along with innovative construction techniques, teams at CERN have now created the first module of a brand-new accelerator, which will be just 2 metres long. The potential uses of this miniature accelerator will include deployment in hospitals for the production of medical isotopes and the treatment of cancer. It’s a real David-and-Goliath story.   Serge Mathot, in charge of the construction of the "mini-RFQ", pictured with the first of the four modules that will make up the miniature accelerator. The miniature accelerator consists of a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), a component found at the start of all proton accelerator chains around the world, from the smallest to the largest. The LHC is designed to produce very high-intensity beams ...

  17. Characterising Super-Earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The era of Super-Earths has formally begun with the detection of transiting low-mass exoplanets CoRoT-7b and GJ 1214b. In the path of characterising super-Earths, the first step is to infer their composition. While the discovery data for CoRoT-7b, in combination with the high atmospheric mass loss rate inferred from the high insolation, suggested that it was a rocky planet, the new proposed mass values have widened the possibilities. The combined mass range 1−10 M⊕ allows for a volatile-rich (and requires it if the mass is less than 4 M⊕ , an Earth-like or a super-Mercury-like composition. In contrast, the radius of GJ 1214b is too large to admit a solid composition, thus it necessarily to have a substantial gas layer. Some evidence suggests that within this gas layer H/He is a small but non-negligible component. These two planets are the first of many transiting low-mass exoplanets expected to be detected and they exemplify the limitations faced when inferring composition, which come from the degenerate character of the problem and the large error bars in the data.

  18. LHC project. Exploring the smallest world with the highest energy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Tomio

    2007-01-01

    The LHC accelerator at CERN will be completed soon and the experiments are about to start, making it possible to explore the TeV energy region for the first time in human history. There exists a clear reason why the TeV region is especially important for experimental exploration. The Higgs particle, the last elusive element of the Standard Model, will be discovered with very high probability. In addition there are high chances to discover signs of new physics beyond the Standard Model such as SUSY particles. Dark matter may be discovered. As an introduction of the mini-special issue for LHC, its goals and history is briefly reviewed, followed by a description on LHC accelerator, four LHC experiments as well as the contributions by Japan. (author)

  19. The LHC cryogenic system and operational experience from the first three years run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delikaris, Dimitri; Tavian, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The LHC (Large Hadron Collider) accelerator helium cryogenic system consists of eight cryogenically independent sectors, each 3.3 km long, all cooled and operated at 1.9 K. The overall, entropy equivalent, installed cryogenic capacity totalizes 144 kW (a) 4.5 K including 19.2 kW (a) 1.8 K with an associated helium inventory of 130 ton. The LHC cryogenic system is considered among the most complex and powerful in the world allowing the cooling down to superfluid helium temperature of 1.9 K. of the accelerators' high field superconducting magnets distributed over the 26.7 km underground ring. The present article describes the LHC cryogenic system and its associated cryogen infrastructure. Operational experience, including cryogen management, acquired from the first three years of LHC operation is finally presented. (author)

  20. An Operational Event Announcer for the LHC Control Centre Using Speech Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Page, S

    2011-01-01

    The LHC Island of the CERN Control Centre is a busy working environment with many status displays and running software applications. An audible event announcer was developed in order to provide a simple and efficient method to notify the operations team of events occurring within the many subsystems of the accelerator. The LHC Announcer uses speech synthesis to report messages based upon data received from multiple sources. General accelerator information such as injections, beam energies and beam dumps are derived from data received from the LHC Timing System. Additionally, a software interface is provided that allows other surveillance processes to send messages to the Announcer using the standard control system middleware. Events are divided into categories which the user can enable or disable depending upon their interest. Use of the LHC Announcer is not limited to the Control Centre and is intended to be available to a wide audience, both inside and outside CERN. To accommodate this, it...

  1. Super-quantum curves from super-eigenvalue models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciosmak, Paweł [Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics, University of Warsaw,ul. Banacha 2, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Hadasz, Leszek [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University,ul. Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Manabe, Masahide [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Sułkowski, Piotr [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-10-10

    In modern mathematical and theoretical physics various generalizations, in particular supersymmetric or quantum, of Riemann surfaces and complex algebraic curves play a prominent role. We show that such supersymmetric and quantum generalizations can be combined together, and construct supersymmetric quantum curves, or super-quantum curves for short. Our analysis is conducted in the formalism of super-eigenvalue models: we introduce β-deformed version of those models, and derive differential equations for associated α/β-deformed super-matrix integrals. We show that for a given model there exists an infinite number of such differential equations, which we identify as super-quantum curves, and which are in one-to-one correspondence with, and have the structure of, super-Virasoro singular vectors. We discuss potential applications of super-quantum curves and prospects of other generalizations.

  2. Super-quantum curves from super-eigenvalue models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciosmak, Paweł; Hadasz, Leszek; Manabe, Masahide; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    In modern mathematical and theoretical physics various generalizations, in particular supersymmetric or quantum, of Riemann surfaces and complex algebraic curves play a prominent role. We show that such supersymmetric and quantum generalizations can be combined together, and construct supersymmetric quantum curves, or super-quantum curves for short. Our analysis is conducted in the formalism of super-eigenvalue models: we introduce β-deformed version of those models, and derive differential equations for associated α/β-deformed super-matrix integrals. We show that for a given model there exists an infinite number of such differential equations, which we identify as super-quantum curves, and which are in one-to-one correspondence with, and have the structure of, super-Virasoro singular vectors. We discuss potential applications of super-quantum curves and prospects of other generalizations.

  3. Super-quantum curves from super-eigenvalue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciosmak, Paweł; Hadasz, Leszek; Manabe, Masahide; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    In modern mathematical and theoretical physics various generalizations, in particular supersymmetric or quantum, of Riemann surfaces and complex algebraic curves play a prominent role. We show that such supersymmetric and quantum generalizations can be combined together, and construct supersymmetric quantum curves, or super-quantum curves for short. Our analysis is conducted in the formalism of super-eigenvalue models: we introduce β-deformed version of those models, and derive differential equations for associated α/ β-deformed super-matrix integrals. We show that for a given model there exists an infinite number of such differential equations, which we identify as super-quantum curves, and which are in one-to-one correspondence with, and have the structure of, super-Virasoro singular vectors. We discuss potential applications of super-quantum curves and prospects of other generalizations.

  4. Future HEP Accelerators: The US Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Pushpalatha [Fermilab; Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2015-11-02

    Accelerator technology has advanced tremendously since the introduction of accelerators in the 1930s, and particle accelerators have become indispensable instruments in high energy physics (HEP) research to probe Nature at smaller and smaller distances. At present, accelerator facilities can be classified into Energy Frontier colliders that enable direct discoveries and studies of high mass scale particles and Intensity Frontier accelerators for exploration of extremely rare processes, usually at relatively low energies. The near term strategies of the global energy frontier particle physics community are centered on fully exploiting the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), while the intensity frontier HEP research is focused on studies of neutrinos at the MW-scale beam power accelerator facilities, such as Fermilab Main Injector with the planned PIP-II SRF linac project. A number of next generation accelerator facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and long-term future programs of accelerator-based HEP research. In this paper, we briefly review the post-LHC energy frontier options, both for lepton and hadron colliders in various regions of the world, as well as possible future intensity frontier accelerator facilities.

  5. LHC-B: a dedicated LHC collider beauty experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhan, S.

    1995-01-01

    LHC-B is a forward detector optimized for the study of CP-violation and other rare phenomena in the decays of beauty particles at the LHC. An open geometry forward detector design, with good mass, vertex resolution and particle identification, will facilitate the collection of a large numbers of event samples in diverse B decay channels and allow for a thorough understanding of the systematic uncertainties. With the expected large event statistics, LHC-B will be able to test the closure of the unitarity triangle and make sensitive tests of the Standard Model description of CP-violation. Here we describe the experiment and summarize its anticipated performance. (orig.)

  6. New magnets for the IR: How far are we from the HL-LHC target?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbi, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Insertion quadrupoles with large aperture and high gradient are required to upgrade the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is a collaboration of US DOE National Laboratories aiming at demonstrating the feasibility of Nb 3 Sn magnet technology for this application. Several series of magnets with increasing performance and complexity have been fabricated, with particular emphasis on addressing length scale-up issues. Program results and future directions are discussed. (author)

  7. Transverse Emittance Measurement and Preservation at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082907

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation will be discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constra...

  8. Keeping HL-LHC accountable

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This week saw the cost and schedule of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) and LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) projects come under close scrutiny from the external review committee set up for the purpose.    HL-LHC, whose implementation requires an upgrade to the CERN injector complex, responds directly to one of the key recommendations of the updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, which urges CERN to prepare for a ‘major luminosity upgrade’, a recommendation that is also perfectly in line with the P5 report on the US strategy for the field. Responding to this recommendation, CERN set up the HL-LHC project in 2013, partially supported by FP7 funding through the HiLumi LHC Design Study (2011-2015), and coordinated with the American LARP project, which oversees the US contribution to the upgrade. A key element of HL-LHC planning is a mechanism for receiving independent expert advice on all aspects of the project.  To this end, several technical reviews h...

  9. Physics Validation of the LHC Software

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The LHC Software will be confronted to unprecedented challenges as soon as the LHC will turn on. We summarize the main Software requirements coming from the LHC detectors, triggers and physics, and we discuss several examples of Software components developed by the experiments and the LCG project (simulation, reconstruction, etc.), their validation, and their adequacy for LHC physics.

  10. Dissecting an LHC dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The cold mass of a 15-metre main dipole magnet has some fifteen different components. All the main components are manufactured under CERN's direct responsibility. Four of them transit through CERN before being shipped to the dipole assembly contractors, namely the cable, which constitutes the magnet's superconducting core (see Bulletin 14/2004), the beam screens, the heat exchanger tubes and the cold bore beam tubes. The two latter components transit via Building 927 where they undergo part of the production process. The 58-mm diameter heat exchanger tubes will remove heat from the magnets using superfluid helium. The 53-mm diameter cold bore tubes will be placed under vacuum to allow the twin beams to circulate around the LHC.

  11. What Do They Actually Probe at the LHC?

    OpenAIRE

    Kirilyuk , Andrei

    2013-01-01

    34 pages, 56 refs, 28 eqs; minor corrections in v3; International audience; The existence of the omnipresent Higgs field providing the fundamental origin of elementary particle mass is the main theoretical concept behind the ongoing large-scale experiments at the LHC accelerator. We critically reconsider the properties of this concept of mass noting that many fundamental deficiencies and hard problems it contains leave serious doubts about this interpretation, without feasible progress in vie...

  12. Detection of Resistive Transitions in LHC Superconducting Components

    OpenAIRE

    Denz, R; Rodríguez-Mateos, F

    2001-01-01

    The LHC has entered the construction phase. It will incorporate a large number of superconducting components like magnets, current leads and busbars. All these components require protection means in case of a transition from the superconducting to the resistive state, the so-called quench. Key elements in the protection system are electronic quench detectors, which have to be able to identify a quench in any state of the powering cycle of the accelerator. According to the different properties...

  13. LHC train control system for autonomous inspections and measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Di Castro, Mario; Baiguera Tambutti, Maria Laura; Gilardoni, Simone; Losito, Roberto; Lunghi, Giacomo; Masi, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    Intelligent robotic systems are becoming essential for inspection and measurements in harsh environments, such as the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) accelerators complex. Aiming at increasing safety and machine availability, robots can help to perform repetitive or dangerous tasks, reducing the risk for the personnel as the exposure to radiation. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tunnel at CERN has been equipped with fail-safe trains on monorail able to perform autonomously d...

  14. LHC Availability 2017: Technical Stop 1 to Technical Stop 2

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; Walsh, David John; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Technical Stop 1 (TS1) to Technical Stop 2 (TS2) in 2017. This period was dedicated to proton physics with a bunch spacing of 25ns. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  15. LHC@home online tutorial for Mac users - recording

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A step-by-step online tutorial about LHC@home for Mac users by Alexandre Racine. It contains detailed instructions on how-to-join this volunteer computing project.  There are 3 screen capture videos with the real installation process accelerated attached to the event page. This 5' video is linked from http://lhcathome.web.cern.ch/join-us Also from the CDS e-learning category.

  16. Beam Scraping for LHC Injection

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, H; Fischer, C; Gras, J-J; Koschik, A; Kramer, Daniel; Pedersen, S; Redaelli, S

    2007-01-01

    Operation of the LHC will require injection of very high intensity beams from the SPS to the LHC. Fast scrapers have been installed and will be used in the SPS to detect and remove any existing halo before beams are extracted, to minimize the probability for quenching of superconducting magnets at injection in the LHC. We briefly review the functionality of the scraper system and report about measurements that have recently been performed in the SPS on halo scraping and re-population of tails.

  17. CERN LHC dipole prototype success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In a crash programme, the first prototype superconducting dipole magnet for CERN's LHC protonproton collider was successfully powered for the first time at CERN on 14 April, eventually sailing to 9T, above the 8.65T nominal LHC field, before quenching for the third time. The next stage is to install the delicate measuring system for making comprehensive magnetic field maps in the 10 m long, 50 mm diameter twin-apertures of the magnet. These measurements will check that the required LHC field quality has been achieved at both the nominal and injection fields

  18. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jon; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; De Roeck, Albert; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+$\\alpha_s$ uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. We finally discuss tools which allow for the delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology.

  19. Theory of super LIE groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, M.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of supergravity has attracted increasing attention in the recent years as a unified theory of elementary particle interactions. The superspace formulation of the theory is highly suggestive of an underlying geometrical structure of superspace. It also incorporates the beautifully geometrical general theory of relativity. It leads us to believe that a better understanding of its geometry would result in a better understanding of the theory itself, and furthermore, that the geometry of superspace would also have physical consequences. As a first step towards that goal, we develop here a theory of super Lie groups. These are groups that have the same relation to a super Lie algebra as Lie groups have to a Lie algebra. More precisely, a super Lie group is a super-manifold and a group such that the group operations are super-analytic. The super Lie algebra of a super Lie group is related to the local properties of the group near the identity. This work develops the algebraic and super-analytical tools necessary for our theory, including proofs of a set of existence and uniqueness theorems for a class of super-differential equations

  20. LS1 Report: the electric atmosphere of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Simon Baird

    2013-01-01

    In the LHC, testing of the main magnet (dipole and quadrupole) circuits has been completed. At the same time, the extensive tests of all the other circuits up to current levels corresponding to 7 TeV beam operation have been performed, and now the final ElQA (Electrical Quality Assurance) tests of the electrical circuits are proceeding.   In Sectors 4-5 and 5-6, where the ElQA checks have been finished, the process of removing and storing the helium has started (see the article Heatwave warning for the LHC, in this issue). This is the first step in warming up the whole machine to room temperature so that the main LS1 activities, SMACC (Super Conducting Magnet and Circuit Consolidation) and the R2E (Radiation Two Electronics) programmes, which are scheduled to start on 19 April and 22 March respectively, can get under way. As far as the LHC injectors are concerned, LINAC2 and the PS Booster are in shutdown mode, having completed their preparatory hardware test programmes, and shutdown work has alr...