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Sample records for super eruption located

  1. Explosive Super-eruptions: Problems and Prejudices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, S.

    2010-12-01

    A super-eruption is defined as one with a magma yield > 10^15 kg (magnitude (M) 8). The term has mainly been applied to large-scale, caldera and ignimbrite-forming explosive eruptions, but it can be applied to all eruptions that released > 10^15 kg of magma. For effusive volcanism, evidence suggests that individual eruptions of this size ( > ~ 370 km^3 of typical basalt or > 450 km^3 of rhyolite flood lava) arise only during periods of LIP formation. The super-eruption concept raises interesting questions about genesis and storage of magmas that feed these vast events. Deposits of major explosive eruptions are Plinian fallout, ignimbrite sheets, and co-ignimbrite ash fall. Based on earlier suggestions and evidence, widespread outflow ignimbrite (O), co-ignimbrite ash (A), and inter-caldera ignimbrite (I) are all major components of the total super-eruption deposit and may tend towards being subequal. In super-eruption deposits, the reported volume of vent-derived Plinian eruption column fallout is often a minor component of the total volume, yet in several cases (Oruanui, Taupo, 26 ka ago, M 8.1; Bishop Tuff, 760 ka, M 8.2; Bandelier (Otowi) Tuff, 1.6 Ma, M8) it is now recognized that vent-derived columns persisted for most of the eruption. Thus, distally, the ash-fall derived from co-ignimbrite ash clouds may be mixed with contemporaneous fallout from a vertical column. Some major ignimbrites have no reported associated Plinian deposit; the huge Young Toba Tuff (YTT, 74 ka, M 8.8) is a significant example. However, the very widespread Toba ash-fall deposit constitutes ~ 40 % of the total mass of magma erupted and is presumed to be co-ignimbrite. Timing of the onset of column collapse probably controls whether a recognizable Plinian deposit is laid down. All super-eruptions probably produce extensive fallout deposits, and this is generally of vent-derived and pyroclastic-flow-derived origin. Establishing the relationships between large-scale ignimbrites and their

  2. Italian super-eruption larger than thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-07-01

    Recent research suggested that the super-eruption of the Campi Flegrei caldera volcano in southern Italy about 40,000 years ago may have played a part in wiping out, or forcing the migration of, the Neanderthal and modern human populations in the eastern Mediterranean regions that were covered in ash. Now a new modeling study by Costa et al. suggests that this eruption may have been even larger than previously thought. This Campi Flegrei eruption produced a widespread ash layer known as Campanian Ignimbrite (CI). Using ash thickness measurements collected at 115 sites and a three-dimensional ash dispersal model, the researchers found that the CI super-eruption would have spread 250-300 cubic kilometers of ash across a 3.7-million-square kilometer region—2 to 3 times previous ash volume estimates.

  3. Historical Significant Volcanic Eruption Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A significant eruption is classified as one that meets at least one of the following criteriacaused fatalities, caused moderate damage (approximately $1 million or...

  4. Eruption and emplacement timescales of ignimbrite super-eruptions from thermo-kinetics of glass shards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eLavallée

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Super-eruptions generating hundreds of cubic kilometres of pyroclastic density currents are commonly recorded by thick, welded and lava-like ignimbrites. Despite the huge environmental impact inferred for this type of eruption, little is yet known about the timescales of deposition and post-depositional flow. Without these timescales, the critical question of the duration of any environmental impact, and the ensuing gravity of its effects for the Earth system, eludes us. The eruption and welding of ignimbrites requires three transects of the glass transition. Magma needs to: 1 fragment during ascent, 2 liquefy and relax during deposition, agglutination and welding (sintering, and 3 quench by cooling into the glassy state. Here we show that welding is a rapid, syn-depositional process and that the welded ignimbrite sheet may flow for up to a few hours before passing through the glass transition a final time. Geospeedometry reveals that the basal vitrophyre of the Grey’s Landing ignimbrite underwent the glass transition at a rate of ~0.1 °C.min^-1 at 870 °C; that is, 30-180 °C below pre-eruptive geothermometric estimates. Application of a 1-D cooling model constrains the timescale of deposition, agglutination, and welding of the basal vitrophyre to less than 1 hour, and possibly even tens of minutes. Thermo-mechanical iteration of the sintering process indicates an optimal temperature solution for the emplacement of the vitrophyres at 966 °C. The vitrophyres reveal a Newtonian rheology up to 46 MPa, which suggests that the ash particles annealed entirely during welding and that viscous energy dissipation is unlikely from loading conditions alone, unless shear stresses imposed by the overlying ash flow were excessively high and sustained over long distances. The findings underline the value of the term 'lava-like' flow to describe the end rheology of Snake River-type ignimbrites, fully consistent with the typical lithofacies observed.

  5. The magnitude and impact of the Youngest Toba Tuff super-eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eCosta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Super-eruptions, orders of magnitude larger than eruptions experienced in historic times, have devastated wide areas by pyroclastic flows, covered continent-size areas by ash fallout, and injected large quantities of aerosols into the stratosphere affecting global climate. The Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT is the largest known super-eruption in the Quaternary. Here we reconstructed the ultra-distal volcanic ash dispersal during this super-eruption using a computational ash dispersal model, which provides insights into the eruption dynamics and the impact of the event. The method uses a 3D time-dependent tephra dispersion model, a set of wind fields, and several tens of thickness measurements of the YTT tephra deposit. Results reveal that the YTT eruption dispersed ~8600 km3 (~3800 km3 dense rock equivalent, DRE of ash, covering ~40 million km2 with more than 5 mm of ash. These new fallout volume estimations indicate that the total volume of the material erupted (including the massive pyroclastic density current, 1500 km3 DRE, deposits on Sumatra was ~5300 km3 DRE. Simulation results indicate that the eruption had a very large mass flow rate and that the umbrella cloud, associated with the eruption plume, spread as an enormous gravity current around the neutral buoyancy level. The YTT tephra forms a key chronostratigraphic marker in the sedimentary sequences, and is particularly useful for constraining the age of the palaeoenvironmental and archaeological records, and synchronizing these archives to investigate temporal relationships. These new constraints on the extent of the YTT deposit are therefore particularly useful for cryptotephra studies that aim to find non-visible tephra layers for these chronological purposes. This method used to constrain volcanological parameters of eruptions in the past provides insights into the dispersal processes, and allows the amount of volatiles released to be estimated which is crucial to assessing the impact of

  6. Insights into the Toba Super-Eruption using SEM Analysis of Ash Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, E.; Achyuthan, H.; Durant, A. J.; Gibbard, P.; Mokhtar, S.; Oppenheimer, C.; Raj, R.; Shridar, A.

    2010-12-01

    The ~74 ka Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT) super-eruption of Toba volcano, Northern Sumatra, was the largest eruption of the Quaternary (magnitude M= 8.8) and injected massive quantities of volcanic gases and ash into the stratosphere. YTT deposits covered at least 40,000,000 km2 of Southeast Asia and are preserved in river valleys across peninsular India and Malaysia, and in deep-sea tephra layers in the Indian Ocean, Bay of Bengal and South China Sea. Initial studies hypothesized the eruption caused immediate and substantial global cooling during the ~ 1 kyr between Dansgaard-Oeschger events 19 and 20 which devastated ecosystems and hominid populations. A more recent review argues against severe post-YTT climatic deterioration and cannot find clear evidence for considerable impacts on ecosystems or bio-diversity. The determination of the eruptive parameters is crucial in this issue to document the eruption and understand the potential impacts from future super-volcanic eruptions. Volcanic ash deposits can offer dramatic insights into key eruptive parameters, including magnitude, duration and plume height. The composition and shape of volcanic ashes can be used to interpret physical properties of an erupting magma and tephra transport, while textural characteristics such as grain roughness and surface vescicularity can provide insights into degassing history, volatile content and explosive activity of the volcano. We present a stratigraphic and sedimentological analysis of YTT deposits in stratified contexts at three localities in India, at two sites in Peninsular Malaysia, and at several localities around Lake Toba and on Samosir Island, Sumatra. These sites offer excellent constraints on the spatial distribution of YTT deposits which can be used to infer dispersal directions of the cloud, and provide insights into environmental controls on preservation of tephra beds. The research aims at a systematic interpretation of the Toba tephra to understand the volcanic

  7. Topographical Analysis of Fretted Terrain: Implications for Ancient Martian Super-eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, K. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Whelley, P.

    2016-12-01

    Recent work has identified Late Noachian to Early Hesperian plains-style caldera complexes on Mars in western Arabia Terra (AT), eruptions from which might have produced widespread volcanic deposits throughout AT and the entire planet. AT is composed of 2 km thick friable and fretted Late Noachian to Early Hesperian material. Although an ash deposit origin has been suggested for the friable material due to its low thermal inertia, layering, thickness, sulfate abundance, zonal indurations and draped morphology, prior to 2013 no volcanic sources with ability to produce such a deposit were known, and therefore the existence of extensive ash deposits on AT was thought unlikely. Due to recent identification of evidence for ancient super-eruptions in AT such as Eden Patera, the geomorphology of the fretted material warrants reexamination. This study involves a quantitative analysis of eroded valleys throughout the fretted terrain visible at Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution (463 m). These erosion features are mapped objectively via the D8 flow direction algorithm, a technique developed for delineating watersheds with DEMs. The features are then partitioned based on depth and location. Valley orientations are measured for each feature segment and plotted on rose diagrams. To study valley formation mechanisms we use the ratio between high and low stream order lengths (bifurcation ratio) as well as the variance between orientation and primary slope direction. On Earth, bifurcation ratios > 3 and 5 indicate other processes principally formed the valleys and are consistent with the deformation of welded and fractured volcanic deposits. Valleys east of Isidis basin (IB) have bifurcation ratios process throughout the study area. We propose that the AT fretted terrain resembles a network of valleys formed by exploiting angular cooling and compaction fractures in a Late Noachian to Early Hesperian volcanic deposit.

  8. Was there a super-eruption on the Gondwanan coast 477 Ma ago?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Alonso, G.; Gutiérrez-Marco, J. C.; Fernández-Suárez, J.; Bernárdez, E.; Corfu, F.

    2016-06-01

    Precise zircon and monazite ID-TIMS U-Pb dating of three Lower Ordovician altered ash-fall tuff beds (K-bentonites) in the Cantabrian Zone of NW Iberia yielded coeval ages together with an equivalent previously studied sample (477.5 ± 1 (Gutierrez-Alonso et al., 2007)), of 477 ± 1.3 Ma, 477.2 ± 1.1 Ma and 477.3 ± 1 Ma, with a pooled concordia age (all analyses in the four samples) of 477.2 ± 0.74 Ma. A conservative estimation of the volume and mass of the studied K-bentonite beds (using exclusively the CZ data) yields a volume for the preserved deposits of ca. 37.5 km3 (Volcanic Explosivity Index - VEI = 6, Colossal). When considering other putative equivalent beds in Iberia and neighboring realms (i.e. Armorica, Sardinia) the volume of ejecta associated to this event would make it reach the Supervolcanic-Apocalyptic status (VEI = 8, > 1000 km3). At variance with most known cases of this kind of gigantic eruption events, geological observations indicate that the studied magmatic event was related to continental margin extension and thinning and not to plate convergence. We speculate that a geochronologically equivalent large caldera event recognized in the geological record of NW Iberia could be ground zero of this super-eruption.

  9. Independent CMEs from a Single Solar Active Region - The Case of the Super-Eruptive NOAA AR11429

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Patsourakos, Spiros; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2014-06-01

    In this investigation we study AR 11429, the origin of the twin super-fast CME eruptions of 07-Mar-2012. This AR fulfills all the requirements for the 'perfect storm'; namely, Hale's law incompatibility and a delta-magnetic configuration. In fact, during its limb-to-limb transit, AR 11429 spawned several eruptions which caused geomagnetic storms, including the biggest in Cycle 24 so far. Magnetic Flux Ropes (MFRs) are twisted magnetic structures in the corona, best seen in ~10MK hot plasma emission and are often considered as the culprit causing such super-eruptions. However, their 'dormant' existence in the solar atmosphere (i.e. prior to eruptions), is a matter of strong debate. Aided by multi-wavelength and multi-spacecraft observations (SDO/HMI & AIA, HINODE/SOT/SP, STEREO B/EUVI) and by using a Non-Linear Force-Free (NLFFF) model for the coronal magnetic field, our work shows two separate, weakly-twisted magnetic flux systems which suggest the existence of possible pre-eruption MFRs.

  10. Respirable dust meter locates super polluters in traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Schrauwers, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Netherlands is having trouble with the EU standards for respirable dust (PM 10). The Dutch Council of State recently blocked a number of residential development projects because local conditions failed to meet the PM 10 standard. Research by the Nano Structured Materials group at TU Delft shows that some 5% of the seven or so million motor vehicles currently on the road in the Netherlands are responsible for over 40% of all respirable dust emitted by traffic. Although most of these super ...

  11. Slow-moving and far-travelled dense pyroclastic flows during the Peach Spring super-eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Olivier; Buesch, David C.; Valentine, Greg A.

    2016-01-01

    Explosive volcanic super-eruptions of several hundred cubic kilometres or more generate long run-out pyroclastic density currents the dynamics of which are poorly understood and controversial. Deposits of one such event in the southwestern USA, the 18.8 Ma Peach Spring Tuff, were formed by pyroclastic flows that travelled >170 km from the eruptive centre and entrained blocks up to ~70–90 cm diameter from the substrates along the flow paths. Here we combine these data with new experimental results to show that the flow’s base had high-particle concentration and relatively modest speeds of ~5–20 m s−1, fed by an eruption discharging magma at rates up to ~107–108 m3 s−1 for a minimum of 2.5–10 h. We conclude that sustained high-eruption discharge and long-lived high-pore pressure in dense granular dispersion can be more important than large initial velocity and turbulent transport with dilute suspension in promoting long pyroclastic flow distance.

  12. Micro-scale δ18O analyses of a Borneo stalagmite across the Toba super-eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orland, I. J.; Cobb, K. M.; Carolin, S.; Linzmeier, B.; Valley, J. W.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Toba super-eruption occurred in close association with an abrupt climate transition from Greenland Interstadial (GI-) 20 to Greenland Stadial (GS-) 20, roughly 74 ky BP. As such, it is conceivable that the eruption played a role, whether direct or indirect, in shaping global-scale climate in the years, decades, and/or centuries that followed. Understanding the climatic response to Toba is important not only because the eruption represents an extreme atmospheric perturbation that is relevant to modeling future climate change, but also because the climate response may have slowed human population growth. Recent attempts to characterize either the regional or global climate response to Toba have been limited by a lack of age control, geographic proximity, and/or a convincing marker of the major eruption. Multiple U-Th-dated calcite stalagmites from Gunung Mulu National Park (Borneo; 4°N, 115°E) reveal a 1,000-year long period with elevated oxygen isotope values (δ18O; Carolin et al. 2013) that began abruptly and within error of the 40Ar/39Ar-dated Toba eruption (Storey et al., 2012). The δ18O shift is interpreted as a change in regional rainfall δ18O, and perhaps reflects a prolonged shift in the mean state of tropical climate. Microdrill analysis of the Mulu stalagmites showed that the abrupt onset of this period is marked by a large (>1‰) monotonic increase in δ18O. Here, we examine the structure of the abrupt δ18O increase at high-resolution in Mulu stalagmite "SC03". The WiscSIMS CAMECA IMS 1280 was used to measure δ18O in 857 spots along a 5.5 mm ( 1300 yr) linear, growth-axis traverse that is centered on the microdrilled δ18O shift. SIMS spot diameters are 6 mm in the growth dimension, 2 yr temporal resolution, with spot-to-spot δ18O reproducibility of ±0.3‰ (2 s.d.). The SIMS data reveal four δ18O excursions of ±2-3‰ over 6-10 spot intervals ( 10-20 yrs) during the 300 yr transition from GI-20 to GS-20, likely caused by fluctuations in

  13. High-resolution and super stacking of time-reversal mirrors in locating seismic sources

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Weiping

    2011-07-08

    Time reversal mirrors can be used to backpropagate and refocus incident wavefields to their actual source location, with the subsequent benefits of imaging with high-resolution and super-stacking properties. These benefits of time reversal mirrors have been previously verified with computer simulations and laboratory experiments but not with exploration-scale seismic data. We now demonstrate the high-resolution and the super-stacking properties in locating seismic sources with field seismic data that include multiple scattering. Tests on both synthetic data and field data show that a time reversal mirror has the potential to exceed the Rayleigh resolution limit by factors of 4 or more. Results also show that a time reversal mirror has a significant resilience to strong Gaussian noise and that accurate imaging of source locations from passive seismic data can be accomplished with traces having signal-to-noise ratios as low as 0.001. Synthetic tests also demonstrate that time reversal mirrors can sometimes enhance the signal by a factor proportional to the square root of the product of the number of traces, denoted as N and the number of events in the traces. This enhancement property is denoted as super-stacking and greatly exceeds the classical signal-to-noise enhancement factor of. High-resolution and super-stacking are properties also enjoyed by seismic interferometry and reverse-time migration with the exact velocity model. © 2011 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  14. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: earthquake locations and source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Natalia G.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Hansen, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field.

  15. Three-dimensional Probabilistic Earthquake Location Applied to 2002-2003 Mt. Etna Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaccio, A.; Tuve', T.; Zuccarello, L.; Patane', D.; Saccorotti, G.; D'Agostino, M.

    2005-12-01

    Recorded seismicity for the Mt. Etna volcano, occurred during the 2002-2003 eruption, has been relocated using a probabilistic, non-linear, earthquake location approach. We used the software package NonLinLoc (Lomax et al., 2000) adopting the 3D velocity model obtained by Cocina et al., 2005. We applied our data through different algorithms: (1) via a grid-search; (2) via a Metropolis-Gibbs; and (3) via an Oct-tree. The Oct-Tree algorithm gives efficient, faster and accurate mapping of the PDF (Probability Density Function) of the earthquake location problem. More than 300 seismic events were analyzed in order to compare non-linear location results with the ones obtained by using traditional, linearized earthquake location algorithm such as Hypoellipse, and a 3D linearized inversion (Thurber, 1983). Moreover, we compare 38 focal mechanisms, chosen following stricta criteria selection, with the ones obtained by the 3D and 1D results. Although the presented approach is more of a traditional relocation application, probabilistic earthquake location could be used in routinely survey.

  16. Effect of Timing and Location of Hotspot on Super Knock during Pre-ignition

    KAUST Repository

    Jaasim, Mohammed

    2017-03-28

    Pre-ignition in SI engine is a critical issue that needs addressing as it may lead to super knock event. It is widely accepted that pre-ignition event emanates from hot spot(s) that can be anywhere inside the combustion chamber. The location and timing of hotspot is expected to influence the knock intensity from a pre-ignition event. In this study, we study the effect of location and timing of hot spot inside the combustion chamber using numerical simulations. The simulation is performed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE™. We simulate 3-D engine geometry coupled with chemistry, turbulence and moving structures (valves, piston). G-equation model for flame tracking coupled with multi-zone model is utilized to capture auto-ignition (knock) and solve gas phase kinetics. A parametric study on the effect of hot spot timing and location inside the combustion chamber is performed. The hot spot timing considered are -180 CAD, -90 CAD and -30 CAD and the locations of the hot spots are in the center and two edges of the piston surfaces. Simulation results for normal combustion cycle are validated against the experimental data. The simulation results show great sensitivity to the hot spot timing, and the influence of local temperature gradient is noted to be significant. In case of early hot spot timing of -180 CAD, the pre-ignition event did not lead to super knock. Nevertheless, at late hot spot timing, super knock was realized. On the other hand, the effect of hot spot location on pre-ignition event depends on the geometry of the combustion chamber.

  17. Geology and geochronology of the Tana Basin, Ethiopia: LIP volcanism, super eruptions and Eocene-Oligocene environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prave, A. R.; Bates, C. R.; Donaldson, C. H.; Toland, H.; Condon, D. J.; Mark, D.; Raub, T. D.

    2016-06-01

    New geological and geochronological data define four episodes of volcanism for the Lake Tana region in the northern Ethiopian portion of the Afro-Arabian Large Igneous Province (LIP): pre-31 Ma flood basalt that yielded a single 40Ar/39Ar age of 34.05 ± 0.54 / 0.56 Ma; thick and extensive felsic ignimbrites and rhyolites (minimum volume of 2- 3 ×103 km3) erupted between 31.108 ± 0.020 / 0.041 Ma and 30.844 ± 0.027 / 0.046 Ma (U-Pb CA-ID-TIMS zircon ages); mafic volcanism bracketed by 40Ar/39Ar ages of 28.90 ± 0.12 / 0.14 Ma and 23.75 ± 0.02 / 0.04 Ma; and localised scoraceous basalt with an 40Ar/39Ar age of 0.033 ± 0.005 / 0.005 Ma. The felsic volcanism was the product of super eruptions that created a 60-80 km diameter caldera marked by km-scale caldera-collapse fault blocks and a steep-sided basin filled with a minimum of 180 m of sediment and the present-day Lake Tana. These new data enable mapping, with a finer resolution than previously possible, Afro-Arabian LIP volcanism onto the timeline of the Eocene-Oligocene transition and show that neither the mafic nor silicic volcanism coincides directly with perturbations in the geochemical records that span that transition. Our results reinforce the view that it is not the development of a LIP alone but its rate of effusion that contributes to inducing global-scale environmental change.

  18. Soufrière Hills eruption, Montserrat, 1995 - 1997: volcanic earthquake locations and fault plane solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinall, W.P.; Miller, A.D.; Lynch, L.L.; Latchman, J.L.; Stewart, R.C.; White, R.A.; Power, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A total of 9242 seismic events, recorded since the start of the eruption on Montserrat in July 1995, have been uniformly relocated with station travel-time corrections. Early seismicity was generally diffuse under southern Montserrat, and mostly restricted to depths less than 7 km. However, a NE-SW alignment of epicentres beneath the NE flank of the volcano emerged in one swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes (VTs) and later nests of VT hypocentres developed beneath the volcano and at a separated location, under St. George's Hill. The overall spatial distribution of hypocentres suggests a minimum depth of about 5 km for any substantial magma body. Activity associated with the opening of a conduit to the surface became increasingly shallow, with foci concentrated below the crater and, after dome building started in Fall 1995, VTs diminished and repetitive swarms of ‘hybrid’ seismic events became predominant. By late-1996, as magma effusion rates escalated, most seismic events were originating within a volume about 2 km diameter which extended up to the surface from only about 3 km depth - the diminution of shear failure earthquakes suggests the pathway for magma discharge had become effectively unconstricted. Individual and composite fault plane solutions have been determined for a few larger earthquakes. We postulate that localised extensional stress conditions near the linear VT activity, due to interaction with stresses in the overriding lithospheric plate, may encourage normal fault growth and promote sector weaknesses in the volcano.

  19. Eruption status of third molar and its possible influence on the location of mandibular angle fracture: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen Satish; Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Kumar, G B Ananth

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of eruption status of mandibular third molars on the location of mandibular angle fracture. We also aimed to evaluate the incidence of damage to mandibular third molar teeth (M3) and its roots. Medical records and panoramic radiographs of 142 patient cohorts with mandibular angle fractures with third molars present were retrospectively reviewed. Revealed that incidence of angle fracture were high in patients with fully erupted M3 when compared to unerupted group. Out of 142 patients, 108 fractures were found involving the M3 socket and 14.1 % had damage to M3. The presence of erupted mandibular third molar increases the chances of angle fracture when compared to impacted M3. Involvement of the M3 socket often resulted in increased operative time and complexity of the surgical procedure with possible removal of the damaged M3.

  20. Locating the depth of magma supply for volcanic eruptions, insights from Mt. Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Harri; Barker, Abigail K.; Troll, Valentin R.

    2016-01-01

    Mt. Cameroon is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa and poses a possible threat to about half a million people in the area, yet knowledge of the volcano’s underlying magma supply system is sparse. To characterize Mt. Cameroon’s magma plumbing system, we employed mineral-melt equilibrium thermobarometry on the products of the volcano’s two most recent eruptions of 1999 and 2000. Our results suggest pre-eruptive magma storage between 20 and 39 km beneath Mt. Cameroon, which corresponds to the Moho level and below. Additionally, the 1999 eruption products reveal several shallow magma pockets between 3 and 12 km depth, which are not detected in the 2000 lavas. This implies that small-volume magma batches actively migrate through the plumbing system during repose intervals. Evolving and migrating magma parcels potentially cause temporary unrest and short-lived explosive outbursts, and may be remobilized during major eruptions that are fed from sub-Moho magma reservoirs. PMID:27713494

  1. Locating the depth of magma supply for volcanic eruptions, insights from Mt. Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Harri; Barker, Abigail K; Troll, Valentin R

    2016-10-07

    Mt. Cameroon is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa and poses a possible threat to about half a million people in the area, yet knowledge of the volcano's underlying magma supply system is sparse. To characterize Mt. Cameroon's magma plumbing system, we employed mineral-melt equilibrium thermobarometry on the products of the volcano's two most recent eruptions of 1999 and 2000. Our results suggest pre-eruptive magma storage between 20 and 39 km beneath Mt. Cameroon, which corresponds to the Moho level and below. Additionally, the 1999 eruption products reveal several shallow magma pockets between 3 and 12 km depth, which are not detected in the 2000 lavas. This implies that small-volume magma batches actively migrate through the plumbing system during repose intervals. Evolving and migrating magma parcels potentially cause temporary unrest and short-lived explosive outbursts, and may be remobilized during major eruptions that are fed from sub-Moho magma reservoirs.

  2. Identify source location and release time for pollutants undergoing super-diffusion and decay: Parameter analysis and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Sun, HongGuang; Lu, Bingqing; Garrard, Rhiannon; Neupauer, Roseanna M.

    2017-09-01

    Backward models have been applied for four decades by hydrologists to identify the source of pollutants undergoing Fickian diffusion, while analytical tools are not available for source identification of super-diffusive pollutants undergoing decay. This technical note evaluates analytical solutions for the source location and release time of a decaying contaminant undergoing super-diffusion using backward probability density functions (PDFs), where the forward model is the space fractional advection-dispersion equation with decay. Revisit of the well-known MADE-2 tracer test using parameter analysis shows that the peak backward location PDF can predict the tritium source location, while the peak backward travel time PDF underestimates the tracer release time due to the early arrival of tracer particles at the detection well in the maximally skewed, super-diffusive transport. In addition, the first-order decay adds additional skewness toward earlier arrival times in backward travel time PDFs, resulting in a younger release time, although this impact is minimized at the MADE-2 site due to tritium's half-life being relatively longer than the monitoring period. The main conclusion is that, while non-trivial backward techniques are required to identify pollutant source location, the pollutant release time can and should be directly estimated given the speed of the peak resident concentration for super-diffusive pollutants with or without decay.

  3. A cascade of magmatic events during the assembly and eruption of a super-sized magma body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Aidan. S. R.; Barker, Simon J.; Millet, Marc-Alban; Morgan, Daniel J.; Rooyakkers, Shane M.; Schipper, C. Ian; Wilson, Colin J. N.

    2017-07-01

    We use comprehensive geochemical and petrological records from whole-rock samples, crystals, matrix glasses and melt inclusions to derive an integrated picture of the generation, accumulation and evacuation of 530 km3 of crystal-poor rhyolite in the 25.4 ka Oruanui supereruption (New Zealand). New data from plagioclase, orthopyroxene, amphibole, quartz, Fe-Ti oxides, matrix glasses, and plagioclase- and quartz-hosted melt inclusions, in samples spanning different phases of the eruption, are integrated with existing data to build a history of the magma system prior to and during eruption. A thermally and compositionally zoned, parental crystal-rich (mush) body was developed during two periods of intensive crystallisation, 70 and 10-15 kyr before the eruption. The mush top was quartz-bearing and as shallow as 3.5 km deep, and the roots quartz-free and extending to >10 km depth. Less than 600 year prior to the eruption, extraction of large volumes of 840 °C low-silica rhyolite melt with some crystal cargo (between 1 and 10%), began from this mush to form a melt-dominant (eruptible) body that eventually extended from 3.5 to 6 km depth. Crystals from all levels of the mush were entrained into the eruptible magma, as seen in mineral zonation and amphibole model pressures. Rapid translation of crystals from the mush to the eruptible magma is reflected in textural and compositional diversity in crystal cores and melt inclusion compositions, versus uniformity in the outermost rims. Prior to eruption the assembled eruptible magma body was not thermally or compositionally zoned and at temperatures of 790 °C, reflecting rapid cooling from the 840 °C low-silica rhyolite feedstock magma. A subordinate but significant volume (3-5 km3) of contrasting tholeiitic and calc-alkaline mafic material was co-erupted with the dominant rhyolite. These mafic clasts host crystals with compositions which demonstrate that there was some limited pre-eruptive physical interaction of mafic

  4. The beginning of explosive eruptions on a location lacking volcanoes: A case study on the Hijiori volcano, Northeastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, I.

    2006-12-01

    The volcanic activity of Hijiori volcano (N38 36°f 35°f°f, E140 9°f 20°f°f, WGS84) is reported in detail as a case study to understand how a new felsic volcano commences the activity. Hijiori volcano, a small caldera with approximately 2 km in diameter, is one of the 108 active volcanoes in Japan, which erupted at about 12,000 years ago (in Calendar age) on the location where no volcanic body existed before the activity. From the field survey, it turns out that the suite of activities initiated by the major eruption that deposited a valley filling non-welded pumice flows. Finally the pumice flows covered the range 5 km to the southward and 9 km to the northward with total maximum thickness of about 150 m. The accompanying pumice fall and ash fall extends 60 km to the eastward. Although span of the activity is as short as the resolving power of radiocarbon dating, there recognized a quiescence for three times. After the every quiescence, phreatic (or phreatomagmatic) activities deposited lapilli falls and flows in the proximity. Total volume of the valley filling pyroclastic flows and the air falls are estimated to be 1.4 and 0.6 cubic km, respectively. All the pumices from the three major eruptions are similar in their phenocryst content (50- vol. percent), phenocryst assemblages (Pl, Qz, OPx, Hb, and Mt), bulk chemistry (c.a. 64 wt. percent SiO2), and in isotopic (Sr, Nd) compositions. Mt phenocrysts have no zoning profiles and their chemical compositions (Al2O3, Mg/Mn) are mostly unique through the eruptive sequences, suggesting that the physicochemical conditions of the magma were the same just before the each eruption. On the contrary Pl, Qz, OPx and Hb phenocrysts showed distinct zoning, suggesting that the magma chamber of Hijiori volcano had been disturbed repeatedly by such as magma mixing that continued intermittently before and during the eruptive activities. The observed difference between Mt and the other phenocrysts implies that there were

  5. Combined Approach to the Analysis of Rainfall Super-Extremes in Locations with Limited Observational Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, V.; Libertino, A.; Sharma, A.; Claps, P.

    2015-12-01

    The prospect of climatic change and its impacts have brought spatial statistics of extreme events into sharper focus. The so-called "water bombs" are predicted to become more frequent in the extra-tropical regions, and, actually, they raise serious concerns in some regions of the Mediterranean area. However, quantitative statistical methods to properly account for the probability of occurrence of these super-extreme events are still lacking, due to their rare occurrence and to the limited spatial scale at which these events occur. In order to overcome the lack of data, we propose at first to exploit the information derived from remote sensed datasets. Despite the coarser resolution, these databases are able to provide information continuous in space and time, overcoming the problems related to the discontinuous nature of rainfall measurements. We propose to apply such a kind of approach with the adoption of a Bayesian framework, aimed at combining local measurements with climatic regional information, conditioning the exceedance probability on the large and mesoscale characteristics of the system. The case study refers to an area located in the North-West of Italy, historically affected by extraordinary precipitation events. We use a dataset of daily at-gauge rainfall measurements extracted from the NOAA GHCN-Daily dataset, combined with the ones provided by some local Environmental Agencies. Daily estimations from the TRMM are adopted too. First, we identify the most intense events occurred in the area, combining the information from the different datasets. Analysing the related synoptic conditions with the reanalysis of the ECMWF, we then define the conditional variables and the hierarchical relationships between the events and their type. Different climatic configurations that combined with the local morphology and the seasonal condition of the Mediterranean Sea can triggers very intense precipitation events are identified. The results, compared with those

  6. Cooling Before Super-Eruption: No Evidence of Rejuvenation in a Crystal-Rich Dacite Magma Body, Southern Great Basin Ignimbrite Province, Utah and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, K. T.; Christiansen, E. H.; Best, M. G.; Dorais, M.

    2015-12-01

    The model of rejuvenation of a near-solidus crystal mush to produce large volumes of crystal-rich magma is tested here by analyzing the mineralogical, chemical, modal, and physical characteristics of the 31.1 Ma super-eruptive (2000 km3) Cottonwood Wash Tuff. It is the oldest in a series of three so-called "monotonous intermediate" ignimbrites from the Indian Peak-Caliente volcanic field in southern Utah and Nevada. A crystal-rich (~50% Pl + Qz + Hbl + Bt + Mag + Ilm + Cpx + Zrn + Ap + Po) dacite (62 - 69 wt% SiO2), the Cottonwood Wash Tuff is similar in age, volume, mineralogy, crystallinity, and elemental composition to the 28.0 Ma, ~5000 km3 Fish Canyon Tuff (~45% Pl + Kfs + Qz + Hbl + Bt + Ttn + Mag + Ilm + Ap + Zrn + Po, 66 - 68 wt% SiO2), used as the basis of the rejuvenation model. The Cottonwood Wash magma chamber was compositionally varied as shown by mineral and juvenile clast compositions. Whole-rock compositional variations are likely due to the variation of mineral proportions induced by shear in the magma chamber. Mineral compositions and experimental phase relationships show the pre-eruption magma crystallized at 800°C, 2.5 kb under water-undersaturated but oxidized conditions (delta QFM = 2.1). The majority of plagioclase and amphibole grains exhibit small-scale oscillatory zonation; where systematic compositional zonation exists, normal and reverse zonation are equally present. Cathodoluminescence of quartz reveals typically normally zoned phenocrysts with late resorption, considered to be the result of eruptive decompression. Many of the characteristics used to identify the rejuvenation of a near-solidus mush for the Fish Canyon Tuff are not present in the Cottonwood Wash Tuff [i.e., reversely zoned hornblende or plagioclase, partially remelted mineral aggregates, evidence of fluid saturation, resorption textures not related to decompression, rapakivi mantles, and hybrid andesite inclusions.] The Cottonwood Wash magma system did not undergo

  7. Phytoliths Used to Investigate the Effects of the Indonesian Mount Toba Super-Eruption (~75 kyr) in East Africa: A Subdecadal Record from Lake Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, C. L.; Cohen, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    The recent discovery of cryptotephra visually and chemically matched to the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT, 75.0 ± 0.9 kyr) in Lake Malawi drill core sediments has spurred renewed interest in this period of time in East Africa. The YTT is the most recent and largest of the four Mount Toba eruptions, and is the only super-eruption to have taken place during the Quaternary. The timing of the YTT approximately coincides with a hypothesized human genetic bottleneck. Several climate models have proposed an episode of global cooling following the YTT; however, the magnitude and duration of the cooling is much debated, ranging from just a few degrees of cooling to a state of volcanic winter. Cored sediments from Lake Malawi provide an excellent record of local variability in the lake's watershed that may be linked to specific climatic events. To investigate the possible effects of the YTT in East Africa, we continuously sampled Lake Malawi drill core 2A-10H-2 at 2-4 mm (~6 yr) intervals above and below the first occurrence of the YTT. Poaceae phytoliths were grouped into plant functional types (C3, C4, xerophytic, mesophytic, arboreal, etc.), revealing mostly subtle changes in terrestrial vegetation over the ~400 yr time period examined. Abrupt increases in concentration values for phytoliths derived from riverine Podostemaceae plants appear to signal increased discharge from rivers draining the surrounding uplands. Perhaps most significant is the increasing trend in burned phytoliths and decreasing trend in tree phytoliths post-YTT. Although there appears to be a very weak cooling signal synchronous with the YTT, the most abrupt terrestrial vegetation changes appear to be better correlated with the deposition of a slightly older cryptotephra horizon derived from the local Rungwe Volcanic Province. A potential complication with this record is the existence of a turbidite pre-YTT that encompasses the Rungwe horizon.

  8. Ballistic blocks around Kīlauea Caldera: Their vent locations and number of eruptions in the late 18th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Donald A.; Zolkos, Scott P.; Haravitch, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of ballistic blocks occur around Kīlauea Caldera and record part of the latest major period of explosive activity on the volcano, in late 1790 or within a few years thereafter. The sizes of the blocks – the largest of which is more than 2 m in nominal diameter – and differences in rock types allow the definition of at least 6 dispersal lobes of mostly undetermined relative age. The orientations of the lobes help approximate the locations of vents or explosion sources on the floor of the caldera, now deeply buried by younger lava flows. The vents may have been distributed northward for about 2 km from near the site of the modern Halema'uma'u Crater and were apparently confined to the western half of the caldera. The blocks are entirely lithic except for those in one dispersal lobe, which contains cored bombs and blocks as well as juvenile lapilli. Eruption parameters calculated from EJECT! suggest that the phreatic and phreatomagmatic explosions could have been generated at the water table, about 600 m below the high point on the caldera rim.

  9. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Power, John

    2011-02-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data.

  10. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P.B.; Chouet, B.A.; Power, J.

    2011-01-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. 北半球72ka BP气候突变事件及其与Toba火山的关系%The Relation between the 72 ka BP Event and the Toba Super-eruption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴帅男; 陈仕涛; 段福才

    2012-01-01

    The abrupt cooling event occurred about 72(the 72 ka Event) is the largest climate change during the last glacial period.At the same time a super-eruption of Toba volcano,the largest explosive eruption over the past two million years,erupted in northern Sumatra,with a Volcanic Explosivity Index of magnitude 8.It always deserves special attention for the relation between the 72 ka Event and the Toba Super-eruption.Therefore,an in-depth study of the 72 ka Event should be useful for further evaluating the environment effect of the eruption and refining the mechanism of the abrupt events during the last glacial period.Here,we make a systematic rewiew about the research achievements from different fields such as marine cores,ice cores,stalagmites,loess,lakes and so on.These records showed different expressions on the cold event occurred about 72 ka BP and/or the Toba eruption and their relations.Based on the timing of this cold event and the Toba eruption,and the operating mechanism of the volcanic eruption on climate,the eruption has substantial impact on climate.This impact is well documented by Greenland ice core records,and further supported by climate models.Nevertheless,marine core records in low latitudes did not exhibit an obvious climate change around the super eruption,and,at least,the amplitude of the variation is not strong as one in the high latitude.Also,paleontological evidences show that the Toba eruption did not make a catastrophic effect on the living environment.So,the relation between the 72 ka Event and the Toba Super-eruption is still being hotly debated.The further progress depends not only on developing resolution and chronological precision of climate records,but also on detecting the evidence of volcanic eruptions as well.%72 ka BP左右的强降温事件是末次冰期最大的气候突变事件,且同时期发生了第四纪以来最强的火山喷发———Toba火山喷发,后者在此次强降温事件中扮演着什么角色一直

  12. Tectonic and magmatic controls on the location of post-subduction monogenetic volcanoes in Baja California, Mexico, revealed through spatial analysis of eruptive vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germa, Aurélie; Connor, Laura J.; Cañon-Tapia, Edgardo; Le Corvec, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Post-subduction (12.5 Ma to less than 1 Ma) monogenetic volcanism on the Baja California peninsula, Mexico, formed one of the densest intra-continental areas of eruptive vents on Earth. It includes about 900 vents within an area ˜700 km long (N-S) and 70 to 150 km wide (W-E). This study shows that post-subduction volcanic activity was distributed along this arc and that modes exist in the volcano distribution, indicating that productivity of the magma source region was not uniform along the length of the arc. Vent clustering, vent alignments, and cone elongations were measured within eight monogenetic volcanic fields located along the peninsula. Results indicate that on a regional scale, vent clustering varies from north to south with denser spatial clustering in the north on the order of 1.9 × 10-1 vents/km2 to less dense clustering in the south on the order of 7.8 × 10-2 vents/km2. San Quintin, San Carlos, Jaraguay, and Santa Clara are spatially distinct volcanic fields with higher eruptive vent densities suggesting the existence of individual melt columns that may have persisted over time. In contrast, the San Borja, Vizcaino, San Ignacio, and La Purisima vent fields show lower degrees of vent clustering and no obvious spatial gaps between fields, thus indicating an area of more distributed volcanism. Insight into the lithospheric stress field can be gained from vent alignments and vent elongation measurements. Within the fields located along the extinct, subduction-related volcanic arc, elongation patterns of cinder cones and fissure-fed spatter cones, vent clusters, and vent alignments trend NW-SE and N-S. Within the Santa Clara field, located more to the west within the forearc, elongation patterns of the same volcanic features trend NE-SW. These patterns suggest that magmatism was more focused in the forearc and in the northern part of Baja California than in its southern region. Within the extinct arc, magma ascent created volcano alignments and elongate

  13. Finding of an historical document describing an eruption in the NW flank of Etna in July 1643 AD: timing, location and volcanic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, Stefano; Vigliotti, Luigi

    2015-11-01

    The eruptive activity of Etna volcano is well known in detail due to the integration of numerous geological and historical investigations. The study of historical sources of the volcano's activity started in the sixteenth century and has been reported in several catalogues of the eruptions published mainly in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We have found a new document written in 1643 by the Fiscal Prosecutor of the High Court for the viceroy of Sicily in which he reported earthquakes occurring in the small town of Troina. The document also describes an eruption taking place in the Bronte region of Etna between 18 and 28 of July that was previously unknown in current historical catalogues, even those compiled by recent historiographical studies. This eruption clearly produced the volcanic products outcropping in the upper NW flank, shown on the new geological map of Etna as the Val di Cannizzola lava flow. The July 1643 eruption was a brief event with the emission of a roughly 2.7-km-long lava flow of very low volume (3-4 × 106 m3). It occurred in a period characterised instead by long-lasting and high-lava-volume eruptions that preceded the large and destructive 1669 eruption, the main event that has occurred on Etna in historical time.

  14. Eruption Warning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    When the Galeras volcano in the Colombian Andes erupted on Jan. 14, 1993, it. claimed the lives of six scientists. Yet the tragic eruption may result in a way to save thousands of lives. Stanley Williams of Arizona State University, the only survivor of the seven-person team in the crater, believes that data collected before the eruption can be used to forecast volcanic activity.

  15. Eruptive hidradenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, P; Bolognia, J

    1990-07-01

    This case report emphasizes two clinical findings that aid in the diagnosis of eruptive hidradenoma. They are the predilection of the lesions for the anterior rather than posterior surface of the trunk and the presence of milialike inclusions within the papules. Eruptive hidradenomas are appendageal tumors that differentiate toward intraepidermal eccrine ducts and the milialike papules represent dilated cystic ductal structures. This patient had concomitant involvement of the eyelids, which has been observed in some, but not all, cases of eruptive hidradenoma.

  16. Eruptive collagenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhi Sanjay

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of eruptive collagenoma in a male is being reported. He presented with asymptomatic nodules and plaques over the trunk, upper extremity and face of 15 years duration. Family history was negative. Histopathology with H & E stain followed by Verhoeff van Gieson s staining revealed increased collagen in dermis confirming the diagnosis of eruptive collagenoma. Patient also had Beckers naevus.

  17. The initial dispersal and radiative forcing of a Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude super volcano: a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Timmreck

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry climate model MAECHAM4/ CHEM with interactive and prognostic volcanic aerosol and ozone was used to study the initial dispersal and radiative forcing of a possible Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude super eruption. Tropospheric climate anomalies are not analysed since sea surface temperatures are kept fixed. Our experiments show that the global dispersal of a super eruption located at Yellowstone, Wy. is strongly dependent on the season of the eruption. In Northern Hemisphere summer the volcanic cloud is transported westward and preferentially southward, while in Northern Hemisphere winter the cloud is transported eastward and more northward compared to the summer case. Aerosol induced heating leads to a more global spreading with a pronounced cross equatorial transport. For a summer eruption aerosol is transported much further to the Southern Hemisphere than for a winter eruption. In contrast to Pinatubo case studies, strong cooling tendencies appear with maximum peak values of less than −1.6 K/day three months after the eruption in the upper tropical stratosphere. This strong cooling effect weakens with decreasing aerosol density over time and initially prevents the aerosol laden air from further active rising. All-sky net radiative flux changes of less than −32 W/m2 at the surface are about a factor of 6 larger than for the Pinatubo eruption. Large positive flux anomalies of more than 16 W/m2 are found in the first months in the tropics and sub tropics. These strong forcings call for a fully coupled ocean/atmosphere/chemistry model to study climate sensitivity to such a super-eruption.

  18. Super-Sonograms and graphical seismic source locations: Facing the challenge of real-time data processing in an OSI SAMS installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Manfred

    2010-05-01

    The installation and operation of an OSI seismic aftershock monitoring system (SAMS) is bound by strict time constraints: 30+ small arrays must be set up within days, and data screening must cope with the daily seismogram input. This is a significant challenge since any potential, single ML -2.0 aftershock from a potential nuclear test must be detected and discriminated against a variety of higher-amplitude noise bursts. No automated approach can handle this task to date; thus some 200 traces of 24/7 data must be screened manually with a time resolution sufficient to recover signals of just a few sec duration, and with tiny amplitudes just above the threshold of ambient noise. Previous tests confirmed that this task can not be performed by time-domain signal screening via established seismological processing software, e.g. PITSA, SEISAN, or GEOTOOLS. Instead, we introduced 'SonoView', a seismic diagnosis tool based on a compilation of array traces into super-sonograms. Several hours of cumulative array data can be displayed at once on a single computer screen - without sacrifying the necessary detectability of few-sec signals. Then 'TraceView' will guide the analyst to select the relevant traces with best SNR, and 'HypoLine' offers some interactive, graphical location tools for fast epicenter estimates and source signature identifications. A previous release of this software suite was successfully applied at IFE08 in Kasakhstan, and supported the seismic sub-team of OSI in its timely report compilation.

  19. A model for magnetically coupled sympathetic eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Torok, T; Titov, V S; Mikic, Z; Reeves, K K; Velli, M; Linker, J A; De Toma, G

    2011-01-01

    Sympathetic eruptions on the Sun have been observed for several decades, but the mechanisms by which one eruption can trigger another one remain poorly understood. We present a 3D MHD simulation that suggests two possible magnetic trigger mechanisms for sympathetic eruptions. We consider a configuration that contains two coronal flux ropes located within a pseudo-streamer and one rope located next to it. A sequence of eruptions is initiated by triggering the eruption of the flux rope next to the streamer. The expansion of the rope leads to two consecutive reconnection events, each of which triggers the eruption of a flux rope by removing a sufficient amount of overlying flux. The simulation qualitatively reproduces important aspects of the global sympathetic event on 2010 August 1 and provides a scenario for so-called twin filament eruptions. The suggested mechanisms are applicable also for sympathetic eruptions occurring in other magnetic configurations.

  20. Creeping eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are infected. Symptoms Symptoms of creeping eruption include: Blisters Itching , may be more severe at night Raised, ... enter the body through bare feet, so wearing shoes in areas where hookworm infestations are known to ...

  1. The influence of eruption season on the global aerosol evolution and radiative impact of tropical volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of tropical volcanic eruptions using a general circulation model with coupled aerosol microphysics are used to assess the influence of season of eruption on the aerosol evolution and radiative impacts at the Earth's surface. This analysis is presented for eruptions with SO2 injection magnitudes of 17 and 700 Tg, the former consistent with estimates of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the later a near-"super eruption". For each eruption magnitude, simulations are performed with eruptions at 15° N, at four equally spaced times of year. Sensitivity to eruption season of aerosol optical depth (AOD, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave (SW radiative flux is quantified by first integrating each field for four years after the eruption, then calculating for each cumulative field the absolute or percent difference between the maximum and minimum response from the four eruption seasons. Eruption season has a significant influence on AOD and clear-sky SW radiative flux anomalies for both eruption magnitudes. The sensitivity to eruption season for both fields is generally weak in the tropics, but increases in the mid- and high latitudes, reaching maximum values of ~75 %. Global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies show sensitivity to eruption season on the order of 15–20 %, which results from differences in aerosol effective radius for the different eruption seasons. Smallest aerosol size and largest cumulative impact result from a January eruption for Pinatubo-magnitude eruption, and from a July eruption for the near-super eruption. In contrast to AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies, all-sky SW anomalies are found to be insensitive to season of eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude eruption experiment, due to the reflection of solar radiation by clouds in the mid- to high latitudes. However, differences in all-sky SW anomalies between eruptions in different seasons are significant for the larger eruption magnitude, and the ~15 % sensitivity to

  2. Eruptive pseudoangiomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Margarita; Ballona, Rosalía; Correa, Noemí; Schroh, Roberto; Coll, N

    2002-01-01

    We describe two children with acute onset and spontaneous resolution of angioma-like papules during a viral illness. The biopsy specimens from both patients showed a unique histologic appearance consisting of dilated dermal blood vessels with plump, hobnail-shaped endothelial cells. On the basis of the natural history and the histopathologic features we suggest the diagnosis of eruptive pseudoangiomatosis.

  3. The influence of eruption season on the global aerosol evolution and radiative impact of tropical volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of tropical volcanic eruptions using a general circulation model with coupled aerosol microphysics are used to assess the influence of season of eruption on the aerosol evolution and radiative impacts at the Earth's surface. This analysis is presented for eruptions with SO2 injection magnitudes of 17 and 700 Tg, the former consistent with estimates of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the later a near-"super eruption". For each eruption magnitude, simulations are performed with eruptions at 15° N, at four equally spaced times of year, and sensitivity to eruption season is quantified as the difference between the maximum and minimum cumulative anomalies.

    Eruption season has a significant influence on aerosol optical depth (AOD and clear-sky shortwave (SW radiative flux anomalies for both eruption magnitudes. The sensitivity to eruption season for both fields is generally weak in the tropics, but increases in the mid- and high latitudes, reaching maximum values of ~80 %. Global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies show sensitivity to eruption season on the order of 15–20 %, which results from differences in aerosol effective radius for the different eruption seasons. Smallest aerosol size and largest cumulative impact result from a January eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude, and from a July eruption for the near-super eruption. In contrast to AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies, all-sky SW anomalies are found to be insensitive to season of eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude eruption experiment, due to the reflection of solar radiation by clouds in the mid- to high latitudes. However, differences in all-sky SW anomalies between eruptions in different seasons are significant for the larger eruption magnitude, and the ~15 % sensitivity to eruption season of the global mean all-sky SW anomalies is comparable to the sensitivity of global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies. Our estimates of sensitivity to eruption season

  4. Reconstructing the plinian and co-ignimbrite sources of large volcanic eruptions: A novel approach for the Campanian Ignimbrite

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Marti; Arnau Folch; Antonio Costa; Samantha Engwell

    2016-01-01

    The 39 ka Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) super-eruption was the largest volcanic eruption of the past 200 ka in Europe. Tephra deposits indicate two distinct plume forming phases, Plinian and co-ignimbrite, characteristic of many caldera-forming eruptions. Previous numerical studies have characterized the eruption as a single-phase event, potentially leading to inaccurate assessment of eruption dynamics. To reconstruct the volume, intensity, and duration of the tephra dispersal, we applied a compu...

  5. Erupted compound odontome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekar S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are considered to be hamartomas rather than a true neoplasm. They consist chiefly of enamel and dentin, with variable amount of pulp and cementum when fully developed. They are generally asymptomatic and are included under the benign calcified odontogenic tumors. They are usually discovered on routine radiographic examination. Eruption of an odontoma in the oral cavity is rare. Peripheral compound odontomas arise extraosseously and have a tendency to exfoliate. In this article we are reporting a case of a 15-year-old girl with peripheral compound odontoma, with a single rudimentary tooth-like structure in the mandibular right second molar region, which is about to be exfoliated. Its eruption in the oral cavity and location in the mandibular posterior region is associated with aplasia of the mandibular right second molar, making it an interesting case for reporting.

  6. Location, location, location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, S.P.; Goeree, J.K.; Ramer, R.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the canonical location-then-price duopoly game with general log- concave consumer densities. A unique pure-strategy equilibrium to the two-stage game exists if the density is not "too asymmetric" and not "too concave." These criteria are satisfied by many commonly used densities. Equilibr

  7. Super Special Codes using Super Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Kandasamy, W B Vasantha; Ilanthenral, K

    2010-01-01

    The new classes of super special codes are constructed in this book using the specially constructed super special vector spaces. These codes mainly use the super matrices. These codes can be realized as a special type of concatenated codes. This book has four chapters. In chapter one basic properties of codes and super matrices are given. A new type of super special vector space is constructed in chapter two of this book. Three new classes of super special codes namely, super special row code, super special column code and super special codes are introduced in chapter three. Applications of these codes are given in the final chapter.

  8. Variations in eruption style during the 1931A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, R.S.; Gardner, J.E.; Neal, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 1931A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska, progressed from subplinian to effusive eruptive style and from trachydacite to basaltic andesite composition from multiple vent locations. Eyewitness accounts and new studies of deposit stratigraphy provide a combined narrative of eruptive events. Additional field, compositional, grain size, componentry, density, and grain morphology data document the influences on changing eruptive style as the eruption progressed. The eruption began on 1 May 1931A.D. when a large subplinian eruption column produced vesicular juvenile-rich tephra. Subsequent activity was more intermittent, as magma interacted with groundwater and phreatomagmatic ash and lithic-rich tephra was dispersed up to 600km downwind. Final erupted products were more mafic in composition and the eruption became more strombolian in style. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that two trachydacitic lava flows were erupted from separate but adjacent vents before the phreatomagmatic phase concluded and that basaltic andesite lava from a third vent began to effuse near the end of explosive activity. The estimated total bulk volume of the eruption is 0.9km3, which corresponds to approximately 0.3km3 of magma. Eruption style changes are interpreted as follows: (1) a decrease in magma supply rate caused the change from subplinian to phreatomagmatic eruption; (2) a subsequent change in magma composition caused the transition from phreatomagmatic to strombolian eruption style. Additionally, the explosion and effusion of a similar magma composition from three separate vents indicates how the pre-existing caldera structure controlled the pathway of shallow magma ascent, thus influencing eruption style. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V..

  9. Variations in eruption style during the 1931 A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Robert S.; Gardner, James E.; Neal, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The 1931 A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska, progressed from subplinian to effusive eruptive style and from trachydacite to basaltic andesite composition from multiple vent locations. Eyewitness accounts and new studies of deposit stratigraphy provide a combined narrative of eruptive events. Additional field, compositional, grain size, componentry, density, and grain morphology data document the influences on changing eruptive style as the eruption progressed. The eruption began on 1 May 1931 A.D. when a large subplinian eruption column produced vesicular juvenile-rich tephra. Subsequent activity was more intermittent, as magma interacted with groundwater and phreatomagmatic ash and lithic-rich tephra was dispersed up to 600 km downwind. Final erupted products were more mafic in composition and the eruption became more strombolian in style. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that two trachydacitic lava flows were erupted from separate but adjacent vents before the phreatomagmatic phase concluded and that basaltic andesite lava from a third vent began to effuse near the end of explosive activity. The estimated total bulk volume of the eruption is 0.9 km3, which corresponds to approximately 0.3 km3 of magma. Eruption style changes are interpreted as follows: (1) a decrease in magma supply rate caused the change from subplinian to phreatomagmatic eruption; (2) a subsequent change in magma composition caused the transition from phreatomagmatic to strombolian eruption style. Additionally, the explosion and effusion of a similar magma composition from three separate vents indicates how the pre-existing caldera structure controlled the pathway of shallow magma ascent, thus influencing eruption style.

  10. Triggering of volcanic eruptions by large earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    When a large earthquake occurs near an active volcano, there is often concern that volcanic eruptions may be triggered by the earthquake. In this study, recently accumulated, reliable data were analyzed to quantitatively evaluate the probability of the occurrence of new eruptions of volcanoes located near the epicenters of large earthquakes. For volcanoes located within 200 km of large earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 or greater, the eruption occurrence probability increases by approximately 50% for 5 years after the earthquake origin time. However, no significant increase in the occurrence probability of new eruptions was observed at distant volcanoes or for smaller earthquakes. The present results strongly suggest that new eruptions are likely triggered by static stress changes and/or strong ground motions caused by nearby large earthquakes. This is not similar to the previously presented evidence that volcanic earthquakes at distant volcanoes are remotely triggered by surface waves generated by large earthquakes.

  11. Assessing Eruption Column Height in Ancient Flood Basalt Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Self, Stephen; Schmidt, Anja; Hunter, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    flood basalt eruptions could have influenced climate on time scales of decades to centuries but the location (i.e., latitude) of the province and relevant paleoclimate is important and must be considered.

  12. Assessing eruption column height in ancient flood basalt eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Self, Stephen; Schmidt, Anja; Hunter, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    A buoyant plume model is used to explore the ability of flood basalt eruptions to inject climate-relevant gases into the stratosphere. An example from the 1986 Izu-Oshima basaltic fissure eruption validates the model's ability to reproduce the observed maximum plume heights of 12-16 km above sea level, sustained above fire-fountains. The model predicts maximum plume heights of 13-17 km for source widths of between 4-16 m when 32% (by mass) of the erupted magma is fragmented and involved in the buoyant plume (effective volatile content of 6 wt%). Assuming that the Miocene-age Roza eruption (part of the Columbia River Basalt Group) sustained fire-fountains of similar height to Izu-Oshima (1.6 km above the vent), we show that the Roza eruption could have sustained buoyant ash and gas plumes that extended into the stratosphere at ∼ 45 ° N. Assuming 5 km long active fissure segments and 9000 Mt of SO2 released during explosive phases over a 10-15 year duration, the ∼ 180km of known Roza fissure length could have supported ∼36 explosive events/phases, each with a duration of 3-4 days. Each 5 km fissure segment could have emitted 62 Mt of SO2 per day into the stratosphere while actively fountaining, the equivalent of about three 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruptions per day. Each fissure segment could have had one to several vents, which subsequently produced lava without significant fountaining for a longer period within the decades-long eruption. Sensitivity of plume rise height to ancient atmospheric conditions is explored. Although eruptions in the Deccan Traps (∼ 66Ma) may have generated buoyant plumes that rose to altitudes in excess of 18 km, they may not have reached the stratosphere because the tropopause was substantially higher in the late Cretaceous. Our results indicate that some flood basalt eruptions, such as Roza, were capable of repeatedly injecting large masses of SO2 into the stratosphere. Thus sustained flood basalt eruptions could have influenced

  13. Jupiter Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  14. Intertriginous eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ronni; Oumeish, Oumeish Youssef; Parish, Lawrence Charles

    2011-01-01

    Intertrigo is a superficial inflammatory skin disorder involving any area of the body where two opposing skin surfaces can touch and rub or chaff. The word "intertrigo" comes from the Latin inter (between) and terere (to rub) and reflects the rubbing together of skin against skin to create maceration and irritation, hence, friction dermatitis or chaffing. It is a common disorder that can affect any individual from infancy to old age. It is primarily caused by skin-on-skin friction and is facilitated by moisture trapped in deep skin folds where air circulation is limited. The condition is particularly common in obese patients who have diabetes and who are exposed to heat and humidity. The moist, damaged skin associated with intertrigo is a fertile breeding ground for various microorganisms, and secondary cutaneous infections are commonly observed in these areas. The present chapter does not deal with "ordinary" intertrigo, but rather with other skin diseases that have affinity to the intertriginous areas. Diseases mentioned are: acrodermatitis enteropathica, the baboon syndrome or intertriginous drug eruption, Darier disease, Hailey-Hailey, granular parakeratosis, Kawasaki syndrome, necrolytic migratory erythema, streptococcal intertrigo and others. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Forecasting eruptions using pre-eruptive seismic patterns at Sinabung Volcano, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCausland, W. A.; White, R. A.; Hendrasto, M.; Gunawan, H.; Indrastuti, N.; Triastuti, H.; Suparman, Y.; Putra, A.

    2015-12-01

    Forecasting the size, timing and style of volcanic eruptions is of primary interest to observatories and civil authorities world-wide, yet most observatories only have access to long-term data at a very limited number of volcanoes under their jurisdiction. When extensive long-term data sets are available to responsible agencies, volcanic eruptive size, timing and style can usually be successfully forecast using current monitoring data and knowledge of precursory eruptive patterns, enabling the communication of timely forecasts to civil authorities. Experienced agencies, such as Indonesia's Center for Volcanology and Geologic Hazards Mitigation and the USAID-USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program, utilize extensive collective experiences with multiple monitoring streams over multiple eruption cycles and across volcano types to successfully forecast eruption size, style and onset, as well as changes in eruptive style and size within ongoing eruptions. The longest-term real-time monitoring parameter commonly available at volcanoes worldwide is seismic data. Seismic data is a direct measure of rate-dependent strain changes in the magmatic system from the deep magmatic input to shallow eruptive processes. Patterns of pre-eruptive earthquakes coupled with other available monitoring data and conceptual models of magma ascent enable short-term forecasting of eruption size, style, and onset. First order event locations, characterization of background seismicity, and changes in earthquake types and energy release are most important to successful eruption forecasting. This study demonstrates how this approach has been used to successfully forecast eruption onsets, changes in eruptive style, and to change alert levels and extend or contract evacuation zones during the ongoing eruption of Sinabung Volcano, Indonesia.

  16. Super Factories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D G Hitlin

    2006-11-01

    Heavy-flavor physics, in particular and physics results from the factories, currently provides strong constraints on models of physics beyond the Standard Model. A new generation of colliders, Super Factories, with 50 to 100 times the luminosity of existing colliders, can, in a dialog with LHC and ILC, provide unique clarification of new physics phenomena seen at those machines.

  17. An erupted compound odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anil; Vij, Hitesh; Vij, Ruchieka; Malhotra, Ritika

    2014-04-12

    Odontomas are familiar entities but their eruption into the oral cavity is an extraordinary occurrence, which may be associated with pain, infection, malocclusion, etc. Not many cases of erupted odontomas have been reported in the literature. This paper puts forth a case of erupting odontoma in an attempt to add to the list of reported cases of this unique pathology.

  18. The Super Patalan Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the super Patalan numbers, a generalization of the super Catalan numbers in the sense of Gessel, and prove a number of properties analagous to those of the super Catalan numbers. The super Patalan numbers generalize the super Catalan numbers similarly to how the Patalan numbers generalize the Catalan numbers.

  19. Mechanism of human tooth eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2014-01-01

    discussed in the introduction. Human studies, mainly clinical and radiological, have focused on normal eruption and gender differences. Why a tooth begins eruption and what enables it to move eruptively and later to end these eruptive movements is not known. Pathological eruption courses contribute...

  20. Pre-, Syn- and Post Eruptive Seismicity of the 2011 Eruption of Nabro Volcano, Eritrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goitom, Berhe; Hammond, James; Kendall, Michael; Nowacky, Andy; Keir, Derek; Oppenheimer, Clive; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ayele, Atalay; Ibrahim, Said; Jacques, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Nabro volcano, located in south-east Eritrea, East Africa, lies at the eastern margin of the Afar Rift and the Danakil Depression. Its tectonic behaviour is controlled by the divergence of the Arabian, Nubian and Somali plates. Nabro volcano was thought to be seismically quiet until it erupted in June 2011 with limited warning. The volcano erupted on June 12, 2011 around 20:32 UTC, following a series of earthquakes on that day that reached a maximum magnitude of 5.8. It is the first recorded eruption of Nabro volcano and only the second in Eritrea, following the Dubbi eruption in 1861. A lava flow emerged from the caldera and travelled about 20 km from the vent and buried settlements in the area. At the time of this eruption there was no seismic network in Eritrea, and hence the volcano was not monitored. In this study we use ten Ethiopian, one Yemeni and one Djibouti stations to investigate the seismicity of the area before, during and after the eruption. Four Eritrean seismic stations deployed in June 2011, four days after the eruption, are also included in the dataset. Travel time picks supplied by colleagues from Djibouti were also incorporated into the dataset. Our analysis covers roughly three months before and after the eruption and shows that Nabro was seismically quiet before the eruption (nine events), with the exception of one major earthquake (4.8 magnitude) that occurred on March 31, 2011. In contrast, the region shows continued seismic activity after the eruption (92 events). During the eruption seismicity levels are high (123 events), with two days particularly active, June 12 and June 17 with 85 and 28 discrete events, respectively. Maximum magnitudes of 5.8 and 5.9 were recorded on these two days. The two days of increased seismicity are consistent with satellite observations of the eruption which show two distinct phases of the eruption. The period between these two phases was dominated by volcanic tremor. The tremor signal lasted for almost one

  1. Months between rejuvenation and volcanic eruption at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Christy B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Boyce, Jeremy W

    2015-01-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Valles, USA. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming super-eruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses geospeedometry of trace element profiles with nanometer resolution in sanidine crystals to reveal that Yellowstone’s most recent volcanic cycle began when remobilization of a near- or sub-solidus silicic magma occurred less than 10 months prior to eruption, following a 220,000 year period of volcanic repose. Our results reveal a geologically rapid timescale for rejuvenation and effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava even after protracted cooling of the subvolcanic system, which is consistent with recent physical modeling that predict a timescale of several years or less. Future renewal of rhyolitic volcanism at Yellowstone is likely to require an energetic intrusion of mafic or silicic magma into the shallow subvolcanic reservoir and could rapidly generate an eruptible rhyolite on timescales similar to those documented here.

  2. The Super-Kamiokande Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, C W

    2008-01-01

    Super-Kamiokande is a 50 kiloton water Cherenkov detector located at the Kamioka Observatory of the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo. It was designed to study neutrino oscillations and carry out searches for the decay of the nucleon. The Super-Kamiokande experiment began in 1996 and in the ensuing decade of running has produced extremely important results in the fields of atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillations, along with setting stringent limits on the decay of the nucleon and the existence of dark matter and astrophysical sources of neutrinos. Perhaps most crucially, Super-Kamiokande for the first time definitively showed that neutrinos have mass and undergo flavor oscillations. This chapter will summarize the published scientific output of the experiment with a particular emphasis on the atmospheric neutrino results.

  3. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  4. Eruptive syringomas: an unusual presentation on the buttocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Charles L; Smith, Eric P; Graham, Bradley S

    2005-10-01

    Syringomas are benign, eccrine, sweat gland tumors. Eruptive syrin-gomas are rare variants that typically develop on the body's anterior surface. We present the case of a 21-year-old black man with multiple, eruptive, asymptomatic syringomas on his buttocks that had persisted for 3 months. This case is unusual in that the patient's age, race, and sex and the location of the lesions are not considered typical for eruptive syringomas. We also present a review of eruptive syringomas and recent literature.

  5. SANTORINI BEFORE THE MINOAN ERUPTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, Walter L.; Sørensen, Annette Højen; Katsipis, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions Several detailed geological observations in the landscape of Santorini enable us to claim that the two harbour towns were located on the inner side of the caldera wall on the island of Thera prior to the Minoan Eruption. This hypothesis is in agreement with the excavation sites of Balos...... and Raos. The painted landscape in the fresco is highly comparable to what is seen in the two harbour sites discussed above. The water-filled caldera gave the inhabitants additional advantages: several natural harbours, good fishing grounds, and mineral resources. This new interpretation enables us to claim...

  6. ERUPTIVE KERATOACANTHOMA OF GRZYBOWSKI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Molochkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of a very rare disorder – generalized eruptive keratoacanthoma of Grzybowski in a woman aged 82 years old. The disease is characterized by sudden emergence of hundreds or thousands of neoplasms (2–5 cm in diameters rapidly spreading throughout the body skin. It is frequently associated with internistic cancer. In this case, generalized eruptive keratoacanthoma of Grzybowski was diagnosed 4 years after the disease onset. The authors emphasize the role of proper diagnosis and treatment of this pathology. Aromatic retinoids were highly effective in the therapy of generalized eruptive keratoacanthoma of Grzybowski.

  7. An erupted complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozoglu, Sinan; Yildirim, Umran; Buyukkurt, M Cemil

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are benign tumors of odontogenic origin. The cause of the odontoma is unknown, but it is believed to be hereditary or due to a disturbance in tooth development triggered by trauma or infection. Odontomas may be either compound or complex. Although these tumors are seen frequently, erupted odontomas are rare. The purpose of this study is to present a rare case of complex odontoma that erupted into the oral cavity.

  8. Eruption of Mount St. Helens, May 18, 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount Saint Helens was the most destructive in the history of the United States. Mt. Saint Helens is located in southwest Washington in...

  9. Eruption column physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Why do Martian Magmas erupt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Eruption of silicate lava, whether on Earth or another planet, requires that at some depth the melt has lower density than the surrounding rocks. As the densities of silicate liquids change during crystallization, whether a particular silicate liquid will erupt or be trapped at a level of neutral buoyancy is a complex yet fundamental issue for planetary dynamics. In general, 3 factors drive surface eruptions: inherent buoyancy relative to mantle phases, compositional evolution, and volatile contents. These factors manifest on Earth as terrestrial basalts commonly have compositions close to a density minimum [1]. Recent work has produced estimates of Martian parental magma compositions [2-5] based on shergottite meteorites and from Gusev crater. Using the MELTS algorithm [6] and other density calibrations, we simulated evolution of these liquids, focusing on density changes. For much of the crystallization path, density is controlled by FeO. All of the liquids begin with ρ ~ 2.8 g/cc at 1 bar, and the evolution of liquid density is controlled by the liquidus phases. At low pressures, olivine is the liquidus phase for each melt, and as FeO is not incompatible in olivine, olivine crystallization decreases liquid density, increasing buoyancy with crystallization. However, FeO is incompatible in pyroxene, and thus liquids crystallizing pyroxene become denser and less buoyant with crystallization, producing liquids with densities up to and above 3.0 g/cc. As the olivine-pyroxene saturation relationship is affected by pressure and chemistry, the identity of the liquidus phase and density evolution will vary between magmas. Without spreading centers, Mars has no location where the mantle approaches the surface, and it is likely that any magma which is denser than the crust will stall below or within that crust. The crystallization path of a liquid is a function of pressure, with pyroxene crystallizing first at P > 10 kbar (~80 km depth), close to the base of the Martian

  11. Structural analysis of the eruptive fissures at Mount Etna (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mazzarini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mount Etna produces frequent eruptions from its summit craters and from fissures on its flanks. The flank fissures trend approximately radially to the summit, and are mainly concentrated in three rift zones that are located on the NE, S and W flanks. Many flank eruptions result from lateral magma transfer from the central conduit into fractures intersecting the flanks, although some eruptions are fed through newly formed conduits that are not directly linked to the central conduit. We analyzed the structural features of eruptions from 1900 to the present, one of the most active periods in the documented eruptive history of Etna, which comprised 35 summit and 33 flank events. Except for a small eruption on the W flank in 1974, all of the flank eruptions in this interval occurred on or near the NE and S rifts. Eruptions in the NE sector were generally shorter, but their fissure systems developed more rapidly and were longer than those in the S sector. In contrast, summit eruptions had longer mean durations, but generally lower effusion rates (excluding paroxysmal events characterized by very high effusion rates that lasted only a few hours. This database was examined considering the main parameters (frequency and strike of the eruptive fissures that were active over the last ~2 ka. The distribution in time and space of summit and flank eruptions appears to be closely linked to the dynamics of the unstable E to S flank sector of Etna, which is undergoing periodic displacements induced by subvolcanic magma accumulation and gravitational pull. In this framework, magma accumulation below Etna exerts pressure against the unbuttressed E and S flanks, which have moved away from the rest of the volcano. This has caused an extension to the detachment zones, and has facilitated magma transfer from the central conduit into the flanks.

  12. Caldera development during the Minoan eruption, Thira, Cyclades, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.; McCoy F. Jr.

    1984-09-30

    The well-known caldera of Thira (Santorini), Greece, was not formed during a single eruption but is composed of two overlapping calderas superimposed upon a complex volcanic field that developed along a NE trending line of vents. Before the Minoan eruption of 1400 B.C., Thira consisted of three lava shields in the northern half of the island and a flooded depression surrounded by tuff deposits in the southern half. Andesitic lavas formed the overlapping shields of the north and were contemporaneous with and, in many places, interbedded with the southern tuff deposits. Although there appears to be little difference between the composition of magmas erupted, differences in eruption style indicate that most of the activity in the northern half of the volcanic field was subaerial, producing lava flows, whereas in the south, eruptions within a flooded depression produced a sequence of mostly phreatomagmatic tuffs. Many of these tuffs are plastered onto the walls of what appears to have been an older caldera, most probably associated with an eruption of rhyodiacitic tephra 100,000 years ago. The Minoan eruption of about 1400 B.C. had four distinct phases, each reflecting a different vent geometry and eruption mechanism. The Minoan activity was preceded by minor eruptions of fine ash. (1) The eruption began with a Plinian phase, from subaerial vent(s) located on the easternmost of the lave shields. (2) Vent(s) grew toward the SW into the flooded depression. Subsequent activity deposited large-scale base surge deposits during vent widening by phreatomagnetic activity. (3) The third eruptive phase was also phreatomagmatic and produced 60% of the volume of the Minoan Tuff. This activity was nearly continuous and formed a large featureless tuff ring with poorly defined bedding.

  13. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  14. Large historical eruptions at subaerial mud volcanoes, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Active mud volcanoes in the northern Apennines, Italy, currently have gentle eruptions. There are, however, historical accounts of violent eruptions and outbursts. Evidence for large past eruptions is also recorded by large decimeter rock clasts preserved in erupted mud. We measured the rheological properties of mud currently being erupted in order to evaluate the conditions needed to transport such large clasts to the surface. The mud is well-characterized by the Herschel-Bulkley model, with yield stresses between 4 and 8 Pa. Yield stresses of this magnitude can support the weight of particles with diameters up to several mm. At present, particles larger than this size are not being carried to the surface. The transport of larger clasts to the surface requires ascent speeds greater than their settling speed in the mud. We use a model for the settling of particles and rheological parameters from laboratory measurements to show that the eruption of large clasts requires ascent velocities > 1 m s−1, at least three orders of magnitude greater than during the present, comparatively quiescent, activity. After regional earthquakes on 20 May and 29 May 2012, discharge also increased at locations where the stress changes produced by the earthquakes would have unclamped feeder dikes below the mud volcanoes. The magnitude of increased discharge, however, is less than that inferred from the large clasts. Both historical accounts and erupted deposits are consistent in recording episodic large eruptions.

  15. Magma plumbing for the 2014-2015 Holuhraun eruption, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Harri; Mattsson, Tobias; Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Burchardt, Steffi; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Tryggvason, Ari; Krumbholz, Michael; Harris, Chris

    2016-08-01

    The 2014-2015 Holuhraun eruption on Iceland was located within the Askja fissure swarm but was accompanied by caldera subsidence in the Bárðarbunga central volcano 45 km to the southwest. Geophysical monitoring of the eruption identified a seismic swarm that migrated from Bárðarbunga to the Holuhraun eruption site over the course of two weeks. In order to better understand this lateral connection between Bárðarbunga and Holuhraun, we present mineral textures and compositions, mineral-melt-equilibrium calculations, whole rock and trace element data, and oxygen isotope ratios for selected Holuhraun samples. The Holuhraun lavas are compositionally similar to recorded historical eruptions from the Bárðarbunga volcanic system but are distinct from the historical eruption products of the nearby Askja system. Thermobarometry calculations indicate a polybaric magma plumbing system for the Holuhraun eruption, wherein clinopyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at average depths of ˜17 km and ˜5 km, respectively. Crystal resorption textures and oxygen isotope variations imply that this multilevel plumbing system facilitated magma mixing and assimilation of low-δ18O Icelandic crust prior to eruption. In conjunction with the existing geophysical evidence for lateral migration, our results support a model of initial vertical magma ascent within the Bárðarbunga plumbing system followed by lateral transport of aggregated magma batches within the upper crust to the Holuhraun eruption site.

  16. Calculus super review

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Get all you need to know with Super Reviews! Each Super Review is packed with in-depth, student-friendly topic reviews that fully explain everything about the subject. The Calculus I Super Review includes a review of functions, limits, basic derivatives, the definite integral, combinations, and permutations. Take the Super Review quizzes to see how much you've learned - and where you need more study. Makes an excellent study aid and textbook companion. Great for self-study!DETAILS- From cover to cover, each in-depth topic review is easy-to-follow and easy-to-grasp - Perfect when preparing for

  17. Algebra & trigonometry super review

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Get all you need to know with Super Reviews! Each Super Review is packed with in-depth, student-friendly topic reviews that fully explain everything about the subject. The Algebra and Trigonometry Super Review includes sets and set operations, number systems and fundamental algebraic laws and operations, exponents and radicals, polynomials and rational expressions, equations, linear equations and systems of linear equations, inequalities, relations and functions, quadratic equations, equations of higher order, ratios, proportions, and variations. Take the Super Review quizzes to see how much y

  18. Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Eruption – A Brief Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OROIAN I.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the main aspects of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption in Iceland. The process ispresented in the context of Iceland location on tectonic plates’ distribution. Aspects concerning Eyjafjallajökull positionon volcanic landscape of Iceland, both eruption phases and ash composition are briefly described. There are alsoemphasized the effects of the event on main common life aspects it affected (aircraft in Europe and farming in Iceland.The influence of the volcano eruption on the climate change is also discussed.

  19. Kaposi′s varicelliform eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Manjunath

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi′s varicelliform eruption (eczema herpeticum is the name given to a distinct cutaneous eruption caused by herpes simplex and certain other viruses that infect persons with preexisting dermatosis. Most commonly it is associated with atopic dermatitis. We report a case of a three-year-old atopic child who presented with extensive vesicular eruption suggestive of Kaposi′s varicelliform eruption. There was history of fever, malaise and extensive vesicular eruptions. Diagnosis was made based on clinical features and Tzanck smear examination. Patient responded adequately to oral acyclovir therapy.

  20. Super Tomboy Style

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sparked by Super Girl, the androgynous look is in among Chinese youth On September 8, this year's top six contestants on the Super Girl television show, a singing contest for young women, stepped into the spotlight. Nearly none of them had long black hair or wore evening gowns, traditionally associated with beauty in China. Rather, they

  1. Super eruption environments make for "super" hydrothermal explosions: Extreme hydrothermal explosions in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, L. A.; Shanks, W. P.; Pierce, K. L.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrothermal explosions are violent events resulting in the rapid ejection of boiling water, steam, mud, and rock fragments over areas that range from a few meters in diameter up to several kilometers in diameter. Hydrothermal explosions occur where shallow interconnected reservoirs of steam-saturated fluids underlie thermal fields. Sudden reduction in pressure causes the fluids to flash to steam resulting in significant expansion, rock fragmentation, and debris ejection. In Yellowstone, at least 20 large (>100 meters in diameter) hydrothermal explosions have been identified, and the scale of the individual events dwarfs similar features in other hydrothermal and geothermal areas of the world. Large explosions in Yellowstone have occurred over the past 16 ka at an interval of ~1 per every 700 yrs and similar events are likely to occur in the future. Our studies of hydrothermal explosive events indicate: 1) none are associated with magmatic or volcanic events; 2) several have been triggered by seismic events coupled with other processes; 3) lithic clasts and matrix from explosion deposits are extensively altered, indicating long-term, extensive hydrothermal mineralization in areas that were incorporated into the explosion deposit; 4) many lithic clasts in explosion breccia deposits contain evidence of repeated fracturing and cementation; and 4) dimensions of many documented large hydrothermal explosion craters in Yellowstone are similar to the dimensions of currently active geyser basins or thermal areas in Yellowstone. The vast majority of active thermal areas in Yellowstone are characterized by 1) high-temperature hot-water systems in areas of high heat-flow, 2) extensive systems of hot springs, fumaroles, geysers, sinter terraces, mud pots, and, in places, small hydrothermal explosion craters, 3) widespread alteration of host rocks, 4) large areal dimensions (>several 100 m) and 5) intermittent but long-lived activity (40,000 to 300,000 years). Critical requirements for large hydrothermal explosions are an interconnected system of well-developed joints and fractures along which hydrothermal fluids flow and a water-saturated system close to or at boiling temperatures. Important factors are the active deformation of the Yellowstone caldera, active faults and moderate seismicity, high heat flow, climate changes, and regional stresses. Ascending fluids flow along fractures that develop in response to active deformation of the Yellowstone caldera and along edges of impermeable rhyolitic lava flows. Alteration, self sealing, and dissolution further constrain the distribution and development of hydrothermal fields. A partial impermeable cap can contribute to the final over-pressurization. An abrupt drop in pressure initiates steam-flashing and is instantly transmitted through interconnected fractures, resulting in a series of multiple large-scale explosions and excavation of an explosion crater. Strong similarities between large hydrothermal explosion craters and thermal fields in Yellowstone may indicate that catastrophic failures leading to large hydrothermal explosions represent a unique phase in the life cycle of a geyser basin.

  2. Geyser's Eruptive Activity in Broadband Seismic Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim

    2010-05-01

    -phase steam mixture and the conduit wall, due to an increased amount of steam in final stages of boiling. The most important result is detection of hidden underground geyser in the area of the Giant geyser. Its deep activity is recorded by seismometer (by seismic and mass position channels) as very stable quasi-periodic oscillations with period 16-18 min. Earlier the existents of the underground geyser was assumed due to observation of intense bursts with such periodicity during boiling-effusion mode berofe every eruption of the Giant geyser. So the supposed underground geyser was accounted as the main heat provider and the principal cause of the Giant geyser eruptions. We named this deep quasi-periodic source of seismic signal (underground geyser) "Heart of Giant". As a result of that, our reconnaissance seismic survey is informative and shows some new facts about geysers, which were not detected earlier by other most traditional methods of geyser study. The main task for future seismic research in the Valley of the Geysers is the location and more particular analysis of the underground "Heart of Giant" geyser.

  3. Nonlinear Super Integrable Couplings of Super Classical-Boussinesq Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuzhi Xing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear integrable couplings of super classical-Boussinesq hierarchy based upon an enlarged matrix Lie super algebra were constructed. Then, its super Hamiltonian structures were established by using super trace identity. As its reduction, nonlinear integrable couplings of the classical integrable hierarchy were obtained.

  4. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream Disturbances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajendra Shelke

    2006-06-01

    Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary disturbances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of enhanced density turbulence in the interplanetary medium driven by the high-speed flows of low-density plasma trailing behind for several days. Here, an attempt has been made to investigate the solar cause of erupting stream disturbances, mapped by Hewish & Bravo (1986) from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements made between August 1978 and August 1979 at 81.5 MHz. The position of the sources of 68 erupting stream disturbances on the solar disk has been compared with the locations of newborn coronal holes and/or the areas that have been coronal holes previously. It is found that the occurrence of erupting stream disturbances is linked to the emergence of newcoronal holes at the eruption site on the solar disk. A coronal hole is indicative of a radial magnetic field of a predominant magnetic polarity. The newborn coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The fundamental activity for the onset of an erupting stream seems to be a transient opening of pre-existing closed magnetic structures into a new coronal hole, which can support high-speed flow trailing behind the compression zone of the erupting stream for several days.

  5. Super-resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution, the process of obtaining one or more high-resolution images from one or more low-resolution observations, has been a very attractive research topic over the last two decades. It has found practical applications in many real world problems in different fields, from satellite...... the contributions of different authors to the basic concepts of each group. Furthermore, common issues in super-resolution algorithms, such as imaging models and registration algorithms, optimization of the cost functions employed, dealing with color information, improvement factors, assessment of super...

  6. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  7. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  8. Estimates of eruption velocity and plume height from infrasonic recordings of the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan-Auerbach, Jacqueline; Bellesiles, Anna; Fernandes, Jennifer K.

    2010-01-01

    The 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, began with an explosive phase comprising 13 discrete Vulcanian blasts. These events generated ash plumes reaching heights of 3-14 km. The eruption was recorded by a dense geophysical network including a pressure sensor located 3.2 km from the vent. Infrasonic signals recorded in association with the eruptions have maximum pressures ranging from 13-111 Pa. Eruption durations are estimated to range from 55-350 s. Neither of these parameters, however, correlates with eruption plume height. The pressure record, however, can be used to estimate the velocity and flux of material erupting from the vent, assuming that the sound is generated as a dipole source. Eruptive flux, in turn, is used to estimate plume height, assuming that the plume rises as a buoyant thermal. Plume heights estimated in this way correlate well with observations. Events that exhibit strongly impulsive waveforms are underestimated by the model, suggesting that flow may have been supersonic.

  9. Erupted complex odontoma delayed eruption of permanent molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtawa, Yumi; Ichinohe, Saori; Kimura, Eri; Hashimoto, Sadamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Odontomas, benign tumors that develop in the jaw, rarely erupt into the oral cavity. We report an erupted odontoma which delayed eruption of the first molar. The patient was a 10-year-old Japanese girl who came to our hospital due to delayed eruption of the right maxillary first molar. All the deciduous teeth had been shed. The second premolar on the right side had erupted, but not the first molar. Slight inflammation of the alveolar mucosa around the first molar had exposed a tooth-like, hard tissue. Panoramic radiography revealed a radiopaque mass indicating a lesion approximately 1 cm in diameter. The border of the image was clear, and part of the mass was situated close to the occlusal surface of the first molar. The root of the maxillary right first molar was only half-developed. A clinical diagnosis of odontoma was made. The odontoma was subsequently extracted, allowing the crown of the first molar to erupt almost 5 months later. The dental germ of the permanent tooth had been displaced by the odontoma. However, after the odontoma had been extracted, the permanent tooth was still able to erupt spontaneously, as eruptive force still remained. When the eruption of a tooth is significantly delayed, we believe that it is necessary to examine the area radiographically. If there is any radiographic evidence of a physical obstruction that might delay eruption, that obstruction should be removed before any problems can arise. Regular dental checkups at schools might improve our ability to detect evidence of delayed eruption earlier.

  10. Early eruption of permanent canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, S

    2012-01-01

    Systemic and local factors can modify the eruption time of teeth. Generalized eruption time changes could be due to some systemic diseases like hyperthyroidism, hypophosphatasia, precocious puberty, Proteus syndrome, etc. Localized early eruption of permanent teeth could be due to early extraction of deciduous teeth. Presented here is an extremely rare case of early eruption of permanent canines in a 7-year old female child. Though the number of such cases is very limited, the clinician should poses adequate knowledge and keeps an open eye to identify such cases.

  11. Early eruption of permanent canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local factors can modify the eruption time of teeth. Generalized eruption time changes could be due to some systemic diseases like hyperthyroidism, hypophosphatasia, precocious puberty, Proteus syndrome, etc. Localized early eruption of permanent teeth could be due to early extraction of deciduous teeth. Presented here is an extremely rare case of early eruption of permanent canines in a 7-year old female child. Though the number of such cases is very limited, the clinician should poses adequate knowledge and keeps an open eye to identify such cases.

  12. Nuclear collapse observed during the eruption of Mt. Usu

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T A

    2002-01-01

    Mt. Usu which was located about 70 km southwest from Sapporo in Hokkaido (the north island of Japan) began to erupt on March 31 in 2000. A nuclear emulsion was placed on a foot of Mt. Usu to catch small atomic clusters which were expected to be emitted during the eruption. Curious atomic clusters and their reaction products were successfully observed on surfaces of the nuclear emulsion. By comparing them with similar products which were obtained in previous experiments of discharge and electrolysis, it was concluded that micro Ball Lightning was really emitted during the eruption of Mt. Usu and that explosive reactions by nuclear collapse could have been involved to contribute to energy of the eruption. (author)

  13. Pseudoephedrine may cause "pigmenting" fixed drug eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya, Esen; Elinç-Aslan, Meryem Sevinç

    2011-05-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a distinctive drug eruption characterized by recurrent well-defined lesions in the same location each time the responsible drug is taken. Two different clinical forms have been described: the common classic pigmenting form and the rare nonpigmenting form. Nonpigmenting FDE is mainly characterized by symmetrical large erythematous plaques and the dermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Pseudoephedrine is known as the major inducer of nonpigmenting FDE. Pigmenting FDE from pseudoephedrine has not been reported previously. Here, the first case of pseudoephedrine-induced pigmenting FDE is reported, showing the characteristic features of classic pigmenting FDE such as asymmetry, normal-sized lesions, and the epidermodermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Moreover, a positive occlusive patch-test reaction to pseudoephedrine could be demonstrated on postlesional FDE skin for the first time.

  14. Will Teide erupt again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Joan; Geyer, Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of hazard in volcanic systems characterised by long repose period is difficult because the lack of knowledge of the past volcanic history and also because in many cases volcanism is not perceived as a potential problem, being only regarded as an attraction for tourism or a source of economic benefit, thus hiding the need to conduct hazard assessment. Teide, in the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands), is not an exception to this general rule and, despite being one of the largest composite volcanoes in the World, it is generally considered as a non-active volcano by population, visitors and even by some scientists. However, geological and geophysical evidence, including a large diversity of monitoring signals recorded during last decades, as well as a simple comparison with similar volcanoes that have erupted in recent times after hundreds or even thousands of years of quiescence, recommend to consider Teide as an active volcano and to take the necessary precaution in an island with nearly one million of permanent inhabitants and nearly 5 millions of visitors per year. What is the potential of Teide to erupt again? is the question that relies behind the fact of considering it as active, and that needs to be answered first. Based on the current volcanological, petrological and geophysical knowledge We propose a conceptual model on the magma recharge mechanisms, structure of the plumbing system, and eruption triggers and dynamics of Teide volcano that helps to understand its behaviour and to anticipate future activity. Ramón y Cajal contract (RYC-2012-11024)

  15. NETL Super Computer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NETL Super Computer was designed for performing engineering calculations that apply to fossil energy research. It is one of the world’s larger supercomputers,...

  16. Super-resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    and aerial imaging to medical image processing, to facial image analysis, text image analysis, sign and number plates reading, and biometrics recognition, to name a few. This has resulted in many research papers, each developing a new super-resolution algorithm for a specific purpose. The current......Super-resolution, the process of obtaining one or more high-resolution images from one or more low-resolution observations, has been a very attractive research topic over the last two decades. It has found practical applications in many real world problems in different fields, from satellite...... the contributions of different authors to the basic concepts of each group. Furthermore, common issues in super-resolution algorithms, such as imaging models and registration algorithms, optimization of the cost functions employed, dealing with color information, improvement factors, assessment of super...

  17. Volcanic Eruptions in the southern Red Sea 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsson, Sigurjón; Xu, Wenbin; Ruch, Joël

    2017-04-01

    After more than a century of volcanic quiescence the southern Red Sea has seen three volcanic eruptions during the past decade. The eruptions occurred on Jebel at Tair Island in 2007-8 and within the Zubair archipelago in 2011-12 and 2013. As the islands are remote, without geophysical instrumentation, and lack direct observers, we obtained most of the information about these eruptions from studying Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and optical satellite images. We used the images to deduce the timing and progress of the volcanic activity and to constrain the geometry of the dikes feeding the eruptions. The Jebel at Tair eruption started energetically and caused damage to Yemeni military buildings on the island and even a few casualties. The erupted lava came from a short summit fissure and covers about 6 km2, which is almost half of the island. The fissure orientations of this and previous eruptions indicate that the stress field on Tair Island is temporarily varying and isolated from the regional Red Sea stress field. The eruptions within the Zubair archipelago, which is located about 50 km southeast of Tair Island, produced two new islands and were fed by dikes much larger than the small size of the new islands might suggest. This is indicated by relative displacements between different islands in the archipelago, derived from offset tracking of SAR images. Together the three volcanic eruptions and several seismic swarms indicate that the southern Red Sea has been experiencing a rifting episode with multiple dike intrusions and meter-scale extension, and that this part of the plate boundary is more active than previously thought.

  18. Super-Kamiokande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Lluís Martí

    2016-06-01

    The Super-Kamiokande experiment performs a large variety of studies, many of them in the neutrino sector. The archetypes are atmospheric neutrino (recently awarded with the Nobel prize for Mr. T. Kajita) and the solar neutrinos analyses. In these proceedings we report our latest results and present updates to indirect dark matter searches, our solar neutrino analysis and discuss the future upgrade of Super-Kamiokande by loading gadolinium into our ultra-pure water.

  19. The Super Girl Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG PEI

    2006-01-01

    @@ In recent years, Changsha,the capital city of Hunan Province, has become famous across China for its innovative TV channel, in particular the cultural phenomenon of the Super Girl talent show. And as far as culture goes, Hunan TV is merely a reflection of a renaissance happening in the city. Animation, music halls, drama festivals and a famous book market are just some of the city's cultural sectors that are benefiting from the fame and notoriety of the Super Girl show.

  20. The formation of super-rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, G

    1980-01-01

    The author has calculated the collision of a small neutral cloud (surface density approximately 10/sup 19/ cm/sup -2/) with a constant density galactic disk. Through the collision, a large amount of energy is deposited in a small volume of the galaxy, resulting in a supersonic expansion of very hot (10/sup 6/-10/sup 7/K) gas into the Galaxy and out of the galactic disk. The expansion generates a large cavity (a super-ring) with physical characteristics (diameter, velocity of expansion, etc.) in agreement with the observations, and a large volume of hot low-density gas with properties similar to those of the observed coronal gas. (31 refs).

  1. Nonlinear Super Integrable Couplings of Super Dirac Hierarchy and Its Super Hamiltonian Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤福财

    2012-01-01

    We construct nonlinear super integrable couplings of the super integrable Dirac hierarchy based on an enlarged matrix Lie superalgebra. Then its super Hamiltonian structure is furnished by super trace identity. As its reduction, we gain the nonlinear integrable couplings of the classical integrable Dirac hierarchy.

  2. Galactic Super-volcano in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A galactic "super-volcano" in the massive galaxy M87 is erupting and blasting gas outwards, as witnessed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and NSF's Very Large Array. The cosmic volcano is being driven by a giant black hole in the galaxy's center and preventing hundreds of millions of new stars from forming. Astronomers studying this black hole and its effects have been struck by the remarkable similarities between it and a volcano in Iceland that made headlines earlier this year. At a distance of about 50 million light years, M87 is relatively close to Earth and lies at the center of the Virgo cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies. M87's location, coupled with long observations over Chandra's lifetime, has made it an excellent subject for investigations of how a massive black hole impacts its environment. "Our results show in great detail that supermassive black holes have a surprisingly good control over the evolution of the galaxies in which they live," said Norbert Werner of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, who led one of two papers describing the study. "And it doesn't stop there. The black hole's reach extends ever farther into the entire cluster, similar to how one small volcano can affect practically an entire hemisphere on Earth." The cluster surrounding M87 is filled with hot gas glowing in X-ray light, which is detected by Chandra. As this gas cools, it can fall toward the galaxy's center where it should continue to cool even faster and form new stars. However, radio observations with the Very Large Array suggest that in M87 jets of very energetic particles produced by the black hole interrupt this process. These jets lift up the relatively cool gas near the center of the galaxy and produce shock waves in the galaxy's atmosphere because of their supersonic speed. The scientists involved in this research have found the interaction of this cosmic

  3. Fixed drug eruption to tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, D C; Varigos, G A

    1997-11-01

    An 11-year-old girl with a recurrent fixed drug eruption to tartrazine on the dorsum of the left hand is presented. Oral provocation tests to both the suspected food, an artificially coloured cheese crisp, and to tartrazine were positive. This case highlights fire need to consider artificial flavours, colours and preservatives as potential culprits in classic drug eruptions.

  4. Deforming super Riemann surfaces with gravitinos and super Schottky groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Playle, Sam [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2016-12-12

    The (super) Schottky uniformization of compact (super) Riemann surfaces is briefly reviewed. Deformations of super Riemann surface by gravitinos and Beltrami parameters are recast in terms of super Schottky group cohomology. It is checked that the super Schottky group formula for the period matrix of a non-split surface matches its expression in terms of a gravitino and Beltrami parameter on a split surface. The relationship between (super) Schottky groups and the construction of surfaces by gluing pairs of punctures is discussed in an appendix.

  5. Subglacial Silicic Eruptions: Wet Cavities and Moist Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J. A.; McGarvie, D. W.; Gilbert, J. S.; Smellie, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    Comparing the deposits of subglacial eruptions with those of subaerial and subaqueous eruptions enables the influence of magma-water-ice interactions to be explored. In this presentation, the Icelandic subglacial rhyolite tuyas of Kerlingarfjöll and Prestahnúkur are compared with subaerial and subaqueous rhyolite formations at Sierra La Primavera, México. Prestahnúkur formed by the subglacial lava effusion and thick lava flows with steep termini are products of confinement by ice walls. Basal deposits of perlitised obsidian lobes suggest a water-saturated environment, and the extremely abundant microvesicular lava blocks surrounding these lobes and throughout the edifice are broadly similar to the carapaces of silicic lava domes at La Primavera known to have a subaqueous origin. Although bedded and sorted deposits are present at Prestahnúkur, they are trivial compared to the thick and extensive caldera-lake deposits of La Primavera, which even contain a "giant pumice" marker bed formed by the lake-wide deposition of once-bouyant blocks. The Kerlingarfjöll rhyolite tuyas formed during explosive subglacial eruptions. The first-erupted material forms structureless beds of phreatomagmatically-fragmented ash; ash from subaqueous eruptions at La Primavera is similarly fine grained, but in contrast is well-bedded (due to lacustrine deposition). Later-erupted material at Kerlingarfjöll typically consists of massive unconsolidated lapilli-tuffs. The lapilli themselves are similar to those within the well-sorted subaerially-formed pumice cones La Primavera, however Kerlingarfjöll's lapilli- tuffs have grain-size characteristics of proximal pyroclastic flows. These observations suggest that although similar fragmentation mechanisms operated in both locations, transport and consequent sorting was limited at Kerlingarfjöll. The different products of the two Icelandic subglacial tuyas are related to their different eruption rates and magma volatile contents. Melting of

  6. Carbon sequestration and eruption hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.

    2007-12-01

    In order to reduce the buildup of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, proposals have been made to sequestrate carbon in ocean, or in coal mines and other underground formations. High gas concentration in ocean or underground formations has to potential to power gas-driven eruptions. In this presentation, possible eruption hazards are explored. Whenever carbon dioxide is sequestrated in the form of carbon dioxide gas, or dissolved and/or absorbed carbon dioxide, it is necessary to exercise caution to avoid gas-driven eruption hazard. It is long known that explosive volcanic eruptions are driven by H2O gas in magma. Lake eruptions powered by dissolved CO2 in lake bottom water were discovered in the 1980's (Kling et al., 1987; Zhang, 1996). Gas-driven ocean eruptions with mechanism similar to lake eruptions have been hypothesized (Zhang, 2003; Zhang and Kling, 2006) although not confirmed. Mud volcanos are commonly thought to be driven by methane-rich fluids in sediment (Milkov, 2000). Recently, Zhang et al. (2007) have proposed that coal outbursts in underground coal mines are driven by dissolved high CO2 concentration in coal, causing coal fragmentation and outburst. That is, coal outbursts may be regarded as a new type of gas-driven eruptions. Therefore, high concentrations of free gas or dissolved/absorbed gas may power eruptions of magma, lake water, ocean water, sediment, and coal. Gas- driven volcanic, lake and ocean eruptions are due to volume expansion from bubble growth, whereas gas-driven coal and sediment eruptions are due to high gas-pressure, leading to fragmentation of coal and sediment. (In explosive volcanism, magma fragmentation is also a critical point.) The threshold conditions for many of these eruptions are not known yet. In planning large (industrial) scale injection of CO2 into a natural reservoir, it is important to know the eruption threshold and design the injection scheme accordingly. More safe sequestration in terms of eruption hazards would

  7. Automated Detection of Solar Eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Hurlburt, Neal

    2015-01-01

    Observation of the solar atmosphere reveals a wide range of motions, from small scale jets and spicules to global-scale coronal mass ejections. Identifying and characterizing these motions are essential to advancing our understanding the drivers of space weather. Both automated and visual identifications are currently used in identifying CMEs. To date, eruptions near the solar surface (which may be precursors to CMEs) have been identified primarily by visual inspection. Here we report on EruptionPatrol (EP): a software module that is designed to automatically identify eruptions from data collected by SDO/AIA. We describe the method underlying the module and compare its results to previous identifications found in the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase. EP identifies eruptions events that are consistent with those found by human annotations, but in a significantly more consistent and quantitative manner. Eruptions are found to be distributed within 15Mm of the solar surface. They possess peak speeds ranging from...

  8. Super-resolved imaging with ultimate time resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ashida, Yuto

    2015-01-01

    Precisely and accurately locating point objects is a long-standing common thread in science. Super-resolved imaging of single molecules has revolutionized our view of quasi-static nanostructures $\\it{in-vivo}$. A wide-field approach based on localizing individual fluorophores has emerged as a versatile method to surpass the standard resolution limit. In those techniques, the super-resolution is realized by sparse photoactivation and localization together with the statistical analysis based on point spread functions. Nevertheless, the slow temporal resolution of super-resolved imaging severely restricts the utility to the study of live-cell phenomena. Clearly, a major breakthrough to observe fast, nanoscale dynamics needs to be made. Here we present a super-resolved imaging method that achieves the theoretical-limit time resolution. By invoking information theory, we can achieve the robust localization of overlapped light emitters at an order of magnitude faster speed than the conventional super-resolution mic...

  9. Solar Eruptive Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    It s long been known that the Sun plays host to the most energetic explosions in the solar system. But key insights into the forms that energy takes have only recently become available. Solar flares have been phenomena of both academic and practical interest since their discovery in 1859. From the academic point of view, they are the nearest events for studying the explosive release of energy in astrophysical magnetized plasmas. From the practical point of view, they disrupt communication channels on Earth, from telegraph communications in 1859 to radio and television signals today. Flares also wreak havoc on the electrical power grid, satellite operations, and GPS signals, and energetic charged particles and radiation are dangerous to passengers on high-altitude polar flights and to astronauts. Flares are not the only explosive phenomena on the Sun. More difficult to observe but equally energetic are the large coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the ejection of up to ten billion tons of magnetized plasma into the solar wind at speeds that can exceed 1000 km/s. CMEs are primarily observed from the side, with coronagraphs that block out the bright disk of the Sun and lower solar atmosphere so that light scattered from the ejected mass can be seen. Major geomagnetic storms are now known to arise from the interaction of CMEs with Earth's magnetosphere. Solar flares are observed without CMEs, and CMEs are observed without flares. The two phenomena often occur together, however, and almost always do in the case of large flares and fast CMEs. The term solar eruptive event refers to the combination of a flare and a CME. Solar eruptive events generate a lot of heat: They can heat plasma to temperatures as high at 50 million Kelvin, producing radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. But that s not all. A fascinating aspect of solar eruptive events is the acceleration of electrons and ions to suprathermal often relativistic energies. The accelerated particles are primarily

  10. Scaling properties of planetary calderas and terrestrial volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sanchez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Volcanism plays an important role in transporting internal heat of planetary bodies to their surface. Therefore, volcanoes are a manifestation of the planet's past and present internal dynamics. Volcanic eruptions as well as caldera forming processes are the direct manifestation of complex interactions between the rising magma and the surrounding host rock in the crust of terrestrial planetary bodies. Attempts have been made to compare volcanic landforms throughout the solar system. Different stochastic models have been proposed to describe the temporal sequences of eruptions on individual or groups of volcanoes. However, comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for volcano formation and eruption and more specifically caldera formation remains elusive. In this work, we propose a scaling law to quantify the distribution of caldera sizes on Earth, Mars, Venus, and Io, as well as the distribution of calderas on Earth depending on their surrounding crustal properties. We also apply the same scaling analysis to the distribution of interevent times between eruptions for volcanoes that have the largest eruptive history as well as groups of volcanoes on Earth. We find that when rescaled with their respective sample averages, the distributions considered show a similar functional form. This result implies that similar processes are responsible for caldera formation throughout the solar system and for different crustal settings on Earth. This result emphasizes the importance of comparative planetology to understand planetary volcanism. Similarly, the processes responsible for volcanic eruptions are independent of the type of volcanism or geographical location.

  11. Raspberry Pi super cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Andrew K

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a step-by-step, tutorial-based approach which will teach you how to develop your own super cluster using Raspberry Pi computers quickly and efficiently.Raspberry Pi Super Cluster is an introductory guide for those interested in experimenting with parallel computing at home. Aimed at Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, this book is a primer for getting your first cluster up and running.Basic knowledge of C or Java would be helpful but no prior knowledge of parallel computing is necessary.

  12. SuperQuant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    SuperQuant is a quantitative proteomics data processing approach that uses complementary fragment ions to identify multiple co-isolated peptides in tandem mass spectra allowing for their quantification. This approach can be applied to any shotgun proteomics data set acquired with high mass accura...... of the same proteins were close to the values typical for other precursor ion-based quantification methods. The raw data is deposited to ProteomeXchange (PXD001907). The developed node is available for testing at https://github.com/caetera/SuperQuantNode....

  13. "Super Roman Pots"

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    Remotely controlled re-entrant vacuum vessels, with very thin (0.17 mm) central windows, that will be installed in each downstream arm of intersection I-8. Detectors for a coming physics experiment, placed inside these "Super Roman Pots", can be moved very close to the circulating ISR beams.

  14. A Super Roman Pot

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Remotely controlled re-entrant vacuum vessels, with very thin (0.17 mm) central windows, that were installed in each downstream arm of the ISR intersection I-8. Detectors placed inside these Super Roman Pots could be moved very close to the circulating ISR beams. (See Annual Report 1974 p. 110.)

  15. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  16. Tenofovir induced lichenoid drug eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mrinal; Gupta, Heena; Gupta, Anish

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous adverse reactions are a common complication of anti-retroviral therapy. Tenofovir is a newer anti-retroviral drug belonging to the nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor group. Systemic adverse effects like nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hepatotoxicity and renal toxicity are common with tenofovir but cutaneous adverse effects are rare. Lichenoid drug eruptions are a common adverse effect seen with a large variety of drugs including antimalarials, antihypertensives, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and diuretics. Lichenoid drug eruption is a rare cutaneous adverse effect of tenofovir with only a single case reported till date. Here, we report a case of tenofovir induced lichenoid drug eruption in a 54-year-old human immunodeficiency virus affected male who presented with generalized lichenoid eruption after 6 weeks of initiation of tenofovir and complete clearance on cessation of the drug.

  17. Premature dental eruption: report of case.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, C M

    2011-08-05

    This case report reviews the variability of dental eruption and the possible sequelae. Dental eruption of the permanent teeth in cleft palate children may be variable, with delayed eruption the most common phenomenon. A case of premature dental eruption of a maxillary left first premolar is demonstrated, however, in a five-year-old male. This localized premature dental eruption anomaly was attributed to early extraction of the primary dentition, due to caries.

  18. An extremely large magnitude eruption close to the Plio-Pleistocene boundary: reconstruction of eruptive style and history of the Ebisutoge-Fukuda tephra, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, K.; Nagahashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, S.

    2001-06-01

    An extremely large magnitude eruption of the Ebisutoge-Fukuda tephra, close to the Plio-Pleistocene boundary, central Japan, spread volcanic materials widely more than 290,000 km 2 reaching more than 300 km from the probable source. Characteristics of the distal air-fall ash (>150 km away from the vent) and proximal pyroclastic deposits are clarified to constrain the eruptive style, history, and magnitude of the Ebisutoge-Fukuda eruption. Eruptive history had five phases. Phase 1 is phreatoplinian eruption producing >105 km 3 of volcanic materials. Phases 2 and 3 are plinian eruption and transition to pyroclastic flow. Plinian activity also occurred in phase 4, which ejected conspicuous obsidian fragments to the distal locations. In phase 5, collapse of eruption column triggered by phase 4, generated large pyroclastic flow in all directions and resulted in more than 250-350 km 3 of deposits. Thus, the total volume of this tephra amounts over 380-490 km 3. This indicates that the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) of the Ebisutoge-Fukuda tephra is greater than 7. The huge thickness of reworked volcaniclastic deposits overlying the fall units also attests to the tremendous volume of eruptive materials of this tephra. Numerous ancient tephra layers with large volume have been reported worldwide, but sources and eruptive history are often unknown and difficult to determine. Comparison of distal air-fall ashes with proximal pyroclastic deposits revealed eruption style, history and magnitude of the Ebisutoge-Fukuda tephra. Hence, recognition of the Ebisutoge-Fukuda tephra, is useful for understanding the volcanic activity during the Pliocene to Pleistocene, is important as a boundary marker bed, and can be used to interpret the global environmental and climatic impact of large magnitude eruptions in the past.

  19. Unusually large erupted complex odontoma: A rare case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagewadi, Shivanand B.; Kukreja, Rahul; Suma, Gundareddy N.; Yadav, Bhawn; Sharma, Havi [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, ITS Centre for Dental Studies and Research, Murad Nagar (India)

    2015-03-15

    Odontomas are nonaggressive, hamartomatous developmental malformations composed of mature tooth substances and may be compound or complex depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or on their resemblance to normal teeth. Among them, complex odontomas are relatively rare tumors. They are usually asymptomatic in nature. Occasionally, these tumors become large, causing bone expansion followed by facial asymmetry. Odontoma eruptions are uncommon, and thus far, very few cases of erupted complex odontomas have been reported in the literature. Here, we report the case of an unusually large, painless, complex odontoma located in the right posterior mandible.

  20. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Counihan, K P

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases.

  1. Unusually large erupted complex odontoma: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagewadi, Shivanand B; Kukreja, Rahul; Suma, Gundareddy N; Yadav, Bhawna; Sharma, Havi

    2015-03-01

    Odontomas are nonaggressive, hamartomatous developmental malformations composed of mature tooth substances and may be compound or complex depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or on their resemblance to normal teeth. Among them, complex odontomas are relatively rare tumors. They are usually asymptomatic in nature. Occasionally, these tumors become large, causing bone expansion followed by facial asymmetry. Odontoma eruptions are uncommon, and thus far, very few cases of erupted complex odontomas have been reported in the literature. Here, we report the case of an unusually large, painless, complex odontoma located in the right posterior mandible.

  2. Internal triggering of volcanic eruptions: tracking overpressure regimes for giant magma bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, Samantha; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Ghiorso, Mark S.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding silicic eruption triggers is paramount for deciphering explosive volcanism and its potential societal hazards. Here, we use phase equilibria modeling to determine the potential role of internal triggering - wherein magmas naturally evolve to a state in which eruption is inevitable - in rhyolitic magma bodies. Whole-rock compositions from five large to super-sized rhyolitic deposits are modeled using rhyolite-MELTS. By running simulations with varying water contents, we can track crystallization and bubble exsolution during magma solidification. We use simulations with variable enthalpy and fixed pressure for the five compositions. The interplay between bubble exsolution and crystallization can lead to an increase in the system volume, which can lead to magma overpressurization. We find that internal triggering is possible for high-silica rhyolite magmas crystallizing at pressures below 300 MPa (50 wt.%, which makes magma immobile - high-silica rhyolite eruptions from such depths would require external triggering, but examples are scarce or entirely absent. Calculated crystallinities at which the critical overpressure threshold is reached compare favorably with observed crystal contents in natural samples for many systems, suggesting that internal evolution plays a critical role in triggering eruptions. Systems in which fluid saturation happens late relative to crystallization or in which degassing is effective can delay or avoid internal triggering. We argue that priming by crystallization and bubble exsolution is critical for magma eruption, and external triggering serves simply as the final blow - rather than being the driving force - of explosive rhyolitic eruptions.

  3. Can the structure of an explosive caldera affect eruptive behaviour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, C. P.; Branney, M.; Carrasco-Nuñez, G.; Barford, D.

    2010-12-01

    stratigraphy has revealed new insights into the structural and eruptive history. (1) Eruption frequency has increased with time over the last 460 Ka, especially after the second major collapse (~ 100 Ka). (2) Explosive eruption volumes have generally decreased with time by 3 orders of magnitude. (3) Plinian eruptions have become less evolved with time, whereas small basaltic andesite (~ 57% SiO2) eruptions have continued throughout much of the history of the volcano with little change. (4) The first major caldera collapse eruption (≥115 km3 DRE) that produced Los Humeros caldera has some piecemeal characteristics. (5) The greatest density of faulting is located within the second major collapse structure (the nested ~ 10 km diameter Los Potreros caldera). Geochronological, petrological and geochemical interpretations are in progress: initial results are consistent with the idea that Los Humeros caldera became more intensely fractured with time, and that this may have affected differentiation, eruption behaviour and periodicity.

  4. Eruptions from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    The Sun often exhibits outbursts, launching material from its surface in powerful releases of energy. Recent analysis of such an outburst captured on video by several Sun-monitoring spacecraft may help us understand the mechanisms that launch these eruptions.Many OutburstsSolar jets are elongated, transient structures that are thought to regularly release magnetic energy from the Sun, contributing to coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the other hand, are enormous blob-like explosions, violently ejecting energy and mass from the Sun at incredible speeds.But could these two types of events actually be related? According to a team of scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China, they may well be. The team, led by Jiajia Liu, has analyzed observations of a coronal jet that they believe prompted the launch of a powerful CME.Observing an ExplosionGif of a movie of the CME, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at a wavelength of 304. The original movie can be found in the article. [Liu et al.]An army of spacecraft was on hand to witness the event on 15 Jan 2013 including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The instruments on board these observatories captured the drama on the northern limb of the Sun as, at 19:32 UT, a coronal jet formed. Just eight minutes later, a powerful CME was released from the same active region.The fact that the jet and CME occurred in the same place at roughly the same time suggests theyre related. But did the initial motions of the CME blob trigger the jet? Or did the jet trigger the CME?Tying It All TogetherIn a recently published study, Liu and collaborators analyzed the multi-wavelength observations of this event to find the heights and positions of the jet and CME. From this analysis, they determined that the coronal jet triggered the release

  5. Evaluation of climate impacts after a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Anton; Kokkola, Harri; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Niemeier, Ulrike; Timmreck, Claudia; Lehtinen, Kari; Hakkarainen, Hanne; Korhonen, Hannele

    2016-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by injecting sulfur to the stratosphere is one of the most discussed geoengineering methods, because it has been suggested to be affordable and effective and its impacts have been thought to be predictable based on volcanic eruptions. Injecting sulfur to the stratosphere could be seen as an analogy of large volcanic eruptions, where large amounts of sulfur dioxide are released into the stratosphere. In the atmosphere sulfur dioxide oxidizes and forms aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols which reflect incoming solar radiation back to space. If SRM is ever used to cool the climate it is possible that a large volcanic eruption could happen also during the SRM, which would lead temporally to a very strong cooling. The simulations in this study were performed in two steps. In the first step, we used the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-HAM-SALSA to define global aerosol fields in scenarios with stratospheric sulfur injections and/or a volcanic eruption. In the second step of the study we performed climate simulations using Max-Planck-Institute's Earth system model (MPI-ESM) by using aerosol fields defined by MAECHAM5-HAM-SALSA. We studied scenarios of volcanic eruptions in two different locations and seasons and during the SRM sulfur injections and without injections. According to our simulations the radiative impacts of the eruption and SRM are not additive and the radiative effects and climate changes occurring after the eruption depend strongly on whether SRM is continued or suspended after the eruption. Adding to this, sulfate burden and radiative forcing after the volcanic eruption decrease significantly faster if the volcanic eruption happens during the geoengineering injections. In this situation, sulfur from the eruption does not only form new particles but it also condenses into pre-existing particles. Furthermore, the new small particles that are formed after the eruption coagulate effectively with the existing larger particles from

  6. Dental eruption in afrotherian mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmann Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Afrotheria comprises a newly recognized clade of mammals with strong molecular evidence for its monophyly. In contrast, morphological data uniting its diverse constituents, including elephants, sea cows, hyraxes, aardvarks, sengis, tenrecs and golden moles, have been difficult to identify. Here, we suggest relatively late eruption of the permanent dentition as a shared characteristic of afrotherian mammals. This characteristic and other features (such as vertebral anomalies and testicondy recall the phenotype of a human genetic pathology (cleidocranial dysplasia, correlations with which have not been explored previously in the context of character evolution within the recently established phylogeny of living mammalian clades. Results Although data on the absolute timing of eruption in sengis, golden moles and tenrecs are still unknown, craniometric comparisons for ontogenetic series of these taxa show that considerable skull growth takes place prior to the complete eruption of the permanent cheek teeth. Specimens showing less than half (sengis, golden moles or two-thirds (tenrecs, hyraxes of their permanent cheek teeth reach or exceed the median jaw length of conspecifics with a complete dentition. With few exceptions, afrotherians are closer to median adult jaw length with fewer erupted, permanent cheek teeth than comparable stages of non-afrotherians. Manatees (but not dugongs, elephants and hyraxes with known age data show eruption of permanent teeth late in ontogeny relative to other mammals. While the occurrence of delayed eruption, vertebral anomalies and other potential afrotherian synapomorphies resemble some symptoms of a human genetic pathology, these characteristics do not appear to covary significantly among mammalian clades. Conclusion Morphological characteristics shared by such physically disparate animals such as elephants and golden moles are not easy to recognize, but are now known to include late eruption

  7. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    it has died," said co-author Scott Chapman, also of Cambridge University. "This means we don't have to catch the black holes in the act to witness the big impact they have." This is the first X-ray ghost ever seen after the demise of radio-bright jets. Astronomers have observed extensive X-ray emission with a similar origin, but only from galaxies with radio emission on large scales, signifying continued eruptions. In HDF 130, only a point source is detected in radio images, coinciding with the massive elliptical galaxy seen in its optical image. This radio source indicates the presence of a growing supermassive black hole. People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way's Super-efficient Particle Accelerators Caught in The Act NASA Joins "Around the World in 80 Telescopes" Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Galaxies Coming of Age in Cosmic Blobs "This result hints that the X-ray sky should be littered with such ghosts," said co-author Caitlin Casey, also of Cambridge, "especially if black hole eruptions are as common as we think they are in the early Universe." The power contained in the black hole eruption was likely to be considerable, equivalent to about a billion supernovas. The energy is dumped into the surroundings and transports and heats the gas. "Even after the ghost disappears, most of the energy from the black hole's eruption remains", said Fabian. "Because they're so powerful, these eruptions can have profound effects lasting for billions of years." The details of Chandra's data of HDF 130 helped secure its true nature. For example, in X-rays, HDF 130 has a cigar-like shape that extends for some 2.2 million light years. The linear shape of the X-ray source is consistent with the shape of radio jets and not with that of a galaxy cluster, which is expected to be circular. The energy distribution of the X-rays is also consistent with the interpretation of an X-ray ghost. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra

  8. Water-magma interaction and plume processes in the 2008 Okmok eruption, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unema, Joel; Ort, Michael H.; Larsen, Jessica D; Neal, Christina; Schaefer, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Eruptions of similar explosivity can have divergent effects on the surroundings due to differences in the behavior of the tephra in the eruption column and atmosphere. Okmok volcano, located on Umnak Island in the eastern Aleutian Islands, erupted explosively between 12 July and 19 August 2008. The basaltic andesitic eruption ejected ∼0.24 km3dense rock equivalent (DRE) of tephra, primarily directed to the northeast of the vent area. The first 4 h of the eruption produced dominantly coarse-grained tephra, but the following 5 wk of the eruption deposited almost exclusively ash, much of it very fine and deposited as ash pellets and ashy rain and mist. Meteorological storms combined with abundant plume water to efficiently scrub ash from the eruption column, with a rapid decrease in deposit thickness with distance from the vent. Grain-size analysis shows that the modes (although not their relative proportions) are very constant throughout the deposit, implying that the fragmentation mechanisms did not vary much. Grain-shape features consistent with molten fuel-coolant interaction are common. Surface and groundwater drainage into the vents provided the water for phreatomagmatic fragmentation. The available water (water that could reach the vent area during the eruption) was ∼2.8 × 1010 kg, and the erupted magma totaled ∼7 × 1011 kg, which yield an overall water:magma mass ratio of ∼0.04, but much of the water was not interactive. Although magma flux dropped from 1 × 107 kg/s during the initial 4 h to 1.8 × 105 kg/s for the remainder of the eruption, most of the erupted material was ejected during the lower-mass-flux period due to its much greater length, and this tephra was dominantly deposited within 10 km downwind of the vent. This highlights the importance of ash scrubbing in the evaluation of hazards from explosive eruptions.

  9. Active Eruptions in the NE Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, J. A.; Embley, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    NE Lau Response Team: K Rubin, E Baker, J Lupton, M Lilley, T Shank, S Merle, R Dziak, T Collasius (Jason 2 Expedition Leader), N Buck, T Baumberger, D Butterfield, D Clague, D Conlin, J Cowen, R Davis, L Evans, J Huber, M Keith, N Keller, P Michael, E Podowski, A-L Reysenbach, K Roe, H Thomas, S Walker. During a May 2009 cruise to W Mata volcano in the NE Lau Basin, we made the first observations of an active eruption on the deep-sea floor. The cruise was organized after volcanic activity was detected at two sites (W Mata volcano and NE Lau Spreading Center, NELSC) during a Nov. 2008 NOAA-PMEL expedition. At that time, both sites had elevated H2 concentrations and volcaniclastic shards in the hydrothermal plumes. Moored hydrophone data since Jan 2009 indicate that the activity at W Mata has been continuous between these expeditions. Results of our cruise and other work suggest that the NE Lau Basin hosts an unusually high level of magmatic activity, making it an ideal location to study the effects of magmatic processes on hydrothermal activity and associated ecosystems. W Mata was visited with 5 ROV Jason 2 dives and 2 dives with the MBARI autonomous mapping vehicle in May 2009. It was actively erupting at the 1200 m deep summit during each, so a hydrophone was deployed locally to collect acoustic data. Ship and shore-based analysis of HD video, molten lava, rocks, sediments, hot spring waters, and micro- and macro biological specimens collected by Jason 2 have provided a wealth of data. The eruption itself was characterized by extrusion of red, molten lava, extensive degassing, formation of large magma bubbles, explosive pyroclast ejection, and the active extrusion of pillow lavas. The erupting magmas are boninite, a relatively rare magma type found only at convergent margins. The hydrothermal fluids are generally acidic and all diffuse fluids collected were microbially active, even those at pH 20 yrs the PMEL-Vents and NSF RIDGE programs have sought to observe

  10. SuperSegger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stylianidou, Stella; Brennan, Connor; Nissen, Silas B

    2016-01-01

    -colonies with many cells, facilitating the analysis of cell-cycle dynamics in bacteria as well as cell-contact mediated phenomena. This package has a range of built-in capabilities for characterizing bacterial cells, including the identification of cell division events, mother, daughter, and neighboring cells......Many quantitative cell biology questions require fast yet reliable automated image segmentation to identify and link cells from frame-to-frame, and characterize the cell morphology and fluorescence. We present SuperSegger, an automated MATLAB-based image processing package well......-suited to quantitative analysis of high-throughput live-cell fluorescence microscopy of bacterial cells. SuperSegger incorporates machine-learning algorithms to optimize cellular boundaries and automated error resolution to reliably link cells from frame-to-frame. Unlike existing packages, it can reliably segment micro...

  11. The August 2010 Phreatic Eruption of Mount Sinabung, North Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igan S. Sutawidjaja

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.155Mount Sinabung, located in Karo Regency, North Sumatra Province, is a strato volcano having four active craters. Since its latest eruption about 1,200 year ago, a phreatic eruption occurred on August 27th, 2010. The eruption took place in Crater-I, which was initiated by a greyish white plume and then followed by black plumes as high as 2000 m above the crater. Altered rock fragments and ash were erupted during this event. The altered rocks show a development of argillic alterations which was formed in the hydrothermal system in depth. The alteration zone is formed along the northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast trend across the three craters. All of the craters are actively discharging solfataric gases, of which sulphur deposits are resulted, and they have been quarried by the local people. The age of the latest magmatic eruption was dated by 14C method from the charcoal sample found in the pyroclastic flow deposits near Bekerah Village.

  12. Critical decay index at the onset of solar eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Zuccarello, F P; Gilchrist, S A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are topological structures consisting of twisted magnetic field lines that globally wrap around an axis. The torus instability model predicts that a magnetic flux rope of major radius $R$ undergoes an eruption when its axis reaches a location where the decay index $-d(\\ln B_{ex})/d(\\ln R)$ of the ambient magnetic field $B_{ex}$ is larger than a critical value. In the current-wire model, the critical value depends on the thickness and time-evolution of the current channel. We use magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate if the critical value of the decay index at the onset of the eruption is affected by the magnetic flux rope's internal current profile and/or by the particular pre-eruptive photospheric dynamics. The evolution of an asymmetric, bipolar active region is driven by applying different classes of photospheric motions. We find that the critical value of the decay index at the onset of the eruption is not significantly affected by either the pre-eruptive photospheric e...

  13. Keck observations of eruptions on Io in 2003-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Imke; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Marchis, Franck

    2016-08-01

    We report observations of four energetic volcanic eruptions on Io: at Tupan Patera on UT 8 March 2003; Tung Yo Patera on UT 28 May 2004; Sui Jen Patera on UT 30 May 2004; and south of Babbar Patera on UT 31 May 2005. The Tung Yo, Sui Jen and south of Babbar Paterae eruptions are in locations where no activity had been seen before. Our observations were obtained at near-infrared wavelengths (1.2-4.7 μm) with the 10-m Keck telescope equipped with adaptive optics. We report single and two-temperature blackbody fits, as well as single-component and dual-component Io Flow Model (IFM) fits (Davies, 1996, Icarus, 124, 45-61) to all four eruptions where applicable. We use 2-μm and 5-μm radiant fluxes, the 2:5-μm radiant flux ratio, and radiant flux density of each thermal source to constrain the likely style of volcanic eruption. All eruptions are characterized by a high temperature IFM component (ranging from 1475 to ∼900 K) from a relatively small area (floor of the patera may have been resurfaced with silicate lava in 2003.

  14. NASA Super Pressure Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    NASA is in the process of qualifying the mid-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB) to provide constant density altitude flight for science investigations at polar and mid-latitudes. The status of the development of the 18.8 million cubic foot SPB capable of carrying one-tone of science to 110,000 feet, will be given. In addition, the operating considerations such as launch sites, flight safety considerations, and recovery will be discussed.

  15. Super-diversité

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crul, M.R.J.; Schneider, J.; Lelie, F.

    2013-01-01

    Le concept de super-diversité, en cernant les conditions d'un scénario 'avenir optimiste, offre un nouvel éclairage au débat sur l'intégration. Nous sommes à la croisée des chemins. Cette étude comparative internationale montre qu'un avenir souriant se profile dans les villes qui donnent des chances

  16. Performing the Super Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallionpaa, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The genre of contemporary classical music has seen significant innovation and research related to new super, hyper, and hybrid instruments, which opens up a vast palette of expressive potential. An increasing number of composers, performers, instrument designers, engineers, and computer programmers...... provides the performer extensive virtuoso capabilities in terms of instrumental range, harmony, timbre, or spatial, textural, acoustic, technical, or technological qualities. The discussion will be illustrated by a composition case study involving augmented musical instrument electromagnetic resonator...

  17. Performing the Super Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallionpaa, Maria

    2016-01-01

    provides the performer extensive virtuoso capabilities in terms of instrumental range, harmony, timbre, or spatial, textural, acoustic, technical, or technological qualities. The discussion will be illustrated by a composition case study involving augmented musical instrument electromagnetic resonator......The genre of contemporary classical music has seen significant innovation and research related to new super, hyper, and hybrid instruments, which opens up a vast palette of expressive potential. An increasing number of composers, performers, instrument designers, engineers, and computer programmers...

  18. Characterising Super-Earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The era of Super-Earths has formally begun with the detection of transiting low-mass exoplanets CoRoT-7b and GJ 1214b. In the path of characterising super-Earths, the first step is to infer their composition. While the discovery data for CoRoT-7b, in combination with the high atmospheric mass loss rate inferred from the high insolation, suggested that it was a rocky planet, the new proposed mass values have widened the possibilities. The combined mass range 1−10 M⊕ allows for a volatile-rich (and requires it if the mass is less than 4 M⊕ , an Earth-like or a super-Mercury-like composition. In contrast, the radius of GJ 1214b is too large to admit a solid composition, thus it necessarily to have a substantial gas layer. Some evidence suggests that within this gas layer H/He is a small but non-negligible component. These two planets are the first of many transiting low-mass exoplanets expected to be detected and they exemplify the limitations faced when inferring composition, which come from the degenerate character of the problem and the large error bars in the data.

  19. Super Fuzzy Matrices and Super Fuzzy Models for Social Scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Kandasamy, W B Vasantha; Amal, K

    2008-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of fuzzy super matrices and operations on them. This book will be highly useful to social scientists who wish to work with multi-expert models. Super fuzzy models using Fuzzy Cognitive Maps, Fuzzy Relational Maps, Bidirectional Associative Memories and Fuzzy Associative Memories are defined here. The authors introduce 13 multi-expert models using the notion of fuzzy supermatrices. These models are described with illustrative examples. This book has three chapters. In the first chaper, the basic concepts about super matrices and fuzzy super matrices are recalled. Chapter two introduces the notion of fuzzy super matrices adn their properties. The final chapter introduces many super fuzzy multi expert models.

  20. Super-quantum curves from super-eigenvalue models

    CERN Document Server

    Ciosmak, Paweł; Manabe, Masahide; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    In modern mathematical and theoretical physics various generalizations, in particular supersymmetric or quantum, of Riemann surfaces and complex algebraic curves play a prominent role. We show that such supersymmetric and quantum generalizations can be combined together, and construct supersymmetric quantum curves, or super-quantum curves for short. Our analysis is conducted in the formalism of super-eigenvalue models: we introduce $\\beta$-deformed version of those models, and derive differential equations for associated $\\alpha/\\beta$-deformed super-matrix integrals. We show that for a given model there exists an infinite number of such differential equations, which we identify as super-quantum curves, and which are in one-to-one correspondence with, and have the structure of, super-Virasoro singular vectors. We discuss potential applications of super-quantum curves and prospects of other generalizations.

  1. Super-quantum curves from super-eigenvalue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciosmak, Paweł; Hadasz, Leszek; Manabe, Masahide; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    In modern mathematical and theoretical physics various generalizations, in particular supersymmetric or quantum, of Riemann surfaces and complex algebraic curves play a prominent role. We show that such supersymmetric and quantum generalizations can be combined together, and construct supersymmetric quantum curves, or super-quantum curves for short. Our analysis is conducted in the formalism of super-eigenvalue models: we introduce β-deformed version of those models, and derive differential equations for associated α/ β-deformed super-matrix integrals. We show that for a given model there exists an infinite number of such differential equations, which we identify as super-quantum curves, and which are in one-to-one correspondence with, and have the structure of, super-Virasoro singular vectors. We discuss potential applications of super-quantum curves and prospects of other generalizations.

  2. Super-quantum curves from super-eigenvalue models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciosmak, Paweł [Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics, University of Warsaw,ul. Banacha 2, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Hadasz, Leszek [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University,ul. Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Manabe, Masahide [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Sułkowski, Piotr [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-10-10

    In modern mathematical and theoretical physics various generalizations, in particular supersymmetric or quantum, of Riemann surfaces and complex algebraic curves play a prominent role. We show that such supersymmetric and quantum generalizations can be combined together, and construct supersymmetric quantum curves, or super-quantum curves for short. Our analysis is conducted in the formalism of super-eigenvalue models: we introduce β-deformed version of those models, and derive differential equations for associated α/β-deformed super-matrix integrals. We show that for a given model there exists an infinite number of such differential equations, which we identify as super-quantum curves, and which are in one-to-one correspondence with, and have the structure of, super-Virasoro singular vectors. We discuss potential applications of super-quantum curves and prospects of other generalizations.

  3. Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Russia: preventing the danger of volcanic eruptions to aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girina, O.; Neal, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    Anchorage VAAC, the Washington VAAC, the Montreal VAAC, and the Darwin VAAC to release timely eruption warnings. Urgent information is sent by email to government agencies, aviation services, and scientists (>300 users) located throughout the North Pacific region. KVERT staff also notify AMC and other emergency agencies in Kamchatka by telephone. VONA/KVERT Information Releases (VONA - Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation) are formal written notifications that are sent by email to these same users to announce Aviation Color Code changes and significant changes in activity. These statements are posted on the KVERT (http://www.kscnet.ru/ivs/kvert/) and the AVO (http://www.avo.alaska.edu) web site. During the period of 2009-2011, eruptions of 6 of Kamchatkan volcanoes were potentially dangerous for aviation: three significant events occurred at Bezymianny (2009, 2010 and 2011), one protracted eruption at Klyuchevskoy (from 2009 till 2010), three short events at Koryaksky (2009) and an ongoing explosive-effusive eruption at Kizimen (2010-2012). Eruptions of Karymsky and Sheveluch volcanoes have continued essentially uninterrupted throughout the period 2009-2011 and have also posed a hazard to aviation intermittently. Very strong explosive eruption of Sheveluch occurred on October 27-28, 2010.

  4. Diclofenac Induced Fixed Drug Eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Umeshchandra C Honnaddi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diclofenac is the most commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID for treating various inflammatory and painful conditions. It is generally well tolerated; gastric upset is the most common adverse effect. However very few cases of fixed drug eruptions were reported. Here we present a case of Diclofenac Induced Fixed Drug Eruption. A 62 year old male patient developed fixed drug eruptions with plaques on left thigh two days after receiving diclofenac for osteoarthritic pain. Other etiologies including insect bite, infections were ruled out. One week later after stopping the drug, the lesions were subsided. Diclofenac was strongly suspected as the casual drug. CD8+ effector T-cells have shown to play an important role. However it seems to be a reversible and drug related event. Although it is not life-threatening, fixed drug eruption can have significant effect on the quality of life of patients.Conclusion: Diclofenac is one of the most commonly prescribed NSAIDs by the Physicians. It is usually well tolerated, gastric upset is the most common adverse effect noted with this drug. This case is being reported to highlight a drug as safe as Diclofenac may also be associated with Fixed Drug Eruptions.

  5. Automated detection of solar eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurlburt N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Observation of the solar atmosphere reveals a wide range of motions, from small scale jets and spicules to global-scale coronal mass ejections (CMEs. Identifying and characterizing these motions are essential to advancing our understanding of the drivers of space weather. Both automated and visual identifications are currently used in identifying Coronal Mass Ejections. To date, eruptions near the solar surface, which may be precursors to CMEs, have been identified primarily by visual inspection. Here we report on Eruption Patrol (EP: a software module that is designed to automatically identify eruptions from data collected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA. We describe the method underlying the module and compare its results to previous identifications found in the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase. EP identifies eruptions events that are consistent with those found by human annotations, but in a significantly more consistent and quantitative manner. Eruptions are found to be distributed within 15 Mm of the solar surface. They possess peak speeds ranging from 4 to 100 km/s and display a power-law probability distribution over that range. These characteristics are consistent with previous observations of prominences.

  6. The Tala Tuff, La Primavera caldera Mexico. Pre-eruptive conditions and magma processes before eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Ceballos, G.

    2015-12-01

    La Primavera caldera, Jalisco Mexico, is a Pleistocenic volcanic structure formed by dome complexes and multiple pyroclastic flows and fall deposits. It is located at the intersection of the Chapala, Colima, and Tepic grabens in western Mexico. The first volcanic activity associated to La Primavera started ~0.1 Ma with the emission of pre-caldera lavas. The caldera collapse occurred 95 ka and is associated to the eruption of ~20 km3of pumice flows known as the Tala tuff (Mahood 1980). The border of the caldera was replaced by a series of domes dated in 75-30 ky, which partially filled the inner depression of the caldera with pyroclastic flows and falls. For more than a decade the Federal Commission of Electricity in Mexico (CFE) has prospected and evaluated the geothermal potential of the Cerritos Colorados project at La Primavera caldera. In order to better understand the plumbing system that tapped the Tala tuff and to investigate its relation with the potential geothermal field at La Primavera we performed a series of hydrothermal experiments and studied melt inclusions hosted in quartz phenocrysts by Fourier Infra red stectroscopy (FTIR). Although some post caldera products at La Primavera contain fayalite and quartz (suggesting QFM conditions) the Tala tuff does not contain fayalite and we ran experiments under NNO conditions. The absence of titanomagnetite does not allowed us to calculate pre-eruptive temperature. However, the stability of quartz and plagioclase, which are natural phases, suggest that temperature should be less than 750 °C at a pressure of 200 MPa. The analyses of H2O and CO2 dissolved in melt inclusions yielded concentrations of 2-5 wt.% and 50-100 ppm respectively. This data confirm that the pre-eruptive pressure of the Tala tuff is ~200 MPa and in addition to major elements compositions suggest that the Tala tuff is either, compositionally zoned or mixed with other magma just prior to eruption.

  7. The 1631 eruption of Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandi, G.; Barrella, A. M.; Borrelli, A.

    1993-11-01

    Contemporary accounts of the violent eruption of Vesuvius in 1631 are reviewed, and recorded events are correlated with resulting volcanic deposits. Field study of the deposits in the proximal area revealed the presence of tephra falls, pyroclastic flows and lava, with subordinate surge deposits. A total volume of 1.1 km 3 (0.55 km 3 DRE) of phono-tephritic to phonolitic magma was ejected during 24 hours. The different magma compositions correspond with a transition from a lower, white, aphyric, highly vesiculated pumice (layer 1) to an upper, gray, crystal-rich, poorly vesiculated pumice (layer 3), showing reverse grading. Isopach and isopleth maps of the tephra-falls have been constructed to determine changes in the eruptive style and temporal evolution of the eruption column which reached a maximum height of 16 to 28 km. The recorded column height variations show a change in the mass discharge rate (8.9 × 10 6 kg/s to 8.2 × 10 7 kg/s) and the occurrence of pyroclastic flows during the deposition of the weakly vesiculated, dense pumice of the upper part of layer 3. Pyroclastic flows are crystal-rich and show St. Vincent-type features. The explosive phase demolished the upper part of the pre-existing cone, and debris flows invaded the southern side of the volcano. In the afternoon of December 17, 1631 an outbreak of lava flow from a southern lateral fracture system occurred, and effusion of lava continued up to midnight of December 18. Intermittent steam blasts continued to the end of December, when the eruption ended and Mount Vesuvius entered a solfataric phase. The earthquakes that had marked both the pre-eruptive and eruptive phases, continued, however, well into March 1632.

  8. Erupted odontoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Nilesh; Mehta, Dhaval; Vachhrajani, Kanan; Nimavat, Abhishek

    2014-07-01

    Odontomas are nonaggressive, hamartomatous developmental malformations or lesions of odontogenic origin, which consist of enamel, dentin, cementum and pulpal tissue 'Erupted odontoma' is a term used to specifically denote odontomas, which are exposed into the oral cavity. These are rare entities with only 25-30 cases being reported so far in the dental literature. Here, we present a rare case of an erupted odontoma in an adolescent patient who came with a complaint of bad aesthetics due to the presence of multiple small teeth like structures in the upper front teeth region.

  9. Did the Nabro volcanic eruption directly overshoot the tropopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Steiner, Andrea K.; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Brenot, Hugues; Rieckh, Therese

    2015-04-01

    During the night of 12 to 13 June 2011 an explosive eruption occurred at the Nabro volcano located in Eritrea (13.4°N, 41.7°E). This has been recognized as the largest volcanic eruption since Pinatubo 1991, ejecting ash and sulfur dioxide (SO2) into the atmosphere, spreading over more than 60 degrees in latitude and more than 100 degrees in longitude within a few days and lasting for more than 15 days. While there is agreement on the fact that the eruptive mass reached the stratosphere, the processes bringing the cloud to the lower stratosphere are still much debated. For solving this issue we used about 300 atmospheric profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) observations and analyzed the pre-eruption conditions and the impact of the eruption itself on the tropospheric and stratospheric thermal structure. The GPS RO technique enables measurements of the atmospheric parameters in nearly any meteorological condition, with global coverage, high vertical resolution and high accuracy, making RO data well suited to study the thermodynamic structure of volcanic clouds and their impact on climate. In the Nabro area there are no ground based measurements that can be used for such kind of studies and, in the period of the eruption, there are no acquisitions by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. By analyzing the RO bending angle anomaly in the volcanic cloud area, we evaluated the cloud top altitude and compared it to the tropopause altitude (also derived from RO) in the same area. Moreover, we analyzed the RO temperature profiles before and after the eruption. Our results show that the volcanic cloud directly overshoot the tropopause and that the injected SO2 warmed the lower stratosphere in an area of about 10x10 degrees in latitude and longitude for 6 months, which is consistent with the effect found on a larger scale for the Pinatubo eruption in 1991. This study shows the capabilities

  10. Io - One of at Least Four Simultaneous Erupting Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of an active volcanic eruption on Jupiter's satellite Io was taken 1 hour, 52 minutes after the accompanying picture, late in the evening of March 4, 1979, Pacific time. On the limb of the satellite can be seen one of at least four simultaneous volcanic eruptions -- the first such activity ever observed on another celestial body. Seen against the limb are plume-like structures rising more than 60 miles (100 kilometers) above the surface. Several eruptions have been identified with volcanic structures on the surface of Io, which have also been identified by Voyager 1's infrared instrument as being abnormally hot -- several hundred degrees warmer than surrounding terrain. The fact that several eruptions appear to be occurring at the same time suggests that Io has the most active surface in the solar system and that volcanism is going on there essentially continuously. Another characteristic of the observed volcanism is that it appears to be extremely explosive, with velocities more than 2,000 miles an hour (at least 1 kilometer per second). That is more violent than terrestrial volcanoes like Etna, Vesuvius or Krakatoa.

  11. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embley, Robert W; Chadwick, William W; Baker, Edward T; Butterfield, David A; Resing, Joseph A; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lupton, John E; Juniper, S Kim; Rubin, Kenneth H; Stern, Robert J; Lebon, Geoffrey T; Nakamura, Ko-ichi; Merle, Susan G; Hein, James R; Wiens, Douglas A; Tamura, Yoshihiko

    2006-05-25

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes.

  12. Eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Pedersen, Rikke; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Thorbjarnardóttir, Bergthóra; Jakobsdóttir, Steinunn; Roberts, Matthew J.

    2010-05-01

    The April 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano (Figure 1), located on Iceland's southern coast, created unprecedented disruptions to European air traffic during 15-20 April, costing the aviation industry an estimated $250 million per day (see the related news item in this issue). This cost brings into focus how volcanoes can affect communities thousands of miles away. Eyjafjallajökull rises to 1666 meters above sea level and hosts agricultural land on its southern slopes, with farms located as close as 7 kilometers from the summit caldera. In the past 1500 years, Eyjafjallajökull has produced four comparatively small eruptions. The eruption previous to 2010 began in December 1821 and lasted for over a year, with intermittent explosive activity spreading a thin layer of tephra (ash and larger ejected clasts) over the surrounding region. In contrast, the explosive 2010 eruption, sourced within the ice-capped summit of the volcano, so far is larger and characterized by magma of a slightly different composition. This may suggest that deep within the volcano, the 1821 magma source is mixing with new melt, or that residual melt from past intrusive events is being pushed out by new magma.

  13. Location Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    With rapid development of sensor and wireless mobile devices, it is easy to access mobile users' location information anytime and anywhere. On one hand, LBS is becoming more and more valuable and important. On the other hand, location privacy issues raised by such applications have also gained more attention. However, due to the specificity of location information, traditional privacy-preserving techniques in data publishing cannot be used. In this chapter, we will introduce location privacy, and analyze the challenges of location privacy-preserving, and give a survey of existing work including the system architecture, location anonymity and query processing.

  14. Volcano-tectonic earthquakes: A new tool for estimating intrusive volumes and forecasting eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Randall A.; McCausland, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    We present data on 136 high-frequency earthquakes and swarms, termed volcano-tectonic (VT) seismicity, which preceded 111 eruptions at 83 volcanoes, plus data on VT swarms that preceded intrusions at 21 other volcanoes. We find that VT seismicity is usually the earliest reported seismic precursor for eruptions at volcanoes that have been dormant for decades or more, and precedes eruptions of all magma types from basaltic to rhyolitic and all explosivities from VEI 0 to ultraplinian VEI 6 at such previously long-dormant volcanoes. Because large eruptions occur most commonly during resumption of activity at long-dormant volcanoes, VT seismicity is an important precursor for the Earth's most dangerous eruptions. VT seismicity precedes all explosive eruptions of VEI ≥ 5 and most if not all VEI 4 eruptions in our data set. Surprisingly we find that the VT seismicity originates at distal locations on tectonic fault structures at distances of one or two to tens of kilometers laterally from the site of the eventual eruption, and rarely if ever starts beneath the eruption site itself. The distal VT swarms generally occur at depths almost equal to the horizontal distance of the swarm from the summit out to about 15 km distance, beyond which hypocenter depths level out. We summarize several important characteristics of this distal VT seismicity including: swarm-like nature, onset days to years prior to the beginning of magmatic eruptions, peaking of activity at the time of the initial eruption whether phreatic or magmatic, and large non-double couple component to focal mechanisms. Most importantly we show that the intruded magma volume can be simply estimated from the cumulative seismic moment of the VT seismicity from:

  15. About the Mechanism of Volcanic Eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to the volcanic eruption theory is proposed. It is based on a simple physical mechanism of the imbalance in the system "magma-crust-fluid". This mechanism helps to explain from unified positions the different types of volcanic eruptions. A criterion of imbalance and magma eruption is derived. Stratovolcano and caldera formation is analyzed. High explosive eruptions of the silicic magma is discussed

  16. Eruption cysts: A series of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Dhawan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eruption cysts are benign cysts that appear on the mucosa of a tooth shortly before its eruption. They may disappear by themselves but if they hurt, bleed or are infected they may require surgical treatment to expose the tooth and drain the contents. Here we present 2 case reports of eruption cysts presenting with different chief complaint. The treatment included incising the eruption cyst and draining the contents of the cyst.

  17. Super insulating aerogel glazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    2004-01-01

    Monolithic silica aerogel offers the possibility of combining super insulation and high solar energy transmittance, which has been the background for a previous and a current EU project on research and development of monolithic silica aerogel as transparent insulation in windows. Generally, windows...... form the weakest part of the thermal envelope with respect to heat loss coefficient, but on the other hand also play an important role for passive solar energy utilisation. For window orientations other than south, the net energy balance will be close to or below zero. However, the properties...

  18. Super insulating aerogel glazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application results of a previous and current EU-project on super insulating glazing based on monolithic silica aerogel. Prototypes measuring approx. 55´55 cm2 have been made with 15 mm evacuated aerogel between two layers of low-iron glass. Anti-reflective treatment...... of the glass and a heat-treatment of the aerogel increases the visible quality and the solar energy transmittance. A low-conductive rim seal solution with the required vacuum barrier properties has been developed along with a reliable assembly and evacuation process. The prototypes have a centre heat loss...

  19. Super-heptazethrene

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Wangdong

    2016-05-30

    The challenging synthesis of a laterally extended heptazethrene molecule, the super-heptazethrene derivative SHZ-CF3, is reported. This molecule was prepared using a strategy involving a multiple selective intramolecular Friedel–Crafts alkylation followed by oxidative dehydrogenation. Compound SHZ-CF3 exhibits an open-shell singlet diradical ground state with a much larger diradical character compared with the heptazethrene derivatives. An intermediate dibenzo-terrylene SHZ-2H was also obtained during the synthesis. This study provides a new synthetic method to access large-size quinoidal polycyclic hydrocarbons with unique physical properties.

  20. Respirable dust meter locates super polluters in traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Netherlands is having trouble with the EU standards for respirable dust (PM 10). The Dutch Council of State recently blocked a number of residential development projects because local conditions failed to meet the PM 10 standard. Research by the Nano Structured Materials group at TU Delft shows

  1. Tracking the seismicity preceding and during the March 2010 Fimmvörduháls fissure eruption and April 2010 summit eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasewicz, J.; Brandsdottir, B.; Hensch, M.; White, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    Using Coalescence Microseismic Mapping (CMM) we have located over 9,000 earthquakes in the period starting two weeks prior to the Fimmvörduháls fissure eruption at the northeastern margin of the Eyjafjallajökull stratovolcano, South Iceland. CMM is an automatic earthquake detection and location program developed at Cambridge University which performs a search in time and space for a best-fit earthquake location. This is done by migrating both P and S wave energy from each seismometer location back into the subsurface and finding an optimum event location where the back-projected energy coalesces within a specified search volume by fitting it to a grid for which P- and S-wave travel times have been calculated from each point in the grid to every seismometer. Following a prolonged period of escalating seismicity we deployed six temporary, three-component, broadband seismometers around the Eyjafjallajökull volcano on 5th March 2010. Data from these seismometers were augmented by data from the eight closest seismometers of the permanent network operated by the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO). During March 2010, sustained seismic activity was concentrated primarily between 3-6 km depth under the northeastern flank of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano. To first order, the seismicity migrated eastwards away from the Eyjafjallajökull caldera and towards the first eruption site at Fimmvörduháls during the two weeks prior to eruption. We attribute this to melt movement within the crust. However, clusters in three (or more) discrete locations on the northeastern flank are observed to have been active simultaneously, or with activity alternating between locations, suggesting that magma movement was more complex than a single dyke propagating towards the Fimmvörduháls eruption site. Seismic activity decreased markedly in the two days prior to the onset of the fissure eruption on March 20th. The fissure eruption continued until 12th April and was a pre-cursor to the

  2. An Unusual Case Report of Erupted Odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are the most common of the odontogenic tumors of the jaws, which are benign, slow growing, and nonaggressive. They are usually asymptomatic and found in routine dental radiographic examination. Odontomas are usually associated with tooth eruption disturbances. Eruption of odontoma in oral cavity is rare entity. Here we report a case of an unusual erupted compound odontoma.

  3. Arcade Implosion Caused by a Filament Eruption in a Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juntao; Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.; Thalmann, J. K.; Hudson, H. S.; Hannah, I. G.

    2016-12-01

    Coronal implosions—the convergence motion of plasmas and entrained magnetic field in the corona due to a reduction in magnetic pressure—can help to locate and track sites of magnetic energy release or redistribution during solar flares and eruptions. We report here on the analysis of a well-observed implosion in the form of an arcade contraction associated with a filament eruption, during the C3.5 flare SOL2013-06-19T07:29. A sequence of events including the magnetic flux-rope instability and distortion, followed by a filament eruption and arcade implosion, lead us to conclude that the implosion arises from the transfer of magnetic energy from beneath the arcade as part of the global magnetic instability, rather than due to local magnetic energy dissipation in the flare. The observed net contraction of the imploding loops, which is found also in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations, reflects a permanent reduction of magnetic energy underneath the arcade. This event shows that, in addition to resulting in the expansion or eruption of an overlying field, flux-rope instability can also simultaneously implode an unopened field due to magnetic energy transfer. It demonstrates the “partial opening of the field” scenario, which is one of the ways in 3D to produce a magnetic eruption without violating the Aly-Sturrock hypothesis. In the framework of this observation, we also propose a unification of three main concepts for active region magnetic evolution, namely the metastable eruption model, the implosion conjecture, and the standard “CSHKP” flare model.

  4. Geophysical Implications of Macro Variations in Enceladan Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurford, Terry; Hedman, Matthew M.; Spitale, Joseph N.; Rhoden, Alyssa R.

    2014-05-01

    Models of the evolution of Saturn's E ring have shown that Enceladus is the likely source of its particles [1]. Particles within this ring are quickly destroyed and must be constantly replenished [2,3]. Until recently the Enceladan source for these particles had been debated, but Cassini observations have tied their source to eruptions from a large fracture system in the south polar region. Cassini observations of the south pole of Enceladus revealed large rifts in the crust, informally called “tiger stripes”, which exhibit higher temperatures than the surrounding terrain and are likely sources of the observed plumes [4,5]. Diurnal tides due to Enceladus' orbital eccentricity were predicted to control the timing of eruptions as tidal stress varied across active faults on an orbital timescale [6]. These tidal stresses are periodic, driving motion along the rifts throughout Enceladus' orbit, influencing the timing and location of eruption as well as the formation and evolution of the E ring. Moreover, recent work has shown that Cassini has detected changes in the plume on orbital timescales [7], confirming the prediction of tidal control. Macro variations in eruptive plumes can be used to probe the conditions under which the eruptions occur [8]. We explore further the links between tidal control of eruptions and their geophysical implications.[1] M. Horanyi, et al., Icarus 97, 248 (1992). [2] P. K. Haff, et al., Icarus 56, 426 (1983). [3] S. Jurac, et al., Icarus 149, 384 (2001). [4] J. R. Spencer, et al., Science 311, 1401 (2006).[5] C. C. Porco, et al., Science 311, 1393 (2006).[6] T.A. Hurford, et al., Nature 447, 292 (2007).[7] M. Hedman, et al., Nature 500, 182 (2013).[8] T.A. Hurford, et al., Icarus 203, 541 (2009).

  5. Eruptive history of Sundoro volcano, Central Java, Indonesia since 34 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prambada, Oktory; Arakawa, Yoji; Ikehata, Kei; Furukawa, Ryuta; Takada, Akira; Wibowo, Haryo Edi; Nakagawa, Mitsuhiro; Kartadinata, M. Nugraha

    2016-11-01

    Reconstruction of the eruptive history of Sundoro volcano is needed to forecast the probability of future eruptions and eruptive volumes. Sundoro volcano is located in Central Java (Indonesia), 65 km northwest of Yogyakarta, and in one of the most densely populated areas of Indonesia. On the basis of stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating, petrography, and whole-rock geochemistry, we recognize the following 12 eruptive groups: (1) Ngadirejo, (2) Bansari, (3) Arum, (4) Kembang, (5) Kekep, (6) Garung, (7) Kertek, (8) Watu, (9) Liyangan, (10) Kledung, (11) Summit, and (12) Sibajak. The Ngadirejo (34 ka BP) to Kledung (1 ka) eruptive groups are inferred to have been the stratovolcano building phase. Based on compositions of deposits, one or more magma reservoirs of intermediate chemical composition are inferred to have existed below the volcano during the periods of time represented by the eruptive groups. SiO2 of juvenile eruptive products ranges from 50 to 63 wt%, and K2O contents range from high K to medium K. The chemical composition and phenocryst content of eruptive products change with time. The lower SiO2 products contain mainly plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine, whereas the more evolved rocks contain plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and rare hornblende and olivine. Our work has defined Sundoro's eruptive history for the period 1-34 ka, and this history helps us to forecast future activity. We estimated that the total amount of magma discharged since 34 ka is approximately 4.4 km3. The average eruption rate over this group ranges from 0.14 to 0.17 km3/kyr. The eruption rate and the frequency of individual eruptions indicate that the volcano has been very active since 34 ka, and this activity in combination with our petrological data suggest the presence of one or more magma reservoirs that have been repeatedly filled and then discharged as eruptions have taken place. Our data further suggest that the volume of the crustal reservoir system has

  6. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Thermal-IR Observations of Jupiter and Io with ISAAC at the VLT Summary Impressive thermal-infrared images have been obtained of the giant planet Jupiter during tests of a new detector in the ISAAC instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). . They show in particular the full extent of the northern auroral ring and part of the southern aurora. A volcanic eruption was also imaged on Io , the very active inner Jovian moon. Although these observations are of an experimental nature, they demonstrate a great potential for regular monitoring of the Jovian magnetosphere by ground-based telescopes together with space-based facilities. They also provide the added benefit of direct comparison with the terrestrial magnetosphere. PR Photo 21a/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (L-band: 3.5-4.0 µm) . PR Photo 21b/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 4.07 µm) . PR Photo 21c/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.28 µm) . PR Photo 21d/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.21 µm) . PR Photo 21e/01 : ISAAC image of the Jovian aurorae (false-colour). PR Photo 21f/01 : ISAAC image of volcanic activity on Io . Addendum : The Jovian aurorae and polar haze. Aladdin Meets Jupiter Thermal-infrared images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io have been obtained during a series of system tests with the new Aladdin detector in the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) , in combination with an upgrade of the ESO-developed detector control electronics IRACE. This state-of-the-art instrument is attached to the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The observations were made on November 14, 2000, through various filters that isolate selected wavebands in the thermal-infrared spectral region [1]. They include a broad-band L-filter (wavelength interval 3.5 - 4.0 µm) as well as several narrow-band filters (3.21, 3.28 and 4.07 µm). The filters allow to record the light from different components of the Jovian atmosphere

  7. A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash-cloud transport and dispersion during eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, L.G.; Guffanti, M.; Servranckx, R.; Webley, P.; Barsotti, S.; Dean, K.; Durant, A.; Ewert, J.W.; Neri, A.; Rose, William I.; Schneider, D.; Siebert, L.; Stunder, B.; Swanson, G.; Tupper, A.; Volentik, A.; Waythomas, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    During volcanic eruptions, volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs) are used to forecast the location and movement of ash clouds over hours to days in order to define hazards to aircraft and to communities downwind. Those models use input parameters, called "eruption source parameters", such as plume height H, mass eruption rate ???, duration D, and the mass fraction m63 of erupted debris finer than about 4??{symbol} or 63????m, which can remain in the cloud for many hours or days. Observational constraints on the value of such parameters are frequently unavailable in the first minutes or hours after an eruption is detected. Moreover, observed plume height may change during an eruption, requiring rapid assignment of new parameters. This paper reports on a group effort to improve the accuracy of source parameters used by VATDs in the early hours of an eruption. We do so by first compiling a list of eruptions for which these parameters are well constrained, and then using these data to review and update previously studied parameter relationships. We find that the existing scatter in plots of H versus ??? yields an uncertainty within the 50% confidence interval of plus or minus a factor of four in eruption rate for a given plume height. This scatter is not clearly attributable to biases in measurement techniques or to well-recognized processes such as elutriation from pyroclastic flows. Sparse data on total grain-size distribution suggest that the mass fraction of fine debris m63 could vary by nearly two orders of magnitude between small basaltic eruptions (??? 0.01) and large silicic ones (> 0.5). We classify eleven eruption types; four types each for different sizes of silicic and mafic eruptions; submarine eruptions; "brief" or Vulcanian eruptions; and eruptions that generate co-ignimbrite or co-pyroclastic flow plumes. For each eruption type we assign source parameters. We then assign a characteristic eruption type to each of the world's ??? 1500

  8. Talon cusp on palatally erupted mesiodens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashalata Gannepalli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Talon cusp is an accessory cusp-like structure or an extra cusp on an anterior tooth arising as a result of evagination on the surface of the crown before calcification has occurred. The cusp is composed of normal enamel and dentin containing varying extensions of pulp tissue. It is associated with few developmental anomalies such as peg laterals, dens invaginatus, and mesiodens. Mesiodens is a supernumerary tooth located in the premaxillary central incisor region which is supplemental or rudimentary type. Association of mesiodens with talon cusp is a rare occurrence with 25 cases reported. The presence of Talon cusp or a supernumerary tooth – mesiodens – leads to clinical implications such as poor esthetics, crowding, rotations, and also occlusal discrepancies. In this report, we present a case report of an 18-year-old male having a talon cusp on palatally erupted mesiodens.

  9. Application of computer-assisted mapping to volcanic hazard evaluation of surge eruptions: Vulcano, lipari, and vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Michael F.; Malin, Michael C.

    1983-09-01

    A previously developed computer-assisted model has been applied to several pyroclastic-surge eruptions at three active volcanoes in Italy. Model hazard maps created for various vent locations, eruption types, and mass production rates reasonably reproduced pyroclastic-surge deposits from several recent eruptions on Vulcano, Lipari, and Vesuvius. Small-scale phreatic eruptions on the island of Vulcano (e.g. the 1727 explosion of Forgia Vecchia) pose a limited but serious threat to the village of Porto. The most dangerous zone affected by this type of eruption follows a NNW fissure system between Fossa and Vulcanello. Moderate-sized eruptions on Vulcano, such as those associated with the present Fossa Crater are a much more serious threat to Porto as well as the entire area within the caldera surrounding the cone. The less frequent surge eruptions on Lipari have been even more violent. The extreme mobility of surges like those produced from Monte Guardia (approx. 20,000 y.b.p.) and Monte Pilato would not only threaten the entire island of Lipari, but also the northern part of neighboring Vulcano. Eruptions at Vesuvius with energy and efficiency similar to that of the May 18, 1980 blast of Mount St. Helens would be still more destructive because of the great initial elevation of the summit vent. In addition, surge eruptions at Vesuvius are generally part of more complex eruption cycles that involve several other types of volcanic phenomena including Plinian fall and pyroclastic flows.

  10. Quantitative super-resolution microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkes, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Super-Resolution Microscopy is an optical fluorescence technique. In this thesis we focus on single molecule super-resolution, where the position of single molecules is determined. Typically these molecules can be localized with a 10 to 30nm precision. This technique is applied in four different s

  11. Ground Deformation during Papandayan Volcano 2002 Eruption as Detected by GPS Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanuddin Z. Abidin

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Papandayan is an A-type active volcano located in the southern part of Garut Regency, about 70 km southeast of Bandung, Indonesia. Its earliest recorded eruption, and most violent and devastating outburst occurred in 1772 and the latest eruptions occurred in the period of 11 November to 8 December 2002, and consisted of freatic, freatomagmatic and magmatic types of eruption.During the latest eruption period, GPS surveys were conducted at several points inside and around the crater in a radial mode using the reference point located at Papandayan observatory around 10 km from the crater. At the points closest to the erupting craters, GPS displacements up to a few dm were detected, whereas at the points outside the crater, the displacements were in the cm level. The magnitude of displacements observed at each point also show a temporal variation according to the eruption characteristics. The results show that deformation during eruption tends to be local, e.g. just around the crater. Pressure source is difficult to be properly modeled from GPS results, due to limited GPS data available and differences in topography, geological structure and/or rheology related to each GPS station.

  12. a Reconstruction of the 1793 Eruption of San Martin Tuxtla Volcano, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, L.

    2013-05-01

    San Martin Volcano is located in the State of Veracruz, Eastern Mexico (18.572N, 95.169W, 1650 masl). The last eruption of this volcano occurred in 1793. The activity, which was documented lasted for several months and produced thick ashfall deposits in its vicinity. The blasts were heard in the coast of Tampico some 500km NW from the volcano. There are also reports of noticeable ashfall at distances as far as 200 Km from the crater. No casualties from the eruption were reported but the economic and other human activities were greatly perturbed. The center of emission eruption was a cinder cone located within the 500 wide crater in the summit of the volcano. We present isopach maps of the airfall deposits from this eruption. The 5cm isopach covers an area roughly 200 Km2 with downwind axis towards the W-SW. Based on this information we reconstructed some of the characteristics of the eruption by fitting the theoretical isopachs obtained from the well known model of ash deposition by Suzuki to the observed isopachs. The estimated height of the eruptive column is of the order of 10 km for a mass erupted of 0.5 cubic km. We used wind data from the nearby meteorological station of the city of Veracruz.

  13. Primary tooth radicular resorption as a consequence of self-corrected ectopic eruption: 2 unusual cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzeler, Irem; Sara, Sezgi; Cehreli, Zafer C; Uysal, Serdar; Musselman, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Resorption of the distal root of primary second molars is a common consequence of ectopically erupting permanent first molars. Here, we report 2 unusual cases of primary molar root resorption caused by reversible (self-correcting) ectopic eruption of premolar and canine teeth. In both cases, severe pathological resorption of the mesial roots of primary molars was detected on routine dental radiographs, and the affected molars remained asymptomatic until exfoliation. The purpose of this paper was, using 2 case studies, to highlight the possibility of primary root resorption as a sequel of self-corrected ectopic eruption in locations not frequently diagnosed or reported.

  14. Kilauea's Ongoing Eruption: 25th Year Brings Major Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, T. R.

    2007-12-01

    2007 marks the 25th year of nearly continuous eruption on Kilauea's east rift zone. Episodic high lava fountains, which built the Pu`u `O`o cone during the first three years of the eruption, ended in 1986. Activity then migrated downrift and the Kupaianaha shield was formed by passive effusion of lava. The change in eruptive style resulted in a switch at Pu`u `O`o from cone construction to cone collapse that has been ongoing for the last two decades. Activity at Kupaianaha ceased in 1992, and the eruption resumed at Pu`u `O`o. The eruptive style established at Kupaianaha continued, however, with continuous effusion from vents on the southwest flank of the Pu`u `O`o cone. The last 15 years have been characterized by the formation of relatively stable tube systems---broken only by a brief fissure eruption uprift of Pu`u `O`o in 1997---that have carried lava from the flank vents to the ocean about 9 km away. The Prince Kuhio Kalanianaole (PKK) tube, the most recent of these tube systems to develop, was active from March 2004 to June 2007. The PKK flow was emplaced almost entirely on older flows of this eruption and entered the ocean in several locations over a span of 6 km. The "Father's Day" intrusion of June 17--19, 2007, robbed the supply of magma to Pu`u `O`o and, thus, the active flow field. The floor of the Pu`u `O`o crater dropped 80--100 m, the PKK tube system drained, and the active flows and ocean entry quickly stagnated. On June 19, a short-lived fissure eruption broke out low on the east flank of Kane Nui o Hamo, about 6 km uprift of Pu`u `O`o, burying only 0.22 hectares. The eruption at Kilauea paused from June 20 through July 1 or 2, when lava returned to Pu`u `O`o and began refilling the collapsed crater. Near midnight on July 20--21, after at least 19 days of lava lake growth, the lava pond within the Pu`u `O`o crater drained suddenly when a series of fissures opened on the east flank of the cone and propagated ~2 km downrift. The new activity, dubbed

  15. The Longevity of Lava Dome Eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Wolpert, Robert L; Calder, Eliza S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the duration of past, on-going and future volcanic eruptions is an important scientific goal and a key societal need. We present a new methodology for forecasting the duration of on-going and future lava dome eruptions based on a database (DomeHaz) recently compiled by the authors. The database includes duration and composition for 177 such eruptions, with "eruption" defined as the period encompassing individual episodes of dome growth along with associated quiescent periods during which extrusion pauses but unrest continues. In a key finding we show that probability distributions for dome eruption durations are both heavy-tailed and composition-dependent. We construct Objective Bayes statistical models featuring heavy-tailed Generalized Pareto distributions with composition-specific parameters to make forecasts about the durations of new and on-going eruptions that depend on both eruption duration-to-date and composition. Our Bayesian predictive distributions reflect both uncertainty about mode...

  16. Library Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh locations including address, coordinates, phone number, square footage, and standard operating hours.

  17. the sub-Plinian Greenish Pumice eruption (19,065±105 yr cal BP) of Mount Somma - Vesuvius. Geochemical and textural constrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, Géraldine; Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Cioni, Raffaello; Mundula, Filippo; Orsi, Giovanni; Civetta, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Researches are currently focused on large intensity and stable eruptive columns as for Plinian event. But the large variability in deposits issued from sub-Plinian eruptions needs more observations, theoretical and experimental investigations to be better described and enhances criteria of classification and the knowledge on processes at the origin of this unsteadiness of various timescales. Here, we focus on the well-known example of sub-Plinian eruption exhibiting by Mount Somma-Vesuvius: the Greenish Pumice eruption (GP). On the basis of coupled geochemical and textural analyses we investigate the volatile behavior (H2O, CO2 and halogen (F, Cl)) to better constrain (1) the magma reservoir location and pre-eruptive state and (2) the sub-Plinian eruptive style through a detailed study of the degassing processes in relation with the dynamic of the eruptive column. Results evidence that Cl act as a geobarometer for the trachytic-phonolitic melt involved during the eruption indicating that magma reservoir was at 100 MPa (Cl buffer value: 5300 ±130 ppm) and wholly H2O-saturated (pre-eruptive H2O content between 3.8 and 5.2 wt%). The eruption dynamic is clearly explained by open-system degassing processes responsible of the eruptive column instability, correlated to textural heterogeneities of the eruptive products reflecting conduit heterogeneity (smaller diameter and higher horizontal gradient in magma ascent velocity).

  18. The lateral extent of volcanic interactions during unrest and eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Juliet; Robertson, Elspeth; Cashman, Katharine

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions often occur simultaneously or tap multiple magma reservoirs. Such lateral interactions between magmatic systems are attributed to stress changes or hydraulic connections but the precise conditions under which coupled eruptions occur have yet to be quantified. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar satellite data to analyse the surface deformation generated by volcanic unrest in the Kenyan Rift. We identify several magma sources located at depths of 2-5 km importantly, sources that are spaced less than about 10 km apart interact, whereas those spaced more than about 25 km apart do not. However, volcanoes up to 25 km apart have interacted in the geologic past. Thus, volcanic coupling is not simply controlled by the distance between the magma reservoirs. We then consider different tectonic settings globally, including intraplate volcanoes such as Hawaii and Yellowstone, arc volcanism in Alaska and Chile, and other rift settings, such as New Zealand, Iceland and Afar. We find that the most closely spaced magmatic interactions are controlled by the extent of a shallow crystal mush layer, stress changes can couple large eruptions over distances of about 20-40 km, and only large dyke intrusions or subduction earthquakes could generate coupled eruptions over distances of about 50-100 km.

  19. Super insulating aerogel glazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    2004-01-01

    Monolithic silica aerogel offers the possibility of combining super insulation and high solar energy transmittance, which has been the background for a previous and a current EU project on research and development of monolithic silica aerogel as transparent insulation in windows. Generally, windows...... form the weakest part of the thermal envelope with respect to heat loss coefficient, but on the other hand also play an important role for passive solar energy utilisation. For window orientations other than south, the net energy balance will be close to or below zero. However, the properties...... of aerogel glazing will allow for a positive net energy gain even for north facing vertical windows in a Danish climate during the heating season. This means that high quality daylight can be obtained even with additional energy gain. On behalf of the partners of the two EU projects, results related...

  20. Characterizing the first historic eruption of Nabro, Eritrea: Insights from thermal and UV remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealing, Christine R.

    June 2011 saw the first historic eruption of Nabro volcano, one of an ongoing sequence of eruptions in the Afar-Red Sea region since 2005. It halted air travel in northern Africa, contaminated food and water sources, and displaced thousands from their homes. Due to its remote location, little was known about this event in terms of the quantity of erupted products and the timing and mechanisms of their emplacement. Geographic isolation, previous quiescence and regional civil unrest meant that this volcano was effectively unmonitored at the time of eruption, and opportunities for field study are limited. Using free, publicly available satellite data, I examined rates of lava effusion and SO2 emission in order to quantify the amount of erupted products and understand the temporal evolution of the eruption, as well as explore what information can be gleaned about eruption mechanisms using remote sensing data. These data revealed a bimodal eruption, beginning with explosive activity marked by high SO2 emission totalling 1824 - 2299 KT, and extensive ash fall of 270 - 440 km2. This gave way to a period of rapid effusion, producing a ˜17 km long lava flow, and a volume of ˜22.1 x 106 m3. Mass balance between the SO2 and lava flows reveals no sulfur 'excess', suggesting that nearly all of the degassed magma was extruded. The 2011 eruption of Nabro lasted nearly 6 weeks, and may be considered the second largest historic eruption in Africa. Work such as this highlights the importance of satellite remote sensing for studying and monitoring volcanoes, particularly those in remote regions that may be otherwise inaccessible.

  1. Cl constrains on shallow plumbing system and pre-eruptive conditions of the Phlegrean Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, Géraldine; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Boudon, Georges; Civetta, Lucia; Orsi, Giovanni; D'Antonio, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    The bay of Naples is known to concentrate several dangerous volcanoes that erupted a lot of times in prehistorical and historical periods: Vesuvius, Phlegrean Fields and Ischia Island. Phlegrean Fields produced voluminous high-magnitude eruptions including: the Campanian Ignimbrite (39 ka BP), one of the two largest explosive eruptions of the Mediterranean region during the last 200,000 years, with 300 km3 of magma emitted, and the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff (15 ka BP), the second major eruption (40 km3 of magma emitted). The Ischia Island is located in the Bay of Naples and its eruptive history has been recently detailed. We present a geochemical investigation of volatile components on the fallout products of the major explosive eruptions of Phlegrean Fields: the Campanian Ignimbrite (39 ka BP), the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff (15 ka BP), the Pomici Principali (10 ka BP; 0.38 km3 DRE magma), the Agnano Monte-Spina (4.1 ka BP; 0.60 km3 DRE magma); the Astroni 6 (3.8 ka BP; 0.70 km3 DRE magma); the Monte Nuovo (1,538 AD), which is the most recent eruption of the Phlegrean Fields (0.04 km3 DRE magma), and for comparison the Cretaio eruption of the Ischia Island (1,800 a BP; 0.02 km3 DRE magma). Volatiles of magmas (H2O, CO2, SO2, Cl, F) are informative not only because they play a key role in the eruptive dynamic but also because they, and especially chlorine, may allow estimating the pressure of localization of the magma storage and pre-eruptive water content (prior the eruption). In the alkaline magmas involved during the Phlegrean Fields eruptions, H2O is the main volatile species but Cl behaviour is particularly interesting to study. Experimentally, it has been demonstrated that in a pressure, temperature and composition domain a water-saturated magma may be in equilibrium with a fluid phase consisting of a water-rich vapor and a chlorine-rich brine. In that case, the Cl content in magma is buffered. This effect allows determining the pressure of localization of

  2. Volcanic eruptions and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The historical record of large volcanic eruptions from 1500 to 1980 is subjected to detailed time series analysis. In two weak but probably statistically significant periodicities of about 11 and 80 yr, the frequency of volcanic eruptions increases (decreases) slightly around the times of solar minimum (maximum). Time series analysis of the volcanogenic acidities in a deep ice core from Greenland reveals several very long periods ranging from about 80 to about 350 yr which are similar to the very slow solar cycles previously detected in auroral and C-14 records. Solar flares may cause changes in atmospheric circulation patterns that abruptly alter the earth's spin. The resulting jolt probably triggers small earthquakes which affect volcanism.

  3. TOMS measurement of the sulfur dioxide emitted during the 1985 Nevado del Ruiz eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Walter, Louis S.; Schnetzler, Charles C.; Doiron, Scott D.

    1990-07-01

    The eruptions of Nevado del Ruiz in 1985 were unusually rich in sulfur dioxide. These eruptions were observed with the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) which can quantitatively map volcanic sulfur dioxide plumes on a global scale. A small eruption, originally believed to be of phreatic origin, took place on September 11, 1985. However, substantial amounts of sulfur dioxide from this eruption were detected with TOMS on the following day. The total mass of SO 2, approximately 9 ± 3 × 10 4 metric tons, was deposited in two clouds, one in the upper troposphere, the other possibly at 15 km near the stratosphere. The devastating November 13 eruptions were first observed with TOMS at 1150 EST on November 14. Large amounts of sulfur dioxide were found in an arc extending 1100 km from south of Ruiz northeastward to the Gulf of Venezuela and as an isolated cloud centered at 7°N on the Colombia-Venezuela border. On November 15 the plume extended over 2700 km from the Pacific Ocean off the Colombia coast to Barbados, while the isolated mass was located over the Brazil-Guyana border, approximately 1600 km due east of the volcano. Based on wind data from Panama, most of the sulfur dioxide was located at 10-16 km in the troposphere and a small amount was quite likely deposited in the stratosphere at an altitude above 24 km. The total mass of sulfur dioxide in the eruption clouds was approximately 6.6 ± 1.9 × 10 5 metric tons on November 14. When combined with quiescent sulfur dioxide emissions during this period, the ratio of sulfur dioxide to erupted magma from Ruiz was an order of magnitude greater than in the 1982 eruption of El Chichon or the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens.

  4. Swift detection of the super-swift switch-on of the super-soft phase in nova V745 Sco (2014)

    CERN Document Server

    Page, K L; Kuin, N P M; Henze, M; Walter, F M; Beardmore, A P; Bode, M F; Darnley, M J; Delgado, L; Drake, J J; Hernanz, M; Mukai, K; Nelson, T; Ness, J -U; Schwarz, G J; Shore, S N; Starrfield, S; Woodward, C E

    2015-01-01

    V745 Sco is a recurrent nova, with the most recent eruption occurring in February 2014. V745 Sco was first observed by Swift a mere 3.7 hr after the announcement of the optical discovery, with the super-soft X-ray emission being detected around four days later and lasting for only ~two days, making it both the fastest follow-up of a nova by Swift and the earliest switch-on of super-soft emission yet detected. Such an early switch-on time suggests a combination of a very high velocity outflow and low ejected mass and, together with the high effective temperature reached by the super-soft emission, a high mass white dwarf (>1.3 M_sun). The X-ray spectral evolution was followed from an early epoch where shocked emission was evident, through the entirety of the super-soft phase, showing evolving column density, emission lines, absorption edges and thermal continuum temperature. UV grism data were also obtained throughout the super-soft interval, with the spectra showing mainly emission lines from lower ionization...

  5. Xinjiang Girl World Super Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Leading Chinese model Yue Mei won thetitle of World Super Model at the ’98 WorldSuper Model Competition held in FranceSeptember 6 - 17. Yue, a university studentfrom the Xinjiang Uygur AutonomousRegion, had won the top title at ’98 ChinaSuper Model Competition held in Beijingone month earier.After that, she underwentone month’s professional modeling trainingwith the New Silk Road ModelingManagement Company before setting off forthe world competition. In France, Yueimpressed the judges with her strikingfeatures, and display of oriental elegance and

  6. IPLOR performance in detecting infrasound from volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghica, Daniela; Popa, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    Plostina infrasound array (IPLOR) is located in the central part of Romania, in Vrancea region, its current configuration consisting of 6 elements equipped with Chaparral Physics sensors deployed over a 2.5 km aperture. The array detectability observed after processing of more than 6 years of data has shown that IPLOR is more effective in measuring mainly infrasound signals produced by natural and anthropogenic impulsive sources. This can be explained by the sensors' characteristics (frequency response, dynamic range) and the large aperture of array. Among the types of events observed with IPLOR, an emphasis can be given to the Mt. Etna volcanic eruptions as one of the powerful infrasound source recorded by the array. Located at about 1320 km distance from volcano, the array has proved efficient in observing both large and small eruptions. In case of the most large eruptive episodes occurred lately (April and October 2013, December 2015), long duration infrasonic signals were detected, the initial impulsive signature of the volcanic explosion being followed by a long train of irregular waves with smaller amplitudes and higher frequency, extended over periods ranging from 6 hours to more than three days (in December 2015). For the purpose of assessing the IPLOR performance in detecting Etna eruptions, the signal interactive analysis was performed using WinPMCC, CEA/DASE version of PMCC software. The infrasound detections obtained were plotted in function of back-azimuth, velocity and frequency, showing that the detectability is dependent both on the diurnal variations of the noise around the array (during the night the human activity diminishes) and on the seasonally dependent stratospheric winds (westward propagation during summer and eastward propagation during winter). In case of the Etna eruptive episodes detected by IPLOR, the back azimuth observed is in good agreement with the expected value (230o), i.e. an average value of 232±2o could be resolved. The

  7. SuperB Progress Reports Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Biagini, Maria Enrica; Boscolo, M; Buonomo, B; Demma, T; Drago, A; Esposito, M; Guiducci, S; Mazzitelli, G; Pellegrino, L; Preger, M A; Raimondi, P; Ricci, R; Rotundo, U; Sanelli, C; Serio, M; Stella, A; Tomassini, S; Zobov, M; Bertsche, K; Brachman, A; Cai, Y; Chao, A; Chesnut, R; Donald, M.H; Field, C; Fisher, A; Kharakh, D; Krasnykh, A; Moffeit, K; Nosochkov, Y; Pivi, M; Seeman, J; Sullivan, M.K; Weathersby, S; Weidemann, A; Weisend, J; Wienands, U; Wittmer, W; Woods, M; Yocky, G; Bogomiagkov, A; Koop, I; Levichev, E; Nikitin, S; Okunev, I; Piminov, P; Sinyatkin, S; Shatilov, D; Vobly, P; Bosi, F; Liuzzo, S; Paoloni, E; Bonis, J; Chehab, R; Le Meur, G; Lepercq, P; Letellier-Cohen, F; Mercier, B; Poirier, F; Prevost, C; Rimbault, C; Touze, F; Variola, A; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L; Jeremie, A; Baylac, M; Bourrion, O; De Conto, J M; Gomez, Y; Meot, F; Monseu, N; Tourres, D; Vescovi, C; Chanci, A; Napoly, O; Barber, D P; Bettoni, S; Quatraro, D

    2010-01-01

    This report details the present status of the Accelerator design for the SuperB Project. It is one of four separate progress reports that, taken collectively, describe progress made on the SuperB Project since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008.

  8. SuperB Progress Report: Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Donvito, G.; Spinoso, V.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; /INFN, Pavia /Bergamo U., Ingengneria Dept.; Eigen, G.; Fehlker, D.; Helleve, L.; /Bergen U.; Carbone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Gabrielli, A.; Galli, D.; Giorgi, F.; Marconi, U.; Perazzini, S.; Sbarra, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Caltech /Carleton U. /Cincinnati U. /INFN, CNAF /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /UC, Irvine /Taras Shevchenko U. /Orsay, LAL /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Frascati /INFN, Legnaro /Orsay, IPN /Maryland U. /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Caltech /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /PNL, Richland /Queen Mary, U. of London /Rutherford /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome2 /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /SLAC /Tel Aviv U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Padua /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /TRIUMF /British Columbia U. /Montreal U. /Victoria U.

    2012-02-14

    This report describes the present status of the detector design for SuperB. It is one of four separate progress reports that, taken collectively, describe progress made on the SuperB Project since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008.

  9. Reconstructing the plinian and co-ignimbrite sources of large volcanic eruptions: A novel approach for the Campanian Ignimbrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Alejandro; Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Engwell, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    The 39 ka Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) super-eruption was the largest volcanic eruption of the past 200 ka in Europe. Tephra deposits indicate two distinct plume forming phases, Plinian and co-ignimbrite, characteristic of many caldera-forming eruptions. Previous numerical studies have characterized the eruption as a single-phase event, potentially leading to inaccurate assessment of eruption dynamics. To reconstruct the volume, intensity, and duration of the tephra dispersal, we applied a computational inversion method that explicitly accounts for the Plinian and co-ignimbrite phases and for gravitational spreading of the umbrella cloud. To verify the consistency of our results, we performed an additional single-phase inversion using an independent thickness dataset. Our better-fitting two-phase model suggests a higher mass eruption rate than previous studies, and estimates that 3/4 of the total fallout volume is co-ignimbrite in origin. Gravitational spreading of the umbrella cloud dominates tephra transport only within the first hundred kilometres due to strong stratospheric winds in our best-fit wind model. Finally, tephra fallout impacts would have interrupted the westward migration of modern hominid groups in Europe, possibly supporting the hypothesis of prolonged Neanderthal survival in South-Western Europe during the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition.

  10. Seismo-acoustic evidence for an avalanche driven phreatic eruption through a beheaded hydrothermal system: An example from the 2012 Tongariro eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, A.D.; Jousset, P.; Lyons, J.J.; Carniel, R.; Fournier, R.; Fry, B.; Miller, C.

    2016-01-01

    The 6 August 2012 Te Maari eruption comprises a complex eruption sequence including multiple eruption pulses, a debris avalanche that propagated ~ 2 km from the vent, and the formation of a 500 m long, arcuate chasm, located ~ 300 m from the main eruption vent. The eruption included 6 distinct impulses that were coherent across a local infrasound network marking the eruption onset at 11:52:18 (all times UTC). An eruption energy release of ~ 3 × 1012 J was calculated using a body wave equation for radiated seismic energy. A similar calculation based on the infrasound record, shows that ~ 90% of the acoustic energy was released from three impulses at onset times 11:52:20 (~ 20% of total eruption energy), 11:52:27 (~ 50%), and 11:52:31 (~ 20%). These energy impulses may coincide with eyewitness accounts describing an initial eastward directed blast, followed by a westward directed blast, and a final vertical blast. Pre-eruption seismic activity includes numerous small unlocatable micro-earthquakes that began at 11:46:50. Two larger high frequency earthquakes were recorded at 11:49:06 and 11:49:21 followed directly by a third earthquake at 11:50:17. The first event was located within the scarp based on an arrival time location from good first P arrival times and probably represents the onset of the debris avalanche. The third event was a tornillo, characterised by a 0.8 Hz single frequency resonance, and has a resonator attenuation factor of Q ~ 40, consistent with a bubbly fluid filled resonator. This contrasts with a similar tornillo event occurring 2.5 weeks earlier having Q ~ 250–1000, consistent with a dusty gas charged resonator. We surmise from pre-eruption seismicity, and the observed attenuation change, that the debris avalanche resulted from the influx of fluids into the hydrothermal system, causing destabilisation and failure. The beheaded hydrothermal system may have then caused depressurisation frothing of the remaining gas charged system leading to the

  11. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  12. An ergodic approach to eruption hazard scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The complexity and indeterminacy of volcanic processes demand the use of statistical methods to analyze the expectations of the occurrence and size of future eruptions. The probability of a volcano producing potentially destructive eruptions in a given time interval may be estimated analyzing the sequence of past eruptions assuming a physically plausible process. Since the threat posed by eruptions depends on their mass or energy release (magnitude) and on their emission rate (intensity), the Volcanic Explosivity Index is a suitable measure to quantify the eruptive events, particularly considering that the largest available global catalogues use that measure. The definition of volcanic hazard is thus posed here in terms of the expected annual release of energy by eruptions in each VEI category. This concept is based on the ergodic property of a large set of volcanoes to release about the same amount of energy in each VEI category over a sufficiently large time interval. This property is however constrained to the VEI range of eruptions that constitute complete catalogues (VEI >2) in the lower end, and to the extreme eruptions that may destroy or significantly alter a volcanic system, such as the large caldera-forming eruptions (VEI < 7). In such conditions, a simple power law for eruptions at the global level relating the global rate of energy release to the eruption magnitude has been proposed as a statistical basis for eruptive event model development. Following the above mentioned arguments, we assume that a similar scaling law rules the annual rate at which energy is released by eruptions at individual volcanoes as log(EmRm)=bM+a, where Em is the energy released by eruptions in the VEI magnitude class M, and Rm is the occurrence rate of such eruptions over times ranges in which catalogues may be considered complete. The parameters b and a depend on the eruptive history of individual volcanoes, the former determining the preferred mode of the volcano to release

  13. New physical characterization of the Fontana Lapilli basaltic Plinian eruption, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Houghton, B. F.; Wehrmann, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Fontana Lapilli deposit was erupted in the late Pleistocene from a vent, or multiple vents, located near Masaya volcano (Nicaragua) and is the product of one of the largest basaltic Plinian eruptions studied so far. This eruption evolved from an initial sequence of fluctuating fountain-like events and moderately explosive pulses to a sustained Plinian episode depositing fall beds of highly vesicular basaltic-andesite scoria (SiO2 > 53 wt%). Samples show unimodal grain size distribution and a moderate sorting that are uniform in time. The juvenile component predominates (> 96 wt%) and consists of vesicular clasts with both sub-angular and fluidal, elongated shapes. We obtain a maximum plume height of 32 km and an associated mass eruption rate of 1.4 × 108 kg s-1 for the Plinian phase. Estimates of erupted volume are strongly sensitive to the technique used for the calculation and to the distribution of field data. Our best estimate for the erupted volume of the majority of the climactic Plinian phase is between 2.9 and 3.8 km3 and was obtained by applying a power-law fitting technique with different integration limits. The estimated eruption duration varies between 4 and 6 h. Marine-core data confirm that the tephra thinning is better fitted by a power-law than by an exponential trend.

  14. What's So Super about Superfoods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with meals. The Skinny on Common Super Foods Salmon is a fatty fish that’s low in saturated ... soy nuts are high in polyunsaturated fat, fiber, vitamins and minerals but low in saturated fat. They ...

  15. Super Ministries,Better Administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Chinese lawmakers on March 15th endorsed a State Counci l proposal for institutional overhaul of the tentral government,which involves the establishment of"super ministries"concerning energy,transport,industry and environmental protection.

  16. Ozone depletion following future volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Klobas, J.; Wilmouth, David M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Anderson, James G.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    2017-07-01

    While explosive volcanic eruptions cause ozone loss in the current atmosphere due to an enhancement in the availability of reactive chlorine following the stratospheric injection of sulfur, future eruptions are expected to increase total column ozone as halogen loading approaches preindustrial levels. The timing of this shift in the impact of major volcanic eruptions on the thickness of the ozone layer is poorly known. Modeling four possible climate futures, we show that scenarios with the smallest increase in greenhouse gas concentrations lead to the greatest risk to ozone from heterogeneous chemical processing following future eruptions. We also show that the presence in the stratosphere of bromine from natural, very short-lived biogenic compounds is critically important for determining whether future eruptions will lead to ozone depletion. If volcanic eruptions inject hydrogen halides into the stratosphere, an effect not considered in current ozone assessments, potentially profound reductions in column ozone would result.

  17. Radio Diagnostics of Electron Acceleration Sites During the Eruption of a Flux Rope in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Eoin P.; Vilmer, Nicole; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2016-12-01

    Electron acceleration in the solar corona is often associated with flares and the eruption of twisted magnetic structures known as flux ropes. However, the locations and mechanisms of such particle acceleration during the flare and eruption are still subject to much investigation. Observing the exact sites of particle acceleration can help confirm how the flare and eruption are initiated and how they evolve. Here we use the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to analyze a flare and erupting flux rope on 2014 April 18, while observations from the Nançay Radio Astronomy Facility allow us to diagnose the sites of electron acceleration during the eruption. Our analysis shows evidence of a pre-formed flux rope that slowly rises and becomes destabilized at the time of a C-class flare, plasma jet, and the escape of ≳75 keV electrons from the rope center into the corona. As the eruption proceeds, continued acceleration of electrons with energies of ˜5 keV occurs above the flux rope for a period over 5 minutes. At the flare peak, one site of electron acceleration is located close to the flare site, while another is driven by the erupting flux rope into the corona at speeds of up to 400 km s-1. Energetic electrons then fill the erupting volume, eventually allowing the flux rope legs to be clearly imaged from radio sources at 150-445 MHz. Following the analysis of Joshi et al. (2015), we conclude that the sites of energetic electrons are consistent with flux rope eruption via a tether cutting or flux cancellation scenario inside a magnetic fan-spine structure. In total, our radio observations allow us to better understand the evolution of a flux rope eruption and its associated electron acceleration sites, from eruption initiation to propagation into the corona.

  18. What are super-enhancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Sebastian; Lieb, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    The term 'super-enhancer' has been used to describe groups of putative enhancers in close genomic proximity with unusually high levels of Mediator binding, as measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-seq). Here we review the identification and composition of super-enhancers, describe links between super-enhancers, gene regulation and disease, and discuss the functional significance of enhancer clustering. We also provide our perspective regarding the proposition that super-enhancers are a regulatory entity conceptually distinct from what was known before the introduction of the term. Our opinion is that there is not yet strong evidence that super-enhancers are a novel paradigm in gene regulation and that use of the term in this context is not currently justified. However, the term likely identifies strong enhancers that exhibit behaviors consistent with previous models and concepts of transcriptional regulation. In this respect, the super-enhancer definition is useful in identifying regulatory elements likely to control genes important for cell type specification.

  19. How and Why Do Geysers Erupt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    Geysers are features that produce episodic eruptions of water, steam and sometimes non-condensable gases. Natural geysers are rare, with fewer than 1,000 worldwide. They are more than curiosities and popular tourist attractions: they offer a direct window into geothermal processes, and may serve as a natural small-scale laboratory to study larger-scale eruptive process such as those at volcanoes, and other self-organized, intermittent processes that result from phase separation and localized input of energy and mass. Despite > 200 years of scientific study, basic questions remain: Do eruptions begin from the bottom or top of the geyser? What controls eruption duration? Why do eruptions end? What are the required special subsurface geometries? Why are some geysers periodic, and others irregular? How and why do they respond to external influences such as weather, tides, and earthquakes? This presentation will review new insights from field studies at Lone Star geyser, Yellowstone National Park, geysers in the El Tatio geyser field, Chile, and laboratory models. At Lone Star we infer that dynamics are controlled by thermal and mechanical coupling between the conduit and a deeper, laterally-offset reservoir (called a "bubble trap" in previous studies). At El Tatio, we measured pressure and temperature within geysers over multiple eruption cycles: this data document the heating of liquid water by steam delivered from below. The laboratory experiments reveal how episodic release of steam from a bubble trap prepares a conduit for eruption and can generate a range of eruption intensities. In all cases, the eruption initiation, duration and termination are controlled by the interaction between the accumulation and transport of steam and liquid, and modulated by the geometry of the geyser's plumbing. Time series of thousands of eruptions confirm that internal processes control eruptions, with only pool geysers showing a sensitivity to air temperature; only very large stress

  20. Flux Cancellation Leading to CME Filament Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Roxana M.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filaments are strands of relatively cool, dense plasma magnetically suspended in the lower density hotter solar corona. They trace magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) in the photosphere below, and are supported against gravity at heights of up to approx.100 Mm above the chromosphere by the magnetic field in and around them. This field erupts when it is rendered unstable, often by magnetic flux cancellation or emergence at or near the PIL. We have studied the evolution of photospheric magnetic flux leading to ten observed filament eruptions. Specifically, we look for gradual magnetic changes in the neighborhood of the PIL prior to and during eruption. We use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), both on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), to study filament eruptions and their photospheric magnetic fields. We examine whether flux cancellation or/and emergence leads to filament eruptions. We find that continuous flux cancellation was present at the PIL for many hours prior to each eruption. We present two CME-producing eruptions in detail and find the following: (a) the pre-eruption filament-holding core field is highly sheared and appears in the shape of a sigmoid above the PIL; (b) at the start of the eruption the opposite arms of the sigmoid reconnect in the middle above the site of (tether-cutting) flux cancellation at the PIL; (c) the filaments first show a slow-rise, followed by a fast-rise as they erupt. We conclude that these two filament eruptions result from flux cancellation in the middle of the sheared field, and thereafter evolve in agreement with the standard model for a CME/flare filament eruption from a closed bipolar magnetic field [flux cancellation (van Ballegooijen and Martens 1989 and Moore and Roumelrotis 1992) and runaway tether-cutting (Moore et. al 2001)].

  1. Holography based super resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Anwar; Mudassar, Asloob A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes the simulation of a simple technique of superresolution based on holographic imaging in spectral domain. The input beam assembly containing 25 optical fibers with different orientations and positions is placed to illuminate the object in the 4f optical system. The position and orientation of each fiber is calculated with respect to the central fiber in the array. The positions and orientations of the fibers are related to the shift of object spectrum at aperture plane. During the imaging process each fiber is operated once in the whole procedure to illuminate the input object transparency which gives shift to the object spectrum in the spectral domain. This shift of the spectrum is equal to the integral multiple of the pass band aperture width. During the operation of single fiber (ON-state) all other fibers are in OFF-state at that time. The hologram recorded by each fiber at the CCD plane is stored in computer memory. At the end of illumination process total 25 holograms are recorded by the whole fiber array and by applying some post processing and specific algorithm single super resolved image is obtained. The superresolved image is five times better than the band-limited image. The work is demonstrated using computer simulation only.

  2. The 2009-2010 eruption of Gaua volcano (Vanuatu archipelago): Eruptive dynamics and unsuspected strong halogens source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani, Philipson; Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Delmelle, Pierre; Quiniou, Thomas; Lefèvre, Jérôme; Bule, Esline Garaebiti; Hiroshi, Shinohara; Lardy, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Gaua, a little known volcano in the northern part of Vanuatu archipelago, went through a long term eruptive activity between September 2009 and July 2010. The eruption started by a phreatic to phreatomagmatic activity which progressively shifted into a magmatic discharge. The first eruptive phase involved the hydrothermal system in place. The latter was likely influenced by seawater seepage, leading to the formation of anhydrite. Magma involved hereafter this opening phase is of basaltic andesite and basaltic trachyandesite composition (high K calc-alkaline series), typical of the northern part of the Vanuatu archipelago. The 2009-2010 activity discharged at least 184 kt of SO2 and a significant amount of halogens (72 kt Cl and 217 kt F). Such halogen releases indicate that Gaua is a strong source of halogens into the atmosphere. High and sustained amount of F discharges are known to induce health issues and should not be ignored on Gaua island. During this eruption the quiescent and voluminous Lake Letas was slightly affected by the eruption. Nevertheless the hydrothermal discharge point into the lake, situated on the southeastern part of Mt. Garet appeared to be relatively active. At this particular location rock forming elements, leached out from volcanic rock by acid fluids released by the new intrusion of magma, were discharged along with anions into Lake Letas. This release has triggered localized chemistry changes in the lake. We speculate that this discharge has also disturbed the bottom water in a limited perimeter, remobilizing reduced Fe to the surface and subsequently triggering the change in the water color by Fe oxidation.

  3. Super-virtual refraction interferometry: an engineering field data example

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2012-10-01

    The theory of super-virtual refraction interferometry (SVI) was recently developed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of far-offset traces in refraction surveys. This enhancement of the SNR is proportional to √N and can be as high as N if an iterative procedure is used. Here N is the number of post-critical shot positions that coincides with the receiver locations. We now demonstrate the SNR enhancement of super-virtual refraction traces for one engineering-scale synthetic data and two field seismic data sets. The field data are collected over a normal fault in Saudi Arabia. Results show that both the SNR of the super-virtual data set and the number of reliable first-arrival traveltime picks are significantly increased. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  4. Solar Eruption and Local Magnetic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-11-01

    It is now a common practice to use local magnetic parameters such as magnetic decay index for explaining solar eruptions from active regions, but there can be an alternative view that the global properties of the source region should be counted as a more important factor. We discuss this issue based on Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of the three successive eruptions within 1.5 hr from the NOAA active region 11444 and the magnetic parameters calculated using the nonlinear force-free field model. Two violent eruptions occurred in the regions with relatively high magnetic twist number (0.5-1.5) and high decay index (0.9-1.1) at the nominal height of the filament (12″) and otherwise a mild eruption occurred, which supports the local-parameter paradigm. Our main point is that the time sequence of the eruptions did not go with these parameters. It is argued that an additional factor, in the form of stabilizing force, should operate to determine the onset of the first eruption and temporal behaviors of subsequent eruptions. As supporting evidence, we report that the heating and fast plasma flow continuing for a timescale of an hour was the direct cause for the first eruption and that the unidirectional propagation of the disturbance determined the timing of subsequent eruptions. Both of these factors are associated with the overall magnetic structure rather than local magnetic properties of the active region.

  5. Coronal Jets from Minifilament Eruptions in Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, A. C.; Martinez, F.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Solar coronal jets are transient (frequently of lifetime 10 min) features that shoot out from near the solar surface, become much longer than their width, and occur in all solar regions, including coronal holes, quiet Sun, and active regions (e.g., Shimojo et al. 1996, Certain et al. 2007). Sterling et al. (2015) and other studies found that in coronal holes and in quiet Sun the jets result when small-scale filaments, called ``minifilaments,'' erupt onto nearby open or high-reaching field lines. Additional studies found that coronal-jet-onset locations (and hence presumably the minifilament-eruption-onset locations) coincided with locations of magnetic-flux cancellation. For active region (AR) jets however the situation is less clear. Sterling et al. (2016) studied jets in one active region over a 24-hour period; they found that some AR jets indeed resulted from minifilament eruptions, usually originating from locations of episodes of magnetic-flux cancelation. In some cases however they could not determine whether flux was emerging or canceling at the polarity inversion line from which the minifilament erupted; and for other jets of that region minifilaments were not conclusively apparent prior to jet occurrence. Here we further study AR jets, by observing them in a single AR over a one-week period, using X-ray images from Hinode/XRT and EUV/UV images from SDO/AIA, and line-of-sight magnetograms and white-light intensity-grams from SDO/HMI. We initially identified 13 prominent jets in the XRT data, and examined corresponding AIA and HMI data. For at least several of the jets, our findings are consistent with the jets resulting from minifilament eruptions, and originating from sights of magnetic-field cancelation. Thus our findings support that, at least in many cases, AR coronal jets result from the same physical processes that produce coronal jets in quiet-Sun and coronal-hole regions. FM was supportedby the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at

  6. Plinian vs. phreatomagmatic eruptions at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Baptiste; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Larsen, Guðrún

    2016-04-01

    Grímsvötn is a subglacial central volcano located under the Vatnajökull ice cap, above the assumed centre of the Iceland mantle plume. Historical explosive eruptions are mostly of phreatomagmatic character whereas pure magmatic behaviour may characterize the largest eruptions. What causes this different eruption behaviour is uncertain. Here, we report petrological estimates of crystallization depth and volatile degassing as recorded by sulfur concentrations in melt inclusions (MI) hosted by ferromagnesian minerals and the groundmass glass. Tephra from four eruptions, AD 1823, 1873, 2004 and 2011, were selected. The 2011 and 1873 are the largest known historical eruptions, whereas the 2004 eruption is probably amongst the smallest. The repose time preceding those eruptions is surprisingly similar, or 6 to 7 years, and the major-element compositions are uniform. Plagioclase, clinopyroxene (cpx) and olivine are the three coexisting phases at the liquidus in the quartz-tholeiites of Grímsvötn. The cpx-melt geothermobarometer (Putirka 2008) applied to the 2011 tephra reveals that cpx crystallized over a large range of P from 60 to 640 MPa (depth range: 1.7-18km) and T between 1060 and 1175°C before the Plinian eruption, therefore mobilizing the entire crustal magma system. In contrast, the phreatomagmatic tephra do not record the shallowest crystallization but interestingly all four tephra have identical median entrapment pressure of approximately 400 MPa. Therefore, the depth from which the magma bodies are derived, does not explain the difference in explosivity between those eruptions nor the variable magma volume (V) produced. Sulfur concentrations in MI are only slightly higher in the Plinian products, the difference (10%) being insufficient to explain the different eruption regimes. The ΔS, the difference between the maximum S concentrations in MI and the mean of the groundmass glass for a given eruption, is higher in the Plinian tephra. Based on literature

  7. Extreme super-resolution using the spherical geodesic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñano, Juan Carlos; González, Juan Carlos; Benítez, Pablo; Grabovičkić, Dejan

    2012-06-01

    Leonhardt demonstrated (2009) that the 2D Maxwell Fish Eye lens (MFE) can focus perfectly 2D Helmholtz waves of arbitrary frequency, i.e., it can transport perfectly an outward (monopole) 2D Helmholtz wave field, generated by a point source, towards a "perfect point drain" located at the corresponding image point. Moreover, a prototype with λ/5 super-resolution (SR) property for one microwave frequency has been manufactured and tested (Ma et al, 2010). Although this prototype has been loaded with an impedance different from the "perfect point drain", it has shown super-resolution property. However, neither software simulations nor experimental measurements for a broad band of frequencies have yet been reported. Here we present steady state simulations for two cases, using perfect drain as suggested by Leonhardt and without perfect drain as in the prototype. All the simulations have been done using a device equivalent to the MFE, called the Spherical Geodesic Waveguide (SGW). The results show the super-resolution up to λ/3000, for the system loaded with the perfect drain, and up to λ /500 for a not perfect load. In both cases super-resolution only happens for discrete number of frequencies. Out of these frequencies, the SGW does not show super-resolution in the analysis carried out.

  8. Chronology and impact of the 2011 Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elissondo, M.; Baumann, V.; Bonadonna, C.; Pistolesi, M.; Cioni, R.; Bertagnini, A.; Biass, S.; Herrero, J. C.; Gonzalez, R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed chronological reconstruction of the 2011 eruption of Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano (Chile) based on information derived from newspapers, scientific reports and satellite images. Chronology of associated volcanic processes and their local and regional effects (i.e. precursory activity, tephra fallout, lahars, pyroclastic density currents, lava flows) are also presented. The eruption had a severe impact on the ecosystem and on various economic sectors, including aviation, tourism, agriculture, and fishing industry. Urban areas and critical infrastructures, such as airports, hospitals and roads, were also impacted. The concentration of PM10 (Particulate Matter ≤ 10 μm) was measured during and after the eruption, showing that maximum safety threshold levels of daily and annual exposures were surpassed in several occasions. Probabilistic analysis of atmospheric and eruptive conditions have shown that the main direction of dispersal is directly towards east of the volcano and that the climactic phase of the eruption, dispersed toward south-east, has a probability of occurrence within 1 %. The management of the crisis, including evacuation of people, is discussed, as well as the comparison with the impact associated with other recent eruptions located in similar areas and having similar characteristics (i.e. Quizapu, Hudson, and Chaitén volcanoes). This comparison shows that the regions downwind and very close to the erupting volcanoes suffered very similar problems, without a clear relation with the intensity of the eruption (e.g. health problems, damage to vegetation, death of animals, roof collapse, air traffic disruptions, road closure, lahars and flooding). This suggests that a detailed collection of impact data can be largely beneficial for the development of plans for the management of an eruptive crisis and the mitigation of associated risk of the Andean region.

  9. Chronology and impact of the 2011 Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elissondo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed chronological reconstruction of the 2011 eruption of Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano (Chile based on information derived from newspapers, scientific reports and satellite images. Chronology of associated volcanic processes and their local and regional effects (i.e. precursory activity, tephra fallout, lahars, pyroclastic density currents, lava flows are also presented. The eruption had a severe impact on the ecosystem and on various economic sectors, including aviation, tourism, agriculture, and fishing industry. Urban areas and critical infrastructures, such as airports, hospitals and roads, were also impacted. The concentration of PM10 (Particulate Matter ≤ 10 μm was measured during and after the eruption, showing that maximum safety threshold levels of daily and annual exposures were surpassed in several occasions. Probabilistic analysis of atmospheric and eruptive conditions have shown that the main direction of dispersal is directly towards east of the volcano and that the climactic phase of the eruption, dispersed toward south-east, has a probability of occurrence within 1 %. The management of the crisis, including evacuation of people, is discussed, as well as the comparison with the impact associated with other recent eruptions located in similar areas and having similar characteristics (i.e. Quizapu, Hudson, and Chaitén volcanoes. This comparison shows that the regions downwind and very close to the erupting volcanoes suffered very similar problems, without a clear relation with the intensity of the eruption (e.g. health problems, damage to vegetation, death of animals, roof collapse, air traffic disruptions, road closure, lahars and flooding. This suggests that a detailed collection of impact data can be largely beneficial for the development of plans for the management of an eruptive crisis and the mitigation of associated risk of the Andean region.

  10. Jupiter Eruptions Captured in Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This infrared image shows two bright plume eruptions obtained by the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on April 5, 2007. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vigorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  11. Fixed drug eruptions with modafinil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loknath Ghoshal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modafinil is a psychostimulant drug, which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of narcolepsy associated excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep disorder related to shift work, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, presently it is being used as a lifestyle medicine; in India, it has been misused as an "over the counter" drug. Modafinil is known to have several cutaneous side effects. Fixed drug eruption (FDE is a distinctive drug induced reaction pattern characterized by recurrence of eruption at the same site of the skin or mucous membrane with repeated systemic administration. Only two case reports exist in the literature describing modafinil induced FDE until date. Here, we report two similar cases. The increasing use of this class of drug amongst the medical personnel might be posing a threat to the proper use and encouraging subsequent abuse. There might be a considerable population using these drugs unaware of the possible adverse effects. Authorities should be more alert regarding the sale and distribution of such medicines.

  12. Herculaneum: Clues to Vesuvius eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    More than 80 skeletons have been unearthed in the ancient Mediterranean town of Herculaneum, west of Italy's Mount Vesuvius. This anthropological find corroborates a reinterpretation by three University of Rhode Island scientists of the sequence of the August A.D. 79 eruption of Vesuvius. In addition, the discovery is the first proof that large numbers of people perished as they tried to flee from the eruption, estimated to have been about 10 times more powerful than the May 1980 Mount St. Helens blast.‘Who says dead men don't talk? Their bones have something to say about them and their everyday lives,’ says Sara C. Bisel, a physical anthropologist who analyzed the skeletons. Among the remains are a cluster of skeletons from six adults, four children, and two infants trying to shield themselves from the volcanic onslaught; the skeleton of a sailor, still clutching an oar, lying on his back beside an 8-m-long capsized boat; a woman whose now bony hand was still graced with gem-encrusted gold rings; and a soldier (see Figure 1). From these and other finds the anthropological team was able to discern that the ancient Romans, on average, were shorter than modern citizens and, judging from the condition of some of the teeth, probably had a low-sugar diet.

  13. Bárðarbunga volcano - post-eruption trends following the Holuhraun eruption in 2014-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hooper, Andrew; Jónasson, Kristján; Vogfjörð, Kristín; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús; Hjorleifsdóttir, Vala; Rodríguez-Cardozo, Felix R.; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.; Parks, Michelle M.; Roberts, Matthew; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B.; Hognadóttir, Thordis; Pfeffer, Melissa A.; Geirsson, Halldór; Barsotti, Sara; Oddsson, Bjorn

    2017-04-01

    ' first motion polarity reverses sign. This time coincides with the ending of the caldera collapse and the eruption. We investigate relative locations of the earthquakes as well as moment tensor solutions and compare results of the post-eruption period to the period during caldera subsidence and eruptive activity. In addition, we present analysis of post-eruption trends of the deformation data as well as seismicity trends. Preliminary results suggest that caldera fault movements where reversed soon after the eruption ended in spring 2015 when we also observe outwards movement of GPS stations around the caldera, indicating re-inflation long before any seismicity increase was detected. These data and their interpretation are vital to understanding the current status of the volcano and, eventually, to perform a more accurate and reliable hazard assessment.

  14. 2006-2008 Eruptions and Volcano Hazards Of Soputan Volcano, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendratno, K.; Pallister, J. S.; McCausland, W. A.; Kristianto, M.; Bina, F. R.; Carn, S. A.; Haerani, N.; Griswold, J.; Keeler, R.

    2010-12-01

    Soputan is a basalt volcano located in North Sulawesi near the southern margin of the Quaternary Tondano Caldera. Unusual for a basalt volcano, Soputan produces summit lava domes and explosive eruptions, as well as voluminous basaltic tephra deposits and lava flows. Soputan erupted five times during 2006-2008: on 14 December, 2006, 12-15 August, 2007, 25-26 October, 2007, 5-6 June, 2008, and 5-6 October, 2008. The 2006-2007 eruptions destroyed a lava dome at the volcano’s summit and exposed the conduit, resulting in Vulcanian eruptions and St. Vincent type pyroclastic flows from an open vent structure. We used high-resolution satellite images and digital elevation models to make photo-geologic maps of the deposits from the 2006, 2007 and 2008 eruptions, to estimate volumes of deposits using GIS and to model potential flow hazards. In March, 2008 and in March 2009 we conducted reconnaissance geologic field investigations at Soputan. This work was done to field-check our photo-geologic mapping, to reconstruct the sequence of eruptive events in 2006-2008 and to collect samples for geochemical and petrographic analysis. We also analyzed seismic records and SO2 emission data from the eruptions and we interpreted these data in the context of our geologic and geochemical data to provide insights into the ascent and degassing of magmas. On the basis of the eruptive history and modeling of potential lahar inundation areas we present an updated assessment of volcano hazards and a forecast for future eruptions at Soputan. Our analysis of field and petrologic data indicates that Soputan is an open-system volcano, which taps basalt magma from great depth, apparently with little shallow storage of this magma. Degassing of the magma as it rises within the conduit results in growth of micro-phenocrysts, evolution of the matrix melt and a commensurate increase in the viscosity of the magma. This, in turn, results in growth of lava domes and more explosive eruptions than are

  15. Global Significant Volcanic Eruptions Database, 4360 BC to present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Significant Volcanic Eruptions Database is a global listing of over 600 eruptions from 4360 BC to the present. A significant eruption is classified as one that...

  16. Textural and geochemical constraints on eruptive style of the 79AD eruption at Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Boudon, Georges; Villemant, Benoît.

    2010-05-01

    The 79AD eruption of Vesuvius, also known as the "Pompeii eruption", is the reference for one of the explosive eruptive styles, the plinian-type eruption. The eruption involved H2O-rich phonolitic magmas and is commonly divided into three phases: an initial phreatomagmatic phase, followed by a plinian event which produced a thick pumice fallout deposit and a final phase that was dominated by numerous column-collapse events. During the plinian phase, a first white pumice fallout was produced from a high steady eruptive column, followed by a grey pumice fallout originated by an oscillatory eruptive column with several partial column collapse events. This study focuses on the pumice fallout deposits, sampled in a proximal thick section, at the Terzigno quarry, 6 km southeast of the present crater. In order to constrain the degassing processes and the eruptive dynamics, major element compositions, residual volatile contents (H2O, Cl) and textural characteristics (vesicularity and microcrystallinity) were studied. A previous study that we performed on the pre-eruptive Cl content has shown that Cl may be used as an indicator of magma saturation with Cl-rich fluids and of pre-eruptive pressures. Cl contents measured in melt inclusions show that only the white pumice and the upper part of the grey pumice magma were H2O saturated prior eruption. Large variations in residual volatile contents exist between the different eruptive units and textural features strongly differ between white and grey pumice clasts but also within the grey pumice clasts. The degassing processes were thus highly heterogeneous: the white pumice eruptive units represent a typical closed-system degassing evolution whereas the first grey pumice one, stored in the same pre-eruptive saturation conditions, follows a particular open-system degassing evolution. Here we propose a new model of the 79AD eruption where pre-eruptive conditions (H2O saturation, magma temperature and viscosity) are the critical

  17. Electrically tuned super-capacitors

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, Tazima S

    2015-01-01

    Fast charging and discharging of large amounts of electrical energy make super-capacitors ideal for short-term energy storage [1-5]. In its simplest form, the super-capacitor is an electrolytic capacitor made of an anode and a cathode immersed in an electrolyte. As for an ordinary capacitor, minimizing the charge separation distance and increasing the electrode area increase capacitance. In super-capacitors, charge separation is of nano-meter scale at each of the electrode interface (the Helmholtz double layer). Making the electrodes porous increases their effective surface area [6-8]. A separating layer between the anode and the cathode electrodes is used to minimize unintentional electrical discharge (Figure 1). Here we show how to increase the capacitance of super-capacitors by more than 45 percent when modifying the otherwise passive separator layer into an active diode-like structure. Active control of super-capacitors may increase their efficiency during charge and discharge cycles. Controlling ion flow...

  18. Quantization of super Teichmueller spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Nezhla

    2016-08-15

    The quantization of the Teichmueller spaces of Riemann surfaces has found important applications to conformal field theory and N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories. We construct a quantization of the Teichmueller spaces of super Riemann surfaces, using coordinates associated to the ideal triangulations of super Riemann surfaces. A new feature is the non-trivial dependence on the choice of a spin structure which can be encoded combinatorially in a certain refinement of the ideal triangulation. We construct a projective unitary representation of the groupoid of changes of refined ideal triangulations. Therefore, we demonstrate that the dependence of the resulting quantum theory on the choice of a triangulation is inessential. In the quantum Teichmueller theory, it was observed that the key object defining the Teichmueller theory has a close relation to the representation theory of the Borel half of U{sub q}(sl(2)). In our research we observed that the role of U{sub q}(sl(2)) is taken by quantum superalgebra U{sub q}(osp(1 vertical stroke 2)). A Borel half of U{sub q}(osp(1 vertical stroke 2)) is the super quantum plane. The canonical element of the Heisenberg double of the quantum super plane is evaluated in certain infinite dimensional representations on L{sup 2}(R) x C{sup 1} {sup vertical} {sup stroke} {sup 1} and compared to the flip operator from the Teichmueller theory of super Riemann surfaces.

  19. Large erupting complex odontoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengal, Manoj; Arora, Honey; Ghosh, Sujoy; Pai, Keerthilatha M

    2007-03-01

    Odontomas are the most common odontogenic tumours. They are usually asymptomatic and are often discovered during routine radiography. We report a case of a large erupting complex odontoma that caused pain, infection and facial asymmetry. This case is significant as there are few reports of complex odontoma erupting in the oral cavity.

  20. Satellite observations of lightning-generated NOx in volcanic eruption clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon; Krotkov, Nickolay; Pickering, Ken; Allen, Dale; Bucsela, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The generation of NO2 by lightning flashes is known to be an important source of NOx in the free troposphere, particularly in the tropics, with implications for ozone production. Although UV-visible satellite observations of lightning-generated NOx (LNOx) in thunderstorms have been previously reported, here we present the first satellite observations of LNOx generated by lightning in explosive volcanic eruption clouds (vLNOx) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard NASA's Aura satellite. To date we have identified vLNOx in operational OMI NO2 measurements (OMNO2) during the high-latitude eruptions of Okmok (Aleutian Is; July 2008), Kasatochi (Aleutian Is; August 2008), Redoubt (Alaska; March 2009) and Grimsvötn (Iceland; May 2011), although analysis of OMNO2 data for other eruptions is underway. We use World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) observations to verify the occurrence and location of lightning flashes in the volcanic eruption clouds. All the vLNOx anomalies are associated with strong UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) signals due to volcanic ash. Preliminary analysis shows that the maximum vLNOx column detected by OMI decreases linearly with time since eruption, and suggests that the vLNOx signal is transient and can be detected up to ~5-6 hours after an eruption. Detection of vLNOx is hence only possible for eruptions occurring a few hours before the daytime OMI overpass. Based on the number of lightning flashes detected by WWLLN in each eruption cloud, we also estimate the vLNOx production efficiency (moles vLNOx per flash). Preliminary estimates for the 2008 Kasatochi eruption suggest that this is significantly higher than the production efficiency in thunderstorms, but may be biased high due to the low detection efficiency of WWLLN (aviation hazards due to volcanic ash. Furthermore, the vLNOx observations may provide information on air entrainment in volcanic eruption columns, which is required for some volcanic ash dispersion models. Although

  1. Geodetic Monitoring of The Strain Evolution Field During The July - August 2001 Mt. Etna Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, G.; Etna01-Geo Team

    Since the beginning of the 2001 Etna eruption, EDM and GPS measurements have been carried out to monitor the evolution of the ground deformation pattern of the volcano during the particular period of activity. The ground deformation pattern pre- ceding the eruption was known thanks to previous EDM and GPS surveys carried out and completed just few days before the onset of the eruption. During the period of activity, EDM measurements have been carried out daily on the uppermost part of the southern and northeastern trilateration networks in order to monitor the strain of the areas surrounding the eruptive fractures. These surveys allowed following the evolu- tion of the strain field since the beginning of the seismic swarm preceding the opening of the eruptive fracture system. Most of the ground deformation has been observed during the very first days of the eruption. Starting from the last days of the activity, the three EDM networks located on the NE, SW and S flanks of the volcano have been completely measured to fix the ground deformation pattern caused by the eruption. During the opening of the fracture system, the N-S GPS profile (17 stations), starting from the NE Rift to the Rifugio Sapienza area, has been measured together with a few GPS stations on the upper part of the volcano. The comparison of these measurements with the previous ones carried out the day before the seismic swarm, depicts a strong ground deformation pattern in good agreement with the dynamics of the intrusion. Later, several measurements have been carried out also during the eruption, on part of the N-S profile (12 stations), from the NE rift to the Piano del Lago area, very near the upper part of the eruptive fracture, because some of the southernmost stations were covered by the lava flows during the first days of the eruption. GPS sessions have been also carried out almost daily on an E-W profile, consisting of 16 stations and cross- ing the Rifugio Sapienza and the 1989 fracture

  2. Chronology of Postglacial Eruptive Activity and Calculation of Eruption Probabilities for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathenson, Manuel; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Champion, Duane E.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano has had 4 eruptive episodes in its postglacial history (since 13,000 years ago) comprising 16 eruptions. Time intervals between events within the episodes are relatively short, whereas time intervals between the episodes are much longer. An updated radiocarbon chronology for these eruptions is presented that uses paleomagnetic data to constrain the choice of calibrated ages. This chronology is used with exponential, Weibull, and mixed-exponential probability distributions to model the data for time intervals between eruptions. The mixed exponential distribution is the best match to the data and provides estimates for the conditional probability of a future eruption given the time since the last eruption. The probability of an eruption at Medicine Lake volcano in the next year from today is 0.00028.

  3. Investigating the explosivity of shallow sub-aqueous basaltic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, R.; White, J. D. L.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce pyroclasts containing vesicles, clearly implying exsolution of volatiles from the magma has occurred. Our aim is to understand the textural characteristics of vesiculated clasts as a quantitative indicator of the eruptive behaviour of a volcano. Assessing water's role in volatile degassing and outgassing has been and is being well documented for terrestrial eruptions; the same cannot be said, however, for their shallow subaqueous counterparts. The eruptive behaviour of Surtseyan volcanoes, which include both subaqueous and subaerial phases (for example, the type-location Surtsey, Iceland in 1963) is under investigation here and for good reason. Volcanic eruptions during which water and basaltic magma come into contact appear to ignite violent eruptions of many of the small "monogenetic" volcanoes so abundant on Earth. A key problem remains that detailed conditions of water-magma interactions are not yet fully understood. Field samples obtained from exposed sequences deposited originally in a subaqueous environment allow for the necessary analysis of lapilli. With the aid of experimental data, mathematical modelling and terrestrial analogues the ambition is to unravel volatile degassing, ascent histories and fragmentation processes, allowing us ultimately to identify both the role water plays in the explosivity of shallow subaqueous eruptions, and the rise history of magma to the point of interaction. The first site, Pahvant Butte is located in southwest Utah, U.S. It is a well preserved tuff cone overlying a subaqueously deposited mound of glassy ash composed of sideromelane and tachylite. It was erupted under ~85m of water into Lake Bonneville approximately 15,300 years ago. Our focus is on samples collected from a well-bedded, broadly scoured coarse ash and lapilli lithofacies on the eastern flank of the edifice. Vesicularity indices span from 52.6% - 60.8%, with very broad vesicularity ranges, 20.6% - 81.0% for one extreme sample. The

  4. Super-Virasoro anomaly, super-Weyl anomaly and the super-Liouville action for 2D supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, T; Suzuki, T; Fujiwara, Takanori; Igarashi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tadao

    1996-01-01

    The relation between super-Virasoro anomaly and super-Weyl anomaly in N=1 NSR superstring coupled with 2D supergravity is investigated from canonical theoretical view point. The WZW action canceling the super-Virasoro anomaly is explicitly constructed. It is super-Weyl invariant but nonlocal functional of 2D supergravity. The nonlocality can be remedied by the super-Liouvlle action, which in turn recovers the super-Weyl anomaly. The final gravitational effective action turns out to be local but noncovariant super-Liouville action, describing the dynamical behavior of the super-Liouville fields. The BRST invariance of this approach is examined in the superconformal gauge and in the light-cone gauge.

  5. Bromo volcano area as human-environment system: interaction of volcanic eruption, local knowledge, risk perception and adaptation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachri, Syamsul; Stötter, Johann; Sartohadi, Junun

    2013-04-01

    People in the Bromo area (located within Tengger Caldera) have learn to live with the threat of volcanic hazard since this volcano is categorized as an active volcano in Indonesia. During 2010, the eruption intensity increased yielding heavy ash fall and glowing rock fragments. A significant risk is also presented by mass movement which reaches areas up to 25 km from the crater. As a result of the 2010 eruption, 12 houses were destroyed, 25 houses collapsed and there were severe also effects on agriculture and the livestock sector. This paper focuses on understanding the interaction of Bromo volcanic eruption processes and their social responses. The specific aims are to 1) identify the 2010 eruption of Bromo 2) examine the human-volcano relationship within Bromo area in general, and 3) investigate the local knowledge related to hazard, risk perception and their adaptation strategies in specific. In-depth interviews with 33 informants from four districts nearest to the crater included local people and authorities were carried out. The survey focused on farmers, key persons (dukun), students and teachers in order to understand how people respond to Bromo eruption. The results show that the eruption in 2010 was unusual as it took continued for nine months, the longest period in Bromo history. The type of eruption was phreatomagmatic producing material dominated by ash to fine sand. This kind of sediment typically belongs to Tengger mountain eruptions which had produced vast explosions in the past. Furthermore, two years after the eruption, the interviewed people explained that local knowledge and their experiences with volcanic activity do not influence their risk perception. Dealing with this eruption, people in the Bromo area applied 'lumbung desa' (traditional saving systems) and mutual aid activity for surviving the volcanic eruption. Keywords: Human-environment system, local knowledge, risk perception, adaptation strategies, Bromo Volcano Indonesia

  6. Petrological evidence for non-linear increase of magmatic intrusion rates before eruption at open vent mafic volcanoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, D. C. S.; Costa Rodriguez, F.

    2015-12-01

    The most active volcanoes on earth erupt in a yearly to decadal time scales, typically erupt mafic magmas and are open-vent systems with prominent degassing plumes (e.g. Mayon, Arenal, Llaima, Etna). Here we investigate the plumbing systems, dynamics, and processes that drive eruptions at these systems. These are key questions for improving hazard evaluation, and better understanding the unrest associated with these types of volcanoes. The petrology and geochemistry from six historical eruptions (1947-2006) of Mayon volcano (Philippines) shows that all lavas are basaltic andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase + orthopyroxene (Opx) + clinopyroxene. Opx crystals show a variety of compositions and zoning patterns (reverse, normal or complex) with Mg# (= 100 *Mg/[Mg+Fe]) varying from 67 to 81. The simplest interpretation is that the low Mg# parts of the crystals resided on an upper crustal and crystal rich reservoir that was intruded by more primitive magmas from which the high Mg# parts of the crystals grew. Modelling Mg-Fe diffusion in Opx shows that times since magma injection and eruption range from a few days up to 3.5 years in all of the investigated eruptions. The longest diffusion times are shorter than the repose times between the eruptions, which implies that crystal recycling between eruptive events is negligible. This is a surprising result that shows that for each eruption a different part of the evolved crystal-rich plumbing system is activated. This can be due to random intrusion location or an irreversibility of the plumbing system that prevents multiple eruptions from the same crystal-rich part. Moreover, we find that the number of intrusions markedly increases before each eruption in a non-linear manner. Such an increased rate of intrusions with time might reflect non-linear rheological properties of the crystal-rich system, of the enclosing rocks, or the non-linear evolution of crystal-melt reaction-dissolution fronts during magma intrusions.

  7. Small volcanic eruptions and the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, David M.

    2012-09-01

    (Rampino and Self 1984, Pyle et al 1996, Self and Rampino 2012). But as yet, there is little evidence for the consequences of this scale of eruption for the climate system (Miles et al 2004), and few data against which to test simulations of stratospheric sulfur-injection 'geoengineering' scenarios of a similar scale and frequency (e.g. English et al 2012). A hint of the new volcano-observing capability came during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland. For a few days in April 2010 meteorological conditions, coupled with a dramatic increase in volcanic ash production, led to the wide dispersal of fine volcanic particles across northern Europe; an event which was widely tracked by ground-based and satellite-borne instruments, augmented by in situ measurements from balloons and aircraft (Bennett et al 2010, Flentje et al 2010, Harrison et al 2010, Stohl et al 2011). Despite the interest in Eyjafjallajökull at the time, this was, geologically, only a very modest eruption with limited sulfur emissions and an impact restricted mainly to the regional troposphere (e.g. Thomas and Prata 2011, Walker et al 2012). Then, in June 2011, a previously dormant volcano in north-east Africa began to erupt violently. Little is known about Nabro, which is a partially collapsed volcano that straddles the Eritrea-Ethiopia border, and has had no known historical activity (Wiart and Oppenheimer 2005). Despite the remote location, and lack of prior warning, the event and its aftermath were remarkably well captured by remote-sensing instruments, as demonstrated in the new letter by Sawamura et al (2012). Using both ground-based and satellite-borne laser-ranging (lidar) data, Sawamura et al (2012) were able to extract detailed information about the nature of the volcanic aerosol layer, and its spread around the globe. The eruption started strongly, with substantial ash plumes for the first 48 h, rising to 9-14 km altitude (Smithsonian Institution 2011, Bourassa et al 2012), that carried at

  8. 3D super-virtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Kai

    2014-08-05

    Super-virtual refraction interferometry enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of far-offset refractions. However, when applied to 3D cases, traditional 2D SVI suffers because the stationary positions of the source-receiver pairs might be any place along the recording plane, not just along a receiver line. Moreover, the effect of enhancing the SNR can be limited because of the limitations in the number of survey lines, irregular line geometries, and azimuthal range of arrivals. We have developed a 3D SVI method to overcome these problems. By integrating along the source or receiver lines, the cross-correlation or the convolution result of a trace pair with the source or receiver at the stationary position can be calculated without the requirement of knowing the stationary locations. In addition, the amplitudes of the cross-correlation and convolution results are largely strengthened by integration, which is helpful to further enhance the SNR. In this paper, both synthetic and field data examples are presented, demonstrating that the super-virtual refractions generated by our method have accurate traveltimes and much improved SNR.

  9. Sala polideportiva de Super-Lioran Francia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzucconi, Vittorio

    1980-12-01

    Full Text Available The polysports hall of the Super-Lioran winter resort, located in a crater filled with aliuvionary deposits, consists of two clearly differentiated parts: a lower one, of concrete, where there is the skating rink and various services, and an upper one consisting of hyperbolic paraboloid elements. This roof is of adhered laminate wood. The laminate roof structure rests on the ground, and almost merges with it, to later emerge from the snow giving the assembly almost an abstract nature which helps to increase the beauty of the area.

    La sala polideportiva de la estación invernal de Super-Lioran, situada en un cráter relleno de depósitos aluvionares, consta de dos partes claramente diferenciadas: una inferior, de hormigón, donde se encuentran la pista de patinaje y los distintos servicios, y una superior formada por elementos de paraboloide hiperbólico. Esta cubierta es de madera laminada encolada. La estructura laminar de la cubierta se apoya en el suelo casi confundiéndose con él, y luego emerge desde la nieve proporcionando al conjunto un carácter casi abstracto que contribuye a aumentar la belleza de la zona.

  10. The 2014 Submarine Eruption of Ahyi Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, M. M.; Chadwick, W.; Merle, S. G.; Buck, N. J.; Butterfield, D. A.; Coombs, M. L.; Evers, L. G.; Heaney, K. D.; Lyons, J. J.; Searcy, C. K.; Walker, S. L.; Young, C.; Embley, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    On April 23, 2014, Ahyi Volcano, a submarine cone in the Northern Mariana Islands (NMI), ended a 13-year-long period of repose with an explosive eruption lasting over 2 weeks. The remoteness of the volcano and the presence of several seamounts in the immediate area posed a challenge for constraining the source location of the eruption. Critical to honing in on the Ahyi area quickly were quantitative error estimates provided by the CTBTO on the backazimuth of hydroacoustic arrivals observed at Wake Island (IMS station H11). T-phases registered across the NMI seismic network at the rate of approximately 10 per hour until May 8 and were observed in hindsight at seismic stations on Guam and Chichijima. After May 8, sporadic T-phases were observed until May 17. Within days of the eruption onset, reports were received from NOAA research divers of hearing explosions underwater and through the hull on the ship while working on the SE coastline of Farallon de Pajaros (Uracas), a distance of 20 km NW of Ahyi. In the same area, the NOAA crew reported sighting mats of orange-yellow bubbles on the water surface and extending up to 1 km from the shoreline. Despite these observations, satellite images showed nothing unusual throughout the eruption. During mid-May, a later cruise leg on the NOAA ship Hi'ialakai that was previously scheduled in the Ahyi area was able to collect some additional data in response to the eruption. Preliminary multibeam sonar bathymetry and water-column CTD casts were obtained at Ahyi. Comparison between 2003 and 2014 bathymetry revealed that the minimum depth had changed from 60 m in 2003 to 75 m in 2014, and a new crater ~95 m deep had formed at the summit. Extending SSE from the crater was a new scoured-out landslide chute extending downslope to a depth of at least 2300 m. Up to 125 m of material had been removed from the head of the landslide chute and downslope deposits were up to 40 m thick. Significant particle plumes were detected at all three

  11. Phreatomagmatic and water-influenced Strombolian eruptions of a small-volume parasitic cone complex on the southern ringplain of Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand: Facies architecture and eruption mechanisms of the Ohakune Volcanic Complex controlled by an unstable fissure eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kósik, S.; Németh, K.; Kereszturi, G.; Procter, J. N.; Zellmer, G. F.; Geshi, N.

    2016-11-01

    The Ohakune Volcanic Complex is a late Pleistocene tuff ring - scoria/spatter cone complex located south of Ruapehu volcano. This small-volume volcano consists of an outer E-W elongated compound tuff ring edifice, three inner scoria-spatter cones and further volcanic depressions, located on the Ohakune Fault. We quantified accurately the variations of the eruptive styles and processes through time by systematic sampling of key stratigraphic marker beds at proximal and distal locations, and the determination of grain size distribution, componentry, density and vesicularity. Using a Digital Terrain Model coupled with stratigraphic data, we also determined the spatial distribution and volume of each identified unit and individual edifices within the Ohakune Volcanic Complex. Activity began with a shallow phreatomagmatic phase characterized by an almost continuous generation of a low eruptive column, accompanied by wet pyroclastic density currents, together with the ejection of juvenile fragments and accidental lithics from the surrounding country rocks. Subsequent activity was dominated by a variety of Strombolian eruptions exhibiting differing intensities that were at times disrupted by phreatic blasts or phreatomagmatic explosions due to the interaction with external water and/or sudden changes in magma discharge rate. At least three major vent-shifting events occurred during the eruption, which is demonstrated by the truncation of the initial tuff ring and the infilling of the truncated area by several coarse grained surge units. Our study indicates that approx. 12 × 106 m3 DRE magma erupted within maximum 2.5 to 5 months through multiple vents. The erupted magma ascended from a depth of 16-18 km, and reached the surface within approximately 50 h. Alternating eruption styles, frequent vent-shifting and a variety of emplacement mechanisms inferred from the deposits of the Ohakune Volcanic Complex demonstrate the unpredictable nature of small-volume volcanism

  12. FOGO-2014: Monitoring the Fogo 2014 Eruption, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rui; Faria, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Fogo volcano, located in the Cape Verde Archipelago offshore Western Africa, is a complete stratovolcano system that was created by the Cape Verde hotspot, forming the island of Fogo. The top (Pico do Fogo) reaches ~2830m above sea level, and raises ~1100m above Chã das Caldeiras, an almost flat circular area with approximately 10 kilometres in the north-south direction and 7 kilometres in the east-west direction. Chã das Caldeiras, surrounded towards the West by the ~1000m high Bordeira rampart, has been inhabited since the early 20th Century, because it is one of the most productive agricultural areas in this semi-arid country. Fogo volcano erupted on November 23, 2014 (~10:00UTC) on a subsidiary vent of the main cone, after 19 years of inactivity. C4G (Collaboratory for Geosciences), a distributed research infrastructure created in 2014 in the framework of the Portuguese Roadmap for Strategic Research Infrastructures, immediately offered support to the Cape Verdean authorities, with the goal of complementing the permanent geophysical monitoring network operated in Fogo island by INMG, the Cape Verdean Meteorological and Geophysical Institute. This permanent network is composed of seven seismographic stations and three tiltmeter stations, and the data is transmitted in real time to the INMG geophysical laboratory in São Vicente Island, where it is analysed on a routine basis. Pre-eruptive activity started to be detected by the permanent monitoring network on October 2014, with earthquakes occurring at depths larger than 15 km. These events led to a first volcanic warning to the Cape Verdean Civil Protection Agency. On November 22 several volcano-tectonic earthquakes were recorded at shallow depths, indicating shallow fracturing. On the basis of this activity, INMG issued a formal alert of an impending eruption to the Civil Protection Agency, ~24 hours before the onset of the eruption. Volcanic tremor and clear tiltmeter signals were recorded about one hour

  13. Volcanic hazards from Bezymianny- and Bandai-type eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, L.; Glicken, H.; Ui, T.

    1987-01-01

    Major slope failures are a significant degradational process at volcanoes. Slope failures and associated explosive eruptions have resulted in more than 20 000 fatalities in the past 400 years; the historic record provides evidence for at least six of these events in the past century. Several historic debris avalanches exceed 1 km3 in volume. Holocene avalanches an order of magnitude larger have traveled 50-100 km from the source volcano and affected areas of 500-1500 km2. Historic eruptions associated with major slope failures include those with a magmatic component (Bezymianny type) and those solely phreatic (Bandai type). The associated gravitational failures remove major segments of the volcanoes, creating massive horseshoe-shaped depressions commonly of caldera size. The paroxysmal phase of a Bezymianny-type eruption may include powerful lateral explosions and pumiceous pyroclastic flows; it is often followed by construction of lava dome or pyroclastic cone in the new crater. Bandai-type eruptions begin and end with the paroxysmal phase, during which slope failure removes a portion of the edifice. Massive volcanic landslides can also occur without related explosive eruptions, as at the Unzen volcano in 1792. The main potential hazards from these events derive from lateral blasts, the debris avalanche itself, and avalanche-induced tsunamis. Lateral blasts produced by sudden decompression of hydrothermal and/or magmatic systems can devastate areas in excess of 500km2 at velocities exceeding 100 m s-1. The ratio of area covered to distance traveled for the Mount St. Helens and Bezymianny lateral blasts exceeds that of many pyroclastic flows or surges of comparable volume. The potential for large-scale lateral blasts is likely related to the location of magma at the time of slope failure and appears highest when magma has intruded into the upper edifice, as at Mount St. Helens and Bezymianny. Debris avalanches can move faster than 100 ms-1 and travel tens of

  14. Arcade Implosion Caused by a Filament Eruption in a Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Juntao; Fletcher, L; Thalmann, J K; Hudson, H S; Hannah, I G

    2016-01-01

    Coronal implosions - the convergence motion of plasmas and entrained magnetic field in the corona due to a reduction in magnetic pressure - can help to locate and track sites of magnetic energy release or redistribution during solar flares and eruptions. We report here on the analysis of a well-observed implosion in the form of an arcade contraction associated with a filament eruption, during the C3.5 flare SOL2013-06-19T07:29. A sequence of events including magnetic flux-rope instability and distortion, followed by filament eruption and arcade implosion, lead us to conclude that the implosion arises from the transfer of magnetic energy from beneath the arcade as part of the global magnetic instability, rather than due to local magnetic energy dissipation in the flare. The observed net contraction of the imploding loops, which is found also in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations, reflects a permanent reduction of magnetic energy underneath the arcade. This event shows that, in addition to resulting in e...

  15. Eruption cysts: A series of 66 cases with clinical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen-Tunç, Emine; Şaroğlu-Sönmez, Işıl; Bayrak, Şule; Tüloğlu, Nuray

    2017-01-01

    Background An eruption cyst (EC) is a benign, developmental cyst associated with a primary or permanent tooth. This paper presents 66 ECs in 53 patients who reported to 3 different centers in Turkey between 2014-2015. Material and Methods 53 patients (31 male, 22 female) with 66 ECs were diagnosed and treated over a 1-year period. The mean age of patients was 5.4 years (minimum 5 months, maximum 11 years). Clinical examination and periapical radiographs were used to establish diagnosis. Age, gender, site, history of trauma and type of treatment were recorded. Results Of the 66 ECs diagnosed in 53 patients, more than half (56.6%) were located in the maxilla, with the maxillary first primary molars the teeth most commonly associated with ECs (30.3%). Multiple ECs were diagnosed in 13 of the 53 patients. ECs had previously diagnosed in the primary dentition of 2 patients, 3 patients reported a history of trauma to primary teeth. In the majority of patients (46 cases, 86.8%), no treatment was provided, whereas surgical treatment was provided in the remaining 7 cases (13.2%). Conclusions Eruption cysts are usually asymptomatic and do not require treatment;. however, if the cyst is symptomatic, it should be treated with simple surgical excision. Key words:Odontogenic cyst, children, eruption cyst, oral pathology. PMID:28160586

  16. Quantitative analysis of the 1981 and 2001 Etna flank eruptions: a contribution for future hazard evaluation and mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Proietti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Lava flows produced during Etna flank eruptions represent severe hazards for the nearby inhabited areas, which can be protected by adopting prompt mitigation actions, such as the building of diversion barriers. Lava diversion measures were attempted recently during the 1983, 1991-93, 2001 and 2002 Etna eruptions, although with different degrees of success. In addition to the complexity of barrier construction (due to the adverse physical conditions, the time available to successfully slow the advance of a lava flow depends on the lava effusion rate, which is not easily measurable. One method to estimate the average lava effusion rate over a specified period of time is based on a volumetric approach; i.e. the measurement of the volume changes of the lava flow over that period. Here, this has been compared to an approach based on thermal image processing, as applied to estimate the average effusion rates of lava flows during the 1981 and 2001 Etna eruptions. The final volumes were measured by the comparison of pre-eruption and post-eruption photogrammetric digital elevation models and orthophotographs. Lava volume growth during these eruptions was estimated by locating the flow-front positions from analyses of scientific papers and newspapers reports, as well as from helicopter photographs. The analyses of these two eruptions contribute to the understanding of the different eruptive mechanisms, highlighting the role of the peak effusion rate, which represents a critical parameter for planning of mitigation actions and for hazard evaluation.

  17. Microsphere Super-resolution Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zengbo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique -microsphere nanoscopy- that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) samples. This chapter reviews the technique, which covers its background, fundamentals, experiments, mechanisms as well as the future outlook.

  18. Interactive Super Mario Bros Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Patrikk D.; Olsen, Jeppeh M.; Risi, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    to encourage the evolution of desired behaviors. In this paper, we show how casual users can create controllers for \\emph{Super Mario Bros} through an interactive evolutionary computation (IEC) approach, without prior domain or programming knowledge. By iteratively selecting Super Mario behaviors from a set...... of candidates, users are able to guide evolution towards a variety of different behaviors, which would be difficult with an automated approach. Additionally, the user-evolved controllers perform similarly well as controllers evolved with a traditional fitness-based approach when comparing distance traveled...

  19. Quantisation of super Teichmueller theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Nezhla [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Mathematics; Pawelkiewicz, Michal; Techner, Joerg [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2015-12-15

    We construct a quantisation of the Teichmueller spaces of super Riemann surfaces using coordinates associated to ideal triangulations of super Riemann surfaces. A new feature is the non-trivial dependence on the choice of a spin structure which can be encoded combinatorially in a certain refinement of the ideal triangulation. By constructing a projective unitary representation of the groupoid of changes of refined ideal triangulations we demonstrate that the dependence of the resulting quantum theory on the choice of a triangulation is inessential.

  20. Quantisation of super Teichmueller theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aghaei, Nezhla; Teschner, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    We construct a quantisation of the Teichmueller spaces of super Riemann surfaces using coordinates associated to ideal triangulations of super Riemann surfaces. A new feature is the non-trivial dependence on the choice of a spin structure which can be encoded combinatorially in a certain refinement of the ideal triangulation. By constructing a projective unitary representation of the groupoid of changes of refined ideal triangulations we demonstrate that the dependence of the resulting quantum theory on the choice of a triangulation is inessential.

  1. Pre-eruption deformation and seismic anomalies in 2012 in Tolbachik volcanic zone, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim; Titkov, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    during first hours of eruption. For investigation of pre-eruption crust deformations we used data of 8 permanent GPS stations located within Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes. GPS points were at the distances from 20 to 60 km from eruption site and Plosky Tolbachik. The permanent GPS network registered horizontal compression of adjacent area had begun half a year before the fissure eruption. The compressive strain reached about 10^-7 immediately prior to one. The principal axis of the compressive strain was approximately directed to Tolbachik volcanic zone. It is a good indicator of the slow inflation of the magma reservoir in the area of Plosky Tolbachik. Then during first months of eruptive activity a lowering and a tension of surrounding areas were observed and the stretching strain reached 1.5×10^-6. The principal axis of the stretching strain after the eruption start was oriented exactly to the eruption site as the evidence of magma chamber deflation. So unrest of Tolbachik volcanic zone and the 2012-13 Tolbachik fissure eruption were preceded by simultaneous anomalies in seismic and GPS data with the duration about 5-6 months. GPS measurements, as well as seismic survey, confirmed the hidden magma inflowing into the reservoir under Plosky Tolbachik volcano in July-November 2012 without any magmatic activity in the crater. As a result of that, the preparation of the 2012-13 Tolbachik fissure eruption and process of magma intrusion were relatively long, the magma source was located under Plosky Tolbachik volcano and then it migrated laterally very quickly (during several hours) to the south slop of the Plosky Tolbachik volcano, where lava started to flow from the emerged surface fissure.

  2. Generalized eruptive histiocytosis mimicking leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B C Sharath Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized eruptive histiocytosis (GEH is a rare cutaneous histiocytosis that mainly affects adults and presents with multiple symmetric papules on face, trunk, and proximal extremities. GEH is included in type IIa (histiocytes involving cells of dermal dendrocyte lineage of histiocytic disorders. Clinical and pathological correlations are required for differentiating GEH from other histiocytic disorders and from lepromatous leprosy which clinically mimic GEH and is prevalent in India. We report a case of a middle-aged woman who presented with generalized asymptomatic papules and nodules and was treated for leprosy but was finally diagnosed to have GEH after clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical correlation. Furthermore, the newer lesions also showed features of progressive nodular histiocytosis.

  3. Generalized eruptive histiocytosis mimicking leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharath Kumar, B C; Nandini, A S; Niveditha, S R; Gopal, M G

    2011-01-01

    Generalized eruptive histiocytosis (GEH) is a rare cutaneous histiocytosis that mainly affects adults and presents with multiple symmetric papules on face, trunk, and proximal extremities. GEH is included in type IIa (histiocytes involving cells of dermal dendrocyte lineage) of histiocytic disorders. Clinical and pathological correlations are required for differentiating GEH from other histiocytic disorders and from lepromatous leprosy which clinically mimic GEH and is prevalent in India. We report a case of a middle-aged woman who presented with generalized asymptomatic papules and nodules and was treated for leprosy but was finally diagnosed to have GEH after clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical correlation. Furthermore, the newer lesions also showed features of progressive nodular histiocytosis.

  4. Compound-specific carbon isotopes from Earth's largest flood basalt eruptions directly linked to the end-Triassic mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Jessica H; Olsen, Paul E; Eglinton, Timothy; Brookfield, Michael E; Sambrotto, Raymond N

    2010-04-13

    A leading hypothesis explaining Phanerozoic mass extinctions and associated carbon isotopic anomalies is the emission of greenhouse, other gases, and aerosols caused by eruptions of continental flood basalt provinces. However, the necessary serial relationship between these eruptions, isotopic excursions, and extinctions has never been tested in geological sections preserving all three records. The end-Triassic extinction (ETE) at 201.4 Ma is among the largest of these extinctions and is tied to a large negative carbon isotope excursion, reflecting perturbations of the carbon cycle including a transient increase in CO(2). The cause of the ETE has been inferred to be the eruption of the giant Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP). Here, we show that carbon isotopes of leaf wax derived lipids (n-alkanes), wood, and total organic carbon from two orbitally paced lacustrine sections interbedded with the CAMP in eastern North America show similar excursions to those seen in the mostly marine St. Audrie's Bay section in England. Based on these results, the ETE began synchronously in marine and terrestrial environments slightly before the oldest basalts in eastern North America but simultaneous with the eruption of the oldest flows in Morocco, a CO(2) super greenhouse, and marine biocalcification crisis. Because the temporal relationship between CAMP eruptions, mass extinction, and the carbon isotopic excursions are shown in the same place, this is the strongest case for a volcanic cause of a mass extinction to date.

  5. The construction of orthodox super rpp semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yong; GUO Yuqi; Kar Ping Shum

    2004-01-01

    We define orthodox super rpp semigroups and study their semilattice decompositions. Standard representation theorem of orthodox super rpp semigroups whose subband of idempotents is in the varieties of bands described by an identity with at most three variables are obtained.

  6. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the ‘strength’ of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  7. Ciprofloxacin induced fixed drug eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ravishankar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruption (FDE is a clinical entity occurring in the same site or sites each time the drug is administered. Acute lesions appear as sharply marginated erythematous plaques, which are usually found on lips, genitalia, abdomen, and legs. The eruptions usually occur within hours of administration of the offending agent and resolves spontaneously without scarring after few weeks of onset. Most common drugs causing FDE are sulfonamides, tetracyclines, salicylates, barbiturates, doxycycline, fluconazole, clarithromycin, etc. Ciprofloxacin, a widely used fluoroquinolone antimicrobial, induces cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs in about 1-2% of treated patients. Urticaria, angioedema, maculopapular exanthems, and photosensitivity are the most frequently documented cutaneous adverse reactions. In this case report, the patient soon after taking ciprofloxacin tablets, developed itching in the lips, palms and in scrotal region. On continuing the treatment, the next day he developed fluid filled lesions over palm, knuckle, and hyperpigmentation. He gives a history of severe itching and rashes in scrotal region. He gives a history of similar complaints in the previous month after taking ciprofloxacin medication. There was no history of intake of any other medication. On examination, bullous lesions and pustules in finger webs, hyperpigmentation on knuckles, and scrotal erosions were seen. In the present case report, the patient presented with FDE immediately after oral administration of ciprofloxacin and got completely cured after stopping the drug and taking adequate treatment. According to the Naranjo's ADR probability scale (score=8, this ADR is categorized as a and ldquo;probable and rdquo; reaction to the drug. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(6.000: 1096-1097

  8. Reconstructing the deadly eruptive events of 1790 CE at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Don; Weaver, Samantha J; Houghton, Bruce F

    2014-01-01

    A large number of people died during an explosive eruption of Kīlauea Volcano in 1790 CE. Detailed study of the upper part of the Keanakāko‘i Tephra has identified the deposits that may have been responsible for the deaths. Three successive units record shifts in eruption style that agree well with accounts of the eruption based on survivor interviews 46 yr later. First, a wet fall of very fine, accretionary-lapilli–bearing ash created a “cloud of darkness.” People walked across the soft deposit, leaving footprints as evidence. While the ash was still unconsolidated, lithic lapilli fell into it from a high eruption column that was seen from 90 km away. Either just after this tephra fall or during its latest stage, pulsing dilute pyroclastic density currents, probably products of a phreatic eruption, swept across the western flank of Kīlauea, embedding lapilli in the muddy ash and crossing the trail along which the footprints occur. The pyroclastic density currents were most likely responsible for the fatalities, as judged from the reported condition and probable location of the bodies. This reconstruction is relevant today, as similar eruptions will probably occur in the future at Kīlauea and represent its most dangerous and least predictable hazard.

  9. Textural analysis of tephra from a rhyodacitic eruption sequence, Thira (Santorini), Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.

    1983-01-01

    The Minoan eruption sequence of 1390 B.C. produced a minimum volume of 13 km/sup 3/ of rhyodacitic tephra (dense rock equivalent). The eruptions evolved from magmatic to phreatomagmatic and back to a mix of both processes. Thin section and scanning electron micrograph analysis of the tephra sequence provide information about eruption processes that is critical to interpretation of the field data. The eruptions began at a vent located above sea level and produced a coarse-grained Plinian pumice deposit. All later phases of the eruption involved propagating vent(s) into an older flooded caldera and flooding of the sea into a collapsing Minoan caldera. Interaction of magma and water produced fine-grained tephra that consist mostly of slightly curved, nearly flat shards and small pumice pyroclasts. These were derived during fragmentation of a heterogeneous, vesicular magma containing large compound vesicles and smaller, elongate vesicles. The vesiculated magma was thoroughly comminuted during magma-water interactions. The last eruptive phase is interpreted as having involved both magmatic and phreatomagmatic processes. Hot pyroclastic flows from this phase contained a bimodal mixture of pumice pyroclasts and finely comminuted shards.

  10. Explosive eruptive activity and temporal magmatic changes at Yotei Volcano during the last 50,000 years, southwest Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesawa, Shimpei; Nakagawa, Mitsuhiro; Umetsu, Akane

    2016-10-01

    To understand the eruptive history, structure, and magmatic evolution of Yotei Volcano, southwest Hokkaido, Japan, we investigated the geology and petrology of tephras located around the base of the volcano. We identified 43 tephra units interbedded with soils (in descending stratigraphic order, tephras Y1-Y43), and four widespread regional tephras. Ten radiocarbon ages were obtained from soils beneath the Yotei tephras. On the basis of petrologic differences and, the stratigraphic positions of thick layers of volcanic ash soil, indicative of volcanic stratigraphic gaps, the Yotei tephras are divided into four groups (in ascending stratigraphic order): Yotei tephra groups I, II-1, II-2, and II-3. We calculated the age of each eruptive deposit based on the soil accumulation rate, and estimated the volume of each eruption using isopach maps or the correlation between eruption volume and the maximum thickness at ~ 10 km from the summit crater. The results regarding eruptive activity and the rate of explosive eruptions indicate four eruptive stages at Yotei Volcano over the last 50,000 years. Stage I eruptions produced Yotei tephra group I between ca. 54 cal. ka BP and up to at least ca. 46 cal. ka BP, at relatively high average eruption rates of 0.07 km3 dense-rock equivalent (DRE)/ky. After a pause in activity of ca. 8000 years, Stage II-1 to II-2 eruptions produced Yotei tephra groups II-1 and II-2 from ca. 38 to ca. 21 cal. ka BP at high average eruption rates (0.10 km3 DRE/ky), after a pause in activity of 2000-3000 years. Finally, after another pause in activity of 4000-5000 years, Stage II-3 eruptions produced Yotei tephra group II-3 from ca. 16.5 cal. ka BP until the present day, at low average eruption rates (0.009 km3 DRE/ky). Whole-rock geochemical compositions vary within each tephra group over the entire eruption history. For example, group I and II-3 tephras contain the lowest and highest abundances, respectively, of K2O, P2O5, and Zr. Group II-1 has the

  11. Inflation-predictable behavior and co-eruption deformation at Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooner, Scott L.; Chadwick, William W.

    2016-12-01

    Deformation of the ground surface at active volcanoes provides information about magma movements at depth. Improved seafloor deformation measurements between 2011 and 2015 documented a fourfold increase in magma supply and confirmed that Axial Seamount’s eruptive behavior is inflation-predictable, probably triggered by a critical level of magmatic pressure. A 2015 eruption was successfully forecast on the basis of this deformation pattern and marked the first time that deflation and tilt were captured in real time by a new seafloor cabled observatory, revealing the timing, location, and volume of eruption-related magma movements. Improved modeling of the deformation suggests a steeply dipping prolate-spheroid pressure source beneath the eastern caldera that is consistent with the location of the zone of highest melt within the subcaldera magma reservoir determined from multichannel seismic results.

  12. Io: Eruptions at Pillan, and the time evolution of Pele and Pillan from 1996 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Imke; Laver, Conor; Davies, Ashley Gerard; de Kleer, Katherine; Williams, David A.; Howell, Robert R.; Rathbun, Julie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Observations obtained with the near-infrared camera NIRC2, coupled to the adaptive optics system on the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, on 14 August 2007 revealed an active and highly-energetic eruption at Pillan at 245.2 ± 0.7°W and 8.5 ± 0.5°S. A one-temperature blackbody fit to the data revealed a (blackbody) temperature of 840 ± 40 K over an area of 17 km2, with a total power output of ∼500 GW. Using Davies' (Davies, A.G. [1996]. Icarus 124(1), 45-61) Io Flow Model, we find that the oldest lava present is less than 1-2 h old, having cooled down from the eruption temperature of >1400 K to ∼710 K; this young hot lava suggests that an episode of lava fountaining was underway. In addition to an examination of this eruption, we present data of the Pele and Pillan volcanoes obtained with the same instrument and telescope from 2002 through 2015. These data reveal another eruption at Pillan on UT 28 June 2010. Model fits to this eruption yield a blackbody temperature of 600-700 K over an area of ∼60 km2, radiating over 600 GW. On UT 18 February 2015 an energetic eruption was captured by the InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) via mutual event occultations. The eruption took place at 242.7 ± 1°W and 12.4 ± 1°S, i.e., in the eastern part of Pillan Patera. Subsequent observations showed a gradual decrease in the intensity of the eruption. Images obtained with the Keck telescope on 31 March and 5 May 2015 revealed that the locations of the eruption had shifted by 120-160 km to the NW. In contrast to the episodicity of Pillan, Pele has been persistent, observed in every appropriate 4.7 μm observation. Pele was remarkably consistent in its thermal emission from the Galileo era through February 2002, when a blackbody temperature of 940 ± 40 K and an area of 6.5 km2 was measured. Since that time, however, the radiant flux from what is likely a apparently large, overturning lava lake has gradually subsided over the next decade by a factor of

  13. Tidal Control of Jet Eruptions Observed by Cassini ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurford, T. A.; Helfenstein, P.; Spitale, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Observations by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) of Enceladus' south polar region at high phase angles has revealed jets of material venting into space. Observations by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) have also shown that the south polar region is anomalously warm with hotspots associated with geological features called the Tiger Stripes. The Tiger Stripes are large rifts near the south pole of Enceladus, which are typically about 130 km in length, 2 km wide, with a trough 500 m deep, and are l1anked on each side by 100m tall ridges. Preliminary triangulation of jets as viewed at different times and with different viewing geometries in Cassini ISS images taken between 2005 and 2007 have constrained the locations of eight major eruptions of material and found all of them associated with the south polar fractures unofficially the 'Tiger Stripes', and found four of them coincident with the hotspots reported in 2006 by CIRS. While published ISS observations of jet activity suggest that individual eruption sites stay active on the timescale of years, any shorter temporal variability (on timescales of an orbital period, or 1.3 Earth days, for example) is more difficult to establish because of the spotty temporal coverage and the difficulty of visually isolating one jet from the forest of many seen in a typical image. Consequently, it is not known whether individual jets are continuously active, randomly active, or if they erupt on a predictable, periodic schedule. One mechanism that may control the timing of eruptions is diurnal tidal stress, which oscillates between compression/tension as well as right and left lateral shear at any given location throughout Enceladus' orbit and may allow the cracks to open and close regularly. We examine the stresses on the Tiger Stripe regions to see how well diurnal tidal stress caused by Enceladus' orbital eccentricity may possibly correlate with and thus control the observed eruptions. We then identify

  14. Chronology and impact of the 2011 Cordón Caulle eruption, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elissondo, Manuela; Baumann, Valérie; Bonadonna, Costanza; Pistolesi, Marco; Cioni, Raffaello; Bertagnini, Antonella; Biass, Sébastien; Herrero, Juan-Carlos; Gonzalez, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    We present a detailed chronological reconstruction of the 2011 eruption of the Cordón Caulle volcano (Chile) based on information derived from newspapers, scientific reports and satellite images. Chronology of associated volcanic processes and their local and regional effects (i.e. precursory activity, tephra fallout, lahars, pyroclastic density currents, lava flows) are also presented. The eruption had a severe impact on the ecosystem and on various economic sectors, including aviation, tourism, agriculture and fishing industry. Urban areas and critical infrastructures, such as airports, hospitals and roads, were also impacted. The concentration of PM10 (particulate matter ≤ 10 µm) was measured during and after the eruption, showing that maximum safety threshold levels of daily and annual exposures were surpassed in several occasions. Probabilistic analyses suggest that this combination of atmospheric and eruptive conditions has a probability of occurrence of about 1 %. The management of the crisis, including evacuation of people, is discussed, as well as the comparison with the impact associated with other recent eruptions located in similar areas and having similar characteristics (i.e. Quizapu, Hudson and Chaitén volcanoes). This comparison shows that the regions downwind and very close to the erupting volcanoes suffered very similar problems, without a clear relation to the intensity of the eruption (e.g. health problems, damage to vegetation, death of animals, roof collapse, air traffic disruptions, road closure, lahars and flooding). This suggests that a detailed collection of impact data can be largely beneficial for the development of plans for the management of an eruptive crisis and the mitigation of associated risk of the Andean region.

  15. Identifying the volcanic eruption depicted in a neolithic painting at Catalhoyuk, Central Anatolia, Turkey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel K Schmitt

    Full Text Available A mural excavated at the Neolithic Çatalhöyük site (Central Anatolia, Turkey has been interpreted as the oldest known map. Dating to ∼6600 BCE, it putatively depicts an explosive summit eruption of the Hasan Dağı twin-peaks volcano located ∼130 km northeast of Çatalhöyük, and a birds-eye view of a town plan in the foreground. This interpretation, however, has remained controversial not least because independent evidence for a contemporaneous explosive volcanic eruption of Hasan Dağı has been lacking. Here, we document the presence of andesitic pumice veneer on the summit of Hasan Dağı, which we dated using (U-Th/He zircon geochronology. The (U-Th/He zircon eruption age of 8.97±0.64 ka (or 6960±640 BCE; uncertainties 2σ overlaps closely with (14C ages for cultural strata at Çatalhöyük, including level VII containing the "map" mural. A second pumice sample from a surficial deposit near the base of Hasan Dağı records an older explosive eruption at 28.9±1.5 ka. U-Th zircon crystallization ages in both samples range from near-eruption to secular equilibrium (>380 ka. Collectively, our results reveal protracted intrusive activity at Hasan Dağı punctuated by explosive venting, and provide the first radiometric ages for a Holocene explosive eruption which was most likely witnessed by humans in the area. Geologic and geochronologic lines of evidence thus support previous interpretations that residents of Çatalhöyük artistically represented an explosive eruption of Hasan Dağı volcano. The magmatic longevity recorded by quasi-continuous zircon crystallization coupled with new evidence for late-Pleistocene and Holocene explosive eruptions implicates Hasan Dağı as a potential volcanic hazard.

  16. Topological Analyses of Symmetric Eruptive Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenco, O.; Martin, S. F.

    Erupting prominences (filaments) that we have analyzed from Hα Doppler data at Helio Research and from SOHO/EIT 304 Å, show strong coherency between their chirality, the direction of the vertical and lateral motions of the top of the prominences, and the directions of twisting of their legs. These coherent properties in erupting prominences occur in two patterns of opposite helicity; they constitute a form of dynamic chirality called the ``roll effect." Viewed from the positive network side as they erupt, many symmetrically-erupting dextral prominences develop rolling motion toward the observer along with right-hand helicity in the left leg and left-hand helicity in the right leg. Many symmetricaly-erupting sinistral prominences, also viewed from the positive network field side, have the opposite pattern: rolling motion at the top away from the observer, left-hand helical twist in the left leg, and right-hand twist in the right leg. We have analysed the motions seen in the famous movie of the ``Grand Daddy" erupting prominence and found that it has all the motions that define the roll effect. From our analyses of this and other symmetric erupting prominences, we show that the roll effect is an alternative to the popular hypothetical configuration of an eruptive prominence as a twisted flux rope or flux tube. Instead we find that a simple flat ribbon can be bent such that it reproduces nearly all of the observed forms. The flat ribbon is the most logical beginning topology because observed prominence spines already have this topology prior to eruption and an initial long magnetic ribbon with parallel, non-twisted threads, as a basic form, can be bent into many more and different geometrical forms than a flux rope.

  17. Super-resolution Phase Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Depeursinge, Christian

    2013-04-21

    Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) yields reconstructed complex wavefields. It allows synthesizing the aperture of a virtual microscope up to 2π, offering super-resolution phase images. Live images of micro-organisms and neurons with resolution less than 100 nm are presented.

  18. Super Rice Breeding in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@I. Demand for super high yield rice in China   Rice is one of the main staple food in China. The performance of rice sector in production and yield had been very impressive in the last four decades. However, rice production and yield has stagnated since 1990.

  19. Super Girls Still Center Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The TV singing contest continues to draw a devoted audience, but will its impact on Chinese culture fall away like a shooting star? Ask any teenage girl in China to name the finalists of last year's Super Girl show and chances are she will instantly come up with the three big names.She'll probable

  20. Analysis of Forensic Super Timelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    BIB .1  vii List of Figures Figure Page...Hacker disconnects from User’s system  User clicks off Screen Saver  User closes Solitaire program  User logs off system BIB .1...analysis- tapestry_33836. BIB .2 Guðjónsson, K. (2010). Mastering the super timeline with log2timeline. SANS Gold Paper accepted June 29,2010

  1. Constraining the dynamics of 2014-15 Bardarbunga-Holuhraun intrusion and eruption using seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron, Corentin; Donaldson, Clare; White, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption explosively emitted a large quantity of ash in the atmosphere and paralysed the European airspace for weeks. Several seismic scientific studies already contributed to the understanding of this complex eruption (e.g., Tarasewicz et al., 2012). Although an excellent network of seismometers recorded this eruption, some volcanological and seismological aspects are still poorly understood. In order to gain further constraints on the dynamics of this ground-breaking eruptions, we mine the seismic dataset using the seismic ambient noise technique between pairs of stations and the Seismic Amplitude Ratio Analysis (SARA). Our preliminary results reveal a strong contamination of the Cross Correlation Functions (CCF) by the volcanic tremor, particularly above 0.5 Hz even for station pairs located >50 km from the volcano. Although this volcanic tremor precludes the monitoring of the seismic velocities, it literally illuminated the medium. The two phases of the eruptions (i.e., effusive and explosive) are clearly distinguished in these functions due to their different locations. During the explosive phase, an intriguing shift of the main peaks of the cross correlation functions is evidenced (early May 2010). It is remarkably consistent with the downward migration proposed by Tarasewicz et al. (2012) and is interpreted as a migration of the volcanic tremor. SARA methodology, which is continuously imaging and tracking any significant seismicity at a 10-min time scale (Taisne et al., 2010), is applied in the 5-15 Hz frequency band in order to image to continuously migrating microseismicity. The analysis displays several shallow migrations (above 5 km of depth, in March 2010) preceding the effusive phase of the eruption. Interestingly, the results also evidence a fast and deep migration (> 5 km) starting a few hours before the beginning of the explosive phase (13 April 2010). These preliminary results may shed light on the triggering of

  2. A model for Plinian eruptions of Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Barberi, F.; Rosi, M.; Santacroce, R.

    1981-01-01

    The term `Plinian' has been widely used1-4 to describe continuous gas-blast eruptions of large magnitude a typical example5, of which is the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius which destroyed Pompei and the surrounding region. We develop a new model here for the AD 79 event that explains the complete Plinian eruptive episode including pyroclastic fall, pyroclastic flow, base surge, laharic and phreatic activity. This model has widespread implications with regard to volcanic hazard evaluation and geothermal exploration at Vesuvius and other volcanoes with similar patterns of activity, such as Mount St Helens.

  3. Letter: Lichenoid eruption induced by etanercept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Nuria; García-Sánchez, Sagrario; Domínguez, José D

    2012-07-15

    Lichenoid drug eruption is an uncommon, but previously reported, side effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy. The majority of these adverse events relate to infliximab. We report a patient who developed a lichenoid eruption on the back of her hands during etanercept therapy. She improved with topical treatment and discontinuation of the drug was not necessary. The physiopathological link between anti-TNF treatment and lichenoid eruptions remains unclear. It is important to realize that a lichenoid reaction pattern may occur during anti-TNF agent treatment.

  4. Toward Forecasting Volcanic Eruptions using Seismic Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Brenguier, Florent; Campillo, Michel; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Duputel, Zacharie; Coutant, Olivier; Nercessian, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    During inter-eruption periods, magma pressurization yields subtle changes of the elastic properties of volcanic edifices. We use the reproducibility properties of the ambient seismic noise recorded on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano to measure relative seismic velocity variations of less than 0.1 % with a temporal resolution of one day. Our results show that five studied volcanic eruptions were preceded by clearly detectable seismic velocity decreases within the zone of magma injection. These precursors reflect the edifice dilatation induced by magma pressurization and can be useful indicators to improve the forecasting of volcanic eruptions.

  5. A Comparative Study of Confined and Eruptive Flares in NOAA AR 10720

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, X; Ding, M D; Guo, Y; Su, J T

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the distinct properties of two types of flares: eruptive flares associated with CMEs and confined flares without CMEs. Our sample of study includes nine M and X-class flares, all from the same active region (AR), six of which are confined and three others are eruptive. The confined flares tend to be more impulsive in the soft X-ray time profiles and show more slender shapes in the EIT 195 A images, while the eruptive ones are of long-duration events and show much more extended brightening regions. The location of the confined flares are closer to the center of the AR, while the eruptive flares are at the outskirts. This difference is quantified by the displacement parameter, the distance between the AR center and the flare location: the average displacement of the six confined flares is 16 Mm, while that of eruptive ones is as large as 39 Mm. Further, through nonlinear force-free field extrapolation, we find that the decay index of the transverse magnetic field in the low corona (~10 Mm) have a...

  6. Thermal Analysis of Post-eruption Loops from 80,000 to 1.6 million K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T.; Landi, E.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the thermal properties of a set of post eruptive loops which appeared after a prominence eruption on April 30, 2004. The event was observed by TRACE and SOHO/SUMER. The SUMER data was taken from a single slit location with a 90 second cadence and included a number of lines spanning the temperature range 80,000 to 1.6 million K. We perform a differential emission measure analysis of the loops in order to study their thermal evolution.

  7. A Trio of Super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Today, at an international conference, a team of European astronomers announced a remarkable breakthrough in the field of extra-solar planets. Using the HARPS instrument at the ESO La Silla Observatory, they have found a triple system of super-Earths around the star HD 40307. Moreover, looking at their entire sample studied with HARPS, the astronomers count a total of 45 candidate planets with a mass below 30 Earth masses and an orbital period shorter than 50 days. This implies that one solar-like star out of three harbours such planets. A trio of Super-Earths ESO PR Photo 19a/08 A trio of Super-Earths "Does every single star harbour planets and, if yes, how many?" wonders planet hunter Michel Mayor from Geneva Observatory. "We may not yet know the answer but we are making huge progress towards it." Since the discovery in 1995 of a planet around the star 51 Pegasi by Mayor and Didier Queloz, more than 270 exoplanets have been found, mostly around solar-like stars. Most of these planets are giants, such as Jupiter or Saturn, and current statistics show that about 1 out of 14 stars harbours this kind of planet. "With the advent of much more precise instruments such as the HARPS spectrograph on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, we can now discover smaller planets, with masses between 2 and 10 times the Earth's mass," says Stéphane Udry, one of Mayor's colleagues. Such planets are called super-Earths, as they are more massive than the Earth but less massive than Uranus and Neptune (about 15 Earth masses). The group of astronomers have now discovered a system of three super-Earths around a rather normal star, which is slightly less massive than our Sun, and is located 42 light-years away towards the southern Doradus and Pictor constellations. "We have made very precise measurements of the velocity of the star HD 40307 over the last five years, which clearly reveal the presence of three planets," says Mayor. The planets, having 4.2, 6.7, and 9.4 times the mass of the

  8. Eruption and degassing dynamics of the major August 2015 Piton de la Fournaise eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muro, Andrea; Arellano, Santiago; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Bachelery, Patrick; Boudoire, Guillaume; Coppola, Diego; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Galle, Bo; Giudice, Gaetano; Gurioli, Lucia; Harris, Andy; Liuzzo, Marco; Metrich, Nicole; Moune, Severine; Peltier, Aline; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Vlastelic, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) shield volcano is one of the most active basaltic volcanoes in the World with one eruption every nine months, on average. This frequent volcanic activity is broadly bimodal, with frequent small volume, short lived eruptions (volume summit to proximal eruptions of relatively evolved cotectic magmas and relatively long repose periods (up to 3.5 years between 2010 and 2014). The August 2015 eruption was the first large (45±15 Mm3) and long lasting (2 months) eruption since 2007 and the only event to be fully monitored by the new gas geochemical network of Piton de la Fournaise volcanological observatory (DOAS, MultiGaS, diffuse CO2 soil emissions). Regular lava and tephra sampling was also performed for geochemical and petrological analysis. The eruption was preceded by a significant increase in CO2 soil emissions at distal soil stations (ca. 15 km from the summit), with CO2 enrichment also being recorded at summit low temperature fumaroles. Eruptive products were spectacularly zoned, with plagioclase and pyroxene being abundant in the early erupted products and olivine being the main phase in the late-erupted lavas. Total gas emissions at the eruptive vent underwent a decrease during the first half of the eruption and then an increase, mirroring the time evolution of magma discharge rate (from 5-10 m3/s in September to 15-30 m3/s in late-October) and the progressive change in magma composition. In spite of significant evolution in magma and gas output, CO2/SO2 ratios in high temperature gases remained quite low (pulse of deep magma. While erupted magma and high temperature gases were mostly provided by the shallow part of the system, distal sites and summit low temperature fumaroles recorded a deeper triggering mechanism.

  9. Tephra-Producing Eruptions of Holocene Age at Akutan Volcano, Alaska; Frequency, Magnitude, and Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K. L.; Schwaiger, H.

    2012-12-01

    Aleutian arc volcanoes. Tephra deposits from typical VEI 2 historical eruptions are not well preserved on the island so tephra-fall frequency estimated from stratigraphic studies is underestimated. Akutan Island is home to the largest seafood processing plant in North America and has a workforce of more than one thousand people. Other infrastructure consists of a recently constructed paved airfield on neighboring Akun Island (25 km east of the active vent) and a new boat harbor at the head of Akutan Harbor. Plans to develop greenhouses, tourism, and increased cold storage capacity on Akutan and Akun Islands also are evolving. To support the power demands of the development efforts, The City of Akutan is considering the utilization of geothermal resources on the island that are located in Hot Springs Bay valley northwest of the city. All of the existing and planned infrastructure, water supply, and residential areas are about 12 km downwind (east) of the volcano and are at risk from ash-producing eruptions. The historical eruptive history suggests that VEI 2 eruptions are plausible in the near future and the Holocene tephra-fall record indicates that large eruptions (VEI 4 or larger) occur about every few thousand years. Numerical modeling of tephra fallout based on the record of ash-producing eruptions will be used to improve tephra-fall hazard assessments for the area.

  10. Model for determining logistic distribution center: case study of Mount Merapi eruption disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, T. J.; Wigati, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    As one of the most active volcano in the earth, Mount Merapi is periodically erupted and it is considered as a natural disaster for the surrounding area. Kabupaten Sleman as one of the nearest location to this mount has to be always prepared to this disaster. The local government already set three different groups of region, in which potentially affected by Mount Merapi eruption, called KRB I, KRB II, and KRB III. Region KRB III is the closest area to the mount crater and most often affected by the eruption disaster. Whenever KRB III is affected, people live in that area usually being transfer to the next region set that is KRB II. The case presented in this paper is located at the KRB II region, which is the second closest region to the mount crater. A humanitarian distribution system has to be set in this region, since usually this region is became the location of shelters for KRB III population whenever a ‘big’ eruption is happened. A mathematical model is proposed in this paper, for determining the location of distribution center, vehicle route, and the amount of goods delivered to each customer. Some numerical illustration are presented in order to know the behavior of the proposed model.

  11. Super-Earths as Failed Cores in Orbital Migration Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    I explore whether close-in super-Earths were formed as rocky bodies that failed to grow fast enough to become the cores of gas giants before the natal protostellar disk dispersed. I model the failed cores’ inward orbital migration in the low-mass or type I regime to stopping points at distances where the tidal interaction with the protostellar disk applies zero net torque. The three kinds of migration traps considered are those due to the dead zone's outer edge, the ice line, and the transition from accretion to starlight as the disk's main heat source. As the disk disperses, the traps move toward final positions near or just outside 1 au. Planets at this location exceeding about 3 M ⊕ open a gap, decouple from their host traps, and migrate inward in the high-mass or type II regime to reach the vicinity of the star. I synthesize the population of planets that formed in this scenario, finding that a fraction of the observed super-Earths could have been failed cores. Most super-Earths that formed this way have more than 4 M ⊕, so their orbits when the disks dispersed were governed by type II migration. These planets have solid cores surrounded by gaseous envelopes. Their subsequent photoevaporative mass loss is most effective for masses originally below about 6 M ⊕. The failed core scenario suggests a division of the observed super-Earth mass-radius diagram into five zones according to the inferred formation history.

  12. New Approaches for the Characterization of Poorly-Exposed Tephra deposits: the Case Study of Fontana Lapilli Eruption, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Houghton, B.

    2006-12-01

    The Fontana Lapilli deposit was erupted in late Pleistocene from a vent located around Masaya volcano (Nicaragua) and represents the product of one of the largest basaltic plinian eruptions studied so far. This eruption evolved from an initial sequence of short hawaiian-strombolian pulses via a moderately explosive phase to the main series of quasi-steady plinian episodes depositing fallout beds of highly-vesicular basaltic- andesite scorias (SiO2 ~ 53 wt%). Even though a few well preserved outcrops in medial area allowed the temporal evolution of the eruption to be well constrained, the lack of deposit exposure in proximal and distal areas prevents crucial eruption parameters to be determined using standard techniques. As a result we have applied an inversion technique in combination with the forward model TEPHRA to achieve column height and total erupted mass of the main units of Fontana Lapilli eruption. The power of this technique is that input parameters are not estimated a priori as in forward modelling but it automates the process of searching for optimal parameters employing a mathematical algorithm to guide the search for the best-fit parameter set. Results on the column height well agree with field data, whereas estimation of the total erupted mass show a significant discrepancy with values obtained using standard techniques. Such a discrepancy significantly affects the estimate of other important parameters, like mass discharge rate and eruption duration. The application of inversion techniques confirms the problematic of uncertainties associated with field data often used as input factors in numerical models, suggesting that numerical solutions should be preferred to curve- fitting techniques for the determination of eruption parameters above all in cases of poor deposit exposure.

  13. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-09-26

    Many volcanic hazard factors--such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses--relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11-15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011-2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide.

  14. Scabies with bullous pemphigoid - like eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah H

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Association of scabies with a bullus pemphigoid - like eruption is being reported because of its rarity. Histopathology revealed subepidermal bullae with intact basal layer. Treatment with topical gammabenzene hexachloride and systemic antibiotics was effective.

  15. Scabies with bullous pemphigoid - like eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Shah H; Mehta A; Shah K; trivedi A

    2003-01-01

    Association of scabies with a bullus pemphigoid - like eruption is being reported because of its rarity. Histopathology revealed subepidermal bullae with intact basal layer. Treatment with topical gammabenzene hexachloride and systemic antibiotics was effective.

  16. Scabies with bullous pemphigoid - like eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah H

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Association of scabies with a bullus pemphigoid - like eruption is being reported because of its rarity. Histopathology revealed subepidermal bullae with intact basal layer. Treatment with topical gammabenzene hexachloride and systemic antibiotics was effective.

  17. Fixed drug eruption due to paracetamol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Kushwah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruption is a common type of drug eruption seen in dermatology OPD’s. Usually it is seen with sulphonamides, salicylates, tetracyclines, oxyphenbutazones, dapsone, barbiturates, phenolphthalein, morphine, codeine, quinine, phenacetin, erythromycin, griseofulvin, mebendazole etc. We hereby report a case of fixed drug eruption due to single dose of oral paracetamol in an otherwise healthy male after one hour of consuming it. A provisional diagnosis of Paracetamol induced fixed drug eruption was made. Paracetamol was stopped and patient advised never to take Paracetamol in future. Patient was managed with prednisolone 10mg /day, cetirizine 10 mg/day, and amoxicillin 500 mg twice a day and mometasone + fusidic acid cream to be applied over the lesions. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(6.000: 833-835

  18. Eruptive seborrheic keratoses associated with adalimumab use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Kristin L; Knezevich, Stevan R; Raugi, Gregory J

    2013-06-30

    Seborrheic keratoses are common, benign cutaneous growths, however in rare situations they can acutely erupt in large numbers. Eruptive seborrheic keratoses can be associated with internal malignancy (sign of Leser-Trelat), but may also appear in conjunction with inflammatory dermatoses and adverse drug reactions. A 71-year-old Caucasian man presented with acute onset of a pruritic, burning papular erythematous rash on his chest, upper extremities and lower extremities after a routine adalimumab injection for rheumatoid arthritis. Two skin biopsies obtained showed findings diagnostic of seborrheic keratoses. Spontaneous resolution of the diffuse eruptive seborrheic keratoses was achieved within 3 months of discontinuing adalimumab therapy. We believe the development of eruptive seborrheic keratoses due to adalimumab therapy is rare, and because our patient responded promptly to discontinuation of the drug we suggest this should be the preferred course of action in future cases.

  19. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  20. Late Holocene Andesitic Eruptions at Mount Rainier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, T. W.; Vallance, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    Holocene Mt. Rainier erupted much more frequently than is recorded by its 11 pumiceous tephras. In the 2.6-2.2 ka Summerland eruptive period, 6 groups of thin (1-5 mm) Sparsely Vesicular Glassy (SVG) ashes were deposited (S1-S6), followed by the 0.3 km3 C-tephra. Two groups of andesitic lava flows and one andesitic block-and-ash flow (2.45 ka) also erupted in the Summerland period (ice conceals any other products). Based on glass composition the pyroclastic flow correlates with S4 ashes that also contain pumiceous grains and rare pumice lapilli. The first of the lava groups, exposed in windows through the Emmons and Winthrop glaciers, is Sr-rich for Mt. Rainier eruptives and correlates with S5 & S6 ashes based on similar high-Sr plagioclase. The ensuing C-tephra formed by plinian eruption of mixed and mingled magma comprising 4 juvenile components: mixed porphyritic andesite pumice, crystal-poor andesite scoria, vesicular high-Sr dacite blebs in pumice and scoria, and poorly inflated crystal-rich high-Sr dacite. High-Sr components were probably entrained conduit linings and segregations from the preceding high-Sr eruptions. The youngest lava group, exposed at the summit, is normal-Sr andesite lacking mixing textures of the C-tephra, and represents eruption of another small batch of andesitic magma perhaps just after the C event. SVG ash grains have blocky-to-fluidal shapes, are rich in plagioclase microlites, and their glasses are high-SiO2 (66-78%) and low-Al2O3 (15-11%). Melting experiments yield apparent equilibration pressures <50MPa for SVG liquids. SVG ashes likely result from shallow hydromagmatic explosions as largely degassed magmas transited the upper-edifice hydrothermal system during effusive eruptions. Rare pumice lapilli codeposited with S1, S2, and S4 ashes have microlite-free dacitic glasses, one with nonreacted hbl phenocrysts. These pumice formed from magmas that ascended rapidly from reservoir depths, synchronous with or closely between effusive

  1. Three Super Active Regions in the Descending Phase of Solar Cycle 23

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Qi Zhang; Jiang-Tao Su; Juan Guo; Xiao-Fan Wang; Ke-Liang Hu; Gang-Hua Lin; Dong-Guang Wang; Xing-Ming Bao; Yin Zhang; Ji-Hong Liu; Shu-Dong Bao; Yuan-Yong Deng; Wei Li; Jie Chen; Jin-Ping Dun

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the magnetic configurations of three super active regions,NOAA 10484, 10486 and 10488, observed by the Huairou Multi-Channel Solar Telescope (MCST) from 2003 October 18 to November 4. Many energetic phenomena,such as flares (including a X-28 flare) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), occurred during this period. We think that strong shear and fast emergence of magnetic flux are the main causes of these events. The question is also of great interest why these dramatic eruptions occurred so close together in the descending phase of the solar cycle.

  2. Chronology and volcanology of the 1949 multi-vent rift-zone eruption on La Palma (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klügel, A.; Schmincke, H.-U.; White, J. D. L.; Hoernle, K. A.

    1999-12-01

    The compositionally zoned San Juan eruption on La Palma emanated from three eruptive centers located along a north-south-trending rift zone in the south of the island. Seismic precursors began weakly in 1936 and became strong in March 1949, with their foci progressing from the north of the rift zone towards its south. This suggests that magma ascended beneath the old Taburiente shield volcano and moved southward along the rift. The eruption began on June 24, 1949, with phreatomagmatic activity at Duraznero crater on the ridgetop (ca. 1880 m above sea level), where five vents erupted tephritic lava along a 400-m-long fissure. On June 8, the Duraznero vents shut down abruptly, and the activity shifted to an off-rift fissure at Llano del Banco, located at ca. 550 m lower elevation and 3 km to the northwest. This eruptive center issued initially tephritic aa and later basanitic pahoehoe lava at high rates, producing a lava flow that entered the sea. Two days after basanite began to erupt at Llano del Banco, Hoyo Negro crater (ca. 1880 m asl), located 700 m north of Duraznero along the rift, opened on July 12 and produced ash and bombs of basanitic to phonotephritic composition in violent phreatomagmatic explosions ( White and Schmincke, 1999). Llano del Banco and Hoyo Negro were simultaneously active for 11 days and showed a co-variance of their eruption rates indicating a shallow hydraulic connection. On July 30, after 3 days of quiescence at all vents, Duraznero and Hoyo Negro became active again during a final eruptive phase. Duraznero issued basanitic lava at high rates for 12 h and produced a lava flow that descended towards the east coast. The lava contains ca. 1 vol.% crustal and mantle xenoliths consisting of 40% tholeiitic gabbros from the oceanic crust, 35% alkaline gabbros, and 20% ultramafic cumulates. The occurrence of xenoliths almost exclusively in the final lava is consistent with their origin by wall-rock collapse at depth near the end of the eruption

  3. Super-translations and super-rotations at the horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Donnay, Laura; Gonzalez, Hernan A; Pino, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    We show that the asymptotic symmetries close to non-extremal black hole horizons are generated by an extension of super-translations. This group is generated by a semi-direct sum of Virasoro and abelian currents. The charges associated to the asymptotic Killing symmetries satisfy the same algebra. When considering the special case of the stationary black hole, the zero mode charges correspond to the angular momentum and the entropy at the horizon.

  4. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  5. Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes, central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, J.L.; Garcia, P.A.; Arce, J.L.; Siebe, C.; Espindola, J.M.; Komorowski, J.C.; Scott, K.

    1997-01-01

    This field guide describes a five day trip to examine deposits of Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes in central Mexico. We will discuss the stratigraphy, petrology, and sedimentological characteristics of these deposits which provide insights into the eruptive history, type of volcanic activity, and transport and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic materials. These parameters will allow us to discuss the kinds of hazards and the risk that they pose to populations around these volcanoes. The area to be visited is tectonically complex thus we will also discuss the location of the volcanoes with respect to the tectonic environment. The first four days of the field trip will be dedicated to Nevado de Toluca Volcano (19 degrees 09'N; 99 degrees 45'W) located at 23 km. southwest of the City of Toluca, and is the fourth highest peak in the country, reaching an elevation of 4,680 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.). Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano, composed of a central vent excavated upon the remains of older craters destroyed by former events. Bloomfield and Valastro, (1974, 1977) concluded that the last cycle of activity occurred nearly equal 11,600 yr. ago. For this reason Nevado de Toluca has been considered an extinct volcano. Our studies, however, indicate that Nevado de Toluca has had at least two episodes of cone destruction by sector collapse as well as several explosive episodes including plinian eruptions and dome-destruction events. These eruptions occurred during the Pleistocene but a very young eruption characterized by surge and ash flows occurred ca. 3,300 yr. BP. This new knowledge of the volcano's eruptive history makes the evaluation of its present state of activity and the geological hazards necessary. This is important because the area is densely populated and large cities such as Toluca and Mexico are located in its proximity.

  6. Mafic Plinian eruptions: Is fast ascent required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szramek, Lindsay Ann

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that for a Plinian eruption of mafic magma to occur, that magma must ascend rapidly from the chamber to cause it to fragment into a jet containing juvenile and nonjuvenile tephra. To determine how fast mafic Plinian magmas need to travel to the level of fragmentation, a number of decompression experiments were carried out on two hydrous mafic magmas, and the results are compared to the products of two well-documented mafic Plinian eruptions: the basaltic andesite Fontana eruption of Masaya (Nicaragua) and the hawaiite 122 B.C. eruption of Etna (Italy). Comparison of natural and experimental textures shows that the Fontana eruption can be replicated in the lab at decompression rates between 0.1 MPa s-1 and 0.2 MPa s-1. This decompression rate is faster than any previously determined experimentally rate for more silicic eruptions. The hawaiite was unable to be reproduced in the lab. The natural groundmass is highly crystalline, which would have raised the viscosity of the initial melt by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which may not be enough to cause fragmentation.

  7. Impact of an extremely large magnitude volcanic eruption on the global climate and carbon cycle estimated from ensemble Earth System Model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Segschneider

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of the global climate-carbon cycle system to an extremely large Northern Hemisphere mid latitude volcanic eruption is investigated using ensemble integrations with the comprehensive Earth System Model MPI-ESM. The model includes dynamical compartments of the atmosphere and ocean and interactive modules of the terrestrial biosphere as well as ocean biogeochemistry. The MPI-ESM was forced with anomalies of aerosol optical depth and effective radius of aerosol particles corresponding to a super eruption of the Yellowstone volcanic system. The model experiment consists of an ensemble of fifteen model integrations that are started at different pre-ENSO states of a contol experiment and run for 200 yr after the volcanic eruption. The climate response to the volcanic eruption is a maximum global monthly mean surface air temperature cooling of 3.8 K for the ensemble mean and from 3.3 K to 4.3 K for individual ensemble members. Atmospheric pCO2 decreases by a maximum of 5 ppm for the ensemble mean and by 3 ppm to 7 ppm for individual ensemble members approximately 6 yr after the eruption. The atmospheric carbon content only very slowly returns to near pre-eruption level at year 200 after the eruption. The ocean takes up carbon shortly after the eruption in response to the cooling, changed wind fields, and ice cover. This physics driven uptake is weakly counteracted by a reduction of the biological export production mainly in the tropical Pacific. The land vegetation pool shows a distinct loss of carbon in the initial years after the eruption which has not been present in simulations of smaller scale eruptions. The gain of the soil carbon pool determines the amplitude of the CO2 perturbation and the long term behaviour of the overall system: an initial gain caused by reduced soil respiration is followed by a rather slow return towards pre-eruption levels. During this phase, the ocean compensates partly for the

  8. DIRECT SPATIAL ASSOCIATION OF AN X-RAY FLARE WITH THE ERUPTION OF A SOLAR QUIESCENT FILAMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Foord, Adi, E-mail: gordon.d.holman@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-05-10

    Solar flares primarily occur in active regions. Hard X-ray flares have been found to occur only in active regions. They are often associated with the eruption of active region filaments and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). CMEs can also be associated with the eruption of quiescent filaments, not located in active regions. Here we report the first identification of a solar X-ray flare outside an active region observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The X-ray emission was directly associated with the eruption of a long, quiescent filament and fast CME. Images from RHESSI show this flare emission to be located along a section of the western ribbon of the expanding, post-eruption arcade. EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly show no connection between this location and nearby active regions. Therefore the flare emission is found not to be located in or associated with an active region. However, a nearby, small, magnetically strong dipolar region provides a likely explanation for the existence and location of the flare X-ray emission. This emerging dipolar region may have also triggered the filament eruption.

  9. Role of Loss of Equilibrium and Magnetic Reconnection in Coronal Eruptions: Resistive and Hall MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Forbes, T. G.

    2008-12-01

    It has long been suggested that eruptive phenomena such as coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and large flares might be caused by a loss of equilibrium in a coronal flux rope (Van Tend and Kuperus, 1978). Forbes et al. (1994) developed an analytical two-dimensional model in which eruptions occur due to a catastrophic loss of equilibrium and relaxation to a lower-energy state containing a thin current sheet. Magnetic reconnection then intervenes dynamically, leading to the release of magnetic energy and expulsion of a plasmoid. We have carried out high-Lundquist-number simulations to test the loss-of equilibrium mechanism, and demonstrated that it does indeed occur in the quasi-ideal limit. We have studied the subsequent dynamical evolution of the system in resistive and Hall MHD models for single as well as multiple arcades. The typical parallel electric fields are super-Dreicer, which makes it necessary to include collisionless effects via a generalized Ohm's law. It is shown that the nature of the local dissipation mechanism has a significant effect on the global geometry and dynamics of the magnetic configuration. The presence of Hall currents is shown to alter the length of the current sheet and the jets emerging from the reconnection site, directed towards the chromosphere. Furthermore, Hall MHD effects break certain symmetries of resistive MHD dynamics, and we explore their observational consequences.

  10. Towards an Improved Eruptive History for Mauritius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. C.; White, W. M.; Paul, D.

    2007-12-01

    The volcanic island of Mauritius (20°20' S, 57°30' E) is located in the western Indian Ocean, and is understood to be the product of the Réunion mantle plume. Mauritius has a well-established history of episodic volcanism and erosional hiatus, traditionally characterized as three chemically and temporally distinct eruptive phases: 1) the voluminous shield-building lavas of the Older Series (7.8 to 5.5 Ma), 2) the Intermediate Series (3.5 to 1.9 Ma), and 3) the Younger Series (1.00 to 0.00 Ma; Duncan, unpublished data). The Older Series is exposed in remnants of the old shield volcano and is hence analogous to the Hawaiian shield-building phase. Lavas of the Intermediate and Younger Series cover 90% or more of the surface of the island, but are thought to be volumetrically minor. The Intermediate and Younger Series are enriched in incompatible elements, and but have more depleted isotopic signatures than the Older Series and in this and other ways are analogous to Hawaiian post-erosional volcanism. Recent collaboration with the Mauritian Water Resources Unit has permitted the study of a series of newly available drill cores. Dense sampling of a 220-meter core section (#89, Beau Bois, 20°12'25.9'' S, 57°33'50.8'' E) has revealed the presence of nine flow sequences, separated by highly weathered and altered basalt and lateritic soils varying in thickness up to 20 meters. The drill site is located on Intermediate Series lavas, approximately one kilometer inside the topographic rim of the large central caldera complex. Isotopic analysis shows relatively uniform 87Sr/86Sr (0.70377 ± 0.00018) and ǎrepsilonNd (+5.1 ± 0.3) throughout the upper 180 meters of the core. These compositions match those previously reported for the rejuvenescent Intermediate and Younger Series. The deepest sample has more enriched 87Sr/86Sr (0.70422) and ǎrepsilonNd (+4.1), values that fall well within previously established fields for the Older Series. In contrast to recent work ( Paul

  11. Gas-driven eruptions at Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand: towards a coherent model of eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, G. N.; Mader, H. M.; Mangan, M.; Blundy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Mt. Ruapehu is an andesitic cone volcano situated at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone. The summit plateau at Ruapehu consists of three craters (South, Central and North). Historical activity has consisted of frequent small phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions from South Crater. The active vents of South Crater are submerged beneath Crater Lake - a warm, acidic lake. The most recent eruption at Ruapehu occurred on 25th September, 2007 that generated a moderate steam column to about 4.5 km above Crater Lake, and a directed ballistic and surge deposit of coarse blocks and ash to the north of Crater Lake. It also initiated lahars in two catchments. The eruption occurred during the ski season and it resulted in the temporary closure of the three ski fields. Seismicity for the main eruption lasted for about 4 minutes and included an explosive phase which lasted for less than 1 minute and a post-explosion phase which probably indicated resonance in the conduit together with signals generated from lahars and vent stabilisation. Preceding seismicity occurred ~ 10 min before the eruption. The 2007 eruption appears strikingly similar to phreatic/phreatomagmatic eruptions of 1969 and 1975. In those eruptions, limited precursory seismicity was recorded, the bulk of the erupted deposits were accidental lithics, including lake sediments and older lavas, and only a small amount of juvenile material was erupted (~ 5%). It is likely that all three eruptions were driven by magmatic gases, either stored and pressurised beneath a hydrothermal seal, or rapidly exsolved during a gas release event. This poster outlines the plan that we will use to model this common type of eruption at Ruapehu. We will analyse the volatile content of phenocryst-hosted melt inclusions to determine the degassing depth of historic eruptions. This will allow us to identify where the magmas have been or are degassing beneath Crater Lake. Analogue modelling of gas and fluid flow through a visco

  12. Dry? or Wet? Magma-Water Interaction during Minoan-Thera Eruption of Santorini depicted from 3D morphological analysis of Ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydar, E.; Ecochard, E.; Çiner, A.; Fouache, E.

    2012-04-01

    Powerful and, catastrophic Minoan-Thera eruption of Santorini occurred at mid-second millennium BC (~3300 BP) produced totally 30 km3 DRE of tephras (Sigurdsson et al., 1990; Pyle, 1990). Magnitude of Minoan-Thera of Santorini Late Bronze Age eruption was estimated as 6 (Colossal) to 7(super colossal) corresponding to Plinian/Ultraplinian style activity according to Volcanic Explosivity Index (McCoy&Heiken,2000). During this one of the largest eruptions in the human history, vent properties and eruption dynamics have changed from dry plinian phase (first phase) to wet phreatomagmatic surges and to pyroclastic flows, comprising of four distinct phases. Convective eruption cloud formed in the first phase was under influence of westerly winds, according to numerous published papers, extending toward east-northeast-southeast, toward Black Sea, Turkey, Mediterannean Sea. We drilled Letoon Plain, southwestern coast of Turkey and cut 3 cm thick tephra deposit overlying an organic material-rich layer dated as 1612 BC (C14, AMS method), corresponding well to the age of Minoan-Thera eruption. The iron content of Minoan-Thera tephras (≥ 2%) is higher than Turkish tephras (in general 2 as polyhedron - multifractal unvesiculated glassy ashes. Meanwhile, blocky-equant ashes have SA/PA nature of the first phase of Minoan-Thera is not purely magmatic as it was classically claimed in most of the previous works.

  13. 伦敦SuperDesign展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柚子

    2011-01-01

    近日,英国伦敦Super Design展在伦敦Wakefield大街的The Dairy展厅如期举行。本次展览展出了来自包括知名设计师和新兴设计师的特别定制的工作室作品:到如今已经是第五个年头的伦敦Super Deslgn展,力图强发展,展出形式别出心裁、独树一帜,从一个崭新.活跃的角度集展示当代艺术。

  14. Super-stable Poissonian structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we characterize classes of Poisson processes whose statistical structures are super-stable. We consider a flow generated by a one-dimensional ordinary differential equation, and an ensemble of particles ‘surfing’ the flow. The particles start from random initial positions, and are propagated along the flow by stochastic ‘wave processes’ with general statistics and general cross correlations. Setting the initial positions to be Poisson processes, we characterize the classes of Poisson processes that render the particles’ positions—at all times, and invariantly with respect to the wave processes—statistically identical to their initial positions. These Poisson processes are termed ‘super-stable’ and facilitate the generalization of the notion of stationary distributions far beyond the realm of Markov dynamics.

  15. Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Higashi Mozumi, Hida city, Gifu prefecture (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Results on atmospheric neutrino analysis at Super-Kamiokande I is presented. The whole data set of atmospheric neutrino sample in Super-Kamiokande I is consistently explained with an assumption of pure {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations. The allowed range of parameters is 1.5x10{sup -3}<{delta}m{sup 2}<3.4x10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}2{theta}>0.92 at 90% C.L. In the oscillation analysis, we improved the treatment of systematic errors so that they can be considered as independent. This makes possible to find which systematic errors have larger effect on the analysis results. Some sensitivity studies under several assumptions of improvements in systematic errors are presented.

  16. The Next Generation Microlensing Search: SuperMacho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, A; Cook, K; Hiriart, R; Keller, S; Miknaitis, G; Nilolaev, S; Olsen, K; Prochter, G; Rest, A; Schmidt, B; Smith, C; Stubbs, C; Suntzeff, N; Welch, D; Becker, A; Clocchiati, A; Covarrubias, R

    2003-10-27

    Past microlensing experiments such as the MACHO project have discovered the presence of a larger than expected number of microlensing events toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These events could represent a large fraction of the dark matter in the halo of our Galaxy, if they are indeed due to halo lenses. However the locations of most of the lenses are poorly defined. The SuperMacho project will detect and follow up {approx}60 microlensing events exhibiting special properties due to binarity, etc., will allow us to better determine the location and nature of the lenses causing the LMC microlensing events.

  17. The Era of Super Capitalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The world has entered the "super capitalism" era when one third of its economic activities are controlled by less than 3 percent of global financial capital. This year,a global economic recession,triggered by the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis,seems unavoidable. To tackle international financial problems,Tao Dong,Chief Economist for Asia at Credit Suisse First Boston in Hong Kong,shared his insights with China Business Journal. Excerpts follow.

  18. The occurrence of Mt Barca flank eruption in the evolution of the NW periphery of Etna volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, S.; Del Carlo, P.; Lo Castro, M. D.; de Beni, E.; Wijbrans, J.

    2009-01-01

    Geological surveys, tephrostratigraphic study, and 40Ar/39Ar age determinations have allowed us to chronologically constrain the geological evolution of the lower NW flank of Etna volcano and to reconstruct the eruptive style of the Mt Barca flank eruption. This peripheral sector of the Mt Etna edifice, corresponding to the upper Simeto valley, was invaded by the Ellittico volcano lava flows between 41 and 29 ka ago when the Mt Barca eruption occurred. The vent of this flank eruption is located at about 15 km away from the summit craters, close to the town of Bronte. The Mt Barca eruption was characterized by a vigorous explosive activity that produced pyroclastic deposits dispersed eastward and minor effusive activity with the emission of a 1.1-km-long lava flow. Explosive activity was characterized by a phreatomagmatic phase followed by a magmatic one. The geological setting of this peripheral sector of the volcano favors the interaction between the rising magma and the shallow groundwater hosted in the volcanic pile resting on the impermeable sedimentary basement. This process produced phreatomagmatic activity in the first phase of the eruption, forming a pyroclastic fall deposit made of high-density, poorly vesicular scoria lapilli and lithic clasts. Conversely, during the second phase, a typical strombolian fall deposit formed. In terms of hazard assessment, the possible occurrence of this type of highly explosive flank eruption, at lower elevation in the densely inhabited areas, increases the volcanic risk in the Etnean region and widens the already known hazard scenario.

  19. The role of dyking and fault control in the rapid onset of eruption at Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, C.; De La, Llera; Lara, L.E.; Lowenstern, J.

    2011-01-01

    Rhyolite is the most viscous of liquid magmas, so it was surprising that on 2 May 2008 at Chaitén Volcano, located in Chile’s southern Andean volcanic zone, rhyolitic magma migrated from more than 5 km depth in less than 4 hours and erupted explosively with only two days of detected precursory seismic activity. The last major rhyolite eruption before that at Chaitén was the largest volcanic eruption in the twentieth century, at Novarupta volcano, Alaska, in 1912. Because of the historically rare and explosive nature of rhyolite eruptions and because of the surprisingly short warning before the eruption of the Chaitén volcano, any information about the workings of the magmatic system at Chaitén, and rhyolitic systems in general, is important from both the scientific and hazard perspectives. Here we present surface deformation data related to the Chaitén eruption based on radar interferometry observations from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) DAICHI (ALOS) satellite. The data on this explosive rhyolite eruption indicate that the rapid ascent of rhyolite occurred through dyking and that melt segregation and magma storage were controlled by existing faults.

  20. The role of dyking and fault control in the rapid onset of eruption at Chaitén volcano, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Charles; de la Llera, Juan Carlos; Lara, Luis E; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2011-10-19

    Rhyolite is the most viscous of liquid magmas, so it was surprising that on 2 May 2008 at Chaitén Volcano, located in Chile's southern Andean volcanic zone, rhyolitic magma migrated from more than 5 km depth in less than 4 hours (ref. 1) and erupted explosively with only two days of detected precursory seismic activity. The last major rhyolite eruption before that at Chaitén was the largest volcanic eruption in the twentieth century, at Novarupta volcano, Alaska, in 1912. Because of the historically rare and explosive nature of rhyolite eruptions and because of the surprisingly short warning before the eruption of the Chaitén volcano, any information about the workings of the magmatic system at Chaitén, and rhyolitic systems in general, is important from both the scientific and hazard perspectives. Here we present surface deformation data related to the Chaitén eruption based on radar interferometry observations from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) DAICHI (ALOS) satellite. The data on this explosive rhyolite eruption indicate that the rapid ascent of rhyolite occurred through dyking and that melt segregation and magma storage were controlled by existing faults.

  1. BEWARE OF...SUPER GLUES!!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    What happened? A number of accidents have occurred with the use of 'Super Glues'. Some individuals have suffered injuries - severe irritation, or skin bonded together - through getting glue on their face and in their eyes. What are the hazards associated with glues? 'Super Glues' (i.e. cyanoacrylates): Are harmful if swallowed and are chemical irritants to the eyes, respiratory system and skin. Present the risk of polymerization (hardening) leading to skin damage. Be careful ! 'Super Glues' can bond to skin and eyes in seconds. Note: Other glues, resins and hardeners are also chemicals and as such can cause serious damage to the skin, eyes, respiratory or digestive tract. (For example: some components can be toxic, harmful, corrosive, sensitizing agents, etc.). How to prevent accidents in the future? Read the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for all of the glues you work with. Check the label on the container to find out which of the materials you work with are hazardous. Wear the right Per...

  2. Super-Eccentric Migrating Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Socrates, Aristotle; Dong, Subo; Tremaine, Scott

    2011-01-01

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e=0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e>0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is \\dot a \\propto a^0.5 and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/dlog a\\propto a^0.5. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  3. SUPER-ECCENTRIC MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socrates, Aristotle; Katz, Boaz; Dong Subo; Tremaine, Scott [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e = 0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e > 0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is a-dot {proportional_to}a{sup 1/2} and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/d log a{proportional_to}a{sup 1/2}. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  4. REFIR - The operational FutureVolc multi-parameter system providing a best estimate of mass eruption rate during ongoing eruptions in near real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürig, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash injected into the atmosphere poses a serious threat for aviation. Forecasting the concentration of ash promptly requires detailed knowledge of eruption source parameters. However, monitoring an ongoing eruption and quantifying the mass flux in real-time is a considerable challenge. Due to the large uncertainties affecting present-day models, best estimates are often obtained by the application of integrated approaches. One example for this strategy is represented by the EU supersite project "FutureVolc" which aims to monitor eruptions of volcanoes in Iceland. A quasi-autonomous multi-parameter system, denoted "REFIR", has been developed. REFIR makes use of streaming data provided by a multitude of sensors, e.g. by C- and X-band radars, web-cam based plume height tracking systems, imaging ultra-violet and infrared cameras and electric field sensors. These observations are used with plume models that also consider the current local wind and other atmospheric conditions, and a best estimate of source parameters, including the mass eruption rate, is provided in near real-time (within a time interval of 5 minutes) as soon as an eruption has started. Since neither the time nor the location of the next Icelandic eruption is known the system has been developed with a guiding principle of maximum flexibility, and it can effortlessly be implemented elsewhere needing minimum adoption to local conditions. Moreover, it is designed to be easily upgraded, which allows future extension of the existing monitoring network, learning from new events, and incorporating new technologies and model improvements. Data-flow, features and integrated models within REFIR will be presented and strategies for implementing potential future research developments on ash plume dynamics will be discussed.

  5. Impact of explosive volcanic eruptions on the main climate variability modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingedouw, Didier; Mignot, Juliette; Ortega, Pablo; Khodri, Myriam; Menegoz, Martin; Cassou, Christophe; Hanquiez, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    Volcanic eruptions eject largeamounts of materials into the atmosphere, which can have an impact on climate. In particular, the sulphur dioxide gas released in the stratosphere leads to aerosol formation that reflects part of the incoming solar radiation, thereby affecting the climate energy balance. In this review paper, we analyse the regional climate imprints of large tropical volcanic explosive eruptions. For this purpose, we focus on the impact on three major climatic modes, located in the Atlantic (the North Atlantic Oscillation: NAO and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation: AMO) and Pacific (the El Niño Southern Oscillation, ENSO) sectors. We present an overview of the chain of events that contributes to modifying the temporal variability of these modes. Our literature review is complemented by new analyses based on observations of the instrumental era as well as on available proxy records and climate model simulations that cover the last millennium. We show that the impact of volcanic eruptions of the same magnitude or weaker than 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the NAO and ENSO is hard to detect, due to the noise from natural climate variability. There is however a clear impact of the direct radiative forcing resulting from tropical eruptions on the AMO index both in reconstructions and climate model simulations of the last millennium, while the impact on the ocean circulation remains model-dependent. To increase the signal to noise ratio and better evaluate the climate response to volcanic eruptions, improved reconstructions of these climatic modes and of the radiative effect of volcanic eruptions are required on a longer time frame than the instrumental era. Finally, we evaluate climate models' capabilities to reproduce the observed and anticipated impacts and mechanisms associated with volcanic forcing, and assess their potential for seasonal to decadal prediction. We find a very large spread in the simulated responses across the different climate

  6. Utilising Geological Field Measurements and Historic Eruption Volumes to Estimate the Volume of Santorini's Magma Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J.; Drymoni, K.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2015-12-01

    An understanding of the amount of magma available to supply any given eruption is useful for determining the potential eruption magnitude and duration. Geodetic measurements and inversion techniques are often used to constrain volume changes within magma chambers, as well as constrain location and depth, but such models are incapable of calculating total magma storage. For example, during the 2012 unrest period at Santorini volcano, approximately 0.021 km3 of new magma entered a shallow chamber residing at around 4 km below the surface. This type of event is not unusual, and is in fact a necessary condition for the formation of a long-lived shallow chamber, of which Santorini must possess. The period of unrest ended without culminating in eruption, i.e the amount of magma which entered the chamber was insufficient to break the chamber and force magma further towards the surface. We combine previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions at Santorini together with geodetic measurements. Measurements of dykes within the caldera wall provide an estimate of the volume of magma transported during eruptions, assuming the dyke does not become arrested. When the combined volume of a dyke and eruption are known (Ve) they can be used to estimate using fracture mechanics principles and poro-elastic constraints the size of an underlying shallow magma chamber. We present field measurements of dykes within Santorini caldera and provide an analytical method to estimate the volume of magma contained underneath Santorini caldera. In addition we postulate the potential volume of magma required as input from deeper sources to switch the shallow magma chamber from an equilibrium setting to one where the pressure inside the chamber exceeds the surrounding host rocks tensile strength, a condition necessary to form a dyke and a possible eruption.

  7. Maximum horizontal range of volcanic ballistic projectiles ejected during explosive eruptions at Santorini caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, K. I.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the hazard posed by Volcanic Ballistic Projectiles (VBPs) to the Santorini islands considering eruption scenarios that include low (VEI = 2-3) and higher energy (VEI > 3) eruptions. A model that describes rapid decompression of pressurized magma below a caprock along with its fragmentation and acceleration of particles is utilized for estimating initial velocities during vulcanian-style eruptions. These initial velocities are inserted into the ballistic equations assuming that VBPs have a cube-like shape, are subjected to gravity/drag forces and are launched into a zone of reduced drag. Four different diameters of VBPs are considered (0.35 m, 1.0 m, 2.0 m, 3.0 m) and also different values of gas fractions and extent of the reduced drag zone are investigated. The results of these calculations show that an area of 1-2 km width along the western coast of Thera will be within the maximum range of VBPs, provided that the eruptive vent will develop either on Nea Kameni or between Nea Kameni and Thera. Initial velocities for higher energy eruptions are estimated by considering the conversion efficiency of thermal to kinetic energy. For the case of an eruption with VEI = 4 and a number of vents centered between Nea and Palea Kameni, calculations show that the coastal areas of Thera and Therasia are within the maximum horizontal range of VBPs with diameter larger than 0.35 m. As the exact position of the eruptive vent seems to be of crucial importance for determining the areas at risk, continuous seismic and geodetic monitoring of the caldera is needed in order to decipher its likely location.

  8. Volcano shapes, entropies, and eruption probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Agust; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-05-01

    We propose that the shapes of polygenetic volcanic edifices reflect the shapes of the associated probability distributions of eruptions. In this view, the peak of a given volcanic edifice coincides roughly with the peak of the probability (or frequency) distribution of its eruptions. The broadness and slopes of the edifices vary widely, however. The shapes of volcanic edifices can be approximated by various distributions, either discrete (binning or histogram approximation) or continuous. For a volcano shape (profile) approximated by a normal curve, for example, the broadness would be reflected in its standard deviation (spread). Entropy (S) of a discrete probability distribution is a measure of the absolute uncertainty as to the next outcome/message: in this case, the uncertainty as to time and place of the next eruption. A uniform discrete distribution (all bins of equal height), representing a flat volcanic field or zone, has the largest entropy or uncertainty. For continuous distributions, we use differential entropy, which is a measure of relative uncertainty, or uncertainty change, rather than absolute uncertainty. Volcano shapes can be approximated by various distributions, from which the entropies and thus the uncertainties as regards future eruptions can be calculated. We use the Gibbs-Shannon formula for the discrete entropies and the analogues general formula for the differential entropies and compare their usefulness for assessing the probabilities of eruptions in volcanoes. We relate the entropies to the work done by the volcano during an eruption using the Helmholtz free energy. Many factors other than the frequency of eruptions determine the shape of a volcano. These include erosion, landslides, and the properties of the erupted materials (including their angle of repose). The exact functional relation between the volcano shape and the eruption probability distribution must be explored for individual volcanoes but, once established, can be used to

  9. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Valentine

    2001-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', presents information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. Many aspects of this work are aimed at resolution of the Igneous Activity Key Technical Issue (KTI) as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC 1998, p. 3), Subissues 1 and 2, which address the probability and consequence of igneous activity at the proposed repository site, respectively. Within the framework of the Disruptive Events Process Model Report (PMR), this AMR provides information for the calculations in two other AMRs ; parameters described herein are directly used in calculations in these reports and will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Compilation of this AMR was conducted as defined in the Development Plan, except as noted. The report begins with considerations of the geometry of volcanic feeder systems, which are of primary importance in predicting how much of a potential repository would be affected by an eruption. This discussion is followed by one of the physical and chemical properties of the magmas, which influences both eruptive styles and mechanisms for interaction with radioactive waste packages. Eruptive processes including the ascent velocity of magma at depth, the onset of bubble nucleation and growth in the rising magmas, magma fragmentation, and velocity of the resulting gas-particle mixture are then discussed. The duration of eruptions, their power output, and mass discharge rates are also described. The next section summarizes geologic constraints regarding the interaction between magma and waste packages. Finally, they discuss bulk grain size produced by relevant explosive eruptions and grain

  10. Flow-to-fracture transition in a volcanic mush plug may govern normal eruptions at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, J.; Keller, T.; Cashman, K. V.; Persson, P.-O.

    2016-12-01

    Stromboli is a model volcano for studying eruptions driven by degassing. The current paradigm posits that Strombolian eruptions represent the bursting of gas slugs ascending through melt-filled conduits, but petrological observations show that magma at shallow depth is crystalline enough to form a three-phase plug consisting of crystals, bubbles, and melt. We combine a 1-D model of gas flushing a crystalline mush with a 3-D stress model. Our results suggest that localized gas segregation establishes hot conduits of mobile magma within a stagnant plug. The plug is prone to tensile failure controlled by gas overpressure and tectonic stress, with failure most likely beneath the observed vent locations. We hence argue that Strombolian eruptions are related to plug failure rather than flow. Our proposed three-phase model of the shallow plumbing system may provide a promising framework for integrating geophysical, petrological, and morphological observations at Stromboli and in open-system volcanism more generally.

  11. Records of Toba eruptions in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LlANG; Xirong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Rose,W. I., Chesner, C. A., Dispersal of ash in the great Toba eruption, 75 ka, Geology, 1987, 15: 913-917.[2]Acharyya, S. K., Basu, P. K. ,Toba ash on the Indian subcontinent and its implications for correlation of late Pleistocene alluvium, Quaternary Research, 1993, 40: 10-19.[3]Shane, P., Westgate, J., Williams, M. et al., New geochemical evidence for the youngest Toba Tuff in India, Quaternary Research, 1995, 44: 200-204.[4]Westgate, J. A., Sha ne, P. A. R., Pearce, N. J. G. et al., All Toba occurrences across Peninsular India belong to the 75000yr B. P. eruption, Quaternary Research, 1998, 50:107-112.[5]Pattan, J. N., Shane, P., Banakar, V. K., New occurrences of youngest Toba Tuff in abyssal sediments of the Central Indian Basin, Marine Geology, 1999, 155: 243-248.[6]Gasparotto, G., Spadafora, E,, Summa, V. et al., Contribution of grain size and compositional data from the Bengal Fan sediment to the understanding of Toba volcanic event, Marine Geology, 2000, 162: 561-572.[7]Dehn, J., Farrell, J. W., Schmincke, H. U., Neogene tephrochronology from Site 758 on northern Ninetyeast Ridge: Indon isian arc volcanism of the Past 5 Ma, Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results (eds. Weissel, J. P.,Taylor, E., Alt, J. et al.), College Station, Texas, Ocean Drilling Program, 1991, 121: 273-295.[8]Lee M. Y., Wet, K. Y., Chen, Y. G., High-resolution oxygen isotope stratigraphy for the last 150000 years in the southern South China Sea, Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences TAO, 1999, 10: 239-254.[9]Biihring, C., Sarnthein, Toba ash layers in the South China Sea: Evidence of contrasting wind directions during eruption ca.74 ka, Geology, 2000, 28: 275-278.[10]Chesner, C. A., Petrogenesis of the Toba tuffs, Sumatra, Indonesia, Journal of Petrology, 1998, 39: 397-438.[11]Rampino, M. R., Self. S., Volcanic winter and accelerated glaciation follow ing the Toba super-eruption, Nature, 1992, 359:50-52.

  12. Towards a Mathematical Theory of Super-Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Candes, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops a mathematical theory of super-resolution. Broadly speaking, super-resolution is the problem of recovering the fine details of an object---the high end of its spectrum---from coarse scale information only---from samples at the low end of the spectrum. Suppose we have many point sources at unknown locations in $[0,1]$ and with unknown complex-valued amplitudes. We only observe Fourier samples of this object up until a frequency cut-off $f_c$. We show that one can super-resolve these point sources with infinite precision---i.e. recover the exact locations and amplitudes---by solving a simple convex program. This holds provided that the distance between sources is at least $2/f_c$. This result extends to higher dimensions and other models. In one dimension for instance, it is possible to recover a piecewise smooth function by resolving the discontinuity points with infinite precision as well. We also show that the theory and methods are robust to noise. In particular, we develop some theoreti...

  13. Geomorphologic evolution of the eruptive vent of September 2016 at Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergili, Martin; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Peltier, Aline

    2017-04-01

    The Piton de la Fournaise shield volcano on the island of La Réunion has been characterized by repeated activity since the first regular observations in the middle of the 17th century. It is shaped by a system of calderas of different ages, with the most recent one having formed in 2007 at the summit when the Cratère Dolomieu subsided by approx. 350 m within a short period of time. In the past years, activity has concentrated to several fissures and vents located along the outer slopes of the summit cone and within the surrounding caldera, Enclos Fouqué. The present contribution focuses on a geomorphologic description of the eruptive vent of the latest eruption that occurred between 11 and 18 September 2016 at Piton de la Fournaise. The course of the eruption will be illustrated through series of observations, photographs (compiled in time-lapse sequences) and geophysical data acquired by the instruments of the Volcanological Observatory (OVPF). Even though this eruption has been preceded by only a few long-term precursors, the dike propagation to the surface has been accompanied, as usual on this volcano, by a strong seismic crisis and ground deformation that lasted 56 minutes, from 03:45 to 04:41 Universal Time (UT). The beginning of the eruption has been marked by the appearance of the eruptive tremor on the seismic recordings at 04:41 UT. Ejection of lava fountains and the source of lava flows were observed on a length of approx. 1 km along the progressive opening of 7 en échelon fissures, from the northern slope of the summit cone down to the floor of the Enclos Fouqué caldera (elevation: 2340-2160 m asl). During the first hours, lava fountains were 15-30 m high. From the evening of 11 September, the fountain activity slowly confined to three (13 September) and then to two main vents (14 September) in the lower portion of the fissures. Those two vents finally coalesced on 15 September as an elongated cone where two eruptive outlets were still visible

  14. Reconstructing eruptive source parameters from tephra deposit: a numerical approach for medium-sized explosive eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Spanu, A; Barsotti, S

    2015-01-01

    Since the seventies, several reconstruction techniques have been proposed, and are currently used, to extrapolate and quantify eruptive parameters from sampled deposit datasets. Discrete numbers of tephra ground loadings or stratigraphic records are usually processed to estimate source eruptive values. Reconstruction techniques like Pyle, Power law and Weibull are adopted as standard to quantify the erupted mass (or volume) whereas Voronoi for reconstructing the granulometry. Reconstructed values can be affected by large uncertainty due to complexities occurring within the atmospheric dispersion and deposition of volcanic particles. Here we want to quantify the sensitivity of reconstruction techniques, and to quantify how much estimated values of mass and grain size differ from emitted and deposited ones. We adopted a numerical approach simulating with a dispersal code a mild explosive event occurring at Mt. Etna, with eruptive parameters similar to those estimated for eruptions occurred in the last decade. T...

  15. The historical (218 ± 14 aBP) explosive eruption of Tutupaca volcano (Southern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniego, Pablo; Valderrama, Patricio; Mariño, Jersy; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamín; Roche, Olivier; Manrique, Nélida; Chédeville, Corentin; Liorzou, Céline; Fidel, Lionel; Malnati, Judicaëlle

    2015-06-01

    The little known Tutupaca volcano (17° 01' S, 70° 21' W), located at the southern end of the Peruvian arc, is a dacitic dome complex that experienced a large explosive eruption during historical times. Based on historic chronicles and our radiometric data, this eruption occurred 218 ± 14 aBP, probably between 1787 and 1802 AD. This eruption was characterised by a large sector collapse that triggered a small debris avalanche (<1 km3) and an associated pyroclastic eruption whose bulk volume was 6.5-7.5 × 107 m3. Both units were emplaced synchronously and spread onto the plain situated to the northeast of Tutupaca volcano. The spatial and temporal relationship between the debris avalanche and the pyroclastic density current deposits, coupled with the petrological similarity between the juvenile fragments in the debris avalanche, the pyroclastic density current deposits and the pre-avalanche domes, indicates that juvenile magma was involved in the sector collapse. Large amounts of hydrothermally altered material are also found in the avalanche deposit. Thus, the ascent of a dacitic magma, coupled with the fact that the Tutupaca dome complex was constructed on top of an older, altered volcanic sequence, probably induced the destabilisation of the hydrothermally active edifice, producing the debris avalanche and its related pyroclastic density currents. This eruption probably represents the youngest debris avalanche in the Andes and was accompanied by one of the larger explosive events to have occurred in Southern Peru during historical times.

  16. Sympathetic Partial and Full Filament Eruptions Observed in One Solar Breakout Event

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yuandeng; Su, Jiangtao

    2012-01-01

    We report two sympathetic solar eruptions, including a partial and a full flux rope eruption in a quadrupolar magnetic region, where a large and a small filament resided above the middle and the east neutral lines respectively. The large filament first rose slowly at a speed of 8 km/s for 23 minutes and then it was accelerated to 102 km/s. Finally, this filament erupted successfully and caused a coronal mass ejection. During the slow rising phase, various evidence for breakout-like external reconnection has been identified at high and low temperature lines. The eruption of the small filament started around the end of the large filament's slow rising. This filament erupted partially and no associating coronal mass ejection could be detected. Based on a potential field extrapolation, we find that the topology of the three-dimensional coronal field above the source region is composed of three low-lying lobes and a large overlying flux system, and a null point located between the middle lobe and the overlying ant...

  17. Lidar Observations of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer After the Mt. Pinatubo Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Tomohiro; Uchino, Osamu; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    1992-01-01

    The volcano Mt. Pinatubo located on the Luzon Island, Philippines, had explosively erupted on June 15, 1991. The volcanic eruptions such as volcanic ash, SO2 and H2O reached into the stratosphere over 30 km altitude by the NOAA-11 satellite observation and this is considered one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in this century. A grandiose volcanic eruption influences the atmosphere seriously and causes many climatic effects globally. There had been many impacts on radiation, atmospheric temperature and stratospheric ozone after some past volcanic eruptions. The main cause of volcanic influence depends on stratospheric aerosol, that stay long enough to change climate and other meteorological conditions. Therefore it is very important to watch stratospheric aerosol layers carefully and continuously. Standing on this respect, we do not only continue stratospheric aerosol observation at Tsukuba but also have urgently developed another lidar observational point at Naha in Okinawa Island. This observational station could be thought valuable since there is no lidar observational station in this latitudinal zone and it is much nearer to Mt. Pinatubo. Especially, there is advantage to link up these two stations on studying the transportation mechanism in the stratosphere. In this paper, we present the results of lidar observations at Tsukuba and Naha by lidar systems with Nd:YAG laser.

  18. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km far from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  19. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and the Volcanic Ash Radar Retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  20. Pre-eruption Oscillations in Thin and Long Features in a Quiescent Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand D.; Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Morita, Satoshi; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the eruption of a quiescent filament located close to an active region. Large-scale activation was observed in only half of the filament in the form of pre-eruption oscillations. Consequently only this half erupted nearly 30 hr after the oscillations commenced. Time-slice diagrams of 171 Å images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly were used to study the oscillations. These were observed in several thin and long features connecting the filament spine to the chromosphere below. This study traces the origin of such features and proposes their possible interpretation. Small-scale magnetic flux cancellation accompanied by a brightening was observed at the footpoint of the features shortly before their appearance, in images recorded by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A slow rise of the filament was detected in addition to the oscillations, indicating a gradual loss of equilibrium. Our analysis indicates that a change in magnetic field connectivity between two neighbouring active regions and the quiescent filament resulted in a weakening of the overlying arcade of the filament, leading to its eruption. It is also suggested that the oscillating features are filament barbs, and the oscillations are a manifestation during the pre-eruption phase of the filaments.

  1. Observation of Magnetic reconnection at a 3D null point associated with a solar eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, J Q; Yang, K; Cheng, X; Ding, M D

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic null has long been recognized as a special structure serving as a preferential site for magnetic reconnection (MR). However, the direct observational study of MR at null-points is largely lacking. Here, we show the observations of MR around a magnetic null associated with an eruption that resulted in an M1.7 flare and a coronal mass ejection. The GOES X- ray profile of the flare exhibited two peaks at 02:23 UT and 02:40 UT on 2012 November 8, respectively. Based on the imaging observations, we find that the first and also primary X- ray peak was originated from MR in the current sheet underneath the erupting magnetic flux rope (MFR). On the other hand, the second and also weaker X-ray peak was caused by MR around a null-point located above the pre-eruption MFR. The interaction of the null-point and the erupting MFR can be described as a two-step process. During the first step, the erupting and fast expanding MFR passed through the null-point, resulting in a significant displacement of the magnetic fi...

  2. HST Images Flash Ionization of Old Ejecta by the 2011 Eruption of Recurrent Nova T Pyxidis

    CERN Document Server

    Shara, Michael M; Schaefer, Bradley E; Bond, Howard E; Godon, Patrick; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Pagnotta, Ashley; Prialnik, Dina; Sion, Edward M; Toraskar, Jayashree; Williams, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    T Pyxidis is the only recurrent nova surrounded by knots of material ejected in previous outbursts. Following the eruption that began on 2011 April 14.29, we obtained seven epochs (from 4 to 383 days after eruption) of Hubble Space Telescope narrowband Ha images of T Pyx . The flash of radiation from the nova event had no effect on the ejecta until at least 55 days after the eruption began. Photoionization of hydrogen located north and south of the central star was seen 132 days after the beginning of the eruption. That hydrogen recombined in the following 51 days, allowing us to determine a hydrogen atom density of at least 7e5 cm^-3 - at least an order of magnitude denser than the previously detected, unresolved [NII] knots surrounding T Pyx. Material to the northwest and southeast was photoionized between 132 and 183 days after the eruption began. 99 days later that hydrogen had recombined. Both then (282 days after outburst) and 101 days later, we detected almost no trace of hydrogen emission around T Pyx...

  3. River responses to the 2010 major eruption of the Merapi volcano, central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gob, Frédéric; Gautier, Emmanuèle; Virmoux, Clément; Grancher, Delphine; Tamisier, Vincent; Primanda, Kiki Widyaputra; Wibowo, Sandy Budi; Sarrazin, Caroline; de Belizal, Edouard; Ville, Anouk; Lavigne, Franck

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the fluvial readjustment of a Javanese river impacted by the major eruption of the Merapi volcano (Indonesia) in October and November 2010. The basin of the Opak River, located on the southern flank of the Merapi, was subject to substantial sediment input related to massive pyroclastic deposits that were remobilized by numerous lahars during the year after the eruption. Two study sites were equipped in order to evaluate the morphodynamic evolution of the riverbed of the Opak River. Topographic surveys, bedload particle marking, and suspended sediment sampling revealed an important sediment mobilization during efficient flash floods. Surprisingly, no bed aggradation related to the progradation of a sediment wave was observed. Two years after the eruptive event, marked bed incision was observed. The Opak River readjustment differs from that of other fluvial systems affected by massive eruptions in two ways. Firstly, local population extracted the sand and blocks injected by the eruption as they represent a valuable economic resource. Secondly, several dams trapped the major part of the sediment load remobilized by lahars.

  4. Mechanism of the 1996-97 non-eruptive volcano-tectonic earthquake swarm at Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, D.C.; Power, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of volcano-tectonic(VT) earthquake swarms, some of which are accompanied by ground deformation and/or volcanic gas emissions, do not culminate in an eruption.These swarms are often thought to represent stalled intrusions of magma into the mid- or shallow-level crust.Real-time assessment of the likelihood that a VTswarm will culminate in an eruption is one of the key challenges of volcano monitoring, and retrospective analysis of non-eruptive swarms provides an important framework for future assessments. Here we explore models for a non-eruptive VT earthquake swarm located beneath Iliamna Volcano, Alaska, in May 1996-June 1997 through calculation and inversion of fault-plane solutions for swarm and background periods, and through Coulomb stress modeling of faulting types and hypocenter locations observed during the swarm. Through a comparison of models of deep and shallow intrusions to swarm observations,we aim to test the hypothesis that the 1996-97 swarm represented a shallow intrusion, or "failed" eruption.Observations of the 1996-97 swarm are found to be consistent with several scenarios including both shallow and deep intrusion, most likely involving a relatively small volume of intruded magma and/or a low degree of magma pressurization corresponding to a relatively low likelihood of eruption. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Guided tooth eruption: Comparison of open and closed eruption techniques in labially impacted maxillary canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M londhe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: After third molars, the maxillary canines are the most commonly impacted permanent teeth and one-third of these are labial impactions. Impacted canines often require orthodontic guidance in the eruption. This study was conducted to assess the posttreatment results of surgically exposed and orthodontically aligned labially impacted maxillary canines comparing two different surgical techniques. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two phases, a surgical phase and an orthodontic phase. In surgical phase, events during surgical exposure and recovery of 31 patients with labially impacted maxillary canine were recorded. Patients were managed with open and closed eruption technique. The assessment included comparison of two techniques of surgical exposure, postoperative pain, mobility, vitality, periodontal health, level of impaction, and duration of orthodontic treatment. Results: The postoperative recovery was longer after open eruption than close eruption technique (P = 0.000. Postoperative pain experienced by patients was similar, but regression of pain was faster in closed eruption technique. The mean surgical time for open eruption technique was lesser when compared with closed eruption technique (P = 0.000. The total duration of orthodontic treatment was directly dependent upon the level of impaction, with deeper level of impaction having longer duration of orthodontic treatment. The mobility and vitality of guided canine was similar in both techniques. Conclusion: The closed eruption technique was a longer surgical procedure, but the postoperative pain regression was faster. The duration of orthodontic treatment was longer with deeper level of impaction. The closed eruption surgical techniques provide better periodontal tissues around the guided erupted teeth.

  6. How Frequently Can a "Supervolcano" Erupt? Rapid Emplacement of Voluminous Compositionally Diverse Ignimbrites, Central San Juan Calderas, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P. W.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    remain uniform. The more rapid sequential eruptions of large-volume compositionally diverse tuffs and lavas in the San Juan region document that repose periods between "super eruptions" can be shorter than previously recognized and that voluminous subcaldera magma systems can evolve rapidly.

  7. Seismicity and eruptive activity at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala: February 1975 -January 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, A.T.E.; McNutt, S.R.; Harlow, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    We examine seismic and eruptive activity at Fuego Volcano (14??29???N, 90?? 53???W), a 3800-m-high stratovolcano located in the active volcanic arc of Guatemala. Eruptions at Fuego are typically short-lived vulcanian eruptions producing ash falls and ash flows of high-alumina basalt. From February 1975 to December 1976, five weak ash eruptions occurred, accompanied by small earthquake swarms. Between 0 and 140 (average ??? 10) A-type or high-frequency seismic events per day with M > 0.5 were recorded during this period. Estimated thermal energies for each eruption are greater by a factor of 106 than cumulative seismic energies, a larger ratio than that reported for other volcanoes. Over 4000 A-type events were recorded January 3-7, 1977 (cumulative seismic energy ??? 109 joules), yet no eruption occurred. Five 2-hour-long pulses of intense seismicity separated by 6-hour intervals of quiescence accounted for the majority of events. Maximum likelihood estimates of b-values range from 0.7 ?? 0.2 to 2.1 ?? 0.4 with systematically lower values corresponding to the five intense pulses. The low values suggest higher stress conditions. During the 1977 swarm, a tiltmeter located 6 km southeast of Fuego recorded a 14 ?? 3 microradian tilt event (down to SW). This value is too large to represent a simple change in the elastic strain field due to the earthquake swarm. We speculate that the earthquake swarm and tilt are indicative of subsurface magma movement. ?? 1984.

  8. Ionospheric detection and localization of volcano eruptions on the example of the April 2015 Calbuco events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shults, Ksenia; Astafyeva, Elvira; Adourian, Sévan

    2016-10-01

    Using data from ground-based Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers located in southern Chile, we study the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) response to two eruptions of the Calbuco volcano that occurred on 22-23 April 2015. In both cases, the TEC response showed quasi-periodic signals with several consecutive wave trains. The averaged amplitude of the observed covolcanic TEC perturbations amounted 0.45 total electron content unit, 1 TECU = 1016 el m-2 (TECU) for the first eruption and 0.16 TECU for the second one. We compare amplitudes of the TEC response to volcano eruptions of different intensity from our and previously published data, and we show that both the intensity and the background ionospheric conditions define the amplitude of ionospheric covolcanic disturbances. The relative contribution, however, scales with the eruption intensity. The traveltime diagrams allowed to estimate the propagation speed of the observed covolcanic TEC perturbations as 900-1200 m/s, which is close to the acoustic (or shock acoustic) waves speed at the ionospheric height. The spectrograms are consistent with the conclusion on the acoustic nature of the observed TEC perturbations. Finally, we use the approximation of a spherical wave propagating at a constant velocity from a point source, and for the first time, we calculate the location of the volcanic source and the onset time of the volcano eruption from ionospheric measurements. We show that even from 30 s ionospheric GPS data it is possible to "localize" the eruptive source within several degrees of latitude/longitude.

  9. The lightning activities in super typhoons over the Northwest Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The spatial and temporal characteristics of lightning activities have been studied in seven super typhoons from 2005 to 2008 over the Northwest Pacific, using data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). The results indicated that there were three distinct lightning flash regions in mature typhoon, a significant maximum in the eyewall regions (20-80 km from the center), a minimum from 80-200 km, and a strong maximum in the outer rainbands (out of 200 km from the center). The lightning flashes in the outer rainbands were much more than those in the inner rainbands, and less than 1% of flashes occurred within 100 km of the center. Each typhoon produced eyewall lightning outbreak during the periods of its intensification, usually several hours prior to its maximum intensity, indicating that lightning activity might be used as a proxy of intensification of super typhoon. Little lightning occurred near the center after landing of the typhoon.

  10. SuperMimic – Fitting peptide mimetics into protein structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various experimental techniques yield peptides that are biologically active but have unfavourable pharmacological properties. The design of structurally similar organic compounds, i.e. peptide mimetics, is a challenging field in medicinal chemistry. Results SuperMimic identifies compounds that mimic parts of a protein, or positions in proteins that are suitable for inserting mimetics. The application provides libraries that contain peptidomimetic building blocks on the one hand and protein structures on the other. The search for promising peptidomimetic linkers for a given peptide is based on the superposition of the peptide with several conformers of the mimetic. New synthetic elements or proteins can be imported and used for searching. Conclusion We present a graphical user interface for finding peptide mimetics that can be inserted into a protein or for fitting small molecules into a protein. Using SuperMimic, promising locations in proteins for the insertion of mimetics can be found quickly and conveniently.

  11. SuperMimic – Fitting peptide mimetics into protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Andrean; Michalsky, Elke; Schmidt, Ulrike; Preissner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Background Various experimental techniques yield peptides that are biologically active but have unfavourable pharmacological properties. The design of structurally similar organic compounds, i.e. peptide mimetics, is a challenging field in medicinal chemistry. Results SuperMimic identifies compounds that mimic parts of a protein, or positions in proteins that are suitable for inserting mimetics. The application provides libraries that contain peptidomimetic building blocks on the one hand and protein structures on the other. The search for promising peptidomimetic linkers for a given peptide is based on the superposition of the peptide with several conformers of the mimetic. New synthetic elements or proteins can be imported and used for searching. Conclusion We present a graphical user interface for finding peptide mimetics that can be inserted into a protein or for fitting small molecules into a protein. Using SuperMimic, promising locations in proteins for the insertion of mimetics can be found quickly and conveniently. PMID:16403211

  12. Eruption precursors: Manifestations and strategies for detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael; Pritchard, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    The past several decades have seen a rapid increase in volcano monitoring and modeling capabilities. Diverse arrays of instrument networks can detect a variety of pre-, co-, and post-eruptive phenomena, and remote sensing observations are available across a range of spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions. A growing class of models, based on the physics of magmatic systems, are making use of these expanding datastreams, providing probabilistic assessments of such parameters as magma supply, volatile content, and eruption duration. To what extent, however, do these developments heighten our ability to identify eruption precursors? The advent of better data and new models provides an opportunity to reexamine our understanding of pre-eruption unrest, as well as our ability to detect and recognize it as such. An idealized model of the buildup to a volcanic eruption might include magma ascent from a deep source region and accumulation in the mid- to upper crust in the preceding months to years. The process might be manifested by surface inflation and deep long-period earthquakes, and accompanied by an increase in CO2 emissions. As magma continues to accumulate, distal volcano-tectonic earthquakes may result as stress builds on nearby faults, H2S emissions may increase as sulfur in a shallow reservoir is hydrolyzed by groundwater, and fumarole and spring temperatures may increase and show changes in chemistry. In the days to hours before an eruption, sudden changes in the rate and style of earthquakes (including repeating earthquakes and tremor) and deformation may occur as the magma reservoir ruptures and magma moves laterally or vertically. Phreatic eruptions might result as ascending magma comes into contact with groundwater, and SO2 emissions might increase as the path between the magma and surface dries out. How often does such a sequence actually occur? Relatively few volcanoes are comprehensively monitored prior to obvious expressions of unrest, so this is not

  13. Quantifying probabilities of eruptions at Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancato, Alfonso

    2010-05-01

    One of the major goals of modern volcanology is to set up sound risk-based decision-making in land-use planning and emergency management. Volcanic hazard must be managed with reliable estimates of quantitative long- and short-term eruption forecasting, but the large number of observables involved in a volcanic process suggests that a probabilistic approach could be a suitable tool in forecasting. The aim of this work is to quantify probabilistic estimate of the vent location for a suitable lava flow hazard assessment at Mt. Etna volcano, through the application of the code named BET (Marzocchi et al., 2004, 2008). The BET_EF model is based on the event tree philosophy assessed by Newhall and Hoblitt (2002), further developing the concept of vent location, epistemic uncertainties, and a fuzzy approach for monitoring measurements. A Bayesian event tree is a specialized branching graphical representation of events in which individual branches are alternative steps from a general prior event, and evolving into increasingly specific subsequent states. Then, the event tree attempts to graphically display all relevant possible outcomes of volcanic unrest in progressively higher levels of detail. The procedure is set to estimate an a priori probability distribution based upon theoretical knowledge, to accommodate it by using past data, and to modify it further by using current monitoring data. For the long-term forecasting, an a priori model, dealing with the present tectonic and volcanic structure of the Mt. Etna, is considered. The model is mainly based on past vent locations and fracture location datasets (XX century of eruptive history of the volcano). Considering the variation of the information through time, and their relationship with the structural setting of the volcano, datasets we are also able to define an a posteriori probability map for next vent opening. For short-term forecasting vent opening hazard assessment, the monitoring has a leading role, primarily

  14. Russian eruption warning systems for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C.; Girina, O.; Senyukov, S.; Rybin, A.; Osiensky, J.; Izbekov, P.; Ferguson, G.

    2009-01-01

    More than 65 potentially active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Kurile Islands pose a substantial threat to aircraft on the Northern Pacific (NOPAC), Russian Trans-East (RTE), and Pacific Organized Track System (PACOTS) air routes. The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitors and reports on volcanic hazards to aviation for Kamchatka and the north Kuriles. KVERT scientists utilize real-time seismic data, daily satellite views of the region, real-time video, and pilot and field reports of activity to track and alert the aviation industry of hazardous activity. Most Kurile Island volcanoes are monitored by the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT) based in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk. SVERT uses daily moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite images to look for volcanic activity along this 1,250-km chain of islands. Neither operation is staffed 24 h per day. In addition, the vast majority of Russian volcanoes are not monitored seismically in real-time. Other challenges include multiple time-zones and language differences that hamper communication among volcanologists and meteorologists in the US, Japan, and Russia who share the responsibility to issue official warnings. Rapid, consistent verification of explosive eruptions and determination of cloud heights remain significant technical challenges. Despite these difficulties, in more than a decade of frequent eruptive activity in Kamchatka and the northern Kuriles, no damaging encounters with volcanic ash from Russian eruptions have been recorded. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  15. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  16. Filament eruption with apparent reshuffle of endpoints

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Filament eruption on 30 April - 1 May 2010, which shows the reconnection of one filament leg with a region far away from its initial position, is analyzed. Observations from three viewpoints are used for as precise as possible measurements of endpoint coordinates. The northern leg of the erupting prominence loop 'jumps' laterally to the latitude lower than the latitude of the originally southern endpoint. Thus, the endpoints reshuffled their positions in the limb view. Although this behaviour could be interpreted as the asymmetric zipping-like eruption, it does not look very likely. It seems more likely to be reconnection of the flux-rope field lines in its northern leg with ambient coronal magnetic field lines rooted in a quiet region far from the filament. From calculations of coronal potential magnetic field, we found that the filament before the eruption was stable for vertical displacements, but was liable to violation of the horizontal equilibrium. This is unusual initiation of an eruption with combinat...

  17. Laboratory models of Hawaiian and Strombolian eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaupart, Claude; Vergniolle, Sylvie

    1988-01-01

    Basaltic eruptions are often characterized by cyclic changes of activity. At Hawaii, periods of continuous fountaining alternate with much longer periods of effusive outflow1,2. In Strombolian eruptions, activity proceeds through intermittent discrete bursts2-5. We report laboratory experiments that simulate the degassing process in basaltic eruptions. Gas bubbles are generated at the bottom of a tank filled with viscous liquid and topped by a small open conduit. The bubbles rise and accumulate at the roof in a foam layer whose thickness increases. At a critical thickness the bubbles coalesce and the foam collapses, generating gas pockets whose size depends on liquid viscosity and surface tension. At low viscosity a single large gas pocket is formed, which flows into the conduit. This erupts in an annular flow configuration where a central jet expels the liquid films that wet the conduit walls6. At higher viscosity many smaller pockets are formed, which rise as slugs and burst out intermittently at the vent. The experiments imply that the presence of constrictions in the chamber and conduits plays a major role in determining eruption behaviour.

  18. Precursors of eruptions at Vesuvius (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandone, Roberto; Giacomelli, Lisetta

    2008-04-01

    The historical record of activity of Mount Vesuvius is uncommonly long and may serve as a guide to understand precursors before the outbreak of new activity. Reposes of different lengths have been observed in the past, with long ones preceding violent explosive eruptions. Eruptions occurring during periods of permanent activity have been preceded by possible deformation of the volcanic edifice and by short duration, earthquake swarms. Otherwise they have occurred without any reported precursors. The renewal of activity after long periods, like the current one, has been preceded by unrest lasting years to weeks, as a new eruption would require connection to the surface of a reservoir at depth ranging between 6 and 4 km. Since 1944, episodic seismic swarms, have occurred with a frequency similar to that of the violent strombolian eruptions during the last period of permanent activity; they are interpreted as intrusions and arrest of magma batches into a reservoir at the same depth of that feeding past sub-plinian eruptions.

  19. Watching the Birth of Super Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, J L; Turner, Jean L.; Beck, Sara C.

    2003-01-01

    Subarcsecond infrared and radio observations yield important information about the formation of super star clusters from their surrounding gas. We discuss the general properties of ionized and molecular gas near young, forming SSCs, as illustrated by the prototypical young forming super star cluster nebula in the dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253. This super star cluster appears to have a gravitationally bound nebula. The lack of molecular gas suggests a very high star formation efficiency, consistent with the formation of a large, bound star cluster.

  20. Impact of an extremely large magnitude volcanic eruption on the global climate and carbon cycle estimated from ensemble Earth System Model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Segschneider

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The response of the global climate-carbon cycle system to an extremely large Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude volcanic eruption is investigated using ensemble integrations with the comprehensive Earth System Model MPI-ESM. The model includes dynamical compartments of the atmosphere and ocean and interactive modules of the terrestrial biosphere as well as ocean biogeochemistry. The MPI-ESM was forced with anomalies of aerosol optical depth and effective radius of aerosol particles corresponding to a super eruption of the Yellowstone volcanic system. The model experiment consists of an ensemble of fifteen model integrations that are started at different pre-ENSO states of a control experiment and run for 200 years after the volcanic eruption. The climate response to the volcanic eruption is a maximum global monthly mean surface air temperature cooling of 3.8 K for the ensemble mean and from 3.3 K to 4.3 K for individual ensemble members. Atmospheric pCO2 decreases by a maximum of 5 ppm for the ensemble mean and by 3 ppm to 7 ppm for individual ensemble members approximately 6 years after the eruption. The atmospheric carbon content only very slowly returns to near pre-eruption level at year 200 after the eruption. The ocean takes up carbon shortly after the eruption in response to the cooling, changed wind fields and ice cover. This physics-driven uptake is weakly counteracted by a reduction of the biological export production mainly in the tropical Pacific. The land vegetation pool shows a decrease by 4 GtC due to reduced short-wave radiation that has not been present in a smaller scale eruption. The gain of the soil carbon pool determines the amplitude of the CO2 perturbation and the long-term behaviour of the overall system: an initial gain caused by reduced soil respiration is followed by a rather slow return towards pre-eruption levels. During this phase, the ocean compensates partly for the reduced atmospheric

  1. Investigating the mechanisms controlling the eruptive frequency at Hekla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnardi, Marco; Hooper, Andrew; Dumont, Stéphanie

    2015-04-01

    Hekla is one of the most frequently erupting volcanoes in Iceland with 18 summit eruptions during the past 900 years, the last one in February-March 2000. Before 1970 the average repose period between eruptions was of ~60 years but since then Hekla has erupted four times, approximately every 10 years (in 1970, 1980-81, 1991 and 2000). Fifteen years have now passed since the last eruption, but no signs of unrest have yet been recorded. Did something change at Hekla since the last eruption in 2000? There are many factors that may control the eruptive frequency of the volcano, such as changes in the state of stress around its plumbing system or variations in the rate of magma supply from depth. For example, Hekla is located in a very dynamic area, at the intersection of the Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) and the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ). We therefore investigate the effects on the magmatic system caused by seismic activity in the SISZ, in particular the stress changes produced by the post-seismic relaxation following two earthquakes that occurred in June 2000 along faults located only 35-50 km west of Hekla. Since 2000 further stress changes may have also been caused by dike intrusions feeding the eruption of the neighboring volcano Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, or by changes in the rate of ice melting at the ice-caps in central and southern Iceland. In fact, previous studies have highlighted the possible influence of ice melting, and the consequent glacial isostatic adjustment of the crust, on the production of magma and its storage. Furthermore, at Hekla, a direct correlation exists between the duration of the repose period, the volume of the eruption and its silica content. An almost perfectly linear correlation can be found between time and the cumulative erupted volume, as the sum of both lava flows and tephra, between 1104 A.D. and 2010. From this correlation we can infer a conservative constant rate of magma supply to the volcano of ~0.013 km^3/yr. At this

  2. The 2014-2015 eruption at Fogo volcano: constraining the geometry of the intrusion and erupted volumes with space-geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnardi, M.; González, P. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Wright, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    After twenty years of quiescence, Fogo volcano, the most active in the Cape Verde archipelago, erupted for more than two months between November 2014 and February 2015. Voluminous and fast-moving lava flows were erupted from a linear fissure located at the base of Pico do Fogo cone and inundated the summit area of the volcano, destroying two villages. In our work we first use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the European Space Agency's Sentinel-1A satellite, which had been operative for only a few weeks at the time of the onset of the eruption, to constrain the geometry of the intrusion that fed the eruption. The InSAR data was acquired in the TOPS (Terrain Observation by Progressive Scans) mode and the eruption at Fogo represents the first volcanic eruption imaged by Sentinel-1 in its standard acquisition mode. To accurately model TOPS data, variations in both incidence and squint angle of the satellite line-of-sight (LoS) vector need to be taken into account when projecting 3D displacements into the LoS direction. Following this approach, we perform a Bayesian inversion of the InSAR data and infer that the measured deformation is best explained by the intrusion of a sub-vertical dike beneath the southwestern flank of Pico do Fogo cone. This intrusion seems to have first propagated upwards beneath the cone and subsequently laterally towards the southwestern flank of Pico do Fogo, where it reached the surface. Successively, we evaluate differences between pre- and post-eruptive digital elevation models (DEMs) of the volcano to estimate the volume of the most recent lava flows. The DEMs are formed using synthetic aperture radar imagery from the TanDEM-X (TerraSAR add-on for Digital Elevation Measurements) satellite mission and tri-stereo optical imagery from the Pléiades satellite constellation. Preliminary results show that during the 2014-2015 eruption almost 50 million cubic meters of lava were emplaced at the surface of the volcano

  3. Are Avellino (4365 cal BP) and Pompeii twin plinian eruptions? Pre-eruptive constraints and degassing history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît.; Ucciani, Guillaume; Cioni, Raffaello

    2010-05-01

    Somma-Vesuvius activity started 35 ky ago and is characterized by numerous eruptions of variable composition and eruptive style, sometimes interrupted by long periods of unrest. The main explosive eruptions are represented by four plinian eruptions: Pomici di Base eruption (22 cal ky), Mercato (~8900 cal BP), Avellino (4365 cal BP) and Pompeii (79 AD). The 79 AD eruption embodies the most famous eruption since it's responsible of the destruction of Pompeii and Herculanum and it's the first described eruption. The Avellino eruption represents the last plinian event that preceded the Pompeii eruption. The eruptive sequence is similar to the 79 AD plinian eruption, with an opening phase preceding a main plinian fallout activity which ended by a phreatomagmatic phase. The fallout deposit displays a sharp colour contrast from white to grey pumice, corresponding to a magma composition evolution. We focus our study on the main fallout deposit that we sampled in detail in the Traianello quarry, 9 km North-North East of the crater, to investigate the degassing processes during the eruption, using volatile content and textural observations. Density and vesicularity measurements were obtained on a minimum of 100 pumice clasts sampled in 10 stratigraphic levels in the fallout deposit. On the basis of the density distribution, bulk geochemical data, point analytical measurements on glasses (melt inclusions and residual glass) and textural observations were obtained simultaneously on a minimum of 5 pumice clasts per eruptive unit. The glass composition, in particular the Na/K ratio, evolves from Na-rich phonolite for white pumices to a more K-rich phonolite for grey pumices. The pre-eruptive conditions are constrained by systematic Cl measurements in melt inclusions and matrix glass of pumice clasts. The entire magma was saturated relative to sub-critical fluids (a Cl-rich H2O vapour phase and a brine), with a Cl melt content buffered at ~6000 ppm, and a mean pre-eruptive H2O

  4. The tsunami from the 3500BP eruption of Santorini: new perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, David; Nomikou, Paraskevi

    2015-04-01

    Huge caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions are well studied and, from historical events, are increasingly better understood. Yet although the potential volcanic impacts of these eruptions are known, their hazard from tsunami generation is still poorly researched. The eruption of Krakatau in 1883 is one of the most devastating events of historical times. The eruption was spectacular, with a lateral blast or hot pyroclastic surge killing a 1,000 people on the adjacent coast of south Sumatra. Yet it was the 30-40 m high tsunami that devastated the adjacent coastlines and killed many more people than the blast/surge; estimated at over 36,000 by the Dutch authorities, but possibly up to 120,000. The Late Bronze Age (LBA), eruption of Santorini volcano in the southern Aegean is in many respects strikingly similar to the eruption of Krakatau, but no significant evidence for a major, possibly devastating, tsunami has yet been identified from nearby coastlines. Recent offshore research reveals the eruption to be much larger in volume than previously believed. At five times the volume of Krakatau, it is now possibly the largest eruption of the Holocene. The final phases of the Santorini eruption may now involve massive collapse of a volcanic pile that makes the generation of a regionally destructive tsunami much more feasible than previously believed. Archaeotsunami deposits on the east coast of Crete, an island located 100 km south of Santorini, support possible tsunami impact. Based on the revised eruption volume and new models of the eruption, together with recent and new evidence of a tsunami on Crete, we here consider the likelihood that there was indeed a devastating tsunami from the Santorini eruption. On the north coast, coring at two coastal marshes reveals marine sands buried several metres below the land surface. At Malia the sands are dated at approximately 3,500BP. 100 km to the west of Malia, at Delphinos, there are marine sands dated at 2,800BP, although the

  5. Eruption column height: a comparison between ground and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, Simona; Prestifilippo, Michele; Pecora, Emilio; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca; Spata, Gaetano; Coltelli, Mauro

    2014-05-01

    The eruption column height estimation is an essential parameter to evaluate the total mass eruption rate, the gas and aerosol plume dispersal and retrievals. The column height may be estimated using different systems (e.g. satellite, aircraft and ground observations) which may present marked differences. In this work we use the calibrated images collected by the video-surveillance system of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, from the visible camera located in Catania, 27 km from the vent. The analysis is carried out on twenty lava fountains from the New South East Crater during the recent Etna explosive activity. Firstly, we calibrated the camera to estimate its intrinsic parameters and the full camera model. Furthermore, we selected the images which recorded the maximum phase of the eruptive activity. Hence, we applied an appropriate correction to take into account the wind effect. The column height was also evaluated using SEVIRI and MODIS satellite images collected at the same time of the video camera measurements. The satellite column height retrievals is realized by comparing the 11 μm brightness temperature of the most opaque plume pixels with the atmospheric temperature profile measured at Trapani WMO Meteo station (the nearest WMO station to the Etnean area). The comparison between satellite and ground data show a good agreement and the column altitudes ranges between 7.5 and 9 km (upper limit of the camera system). For nine events we evaluated also the thickness of the volcanic plumes in the umbrella region (near the vent) which ranges between 2 and 3 km. The proposed approach help to quantitatively evaluate the column height that may be used by volcanic ash dispersal and sedimentation models for improving forecasts and reducing risks to aviation during volcanic crisis.

  6. Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER) project and a next-generation real-time volcano hazard assessment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, S.

    2012-12-01

    vent position, volume, eruption rate, wind directions and topography. Therefore, numerical simulations with controlled parameters are needed for more precise volcanic eruption predictions. The use of the next-generation system should enable the visualization of past volcanic eruptions datasets such as distributions, eruption volumes and eruption rates, on maps and diagrams using timeline and GIS technology. Similar volcanic eruptions scenarios should be easily searchable from the eruption database. Using the volcano hazard assessment system, prediction of the time and area that would be affected by volcanic eruptions at any locations near the volcano should be possible, using numerical simulations. The system should estimate volcanic hazard risks by overlaying the distributions of volcanic deposits on major roads, houses and evacuation areas using a GIS enabled systems. Probabilistic volcanic hazards maps in active volcano sites should be made based on numerous numerical simulations. The next-generation real-time hazard assessment system would be implemented with user-friendly interface, making the risk assessment system easily usable and accessible online.

  7. Two-Component Super AKNS Equations and Their Finite-Dimensional Integrable Super Hamiltonian System

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Yu; Jingwei Han

    2014-01-01

    Starting from a matrix Lie superalgebra, two-component super AKNS system is constructed. By making use of monononlinearization technique of Lax pairs, we find that the obtained two-component super AKNS system is a finite-dimensional integrable super Hamiltonian system. And its Lax representation and $r$ -matrix are also given in this paper.

  8. Two-Component Super AKNS Equations and Their Finite-Dimensional Integrable Super Hamiltonian System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from a matrix Lie superalgebra, two-component super AKNS system is constructed. By making use of monononlinearization technique of Lax pairs, we find that the obtained two-component super AKNS system is a finite-dimensional integrable super Hamiltonian system. And its Lax representation and r-matrix are also given in this paper.

  9. Petrological insights into the 1976-2000 eruption episode of White Island, New Zealand: an eruption fuelled by repeated mafic recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Geoff; Moune, Severine; Della Pasqua, Fernando; Christenson, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    White Island is a partially submerged volcano located ~ 50 km to the NE of North Island, New Zealand. It is New Zealand's most active volcano and the island is a popular tourist destination. Surprisingly, little is known about the magmatic processes that led to historical eruptions given the potential vulnerability of tourists and its high level of historical activity. In addition, the volcano has been monitored with an array of methods since 1967; from geodetic surveying techniques to geochemical analyses of fluids and gases. Access to an excellent sample record has allowed us to examine a temporal record of magmatic processes, through the careful analysis of scoria clasts. We have then been able to compare apparent timescales of magmatic events to monitored signals. In this work we examine an extended eruptive episode (1976-2000) in order to determine the causes of signals produced throughout this sequence. Previous petrological and geophysical analysis of the 1976-2000 eruptive episode suggested that magma resided at a very shallow depth (i.e., ~ 500 m) for extended periods. This was primarily based on the focussed deformation signal and the low H2O ( 1 km depth prior to eruption. Significant magma degassing into the hydrothermal system was likely responsible for the deformation signal and is unrelated to very shallow magma residence. Taken together, these data provide an important link between petrology and geophysical monitoring at White Island.

  10. Comparison between Major Confined and Eruptive Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Mäkelä, P.; Dennis, B. R.

    2012-05-01

    Statistical studies have shown that a large fraction of major solar flares (42% M-class and 15% X-class) are not associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The CME-less flares are confined flares as opposed to the eruptive flares associated with CMEs. Confined flares are certainly good particle accelerators as inferred from intense microwave, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray emissions. Note that a single acceleration mechanism operates in confined flares, whereas eruptive flares can have both flare-resident and shock accelerations (the shock acceleration is due to energetic CMEs). In this paper, we report on a statistical study of more than two dozen confined flares with soft X-ray flare size exceeding M5 in comparison with a control sample of eruptive flares with similar soft X-ray flare size. We compare the microwave and X-ray emission characteristics in the two populations; these emissions correspond to sunward energy flow. For a given X-ray flare size, the microwave flux is scattered over a wider range for the eruptive flares when compared to the confined flares. We also compare the metric and longer wavelength radio bursts between the two populations; these emissions correspond to the flow of nonthermal electrons away from the Sun. We find that almost all the confined flares lack metric radio bursts, suggesting that there is very little flow of energy into the interplanetary medium. On the other hand, there is high degree of association between eruptive flares and metric radio bursts. This suggests that in confined flares the accelerated electrons have no access to open magnetic field lines. Finally, we examined the association of EUV waves with the two flare populations. While we find EUV waves in most of the eruptive flares, there was no confined flare with EUV waves. This suggests that CMEs is a necessary condition for the generation of global waves.

  11. Research oriented MSc course on solar eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Rami; Heber, Bernd; Agueda, Neus; Kilpua, Emilia; Isavnin, Alexey; Afanasiev, Alexandr; Ganse, Urs; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.

    2014-05-01

    Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, organized a five-credit-point Master-level course on "Solar Eruptions and Space Environment" in spring 2013. The course, attended by nine students, included twenty hours of introductory lectures on solar eruptive phenomena (focusing on energetic particle emissions) as well as experimental and theoretical methods to analyze them. In addition, the course contained ten hours of exercise sessions, where solutions on short calculation exercises were presented and discussed. The main learning method on the course was, however, a coordinated scientific analysis of five solar eruptions observed by the STEREO spacecraft in 2010-2011. The students were grouped in four teams to study the solar eruptive events from four different view points: (1) Analysis of morphology and kinematics of coronal mass ejections, (2) analysis of EUV imaging observations of coronal wave-like transients, (3) solar and interplanetary magnetic field conditions during the eruptions, and (4) emission and transport modelling of near-relativistic electron events associated with the eruptions. Each group of students was assigned a scientist to oversee their work. The students reported weekly on their progress and gave a final presentation (of 30 minutes) in a seminar session at the end of the seven-week course. Grading of the course was based on the home exercises and final presentations. Students were also asked to give anonymous feedback on the course. Learning results on the course were very encouraging, showing that research oriented courses with practical research exercises on specific topics give students deeper knowledge and more practical skills than traditional lectures and home exercises alone.

  12. CHAIN RECONNECTIONS OBSERVED IN SYMPATHETIC ERUPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Magara, Tetsuya [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do, 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Schmieder, Brigitte; Aulanier, Guillaume [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS Sarbonne Universités, Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 5 place Jules Jansson, F-92195 Meudon (France); Guo, Yang, E-mail: navin@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 210023 Nanjing (China)

    2016-04-01

    The nature of various plausible causal links between sympathetic events is still a controversial issue. In this work, we present multiwavelength observations of sympathetic eruptions, associated flares, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occurring on 2013 November 17 in two close active regions. Two filaments, i.e., F1 and F2, are observed in between the active regions. Successive magnetic reconnections, caused for different reasons (flux cancellation, shear, and expansion) have been identified during the whole event. The first reconnection occurred during the first eruption via flux cancellation between the sheared arcades overlying filament F2, creating a flux rope and leading to the first double-ribbon solar flare. During this phase, we observed the eruption of overlying arcades and coronal loops, which leads to the first CME. The second reconnection is believed to occur between the expanding flux rope of F2 and the overlying arcades of filament F1. We suggest that this reconnection destabilized the equilibrium of filament F1, which further facilitated its eruption. The third stage of reconnection occurred in the wake of the erupting filament F1 between the legs of the overlying arcades. This may create a flux rope and the second double-ribbon flare and a second CME. The fourth reconnection was between the expanding arcades of the erupting filament F1 and the nearby ambient field, which produced the bi-directional plasma flows both upward and downward. Observations and a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation confirm the possibility of reconnection and the causal link between the magnetic systems.

  13. Highlights from Super-Kamiokande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Kimihiro

    2016-11-01

    Recent results from Super-Kamiokande experiment are reviewed in this paper; Neutrino mass hierarchy and CP violation in the lepton sector are investigated via νμ → νe oscillation of the atmospheric neutrinos. The event rate, correlation with solar activity, energy spectrum of the solar neutrinos are measured via electron elastic scattering interactions. Neutrino emission from the WIMP annihilation at the center of the Sun are searched in the GeV energy regions. New project, SK-Gd project, to enhance anti-neutrino identification capability, has been approved inside the collaboration group.

  14. Highlights from Super-Kamiokande

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okumura Kimihiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results from Super-Kamiokande experiment are reviewed in this paper; Neutrino mass hierarchy and CP violation in the lepton sector are investigated via νμ → νe oscillation of the atmospheric neutrinos. The event rate, correlation with solar activity, energy spectrum of the solar neutrinos are measured via electron elastic scattering interactions. Neutrino emission from the WIMP annihilation at the center of the Sun are searched in the GeV energy regions. New project, SK-Gd project, to enhance anti-neutrino identification capability, has been approved inside the collaboration group.

  15. The 1913 VEI-4 Plinian Eruption of Volcan de Colima (Mexico): Tephrochronology, Petrology, and Plume Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhr, J. F.; Navarro, C.; Connor, C. B.; Connor, L.

    2006-12-01

    The 18-20 January 1913 VEI-4 eruption of Volcán de Colima closed out a century-scale eruptive cycle, left the summit a deep jagged crater 100 m shorter than before, sent pyroclastic flows out to 15 km on the S flank, and culminated in a Plinian column that resulted in ashfall as far as 725 km to the NE at Saltillo. Historical accounts allow a rough delineation of where distal ash did and did not fall. Today in the field, the 1913 Plinian fall deposit can be traced across the upper flanks of Nevado de Colima, but only to distances of 13 km from the vent. Beyond that point all evidence of the eruption has been eroded from Earth's surface in the past 93 years. We studied the proximal 1913 fall deposit at 45 locations. At 27 locations the 1913 deposit is a single fall unit, up to 80 cm thick. At the other locations, 2-3 individual scoria-fall layers are separated by charcoal- bearing fine-ash horizons, which we interpret as pyroclastic-surge deposits. At locations with multiple units and complex lower 1913 stratigraphy, bulk compositional data on scoriae provided insight regarding to the base of the 1913 deposit. Particular uncertainty clouds field identification of the scoria-fall deposit from the similar VEI-4 eruption in 1818. Granulometric data for the 1913 deposit were obtained by sieving both scoria- fall and fine-ash layers. The 1913 scoriae are relatively homogeneous hornblende andesites with ~58 wt.% SiO2, more mafic than all of the andesitic lava flows that preceded it starting in 1869 and have followed since 1961 (~60% SiO2). The 1913 scoriae have plagioclase > orthopyroxene > clinopyroxene > hornblende > titanomagnetite. The hornblende phenocrysts are greenish brown in color and have clean rims against the vesiculated glassy matrix, indicating that the hornblende remained stable until eruptive quenching. We used electron and ion microprobes to analyze a series of glass inclusions trapped within orthopyroxene phenocrysts for major, minor, and volatile

  16. Characterization of the seismicity prior to the 2011 El Hierro eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza; del Fresno, Carmen; Gomis Moreno, Almudena; Hernández Yanes, Paula; Meletlidis, Stavros; López, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The last eruption of the Canary Islands started on 10 October 2011, 2 km south of El Hierro. This submarine eruption was the first fully monitored volcanic eruption in this archipelago and was preceded by various precursory signals, the most evident of which was the seismicity that started in July 2011. This seismicity includes almost 10,000 low-magnitude earthquakes located during 81 days before the eruption which revealed a 20 km horizontal migration from the north of the island to the south at depths of between 10 and 17 km, the deeper events occurring further south. In this work we try to improve the quality of the seismic catalogue. We applied a relative location algorithm (hypoDD) to improve hypocentral locations. Tests performed to check the reliability of the results gave maximum uncertainties of 400 m in the relocations. Furthermore, new features were found, including the origin of the seismicity in the center of the island and the presence of two alternating seismogenic zones in the north of the island during the first month of activity. The first days of the unrest the seismic network was composed by only 2 seismic stations and almost no location was possible. We obtained information about location and magnitude of these events at the beginning of the seismic crisis by comparison of the waveforms by correlation with located earthquakes. We have also analyzed the baselevel seismicity of El Hierro from 1996 using digital data of a short period station. Manual revision of these data showed a considerably low number of earthquakes in the region before the unrest (less than one event per day).

  17. Terbinafine-induced lichenoid drug eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Haiyan; Lai, Wei; Maibach, Howard I

    2017-03-01

    Drug-induced lichen planus has been induced by antibiotics, anticonvulsants, antidiabetics, antimalarials, antitubercular drugs, antihypertensives, psychiatric drugs, chemotherapeutic agents, diuretic, heavy metals, NSAIDs, etc. Terbinafine, an antifungal agent, is widely used for dermatophyte infections and onychomycosis. Cutaneous adverse effects of terbinafine are rarely reported. Here, we report a case of terbinafine-induced lichenoid drug eruption in a 22-year-old who presented with generalized lichenoid eruption 2 weeks after terbinafine initiation of. The body and lip cleared completely after 8 weeks of drug withdrawal; nail change cleared after 12 weeks.

  18. Adalimumab-induced lichenoid drug eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Habr, Constantin; Meguerian, Zarouwi; Sammour, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors are being widely and increasingly used for the management of a spectrum of rheumatologic diseases that are refractory to conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Various cutaneous side effects have been reported after treatment with TNF-α inhibitors. We present a case report of a 26-year-old male patient who developed a lichenoid drug eruption few months after the initiation of adalimumab for the management of Crohn's disease. We also highlight the clinical and histopathologic differences between lichenoid drug eruptions and idiopathic lichen planus.

  19. Seismological monitoring of the February 2007 effusive eruption of the Stromboli volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scarpato

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available On February 27, 2007, the Stromboli volcano, which has usually been characterized by moderate explosive activity, started an effusive eruption with a small lava flow down the NW flank. The permanent broadband network installed on the island allowed the revealing of anomalies in the seismicity before the effusive eruption and for the phenomena to be followed over time, thus obtaining meaningful information about the eruption dynamics. During the effusive phase, a major explosion occurred on March 15, 2007. On that occasion, two strainmeters deployed on the volcano in the previous year recorded a strain increment before the blast. After this explosion, which further destabilized the upper part of the edifice, swarms of Long-Period (LP and hybrid events were recorded. The characteristics and locations of these events suggest that they were associated with the fracturing processes that affected the summit area of the cone. During the effusive phase, changes in the Very Long Period (VLP event location were recorded. This type of events accompanied the change in the eruptive style, providing information about the magmatic conduit involved in their seismogenetic processes. The effusive phase stopped on April 2, 2007, and the typical Strombolian activity restarted some months later.

  20. Initial fate of fine ash and sulfur from large volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Niemeier

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Large volcanic eruptions emit huge amounts of sulfur and fine ash into the stratosphere. These products cause an impact on radiative processes, temperature and wind patterns. In simulations with a General Circulation Model including detailed aerosol microphysics, the relation between the impact of sulfur and fine ash is determined for different eruption strengths and locations, one in the tropics and one in high Northern latitudes. Fine ash with effective radii between 1 μm and 15 μm has a lifetime of several days only. Nevertheless, the strong absorption of shortwave and longwave radiation causes additional heating and cooling of ±20 K/day and impacts the evolution of the volcanic cloud. Depending on the location of the volcanic eruption, transport direction changes due to the presence of fine ash, vortices develop and temperature anomalies at ground increase. The results show substantial impact on the local scale but only minor impact on the evolution of sulfate in the stratosphere in the month after the simulated eruptions.

  1. Initial fate of fine ash and sulfur from large volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Self

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Large volcanic eruptions emit huge amounts of sulfur and fine ash into the stratosphere. These products cause an impact on radiative processes, temperature and wind patterns. In simulations with a General Circulation Model including detailed aerosol microphysics, the relation between the impact of sulfur and fine ash is determined for different eruption strengths and locations, one in the tropics and one in high Northern latitudes. Fine ash with effective radii between 1 μm and 15 μm has a lifetime of several days only. Nevertheless, the strong absorption of shortwave and long-wave radiation causes additional heating and cooling of ±20 K/day and impacts the evolution of the volcanic cloud. Depending on the location of the volcanic eruption, transport direction changes due to the presence of fine ash, vortices develop and temperature anomalies at ground increase. The results show substantial impact on the local scale but only minor impact on the evolution of sulfate in the stratosphere in the month after the simulated eruptions.

  2. Volcanic Eruption: Students Develop a Contingency Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Dangerous, loud, sensational, exciting - natural hazards have what it takes to get students attention around the globe. Arising interest is the first step to develop an intrinsic motivation to learn about the matter and endure the hardships that students might discover along the way of the unit. Natural hazards thereby establish a close-knit connection between physical and anthropological geography through analyzing the hazardous event and its consequences for the people living in the affected area. Following a general principle of didactics we start searching right on our doorsteps to offer students the possibility to gain knowledge on the familiar and later transfer it to the unknown example. Even in Southwest Germany - a region that is rather known for its wine than its volcanic activity - we can find a potentially hazardous region. The "Laacher See" volcano (a caldera lake) in northern Rhineland-Palatinate is according to Prof. H.U. Schminke a "potentially active volcano" . Its activity can be proven by seismic activities, or experienced when visiting the lake's southeastern shore, where carbondioxid and sulphur gases from the underlying magma chamber still bubble up. The Laacher See is part of a range of volcanoes (classified from 'potentially active' to 'no longer active') of the East Eifel Volcanic Field. Precariously the Laacher See is located closely to the densely populated agglomerations of Cologne (NE, distance: 45 km) and the former capital Bonn (NE: 35km), as well as Koblenz (E: 24km) and the Rhine river. Apart from that, the towns of Andernach (E: 8km ± 30 000 inhabitants) and Mayen (SW: 11km ±20 000 inhabitants) and many smaller towns and villages are nearby due to economic reasons. The number of people affected by a possible eruption easily exceeds two million people considering the range as prime measurement. The underlying danger, as projected in a simulation presented by Prof. Schminke, is a lava stream running down the Brohltal valley

  3. Effects of a submarine eruption on the performance of two brown seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancor, Séfora; Tuya, Fernando; Gil-Díaz, Teba; Figueroa, Félix L.; Haroun, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    World oceans are becoming more acidic as a consequence of CO2 anthropogenic emissions, with multiple physiological and ecological implications. So far, our understanding is mainly limited to some species through in vitro experimentation. In this study, we took advantage of a recent submarine eruption (from October 2011 to March 2012) at ~ 1 nautical mile offshore El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, central east Atlantic) to determine whether altered physical-chemical conditions, mainly sudden natural ocean acidification, affected the morphology, photosynthesis (in situ Chl-a fluorescence) and physiological performance (photo-protective mechanisms and oxidative stress) of the conspicuous brown seaweeds Padina pavonica-a species with carbonate deposition - and Lobophora variegata-a species without carbonate on thallus surfaces - , both with similar morphology. Seaweeds were sampled twice: November 2011 (eruptive phase with a pH drop of ca. 1.22 units relative to standard conditions) and March 2012 (post-eruptive phase with a pH of ca. 8.23), on two intertidal locations adjacent to the eruption and at a control location. P. pavonica showed decalcification and loss of photo-protective compounds and antioxidant activity at locations affected by the eruption, behaving as a sun-adapted species during lowered pH conditions. At the same time, L. variegata suffered a decrease in photo-protective compounds and antioxidant activity during the volcanic event, but its photosynthetic performance remained unaltered. These results reinforce the idea that calcareous seaweeds, as a whole, are more sensitive than non-calcareous seaweeds to alter their performance under scenarios of reduced pH.

  4. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  5. Rapid laccolith intrusion driven by explosive volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Jonathan M.; Cordonnier, Benoit; Schipper, C. Ian; Tuffen, Hugh; Baumann, Tobias S.; Feisel, Yves

    2016-11-01

    Magmatic intrusions and volcanic eruptions are intimately related phenomena. Shallow magma intrusion builds subsurface reservoirs that are drained by volcanic eruptions. Thus, the long-held view is that intrusions must precede and feed eruptions. Here we show that explosive eruptions can also cause magma intrusion. We provide an account of a rapidly emplaced laccolith during the 2011 rhyolite eruption of Cordón Caulle, Chile. Remote sensing indicates that an intrusion began after eruption onset and caused severe (>200 m) uplift over 1 month. Digital terrain models resolve a laccolith-shaped body ~0.8 km3. Deformation and conduit flow models indicate laccolith depths of only ~20-200 m and overpressures (~1-10 MPa) that likely stemmed from conduit blockage. Our results show that explosive eruptions may rapidly force significant quantities of magma in the crust to build laccoliths. These iconic intrusions can thus be interpreted as eruptive features that pose unique and previously unrecognized volcanic hazards.

  6. 3D analysis of craniofacial growth and tooth eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiborg, Sven

    The 9th International Congress on Cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies, 3D analysis, craniofacial growth, tooth eruption......The 9th International Congress on Cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies, 3D analysis, craniofacial growth, tooth eruption...

  7. Optimal Energy Management, Location and Size for Stationary Energy Storage System in a Metro Line Based on Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Huan Xia; Huaixin Chen; Zhongping Yang; Fei Lin; Bin Wang(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China)

    2015-01-01

    The installation of stationary super-capacitor energy storage system (ESS) in metro systems can recycle the vehicle braking energy and improve the pantograph voltage profile. This paper aims to optimize the energy management, location, and size of stationary super-capacitor ESSes simultaneously and obtain the best economic efficiency and voltage profile of metro systems. Firstly, the simulation platform of an urban rail power supply system, which includes trains and super-capacitor energy sto...

  8. The eruption, pyroclastic flow behaviour, and caldera in-filling processes of the extremely large volume (> 1290 km3), intra- to extra-caldera, Permian Ora (Ignimbrite) Formation, Southern Alps, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcock, M. A. W.; Cas, R. A. F.; Giordano, G.; Morelli, C.

    2013-09-01

    The Permian Ora Formation (277-274 Ma) preserves the products of the Ora caldera 'super-eruption', Northern Italy. The stratigraphic architecture of the exceptionally well preserved intra-caldera succession provides evidence for caldera collapse at the onset of the eruption, a multiple discharge point, fissure eruption style, and progressive, incremental caldera in-filling by numerous pyroclastic flow pulses within the caldera. The ignimbrites of the Ora Formation are voluminous (> 1290 km3), crystal-rich (~ 25 to 55%), and ubiquitously welded. The Ora Formation has been divided into four members (a-d), which also define the principal eruption phases. The eruption proceeded in four main stages: (1) early caldera collapse and vent opening, producing locally distributed, basal co-ignimbrite lithic breccia (member a); (2) vent clearing, which produced the eutaxitic, lithic-rich ignimbrite and minor thin ground and ash-cloud surge deposits (member b); (3) waxing and steady eruption, which produced the dominant eutaxitic, coarse-crystal-rich ignimbrite, with local lithic-rich and fine-crystal-rich ignimbrite and minor surge deposits (member c); and (4) waning eruption, recorded by the eutaxitic, fine-crystal-rich ignimbrite, with local lithic-rich ignimbrite deposits (member d).

  9. The 1677 eruption of La Palma, Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Badiola, E.

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available The 1677 volcanic eruption, located close to the town of Fuencaliente at the south end of La Palma, has been associated with the large volcanic cone of San Antonio, an emission centre showing relatively high energy phreatomagmatic phases. However, detailed geological mapping and a reinterpretation of available eye-witness accounts elearly prove the San Antonio emission centre to be a preexisting volcano related to an eruption that occurred several thousands years earlier. The 1677 eruption, or Volcán de Fuencaliente is a low magnitude eruption composed of a small strombolian vent and a cluster of aligned spatter vents. About 75-125 x 106 m3 of lavas from these spatter vents covered an area of 4.5 x 106 m2 and formed a wide coastal platform with 1.6 x 106 m2 of new land gained from the sea. This modest magnitude eruption is in better accord with the negligible damage caused to the area reported in the contemporary accounts. This revision of the 1677 eruption and its magnitude is relevant for the precise reconstruction of the recent volcanism of La Palma and the correct definition of volcanic hazards in the island.La erupción de 1677, localizada cerca de la población de Fuencaliente en el S de la isla de La Palma, ha sido asociada hasta ahora con el cono volcánico denominado San Antonio. Este centro de emisión presenta fases eruptivas de energía relativamente elevada. El estudio geológico de detalle de esta erupción y la reinterpretación de los relatos de la época indican que el volcán San Antonio es, en realidad, un aparato volcánico preexistente, relacionado con algún episodio eruptivo de varios miles de años de antigüedad. La verdadera erupción de 1677 o Volcán de Fuencaliente, es de baja magnitud y está formada por pequeños centros eruptivos estrombolianos y conos alineados de escorias. El volumen de lavas emitidas es de unos 75-125 x 106 m3 y cubre una extensión de aproximadamente 4.5 x 106 m2, de los cuales 1.6 x 106 m2

  10. The 2014-15 eruption and the short-term geochemical evolution of the Fogo volcano (Cape Verde): Evidence for small-scale mantle heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, J.; Martins, S.; Mattielli, N.; Madeira, J.; Faria, B.; Ramalho, R. S.; Silva, P.; Moreira, M.; Caldeira, R.; Moreira, M.; Rodrigues, J.; Martins, L.

    2017-09-01

    Recurrent eruptions at very active ocean island volcanoes provide the ideal means to gain insight on the scale of spatial variations at the mantle source and on temporal changes of magma genesis and evolution processes. In 2014, after 19 years of quiescence, Fogo volcano (Cape Verde Archipelago) experienced a new eruption, with the vents located 200 m from those of the 1995 eruption, and less than 2000 m from those of the 1951 event. This offered a unique opportunity to investigate the existence of small-scale mantle heterogeneities and the short-term compositional evolution of magmas erupted by a very active oceanic volcano like Fogo. Here we present petrological and geochemical data from the early stages of the Fogo's most recent eruption - started on November 23, 2014 - and compare them with the signature of previous eruptions (particularly those of 1995 and 1951). The magmas erupted in 2014 are alkaline (up to 23.4% and 0.94% of normative ne and lc, respectively) with somewhat evolved compositions (Mg # importance to the preservation of a significant part of source heterogeneity by erupted magmas. The decrease in the contribution of an enriched component to the Fogo magmas in the 2014 eruption marks a change on the volcano short-term evolution that was characterized by a progressive increase of the importance of such a component. Nb/U ratios of the 2014 lavas are similar, within 2σ, to the mean value of OIB, but significantly lower than those reported for the 1995 and 1951 eruptions. This is considered to reflect the lack of significant mixing of the 2014 magmas with lithospheric melts, as opposed to what is here hypothesised for the two previous eruptions.

  11. An 18,000 year-long eruptive record from Volcán Chaitén, northwestern Patagonia: Paleoenvironmental and hazard-assessment implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloway, Brent V.; Pearce, Nick J. G.; Moreno, Patricio I.; Villarosa, Gustavo; Jara, Ignacio; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Outes, Valeria

    2017-07-01

    The 2008 eruption of Volcán Chaitén (VCha) in northwestern Patagonia was the first explosive rhyolitic eruption to have occurred within a century and provided an unprecedented scientific opportunity to examine all facets of the eruption ranging from magma rheology/ascent rates to ash-fall effects on biota and infrastructure. Up to very recently it was thought that the latest eruption prior to the 2008 event occurred c. 9750 cal. a BP. Although a number of researchers have recognised additional eruptive products, but their stratigraphy, age, and geochemical attributes have not been systematically described and/or recorded. In this study, we provide a detailed examination of andic cover-beds and tephra-bearing lake sequences located both proximally and distally to VCha, which record a series of hitherto unknown rhyolitic eruptive products and place all previous observations firmly within a coherent stratigraphic framework. Through major- and trace-element glass shard geochemistry we are able to confidently verify eruptive source. A total of 20 discrete tephra beds are recognised, with at least 10 having widespread areal distributions and/or depositional imprints broadly comparable to, or greater than, the 2008-tephra event. This record indicates that VCha has been continuously but intermittently active as far back as the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (c. 18,000 cal a BP) with two dominant, genetically related magma types and an intermediary 'mixed' type. Before this the eruptive record has been largely obscured and/or erased by widespread Andean piedmont glaciation. However, based on the tempo of VCha activity over the last c. 18,000 years, older VCha eruptives can be anticipated to occur as well as future hazardous explosive events. The new eruptive inventory will ultimately be useful for correlating equivalent-aged sequences and refining long-term eruptive tempo as well as corresponding temporal changes in magmatic evolution.

  12. Relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption inferred from historical records

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪洲; 高峰; 吴雪娟; 孟宪森

    2004-01-01

    A large number of seismic records are discovered for the first time in the historical materials about Wudalianchi volcanic group eruption in 1720~1721, which provides us with abundant volcanic earthquake information. Based on the written records, the relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption is discussed in the paper. Furthermore it is pointed that earthquake swarm is an important indication of volcanic eruption. Therefore, monitoring volcanic earthquakes is of great significance for forecasting volcanic eruption.

  13. Burst conditions of explosive volcanic eruptions recorded on microbarographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M.M.; Chouet, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate pressure disturbances in the atmosphere that propagate away either as acoustic or as shock waves, depending on the explosivity of the eruption. Both types of waves are recorded on microbarographs as 1- to 0.1-hertz N-shaped signals followed by a longer period coda. These waveforms can be used to estimate burst pressures end gas concentrations in explosive volcanic eruptions and provide estimates of eruption magnitudes.

  14. Optical trapping with Super-Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We outline the possibility of optical trapping and tweezing with Super-Gaussian beam profiles. We show that the trapping strength can be tuned continuously by adjusting the order of a Super-Gaussian beam, approaching that of a perfect Gaussian...

  15. Tetrahedral Units: For Dodecahedral Super-Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, Y; Liebman, J F

    2016-01-01

    Different novel organic-chemical possibilities for tetrahedral building units are considered, with attention to their utility in constructing different super-structures. As a representative construction we consider the use of sets of 20 such identical tetrahedral units to form a super-dodecahedron.

  16. Phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions along fissures on the top of mafic stratovolcanoes with overlapping compound calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Karoly; Geshi, Nobuo

    2017-04-01

    external water producing debris jet dominated phreatomagmatic tephra and radially expanding pyroclastic density currents to deposit their load around the growing crater. This 3D architecture can only be explained if we infer that the original lower fissure-fed eruptions gradually allow melt to move toward the summit region where they hit ground water accumulated in an older caldera infill that hosted a succession of lava flows intercalated with lava foot and top breccias as well as abundant pyroclastic and reworked porous deposits capable to harvest water from rain and let them ponded along aquitard horizons in the caldera structure. We infer that such eruption mechanism is probably a common eruption style especially associated with volcanic islands with mafic stratovoclanoes that contain some summit caldera structures and located in humic and/or tropical climate.

  17. dbSUPER: a database of super-enhancers in mouse and human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aziz; Zhang, Xuegong

    2016-01-04

    Super-enhancers are clusters of transcriptional enhancers that drive cell-type-specific gene expression and are crucial to cell identity. Many disease-associated sequence variations are enriched in super-enhancer regions of disease-relevant cell types. Thus, super-enhancers can be used as potential biomarkers for disease diagnosis and therapeutics. Current studies have identified super-enhancers in more than 100 cell types and demonstrated their functional importance. However, a centralized resource to integrate all these findings is not currently available. We developed dbSUPER (http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/dbsuper/), the first integrated and interactive database of super-enhancers, with the primary goal of providing a resource for assistance in further studies related to transcriptional control of cell identity and disease. dbSUPER provides a responsive and user-friendly web interface to facilitate efficient and comprehensive search and browsing. The data can be easily sent to Galaxy instances, GREAT and Cistrome web-servers for downstream analysis, and can also be visualized in the UCSC genome browser where custom tracks can be added automatically. The data can be downloaded and exported in variety of formats. Furthermore, dbSUPER lists genes associated with super-enhancers and also links to external databases such as GeneCards, UniProt and Entrez. dbSUPER also provides an overlap analysis tool to annotate user-defined regions. We believe dbSUPER is a valuable resource for the biology and genetic research communities.

  18. Terrestrial planet formation in the presence of migrating super-Earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izidoro, André; Morbidelli, Alessandro [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Raymond, Sean N., E-mail: izidoro.costa@gmail.com, E-mail: morbidelli@oca.eu, E-mail: rayray.sean@gmail.com [CNRS and Université de Bordeaux, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France)

    2014-10-10

    Super-Earths with orbital periods less than 100 days are extremely abundant around Sun-like stars. It is unlikely that these planets formed at their current locations. Rather, they likely formed at large distances from the star and subsequently migrated inward. Here we use N-body simulations to study the effect of super-Earths on the accretion of rocky planets. In our simulations, one or more super-Earths migrate inward through a disk of planetary embryos and planetesimals embedded in a gaseous disk. We tested a wide range of migration speeds and configurations. Fast-migrating super-Earths (τ{sub mig} ∼ 0.01-0.1 Myr) only have a modest effect on the protoplanetary embryos and planetesimals. Sufficient material survives to form rocky, Earth-like planets on orbits exterior to the super-Earths'. In contrast, slowly migrating super-Earths shepherd rocky material interior to their orbits and strongly deplete the terrestrial planet-forming zone. In this situation any Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone are extremely volatile-rich and are therefore probably not Earth-like.

  19. Terrestrial Planet Formation in the Presence of Migrating Super-earths

    CERN Document Server

    Izidoro, André; Raymond, Sean N

    2014-01-01

    Super-Earths with orbital periods less than 100 days are extremely abundant around Sun-like stars. It is unlikely that these planets formed at their current locations. Rather, they likely formed at large distances from the star and subsequently migrated inward. Here we use N-body simulations to study the effect of super-Earths on the accretion of rocky planets. In our simulations, one or more super-Earths migrates inward through a disk of planetary embryos and planetesimals embedded in a gaseous disk. We tested a wide range of migration speeds and configurations. Fast-migrating super-Earths ($\\tau_{mig} \\sim$0.01-0.1 Myr) only have a modest effect on the protoplanetary embryos and planetesimals. Sufficient material survives to form rocky, Earth-like planets on orbits exterior to the super-Earths'. In contrast, slowly-migrating super-Earths shepherd rocky material interior to their orbits and strongly deplete the terrestrial planet-forming zone. In this situation any Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone a...

  20. The SuperB Accelerator: Overview and Lattice Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Preger, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Vaccarezza, C.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Cai, Y.; Fisher, A.; Heifets, S.; Novokhatski, A.; Pivi, M.T.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC; Paoloni, E.; Marchiori, G.; /Pisa U.; Koop, I.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /Daresbury /LBL, Berkeley /CERN /Orsay, LAL /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-22

    SuperB aims at the construction of a very high luminosity (10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} Flavour Factory, with possible location at the campus of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, near the INFN Frascati National Laboratory. In this paper the basic principles of the design and details on the lattice are given. SuperB is a new machine that can exploit novel very promising design approaches: (1) large Piwinski angle scheme will allow for peak luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, well beyond the current state-of-the-art, without a significant increase in beam currents or shorter bunch lengths; (2) 'crab waist' sextupoles will be used for suppression of dangerous resonances; (3) the low beam currents design presents reduced detector and background problems, and affordable operating costs; (4) a polarized electron beam can produce polarized {tau} leptons, opening an entirely new realm of exploration in lepton flavor physics. SuperB studies are already proving useful to the accelerator and particle physics communities. The principle of operation is being tested at DAFNE. The baseline lattice, based on the reuse of all PEP-II hardware, fits in the Tor Vergata University campus site, near Frascati. A CDR is being reviewed by an International Review Committee, chaired by J. Dainton (UK). A Technical Design Report will be prepared to be ready by beginning of 2010.

  1. Super-Earths as Failed Cores in Orbital Migration Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We explore whether close-in super-Earths were formed as rocky bodies that failed to grow fast enough to become the cores of gas giants before the natal protostellar disk dispersed. We model the failed cores' inward orbital migration in the low-mass or type I regime, to stopping points at distances where the tidal interaction with the protostellar disk applies zero net torque. The three kinds of migration traps considered are those due to the dead zone's outer edge, the ice line, and the transition from accretion to starlight as the disk's main heat source. As the disk disperses, the traps move toward final positions near or just outside 1~au. Planets at this location exceeding about 3~M$_\\oplus$ open a gap, decouple from their host trap, and migrate inward in the high-mass or type II regime to reach the vicinity of the star. We synthesize the population of planets formed in this scenario, finding that some fraction of the observed super-Earths can be failed cores. Most super-Earths formed this way have more t...

  2. Ending Aging in Super Glassy Polymer Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, CH; Nguyen, PT; Hill, MR; Thornton, AW; Konstas, K; Doherty, CM; Mulder, RJ; Bourgeois, L; Liu, ACY; Sprouster, DJ; Sullivan, JP; Bastow, TJ; Hill, AJ; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2014-04-16

    Aging in super glassy polymers such as poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) (PTMSP), poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) (PMP), and polymers with intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) reduces gas permeabilities and limits their application as gas-separation membranes. While super glassy polymers are initially very porous, and ultra-permeable, they quickly pack into a denser phase becoming less porous and permeable. This age-old problem has been solved by adding an ultraporous additive that maintains the low density, porous, initial stage of super glassy polymers through absorbing a portion of the polymer chains within its pores thereby holding the chains in their open position. This result is the first time that aging in super glassy polymers is inhibited whilst maintaining enhanced CO2 permeability for one year and improving CO2/N-2 selectivity. This approach could allow super glassy polymers to be revisited for commercial application in gas separations.

  3. Advances in the diagnosis of drug eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, C; Suh Oh, H J

    2013-11-01

    Drug eruptions affecting the skin or mucosas (toxicoderma) are the most common adverse effects of drugs and represent one of the more common diagnostic challenges for the dermatologist. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of drug reactions, pharmacogenetics, and pharmacoepidemiology will help us to resolve the main dilemmas and to anticipate and even prevent such reactions. Many drug eruptions are due to T cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions that can involve activation of different proinflammatory mechanisms, which would explain the varied manifestations. Some aspects defy the classical understanding of antigen processing and presentation. New immunological hypotheses, such as the «p-i concept», have been introduced to complement the hapten theory and, at least in part, help to explain why drug reactions tend to affect the skin and why certain viral infections increase the risk of drug eruptions. In this paper we analyze these pathogenic concepts and the role of HLA genes in the susceptibility to certain severe adverse drug reactions, and also examine other advances in the diagnosis of drug eruptions. We briefly discuss a number of recently described reactions to new drugs.

  4. Emotional Eruptions, Volcanic Activity and Global Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2011-01-01

    The eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April 2010 set off a number of environmental, economic and cultural effects obstructing thousands of people in the midst of their global mobility flows. It halted, as well, the exchange of goods and commodities and exposed the vulnerability of...

  5. Imaging Prominence Eruptions Out to 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Brian E; Linton, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    Views of two bright prominence eruptions trackable all the way to 1AU are here presented, using the heliospheric imagers on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The two events first erupted from the Sun on 2011 June 7 and 2012 August 31, respectively. Only these two examples of clear prominence eruptions observable this far from the Sun could be found in the STEREO image database, emphasizing the rarity of prominence eruptions this persistently bright. For the 2011 June event, a time-dependent 3-D reconstruction of the prominence structure is made using point-by-point triangulation. This is not possible for the August event due to a poor viewing geometry. Unlike the coronal mass ejection (CME) that accompanies it, the 2011 June prominence exhibits little deceleration from the Sun to 1 AU, as a consequence moving upwards within the CME. This demonstrates that prominences are not necessarily tied to the CME's magnetic structure far from the Sun. A mathematical framework is developed ...

  6. Kaposi's varicelliform eruption: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Bruno; Taliercio, Vanina; Luna, Paula; Abad, María Eugenia; Larralde, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's varicelliform eruption is a rare and potentially fatal viral infection caused mainly by reactivation of herpes simplex virus. It concomitantly occurs with pre-existing skin conditions, mostly atopic dermatitis, so it is predominately found in children. We present a case series that includes four adults, familial cases, and previously healthy patients. We also highlight clinical features, associations and therapeutic options.

  7. IMAGING PROMINENCE ERUPTIONS OUT TO 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brian E.; Howard, Russell A.; Linton, Mark G., E-mail: brian.wood@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    Views of two bright prominence eruptions trackable all the way to 1 AU are here presented, using the heliospheric imagers on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The two events first erupted from the Sun on 2011 June 7 and 2012 August 31, respectively. Only these two examples of clear prominence eruptions observable this far from the Sun could be found in the STEREO image database, emphasizing the rarity of prominence eruptions this persistently bright. For the 2011 June event, a time-dependent 3D reconstruction of the prominence structure is made using point-by-point triangulation. This is not possible for the August event due to a poor viewing geometry. Unlike the coronal mass ejection (CME) that accompanies it, the 2011 June prominence exhibits little deceleration from the Sun to 1 AU, as a consequence moving upwards within the CME. This demonstrates that prominences are not necessarily tied to the CME's magnetic structure far from the Sun. A mathematical framework is developed for describing the degree of self-similarity for the prominence's expansion away from the Sun. This analysis suggests only modest deviations from self-similar expansion, but close to the Sun the prominence expands radially somewhat more rapidly than self-similarity would predict.

  8. Holocene eruptions of mauna kea volcano, hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, S C

    1971-04-23

    Postglacial lava flows, interstratified with thick locally derived sheets of tephra, cover some 27.5 square kilometers on the south slope of Mauna Kea. Most of the volcanics were erupted about 4500 years ago and overlie a regionally extensive paleosol which developed largely during the last glaciation.

  9. Emotional Eruptions, Volcanic Activity and Global Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2011-01-01

    The eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April 2010 set off a number of environmental, economic and cultural effects obstructing thousands of people in the midst of their global mobility flows. It halted, as well, the exchange of goods and commodities and exposed the vulnerability...

  10. Lichenoid drug eruption after human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, Mary E; Schleichert, Rachel A; Green, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Lichenoid drug reactions have been linked to a long and growing list of medications, most of which are used mainly in adults, making these reactions exceedingly rare in children. To the best of our knowledge, this case report is the first of a lichenoid drug eruption in a child after human papillomavirus vaccination.

  11. Exploring the climate response to the 1815 Tambora eruption with respect to natural climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Stephan J.; Timmreck, Claudia; Jungclaus, Johann H.

    2010-05-01

    The largest historic volcanic eruption with known origin was the explosion of Mount Tambora in Indonesia in April 1815. In the aftermath of this devastating eruption, the following year 1816 came to be known as the "year without a summer", in particular in USA, Canada, and Europe, where the worst famine over a century as well as typhus epidemics accompanied by enhanced emigration from Europe were recorded. The stratospheric aerosol mass load was estimated to be about three times that of the Pinatubo eruption in 1991, leading to strong impact on the Earth's climate system. In a series of ensemble simulations of the last Millennium we applied our Earth system model, based on the ECHAM5/MPIOM model family, to investigate the climate signal of the Tambora eruption with respect to natural and forced variability. This event contributed to one of the strongest cooling periods during the last Millennium in the ensemble of simulations. However, this period is associated with a large ensemble spread in simulated air temperature on a hemispheric and global as well as on a regional scale, with limited to very strong atmospheric response. The unique path of the climate evolution through the Earth's history yielding the extreme summer in 1816 in North America and Europe is compared with the simulations. A special focus of our analysis is Tambora's impact on climate and its relationship with the status of the climate system, e.g. the ENSO state, at the time of the eruption. Additionally, the contribution of the large volcanic eruption with tropical but unknown location about six years prior to the Tambora in 1809 will be discussed.

  12. Linking magma composition with volcano size and eruptive style in basaltic monogenetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. E.; McGee, L. E.; Cronin, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magma composition, volcano size and eruptive style (together with vent locations) are the definitive parameters of basaltic monogenetic systems. These variables are not independent, but the relationships between them are complex. Monogenetic volcano fields that episodically erupt small-volume, discrete magma batches such as the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF, northern New Zealand), typically represent primary mantle melts variably modified by near source processes. In such cases, where the volume of magma is small, eruption styles are strongly controlled by the interaction of magma with the surficial environment and this is determined by both magma volume and its rise rate. The magmatic compositional extremes of primitive magmas in the AVF define a spectrum ranging from strongly silica-undersaturated nephelinite to sub-alkalic basalt. Nephelinites are low SiO2 (~40 wt.%), highly incompatible-element enriched compositions, representing very low degrees of partial melting (indicates that all of these magmas are sourced within the same general mantle region at depths of 80-70 km. The two compositional extremes also define extremes in volume of magma and ultimately magma flux at the surface. The surficial environment of the AVF is characterized by highly water saturated sediments of variable competency and many pressurized aquifer systems. Where there is a combination of small volumes and low flux rates, environmental factors dominate and phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions ensue, forming tuff cones, rings and maars. Larger volumes and flux rates result in dry eruptions forming cinder cones and lava fields. Thus at a fundamental level defining magma source characteristics and temporal or spatial variation in these (such as cyclic or evolutionary trends) can inform better long term forecasts of surface eruption processes and thus should be more closely examined in hazard studies of monogentic fields.

  13. Super-Eddington stellar winds driven by near-surface energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quataert, Eliot; Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel; Klion, Hannah; Paxton, Bill

    2016-05-01

    We develop analytic and numerical models of the properties of super-Eddington stellar winds, motivated by phases in stellar evolution when super-Eddington energy deposition (via, e.g. unstable fusion, wave heating, or a binary companion) heats a region near the stellar surface. This appears to occur in the giant eruptions of luminous blue variables (LBVs), Type IIn supernovae progenitors, classical novae, and X-ray bursts. We show that when the wind kinetic power exceeds Eddington, the photons are trapped and behave like a fluid. Convection does not play a significant role in the wind energy transport. The wind properties depend on the ratio of a characteristic speed in the problem v_crit˜ (dot{E} G)^{1/5} (where dot{E} is the heating rate) to the stellar escape speed near the heating region vesc(rh). For vcrit ≳ vesc(rh), the wind kinetic power at large radii dot{E}_w ˜ dot{E}. For vcrit ≲ vesc(rh), most of the energy is used to unbind the wind material and thus dot{E}_w ≲ dot{E}. Multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations without radiation diffusion using FLASH and one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with radiation diffusion using MESA are in good agreement with the analytic predictions. The photon luminosity from the wind is itself super-Eddington but in many cases the photon luminosity is likely dominated by `internal shocks' in the wind. We discuss the application of our models to eruptive mass-loss from massive stars and argue that the wind models described here can account for the broad properties of LBV outflows and the enhanced mass-loss in the years prior to Type IIn core-collapse supernovae.

  14. Carbide Derived Carbon Super Capacitor Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelgate, James; Bauer, Dave; Quirin, James; Lofland, S. E.; Hettinger, J. D.; Heon, M.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2010-02-01

    Supercapacitors can be applied into many different fields from nano-robots to high density energy storage. Growing TiC films from a know recipe and removing the transition metal element, Titanium, by chlorination leaves a carbon film that can then be applied as an electrode in a super capacitor. The problem is when the Titanium is removed from the film the stress induced by this process causes the films to fracture into isolated islands. The islands allow electrons to travel across them every easily, but there is no transfer of electrons from island to island. We present results of an investigation of a technique control the location of the fractures and use them to our benefit. Ideally, we want to create them to fracture in parallel lines. To force these fractures into straight lines we will purchase substrates with thermal SiO2 created on the surface of Si. Using an etching process we will removed a channel of SiO2 the same as the thickness of the TiC film we plan on growing. These channels will allow the fractures to form in a correlated way creating a straight line. )

  15. Compound-specific carbon isotopes from Earth’s largest flood basalt eruptions directly linked to the end-Triassic mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Jessica H.; Olsen, Paul E.; Eglinton, Timothy; Brookfield, Michael E.; Sambrotto, Raymond N.

    2010-01-01

    A leading hypothesis explaining Phanerozoic mass extinctions and associated carbon isotopic anomalies is the emission of greenhouse, other gases, and aerosols caused by eruptions of continental flood basalt provinces. However, the necessary serial relationship between these eruptions, isotopic excursions, and extinctions has never been tested in geological sections preserving all three records. The end-Triassic extinction (ETE) at 201.4 Ma is among the largest of these extinctions and is tied to a large negative carbon isotope excursion, reflecting perturbations of the carbon cycle including a transient increase in CO2. The cause of the ETE has been inferred to be the eruption of the giant Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP). Here, we show that carbon isotopes of leaf wax derived lipids (n-alkanes), wood, and total organic carbon from two orbitally paced lacustrine sections interbedded with the CAMP in eastern North America show similar excursions to those seen in the mostly marine St. Audrie’s Bay section in England. Based on these results, the ETE began synchronously in marine and terrestrial environments slightly before the oldest basalts in eastern North America but simultaneous with the eruption of the oldest flows in Morocco, a CO2 super greenhouse, and marine biocalcification crisis. Because the temporal relationship between CAMP eruptions, mass extinction, and the carbon isotopic excursions are shown in the same place, this is the strongest case for a volcanic cause of a mass extinction to date. PMID:20308590

  16. The Lusi mud eruption dynamics: constraints from field data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Adriano; Sciarra, Alessandra; Lupi, Matteo; Mauri, Guillaume; Karyono, Karyono; Husein, Alwi; Aquino, Ida; Ricco, Ciro; Obermann, Anne; Hadi, Soffian

    2017-04-01

    The Indonesian Lusi eruption has been spewing boiling water, gas, and sediments since the 29th of May 2006. Initially, numerous aligned eruptions sites appeared along the Watukosek fault system that was reactivated after the Yogyakarta earthquake occurring the 27th of May in the Java Island. Since its birth Lusi erupted with a pulsating behavior showing intermittent periods of stronger activity resulting in higher fluids and solid emissions intervals. Since 2010 two active vents are constantly active. We conducted detailed monitoring of such clastic geysering activity and this allowed us to distinguish four distinct phases that follow each other and that reoccur every 30 minutes: (1) regular bubbling activity (constant emission of water, mud breccia, and gas); (2) clastic geysering phase with intense bubbling (consisting in reduced vapor emission and more powerful diffused mud bursting); (3) clastic geysering with mud bursts and intense vapour discharge (typically dense plume that propagates up to 100 m in height); (4) quiescent phase marking the end of the geysering activity (basically no gas emissions or bursts observed). In order to better understand this pulsating behavior and to constrain the mechanisms controlling its activity, we designed a multidisciplinary monitoring of the eruption site combining the deployment of numerous instruments around the crater site. Processing of the collected data reveals the dynamic activity of Lusi's craters. Satellite images show that the location of these vents migrated along a NE-SW direction. This is subparallel to the direction of the Watukosek fault system that is the zone of (left) lateral deformation upon which Lusi developed in 2006. Coupling HR camera images with broadband and short period seismic stations allowed us to describe the seismic signal generated by clastic geysering and to constrain the depth of the source generating the signal. We measure a delay between the seismic (harmonic) record and the associated

  17. Terminal Pleistocene to early Holocene volcanic eruptions at Zuni Salt Lake, west-central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Jill; Forman, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Zuni Salt Lake (ZSL) is a large maar in the Red Hill-Quemado volcanic field located in west-central New Mexico in the southwestern USA. Stratigraphic analysis of sections in and around the maar, coupled with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating, indicate that ZSL volcanic activity occurred between ˜13.4 and 9.9 ka and was most likely confined to a ≤500-year interval sometime between ˜12.3 and 11.0 ka. The basal volcanic unit consists of locally widespread basaltic ash fallout interpreted to represent a violent or wind-aided strombolian eruption tentatively attributed to Cerro Pomo, a scoria cone ˜10 km south of ZSL. Subsequent eruptions emanated from vents near or within the present-day ZSL maar crater. Strombolian eruptions of multiple spatter and scoria cones produced basaltic lava and scoria lapilli fallout. Next, a phreatomagmatic eruption created the maar crater and surrounding tephra rim and apron. ZSL eruptions ended with strombolian eruptions that formed three scoria cones on the crater floor. The revised age range of ZSL is younger and more precise than the 190-24 ka 2-sigma age range derived from previous argon dating. This implies that other morphologically youthful, argon-dated volcanoes on the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau might be substantially younger than previously reported.

  18. The 2015 Wolf volcano (Galápagos) eruption studied using Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbin; Jónsson, Sigurjón; Ruch, Joël.; Aoki, Yosuke

    2016-09-01

    An energetic eruption started on 25 May 2015 from a circumferential fissure at the summit of Wolf volcano on Isabela Island, western Galápagos. Further eruptive activity within the Wolf caldera followed in mid-June 2015. As no geodetic observations of earlier eruptions at Wolf exist, this eruption provides an opportunity to study the volcano's magmatic plumbing system for the first time. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from both the Sentinel-1A and ALOS-2 satellites to map and analyze the surface deformation at four time periods during the activity. These data allow us to identify the two eruption phases and reveal strong coeruptive subsidence within the Wolf caldera that is superimposed on a larger volcano-wide subsidence signal. Modeling of the surface displacements shows that two shallow magma reservoirs located under Wolf at ~1 km and ~5 km below sea level explain the subsidence and that these reservoirs appear to be hydraulically connected. We also suggest that the transition from the circumferential to the intracaldera eruption may have involved ring fault activity.

  19. Radio Diagnostics of Electron Acceleration Sites During the Eruption of a Flux Rope in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Carley, Eoin P; Gallagher, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceleration in the solar corona is often associated with flares and the eruption of twisted magnetic structures known as flux ropes. However, the locations and mechanisms of such particle acceleration during the flare and eruption are still subject to much investigation. Observing the exact sites of particle acceleration can help confirm how the flare and eruption are initiated are initiated and how they evolve. Here we use the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to analyse a flare and erupting flux rope on 2014-April-18, while observations from the Nancay Radio Astronomy Facility allows us to diagnose the sites of electron acceleration during the eruption. Our analysis shows evidence for a pre-formed flux rope which slowly rises and becomes destabilised at the time of a C-class flare, plasma jet and the escape of >75 keV electrons from rope center into the corona. As the eruption proceeds, continued acceleration of electrons with energies of ~5 keV occurs above the flux rope for a period over 5 minutes. A...

  20. The 2015 Wolf volcano (Galápagos) eruption studied using Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 data

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenbin

    2016-09-28

    An energetic eruption started on 25 May 2015 from a circumferential fissure at the summit of Wolf volcano on Isabela Island, western Galápagos. Further eruptive activity within the Wolf caldera followed in mid-June 2015. As no geodetic observations of earlier eruptions at Wolf exist, this eruption provides an opportunity to study the volcano\\'s magmatic plumbing system for the first time. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from both the Sentinel-1A and ALOS-2 satellites to map and analyze the surface deformation at four time periods during the activity. These data allow us to identify the two eruption phases and reveal strong coeruptive subsidence within the Wolf caldera that is superimposed on a larger volcano-wide subsidence signal. Modeling of the surface displacements shows that two shallow magma reservoirs located under Wolf at ~1 km and ~5 km below sea level explain the subsidence and that these reservoirs appear to be hydraulically connected. We also suggest that the transition from the circumferential to the intracaldera eruption may have involved ring fault activity.

  1. Eyewitness, stratigraphy, chemistry, and eruptive dynamics of the 1913 Plinian eruption of Volcán de Colima, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo, R.; Macías, J. L.; Gavilanes, J. C.; Arce, J. L.; Komorowski, J. C.; Gardner, J. E.; Valdez-Moreno, G.

    2010-04-01

    Based on the stratigraphic record of the deposits, analysis of previous works, historic archives, and eyewitness accounts the 1913 eruption of Volcán de Colima was reconstructed. The eruption started in 17 January and peaked in 20 January, 1913. It occurred in three main phases: 1) An opening phase with the generation of Merapi-type pyroclastic flows (units F 1, F 2, F 3) and a pyroclastic surge (S 1), 2) A vent-clearing phase with strong explosions that produced Vulcanian-Soufriere-type pyroclastic flows (F 4) and a pyroclastic surge (S 2) which destroyed the summit dome decompressing the magma system, and 3) a Plinian phase with the establishment of a ˜ 23 km high column dispersing a fallout (C 1) to the NE followed by the collapse of the column that generated a pyroclastic surge (S 3) and 15-km long pumice-rich pyroclastic flows (F 5). After the eruption, remobilization of the pyroclastic material generated lahars in main gullies around the crater. Fallout C 1 blanketed an area of ˜ 191,318 km 2 covering the cities of Guzman, Guadalajara, and Saltillo (Coahuila) located at 725 km from the source. It had a volume of 1.4 km 3 (0.57 km 3 DRE = Dense Rock Equivalent). The total volume of pyroclastic flow and surge deposits was 0.26 km 3 (0.07 km 3 DRE) giving a total volume of the eruption of 1.66 km 3 (0.64 km 3 DRE). The Plinian column lasted 4.6 h with a total mass of 1.5 × 10 12 kg and a mass eruption rate of 9.02 × 10 7 kg/s. The column height and the ejected magma volume indicate that the 1913 eruption had a VEI = 5 being the largest event in the historical record of Colima Volcano. Juvenile scoria and pumice consisted of Pl > Opx > Cpx > Hbl + accessory titanomagnetite + Ap and Ol with reaction rims. Chemistry of juvenile scoria and pumice samples is andesitic very homogeneous (58.3 ± 0.5 wt.% SiO 2) and similar to the 1818 juvenile products (58.9 ± 0.2 wt.% SiO 2). The presence of banded scoria, olivine phenocrysts with reaction rims, and trace

  2. Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; /Measurment Science Inc.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

  3. The SuperB factory, physics potential and project status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiechczynski Jaroslaw

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The SuperB project is an international enterprise aiming at the construction of the high-luminosity asymmetric beam energy electron-positron accelerator, which would be located in the area of Rome. It would exploit several novel features allowing to achieve an unprecedented luminosities and to collect almost a hundred times more data than the current generation of ”B factories”. As for the leptonic colliders, it will maintain a clean, low-background experimental environment that is crucial for numerous measurements on the field of high energy physics

  4. Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; /Measurment Science Inc.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

  5. On the origin of Mount Etna eruptive cycles and Stromboli volcano paroxysms: implications for an alternative mechanism of volcanic eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    New mechanism of imbalance between magma column and fluid volume, accumulated in the magmatic system, is considered as a driving force of the volcanic eruption. Conditions of eruption based on this mechanism are used to explain main features of the volcanic activity (eruptive cycles and paroxysms) of the volcanoes Etna and Stromboli (Italy).

  6. The eruptive history and magmatic evolution of Aluto volcano: new insights into silicic peralkaline volcanism in the Ethiopian rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, William; Pyle, David M.; Mather, Tamsin A.; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Biggs, Juliet; Cohen, Benjamin E.; Barfod, Dan N.; Lewi, Elias

    2016-12-01

    The silicic peralkaline volcanoes of the East African Rift are some of the least studied volcanoes on Earth. Here we bring together new constraints from fieldwork, remote sensing, geochronology and geochemistry to present the first detailed account of the eruptive history of Aluto, a restless silicic volcano located in a densely populated section of the Main Ethiopian Rift. Prior to the growth of the Aluto volcanic complex (before 500 ka) the region was characterized by a significant period of fault development and mafic fissure eruptions. The earliest volcanism at Aluto built up a trachytic complex over 8 km in diameter. Aluto then underwent large-volume ignimbrite eruptions at 316 ± 19 ka and 306 ± 12 ka developing a 42 km2 collapse structure. After a hiatus of 250 ka, a phase of post-caldera volcanism initiated at 55 ± 19 ka and the most recent eruption of Aluto has a radiocarbon age of 0.40 ± 0.05 cal. ka BP. During this post-caldera phase highly-evolved peralkaline rhyolite lavas, ignimbrites and pumice fall deposits have erupted from vents across the complex. Geochemical modelling is consistent with rhyolite genesis from protracted fractionation (> 80%) of basalt that is compositionally similar to rift-related basalts found east of the complex. Based on the style and volume of recent eruptions we suggest that silicic eruptions occur at an average rate of 1 per 1000 years, and that future eruptions of Aluto will involve explosive emplacement of localised pumice cones and effusive obsidian coulees of volumes in the range 1-100 × 106 m3.

  7. Rising from the ashes: Changes in salmonid fish assemblages after 30 months of the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallement, Mailén; Macchi, Patricio J; Vigliano, Pablo; Juarez, Santiago; Rechencq, Magalí; Baker, Matthew; Bouwes, Nicolaas; Crowl, Todd

    2016-01-15

    Events such as volcanic eruptions may act as disturbance agents modifying the landscape spatial diversity and increasing environmental instability. On June 4, 2011 the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic complex located on Chile (2236 m.a.s.l., 40° 02' 24" S- 70° 14' 26" W) experience a rift zone eruption ejecting during the first day 950 million metric tons into the atmosphere. Due to the westerly winds predominance, ash fell differentially upon 24 million ha of Patagonia Argentinean, been thicker deposits accumulated towards the West. In order to analyze changes on stream fish assemblages we studied seven streams 8, 19 and 30 months after the eruption along the ash deposition gradient, and compare those data to pre eruption ones. Habitat features and structure of the benthic macroinvertebrate food base of fish was studied. After the eruption, substantial environmental changes were observed in association with the large amount of ash fallout. In western sites, habitat loss due to ash accumulation, changes in the riparian zone and morphology of the main channels were observed. Turbidity was the water quality variable which reflected the most changes throughout time, with NTU values decreasing sharply from West to East sites. In west sites, increased Chironomid densities were recorded 8 months after the initial eruption as well as low EPT index values. These relationships were reversed in the less affected streams farther away from the volcano. Fish assemblages were greatly influenced both by habitat and macroinvertebrate changes. The eruption brought about an initial sharp decline in fish densities and the almost total loss of young of the year in the most western streams affecting recruitment. This effect diminished rapidly with distance from the emission center. Thirty months after the eruption, environmental changes are still occurring as a consequence of basin wide ash remobilization and transport.

  8. Revealing the Eruptive History of Volcanoes from Massive Cross-Correlation of Seismic Signal at Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, A.; Gaillard, P.; Grenouille, A.; Bui-Quang, P.; Guilhem, A.; Bobrov, D.; Kitov, I. O.; Rozhkov, M.

    2015-12-01

    We propose here a massive cross-correlation technique applied to seismic events located around volcanoes and recorded at teleseismic distance. Multichannel cross-correlations are performed between 2002 to 2012 using seismic templates occurring at the time of moderate to large volcanic eruptions. The volcanic periods are reported from the Global Volcanism Program database while the waveform data are obtained from the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The temporal distribution of new seismic events, built from the association of teleseismic detections reveals acceleration patterns, which are highly correlated to the past eruptive activities. These newly detected events are relocated using Bayesian approach and leads to preliminary interpretation of the volcanic plumbing system. Two examples are presented. First, the large 2008 eruption (Volcanic Explosivity Index, VEI4) of Kasatochi (Aleutian Islands, 52.10°N/175.31°W) is used to demonstrate that only few seismic templates (~3) help to reveal the time scale of the eruption. Results are compared to hydroacoustic signal, which is highly correlated to the distribution of new seismic events prior and during eruption. We also show that after the peaked seismic activity (i.e., ~ 100 seismic events in 1 hour) the infrasound signal starts and signs the volcanic plume activity. The second case example reveals with success seven past volcanic eruptions of lower magnitude (VEI1 to VEI2) of the Karangetang volcano (Siau Island in Indonesia, 2.46°N/125.24°E). We show the potential of this method to detect volcanic eruptions in isolated areas. This is of special interest especially when there is no volcano observatory to monitor the volcanic activity, or when the last eruptive period is unknown.

  9. Identifying the Volcanic Eruption Depicted in a Neolithic Painting at Çatalhöyük, Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Danišík, Martin; Aydar, Erkan; Şen, Erdal; Ulusoy, İnan; Lovera, Oscar M.

    2014-01-01

    A mural excavated at the Neolithic Çatalhöyük site (Central Anatolia, Turkey) has been interpreted as the oldest known map. Dating to ∼6600 BCE, it putatively depicts an explosive summit eruption of the Hasan Dağı twin-peaks volcano located ∼130 km northeast of Çatalhöyük, and a birds-eye view of a town plan in the foreground. This interpretation, however, has remained controversial not least because independent evidence for a contemporaneous explosive volcanic eruption of Hasan Dağı has been lacking. Here, we document the presence of andesitic pumice veneer on the summit of Hasan Dağı, which we dated using (U-Th)/He zircon geochronology. The (U-Th)/He zircon eruption age of 8.97±0.64 ka (or 6960±640 BCE; uncertainties 2σ) overlaps closely with 14C ages for cultural strata at Çatalhöyük, including level VII containing the “map” mural. A second pumice sample from a surficial deposit near the base of Hasan Dağı records an older explosive eruption at 28.9±1.5 ka. U-Th zircon crystallization ages in both samples range from near-eruption to secular equilibrium (>380 ka). Collectively, our results reveal protracted intrusive activity at Hasan Dağı punctuated by explosive venting, and provide the first radiometric ages for a Holocene explosive eruption which was most likely witnessed by humans in the area. Geologic and geochronologic lines of evidence thus support previous interpretations that residents of Çatalhöyük artistically represented an explosive eruption of Hasan Dağı volcano. The magmatic longevity recorded by quasi-continuous zircon crystallization coupled with new evidence for late-Pleistocene and Holocene explosive eruptions implicates Hasan Dağı as a potential volcanic hazard. PMID:24416270

  10. Thermodynamics of gas and steam-blast eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, L.G.

    1995-01-01

    Eruptions of gas or steam and non-juvenile debris are common in volcanic and hydrothermal areas. From reports of non-juvenile eruptions or eruptive sequences world-wide, at least three types (or end-members) can be identified: (1) those involving rock and liquid water initially at boiling-point temperatures ('boiling-point eruptions'); (2) those powered by gas (primarily water vapor) at initial temperatures approaching magmatic ('gas eruptions'); and (3) those caused by rapid mixing of hot rock and ground- or surface water ('mixing eruptions'). For these eruption types, the mechanical energy released, final temperatures, liquid water contents and maximum theoretical velocities are compared by assuming that the erupting mixtures of rock and fluid thermally equilibrate, then decompress isentropically from initial, near-surface pressure (???10 MPa) to atmospheric pressure. Maximum mechanical energy release is by far greatest for gas eruptions (??????1.3 MJ/kg of fluid-rock mixture)-about one-half that of an equivalent mass of gunpowder and one-fourth that of TNT. It is somewhat less for mixing eruptions (??????0.4 MJ/kg), and least for boiling-point eruptions (??????0.25 MJ/kg). The final water contents of crupted boiling-point mixtures are usually high, producing wet, sloppy deposits. Final erupted mixtures from gas eruptions are nearly always dry, whereas those from mixing eruptions vary from wet to dry. If all the enthalpy released in the eruptions were converted to kinetic energy, the final velocity (vmax) of these mixtures could range up to 670 m/s for boiling-point eruptions and 1820 m/s for gas eruptions (highest for high initial pressure and mass fractions of rock (mr) near zero). For mixing eruptions, vmax ranges up to 1150 m/s. All observed eruption velocities are less than 400 m/s, largely because (1) most solid material is expelled when mr is high, hence vmax is low; (2) observations are made of large blocks the velocities of which may be less than the

  11. Super-resolved time-frequency analysis of wideband backscattered data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, John; Ling, H.

    1995-01-01

    A time-frequency super-resolution procedure is presented for processing wideband backscattered data containing both scattering center and natural resonance information. In this procedure, Prony's method is first applied in the frequency domain to locate scattering centers. The data is processed one...

  12. Late Holocene Eruptions of Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, J. W.; Sisson, T. W.; Gardner, C. A.; McGeehin, J. P.; Champion, D. E.; Byman, J. A.

    2001-12-01

    Detailed stratigraphy, more than 20 radiocarbon ages, and paleomagnetic secular variation measurements indicate that eruptions of Mount Rainier clustered in three major periods during the past 3000 years. Products include a plinian fall deposit, several vulcanian falls, several fine ash falls that are associated with block-and-ash flows, and lahars that descended all major drainages that head on the volcano. Tephra layers are of two types: vesicle rich (chiefly pumice lapilli, scoria, and ash) and vesicle poor (chiefly fine-grained glass and lithic fragments). Pumice and glass shards in vesicle-rich deposits are microlite-poor and derive from explosive eruptions. Glass shards in vesicle-poor ashes have variable microlite contents and derive from minor explosions, or from ash clouds that billow up from block-and-ash pyroclastic flows. These findings contrast with those of previous studies that document only two eruptions, each associated with a pumiceous tephra layer, during the last 3000 years. The oldest eruptive period, called Summerland, began after 2700 cal yr BP with a vesicle-poor tephra and a collapse of hydrothermally altered rock on the west flank of the volcano that generated the Round Pass mudflow. Lava flows, fine ash falls and a pyroclastic flow erupted ca 2400 to 2500 cal yr BP. Intermittent eruptions produced more fine-grained ash falls, a possible pyroclastic flow and more lahars, then culminated in the plinian "C" fall to the NE and large lahars that flowed south, southeast, and west about 2200 cal yr BP. The Summerland period ended before 1600 cal yr BP with minor fall deposits and lahars. About 1000 cal yr BP, the Deadman Flat eruptions produced large lahars that contain distinctive prismatically-jointed glassy clasts, interpreted as juvenile components from pyroclastic flows, and co- ignimbrite ash in the headwaters of the White River. The lahars descended valleys to the NE and flowed 100 km to Puget Sound. Aggradation shortly after emplacement

  13. Varieties of sweet sorghum Super-1 and Super-2 and its equipment for bioethanol in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabendon, M. B.; Efendi, R.; Santoso, S. B.; Prastowo, B.

    2017-05-01

    The demands for alternative sources of energy are currently growing because people now are more aware of the many negative impacts fossil fuel gives to the environment. Plant based renewable energy provides potential sources of energy with advantages of cleaner fuel effect and capability of integration with food crop production. Sorghum have been considered to be a highly potential source of food, feed and fuel, especially sweet stalk sorghum that posses both functions as source of food from its grain and fuel made from its stalk juice. Sorghum varieties are well known to have excellent adaptability in marginal areas, especially drought prone areas where other food crops are unable to thrive. The current paper aimed to share ongoing research on many functional uses of sweet stalk sorghum varieties released at Indonesian Cereals Research Institute (ICERI). Among many varieties that had been released were two sweet stalk sorghum varieties SUPER-1 and SUPER-2 released in 2013 that stands out in biomass yield and bioethanol production. Based on various researches conducted at different location and planting season, yield potential of biomass ranged at 30 - 40 t/ha with higher yield occurred during dry season. Stalk juice sugar content in brix were found to be higher in dry season ranged at 13.6 % to 18.4 %, and the amount of juice stalk was obtained at about 30-50 % from total biomass yield. Furthermore, bioethanol production from stalk juice after fermentation was at the range of 8 to 10 % from total stalk juice volume. Modification of processing equipment of bioethanol have also been carried out and was able to increased the concentration of ethanol being distilled from 85% -92% to 90% -95%. Another result obtained was able to decreased fermentation time from 14-21 days to 6-10 days. Furthermore, the yield of ethanol from juice was also from an average of 4.95% to 6.75%.

  14. Spatial analysis of the impacts of the Chaitén volcano eruption (Chile) in three fluvial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, H.; Iroumé, A.; Picco, L.; Mohr, C. H.; Mazzorana, B.; Lenzi, M. A.; Mao, L.

    2016-08-01

    The eruption of the Chaitén volcano in May 2008 generated morphological and ecological disturbances in adjacent river basins, and the magnitude of these disturbances depended on the type of dominant volcanic process affecting each of them. The aim of this study is to analyse the morphological changes in different periods in river segments of the Blanco, El Amarillo and Rayas river basins located near the Chaitén volcano. These basins suffered disturbances of different intensity and spatial distribution caused by tephra fall, dome collapses and pyroclastic density currents that damaged hillslope forests, widened channels and destroyed island and floodplain vegetation. Changes continued to occur in the fluvial systems in the years following the eruption, as a consequence of the geomorphic processes indirectly induced by the eruption. Channel changes were analyzed by comparing remote images of pre and post-eruption conditions. Two periods were considered: the first from 2008 to 2009-2010 associated with the explosive and effusive phases of the eruption and the second that correspond to the post-eruption stage from 2009-2010 to 2013. Following the first phases channel segments widened 91% (38 m/yr), 6% (7 m/yr) and 7% (22 m/yr) for Blanco, Rayas and El Amarillo Rivers, respectively, compared to pre-eruption condition. In the second period, channel segments additionally widened 42% (8 m/yr), 2% (2 m/yr) and 5% (4 m/yr) for Blanco, Rayas and El Amarillo Rivers, respectively. In the Blanco River 62 and 82% of the islands disappeared in the first and second period, respectively, which is 6-8 times higher than in the El Amarillo approximately twice the Rayas. Sinuosity increased after the eruption only in the Blanco River but the three study channels showed a high braiding intensity mainly during the first post-eruption period. The major disturbances occurred during the eruptive and effusive phases of Chaitén volcano, and the intensity of these disturbances reflects the

  15. Redoubt Volcano: 2009 Eruption Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, K. F.

    2009-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a 3110-m glaciated stratovolcano located 170 km SW of Anchorage, Alaska, on the W side of Cook Inlet. The edifice comprises a oil production in Cook Inlet was halted for nearly five months. Unrest began in August, 2008 with reports of H2S odor. In late September, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)’s seismic network recorded periods of volcanic tremor. Throughout the fall, AVO noted increased fumarolic emissions and accompanying ice- and snow-melt on and around the 1990 dome, and gas measurements showed elevated H2S and CO2 emissions. On January 23, seismometers recorded 48 hrs of intermittent tremor and discrete, low-frequency to hybrid events. Over the next 6 weeks, seismicity waxed and waned, an estimated 5-6 million m3 of ice were lost due to melting, volcanic gas emissions increased, and debris flows emerged repeatedly from recently formed ice holes near the 1990 dome, located on the crater’s N (“Drift”) side. On March 15, a phreatic explosion deposited non-juvenile ash from a new vent in the summit ice cap just S of the 1990 dome. Ash from the explosion rose to ~4500 m above sea level (asl). The plume was accompanied by weak seismicity. The first magmatic explosion occurred on March 22. Over the next two weeks, more than 19 explosions destroyed at least two lava domes and produced ash plumes that reached 6-18 km asl. Tephra was deposited along variable azimuths including trace to minor amounts on Anchorage and Kenai Peninsula communities, and reached Fairbanks, ~800 km to the N. Several lahars were produced by explosive disruption and melting of the “Drift” glacier. The largest lahars followed explosions on March 23 and April 4 and inundated the Drift River valley to the coast, causing temporary evacuation of the Drift River Oil Terminal, ~40 km from the vent. Time-lapse images captured pyroclastic flows and lahars in the “Drift” glacier valley during several of the explosions. Ballistics and pyroclastic flow deposits were

  16. Studying the Formation and Evolution of Eruptive Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Solar magnetic eruptions are dramatic sources of solar activity, and dangerous sources of space weather hazards. Many of these eruptions take the form of magnetic flux ropes, i.e., magnetic fieldlines wrapping around a core magnetic flux tube. Investigating the processes which form these flux ropes both prior to and during eruption, and investigating their evolution after eruption, can give us a critical window into understanding the sources of and processes involved in these eruptions. This presentation will discuss modeling and observational investigations into these various phases of flux rope formation, eruption, and evolution, and will discuss how these different explorations can be used to develop a more complete picture of erupting flux rope dynamics.

  17. A Microfilament-Eruption Mechanism for Solar Spicules

    CERN Document Server

    Sterling, Alphonse C

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations indicate that solar coronal jets result from eruptions of small-scale chromospheric filaments, called minifilaments; that is, the jets are produced by scaled-down versions of typical-sized filament eruptions. We consider whether solar spicules might in turn be scaled-down versions of coronal jets, being driven by eruptions of "microfilaments." Assuming a microfilament's size is about a spicule's width ($\\sim$300~km), the estimated occurrence number plotted against the estimated size of erupting filaments, minifilaments, and microfilaments approximately follows a power-law distribution (based on counts of CMEs, coronal jets, and spicules), suggesting that many or most spicules could result from microfilament eruptions. Observed spicule-base Ca II brightenings plausibly result from such microfilament eruptions. By analogy with coronal jets, microfilament eruptions might produce spicules with many of their observed characteristics, including smooth rise profiles, twisting motions, and EUV c...

  18. Seismological aspects of the 1989-1990 eruptions at redoubt volcano, Alaska: the SSAM perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, C.D.; Chouet, B.A.; Page, R.A.; Lahr, J.C.; Power, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    SSAM is a simple and inexpensive tool for continuous monitoring of average seismic amplitudes within selected frequency bands in near real-time on a PC-based data acquisition system. During the 1989-1990 eruption sequence at Redoubt Volcano, the potential of SSAM to aid in rapid identification of precursory Long-Period (LP) event swarms was realized, and since this time SSAM has been incorporated in routine monitoring efforts of the Alaska Volcano Observatory. In particular, an eruption that occurred on April 6 was successfully forecast primarily on the basis of recognizing the precursory LP activity on SSAM. Of twenty-two significant eruptions that occurred between December 14 and April 21, eleven had precursory swarms longer than one hour in duration that could be detected on SSAM. For individual swarms, the patterns of relative spectral amplitudes are distinct at each station and remain largely stationary through time, thus indicating that one source may have been preferentially and repeatedly activated throughout the swarm. Typically, a single spectral band dominates the signal at each seismic station: for the vigorous one-day swarm that preceded the first eruption on December 14, signals were sharply peaked in the 1.9-2.7 Hz band at the closest station, located 4 km from the vent, but were dominated by 1.3-1.9 Hz energy at three more distant stations located 7.5-22 km from the vent. The tendency for the signals from different swarms recorded at the same station to be peaked in the same frequency band suggests that all of the sources are characterized by a predominant length scale. Signals from the precursory LP swarms became weaker as the eruption sequence progressed, and swarms that occurred in March and April could only be detected at seismographs on the volcanic edifice. Onset times of precursory LP swarms prior to eruptions ranged from a few hours to about one week, but after the initial vent-clearing phase that ended December 19 these intervals tended to

  19. SuperB Progress Report for Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, B.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Pous, E.; /Barcelona U.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; /Bergen U.; Asgeirsson, D.; /British Columbia U.; Cheng, C.H.; Chivukula, A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.G.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; /Caltech; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; McElrath, B.; /CERN; Andreassen, R.; Meadows, B.; Sokoloff, M.; /Cincinnati U.; Blanke, M.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Lesiak, T.; /Cracow, INP /DESY /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Glasgow U. /Indiana U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol. /KEK, Tsukuba /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Lisbon, IST /Ljubljana U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Maryland U. /MIT /INFN, Milan /McGill U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Notre Dame U. /PNL, Richland /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Orsay, LAL /Orsay, LPT /INFN, Pavia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Queen Mary, U. of London /Regensburg U. /Republica U., Montevideo /Frascati /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rutherford /Sassari U. /Siegen U. /SLAC /Southern Methodist U. /Tel Aviv U. /Tohoku U. /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Uppsala U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Wayne State U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-14

    SuperB is a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measurements that can be made at SuperB play a pivotal role in understanding the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples for using the interplay between measurements to discriminate New Physics models are discussed in this document. SuperB is a Super Flavour Factory, in addition to studying large samples of B{sub u,d,s}, D and {tau} decays, SuperB has a broad physics programme that includes spectroscopy both in terms of the Standard Model and exotica, and precision measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. In addition to performing CP violation measurements at the {Upsilon}(4S) and {phi}(3770), SuperB will test CPT in these systems, and lepton universality in a number of different processes. The multitude of rare decay measurements possible at SuperB can be used to constrain scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model. In terms of other precision tests of the Standard Model, this experiment will be able to perform precision over

  20. The superB silicon vertex tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, G., E-mail: giuliana.rizzo@pi.infn.i [INFN-Pisa and Universita di Pisa (Italy); Avanzini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Calderini, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Crescioli, F.; Dell' Orso, M.; Forti, F.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A. [INFN-Pisa and Universita di Pisa (Italy); Lusiani, A. [Scuola Normale Superiore and INFN-Pisa (Italy); Gregucci, S.; Mammini, P.; Marchiori, G.; Massa, M.; Morsani, F. [INFN-Pisa and Universita di Pisa (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    The SuperB asymmetric e{sup +}-e{sup -} collider has been designed to deliver a luminosity greater than 10{sup 36}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} with moderate beam currents. Comparing to current B-Factories, the reduced center of mass boost of the SuperB machine requires improved vertex resolution to allow precision measurements sensitive to New Physics. We present the conceptual design of the silicon vertex tracker (SVT) for the SuperB detector with the present status of the R and D on the different options under study for its innermost Layer0.

  1. Recent eruptive history of Mount Hood, Oregon, and potential hazards from future eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1980-01-01

    Each of three major eruptive periods at Mount Hood (12,000-15,000(?), 1,500-1,800, and 200-300 years ago) produced dacite domes, pyroclastic flows, and mudflows, but virtually no pumice. Most of the fine lithic ash that mantles the slopes of the volcano and the adjacent mountains fell from ash clouds that accompanied the pyroclastic flows. Widely scattered pumice lapilli that are present at the ground surface on the south, east, and north sides of Mount Hood may have been erupted during the mid-1800's, when the last known activity of the volcano occurred. The geologically recent history of Mount Hood suggests that the most likely eruptive event in the future will be the formation of another dome, probably within the present south-facing crater. The principal hazards that could accompany dome formation include pyroclastic flows and mudflows moving from the upper slopes of the volcano down the floors of valleys. Ash clouds which accompany pyroclastic flows may deposit as much as a meter of fine ash close to their source, and as much as 20 centimeters at a distance of 11 kilometers downwind from the pyroclastic flows. Other hazards that could result from such eruptions include laterally directed explosive blasts that could propel rock fragments outward from the sides of a dome at high speed, and toxic volcanic gases. The scarcity of pumiceous ash erupted during the last 15,000 years suggests that explosive pumice eruptions are not a major hazard at Mount Hood; thus, there seems to be little danger that such an eruption will significantly affect the Portland (Oregon) metropolitan area in the near future.

  2. Pressure Transducer Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Files are located here, defining the locations of the pressure transducers on the HIRENASD model. These locations also correspond to the locations that analysts...

  3. The 2011 Nabro eruption, a SO2 plume height analysis using IASI measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Clarisse

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of the June 2011 Nabro eruption, large stratospheric plumes were observed by several instruments up to altitudes of 21 km, much higher than initial reported injection heights. It has been debated whether deep convection associated with the Asian Summer Monsoon anticyclone played a vital role in the vertical transport of the plume. Here we present a new and fast SO2 height retrieval algorithm for observations of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI. A comprehensive validation with forward trajectories and coincident CALIOP measurements is presented which indicates an accuracy better than 2 km for plumes below 20 km and SO2 columns up to the 1 DU level. We use this new product to analyse the Nabro eruption. Our findings indicate an initial plume located mainly between 15 and 17 km for which the lower parts underwent in succession rapid descent and uplift, within the Asian Monsoon anticyclone circulation, up to the stable thermal tropopause between 16 and 18 km, from where it slowly ascended further into the stratosphere. Evidence is presented that emissions in the first week of the eruption also contributed to the stratospheric sulfur input. This includes a second eruption between 15 and 17 km on the 16th and continuous emissions in the mid-troposphere of which some were also entrained and lifted within the anticyclonic circulation.

  4. Characteristics of volcanic tremor accompanying the September 24th, 1986 explosive eruption of Mt. Etna (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cristofolini

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Features of the volcanic tremor recorded before, during and after the eruptive event which occurred at Mt. Etna on September 24th 1986, are described. The whole eruption was particularly short in time (about eight hours and characterized by an extremely violent explosive activity with lava fountains a few hundred meters high. As the complete record of the seismic signals generated during the whole eruptive episode was available, a detailed spectral analysis of the volcanic tremor recorded at four stations, located at increasing distance from the summit of the volcano, was carried out. Fourier analysis, that was performed using temporal windows of about 11 min in duration, pointed to some large fluctuations of the overall spectral amplitude, as well as some frequency variations of the dominant spectral peaks. The ratio of the overall spectral amplitude recorded at the highest station and at the peripheral ones, was calculated in the two spectral bands 1.0-2.5 and 2.6-6.0 Hz, respectively. The significant contribution of energy at low frequency values supports the hypothesis of a subvertical planar source, which was active during the paroxysmal stage of the eruption. Such results are also supported by the analysis of the attenuation function of the spectral amplitude.

  5. Source mechanism of the May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens eruption from regional surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Roy W.; Langston, Charles A.

    1985-08-01

    A reference source equalization method using regional surface waves from the Mount St. Helens eruption of May 18, 1980, and the Elk Lake event of February 14, 1981, was used to determine the St. Helens eruption source time history. The time domain deconvolution signals display a complex series of pulses lasting 250 s. An initial pulse was isolated and was found to have a smoothly varying two-lobed radiation pattern for both Love and Rayleigh waves, suggesting a near-horizontal point force directed south consistent with previous results. The initial southward force corresponds to the acceleration of the landslide in a northern direction about 5-10 s after the triggering earthquake. Lateral forces were isolated 70-140 s later, consistent with the occurrence of the large lateral blast and the slide changing its direction down the Toutle River Valley. There also appears to be significant source activity between 140 and 250 s after the initial pulse. This later activity exhibits forces in the northwest-southeast azimuth and may correspond to the final deceleration of the landslide. Several vertical pulses were located between 10-60 and 100-120 s after the eruption began. Much of the vertical force represents the two sets of explosions which occurred during the eruption.

  6. New thermoluminescence age estimates for the Nyos maar eruption (Cameroon Volcanic Line).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph; Tchouankoue, Jean Pierre; Nkouamen Nemzoue, Peguy Noel; Ayaba, Félicité; Nformidah-Ndah, Siggy Signe; Nformi Chifu, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Nyos maar is located in the Cameroon Volcanic Line and generates a multitude of primary and secondary hazards to the local population. For risk assessment and hazard mitigation, the age of the Nyos maar eruption provides some vital information. Since previous dating efforts using a range of techniques resulted in vastly varying eruption ages, we applied thermoluminescence (TL) methods to obtain independent and direct chronological constraints for the time of maar formation. Target minerals were granitic quartz clasts contained in pyroclastic surge deposits. Thermoluminescence plateau results prove that heat and/or pressure during the phreatomagmatic eruption was sufficient to reset the inherited luminescence signal of granitic bedrock quartz. Parallel application of three TL measurement protocols to one of the two samples gave consistent equivalent doses for the quartz ultra-violet emission. Despite the robustness of our dose estimates, the assessment of the dose rate was accompanied by methodological challenges, such as estimation of the original size distribution of quartz grains in the pyroclastic deposits. Considering results from additional laboratory analyses to constrain these uncertainties, we calculate an average maximum TL age of 12.3 ± 1.5 ka for the Nyos maar eruption. Based on these new data, a more solid risk assessment can be envisaged.

  7. N=2 Super - $W_{3}$ Algebra and N=2 Super Boussinesq Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, E; Malik, R P

    1995-01-01

    We study classical $N=2$ super-$W_3$ algebra and its interplay with $N=2$ supersymmetric extensions of the Boussinesq equation in the framework of the nonlinear realization method and the inverse Higgs - covariant reduction approach. These techniques have been previously applied by us in the bosonic $W_3$ case to give a new geometric interpretation of the Boussinesq hierarchy. Here we deduce the most general $N=2$ super Boussinesq equation and two kinds of the modified $N=2$ super Boussinesq equations, as well as the super Miura maps relating these systems to each other, by applying the covariant reduction to certain coset manifolds of linear $N=2$ super-$W_3^{\\infty}$ symmetry associated with $N=2$ super-$W_3$. We discuss the integrability properties of the equations obtained and their correspondence with the formulation based on the notion of the second hamiltonian structure.

  8. The 2008 Eruption of Chaitén Volcano, Chile and National Volcano-Monitoring Programs in the U.S. and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, J. W.; Lara, L. E.; Moreno, H.

    2008-12-01

    Chaitén volcano, southern Chile, began erupting on 2 May 2008. The eruption produced 3 Plinian eruption pulses between May 2 and 8. Between Plinian phases the volcano emitted a constant column of ash to approximately 10 km, gradually diminishing to approximately 3 km by the end of June. The eruption of Chaitén was remarkable on several counts--it was the first rhyolite eruption on the planet since Novarupta (Katmai) erupted in 1912, and Chaitén had apparently lain dormant for approximately 9300 years. Though Chaitén is located in a generally sparsely populated region, the eruption had widespread impacts. More than 5000 people had to be quickly evacuated from proximal areas and aviation in southern South America was disrupted for weeks. Within 10 days secondary lahars had overrun much of the town of Chaitén complicating the prospects of the townspeople to return to their homes. Prior to the eruption onset, the nearest real-time seismic station was 300 km distant, and earthquakes were not felt by local citizens until approximately 30 hours before the eruption onset. No other signs of unrest were noted. Owing to the lack of near-field monitoring, and the nighttime eruption onset, there was initial confusion about which volcano was erupting: Chaitén or nearby Michinmahuida. Lack of monitoring systems at Chaitén meant that warning time for the public at risk was extremely short, and owing to the nature of the eruption and the physical geography of the area, it was very difficult to install monitoring instruments to track its progress after the eruption started. The lack of geophysical monitoring also means that an important data set on precursory behavior for silicic systems was not collected. With more than 120 Pleistocene to Holocene-age volcanoes within its continental territory, Chile is one of the more volcanically active countries in the world. The eruption of Chaitén has catalyzed the creation of a new program within the Servicio Nacional de Geología y

  9. Selective fixed drug eruption to amoxycillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, J; Férnandez-Rivas, M; Panadero, P

    1995-07-01

    A selective fixed drug eruption to amoxycillin but not other betalactam drugs is reported. Penicillins are the drugs most frequently implicated in immunological adverse reactions. The most important of these are allergic reactions where an IgE-mediated mechanism is well established. Other immunological mechanisms have been described in reactions, such as haemolytic anaemia, serum sickness, drug-induced nephritis, drug fever and contact dermatitis. Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a type of drug-induced dermatosis, the immunopathogenesis of which remains unknown. FDE is an uncommon reaction to penicillin derivatives, and very few cases have been reported. We present a case of a selective FDE to amoxycillin (AX), with no reaction to other betalactam drugs. Although one similar case has been reported, the reactivity to other penicillin derivatives was not assessed.

  10. An Erupted Dilated Odontoma: A Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dilated odontoma is an extremely rare developmental anomaly represented as a dilatation of the crown and root as a consequence of a deep, enamel-lined invagination and is considered a severe variant of dens invaginatus. An oval shape of the tooth lacking morphological characteristics of a crown or root implies that the invagination happened in the initial stages of morphodifferentiation. Spontaneous eruption of an odontoma is a rare occurrence and the occurrence of a dilated odontoma in a supernumerary tooth is even rarer with only a few case reports documented in the English literature. We present an extremely rare case of erupted dilated odontoma occurring in the supernumerary tooth in anterior maxillary region in an 18-year-old male, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever case reported in English literature.

  11. An Erupted Dilated Odontoma: A Rare Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagra, Amritpreet; Singh, Gurkeerat; Nagpal, Archna; Soin, Atul; Bhardwaj, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    A dilated odontoma is an extremely rare developmental anomaly represented as a dilatation of the crown and root as a consequence of a deep, enamel-lined invagination and is considered a severe variant of dens invaginatus. An oval shape of the tooth lacking morphological characteristics of a crown or root implies that the invagination happened in the initial stages of morphodifferentiation. Spontaneous eruption of an odontoma is a rare occurrence and the occurrence of a dilated odontoma in a supernumerary tooth is even rarer with only a few case reports documented in the English literature. We present an extremely rare case of erupted dilated odontoma occurring in the supernumerary tooth in anterior maxillary region in an 18-year-old male, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever case reported in English literature. PMID:26989523

  12. An Erupted Dilated Odontoma: A Rare Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagra, Amritpreet; Singh, Gurkeerat; Nagpal, Archna; Soin, Atul; Bhardwaj, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    A dilated odontoma is an extremely rare developmental anomaly represented as a dilatation of the crown and root as a consequence of a deep, enamel-lined invagination and is considered a severe variant of dens invaginatus. An oval shape of the tooth lacking morphological characteristics of a crown or root implies that the invagination happened in the initial stages of morphodifferentiation. Spontaneous eruption of an odontoma is a rare occurrence and the occurrence of a dilated odontoma in a supernumerary tooth is even rarer with only a few case reports documented in the English literature. We present an extremely rare case of erupted dilated odontoma occurring in the supernumerary tooth in anterior maxillary region in an 18-year-old male, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever case reported in English literature.

  13. Learning to recognize volcanic non-eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal of volcanology is to answer the questions of when, where, and how a volcano will erupt—in other words, eruption prediction. Generally, eruption predictions are based on insights from monitoring data combined with the history of the volcano. An outstanding example is the A.D. 1980–1986 lava dome growth at Mount St. Helens, Washington (United States). Recognition of a consistent pattern of precursors revealed by geophysical, geological, and geochemical monitoring enabled successful predictions of more than 12 dome-building episodes (Swanson et al., 1983). At volcanic systems that are more complex or poorly understood, probabilistic forecasts can be useful (e.g., Newhall and Hoblitt, 2002; Marzocchi and Woo, 2009). In such cases, the probabilities of different types of volcanic events are quantified, using historical accounts and geological studies of a volcano's past activity, supplemented by information from similar volcanoes elsewhere, combined with contemporary monitoring information.

  14. Surface Movement Regularity of Super-Wide Mining Face With Top-Coal Caving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Run-hou

    2005-01-01

    No.4326 super-wide panel of Wangzhuang Coal Mine ( in which the fully-mechanized top-coal caving longwall mining method was used) was monitored for dynamic characteristic of surface movement. The dynamic surface movement in and after mining was predicted by using the Mining Subsidence Prediction System. The results indicate that after mining, the surface above the super-wide panel reaches a state of full subsidence, making the No.309national highway above the panel be located on the flat bottom of the subsidence basin so that the influence of mining activity in both sides of 4326 panel on the national highway is the smallest.

  15. Photoletter to the editor: Generalized eruptive histiocytoma

    OpenAIRE

    Attia, Abdalla; Seleit, Iman; El Badawy, Nafeesa; Bakry, Ola; Yassien, Hossam

    2011-01-01

    Generalized eruptive histiocytoma is a rare form of non Langerhan's cell histiocytosis. The disease occurs mainly in adults and its etiology is still unknown. We describe a case of 48-year-old female with multiple, firm, hemispherical, redish brown papules. Lesions were distributed on the face, upper limbs and trunk. Patient's general examination and routine laboratory investigations were normal. Excisional biopsy was taken from one representative lesion. Histopathological examination reveale...

  16. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  17. Persistent docetaxel-induced supravenous erythematous eruption*

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Karina de Almeida Pinto; Felix, Paulo Antônio Oldani

    2015-01-01

    Taxanes are drugs used to treat many types of cancer, including breast and lung cancer. The most common side effects of these drugs are neutropenia and mucositis. Signs of skin toxicity are observed in about 65% of cases and include alopecia, hypersensitivity reactions, persistent supravenous erythematous eruption, nail changes, scleroderma reactions and others. We report two cases of skin reaction to docetaxel and warn that it is not necessary to interrupt the treatment in these cases.

  18. Giant eruptions of very massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Giant eruptions or supernova-impostor events are far more mysterious than true supernovae. An extreme example can release as much radiative energy as a SN, ejecting several M_sun of material. These events involve continuous radiation-driven outflows rather than blast waves. They constitute one of the main unsolved problems in stellar astrophysics, but have received surprisingly little theoretical effort. Here I note some aspects that are not yet familiar to most astronomers.

  19. Eruption products of the 1883 eruption of Krakatau and their final settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Yokoyama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Firstly the volume of pyroclastic ejecta during the 1883 eruption of Krakatau is re-examined. To revise the volume of flow deposits, the author basically follows Verbeek’s observation while to estimate the fall deposits, as the last resort, the author assumes that volume ratios fall / flow are common to similar caldera eruptions, and the ratios determined by the caldera- forming eruptions of Novarupta and Pinatubo are applied to the Krakatau eruption. Verbeek’s estimation of the total volume of ejecta, 12 km3 is revised to 19 km3. This is significantly different from the volume of disrupted volcano edifice, 8 km3. Such a result does not support the predecessors’ hypothesis that calderas are formed by collapses of volcano edifices into magma reservoirs in replacement of the total ejecta. Through the discussion on the volume estimation of volcanic ejecta on and around Krakatau, the author recognizes that such estimation should be originally very difficult to attain enough accuracy. Much importance of “caldera deposits” to post-eruption settlements of the ejecta is emphasized. In relation to caldera formation, mechanical stability of a cavity in the crust is discussed. Lastly, upon the basis of subsurface structure, especially caldera deposits, a structural image of Krakatau caldera is presented.

  20. Chain Reconnections observed in Sympathetic Eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Magara, Tetsuya; Guo, Yang; Aulanier, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    The nature of various plausible causal links between sympathetic events is still a controversial issue. In this work, we present multi-wavelength observations of sympathetic eruptions, associated flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occurring on 2013 November 17 in two close-by active regions. Two filaments i.e., F1 and F2 are observed in between the active regions. Successive magnetic reconnections, caused by different reasons (flux cancellation, shear and expansion) have been identified during the whole event. The first reconnection occurred during the first eruption via flux cancellation between the sheared arcades overlying filament F2, creating a flux rope and leading to the first double ribbon solar flare. During this phase we observed the eruption of overlaying arcades and coronal loops, which leads to the first CME. The second reconnection is believed to occur between the expanding flux rope of F2 and the overlying arcades of the filament F1. We suggest that this reconnection destabilized the equi...

  1. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Krier

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report, ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', is to present information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a repository at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report provides information to four other reports: ''Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion'', (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170001]); ''Atmospheric Dispersal and Deposition of Tephra from Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170026]); ''Dike/Drift Interactions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170028]); ''Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027], Section 6.5). This report is organized into seven major sections. This section addresses the purpose of this document. Section 2 addresses quality assurance, Section 3 the use of software, Section 4 identifies the requirements that constrain this work, and Section 5 lists assumptions and their rationale. Section 6 presents the details of the scientific analysis and Section 7 summarizes the conclusions reached.

  2. Featured Image: A Filament Forms and Erupts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    This dynamic image of active region NOAA 12241 was captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in December 2014. Observations of this region from a number of observatories and instruments recently presented by Jincheng Wang (University of Chinese Academy of Sciences) and collaborators reveal details about the formation and eruption of a long solar filament. Wang and collaborators show that the right part of the filament formed by magnetic reconnection between two bundles of magnetic field lines, while the left part formed as a result of shearing motion. When these two parts interacted, the filament erupted. You can read more about the teams results in the article linked below. Also, check out this awesome video of the filament formation and eruption, again by SDO/AIA:http://cdn.iopscience.com/images/0004-637X/839/2/128/Full/apjaa6bf3f1_video.mp4CitationJincheng Wang et al 2017 ApJ 839 128. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa6bf3

  3. Repeat-PPM Super-Symbol Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, J.

    2016-11-01

    To attain a wider range of data rates in pulse position modulation (PPM) schemes with constrained pulse durations, the sender can repeat a PPM symbol multiple times, forming a super-symbol. In addition to the slot and symbol synchronization typically required for PPM, the receiver must also properly align the noisy super-symbols. We present a low-complexity approximation of the maximum-likelihood method for performing super-symbol synchronization without use of synchronization sequences. We provide simulation results demonstrating performance advantage when PPM symbols are spread by a pseudo-noise sequence, as opposed to simply repeating. Additionally, the results suggest that this super-symbol synchronization technique requires signal levels below those required for reliable communication. This validates that the PPM spreading approach proposed to CCSDS can work properly as part of the overall scheme.

  4. Axial Super-resolution Evanescent Wave Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Pendharker, Sarang; Newman, Ward; Ogg, Stephen; Nazemifard, Neda; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    Optical tomographic reconstruction of a 3D nanoscale specimen is hindered by the axial diffraction limit, which is 2-3 times worse than the focal plane resolution. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography (AxSET) method that enables the use of regular evanescent wave microscopes like Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRF) beyond surface imaging, and achieve tomographic reconstruction with axial super-resolution. Our proposed method based on Fourier reconstruction achieves axial super-resolution by extracting information from multiple sets of three-dimensional fluorescence images when the sample is illuminated by an evanescent wave. We propose a procedure to extract super-resolution features from the incremental penetration of an evanescent wave and support our theory by 1D (along the optical axis) and 3D simulations. We validate our claims by experimentally demonstrating tomographic reconstruction of microtubules in HeLa cells with an axi...

  5. Mirror-enhanced super-resolution microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Axial excitation confinement beyond the diffraction limit is crucial to the development of next-generation, super-resolution microscopy. STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) nanoscopy offers lateral super-resolution using a donut-beam depletion, but its axial resolution is still over 500 nm. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is widely used for single-molecule localization, but its ability to detect molecules is limited to within the evanescent field of ~ 100 nm from the cell a...

  6. Solar Multiple Eruptions from a Confined Magnetic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-09-01

    How eruption can recur from a confined magnetic structure is discussed based on the Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of the NOAA active region 11444, which produced three eruptions within 1.5 hr on 2012 March 27. The active region (AR) had the positive-polarity magnetic fields in the center surrounded by the negative-polarity fields around. Since such a distribution of magnetic polarity tends to form a dome-like magnetic fan structure confined over the AR, the multiple eruptions were puzzling. Our investigation reveals that this event exhibits several properties distinct from other eruptions associated with magnetic fan structures: (i) a long filament encircling the AR was present before the eruptions; (ii) expansion of the open-closed boundary (OCB) of the field lines after each eruption was suggestive of the growing fan-dome structure, and (iii) the ribbons inside the closed magnetic polarity inversion line evolved in response to the expanding OCB. It thus appears that in spite of multiple eruptions the fan-dome structure remained undamaged, and the closing back field lines after each eruption rather reinforced the fan-dome structure. We argue that the multiple eruptions could occur in this AR in spite of its confined magnetic structure because the filament encircling the AR was adequate for slipping through the magnetic separatrix to minimize the damage to its overlying fan-dome structure. The result of this study provides a new insight into the productivity of eruptions from a confined magnetic structure.

  7. The hazards of eruptions through lakes and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, L.G.; Witter, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Eruptions through crater lakes or shallow seawater, referred to here as subaqueous eruptions, present hazards from hydromagmatic explosions, such as base surges, lahars, and tsunamis, which may not exist at volcanoes on dry land. We have systematically compiled information from eruptions through surface water in order to understand the circumstances under which these hazards occur and what disastrous effects they have caused in the past. Subaqueous eruptions represent only 8% of all recorded eruptions but have produced about 20% of all fatalities associated with volcanic activity in historical time. Excluding eruptions that have resulted in about a hundred deaths or less, lahars have killed people in the largest number of historical subaqueous eruptions (8), followed by pyroclastic flows (excluding base surges; 5) tsunamis (4), and base surges (2). Subaqueous eruptions have produced lahars primarily on high (>1000 m), steep-sided volcanoes containing small (water waves have caused death or destroyed man-made structures only at submarine volcanoes and at Lake Taal in the Philippines. In spite of evidence that magma-water mixing makes eruptions more explosive, such explosions and their associated base surges have caused fewer deaths, and have been implicated in fewer eruptions involving large numbers of fatalities than lahars and tsunamis. The latter hazards are more deadly because they travel much farther from a volcano and inundate coastal areas and stream valleys that tend to be densely settled.

  8. Earthquake Tidal Triggering Associated with the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, W. S. D.; Tolstoy, M.; Waldhauser, F.; Tan, Y. J.; Garcia, C.; Arnulf, A. F.; Crone, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Ocean Observatories Initiative's real time cabled observatory at Axial Seamount includes a seven station seismic network that spans the southern half of the summit caldera. The network has been in operation since late 2014 and, in conjunction with geodetic sensors on the observatory, has recorded an exceptional data set to characterize the dynamics of the caldera through the April 2015 eruption. Prior to the eruption, earthquake rates were high and double-difference locations show that the inflation of the volcano was accommodated by deformation on an outward dipping caldera ring fault. The onset of the eruption was marked by a seismic crisis on April 24 and rapid deflation of the volcano; the caldera ring fault accommodated deflation and guided a dike beneath the east rim of the caldera. The seismic crisis was followed by a steady decline in the rates of earthquakes and deflation. Numerous seafloor explosions document the timing and location of lava flows in the caldera and on the north rift of the seamount. They ceased after about a month when the volcano started to reinflate. Efforts are presently underway to improve the resolution of hypocenters both through the use of cross-correlation-based double-difference hypocenter locations (Tan et al., this meeting) and by the incorporation of three-dimensional velocity models that account for the heterogeneous structure of the volcano. One particularly interesting aspect of the seismicity is the tidal triggering. Prior to the eruption, when the volcano is critically stressed, the earthquakes show a strong tidal triggering signal with higher rates of seismicity near low tides when faults are unclamped. Earthquake rates at the lowest tides are about six times those at the highest tides. There are also noticeable temporo-spatial patterns in the earthquake swarms that occur at each low tide suggesting that the characteristics of tidal triggering may be spatial dependent. Following the eruption, only a weak tidal

  9. High resolution infrared acquisitions droning over the LUSI mud eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Felice, Fabio; Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    The use of low-cost hand-held infrared (IR) thermal cameras based on uncooled micro-bolometer detector arrays became more widespread during the recent years. Thermal cameras have the ability to estimate temperature values without contact and therefore can be used in circumstances where objects are difficult or dangerous to reach such as volcanic eruptions. Since May 2006 the Indonesian LUSI mud eruption continues to spew boiling mud, water, aqueous vapor, CO2, CH4 and covers a surface of nearly 7 km2. At this locality we performed surveys over the unreachable erupting crater. In the framework of the LUSI Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126), in 2014 and 2015, we acquired high resolution infrared images using a specifically equipped remote-controlled drone flying at an altitude of m 100. The drone is equipped with GPS and an autopilot system that allows pre-programming the flying path or designing grids. The mounted thermal camera has peak spectral sensitivity in LW wavelength (μm 10) that is characterized by low water vapor and CO2 absorption. The low distance (high resolution) acquisitions have a temperature detail every cm 40, therefore it is possible to detect and observe physical phenomena such as thermodynamic behavior, hot mud and fluids emissions locations and their time shifts. Despite the harsh logistics and the continuously varying gas concentrations we managed to collect thermal images to estimate the crater zone spatial thermal variations. We applied atmosphere corrections to calculate infrared absorption by high concentration of water vapor. Thousands of images have been stitched together to obtain a mosaic of the crater zone. Regular monitoring with heat variation measurements collected, e.g. every six months, could give important information about the volcano activity estimating its evolution. A future data base of infrared high resolution and visible images stored in a web server could be a useful monitoring tool. An interesting development will be

  10. Recording Tilt with Broadband Seismic Sensors at Erupting Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, B. E.; Lees, J. M.; Lyons, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    little or no tilt on the flanks of the volcano, indicating that activity is restricted to the very peak of the cone where degassing takes place. Possibly little or no deformation is observed where slug flow or the accumulation of large bubbles does not occur in the deeper parts of the volcano conduit. The timing and nature of inflation and deflation cycles reported for different volcanoes is variable. Data analyzed by Genco and Ripepe (GRL, 2010) from Stromboli volcano show periods of slow inflation with rapid deflation occurring at eruption onset. Alternatively, Sanderson et al. (JVGR, 2010) found little or no inflation prior to eruptions at Santiaguito, but eruptions were followed by strong deflationary pulses. The peak magnitudes of observed tilt are likewise dissimilar, ranging from 60 nanoradians at Stromboli up to ~2 microradians at Anatahan. The effect of sensor location, the style and geometry of the erupting edifice, and analytical methods are explored and illustrated.

  11. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Katharine F.; Cameron, Cheryl; Coombs, Michelle L.; Diefenbach, Angie; Lopez, Taryn; McNutt, Steve; Neal, Christina; Payne, Allison; Power, John A.; Schneider, David J.; Scott, William E.; Snedigar, Seth; Thompson, Glenn; Wallace, Kristi; Waythomas, Christopher F.; Webley, Peter; Werner, Cynthia A.; Schaefer, Janet R.

    2012-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano, an ice-covered stratovolcano on the west side of Cook Inlet, erupted in March 2009 after several months of escalating unrest. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano shares many similarities with eruptions documented most recently at Redoubt in 1966–68 and 1989–90. In each case, the eruptive phase lasted several months, consisted of multiple ashproducing explosions, produced andesitic lava and tephra, removed significant amounts of ice from the summit crater and Drift glacier, generated lahars that inundated the Drift River valley, and culminated with the extrusion of a lava dome in the summit crater. Prior to the 2009 explosive phase of the eruption, precursory seismicity lasted approximately six months with the fi rst weak tremor recorded on September 23, 2008. The first phreatic explosion was recorded on March 15, and the first magmatic explosion occurred seven days later, at 22:34 on March 22. The onset of magmatic explosions was preceded by a strong, shallow swarm of repetitive earthquakes that began about 04:00 on March 20, 2009, less than three days before an explosion. Nineteen major ash-producing explosions generated ash clouds that reached heights between 17,000 ft and 62,000 ft (5.2 and 18.9 km) ASL. During ash fall in Anchorage, the Ted Stevens International Airport was shut down for 20 hours, from ~17:00 on March 28 until 13:00 on March 29. On March 23 and April 4, lahars with fl ow depths to 10 m in the upper Drift River valley inundated parts of the Drift River Terminal (DRT). The explosive phase ended on April 4 with a dome collapse at 05:58. The April 4 ash cloud reached 50,000 ft (15.2 km) and moved swiftly to the southeast, depositing up to 2 mm of ash fall in Homer, Anchor Point, and Seldovia. At least two and possibly three lava domes grew and were destroyed by explosions prior to the final lava dome extrusion that began after the April 4 event. The fi nal lava dome ceased growth by July 1, 2009, with an estimated volume of 72

  12. Full moment tensor analyses to investigate the dynamics of the 2001 Etna eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarao, A.; Cocina, O.; Privitera, E.; Panza, G. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Mt. Etna eruption of July 2001 was announced by a severe seismic activity (2645 earthquakes between 12 and 18 July) and by the opening of a 7 km long field of fractures. Results from multidisciplinary approaches suggest that the observed phenomenology was related to the rapid intrusion of a vertical dike located few km south of the summit region. To add new constraints on the dynamics of the eruption process, we determine the full seismic moment tensors of 61 earthquakes (Md ≥ 2.2), selected among those occurred between July 12 and July 18, located in a depth ranging from 1 km above sea level to 3 km under the volcano. Short period seismograms recorded by the INGV-Catania seismic network have been used for the moment tensor retrieval. For our analyses we employed the INPAR method (Šílený et al., GJI 1992; Šílený, GJI 1998) that has been widely tested to define the realiability of solutions against the influence of random noise, station geometry and wave propagation effects in volcanic and geothermal environments. Our analysis revealed the presence of high percentage of double couple events, well related with the system of fractures bred just before the eruption, but also meaningful non-double couple components that can be explained as the response of the confining rocks to the magma uprising and degassing process. Most of the studied earthquakes show normal fault type mechanisms with significant strike slip components, in addition, pure strike slip and reverse fault mechanisms can be observed, in agreement with the stress regime induced by a dike injection. The space-time analysis of seismic source locations and source moment tensors 1) confirms the evidence of a vertical dike emplacement that fed the 2001 lateral eruption and 2) adds new insights supporting the hypothesis of the injection of a second aborted dike, 2 km SE far from the fractures zone.

  13. FIERCE: FInding volcanic ERuptive CEnters by a grid-searching algorithm in R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, Roberto; Guzmán, Silvina; Neri, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Most eruptions are fed by dikes whose spatial distribution can provide important insights into the positions of possible old eruptive centers that are no longer clearly identifiable in the field. Locating these centers can in turn have further applications, e.g., in hazard assessment. We propose a purely geometrical algorithm—implemented as an R open-source script—named FIERCE (FInding volcanic ERuptive CEnters) based on the number of intersections of dikes identified within a grid of rectangular cells overlain onto a given search region. The algorithm recognizes radial distributions, tangential distributions, or combinations of both. We applied FIERCE to both well-known and less-studied volcanic edifices, in different tectonic settings and having different evolution histories, ages, and compositions. At Summer Coon volcano, FIERCE demonstrated that a radial dike distribution clearly indicates the position of the central vent. On Etna, it confirmed the position of the most important ancient eruptive centers and allowed us to study effects of the structural alignments and topography. On Stromboli, FIERCE not only enabled confirmation of some published locations of older vents but also identified possible vent areas not previously suggested. It also highlighted the influence of the regional structural trend and the collapse scars. FIERCE demonstrated that the dikes at the Somma-Vesuvius were emplaced before formation of Mt. Somma's caldera and indicated a plausible location for the old volcanic crater of Mt. Somma which is compatible with previous studies. At the Vicuña Pampa Volcanic Complex, FIERCE highlights the position of two different vents of a highly degraded volcano.

  14. SuperHILAC Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, B.; Brown, I.G.

    1986-06-01

    A high current MEtal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion source is to be installed in the third injector (Abel) at the SuperHILAC, representing the first accelerator use of this novel ion source. The MEVVA source has produced over 1 A of uranium in all charge states, with typically more than 100 electrical mA (emA) of U/sup 5 +/. A substantial fraction of this high current, heavy ion beam must be successfully transported to the entrance of the Wideroe linac to approach the 10 emA space-charge output limit of the Wideroe. Calculations show that up to 50 emA of U/sup 5 +/ can be transported through the present high voltage column. A bouncer will be added to the Cockcroft-Walton supply to handle the increased beam current. The Low Energy Beam Transport line vacuum will be improved to reduce charge exchange, and the phase matching between the 23 MHz Wideroe and the 70 MHz Alvarez linacs will be improved by the addition of two 70 HMz bunchers. The installation of the MEVVA source along with the modifications described above are expected to result in a five-fold increase in beam delivered to Bevatron experiments, increasing the extracted uranium beam to 5 x 10/sup 7/ ions/pulse.

  15. Super-B Project Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, K.; Donald, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /Pisa U. /CERN

    2010-08-26

    The SuperB project aims at the construction of an asymmetric very high luminosity B-Factory on the Frascati/Tor Vergata (Italy) area, providing a uniquely sensitive probe of New Physics in the flavour sector of the Standard Model. The luminosity goal of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be reached with a new collision scheme with 'large Piwinski angle' (LPA) and the use of 'crab waist sextupoles' (CW). A LPA&CW Interaction Region (IR) has been successfully tested at the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF-Frascati in 2008. The LPA&CW scheme, together with very low {beta}*, will allow for operation with relatively low beam currents and reasonable bunch length, comparable to those of PEP-II and KEKB. In the High Energy Ring (HER), two spin rotators will bring longitudinally polarized beams into collision at the IP. The lattice has been designed with a very low intrinsic emittance and is quite compact, less than 2 km long. The tight focusing requires the final doublet quadrupoles to be very close to the IP and very compact. A Conceptual Design Report was published in March 2007, and beam dynamics and collective effects R&D studies are in progress in order to publish a Technical Design Report by the end of 2010.

  16. SUPER-B LATTICE STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; /Frascati; Piminov, P.; Sinyatkin, S.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Nosochkov, Y.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The SuperB asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is designed for 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} luminosity and beam energies of 6.7 and 4.18 GeV for e{sup +} and e{sup -} respectively. The High and Low Energy Rings (HER and LER) have one Interaction Point (IP) with 66 mrad crossing angle. The 1258 m rings fit to the INFN-LNF site at Frascati. The ring emittance is minimized for the high luminosity. The Final Focus (FF) chromaticity correction is optimized for maximum transverse acceptance and energy bandwidth. Included Crab Waist sextupoles suppress betatron resonances induced in the collisions with a large Piwinski angle. The LER Spin Rotator sections provide longitudinally polarized electron beam at the IP. The lattice is flexible for tuning the machine parameters and compatible with reusing the PEP-II magnets, RF cavities and other components. Details of the lattice design are presented.

  17. Studies of the Super VELO

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156302

    2016-01-01

    The Super VELO is the Run 5 upgrade of the VeloPix detector of the LHCb experiment. Its most challenging task is to cope with a luminosity increase of the factor 10. This study examines the potential physics performance of a detector based on the VeloPix design at high luminosity conditions. It is found that an unmodified VeloPix detector shows poor performance when exposed to 10x design luminosity, most gravely high ghost rates of 40 %. When applying basic assumptions about material changes such as cutting the silicon thickness by half and removing the RF foil, the ghost rate drops by 20 %. When using thin silicon and re-optimizing the tracking algorithm, the ghost rate can even be reduced by 60 %. Applying the additional modification of a pixel area size four times smaller, the ghost rate drops by 88 % and the IP resolution improves. Finally, in a dream scenario with thin silicon, smaller pixels and no RF foil, big gains in resolution and a ghost rate of less than 4 % can be achieved.

  18. Super-virtual refraction interferometry: Field data example over a colluvial wedge

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2011-01-01

    The theory of super-virtual refraction interferometry was recently developed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of far-offset traces in refraction surveys. This enhancement of SNR is proportional to N, and can be as high as N if an iterative procedure is used. Here N is the number of post-critical shot positions that coincides with the receiver locations. We now demonstrate the enhancement of SNR of the super-virtual refraction traces for seismic data collected over a normal fault in Saudi Arabia. Results show that both the SNR of the super-virtual data set and the number of reliable first-arrival-traveltime picks are significantly increased. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. Devastating landslides related to the 2002 Papandayan eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Dalimin Hadisantono

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol1no2.20063Papandayan is an A-type active strato volcano located at some 20 km SW of Garut or about 70 km SE of Bandung the capital city of West Java Province. Geographically, the summit of this volcano lies at the intersection between 07º 19’ 42” S and 107º 44” E. The 2002 Papandayan eruption was preceded by two felt earthquakes, 8 times of A-type volcanic earthquakes and 150 times of B- type volcanic earthquake. These events were followed by a phreatic eruption that took place on 11 November at 16.02 local time. Field observation shows that the summit region, mainly around the craters consists of rocks that have hydrothermally altered to yield clay rich material. This clay rich material covers most of the crater fl oors and the crater rim. Mount Nangklak that forms part of the rim also contains a lava plug from the Old Papandayan volcano. This mountain is covered by fi ne grained, unconsolidated material, and altered rocks. Much of this altered rocks coincides with solfataric and fumarolic activities of 80 to > 300°C. The summit area also contains high discharge of water either originating from the springs or surface water. The increase in seismicity, the fi ne-grained hydrothermal altered rocks, and the existence of some faults that pass through the summit region might have weaken the stability of the summit area. As the result, a landslide occurred on the north fl ank of Mount Nangklak where the landslide material blocked the upper course of Cibeureum Gede River. This landslide material had formed big mudfl ows that caused several houses of fi ve villages were partly burried, some bridges were devastated and several hectares of cultivated land were damaged.    

  20. Devastating landslides related to the 2002 Papandayan eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Dalimin Hadisantono

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol1no2.20063Papandayan is an A-type active strato volcano located at some 20 km SW of Garut or about 70 km SE of Bandung the capital city of West Java Province. Geographically, the summit of this volcano lies at the intersection between 07º 19’ 42” S and 107º 44” E. The 2002 Papandayan eruption was preceded by two felt earthquakes, 8 times of A-type volcanic earthquakes and 150 times of B- type volcanic earthquake. These events were followed by a phreatic eruption that took place on 11 November at 16.02 local time. Field observation shows that the summit region, mainly around the craters consists of rocks that have hydrothermally altered to yield clay rich material. This clay rich material covers most of the crater fl oors and the crater rim. Mount Nangklak that forms part of the rim also contains a lava plug from the Old Papandayan volcano. This mountain is covered by fi ne grained, unconsolidated material, and altered rocks. Much of this altered rocks coincides with solfataric and fumarolic activities of 80 to > 300°C. The summit area also contains high discharge of water either originating from the springs or surface water. The increase in seismicity, the fi ne-grained hydrothermal altered rocks, and the existence of some faults that pass through the summit region might have weaken the stability of the summit area. As the result, a landslide occurred on the north fl ank of Mount Nangklak where the landslide material blocked the upper course of Cibeureum Gede River. This landslide material had formed big mudfl ows that caused several houses of fi ve villages were partly burried, some bridges were devastated and several hectares of cultivated land were damaged.    

  1. Eruptions at Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, USA, part 1: energetics and eruption dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Hurwitz, Shaul; Sohn, Robert; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Murphy, Fred; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Johnston, Malcolm J.S.; Manga, Michael; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2013-01-01

    Geysers provide a natural laboratory to study multiphase eruptive processes. We present results from a four–day experiment at Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, USA. We simultaneously measured water discharge, acoustic emissions, infraredintensity, and visible and infrared video to quantify the energetics and dynamics of eruptions, occurring approximately every three hours. We define four phases in the eruption cycle: 1) a 28 ± 3 minute phase with liquid and steam fountaining, with maximum jet velocities of 16–28 m s− 1, steam mass fraction of less than ∼ 0.01. Intermittently choked flow and flow oscillations with periods increasing from 20 to 40 s are coincident with a decrease in jet velocity and an increase of steam fraction; 2) a 26 ± 8 minute post–eruption relaxation phase with no discharge from the vent, infrared (IR) and acoustic power oscillations gliding between 30 and 40 s; 3) a 59 ± 13 minute recharge period during which the geyser is quiescent and progressively refills, and 4) a 69 ± 14 minute pre–play period characterized by a series of 5–10 minute–long pulses of steam, small volumes of liquid water discharge and 50–70 s flow oscillations. The erupted waters ascend froma 160 − 170° C reservoir and the volume discharged during the entire eruptive cycle is 20.8 ± 4.1 m3. Assuming isentropic expansion, we calculate a heat output from the geyser of 1.4–1.5 MW, which is < 0.1% of the total heat output from Yellowstone Caldera.

  2. Magma degassing and eruption dynamics of the Avellino pumice Plinian eruption of Somma-Vesuvius (Italy). Comparison with the Pompeii eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcone-Boissard, H.; Boudon, G.; Ucciani, G.; Villemant, B.; Cioni, R.; Civetta, L.; Orsi, G.

    2012-05-01

    The eruptive history of Mt. Somma-Vesuvius is characterised by large explosive events: Pomici di Base eruption (22,030 ± 175 yr cal BP), Mercato (8890 ± 90 yr cal BP), Avellino (3945 ± 10 yr cal BP) and Pompeii (79 AD). Pre-eruptive conditions and sin-eruptive degassing processes of the Avellino eruption, the highest-magnitude Plinian event, have been investigated, using volatile contents (F, Cl, H2O) in melt inclusions and residual glass, and textural characteristics of pumice clasts of the 9 fallout layers sampled in detail in a representative sequence. The sequence displays an up-section sharp colour change from white to grey, corresponding to variations in both magma composition and textural characteristics. The pre-eruptive conditions have been constrained by systematic measurements of Cl content in both melt inclusions and matrix glass of pumice clasts. The pumice glass composition varies from Na-rich phonolite (white pumice) to K-rich phonolite (grey pumice). The measured Cl values constantly cluster at 5200 ± 400 ppm (buffer value), whatever the composition of the melt, suggesting that the entire magma body was saturated with sub-critical fluids. This Cl saturation constrains the pre-eruptive pressures and maximum H2O contents at 200 ± 10 MPa and 6.3 ± 0.2 wt.% H2O for the white pumice melt and 195 ± 15 MPa and 5.2 ± 0.2 wt.% H2O for the grey pumice melt. The fluid phase, mainly composed of a H2O-rich vapour phase and brine, probably accumulated at the top of the reservoir and generated an overpressure able to trigger the onset of the eruption. Magma degassing was rather homogeneous for the white and grey eruptive units, mostly occurring through closed-system processes, leading to a typical Plinian eruptive style. A steady-state withdrawal of an H2O-saturated magma may explain the establishment of a sustained Plinian column. Variation from white to grey pumice is accompanied by decrease of mean vesicularity and increase of mean microcrystallinity

  3. Geomorphic Consequences of Volcanic Eruptions in Alaska: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta–Katmai eruption, the 1989–1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed.A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment–water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite

  4. Geomorphic consequences of volcanic eruptions in Alaska: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-10-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta-Katmai eruption, the 1989-1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed. A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment-water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite large

  5. Observation of Magnetic Reconnection at a 3D Null Point Associated with a Solar Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J. Q.; Zhang, J.; Yang, K.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic null has long been recognized as a special structure serving as a preferential site for magnetic reconnection (MR). However, the direct observational study of MR at null-points is largely lacking. Here, we show the observations of MR around a magnetic null associated with an eruption that resulted in an M1.7 flare and a coronal mass ejection. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites X-ray profile of the flare exhibited two peaks at ∼02:23 UT and ∼02:40 UT on 2012 November 8, respectively. Based on the imaging observations, we find that the first and also primary X-ray peak was originated from MR in the current sheet (CS) underneath the erupting magnetic flux rope (MFR). On the other hand, the second and also weaker X-ray peak was caused by MR around a null point located above the pre-eruption MFR. The interaction of the null point and the erupting MFR can be described as a two-step process. During the first step, the erupting and fast expanding MFR passed through the null point, resulting in a significant displacement of the magnetic field surrounding the null. During the second step, the displaced magnetic field started to move back, resulting in a converging inflow and subsequently the MR around the null. The null-point reconnection is a different process from the current sheet reconnection in this flare; the latter is the cause of the main peak of the flare, while the former is the cause of the secondary peak of the flare and the conspicuous high-lying cusp structure.

  6. Snow and ice perturbation during historical volcanic eruptions and the formation of lahars and floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jon J.; Newhall, Christopher G.

    1989-10-01

    Historical eruptions have produced lahars and floods by perturbing snow and ice at more than 40 volcanoes worldwide. Most of these volcanoes are located at latitudes higher than 35°; those at lower latitudes reach altitudes generally above 4000 m. Volcanic events can perturb mantles of snow and ice in at least five ways: (1) scouring and melting by flowing pyroclastic debris or blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, (2) surficial melting by lava flows, (3) basal melting of glacial ice or snow by subglacial eruptions or geothermal activity, (4) ejection of water by eruptions through a crater lake, and (5) deposition of tephra fall. Historical records of volcanic eruptions at snow-clad volcanoes show the following: (1) Flowing pyroclastic debris (pyroclastic flows and surges) and blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris are the most common volcanic events that generate lahars and floods; (2) Surficial lava flows generally cannot melt snow and ice rapidly enough to form large lahars or floods; (3) Heating the base of a glacier or snowpack by subglacial eruptions or by geothermal activity can induce basal melting that may result in ponding of water and lead to sudden outpourings of water or sediment-rich debris flows; (4) Tephra falls usually alter ablation rates of snow and ice but generally produce little meltwater that results in the formation of lahars and floods; (5) Lahars and floods generated by flowing pyroclastic debris, blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, or basal melting of snow and ice commonly have volumes that exceed 105 m3. The glowing lava (pyroclastic flow) which flowed with force over ravines and ridges...gathered in the basin quickly and then forced downwards. As a result, tremendously wide and deep pathways in the ice and snow were made and produced great streams of water (Wolf 1878).

  7. Rain-triggered lahars following the 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano, Indonesia: A major risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bélizal, Edouard; Lavigne, Franck; Hadmoko, Danang Sri; Degeai, Jean-Philippe; Dipayana, Gilang Aria; Mutaqin, Bachtiar Wahyu; Marfai, Muh Aris; Coquet, Marie; Mauff, Baptiste Le; Robin, Anne-Kyria; Vidal, Céline; Cholik, Noer; Aisyah, Nurnaning

    2013-07-01

    The 2010 VEI 4 eruption of Merapi volcano deposited roughly ten times the volume of pyroclastic materials of the 1994 and 2006 eruptions, and is recognized as one of the most intense eruption since 1872. However, as the eruptive phase is now over, another threat endangers local communities: rain-triggered lahars. Previous papers on lahars at Merapi presented lahar-related risk following small-scale dome-collapse PDCs. Thus the aim of this study is to provide new insights on lahar-related risk following a large scale VEI 4 eruption. The paper highlights the high number of events (240) during the 2010-2011 rainy season (October 2010-May 2011). The frequency of the 2010-2011 lahars is also the most important ever recorded at Merapi. Lahars occurred in almost all drainages located under the active cone, with runout distances exceeding 15 km. The geomorphic impacts of lahars on the distal slope of the volcano are then explained as they directly threaten houses and infrastructures: creation of large corridors, avulsions, riverbank erosion and riverbed downcutting are detailed through local scale examples. Related damage is also studied: 860 houses damaged, 14 sabo-dams and 21 bridges destroyed. Sedimentological characteristics of volcaniclastic sediments in lahar corridors are presented, with emphasis on the resource in building material that they represent for local communities. Risk studies should not forget that thousands of people are exposing themselves to lahar hazard when they quarry volcaniclastic sediment on lahar corridors. Finally, the efficient community-based crisis management is explained, and shows how local people organize themselves to manage the risk: 3 fatalities were reported, although lahars reached densely populated areas. To summarize, this study provides an update of lahar risk issues at Merapi, with emphasis on the distal slope of the volcano where lahars had not occurred for 40 years, and where lahar corridors were rapidly formed.

  8. Snow and ice perturbation during historical volcanic eruptions and the formation of lahars and floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jon J.; Newhall, Christopher G.

    1989-01-01

    Historical eruptions have produced lahars and floods by perturbing snow and ice at more than 40 volcanoes worldwide. Most of these volcanoes are located at latitudes higher than 35°; those at lower latitudes reach altitudes generally above 4000 m. Volcanic events can perturb mantles of snow and ice in at least five ways: (1) scouring and melting by flowing pyroclastic debris or blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, (2) surficial melting by lava flows, (3) basal melting of glacial ice or snow by subglacial eruptions or geothermal activity, (4) ejection of water by eruptions through a crater lake, and (5) deposition of tephra fall. Historical records of volcanic eruptions at snow-clad volcanoes show the following: (1) Flowing pyroclastic debris (pyroclastic flows and surges) and blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris are the most common volcanic events that generate lahars and floods; (2) Surficial lava flows generally cannot melt snow and ice rapidly enough to form large lahars or floods; (3) Heating the base of a glacier or snowpack by subglacial eruptions or by geothermal activity can induce basal melting that may result in ponding of water and lead to sudden outpourings of water or sediment-rich debris flows; (4) Tephra falls usually alter ablation rates of snow and ice but generally produce little meltwater that results in the formation of lahars and floods; (5) Lahars and floods generated by flowing pyroclastic debris, blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, or basal melting of snow and ice commonly have volumes that exceed 105 m3.The glowing lava (pyroclastic flow) which flowed with force over ravines and ridges...gathered in the basin quickly and then forced downwards. As a result, tremendously wide and deep pathways in the ice and snow were made and produced great streams of water (Wolf 1878).

  9. Thermal precursors in satellite images of the 1999 eruption of Shishaldin Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, Jonathan; Dean, Kenneson; Engle, Kevin; Izbekov, Pavel

    2002-07-01

    Shishaldin Volcano, Unimak Island Alaska, began showing signs of thermal unrest in satellite images on 9 February 1999. A thermal anomaly and small steam plume were detected at the summit of the volcano in short-wave thermal infrared AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer) satellite data. This was followed by over 2 months of changes in the observed thermal character of the volcano. Initially, the thermal anomaly was only visible when the satellite passed nearly directly over the volcano, suggesting a hot source deep in the central crater obscured from more oblique satellite passes. The "zenith angle" needed to see the anomaly increased with time, presumably as the thermal source rose within the conduit. Based on this change, an ascent rate of ca. 14 m per day for the thermal source was estimated, until it reached the summit on around 21 March. It is thought that Strombolian activity began around this time. The precursory activity culminated in a sub-Plinian eruption on 19 April, ejecting ash to over 45,000 ft. (13,700 m). The thermal energy output through the precursory period was calculated based on geometric constraints unique to Shishaldin. These calculations show fluctuations that can be tied to changes in the eruptive character inferred from seismic records and later geologic studies. The remote location of this volcano made satellite images a necessary observation tool for this eruption. To date, this is the longest thermal precursory activity preceding a sub-Plinian eruption recorded by satellite images in the region. This type of thermal monitoring of remote volcanoes is central in the efforts of the Alaska Volcano Observatory to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruption, and mitigate their associated hazards to air-traffic and local residents.

  10. Historical eruptions of Merapi Volcano, Central Java, Indonesia, 1768-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voight, B.; Constantine, E.K.; Siswowidjoyo, S.; Torley, R.

    2000-01-01

    Information on Merapi eruptive activity is scattered and much is remotely located. A concise and well-documented summary of this activity has been long needed to assist researchers and hazard-mitigation efforts, and the aim of this paper is to synthesize information from the mid-1700s to the present. A descriptive chronology is given, with an abbreviated chronology in a table that summarizes events by year, assigns preliminary Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) ratings and Hartmann classifications, and provides key references. The history of volcano monitoring is also outlined. The study reveals that a major difference in eruption style exists between the twentieth and nineteenth centuries, although the periodicity between larger events seems about the same. During the twentieth century, activity has comprised mainly the effusive growth of viscous lava domes and lava tongues, with occasional gravitational collapses of parts of oversteepened domes to produce the nue??es ardentes - commonly defined as "Merapi-type". In the 1800s, however, explosive eruptions of relatively large size occurred (to VEI 4), and some associated "fountain-collapse" nue??es ardentes were larger and farther reaching than any produced in the twentieth century. These events may also be regarded as typical eruptions for Merapi. The nineteenth century activity is consistent with the long-term pattern of one relatively large event every one or two centuries, based on the long-term eruptive record deduced by others from volcanic stratigraphy. It is uncertain whether or not a "recurrence-time" model continues to apply to Merapi, but if so, Merapi could soon be due for another large event and its occurrence with only modest (or inadequately appreciated) precursors could lead to a disaster unprecedented in Merapi's history because the area around the volcano is now much more densely populated. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between eruptive style and vesicularity of juvenile clasts during eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Yoshimi; Miyamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    It has been reported that juvenile pumice lapilli found in plinian eruptions have high vesicularity, while those found in phreatoplinian eruptions have low vesicularity. However, juvenile glass shards from phreatoplinian eruptions consist of large, expanded bubbles such as bubble wall-type glass. These glass shards seem to possess high vesicularity, unlike the pumice lapilli. This study examines the factors causing this difference, especially focusing on the temporal variations in the vesicularity of the juvenile pyroclasts from eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan. This examination was conducted through four analyses: density measurements of pumice lapilli, thin section texture classification of pumice lapilli, classification of glass shards, and surface texture classification of pumice lapilli. Further, pumice lapilli from plinian eruptions have a low density, and those from phreatoplinian eruptions are characterized by high density. The density of the pumice lapilli depends on the eruption style and is hence determined after the eruption. A progressive increase in the amount of large bubbles is observed in glass shards ejected during an eruptive magmatic to phreatomagmatic sequence. Because it does not hinge on the eruptive style, it is assumed that the vesicularity of the glass shards is kept from the conduit before contact with water, especially on fragmentation by magma vesiculation in the conduit. The surfaces of the pumice lapilli show a similar increase in vesicularity with time as glass shards. However, this increase is not successive throughout, but decreases temporarily at the phreatomagmatic stage of the eruption, as in the case of density. This indicates that the successive bubble growth continues within the pumice, and additional vesiculation is superposed when the magmatic eruption comes into contact with water. Because of this, different juvenile clasts exhibit different vesicularities upon cooling. Interestingly, magma

  12. Dynamics and pre-eruptive conditions of catastrophic, ignimbrite-producing eruptions from the Yenkahe Caldera, Vanuatu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Chris W.; Cronin, Shane J.; Turner, Simon P.; Handley, Heather K.; Gaildry, Clement; Smith, Ian

    2015-12-01

    A combined stratigraphic and geochemical examination of 43 kyr of volcanic activity is presented for the Yenkahe Caldera, a mafic-intermediate volcanic system on the island of Tanna, in the Vanuatu Arc. Through this period two catastrophic ignimbrite-producing eruptions have occurred: the Siwi eruption and the older, Old Tanna Ignimbrite eruption. The latter was previously linked with a different edifice to the north-east, however re-examination has shown it was derived from the Yenkahe Caldera. Radiocarbon dating of this ignimbrite gives an age of 43 kyr B.P. Both eruptions produced voluminous ignimbrite sheets, however differences in deposit sequences show that the eruptions followed distinct courses. Deposits from the more recent Siwi eruption display greater evidence for phreatomagmatic phases during eruption onset. Both ignimbrites are distributed asymmetrically about the caldera, indicating partial collapse in each case. The early stages of the Siwi eruption produced directed pyroclastic surges and spatter fountains. Between these two major eruptions, volcanic activity was maintained through the formation of small, discrete volcanic cones, such as Yasur, which is active today. Whole rock major and trace element data show that intra-caldera activity between cataclysmic eruptions produced magmas of uniform basaltic-trachy-andesitic composition (SiO2 56 wt.%). Minerals within these lavas appear to be in equilibrium with their host. The Siwi eruption produced the most evolved, trachy-andesitic magma (SiO2 > 58 wt.%), while the Old Tanna eruption is associated with less evolved, basaltic-andesite magma (SiO2 53 wt.%). Juvenile clasts from both ignimbrites display diverse mineral chemistry and mineral disequilibrium textures. From these variations in geochemistry and petrology we suggest that a crystal mush or resident magma remained following low-magnitude, intra-caldera activity. MELTS modelling suggest that this was stored at shallow depths, equivalent to

  13. The submarine eruption of La Restinga (El Hierro, Canary Islands): October 2011-March 2012; La erupcion submarina de La Restinga en la isla de El Hierro, Canarias: Octubre 2011-Marzo 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Carracedo, J. C.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Soler, V.; Troll, V. R.; Wiesmaier, S.

    2012-11-01

    The first signs of renewed volcanic activity at El Hierro began in July 2011 with the occurrence of abundant, low-magnitude earthquakes. The increasing seismicity culminated on October 10, 2011, with the onset of a submarine eruption about 2 km offshore from La Restinga, the southernmost village on El Hierro. The analysis of seismic and deformation records prior to, and throughout, the eruption allowed the reconstruction of its main phases: 1) ascent of magma and migration of hypo centres from beneath the northern coast (El Golfo) towards the south rift zone, close to La Restinga, probably marking the hydraulic fracturing and the opening of the eruptive conduit; and 2) onset and development of a volcanic eruption indicated by sustained and prolonged harmonic tremor whose intensity varied with time. The features monitored during the eruption include location, depth and morphological evolution of the eruptive source and emission of floating volcanic bombs. These bombs initially showed white, vesiculated cores (originated by partial melting of underlying pre-volcanic sediments upon which the island of El Hierro was constructed) and black basanite rims, and later exclusively hollow basanitic lava balloons. The eruptive products have been matched with a fissural submarine eruption without ever having attained surtseyan explosiveness. The eruption has been active for about five months and ended in March 2012, thus becoming the second longest reported historical eruption in the Canary Islands after the Timanfaya eruption in Lanzarote (1730-1736). This eruption provided the first opportunity in 40 years to manage a volcanic crisis in the Canary Islands and to assess the interpretations and decisions taken, thereby gaining experience for improved management of future volcanic activity. Seismicity and deformation during the eruption were recorded and analysed by the Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN). Unfortunately, a lack of systematic sampling of erupted pyroclasts and

  14. The 25 September 2007 eruption of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand: Directed ballistics, surtseyan jets, and ice-slurry lahars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, G.; Manville, V.; Della Pasqua, F.; Graettinger, A.; Hodgson, K. A.; Jolly, G. E.

    2010-03-01

    At 20:26 (NZDT) on 25 September 2007 a moderate gas-driven eruption beneath the summit Crater Lake of Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand generated a directed ballistic fallout apron and surtseyan jet that impacted an area of c. 2.5 km 2 to the north of the vent. Two climbers were caught in the blast at a hut 600 m from the vent. Primary, ice-slurry lahars were generated in two catchments draining the summit region, including a flow that entered a commercial ski field. The ejecta consists of blocks of andesitic lava and scoria erupted during previous volcanic episodes, a variety of mineral-cemented lake-floor sediments, vent-fill debris and rare glassy material interpreted to be derived from a fresh batch of magma. A minority of clasts contain formerly molten elemental sulphur, indicating that vent temperatures at the base of the lake were in excess of 119 °C. The ballistic deposit is confined to a c. 40° wide swath directed northwards that extends up to 2 km from the inferred vent location beneath Crater Lake. The strong directionality of the jetted deposits and ballistic-free 'shadow-zones' sheltered by intervening topography all point to a relatively low-angle directed blast. Previous similar eruptions at Ruapehu also show preferred deposit orientations that are here correlated with an inclined and off-centre vent beneath Crater Lake. The 25 September 2007 eruption appears to have resulted from failure of a relatively shallow hydrothermal seal composed of elemental sulphur and other mineral precipitates developed in the vent breccia, which breached following overpressurization by a pulse of magmatic gases released from deeper in the conduit. This event highlights the potential hazard from relatively minor gas-driven eruptions at Ruapehu that can occur with little or no warning. Improved understanding of the eruption mechanism for this style of eruption will inform future risk assessments for Ruapehu and other similar volcanoes worldwide.

  15. The fascinating and complex dynamics of geyser eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Manga, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Geysers episodically erupt liquid and vapor. Despite two centuries of scientific study, basic questions persist—why do geysers exist? What determines eruption intervals, durations, and heights? What initiates eruptions? Through monitoring eruption intervals, analyzing geophysical data, taking measurements within geyser conduits, performing numerical simulations, and constructing laboratory models, some of these questions have been addressed. Geysers are uncommon because they require a combination of abundant water recharge, magmatism, and rhyolite flows to supply heat and silica, and large fractures and cavities overlain by low-permeability materials to trap rising multiphase and multicomponent fluids. Eruptions are driven by the conversion of thermal to kinetic energy during decompression. Larger and deeper cavities permit larger eruptions and promote regularity by isolating water from weather variations. The ejection velocity may be limited by the speed of sound of the liquid + vapor mixture.

  16. Multi-disciplinary Monitoring of the 2014 Eruption of Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Faria, B. V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Fogo volcano, located in the Cape Verde Archipelago (offshore Western Africa), is a complete stratovolcano system. It is the most recent expression of the Cape Verde hotspot, that has formed the archipelago. The summit reaches ~2830m above sea level, and raises 1100m above Chã das Caldeiras, an almost flat circular area. The last eruption of Fogo started on November 23, 2014 (~10:00UTC), after 19 years of inactivity. C4G, a distributed research infrastructure created in 2014 in the framework of the Portuguese Roadmap for Strategic Research Infrastructures, collaborated immediately with INMG, the Cape Verdean Meteorological and Geophysical Institut with the goal of complementing the permanent geophysical monitoring network in operation on Fogo island. The INMG permanent network is composed of seven seismographic stations and three tiltmeter stations, with real-time data transmitted. On the basis of increased pre-event activity (which started in October 2014), INMG issued a formal alert of an impending eruption to the Civil Protection Agency, about 24 hours before the onset of the eruption. Although the eruption caused no casualties or personal injuries due to the warnings issued, the lava expelled by the eruption (which last until the end of January) destroyed the two main villages in the caldera (~1000 inhabitants) and covered vast areas of agricultural land, causing very large economic losses and an uncertain future of the local populations. The C4G team installed a network of seven GNSS receivers and nine seismometers, distributed by the entire island. The data collection started on 28th November 2014, and continued until the end of January 2015. The mission also included a new detailed gravimetric survey of the island, the acquisition of geological samples, and the analysis of the air quality during the eruption. We present here a detailed description of the monitoring efforts carried out during the eruption as well as initial results of the analysis of the

  17. Distribution of tephra from the 1650 AD submarine eruption of Kolumbo volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, S. A.; Carey, S.; Nomikou, P.

    2013-12-01

    Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of Santorini in the Aegean Sea, last erupted in 1650 AD resulting in about 70 fatalities on Thera from gas discharge and significant coastal destruction from tsunamis. Extensive pumice rafts were reported over a large area surrounding Santorini, extending as far south as Crete. Tephra from the 1650 AD submarine eruption has been correlated in sediment box cores using a combination of mineralogy and major element composition of glass shards. The biotite-bearing rhyolite of Kolumbo can be readily discriminated from other silicic pyroclastics derived from the main Santorini complex. In general the tephra deposits are very fine grained (silt to fine sand-size), medium gray in color, and covered by about 10 cms of brown hemipelagic sediment. This corresponds to an average background sedimentation rate of 29 cm/kyr. The distribution of the 1650 AD Kolumbo tephra extends over an area larger than previously inferred from seismic profiles on the volcano's slopes and in adjacent basins. The cores indicate tephra deposits at least 19 km from the caldera, more than double the approximate 9 km inferred from seismic data. The preferential occurrence of the tephra within basins and sedimentological features such as cross bedding and laminations suggests that emplacement was dominated by sediment gravity flows generated from submarine and subaerial eruption plumes. We suggest that generation of the sediment gravity flows took place by collapse of submarine eruption columns and by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities that formed on the sea surface as subaerial fallout accumulated from parts of the columns that breached the surface. Additionally, SEM imaging reveals particle morphologies that can be attributed to fragmentation by both primary volatile degassing (bubble wall shards) and phreatomagmatic activity (blocky equant grains). It is likely that phreatomagmatic activity became more important in the latter stages of the eruptive

  18. Detection of volcanic sulfate aerosol with Envisat MIPAS shown for the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessbach, Sabine; Hoffmann, Lars; Spang, Reinhold; von Hobe, Marc; Müller, Rolf; Riese, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosol is known to have a strong impact on climate. Transport pathways of sulfur dioxide and sulfate aerosol to the stratosphere are still discussed. It is known that volcanic eruptions can inject significant amounts of sulfur directly into the stratosphere. Most sulfur, however, is injected into the troposphere and only a fraction of it can make its way into the stratosphere. Global and altitude resolved time series of observations are a valuable source of information for sulfur dioxide and sulfate aerosol detection. Here we present a new aerosol detection method for the infrared limb sounder Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) and the results for the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions. The new detection method utilizes three infrared window regions that are located around 830, 960, and 1224 cm-1. The combination of these three windows allows for a better detection of enhanced aerosol events in the troposphere as well as the discrimination from ice clouds. With this new method the 10 year record of MIPAS measurements was analyzed. The most remarkable sulfate aerosol events follow the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions. After these eruptions enhanced aerosol is detected in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region. Within one to two months it spreads over most of the northern hemisphere. In the tropics the aerosol reaches altitudes up to around 20 km and in the Arctic up to 15 km. The enhanced aerosol signal can be observed for about 5, 7, and up to 10 month for the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions, respectively. During this period the enhanced aerosol detections decrease in number, strength, and observation altitude. After the Nabro eruption on 13 June 2011 volcanic aerosol is detected in the UTLS region two days after the initial eruption. The following days the aerosol moves around the northern edge of the Asian monsoon region, is then transported southwards and later

  19. 2010 August 1-2 sympathetic eruptions: I. Magnetic topology of the source-surface background field

    CERN Document Server

    Titov, V S; Török, T; Linker, J A; Panasenco, O

    2012-01-01

    A sequence of apparently coupled eruptions was observed on 2010 August 1-2 by SDO and STEREO. The eruptions were closely synchronized with one another, even though some of them occurred at widely separated locations. In an attempt to identify a plausible reason for such synchronization, we study the large-scale structure of the background magnetic configuration. The coronal field was computed from the photospheric magnetic field observed at the appropriate time period by using the potential field source-surface model. We investigate the resulting field structure by analyzing the so-called squashing factor calculated at the photospheric and source-surface boundaries, as well as at different coronal cross-sections. Using this information as a guide, we determine the underlying structural skeleton of the configuration, including separatrix and quasi-separatrix surfaces. Our analysis reveals, in particular, several pseudo-streamers in the regions where the eruptions occurred. Of special interest to us are the mag...

  20. Short-term spasmodic switching of volcanic tremor source activation in a conduit of the 2011 Kirishima eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, T.; Uehira, K.; Yamashita, Y.; Nakamoto, M.; Miyazaki, M.; Chikura, H.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic tremors are seismic indicators providing clues for magma behavior, which is related to volcanic eruptions and activity. Detection of spatial and temporal variations of volcanic tremors is important for understanding the mechanism of volcanic eruptions. However, temporal variations of tremor activity in short-term than a minute have not been previously detected by seismological observations around volcanoes. Here, we show that volcanic tremor sources were activated at the top of the conduit (i.e. the crater) and at its lower end by analyzing seismograms from a dense seismic array during the 2011 Kirishima eruption. We observed spasmodic switching in the seismic ray direction during a volcanic tremor sequence. Such fine volcanic tremor structure suggests an interaction between tremor sources located in both deep and shallow depths. Our result suggests that seismic array observations can monitor the magma behavior and contribute to the evaluation of the activity's transition.

  1. Erupted complex composite odontoma: Report of two atypical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Tomar Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are nonaggressive, hamartomatous developmental malformations of odontogenic origin. They are considered one of the most common odontogenic lesions composed by diverse dental tissues. They may interfere with the eruption of an associated tooth and are more prevalent in the posterior mandible. The eruption of a complex odontoma into the oral cavity is rare. Here, we report such two rare cases of gigantic erupted complex composite odontomas.

  2. Erupted complex odontoma of the posterior maxilla: A rarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sonika; Arul, A Sri Kennath J; Arul, A Sri Sennath J; Chitra, S

    2015-08-01

    Complex odontomas, hamartomas of aborted tooth development, mainly occur in posterior part of the mandible and rarely erupt into the oral cavity. The spontaneous eruption may be associated with pain, inflammation of adjacent soft tissues or recurrent infection. The present case of complex odontoma is of particular interest due to its apparent eruption in the maxillary posterior segment, its association with agenesis of the second molar and impacted third molar; with the lesion being completely asymptomatic.

  3. Impacts of a Pinatubo-size volcanic eruption on ENSO

    KAUST Repository

    Predybaylo, Evgeniya

    2017-01-16

    Observations and model simulations of the climate responses to strong explosive low-latitude volcanic eruptions suggest a significant increase in the likelihood of El Niño during the eruption and posteruption years, though model results have been inconclusive and have varied in magnitude and even sign. In this study, we test how this spread of responses depends on the initial phase of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the eruption year and on the eruption\\'s seasonal timing. We employ the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory CM2.1 global coupled general circulation model to investigate the impact of the Pinatubo 1991 eruption, assuming that in 1991 ENSO would otherwise be in central or eastern Pacific El Niño, La Niña, or neutral phases. We obtain statistically significant El Niño responses in a year after the eruption for all cases except La Niña, which shows no response in the eastern equatorial Pacific. The eruption has a weaker impact on eastern Pacific El Niños than on central Pacific El Niños. We find that the ocean dynamical thermostat and (to a lesser extent) wind changes due to land-ocean temperature gradients are the main feedbacks affecting El Niño development after the eruption. The El Niño responses to eruptions occurring in summer are more pronounced than for winter and spring eruptions. That the climate response depends on eruption season and initial ENSO phase may help to reconcile apparent inconsistencies among previous studies.

  4. Review of 61 cases of odontoma. Presentation of an erupted complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado Cuesta, Susana; Gargallo Albiol, Jordi; Berini Aytés, Leonardo; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2003-01-01

    Odontomas are benign tumors of odontogenic origin characterized by their slow growth. They consist of enamel, dentine, cementum and pulpal tissue and constitute 22% of all odontogenic tumors. Two types of odontoma are recognized: compound and complex. The first is approximately twice as common as complex odontomas. The purpose of this study is to value the prevalence of this kind of tumors in the ambulatory-surgical gambit and their clinical symptoms. We want to emphasize the exceptional spontaneous eruption of this tumors and we report a case of erupted complex odontoma. We made the revision of the cases of diagnosed odontomas between 1983 and 2001 in the Clínica Ntra. Sra. del Remei, in the Centro Médico Teknon and the Master de Cirugía e Implantología Bucal of the Odontologic Clínic (Barcelona University). We analyzed their prevalence, distribution in gender, age of the patients, anatomic location, adjacent structures affectation, symptoms, histologic classification and treatment. 52.4% of the cases were diagnosed in females. 37.7% of the tumors were complex odontomas and 62.3% were diagnosed as compound odontomas. 55.7% of all cases were in the maxilla and 44.3% in the mandible. The anterior portion of maxilla was the most common location (54% of cases). Only a case (1.6%) was erupted, in the molars area of the maxilla.

  5. A Location Privacy Aware Friend Locator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Thomsen, Jeppe Rishede; Saltenis, Simonas

    2009-01-01

    to trade their location privacy for quality of service, limiting the attractiveness of the services. The challenge is to develop a communication-efficient solution such that (i) it detects proximity between a user and the user’s friends, (ii) any other party is not allowed to infer the location of the user...

  6. Super-multiplex vibrational imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lu; Chen, Zhixing; Shi, Lixue; Long, Rong; Anzalone, Andrew V.; Zhang, Luyuan; Hu, Fanghao; Yuste, Rafael; Cornish, Virginia W.; Min, Wei

    2017-04-01

    potential of this 24-colour (super-multiplex) optical imaging approach for elucidating intricate interactions in complex biological systems.

  7. Retrieval and intercomparison of volcanic SO2 injection height and eruption time from satellite maps and ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Federica; Burton, Mike; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Corradini, Stefano; Salerno, Giuseppe; Merucci, Luca; Di Grazia, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    Syneruptive gas flux time series can, in principle, be retrieved from satellite maps of SO2 collected during and immediately after volcanic eruptions, and used to gain insights into the volcanic processes which drive the volcanic activity. Determination of the age and height of volcanic plumes are key prerequisites for such calculations. However, these parameters are challenging to constrain using satellite-based techniques. Here, we use imagery from OMI and GOME-2 satellite sensors and a novel numerical procedure based on back-trajectory analysis to calculate plume height as a function of position at the satellite measurement time together with plume injection height and time at a volcanic vent location. We applied this new procedure to three Etna eruptions (12 August 2011, 18 March 2012 and 12 April 2013) and compared our results with independent satellite and ground-based estimations. We also compare our injection height time-series with measurements of volcanic tremor, which reflects the eruption intensity, showing a good match between these two datasets. Our results are a milestone in progressing towards reliable determination of gas flux data from satellite-derived SO2 maps during volcanic eruptions, which would be of great value for operational management of explosive eruptions.

  8. Lake sediments provide the first eruptive history for Corbetti, a high-risk Main Ethiopian Rift volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Jones, Catherine M.; Lane, Christine S.; Pearce, Nicholas J. G.; Smith, Victoria C.; Lamb, Henry F.; Schaebitz, Frank; Viehberg, Finn; Brown, Maxwell C.; Frank, Ute; Asrat, Asfawossen

    2017-04-01

    A recent World Bank report found that 49 of Ethiopia's 65 known Holocene volcanoes pose a high-risk to the surrounding population. One of these volcanoes, Corbetti, located in the densely populated Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), has only one documented Holocene eruption. Any risk assessment for Corbetti is therefore highly uncertain. Reliable hazard forecasting is dependent on the completeness of volcanic records. In the case of Ethiopian Rift volcanoes complete records are hindered by frequently poorly exposed, buried and inaccessible proximal outcrops. Lake sediments can yield comprehensive, stratigraphically-resolved dossiers of past volcanism. Here we use volcanic ash (tephra) layers preserved in sediments from three MER lakes to provide the first record of Holocene volcanism for Corbetti. It shows that Corbetti has erupted explosively throughout the Holocene at an average return period of 800 years. Based on the thickness and dispersal of the tephras, at least six eruptions were of a large magnitude, and there were four eruptions in the past 2000 years. Future explosive eruptions are likely and these could have significant societal impacts, they could blanket nearby Awassa and Shashamene, home to 260,000 people, with pumice deposits. Our data indicate that the threat posed by Corbetti has been significantly underestimated. These data can be used to refine regional volcano monitoring and develop evacuation plans. This lake sediment-tephrostratigraphic approach shows significant potential for application throughout the East African Rift system, and is essential to understanding volcanic hazards in this rapidly developing region.

  9. Overview of the 2006 eruption of Mt. Merapi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratdomopurbo, Antonius; Beauducel, Francois; Subandriyo, Joko; Agung Nandaka, I. G. Made; Newhall, Christopher G.; Suharna; Sayudi, Dewi Sri; Suparwaka, Heru; Sunarta

    2013-07-01

    In the last part of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, Mt. Merapi in Central-Java Indonesia erupted about every 2-5 years. Most of the eruptions were low in explosivity, with VEI-3 or less. Eruptions usually involve the formation of a lava dome, either in the beginning or in the end of the eruptive episode. For the 2006 eruption, the precursory signal was first observed in the middle of the year 2005 with a decrease in EDM slope distances to points on the rim, an increase of seismicity and a possible increase of SO2 emissions. Those early events marked the beginning of a more continuous period of inflation, which led to the eruption. In total, the pre-eruption displacement of the southern rim reached at least 2.4 m toward the measuring station in Kaliurang (KAL). From late April until June 2006, a lava dome grew on the summit with a volume that gradually increased until it reached about 4.1 million m3 in 38 days. The total of erupted magma was about 5.3 million m3 dense-rock-equivalent (DRE). The dome subsequently collapsed in three steps from June 4 to June 14, leaving an open scar on its southeast side. In this paper we detail the changes of dome morphology that were monitored by taking successive photographs from similar positions. The eruption in 2006 marked a significant change in summit morphology, from west-southwestward opening during the 20th century to the currently southeast orientation. Also, an Mw 6.4 earthquake occurred on 26 May, midway through the eruption, which adds interesting questions about the relationship of the eruption and the earthquake. EDM data from 2006 and previous eruptions show that the summit remains inflated after each eruption, i.e., no significant deflation occurs following eruptions. The lack of post-eruption deflation suggests that magma remains in the shallow parts of the edifice after the eruption. As a result, the complex of summit lava domes and their intrusive roots grow with time and Merapi's rim and